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Sample records for acute sleep loss

  1. How Acute Total Sleep Loss Affects the Attending Brain: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F.; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Design: Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. Methods: The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Conclusion: Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. Citation: Ma N, Dinges DF, Basner M, Rao H. How acute total

  2. Sleep Loss and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Norah S.; Meier-Ewert, Hans K.; Haack, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Controlled, experimental studies on the effects of acute sleep loss in humans have shown that mediators of inflammation are altered by sleep loss. Elevations in these mediators have been found to occur in healthy, rigorously screened individuals undergoing experimental vigils of more than 24 hours, and have also been seen in response to various durations of sleep restricted to between 25 and 50% of a normal 8 hour sleep amount. While these altered profiles represent small changes, such sub-clinical shifts in basal inflammatory cytokines are known to be associated with the future development of metabolic syndrome disease in healthy, asymptomatic individuals. Although the mechanism of this altered inflammatory status in humans undergoing experimental sleep loss is unknown, it is likely that autonomic activation and metabolic changes play key roles. PMID:21112025

  3. Exercise, but not acute sleep loss, increases salivary antimicrobial protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Gillum, Trevor L; Kuennen, Matthew R; Castillo, Micaela N; Williams, Nicole L; Jordan-Patterson, Alex T

    2015-05-01

    Sleep deficiencies may play a role in depressing immune parameters. Little is known about the impact of exercise after sleep deprivation on mucosal immunity. The purpose of this study was to quantify salivary antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) in response to sleep loss before and after exercise. Four men and 4 women (age: 22.8 ± 2; : 49.1 ± 7.1 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) completed 2 exercise trials consisting of 45 minutes of running at 75% VO2peak after a normal night of sleep (CON) and after a night without sleep (WS). Exercise trials were separated by 10 ± 3 days. Saliva was collected before, immediately after, and 1 hour after exercise. LL-37, HNP1-3, Lactoferrin (Lac), and Lysozyme (Lys) were measured. Sleep loss did not affect the concentration or secretion rate of AMPs before or in response to exercise. However, exercise increased the concentration from pre- to post-exercise of LL-37 (pre: 15.5 ± 8.7; post: 22.3 ± 16.2 ng · ml(-1)), HNP1-3 (pre: 2.2 ± 2.3; post: 3.3 ± 2.5 µg · ml(-1)), Lac (pre: 5,234 ± 4,202; post: 12,283 ± 10,995 ng · ml(-1)), and Lys (pre: 5,831 ± 4,465; post: 12,542 ± 10,755 ng · ml(-1)), p <= 0.05. The secretion rates were higher immediately after and 1 hour after exercise compared with before exercise for LL-37 (pre: 3.1 ± 2.1; post: 5.1 ± 3.7; +1: 6.9 ± 8.4 ng · min(-1)), HNP1-3 (pre: 0.38 ± 0.38; post: 0.80 ± 0.75; +1: 0.84 ± 0.67 µg · min(-1)), Lac (pre: 1,096 ± 829; post: 2,948 ± 2,923; +1: 2,464 ± 3,785 ng · min(-1)), and Lys (pre: 1,534 ± 1,790; post: 3,042 ± 2,773; +1: 1,916 ± 1,682 ng · min-(1)), p <= 0.05. These data suggest that the major constituents of the mucosal immune system are unaffected by acute sleep loss and by exercise after acute sleep loss. Exercise increased the concentration and secretion rate of each AMP suggesting enhanced immunity and control of inflammation, despite limited sleep.

  4. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  5. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",...), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  6. Neuroimmunologic aspects of sleep and sleep loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, N. L.; Szuba, M. P.; Staab, J. P.; Evans, D. L.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    The complex and intimate interactions between the sleep and immune systems have been the focus of study for several years. Immune factors, particularly the interleukins, regulate sleep and in turn are altered by sleep and sleep deprivation. The sleep-wake cycle likewise regulates normal functioning of the immune system. Although a large number of studies have focused on the relationship between the immune system and sleep, relatively few studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on immune parameters. Studies of sleep deprivation's effects are important for several reasons. First, in the 21st century, various societal pressures require humans to work longer and sleep less. Sleep deprivation is becoming an occupational hazard in many industries. Second, to garner a greater understanding of the regulatory effects of sleep on the immune system, one must understand the consequences of sleep deprivation on the immune system. Significant detrimental effects on immune functioning can be seen after a few days of total sleep deprivation or even several days of partial sleep deprivation. Interestingly, not all of the changes in immune physiology that occur as a result of sleep deprivation appear to be negative. Numerous medical disorders involving the immune system are associated with changes in the sleep-wake physiology--either being caused by sleep dysfunction or being exacerbated by sleep disruption. These disorders include infectious diseases, fibromyalgia, cancers, and major depressive disorder. In this article, we will describe the relationships between sleep physiology and the immune system, in states of health and disease. Interspersed will be proposals for future research that may illuminate the clinical relevance of the relationships between sleeping, sleep loss and immune function in humans. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  7. The acute effects of twenty-four hours of sleep loss on the performance of national-caliber male collegiate weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Blumert, Peter A; Crum, Aaron J; Ernsting, Mark; Volek, Jeff S; Hollander, Daniel B; Haff, Erin E; Haff, G Gregory

    2007-11-01

    Currently, the degree to which sleep loss influences weightlifting performance is unknown. This study compared the effects of 24 hours of sleep loss on weightlifting performance and subjective ratings of psychological states pre-exercise and postexercise in national-caliber male collegiate weightlifters. Nine males performed a maximal weightlifting protocol following 24 hours of sleep loss and a night of normal sleep. The subjects participated in a randomized, counterbalanced design with each sleep condition separated by 7 days. Testosterone and cortisol levels were quantified prior to, immediately after, and 1 hour after the resistance training session. Additionally, profile of mood states and subjective sleepiness were evaluated at the same time points. The resistance training protocol consisted of several sets of snatches, clean and jerks, and front squats. Performance was evaluated as individual exercise volume load, training intensity and overall workout volume load, and training intensity. During each training session the maximum weight lifted for the snatch, clean and jerk, and front squat were noted. No significant differences were found for any of the performance variables. A significant decrease following the sleep condition was noted for cortisol concentration immediately after and 1 hour postexercise. Vigor, fatigue, confusion, total mood disturbance, and sleepiness were all significantly altered by sleep loss. These data suggest that 24 hours of sleep loss has no adverse effects on weightlifting performance. If an athlete is in an acute period of sleep loss, as noticed by negative mood disturbances, it may be more beneficial to focus on the psychological (motivation) rather than the physiological aspect of the sport.

  8. Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Van Cauter, Eve; Spiegel, Karine; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced sleep duration and quality appear to be endemic in modern society. Curtailment of the bedtime period to minimum tolerability is thought to be efficient and harmless by many. It has been known for several decades that sleep is a major modulator of hormonal release, glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. In particular, slow wave sleep (SWS), thought to be the most restorative sleep stage, is associated with decreased heart rate, blood pressure, sympathetic nervous activity and cerebral glucose utilization, compared with wakefulness. During SWS, the anabolic growth hormone is released while the stress hormone cortisol is inhibited. In recent years, laboratory and epidemiologic evidence have converged to indicate that sleep loss may be a novel risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The increased risk of obesity is possibly linked to the effect of sleep loss on hormones that play a major role in the central control of appetite and energy expenditure, such as leptin and ghrelin. Reduced leptin and increased ghrelin levels correlate with increases in subjective hunger when individuals are sleep restricted rather than well rested. Given the evidence, sleep curtailment appears to be an important, yet modifiable, risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity. The marked decrease in average sleep duration in the last 50 years coinciding with the increased prevalence of obesity, together with the observed adverse effects of recurrent partial sleep deprivation on metabolism and hormonal processes, may have important implications for public health. PMID:18929315

  9. Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Van Cauter, Eve; Spiegel, Karine; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel

    2008-09-01

    Reduced sleep duration and quality appear to be endemic in modern society. Curtailment of the bedtime period to minimum tolerability is thought to be efficient and harmless by many. It has been known for several decades that sleep is a major modulator of hormonal release, glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. In particular, slow wave sleep (SWS), thought to be the most restorative sleep stage, is associated with decreased heart rate, blood pressure, sympathetic nervous activity and cerebral glucose utilization, compared with wakefulness. During SWS, the anabolic growth hormone is released while the stress hormone cortisol is inhibited. In recent years, laboratory and epidemiologic evidence have converged to indicate that sleep loss may be a novel risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The increased risk of obesity is possibly linked to the effect of sleep loss on hormones that play a major role in the central control of appetite and energy expenditure, such as leptin and ghrelin. Reduced leptin and increased ghrelin levels correlate with increases in subjective hunger when individuals are sleep restricted rather than well rested. Given the evidence, sleep curtailment appears to be an important, yet modifiable, risk factor for the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity. The marked decrease in average sleep duration in the last 50 years coinciding with the increased prevalence of obesity, together with the observed adverse effects of recurrent partial sleep deprivation on metabolism and hormonal processes, may have important implications for public health.

  10. Voluntary Sleep Loss in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oonk, Marcella; Krueger, James M.; Davis, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Animal sleep deprivation (SDEP), in contrast to human SDEP, is involuntary and involves repeated exposure to aversive stimuli including the inability of the animal to control the waking stimulus. Therefore, we explored intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), an operant behavior, as a method for voluntary SDEP in rodents. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG) recording electrodes and a unilateral bipolar electrode into the lateral hypothalamus. Rats were allowed to self-stimulate, or underwent gentle handling-induced SDEP (GH-SDEP), during the first 6 h of the light phase, after which they were allowed to sleep. Other rats performed the 6 h ICSS and 1 w later were subjected to 6 h of noncontingent stimulation (NCS). During NCS the individual stimulation patterns recorded during ICSS were replayed. Results: After GH-SDEP, ICSS, or NCS, time in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased. Further, in the 24 h after SDEP, rats recovered all of the REM sleep lost during SDEP, but only 75% to 80% of the NREM sleep lost, regardless of the SDEP method. The magnitude of EEG slow wave responses occurring during NREM sleep also increased after SDEP treatments. However, NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA) responses were attenuated following ICSS, compared to GH-SDEP and NCS. Conclusions: We conclude that ICSS and NCS can be used to sleep deprive rats. Changes in rebound NREM sleep EEG SWA occurring after ICSS, NCS, and GH-SDEP suggest that nonspecific effects of the SDEP procedure differentially affect recovery sleep phenotypes. Citation: Oonk M, Krueger JM, Davis CJ. Voluntary sleep loss in rats. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1467–1479. PMID:27166236

  11. Uncovering Residual Effects of Chronic Sleep Loss on Human Performance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Daniel A.; Wang, Wei; Wyatt, James K.; Kronauer, Richard E.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss leads to profound performance decrements. Yet many individuals believe they adapt to chronic sleep loss or that recovery requires only a single extended sleep episode. To evaluate this, we designed a protocol whereby the usual sleep:wake ratio was reduced from 1:2 to 1:3.3, while the durations of both sleep and wake episodes were increased to ten hours and 32.85 hours respectively. These sleep and wake episodes were distributed across all circadian phases, enabling measurement of the effects of acute and chronic sleep loss at different times of the circadian day and night. Despite recurrent acute and substantial chronic sleep loss, ten hour sleep opportunities consistently restored vigilance performance for several hours of wakefulness. However, chronic sleep loss increased the rate of deterioration in performance across wakefulness, particularly during the circadian “night”. Thus, extended wake during the circadian night reveals the cumulative detrimental effects of chronic sleep loss on performance, with potential adverse health and safety consequences. PMID:20371466

  12. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  13. Sleep Loss in Resident Physicians: The Cause of Medical Errors?

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Milton

    2010-01-01

    This review begins with the history of the events starting with the death of Libby Zion that lead to the Bell Commission, that the studied her death and made recommendations for improvement that were codified into law in New York state as the 405 law that the ACGME essentially adopted in putting a cap on work hours and establishing the level of staff supervision that must be available to residents in clinical situations particularly the emergency room and acute care units. A summary is then provided of the findings of the laboratory effects of total sleep deprivation including acute total sleep loss and the consequent widespread physiologic alterations, and of the effects of selective and chronic sleep loss. Generally the sequence of responses to increasing sleep loss goes from mood changes to cognitive effects to performance deficits. In the laboratory situation, deficits resulting from sleep deprivation are clearly and definitively demonstrable. Sleep loss in the clinical situation is usually sleep deprivation superimposed on chronic sleep loss. An examination of questionnaire studies, the literature on reports of sleep loss, studies of the reduction of work hours on performance as well as observational and a few interventional studies have yielded contradictory and often equivocal results. The residents generally find they feel better working fewer hours but improvements in patient care are often not reported or do not occur. A change in the attitude of the resident toward his role and his patient has not been salutary. Decreasing sleep loss should have had a positive effect on patient care in reducing medical error, but this remains to be unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:21188260

  14. Sleep Modifications in Acute Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Frisullo, Giovanni; Marano, Giuseppe; Morosetti, Roberta; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Vollono, Catello; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a temporary memory loss characterized by an abrupt onset of antero-grade and retrograde amnesia, totally reversible. Since sleep plays a major role in memory consolidation, and in the storage of memory-related traces into the brain cortex, the aims of the present study were: (1) to evaluate changes in sleep macro-structure in TGA; (2) to assess modifications in sleep micro-structure in TGA, with particular reference to the arousal EEG and to cyclic alternating pattern (CAP); (3) to compare sleep parameters in TGA patients with a control group of patients with acute ischemic events (“minor stroke” or transient ischemic attack [TIA]) clinically and neuroradiologically “similar” to the TGA. Methods: TGA group: 17 patients, (8 men and 9 women, 60.2 ± 12.5 years). Stroke or TIA (SoT) group: 17 patients hospitalized in the Stroke Unit for recent onset of minor stroke or TIA with hemispheric localization; healthy controls (HC) group: 17 healthy volunteers, matched for age and sex. Patients and controls underwent full-night polysomnography. Results: In the multivariate analysis (conditions TGA, SoT, and HC) a significant effect of the condition was observed for sleep efficiency index, number of awakenings longer 1 min, REM latency, CAP time, and CAP rate. TGA and SoT differed only for CAP time and CAP rate, which were lower in the TGA group. Conclusions: Microstructural modification associated with TGA could be consequent to: (1) hippocampal dysfunction and memory impairment; (2) impairment of arousal-related structures (in particular, cholinergic pathways); (3) emotional distress. Citation: Della Marca G; Mazza M; Losurdo A; Testani E; Broccolini A; Frisullo G; Marano G; Morosetti R; Pilato F; Profice P; Vollono C; Di Lazzaro V. Sleep modifications in acute transient global amnesia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):921-927. PMID:23997704

  15. Sleep loss, learning capacity and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Michele; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2006-10-01

    At a time when several studies have highlighted the relationship between sleep, learning and memory processes, an in-depth analysis of the effects of sleep deprivation on student learning ability and academic performance would appear to be essential. Most studies have been naturalistic correlative investigations, where sleep schedules were correlated with school and academic achievement. Nonetheless, some authors were able to actively manipulate sleep in order to observe neurocognitive and behavioral consequences, such as learning, memory capacity and school performance. The findings strongly suggest that: (a) students of different education levels (from school to university) are chronically sleep deprived or suffer from poor sleep quality and consequent daytime sleepiness; (b) sleep quality and quantity are closely related to student learning capacity and academic performance; (c) sleep loss is frequently associated with poor declarative and procedural learning in students; (d) studies in which sleep was actively restricted or optimized showed, respectively, a worsening and an improvement in neurocognitive and academic performance. These results may been related to the specific involvement of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in vulnerability to sleep loss. Most methodological limitations are discussed and some future research goals are suggested.

  16. Sleep Loss Effects on Continuous Sustained Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    Sleep loss, continuous performance, sustained performance, sleep deprivation, sleepiness, fatigue, circadian rhythm, hallucination . 20, ABSTRACT...complete the 42 hours and 9 experienced "psychological events such as hallucinations , visual illusions, and disorientation. Of the 20 subjects who... hallucinations , derealizations, and distortions (Mullaney, Kripke, and Fleck, 1981). All 20 subjects who were given either one 6-hour or six 1-hour

  17. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  18. Loss of negative priming following sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Yvonne; Espelid, Erik

    2004-04-01

    It has been argued that one night of sleep loss in young healthy adults produces changes similar to that associated with normal, healthy ageing--in particular, that young sleep-deprived adults perform similarly to 60-year-old sleep-satiated adults on some tasks of frontal lobe function. This proposition was examined using a protocol viewed by many to be a direct probe of nonvolitional attention mechanisms associated with frontal lobe function. A negative priming (NP) procedure was used to compare performance between non-sleep-deprived (NSD) and sleep-deprived (SD, 34 hr) young, healthy adults. This protocol allowed for exploration of two theories of the NP effect based on inhibitory or memorial processes. Under conditions believed to facilitate inhibitory processes a normal NP effect was found for NSD(16 ms) and SD (9 ms) participants. Under conditions believed to rely on memorial processes there was no NP effect following SD, compared with a normal NP effect for NSD participants (11 ms). Distractor interference was also greater following SD. These findings do not suggest a similar pattern of change following sleep loss in healthy young adults to that of normal, healthy, non-sleep-deprived aged groups.

  19. Sleep Loss as a Factor to Induce Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Variations

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Castillo-García, Stephanie Ariadne; Hernández, María Eugenia; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Gómez-González, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping occurs chronically in modern society. Clinical and experimental studies in humans and animal models have shown that immune function is impaired when sleep loss is experienced. Sleep loss exerts a strong regulatory influence on peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators of the immune response. An increasing number of research projects support the existence of reciprocal regulation between sleep and low-intensity inflammatory response. Recent studies show that sleep deficient humans and rodents exhibit a proinflammatory component; therefore, sleep loss is considered as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis). Circulating levels of proinflammatory mediators depend on the intensity and duration of the method employed to induce sleep loss. Recognizing the fact that the concentration of proinflammatory mediators is different between acute and chronic sleep-loss may expand the understanding of the relationship between sleep and the immune response. The aim of this review is to integrate data from recent published reports (2002–2013) on the effects of sleep loss on the immune response. This review may allow readers to have an integrated view of the mechanisms involved in central and peripheral deficits induced by sleep loss. PMID:24367384

  20. Sleep and protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity: impacts of sleep loss and stress

    PubMed Central

    Grønli, Janne; Soulé, Jonathan; Bramham, Clive R.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has been ascribed a critical role in cognitive functioning. Several lines of evidence implicate sleep in the consolidation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Stress disrupts sleep while impairing synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. Here, we discuss evidence linking sleep to mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity and synaptic scaling. We then consider how disruption of sleep by acute and chronic stress may impair these mechanisms and degrade sleep function. PMID:24478645

  1. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Apr 05, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week! Mar 23, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week is ONE ... 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week (NPAW) 2017 date: Mar 1, 2017 FDA Meeting for Acute Porphyrias is ...

  2. Leptin and Hunger Levels in Young Healthy Adults After One Night of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pejovic, Slobodanka; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Basta, Maria; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Zoumakis, Emanuel; Vgontzas, Angeliki; Bixler, Edward O.; Chrousos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system in healthy, young adults has been shown to be associated with decreased leptin levels, impaired insulin sensitivity and increased hunger and appetite. To assess the effects of one night of sleep loss in a less stressful environment on hunger, leptin, adiponectin, cortisol, and blood pressure/heart rate and whether a 2-hour mid-afternoon nap reverses the changes associated with sleep loss, 21 young healthy individuals (10 men, 11 women) participated in a 7-day sleep deprivation experiment (4 consecutive nights followed by a night of sleep loss and 2 recovery nights). Half of the subjects were randomly assigned to take a mid-afternoon nap (1400–1600) the day following the night of total sleep loss. Serial 24-hour blood sampling and hunger scales were completed on the fourth (pre-deprivation) and sixth day (post-deprivation). Leptin levels were significantly increased after one night of total sleep loss, whereas adiponectin, cortisol levels, blood pressure/heart rate, and hunger were not affected. Daytime napping did not influence the effects of sleep loss on leptin, adiponectin or hunger. Acute sleep loss, in a less stressful environment, influences leptin levels in an opposite manner from that of short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system. It appears that sleep loss associated with activation of the stress system but not sleep loss per se may lead to increased hunger and appetite and hormonal changes which ultimately may lead to increased consumption of “comfort” food and obesity. PMID:20545838

  3. Leptin and hunger levels in young healthy adults after one night of sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Pejovic, Slobodanka; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Basta, Maria; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Zoumakis, Emmanuel; Vgontzas, Angeliki; Bixler, Edward O; Chrousos, George P

    2010-12-01

    Short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system in healthy, young adults has been shown to be associated with decreased leptin levels, impaired insulin sensitivity, and increased hunger and appetite. To assess the effects of one night of sleep loss in a less stressful environment on hunger, leptin, adiponectin, cortisol and blood pressure/heart rate, and whether a 2-h mid-afternoon nap reverses the changes associated with sleep loss, 21 young healthy individuals (10 men, 11 women) participated in a 7-day sleep deprivation experiment (four consecutive nights followed by one night of sleep loss and two recovery nights). Half of the subjects were randomly assigned to take a mid-afternoon nap (14:00-16:00 hours) the day following the night of total sleep loss. Serial 24-h blood sampling and hunger scales were completed on the fourth (predeprivation) and sixth day (postdeprivation). Leptin levels were significantly increased after one night of total sleep loss, whereas adiponectin, cortisol levels, blood pressure/heart rate, and hunger were not affected. Daytime napping did not influence the effects of sleep loss on leptin, adiponectin, or hunger. Acute sleep loss, in a less stressful environment, influences leptin levels in an opposite manner from that of short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system. It appears that sleep loss associated with activation of the stress system but not sleep loss per se may lead to increased hunger and appetite and hormonal changes, which ultimately may lead to increased consumption of 'comfort' food and obesity.

  4. The effect of sleep loss on next day effort.

    PubMed

    Engle-Friedman, Mindy; Riela, Suzanne; Golan, Rama; Ventuneac, Ana M; Davis, Christine M; Jefferson, Angela D; Major, Donna

    2003-06-01

    The study had two primary objectives. The first was to determine whether sleep loss results in a preference for tasks demanding minimal effort. The second was to evaluate the quality of performance when participants, under conditions of sleep loss, have control over task demands. In experiment 1, using a repeated-measures design, 50 undergraduate college students were evaluated, following one night of no sleep loss and one night of sleep loss. The Math Effort Task (MET) presented addition problems via computer. Participants were able to select additions at one of five levels of difficulty. Less-demanding problems were selected and more additions were solved correctly when the participants were subject to sleep loss. In experiment 2, 58 undergraduate college students were randomly assigned to a no sleep deprivation or a sleep deprivation condition. Sleep-deprived participants selected less-demanding problems on the MET. Percentage correct on the MET was equivalent for both the non-sleep-deprived and sleep-deprived groups. On a task selection question, the sleep-deprived participants also selected significantly less-demanding non-academic tasks. Increased sleepiness, fatigue, and reaction time were associated with the selection of less difficult tasks. Both groups of participants reported equivalent effort expenditures; sleep-deprived participants did not perceive a reduction in effort. These studies demonstrate that sleep loss results in the choice of low-effort behavior that helps maintain accurate responding.

  5. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bucca, Caterina; Cicolin, Alessandro; Brussino, Luisa; Arienti, Andrea; Graziano, Alessandra; Erovigni, Francesco; Pera, Paolo; Gai, Valerio; Mutani, Roberto; Preti, Giulio; Rolla, Giovanni; Carossa, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism) produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods Polysomnography was performed in 48 edentulous subjects on two consecutive nights, one slept with and the other without dentures. Upper airway size was assessed by cephalometry and by recording forced mid-inspiratory airflow rate (FIF50). Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and oral NO (oNO), were measured as markers of airway and oropharyngeal inflammation. Results The apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) without dentures was significantly higher than with dentures (17·4 ± 3·6 versus 11·0 ± 2·3. p = 0·002), and was inversely related to FIF50 (p = 0·017) and directly related to eNO (p = 0·042). Sleeping with dentures, 23 subjects (48%) had an AHI over 5, consistent with OSA, but sleeping without dentures the number of subjects with abnormal AHI rose to 34 (71%). At cephalometry, removing dentures produced a significant decrease in retropharyngeal space (from 1·522 ± 0·33 cm to 1·27 ± 0·42 cm, p = 0·006). Both morning eNO and oNO were higher after the night slept without dentures (eNO 46·1 ± 8·2 ppb versus 33·7 ± 6·3 ppb, p = 0·035, oNO 84·6 ± 13·7 ppb versus 59·2 ± 17·4 ppb, p = 0·001). Conclusion These findings suggest that complete tooth loss favours upper airway obstruction during sleep. This untoward effect seems to be due to decrease in retropharyngeal space and is associated with increased oral and exhaled NO concentration. PMID:16417639

  6. Loss of Sleep Affects the Ultrastructure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Adolescent Mouse Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    de Vivo, Luisa; Nelson, Aaron B.; Bellesi, Michele; Noguti, Juliana; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: The adolescent brain may be uniquely affected by acute sleep deprivation (ASD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR), but direct evidence is lacking. We used electron microscopy to examine how ASD and CSR affect pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of adolescent mice, focusing on mitochondria, endosomes, and lysosomes that together perform most basic cellular functions, from nutrient intake to prevention of cellular stress. Methods: Adolescent (1-mo-old) mice slept (S) or were sleep deprived (ASD, with novel objects and running wheels) during the first 6–8 h of the light period, chronically sleep restricted (CSR) for > 4 days (using novel objects, running wheels, social interaction, forced locomotion, caffeinated water), or allowed to recover sleep (RS) for ∼32 h after CSR. Ultrastructural analysis of 350 pyramidal neurons was performed (S = 82; ASD = 86; CSR = 103; RS = 79; 4 to 5 mice/group). Results: Several ultrastructural parameters differed in S versus ASD, S versus CSR, CSR versus RS, and S versus RS, although the different methods used to enforce wake may have contributed to some of the differences between short and long sleep loss. Differences included larger cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria in CSR versus S, and higher number of secondary lysosomes in CSR versus S and RS. We also found that sleep loss may unmask interindividual differences not obvious during baseline sleep. Moreover, using a combination of 11 ultrastructural parameters, we could predict in up to 80% of cases whether sleep or wake occurred at the single cell level. Conclusions: Ultrastructural analysis may be a powerful tool to identify which cellular organelles, and thus which cellular functions, are most affected by sleep and sleep loss. Citation: de Vivo L, Nelson AB, Bellesi M, Noguti J, Tononi G, Cirelli C. Loss of sleep affects the ultrastructure of pyramidal neurons in the adolescent mouse frontal cortex. SLEEP 2016;39(4):861–874. PMID:26715225

  7. Enhancing Slow Wave Sleep with Sodium Oxybate Reduces the Behavioral and Physiological Impact of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K.; Hall-Porter, Janine M.; Griffin, Kara S.; Dodson, Ehren R.; Forst, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Denise T.; Eisenstein, Rhody D.; Schweitzer, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether enhancement of slow wave sleep (SWS) with sodium oxybate reduces the impact of sleep deprivation. Design: Double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled design Setting: Sleep research laboratory Participants: Fifty-eight healthy adults (28 placebo, 30 sodium oxybate), ages 18-50 years. Interventions: A 5-day protocol included 2 screening/baseline nights and days, 2 sleep deprivation nights, each followed by a 3-h daytime (08:00-11:00) sleep opportunity and a recovery night. Sodium oxybate or placebo was administered prior to each daytime sleep period. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), psychomotor vigilance test (PVT), Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and Profile of Mood States were administered during waking hours. Measurements and Results: During daytime sleep, the sodium oxybate group had more SWS, more EEG spectral power in the 1-9 Hz range, and less REM. Mean MSLT latency was longer for the sodium oxybate group on the night following the first daytime sleep period and on the day following the second day sleep period. Median PVT reaction time was faster in the sodium oxybate group following the second day sleep period. The change from baseline in SWS was positively correlated with the change in MSLT and KSS. During recovery sleep the sodium oxybate group had less TST, SWS, REM, and slow wave activity (SWA) than the placebo group. Conclusions: Pharmacological enhancement of SWS with sodium oxybate resulted in a reduced response to sleep loss on measures of alertness and attention. In addition, SWS enhancement during sleep restriction appears to result in a reduced homeostatic response to sleep loss. Citation: Walsh JK; Hall-Porter JM; Griffin KS; Dodson ER; Forst EH; Curry DT; Eisenstein RD; Schweitzer PK. Enhancing slow wave sleep with sodium oxybate reduces the behavioral and physiological impact of sleep loss. SLEEP 2010;33(9):1217-1225. PMID:20857869

  8. The effects of sleep loss on capacity and effort

    PubMed Central

    Engle-Friedman, Mindy

    2014-01-01

    Sleep loss appears to affect the capacity for performance and access to energetic resources. This paper reviews research examining the physical substrates referred to as resource capacity, the role of sleep in protecting that capacity and the reaction of the system as it attempts to respond with effort to overcome the limitations on capacity caused by sleep loss. Effort is the extent to which an organism will exert itself beyond basic levels of functioning or attempt alternative strategies to maintain performance. The purpose of this review is to bring together research across sleep disciplines to clarify the substrates that constitute and influence capacity for performance, consider how the loss of sleep influences access to those resources, examine cortical, physiological, perceptual, behavioral and subjective effort responses and consider how these responses reflect a system reacting to changes in the resource environment. When sleep deprived, the ability to perform tasks that require additional energy is impaired and the ability of the system to overcome the deficiencies caused by sleep loss is limited. Taking on tasks that require effort including school work, meal preparation, pulling off the road to nap when driving drowsy appear to be more challenging during sleep loss. Sleep loss impacts the effort-related choices we make and those choices may influence our health and safety. PMID:26483932

  9. A new mathematical model for the homeostatic effects of sleep loss on neurobehavioral performance

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Peter; Kalachev, Leonid V.; Smith, Amber D.; Belenky, Gregory; Dinges, David F.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.

    2009-01-01

    The two-process model of sleep regulation makes accurate predictions of sleep timing and duration for a variety of experimental sleep deprivation and nap sleep scenarios. Upon extending its application to waking neurobehavioral performance, however, the model fails to predict the effects of chronic sleep restriction. Here we show that the two-process model belongs to a broader class of models formulated in terms of coupled non-homogeneous first-order ordinary differential equations, which have a dynamic repertoire capturing waking neurobehavioral functions across a wide range of wake/sleep schedules. We examine a specific case of this new model class, and demonstrate the existence of a bifurcation: for daily amounts of wakefulness less than a critical threshold, neurobehavioral performance is predicted to converge to an asymptotically stable state of equilibrium; whereas for daily wakefulness extended beyond the critical threshold, neurobehavioral performance is predicted to diverge from an unstable state of equilibrium. Comparison of model simulations to laboratory observations of lapses of attention on a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT), in experiments on the effects of chronic sleep restriction and acute total sleep deprivation, suggests that this bifurcation is an essential feature of performance impairment due to sleep loss. We present three new predictions that may be experimentally verified to validate the model. These predictions, if confirmed, challenge conventional notions about the effects of sleep and sleep loss on neurobehavioral performance. The new model class implicates a biological system analogous to two connected compartments containing interacting compounds with time-varying concentrations as being a key mechanism for the regulation of psychomotor vigilance as a function of sleep loss. We suggest that the adenosinergic neuromodulator/receptor system may provide the underlying neurobiology. PMID:18938181

  10. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion in mice.

    PubMed

    Berro, L F; Santos, R; Hollais, A W; Wuo-Silva, R; Fukushiro, D F; Mári-Kawamoto, E; Costa, J M; Trombin, T F; Patti, C L; Grapiglia, S B; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L; Frussa-Filho, R

    2014-09-05

    Sleep deprivation is common place in modern society. Nowadays, people tend to self-impose less sleep in order to achieve professional or social goals. In the social context, late-night parties are frequently associated with higher availability of recreational drugs with abuse potential. Physiologically, all of these drugs induce an increase in dopamine release in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which leads to hyperlocomotion in rodents. Sleep deprivation also seems to play an important role in the events related to the neurotransmission of the dopaminergic system by potentiating its behavioral effects. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of total sleep deprivation (6h) on the acute cocaine-induced locomotor stimulation in male mice. Animals were sleep deprived or maintained in their home cages and subsequently treated with an acute i.p. injection of 15mg/kg cocaine or saline and observed in the open field. Total sleep deprivation for 6h potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by acute cocaine administration. In addition, the cocaine sleep deprived group showed a decreased ratio central/total locomotion compared to the cocaine control group, which might be related to an increase in the impulsiveness of mice. Our data indicate that acute periods of sleep loss should be considered risk factors for cocaine abuse.

  11. Sex Chromosomes Regulate Nighttime Sleep Propensity during Recovery from Sleep Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, Lennisha; Paul, Ketema N.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in spontaneous sleep amount are largely dependent on reproductive hormones; however, in mice some sex differences in sleep amount during the active phase are preserved after gonadectomy and may be driven by non-hormonal factors. In this study, we sought to determine whether or not these sex differences are driven by sex chromosome complement. Mice from the four core genotype (FCG) mouse model, whose sex chromosome complement (XY, XX) is independent of phenotype (male or female), were implanted with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) electrodes for the recording of sleep-wake states and underwent a 24-hr baseline recording followed by six hours of forced wakefulness. During baseline conditions in mice whose gonads remained intact, males had more total sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep than females during the active phase. Gonadectomized FCG mice exhibited no sex differences in rest-phase sleep amount; however, during the mid-active-phase (nighttime), XX males had more spontaneous non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep than XX females. The XY mice did not exhibit sex differences in sleep amount. Following forced wakefulness there was a change in the factors regulating sleep. XY females slept more during their mid-active phase siestas than XX females and had higher NREM slow wave activity, a measure of sleep propensity. These findings suggest that the process that regulates sleep propensity is sex-linked, and that sleep amount and sleep propensity are regulated differently in males and females following sleep loss. PMID:23658713

  12. Cell Injury and Repair Resulting from Sleep Loss and Sleep Recovery in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Carol A.; Henchen, Christopher J.; Szabo, Aniko; Hogg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Increased cell injury would provide the type of change in constitution that would underlie sleep disruption as a risk factor for multiple diseases. The current study was undertaken to investigate cell injury and altered cell fate as consequences of sleep deprivation, which were predicted from systemic clues. Design: Partial (35% sleep reduction) and total sleep deprivation were produced in rats for 10 days, which was tolerated and without overtly deteriorated health. Recovery rats were similarly sleep deprived for 10 days, then allowed undisturbed sleep for 2 days. The plasma, liver, lung, intestine, heart, and spleen were analyzed and compared to control values for damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids; apoptotic cell signaling and death; cell proliferation; and concentrations of glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Measurements and Results: Oxidative DNA damage in totally sleep deprived rats was 139% of control values, with organ-specific effects in the liver (247%), lung (166%), and small intestine (145%). Overall and organ-specific DNA damage was also increased in partially sleep deprived rats. In the intestinal epithelium, total sleep deprivation resulted in 5.3-fold increases in dying cells and 1.5-fold increases in proliferating cells, compared with control. Two days of recovery sleep restored the balance between DNA damage and repair, and resulted in normal or below-normal metabolic burdens and oxidative damage. Conclusions: These findings provide physical evidence that sleep loss causes cell damage, and in a manner expected to predispose to replication errors and metabolic abnormalities; thereby providing linkage between sleep loss and disease risk observed in epidemiological findings. Properties of recovery sleep include biochemical and molecular events that restore balance and decrease cell injury. Citation: Everson CA, Henchen CJ, Szabo A, Hogg N. Cell injury and repair resulting from sleep loss and sleep recovery in laboratory rats

  13. Youthfulness, inexperience, and sleep loss: the problems young drivers face and those they pose for us

    PubMed Central

    Groeger, J A

    2006-01-01

    Young inexperienced drivers are more likely to be involved in road traffic crashes than drivers who are older and more experienced. This paper argues that neither age nor inexperience are, in and of themselves, sufficient explanations of the association between age, experience, and casualty rates. The aim here is to consider what it is about inexperienced young drivers in particular that may increase crash risk. Evidence is reviewed showing differential sleep loss among different teenage groups, which may relate to recently presented evidence that young teenagers are more crash involved than drivers in their early twenties. Potential acute and chronic effects of sleep loss among teenagers and young adults are described. PMID:16788107

  14. Sleep Loss and Partner Violence Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert; Shannon, Lisa; Logan, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    Intimate partner violence victimization has been associated with serious health problems among women, including many disorders that involve sleep disturbances. However, there has been only limited examination of sleep duration among women with victimization experiences. A total of 756 women with a domestic violence order (DVO) against a male…

  15. Astrocytic modulation of sleep homeostasis and cognitive consequences of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Halassa, Michael M.; Florian, Cedrick; Fellin, Tommaso; Munoz, James R.; Lee, So-Young; Abel, Ted; Haydon, Philip G.; Frank, Marcos G.

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes modulate neuronal activity by releasing chemical transmitters via a process termed gliotransmission. The role of this process in the control of behavior is unknown. Since one outcome of SNARE-dependent gliotransmission is the regulation of extracellular adenosine and because adenosine promotes sleep, we genetically inhibited the release of gliotransmitters and asked if astrocytes play an unsuspected role in sleep regulation. Inhibiting gliotransmission attenuated the accumulation of sleep pressure, assessed by measuring the slow wave activity of the EEG during NREM sleep and prevented cognitive deficits associated with sleep loss. Since the sleep-suppressing effects of the A1 receptor antagonist CPT were prevented following inhibition of gliotransmission and because intracerebroventricular delivery of CPT to wildtype mice mimicked the transgenic phenotype we conclude that astrocytes modulate the accumulation of sleep pressure and its cognitive consequences through a pathway involving A1 receptors. PMID:19186164

  16. New neurons in the adult brain: The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a matter of debate. In the case of the hippocampus, integration of new cells in to the existing neuronal circuitry may be involved in memory processes and the regulation of emotionality. In recent years, various studies have examined how the production of new cells and their development into neurons is affected by sleep and sleep loss. While disruption of sleep for a period shorter than one day appears to have little effect on the basal rate of cell proliferation, prolonged restriction or disruption of sleep may have cumulative effects leading to a major decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation, cell survival and neurogenesis. Importantly, while short sleep deprivation may not affect the basal rate of cell proliferation, one study in rats shows that even mild sleep restriction may interfere with the increase in neurogenesis that normally occurs with hippocampus-dependent learning. Since sleep deprivation also disturbs memory formation, these data suggest that promoting survival, maturation and integration of new cells may be an unexplored mechanism by which sleep supports learning and memory processes. Most methods of sleep deprivation that have been employed affect both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Available data favor the hypothesis that decreases in cell proliferation are related to a reduction in REM sleep, whereas decreases in the number of cells that subsequently develop into adult neurons may be related to reductions in both NREM and REM sleep. The mechanisms by which sleep loss affects different aspects of adult neurogenesis are unknown. It has been proposed that adverse effects of sleep disruption may be mediated by stress and

  17. Effect of Physical Work and Sleep Loss on Recovery Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    sleep patterns in college athletes . Perceptual and Motor Skills, 23, 1203-1207. Berger, R.J. and Oswald, I. (1962). Effects of sleep deprivation on...that induced an elevated heart rate corresponding to 301 of the individual’s VO2 max. Exercise periods occurred during the first half-hour for each...Camp Pendleton (mean age of 21.7+2.4 years). 2.2 Exercise Heart Rate and VO2 Max Determination. Assessment of VC2 max was performed on Monday (Day 1

  18. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  19. Coping with Sleep Loss During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changing hormones, anxiety and heartburn can lead to insomnia To use the sharing features on this page, ... like, but many pregnant women also suffer from insomnia, according to the National Sleep Foundation. Hormonal changes ...

  20. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule; (2) when permitted to extend sleep--thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  1. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    low MSLT scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule. When permitted to extend sleep-thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  2. Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Deprivation: Assessment of Fatigue Following Sleep Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carskadon, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    scores (e.g., Sleepy subjects) will show an exaggerated response (performance decrement) to sleep loss compared to subjects who have high MSLT scores (Alert subjects) on a nominal sleep schedule. when permitted to extend sleep-thus discharging their sleep debt-the Sleepy subjects will show a sleep-loss response resembling that of the Alert subjects.

  3. Sleep quality but not sleep quantity effects on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Sarah M.; Lupis, Sarah B.; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas; Wolf, Jutta M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the well-documented deleterious health effects, poor sleep has become a serious public health concern and increasing efforts are directed towards understanding underlying pathways. One potential mechanism may be stress and its biological correlates; however, studies investigating the effects of poor sleep on a body’s capacity to deal with challenges are lacking. The current study thus aimed at testing the effects of sleep quality and sleep quantity on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress. A total of 73 college-aged adults (44 females) were investigated. Self-reported sleep behavior was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and salivary cortisol responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) were measured. In terms of sleep quality, we found a significant three-way interaction, such that relative to bad sleep quality, men who reported fairly good or very good sleep quality showed blunted or exaggerated cortisol responses, respectively, while women’s stress responses were less dependent on their self-reported sleep quality. Contrarily, average sleep duration did not appear to impact cortisol stress responses. Lastly, participants who reported daytime dysfunctions (i.e., having trouble staying awake or keeping up enthusiasm) also showed a trend to blunted cortisol stress responses compared to participants who did not experience these types of daytime dysfunctions. Overall, the current study suggests gender-specific stress reactivity dysfunctions as one mechanism linking poor sleep with detrimental physical health outcomes. Furthermore, the observed differential sleep effects may indicate that while the body may be unable to maintain normal HPA functioning in an acute psychosocial stress situation after falling prey to low sleep quality, it may retain capacities to deal with challenges during extended times of sleep deprivation. PMID:26414625

  4. Involvement of the α1-adrenoceptor in sleep-waking and sleep loss-induced anxiety behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Subhashini, N; Sharma, S; Mallick, B N

    2013-08-15

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon in vertebrates, and its loss affects various behaviors. Independent studies have reported that sleep loss increases anxiety; however, the detailed mechanism is unknown. Because sleep deprivation increases noradrenalin (NA), which modulates many behaviors and induces patho-physiological changes, this study utilized zebrafish as a model to investigate whether sleep loss-induced increased anxiety is modulated by NA. Continuous behavioral quiescence for at least 6s was considered to represent sleep in zebrafish; although some authors termed it as a sleep-like state, in this study we have termed it as sleep. The activity of fish that signified sleep-waking was recorded in light-dark, during continuous dark and light; the latter induced sleep loss in fish. The latency, number of entries, time spent and distance travelled in the light chamber were assessed in a light-dark box test to estimate the anxiety behavior of normal, sleep-deprived and prazosin (PRZ)-treated fish. Zebrafish showed increased waking during light and complete loss of sleep upon continuous exposure to light for 24h. PRZ significantly increased sleep in normal fish. Sleep-deprived fish showed an increased preference for dark (expression of increased anxiety), and this effect was prevented by PRZ, which increased sleep as well. Our findings suggest that sleep loss-induced anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish is likely to be mediated by NA's action on the α1-adrenoceptor.

  5. Sleep and the sleep environment of older adults in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Missildine, Kathy

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to describe sleep characteristics of hospitalized older adults and the nighttime environmental noise and light they encountered. Study participants included patients in an acute care setting; actigraphy and light and sound meters were used to measure the variables. Mean sleep time was 215 minutes, and the average sleep efficiency was 44.72%. Nighttime sleep was fragmented into 5 to 38 intervals of 15 to 24 minutes, with frequent awakenings. Mean light levels were 6.14 lux, with peak intensities of 59.68 lux lasting 95 minutes each night. Mean sound levels were 52.87 dB(A). Sleep was markedly impaired in an environment of elevated light and sound levels. Understanding the role of noise and light in the sleep efficiency of ill older adults can help nurses identify sources of noise and light and initiate sleep improvement protocols.

  6. Sleep quality but not sleep quantity effects on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sarah M; Lupis, Sarah B; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented deleterious health effects, poor sleep has become a serious public health concern and increasing efforts are directed toward understanding underlying pathways. One potential mechanism may be stress and its biological correlates; however, studies investigating the effects of poor sleep on a body's capacity to deal with challenges are lacking. The current study thus aimed at testing the effects of sleep quality and quantity on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress. A total of 73 college-aged adults (44 females) were investigated. Self-reported sleep behavior was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and salivary cortisol responses to the Trier Social Stress Test were measured. In terms of sleep quality, we found a significant three-way interaction, such that relative to bad sleep quality, men who reported fairly good or very good sleep quality showed blunted or exaggerated cortisol responses, respectively, while women's stress responses were less dependent on their self-reported sleep quality. Contrarily, average sleep duration did not appear to impact cortisol stress responses. Lastly, participants who reported daytime dysfunctions (i.e. having trouble staying awake or keeping up enthusiasm) also showed a trend to blunted cortisol stress responses compared to participants who did not experience these types of daytime dysfunctions. Overall, the current study suggests gender-specific stress reactivity dysfunctions as one mechanism linking poor sleep with detrimental physical health outcomes. Furthermore, the observed differential sleep effects may indicate that while the body may be unable to maintain normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning in an acute psychosocial stress situation after falling prey to low sleep quality, it may retain capacities to deal with challenges during extended times of sleep deprivation.

  7. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-05

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR.

  8. Fatigue, Sleep Loss, and Confidence in Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranski, Joseph V.

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-four adults participated in a study examining the accuracy of metacognitive judgments during 28 hr of sleep deprivation (SD) and continuous cognitive work. Three tasks were studied (perceptual comparison, general knowledge, and mental addition), collectively spanning a range of cognitive abilities and levels of susceptibility to SD.…

  9. Sleep and athletic performance: the effects of sleep loss on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Hugh H K; Skorski, Sabrina; Duffield, Rob; Hammes, Daniel; Coutts, Aaron J; Meyer, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Although its true function remains unclear, sleep is considered critical to human physiological and cognitive function. Equally, since sleep loss is a common occurrence prior to competition in athletes, this could significantly impact upon their athletic performance. Much of the previous research has reported that exercise performance is negatively affected following sleep loss; however, conflicting findings mean that the extent, influence, and mechanisms of sleep loss affecting exercise performance remain uncertain. For instance, research indicates some maximal physical efforts and gross motor performances can be maintained. In comparison, the few published studies investigating the effect of sleep loss on performance in athletes report a reduction in sport-specific performance. The effects of sleep loss on physiological responses to exercise also remain equivocal; however, it appears a reduction in sleep quality and quantity could result in an autonomic nervous system imbalance, simulating symptoms of the overtraining syndrome. Additionally, increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines following sleep loss could promote immune system dysfunction. Of further concern, numerous studies investigating the effects of sleep loss on cognitive function report slower and less accurate cognitive performance. Based on this context, this review aims to evaluate the importance and prevalence of sleep in athletes and summarises the effects of sleep loss (restriction and deprivation) on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise. Given the equivocal understanding of sleep and athletic performance outcomes, further research and consideration is required to obtain a greater knowledge of the interaction between sleep and performance.

  10. Role of sleep and sleep loss in hormonal release and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Leproult, Rachel; Van Cauter, Eve

    2010-01-01

    Compared to a few decades ago, adults, as well as children, sleep less. Sleeping as little as possible is often seen as an admirable behavior in contemporary society. However, sleep plays a major role in neuroendocrine function and glucose metabolism. Evidence that the curtailment of sleep duration may have adverse health effects has emerged in the past 10 years. Accumulating evidence from both epidemiologic studies and well-controlled laboratory studies indicates that chronic partial sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity and weight gain. The present chapter reviews epidemiologic studies in adults and children and laboratory studies in young adults indicating that sleep restriction results in metabolic and endocrine alterations, including decreased glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, increased evening concentrations of cortisol, increased levels of ghrelin, decreased levels of leptin and increased hunger and appetite. Altogether, the evidence points to a possible role of decreased sleep duration in the current epidemic of obesity. Bedtime extension in short sleepers should be explored as a novel behavioral intervention that may prevent weight gain or facilitate weight loss. Avoiding sleep deprivation may help to prevent the development of obesity, particularly in children.

  11. Role of Sleep and Sleep Loss in Hormonal Release and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Leproult, Rachel; Van Cauter, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Compared to a few decades ago, adults, as well as children, sleep less. Sleeping as little as possible is often seen as an admirable behavior in contemporary society. However, sleep plays a major role in neuroendocrine function and glucose metabolism. Evidence that the curtailment of sleep duration may have adverse health effects has emerged in the past 10 years. Accumulating evidence from both epidemiologic studies and well-controlled laboratory studies indicates that chronic partial sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity and weight gain. The present chapter reviews epidemiologic studies in adults and children and laboratory studies in young adults indicating that sleep restriction results in metabolic and endocrine alterations, including decreased glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, increased evening concentrations of cortisol, increased levels of ghrelin, decreased levels of leptin and increased hunger and appetite. Altogether, the evidence points to a possible role of decreased sleep duration in the current epidemic of obesity. Bedtime extension in short sleepers should be explored as a novel behavioral intervention that may prevent weight gain or facilitate weight loss. Avoiding sleep deprivation may help to prevent the development of obesity, particularly in children. PMID:19955752

  12. Sleep loss activates cellular markers of inflammation: sex differences.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael R; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 to 3.00h). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes.

  13. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  14. Sleep Loss Exacerbates Fatigue, Depression, and Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; FitzGerald, John D.; Ranganath, Veena K.; Nicassio, Perry M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Disturbances of sleep are hypothesized to contribute to pain. However, experimental data are limited to healthy pain-free individuals. This study evaluated the effect of sleep loss during part of the night on daytime mood symptoms and pain perceptions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with control subjects. Design: A between-groups laboratory study with assessment of mood symptoms and pain perception before and after partial night sleep deprivation (PSD; awake 23:00 hr to 03:00 hr). Setting: General clinical research center. Participants: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 27) and volunteer comparison control subjects (n = 27). Measurements: Subjective reports of sleep, mood symptoms and pain, polysomnographic assessment of sleep continuity, and subjective and objective assessment of rheumatoid arthritis-specific joint pain. Results: PSD induced differential increases in self-reported fatigue (P < 0.09), depression (P < 0.04), anxiety (P < 0.04), and pain (P < 0.01) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with responses in control subjects, in whom differential increases of self-reported pain were independent of changes in mood symptoms, subjective sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep fragmentation. In the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, PSD also induced increases in disease-specific activity as indexed by self-reported pain severity (P < 0.01) and number of painful joints (P < 0.02) as well as clinician-rated joint counts (P < 0.03). Conclusion: This study provides the first evidence of an exaggerated increase in symptoms of mood and pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after sleep loss, along with an activation of rheumatoid arthritis-related joint pain. Given the reciprocal relationship between sleep disturbances and pain, clinical management of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis should include an increased focus on the prevention and treatment of sleep disturbance in this clinical

  15. Trait-Like Vulnerability to Total and Partial Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Tracy L.; Wesensten, Nancy J.; Balkin, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent to which individual differences in vulnerability to total sleep deprivation also reflect individual differences in vulnerability to multiple nights of sleep restriction. Design: Two sleep loss conditions (order counterbalanced) separated by 2 to 4 weeks: (a) total sleep deprivation (TSD) of 2 nights (63 h continuous wakefulness); (b) sleep restriction (SR) of 7 nights of 3 h nightly time in bed (TIB). Both conditions were preceded by 7 in-laboratory nights with 10 h nightly TIB; and followed by 3 recovery nights with 8 h nightly TIB. Measures of cognitive performance (psychomotor vigilance, working memory [1-Back], and mathematical processing), objective alertness, subjective sleepiness, and mood were obtained at regular intervals under both conditions. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were computed using outcome metrics averaged over the last day (08:00-20:00) of TSD and SR. Setting: Residential sleep/performance testing facility. Participants: Nineteen healthy adults (ages 18-39; 11 males, 8 females). Interventions: 2 nights of TSD and 7 nights SR (3 h nightly TIB). Results: Volunteers who displayed greater vulnerability to TSD displayed greater vulnerability to SR on cognitive performance tasks (ICC: PVT lapses = 0.89; PVT speed = 0.86; 1-Back = 0.88; mathematical processing = 0.68, Ps < 0.05). In addition, trait-like responsivity to TSD/SR was found for mood variables vigor (ICC = 0.91), fatigue (ICC = 0.73), and happiness (ICC = 0.85) (all Ps < 0.05). Conclusion: Resilience to sleep loss is a trait-like characteristic that reflects an individual's ability to maintain performance during both types of sleep loss (SR and TSD). Whether the findings extend to sleep schedules other than those investigated here (63 h of TSD and 7 nights of 3 h nightly TIB) will be the focus of future studies. Citation: Rupp TL; Wesensten NJ; Balkin TJ. Trait-like vulnerability to total and partial sleep loss. SLEEP 2012

  16. Sleep Loss and Complex Team Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Joseph Fischer General Dynamics Advanced Information Engineering Services Richard Harrison Donald Harville Air Force Research Laboratory...Air Force Material Command ≈General Dynamics Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate Advanced Information Services...medications for sleep, depression, or ADHD . The mean age of the participants was 26.1 (±2.6) years. Prior to the experimental session start on Friday

  17. Age, circadian rhythms, and sleep loss in flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Nguyen, DE; Rosekind, Mark R.; Connell, Linda J.

    1993-01-01

    Age-related changes in trip-induced sleep loss, personality, and the preduty temperature rhythm were analyzed in crews from various flight operations. Eveningness decreased with age. The minimum of the baseline temperature rhythm occurred earlier with age. The amplitude of the baseline temperature rhythm declined with age. Average daily percentage sleep loss during trips increased with age. Among crewmembers flying longhaul flight operations, subjects aged 50-60 averaged 3.5 times more sleep loss per day than subjects aged 20-30. These studies support previous findings that evening types and subjects with later peaking temperature rhythms adapt better to shift work and time zone changes. Age and circadian type may be important considerations for duty schedules and fatigue countermeasures.

  18. Sleep Disturbance and Older Adults' Inflammatory Responses to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Kathi L.; Ng, H. Mei; Suhr, Julie A.; France, Christopher R.; Marshall, Gailen D.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Moynihan, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Poor sleep diminishes mental and physical health. The objective of this study was to examine associations between sleep disturbance and interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses to acute mental stress in older adults. Design Observational study of community-dwelling, healthy older adults. Setting Participants completed the study in a clinical research laboratory of a mid-sized university. Participants Generally healthy, community-dwelling men and women 50 years of age and older. Measurements IL-6 and negative affect at rest and following a series of challenging cognitive tests; sleep quality; depressive symptoms; perceived stress; loneliness. Results Participants categorized as poor sleepers based on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores had significantly larger IL-6 responses to the cognitive stressors compared to good sleepers. The association between poor sleep and heightened IL-6 response to acute stress was not explained by other psychosocial factors previously linked to immune dysregulation, including depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and loneliness. Conclusions Findings add to the growing evidence for poor sleep as an independent risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Older adults may be particularly vulnerable to effects of sleep disturbance due to significant age-related changes in both sleep and inflammatory regulation. PMID:22327621

  19. Sleep loss and accidents--work hours, life style, and sleep pathology.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Philip, Pierre; Capelli, Aurore; Kecklund, Göran

    2011-01-01

    A very important outcome of reduced sleep is accidents. The present chapter will attempt to bring together some of the present knowledge in this area. We will focus on the driving situation, for which the evidence of the link between sleep loss and accidents is quite well established, but we will also bring up working life in general where evidence is more sparse. It should be emphasized that reduced sleep as a cause of accidents implies that the mediating factor is sleepiness (or fatigue). This link is discussed elsewhere in this volume, but here we will bring in sleepiness (subjective or physiological) as an explanatory factor of accidents. Another central observation is that many real life accident studies do not link accidents to reduced sleep, but infer reduced sleep and/or sleepiness from the context, like, for example, from work schedules, life styles, or sleep pathology. Reduced sleep is mainly due to suboptimal work schedules (or to a suboptimal life style) or to sleep pathology. We have divided the present chapter into two areas.

  20. Impact of sleep and sleep loss on glucose homeostasis and appetite regulation

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Kristen L

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Over the past 30 years there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, both of which can have serious consequences for longevity and quality of life. Sleep durations may have also decreased over this time period. This chapter reviews laboratory and epidemiologic evidence for an association between sleep loss and impairments in glucose metabolism and appetite regulation, which could increase the risk of diabetes or weight gain. PMID:18516218

  1. Diffuse Brain Injury Induces Acute Post-Traumatic Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Striz, Martin; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Donohue, Kevin D.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical observations report excessive sleepiness immediately following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of experimental evidence to support or refute the benefit of sleep following a brain injury. The aim of this study is to investigate acute post-traumatic sleep. Methods Sham, mild or moderate diffuse TBI was induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI) in male C57BL/6J mice at 9:00 or 21:00 to evaluate injury-induced sleep behavior at sleep and wake onset, respectively. Sleep profiles were measured post-injury using a non-invasive, piezoelectric cage system. In separate cohorts of mice, inflammatory cytokines in the neocortex were quantified by immunoassay, and microglial activation was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Results Immediately after diffuse TBI, quantitative measures of sleep were characterized by a significant increase in sleep (>50%) for the first 6 hours post-injury, resulting from increases in sleep bout length, compared to sham. Acute post-traumatic sleep increased significantly independent of injury severity and time of injury (9:00 vs 21:00). The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β increased in brain-injured mice compared to sham over the first 9 hours post-injury. Iba-1 positive microglia were evident in brain-injured cortex at 6 hours post-injury. Conclusion Post-traumatic sleep occurs for up to 6 hours after diffuse brain injury in the mouse regardless of injury severity or time of day. The temporal profile of secondary injury cascades may be driving the significant increase in post-traumatic sleep and contribute to the natural course of recovery through cellular repair. PMID:24416145

  2. The effects of acute sleep deprivation during residency training.

    PubMed

    Bartle, E J; Sun, J H; Thompson, L; Light, A I; McCool, C; Heaton, S

    1988-08-01

    Verbal and symbol concentration, learning, problem solving, clear thinking, manual skills, and memory were tested in 42 surgical residents to assess the effects of acute sleep deprivation on specific neuropsychological parameters. A series of eight neuropsychological tests--digit symbols, digit vigilance, story memory, trail making, PASAT, Raven matrices, delayed story, and pegboard--and a questionnaire on mood states were completed by the residents both when fatigued (less than 4 hours of sleep: mean, 2.0 +/- 1.5 hours) and when rested (more than 4 hours of sleep: mean, 6.5 +/- 1.0 hours), with at least 7 days between tests. In order to eliminate the effects of learning from the first test series, randomization of residents was performed so that one half were first evaluated when rested and one half when fatigued. ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, and the Student t test were used to assess differences. In the acute sleep-deprived state, residents were less vigorous and more fatigued, depressed, tense, confused, and angry (p less than 0.05) than they were in rested state. Despite these changes in mood, however, the responses on all of the functional tests were no different statistically in those who were rested and those who were fatigued (even in those with less than 2 hours' sleep). We conclude that acute sleep deprivation of less than 4 hours alters mood state but does not change performance in test situations in which concentration, clear thinking, and problem solving are important.

  3. Pain Sensitivity and Recovery From Mild Chronic Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, Timothy A.; Harris, Erica; Randall, Surilla; Roth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether an extended bedtime in sleepy and otherwise healthy volunteers would increase alertness and thereby also reduce pain sensitivity. Setting: Outpatient with sleep laboratory assessments. Participants and Interventions: Healthy volunteers (n = 18), defined as having an average daily sleep latency on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) < 8 min, were randomized to 4 nights of extended bedtime (10 hr) (EXT) or 4 nights of their diary-reported habitual bedtimes (HAB). On day 1 and day 4 they received a standard MSLT (10:00, 12:00, 14:00, and 16:00 hr) and finger withdrawal latency pain testing to a radiant heat stimulus (10:30 and 14:30 hr). Results: During the four experimental nights the EXT group slept 1.8 hr per night more than the HAB group and average daily sleep latency on the MSLT increased in the EXT group, but not the HAB group. Similarly, finger withdrawal latency was increased (pain sensitivity was reduced) in the EXT group but not the HAB group. The nightly increase in sleep time during the four experimental nights was correlated with the improvement in MSLT, which in turn was correlated with reduced pain sensitivity. Conclusions: These are the first data to show that an extended bedtime in mildly sleepy healthy adults, which resulted in increased sleep time and reduced sleepiness, reduces pain sensitivity. Citation: Roehrs TA; Harris E; Randall S; Roth T. Pain sensitivity and recovery from mild chronic sleep loss. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1667-1672. PMID:23204609

  4. Maximizing Sensitivity of the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) is among the most widely used measures of behavioral alertness, but there is large variation among published studies in PVT performance outcomes and test durations. To promote standardization of the PVT and increase its sensitivity and specificity to sleep loss, we determined PVT metrics and task durations that optimally discriminated sleep deprived subjects from alert subjects. Design: Repeated-measures experiments involving 10-min PVT assessments every 2 h across both acute total sleep deprivation (TSD) and 5 days of chronic partial sleep deprivation (PSD). Setting: Controlled laboratory environment. Participants: 74 healthy subjects (34 female), aged 22–45 years. Interventions: TSD experiment involving 33 h awake (N = 31 subjects) and a PSD experiment involving 5 nights of 4 h time in bed (N = 43 subjects). Measurements and Results: In a paired t-test paradigm and for both TSD and PSD, effect sizes of 10 different PVT performance outcomes were calculated. Effect sizes were high for both TSD (1.59–1.94) and PSD (0.88–1.21) for PVT metrics related to lapses and to measures of psychomotor speed, i.e., mean 1/RT (response time) and mean slowest 10% 1/RT. In contrast, PVT mean and median RT outcomes scored low to moderate effect sizes influenced by extreme values. Analyses facilitating only portions of the full 10-min PVT indicated that for some outcomes, high effect sizes could be achieved with PVT durations considerably shorter than 10 min, although metrics involving lapses seemed to profit from longer test durations in TSD. Conclusions: Due to their superior conceptual and statistical properties and high sensitivity to sleep deprivation, metrics involving response speed and lapses should be considered primary outcomes for the 10-min PVT. In contrast, PVT mean and median metrics, which are among the most widely used outcomes, should be avoided as primary measures of alertness. Our analyses also suggest

  5. Predicting Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-15

    2011 4. TITLE Predicting Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Loss 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: 5c. Program Element Number: 5d...ADDRESS(ES) Naval Medical Reserach Unit – Dayton 2624 Q St., Bldg. 851, Area B Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION... Program Department of the Navy 2300 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20372-5300 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) BUMED 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Moctezuma, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins. PMID:27738642

  7. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alvarado, G; Domínguez-Salazar, E; Pavon, L; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J; Gómez-González, B

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins.

  8. Sleep, obesity, and weight loss in adults: is there a rationale for providing sleep interventions in the treatment of obesity?

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Janelle W; Smith, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Rates of obesity and sleep disturbances are substantial in adults. A number of cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental studies have found that insufficient sleep and possibly longer sleep are associated with obesity and related eating patterns. Methodological discrepancies and limitations in the literature create ambiguity about the nature and potential mechanisms underlying these relationships. Insomnia and circadian patterns in eating and sleeping have also been examined in relation to weight. Although these studies are not as extensive as those examining sleep duration, the extant literature suggests possible associations between obesity and both insomnia (particularly when combined with short sleep duration) and circadian eating behaviours. However, research has only just begun to examine the benefits of combining sleep interventions with obesity treatment. The goal of the current review is to summarize research examining behavioural sleep patterns and disorders in relation to obesity, to discuss methodological considerations, and to provide an overview of studies examining whether addressing sleep disturbances can augment weight loss treatment effects. We conclude that future studies are needed that take into account sleep duration, sleep disorder co-morbidity, and chronobiology to explore the impact of sleep interventions on weight loss.

  9. The Perilipin Homologue, Lipid Storage Droplet 2, Regulates Sleep Homeostasis and Prevents Learning Impairments Following Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Suzuki, Yasuko; Seugnet, Laurent; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Extended periods of waking result in physiological impairments in humans, rats, and flies. Sleep homeostasis, the increase in sleep observed following sleep loss, is believed to counter the negative effects of prolonged waking by restoring vital biological processes that are degraded during sleep deprivation. Sleep homeostasis, as with other behaviors, is influenced by both genes and environment. We report here that during periods of starvation, flies remain spontaneously awake but, in contrast to sleep deprivation, do not accrue any of the negative consequences of prolonged waking. Specifically, the homeostatic response and learning impairments that are a characteristic of sleep loss are not observed following prolonged waking induced by starvation. Recently, two genes, brummer (bmm) and Lipid storage droplet 2 (Lsd2), have been shown to modulate the response to starvation. bmm mutants have excess fat and are resistant to starvation, whereas Lsd2 mutants are lean and sensitive to starvation. Thus, we hypothesized that bmm and Lsd2 may play a role in sleep regulation. Indeed, bmm mutant flies display a large homeostatic response following sleep deprivation. In contrast, Lsd2 mutant flies, which phenocopy aspects of starvation as measured by low triglyceride stores, do not exhibit a homeostatic response following sleep loss. Importantly, Lsd2 mutant flies are not learning impaired after sleep deprivation. These results provide the first genetic evidence, to our knowledge, that lipid metabolism plays an important role in regulating the homeostatic response and can protect against neuronal impairments induced by prolonged waking. PMID:20824166

  10. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphism Associates with Individual Differences in Sleep Physiologic Responses to Chronic Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Namni; Banks, Siobhan; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel; Dinges, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The COMT Val158Met polymorphism modulates cortical dopaminergic catabolism, and predicts individual differences in prefrontal executive functioning in healthy adults and schizophrenic patients, and associates with EEG differences during sleep loss. We assessed whether the COMT Val158Met polymorphism was a novel marker in healthy adults of differential vulnerability to chronic partial sleep deprivation (PSD), a condition distinct from total sleep loss and one experienced by millions on a daily and persistent basis. Methodology/Principal Findings 20 Met/Met, 64 Val/Met, and 45 Val/Val subjects participated in a protocol of two baseline 10h time in bed (TIB) nights followed by five consecutive 4 h TIB nights. Met/Met subjects showed differentially steeper declines in non-REM EEG slow-wave energy (SWE)—the putative homeostatic marker of sleep drive—during PSD, despite comparable baseline SWE declines. Val/Val subjects showed differentially smaller increases in slow-wave sleep and smaller reductions in stage 2 sleep during PSD, and had more stage 1 sleep across nights and a shorter baseline REM sleep latency. The genotypes, however, did not differ in performance across various executive function and cognitive tasks and showed comparable increases in subjective and physiological sleepiness in response to chronic sleep loss. Met/Met genotypic and Met allelic frequencies were higher in whites than African Americans. Conclusions/Significance The COMT Val158Met polymorphism may be a genetic biomarker for predicting individual differences in sleep physiology—but not in cognitive and executive functioning—resulting from sleep loss in a healthy, racially-diverse adult population of men and women. Beyond healthy sleepers, our results may also provide insight for predicting sleep loss responses in patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, since these groups repeatedly experience chronically-curtailed sleep and demonstrate COMT

  11. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  12. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Huang, Yanhua H; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-28

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD.

  13. Can We Predict Cognitive Performance Decrements Due to Sleep Loss and the Recuperative Effects of Caffeine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-14

    effects of partial sleep loss [or chronic sleep restriction ( CSR )] because they did not account for the effects of prior sleep debt [4]. • All models...both TSD and CSR conditions, 2) be customized to an individual to provide individual-specific predictions of performance during sleep loss, and 3...we used performance data from one study, comprising of four different CSR conditions, to develop the model and validated its predictions on

  14. Dynamic Circadian Modulation in a Biomathematical Model for the Effects of Sleep and Sleep Loss on Waking Neurobehavioral Performance

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Peter; Kalachev, Leonid V.; Mollicone, Daniel J.; Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental observations and theoretical advances have indicated that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation—and thereby sensitivity to neurobehavioral impairment from sleep loss—is modulated by prior sleep/wake history. This phenomenon was predicted by a biomathematical model developed to explain changes in neurobehavioral performance across days in laboratory studies of total sleep deprivation and sustained sleep restriction. The present paper focuses on the dynamics of neurobehavioral performance within days in this biomathematical model of fatigue. Without increasing the number of model parameters, the model was updated by incorporating time-dependence in the amplitude of the circadian modulation of performance. The updated model was calibrated using a large dataset from three laboratory experiments on psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) performance, under conditions of sleep loss and circadian misalignment; and validated using another large dataset from three different laboratory experiments. The time-dependence of circadian amplitude resulted in improved goodness-of-fit in night shift schedules, nap sleep scenarios, and recovery from prior sleep loss. The updated model predicts that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation—and thus sensitivity to sleep loss—depends not only on the duration but also on the circadian timing of prior sleep. This novel theoretical insight has important implications for predicting operator alertness during work schedules involving circadian misalignment such as night shift work. Citation: McCauley P; Kalachev LV; Mollicone DJ; Banks S; Dinges DF; Van Dongen HPA. Dynamic circadian modulation in a biomathematical model for the effects of sleep and sleep loss on waking neurobehavioral performance. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1987-1997. PMID:24293775

  15. Increased impulsivity in response to food cues after sleep loss in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Brandell, Jon; Ros, Olof; Broman, Jan-Erik; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether acute total sleep deprivation (TSD) leads to decreased cognitive control when food cues are presented during a task requiring active attention, by assessing the ability to cognitively inhibit prepotent responses. Methods Fourteen males participated in the study on two separate occasions in a randomized, crossover within-subject design: one night of TSD versus normal sleep (8.5 hours). Following each nighttime intervention, hunger ratings and morning fasting plasma glucose concentrations were assessed before performing a go/no-go task. Results Following TSD, participants made significantly more commission errors when they were presented “no-go” food words in the go/no-go task, as compared with their performance following sleep (+56%; P<0.05). In contrast, response time and omission errors to “go” non-food words did not differ between the conditions. Self-reported hunger after TSD was increased without changes in fasting plasma glucose. The increase in hunger did not correlate with the TSD-induced commission errors. Conclusions Our results suggest that TSD impairs cognitive control also in response to food stimuli in healthy young men. Whether such loss of inhibition or impulsiveness is food cue-specific as seen in obesity—thus providing a mechanism through which sleep disturbances may promote obesity development—warrants further investigation. PMID:24839251

  16. Phagocyte migration and cellular stress induced in liver, lung, and intestine during sleep loss and sleep recovery

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Carol A.; Thalacker, Christa D.; Hogg, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Sleep is understood to possess recuperative properties and, conversely, sleep loss is associated with disease and shortened life span. Despite these critical attributes, the mechanisms and functions by which sleep and sleep loss impact health still are speculative. One of the most consistent, if largely overlooked, signs of sleep loss in both humans and laboratory rats is a progressive increase in circulating phagocytic cells, mainly neutrophils. The destination, if any, of the increased circulating populations has been unknown and, therefore, its medical significance has been uncertain. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine the content and location of neutrophils in liver and lung tissue of sleep-deprived rats. These are two principal sites affected by neutrophil migration during systemic inflammatory illness. The content of neutrophils in the intestine also was determined. Sleep deprivation in rats was produced for 5 and 10 days by the Bergmann-Rechtschaffen disk method, which has been validated for its high selectivity under freely moving conditions and which was tolerated and accompanied by a deep negative energy balance. Comparison groups included basal conditions and 48 h of sleep recovery after 10 days of sleep loss. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme constituent of neutrophils, was extracted from liver, lung, and intestinal tissues, and its activity was determined by spectrophotometry. Leukocytes were located in vasculature and interstitial spaces in the liver and the lung by immunohistochemistry. Heme oxygenase-1, also known as heat shock protein-32 and a marker of cellular stress, and corticosterone also were measured. The results indicate neutrophil migration into extravascular liver and lung tissue concurrent with cell stress and consistent with tissue injury or infection induced by sleep loss. Plasma corticosterone was unchanged. Recovery sleep was marked by increased lung heme oxygenase-1, increased intestinal MPO activity, and

  17. Exercise-Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acute (24-h) sleep deprivation on exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24-h sessions including a brief, high-intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24-h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30-sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self-reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P = 0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P = 0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise-induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF-1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P < 0.01), exercise-induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P < 0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH - resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P < 0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise-induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep-deprived individuals.

  18. Exercise‐Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C.; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of acute (24‐h) sleep deprivation on exercise‐induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin‐like growth factor‐1 (IGF‐1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24‐h sessions including a brief, high‐intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24‐h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30‐sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self‐reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P =0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P =0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF‐1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P <0.01), exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P <0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH – resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P <0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise‐induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep‐deprived individuals. PMID:25281616

  19. Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... is REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ... is REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ...

  20. Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation during Sleep at 3800m: relationship to Acute Mountain Sickness and sleeping oxyhemoglobin saturation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, PL; Popa, DA; Prisk, GK; Sullivan, CE; Edwards, N

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Ascent to high altitude results in hypobaric hypoxia and some individuals will develop Acute Mountain Sickness, which has been shown to be associated with low oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep. Previous research has shown that positive end-expiratory pressure by use of expiratory valves in a face mask while awake, results in a reduction in AMS symptoms and higher oxyhemoglobin saturation. We aimed to test whether pressure ventilation during sleep would prevent AMS by keeping oxyhaemoglobin higher during sleep. Methods We compared sleeping oxyhemoglobin saturation and the incidence and severity of Acute Mountain Sickness in seven subjects sleeping for two consecutive nights at 3800m above sea level using either non-invasive positive pressure ventilation that delivered positive inspiratory and expiratory airway pressure via a face mask, or sleeping without assisted ventilation. The presence and severity of Acute Mountain Sickness was assessed by administration of the Lake Louise questionnaire. Results We found significant increases in the mean and minimum sleeping oxyhemoglobin saturation and decreases in AMS symptoms in subjects who used positive pressure ventilation during sleep. Mean and minimum sleeping SaO2 was lower in subjects who developed AMS after the night spent without positive pressure ventilation. Conclusion The use of positive pressure ventilation during sleep at 3800m significantly increased the sleeping oxygen saturation; we suggest that the marked reduction in symptoms of AMS is due to this higher sleeping SaO2. We agree with the findings from previous studies that the development of AMS is associated with a lower sleeping oxygen saturation. PMID:20051046

  1. Medical and Genetic Differences in the Adverse Impact of Sleep Loss on Performance: Ethical Considerations for the Medical Profession

    PubMed Central

    Czeisler, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recently concluded that-on average-medical residents make more serious medical errors and have more motor vehicle crashes when they are deprived of sleep. In the interest of public safety, society has required limitations on work hours in many other safety sensitive occupations, including transportation and nuclear power generation. Those who argue in favor of traditional extended duration resident work hours often suggest that there are inter- individual differences in response to acute sleep loss or chronic sleep deprivation, implying that physicians may be more resistant than the average person to the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on performance, although there is no evidence that physicians are particularly resistant to such effects. Indeed, recent investigations have identified genetic polymorphisms that may convey a relative resistance to the effects of prolonged wakefulness on a subset of the healthy population, although there is no evidence that physicians are over-represented in this cohort. Conversely, there are also genetic polymorphisms, sleep disorders and other inter-individual differences that appear to convey an increased vulnerability to the performance-impairing effects of 24 hours of wakefulness. Given the magnitude of inter-individual differences in the effect of sleep loss on cognitive performance, and the sizeable proportion of the population affected by sleep disorders, hospitals face a number of ethical dilemmas. How should the work hours of physicians be limited to protect patient safety optimally? For example, some have argued that, in contrast to other professions, work schedules that repeatedly induce acute and chronic sleep loss are uniquely essential to the training of physicians. If evidence were to prove this premise to be correct, how should such training be ethically accomplished in the quartile of physicians and surgeons who are most vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss on performance

  2. Medical and genetic differences in the adverse impact of sleep loss on performance: ethical considerations for the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recently concluded that-on average-medical residents make more serious medical errors and have more motor vehicle crashes when they are deprived of sleep. In the interest of public safety, society has required limitations on work hours in many other safety sensitive occupations, including transportation and nuclear power generation. Those who argue in favor of traditional extended duration resident work hours often suggest that there are inter- individual differences in response to acute sleep loss or chronic sleep deprivation, implying that physicians may be more resistant than the average person to the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on performance, although there is no evidence that physicians are particularly resistant to such effects. Indeed, recent investigations have identified genetic polymorphisms that may convey a relative resistance to the effects of prolonged wakefulness on a subset of the healthy population, although there is no evidence that physicians are over-represented in this cohort. Conversely, there are also genetic polymorphisms, sleep disorders and other inter-individual differences that appear to convey an increased vulnerability to the performance-impairing effects of 24 hours of wakefulness. Given the magnitude of inter-individual differences in the effect of sleep loss on cognitive performance, and the sizeable proportion of the population affected by sleep disorders, hospitals face a number of ethical dilemmas. How should the work hours of physicians be limited to protect patient safety optimally? For example, some have argued that, in contrast to other professions, work schedules that repeatedly induce acute and chronic sleep loss are uniquely essential to the training of physicians. If evidence were to prove this premise to be correct, how should such training be ethically accomplished in the quartile of physicians and surgeons who are most vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss on performance

  3. REM Sleep and Its Loss-associated Epigenetic Regulation with Reference to Noradrenaline in Particular

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rachna; Singh, Abhishek; Bókkon, István; Nath Mallick, Birendra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process, which has been divided into rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) in higher animals. REMS is a unique phenomenon that unlike other sleep-waking states is not under voluntary control. Directly or indirectly it influences or gets influenced by most of the physiological processes controlled by the brain. It has been proposed that REMS serves housekeeping function of the brain. Extensive research has shown that during REMS at least noradrenaline (NA) -ergic neurons must cease activity and upon REMS loss, there are increased levels of NA in the brain, which then induces many of the REMS loss associated acute and chronic effects. The NA level is controlled by many bio-molecules that are regulated at the molecular and transcriptional levels. Similarly, NA can also directly or indirectly modulate the synthesis and levels of many molecules, which in turn may affect physiological processes. The burgeoning field of behavioral neuroepigenetics has gained importance in recent years and explains the regulatory mechanisms underlying several behavioral phenomena. As REMS and its loss associated changes in NA modulate several pathophysiological processes, in this review we have attempted to explain on one hand how the epigenetic mechanisms regulating the gene expression of factors like tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), monoamine oxidase (MAO), noradrenaline transporter (NAT) control NA levels and on the other hand, how NA per se can affect other molecules in neural circuitry at the epigenetic level resulting in behavioral changes in health and diseases. An understanding of these events will expose the molecular basis of REMS and its loss-associated pathophysiological changes; which are presented as a testable hypothesis for confirmation. PMID:26813120

  4. The lateral line confers evolutionarily derived sleep loss in the Mexican cavefish.

    PubMed

    Jaggard, James; Robinson, Beatriz G; Stahl, Bethany A; Oh, Ian; Masek, Pavel; Yoshizawa, Masato; Keene, Alex C

    2017-01-15

    Sleep is an essential behavior exhibited by nearly all animals, and disruption of this process is associated with an array of physiological and behavioral deficits. Sleep is defined by changes in sensory gating that reduce sensory input to the brain, but little is known about the neural basis for interactions between sleep and sensory processing. Blind Mexican cavefish comprise an extant surface dwelling form and 29 cave morphs that have independently evolved increased numbers of mechanoreceptive lateral line neuromasts and convergent evolution of sleep loss. Ablation of the lateral line enhanced sleep in the Pachón cavefish population, suggesting that heightened sensory input underlies evolutionarily derived sleep loss. Targeted lateral line ablation and behavioral analysis localized the wake-promoting neuromasts in Pachón cavefish to superficial neuromasts of the trunk and cranial regions. Strikingly, lateral line ablation did not affect sleep in four other cavefish populations, suggesting that distinct neural mechanisms regulate the evolution of sleep loss in independently derived cavefish populations. Cavefish are subject to seasonal changes in food availability, raising the possibility that sensory modulation of sleep is influenced by metabolic state. We found that starvation promotes sleep in Pachón cavefish, and is not enhanced by lateral line ablation, suggesting that functional interactions occur between sensory and metabolic regulation of sleep. Taken together, these findings support a model where sensory processing contributes to evolutionarily derived changes in sleep that are modulated in accordance with food availability.

  5. Chronic sleep loss during pregnancy as a determinant of stress: impact on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Palagini, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo; Banti, Susanna; Manconi, Mauro; Mauri, Mauro; Riemann, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    Short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and insomnia frequently characterize sleep in pregnancy during all three trimesters. We aimed: (i) to review the clinical evidence of the association between conditions of sleep loss during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes; and (ii) to discuss the potential pathophysiological mechanisms that may be involved. A systematic search of cross-sectional, longitudinal studies using Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO, and MeSH headings and key words for conditions of sleep loss such as 'insomnia', 'poor sleep quality', 'short sleep duration', and 'pregnancy outcome' was made for papers published between January 1, 1960 and July 2013. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria for sleep loss and pregnancy outcome: seven studies on prenatal depression, three on gestational diabetes, three on hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, six on length of labor/type of delivery, eight on preterm birth, and three on birth grow/birth weight. Two main results emerged: (i) conditions of chronic sleep loss are related to adverse pregnancy outcomes; and (ii) chronic sleep loss yields a stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and abnormal immune/inflammatory, reaction, which, in turn, influences pregnancy outcome negatively. Chronic sleep loss frequently characterizes sleep throughout the course of pregnancy and may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Common pathophysiological mechanisms emerged as being related to stress system activation. We propose that in accordance to the allostatic load hypothesis, chronic sleep loss during pregnancy may also be regarded as both a result of stress and a physiological stressor per se, leading to stress 'overload'. It may account for adverse pregnancy outcomes and somatic and mental disorders in pregnancy.

  6. Acute Vision Loss Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Antisdel, Jastin

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old female with a history of uterine cancer and Celiac and Raynaud's Disease presented to our institution with frequent migraines and nasal congestion. She underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and experienced acute unilateral vision loss postoperatively. Rapid recognition of the etiology and effective treatment are paramount given the permanent and irreversible vision loss that can result. Arterial vasospasm following FESS is rare. Patients with autoimmune diseases have perhaps an increased risk for vasospasm secondary to an increased vasoreactive profile. We present the first documented case of nitroglycerin sublingual therapy to successfully treat ophthalmic artery vasospasm following FESS. Nitroglycerin sublingual therapy is a promising treatment for ophthalmic vasospasm secondary to its ability to cross the blood-ocular barrier, its rapid onset of action, and its ability to promote relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. PMID:28286685

  7. The impact of sleep loss on hippocampal function

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep deprivation to impair memory consolidation and plasticity. In this review, we address these topics with a focus on the detrimental effects of post-learning sleep deprivation on memory consolidation. Obtaining adequate sleep is challenging in a society that values “work around the clock.” Therefore, the development of interventions to combat the negative cognitive effects of sleep deprivation is key. However, there are a limited number of therapeutics that are able to enhance cognition in the face of insufficient sleep. The identification of molecular pathways implicated in the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on memory could potentially yield new targets for the development of more effective drugs. PMID:24045505

  8. Does medically induced weight loss improve obstructive sleep apnoea in the obese: review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsson, E

    2011-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterized by repeated periods of breathing cessation during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnoea is both common and underdiagnosed in the obese. A recent study found that as many as 86% of older obese type 2 diabetics had obstructive sleep apnoea. Obesity is independently associated with developing obstructive sleep apnoea, and the reverse may also occur. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea is therefore expected to rise in the wake of the obesity epidemic. The number of partial (hypopnoea) or complete (apnoea) airway obstructions per hour (apnoea-hypopnoea index) is used to classify obstructive sleep apnoea as mild (5-14 events per hour), moderate (15-30) or severe (>30). Severe obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with a two to sixfold increase in all-cause mortality; the impact of mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnoea is less clear. Until recently, the evidence supporting a beneficial effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnoea has been limited by a lack of randomized trials. In 2009, at least three randomized controlled trials evaluated whether medically induced weight loss improves obstructive sleep apnoea. The treatment effect ranged from 42% to 62% improvement, although the highest estimate was seen in a very short duration study (9 weeks). Patients who either lost 10-15 kg or more, or had severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline, benefited most from treatment.

  9. Acute Heroin Abstinence in Man. 1. Changes in Behavior and Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    112. 17 D. C. Kay, R. B. Eisenstein and D. R. Jasinski, Morphine effects on human REM state, waking state, and NREM sleep . Psychopharmacologia, 14...recording days. The EEG state data showed an increase in waking and decrease in both slow wave and REM sleep during acute heroin withdrawal. Total sleep ...was maximally suppressed on withdrawal days 2 and 3 and was still below normal control values on with- drawal days 5 - 7. REM sleep was more

  10. Relationship Between Sleep Quality and Quantity and Weight Loss in Women Participating in a Weight-Loss Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia A.; Morrow, Kelly L.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Perfect, Michelle M.; Ravia, Jennifer J.; Sherwood, Nancy E.; Karanja, Njeri; Rock, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals who report fewer total hours of sleep are more likely to be overweight or obese. Few studies have prospectively evaluated weight-loss success in relation to reported sleep quality and quantity. This analysis sought to determine the association between sleep characteristics and weight loss in overweight or obese women enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a weight-loss program. We hypothesized that in overweight/obese women, significant weight loss would be demonstrated more frequently in women who report a better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) Global Score or sleep >7 h/night as compared to women who report a worse PSQI score or sleep ≤7 h/night. Women of ages 45.5 ± 10.4 (mean ± SD) years and BMI of 33.9 ± 3.3 (n = 245) were randomized and completed PSQI at baseline and 6 months; 198 had weight change assessed through 24 months. At baseline, 52.7% reported PSQI scores above the clinical cutoff of 5. Better subjective sleep quality increased the likelihood of weight-loss success by 33% (relative risk (RR), 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.86), as did sleeping >7 h/night. A worse Global Score at 6 months was associated with a 28% lower likelihood of continued successful weight loss at 18 months, but unassociated by 24 months. These results suggest that sleep quality and quantity may contribute to weight loss in intervention-based studies designed to promote weight control in overweight/obese adult women. PMID:22402738

  11. Cross-Translational Studies in Human and Drosophila Identify Markers of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Gottschalk, Laura; Toedebusch, Cristina; McLeland, Jennifer; Rechtschaffen, Allan; Gilliland-Roberts, Marcia; Duntley, Stephen P.; Shaw, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate sleep has become endemic, which imposes a substantial burden for public health and safety. At present, there are no objective tests to determine if an individual has gone without sleep for an extended period of time. Here we describe a novel approach that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of sleep to identify markers of sleep loss. To begin, we demonstrate that IL-6 is increased in rats following chronic total sleep deprivation and in humans following 30 h of waking. Discovery experiments were then conducted on saliva taken from sleep-deprived human subjects to identify candidate markers. Given the relationship between sleep and immunity, we used Human Inflammation Low Density Arrays to screen saliva for novel markers of sleep deprivation. Integrin αM (ITGAM) and Anaxin A3 (AnxA3) were significantly elevated following 30 h of sleep loss. To confirm these results, we used QPCR to evaluate ITGAM and AnxA3 in independent samples collected after 24 h of waking; both transcripts were increased. The behavior of these markers was then evaluated further using the power of Drosophila genetics as a cost-effective means to determine whether the marker is associated with vulnerability to sleep loss or other confounding factors (e.g., stress). Transcript profiling in flies indicated that the Drosophila homologues of ITGAM were not predictive of sleep loss. Thus, we examined transcript levels of additional members of the integrin family in flies. Only transcript levels of scab, the Drosophila homologue of Integrin α5 (ITGA5), were associated with vulnerability to extended waking. Since ITGA5 was not included on the Low Density Array, we returned to human samples and found that ITGA5 transcript levels were increased following sleep deprivation. These cross-translational data indicate that fly and human discovery experiments are mutually reinforcing and can be used interchangeably to identify candidate biomarkers of sleep loss. PMID:23637783

  12. The Impact of Sleep Loss on Hippocampal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep…

  13. More Daytime Sleeping Predicts Less Functional Recovery Among Older People Undergoing Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Cathy A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Webber, Adam P.; Alam, Tarannum; Littner, Michael R.; Harker, Judith O.; Josephson, Karen R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study the association between sleep/wake patterns among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and their immediate and long-term functional recovery Design: Prospective, observational cohort study Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration) Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, N = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation Interventions: None Measurements and Results: Based on 7-day wrist actigraphy during the rehabilitation stay, mean nighttime percent sleep was only 52.2% and mean daytime percent sleep was 15.8% (16.3% based on structured behavioral observations). Using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), participants reported their sleep was worse during rehabilitation compared to their premorbid sleep. Functional recovery between admission and discharge from rehabilitation (measured by the motor component of the Functional Independence Measure) was not significantly associated with reported sleep quality (PSQI scores) or actigraphically measured nighttime sleep. However, more daytime percent sleep (estimated by actigraphy and observations) during the rehabilitation stay was associated with less functional recovery from admission to discharge, even after adjusting for other significant predictors of functional recovery (mental status, hours of rehabilitation therapy received, rehospitalization, and reason for admission; adjusted R2 = 0.267, P < 0.0001). More daytime sleeping during rehabilitation remained a significant predictor of less functional recovery in adjusted analyses at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: Sleep disturbance is common among older people undergoing inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. These data suggest that more daytime sleeping during the rehabilitation stay is associated with less functional recovery for up to three months after admission for rehabilitation. Citation: Alessi CA; Martin JL; Webber AP; Alam T

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Is a Regulator of Monocyte and Electroencephalographic Responses to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Clegern, William C.; Schmidt, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep loss triggers changes in inflammatory signaling pathways in the brain and periphery. The mechanisms that underlie these changes are ill-defined. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activates inflammatory signaling cascades in response to endogenous and pathogen-associated ligands known to be elevated in association with sleep loss. TLR4 is therefore a possible mediator of some of the inflammation-related effects of sleep loss. Here we describe the baseline electroencephalographic sleep phenotype and the biochemical and electroencephalographic responses to sleep loss in TLR4-deficient mice. Design, Measurements and Results: TLR4-deficient mice and wild type controls were subjected to electroencephalographic and electromyographic recordings during spontaneous sleep/wake cycles and during and after sleep restriction sessions of 3, 6, and 24-h duration, during which sleep was disrupted by an automated sleep restriction system. Relative to wild type control mice, TLR4-deficient mice exhibited an increase in the duration of the primary daily waking bout occurring at dark onset in a light/dark cycle. The amount of time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep by TLR4-deficient mice was reduced in proportion to increased wakefulness in the hours immediately after dark onset. Subsequent to sleep restriction, EEG measures of increased sleep drive were attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. TLR4 was enriched 10-fold in brain cells positive for the cell surface marker CD11b (cells of the monocyte lineage) relative to CD11b-negative cells in wild type mouse brains. To assess whether this population was affected selectively by TLR4 knockout, flow cytometry was used to count F4/80- and CD45-positive cells in the brains of sleep deprived and time of day control mice. While wild-type mice exhibited a significant reduction in the number of CD11b-positive cells in the brain after 24-h sleep restriction, TLR4-deficient mice did not. Conclusion

  15. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  16. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Abnormalities in Children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS)

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Thomas; Buckley, Ashura; Hommer, Rebecca; Grant, Paul; Williams, Kyle; Leckman, James F.; Swedo, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Polysomnographic investigation of sleep architecture in children presenting with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Fifteen consecutive subjects meeting criteria for PANS (mean age = 7.2 y; range 3–10 y) underwent single-night full polysomnography (PSG) read by a pediatric neurologist. Results: Thirteen of 15 subjects (87%) had abnormalities detected with PSG. Twelve of 15 had evidence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep motor disinhibition, as characterized by excessive movement, laughing, hand stereotypies, moaning, or the continuation of periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) into REM sleep. Conclusions: This study shows various forms of REM sleep motor disinhibition present in a population of children with PANS. Citation: Gaughan T, Buckley A, Hommer R, Grant P; Williams K, Leckman JF, Swedo SE. Rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities in children with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1027–1032. PMID:27166296

  17. Effects of acute sleep deprivation on motor and reversal learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Kang, Mihwa; Ramesh, Priyanka V; Klann, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Sleep supports the formation of a variety of declarative and non-declarative memories, and sleep deprivation often impairs these types of memories. In human subjects, natural sleep either during a nap or overnight leads to long-lasting improvements in visuomotor and fine motor tasks, but rodent models recapitulating these findings have been scarce. Here we present evidence that 5h of acute sleep deprivation impairs mouse skilled reach learning compared to a matched period of ad libitum sleep. In sleeping mice, the duration of total sleep time during the 5h of sleep opportunity or during the first bout of sleep did not correlate with ultimate gain in motor performance. In addition, we observed that reversal learning during the skilled reaching task was also affected by sleep deprivation. Consistent with this observation, 5h of sleep deprivation also impaired reversal learning in the water-based Y-maze. In conclusion, acute sleep deprivation negatively impacts subsequent motor and reversal learning and memory.

  18. Sleep Loss and the Inflammatory Response in Mice Under Chronic Environmental Circadian Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Natarajan, Divya; Delisser, Patrick; Davidson, Alec J.; Paul, Ketema N.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work and trans-time zone travel lead to insufficient sleep and numerous pathologies. Here, we examined sleep/wake dynamics during chronic exposure to environmental circadian disruption (ECD), and if chronic partial sleep loss associated with ECD influences the induction of shift-related inflammatory disorder. Sleep and wakefulness were telemetrically recorded across three months of ECD, in which the dark-phase of a light-dark cycle was advanced weekly by 6 h. A three month regimen of ECD caused a temporary reorganization of sleep (NREM and REM) and wake processes across each week, resulting in an approximately 10% net loss of sleep each week relative to baseline levels. A separate group of mice were subjected to ECD or a regimen of imposed wakefulness (IW) aimed to mimic sleep amounts under ECD for one month. Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) was quantified in sleep-wake regulatory areas: the nucleus accumbens (NAc), basal forebrain (BF), and medial preoptic area (MnPO). To assess the inflammatory response, trunk blood was treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent release of IL-6 was measured. Fos-IR was greatest in the NAc, BF, and MnPO of mice subjected to IW. The inflammatory response to LPS was elevated in mice subjected to ECD, but not mice subjected to IW. Thus, the net sleep loss that occurs under ECD is not associated with a pathological immune response. PMID:23696854

  19. Sleep-related headaches.

    PubMed

    Rains, Jeanetta C; Poceta, J Steven

    2012-11-01

    Irrespective of diagnosis, chronic daily, morning, or "awakening" headache patterns are soft signs of a sleep disorder. Sleep apnea headache may emerge de novo or may present as an exacerbation of cluster, migraine, tension-type, or other headache. Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder in chronic migraine and tension-type headache, and increases risk for depression and anxiety. Sleep disturbance (e.g., sleep loss, oversleeping, schedule shift) is an acute headache trigger for migraine and tension-type headache. Snoring and sleep disturbance are independent risk factors for progression from episodic to chronic headache.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Age-Related Sleep Loss in the Fruit Fly

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meagan; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Across phyla, aging is associated with reduced sleep duration and efficiency. Both aging and sleep involve complex genetic architecture and diverse cell types and are heavily influenced by diet and environment. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms of age-dependent changes in sleep will require integrative approaches that go beyond examining these two processes independently. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides a genetically amenable system for dissecting the molecular basis of these processes. In this review, we examine the role of metabolism and circadian rhythms in age-dependent sleep loss. PMID:23594925

  1. Associations between sleep loss and increased risk of obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristen L; Van Cauter, Eve

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades, sleep curtailment has become a very common in industrialized countries. This trend for shorter sleep duration has developed over the same time period as the dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Evidence is rapidly accumulating to indicate that chronic partial sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity and diabetes. Laboratory studies in healthy volunteers have shown that experimental sleep restriction is associated with an adverse impact on glucose homeostasis. Insulin sensitivity decreases rapidly and markedly without adequate compensation in beta cell function, resulting in an elevated risk of diabetes. Prospective epidemiologic studies in both children and adults are consistent with a causative role of short sleep in the increased risk of diabetes. Sleep curtailment is also associated with a dysregulation of the neuroendocrine control of appetite, with a reduction of the satiety factor, leptin, and an increase in the hunger-promoting hormone, ghrelin. Thus, sleep loss may alter the ability of leptin and ghrelin to accurately signal caloric need, acting in concert to produce an internal misperception of insufficient energy availability. The adverse impact of sleep deprivation on appetite regulation is likely to be driven by increased activity in neuronal populations expressing the excitatory peptides orexins that promote both waking and feeding. Consistent with the laboratory evidence, multiple epidemiologic studies have shown an association between short sleep and higher body mass index after controlling for a variety of possible confounders.

  2. Associations between sleep loss and increased risk of obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Kristen L.; Van Cauter, Eve

    2015-01-01

    During the past few decades, sleep curtailment has become a very common behavior in industrialized countries. This trend for shorter sleep duration has developed over the same time period as the dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. There is rapidly accumulating evidence to indicate that chronic partial sleep loss may increase the risk of obesity and diabetes. Laboratory studies in healthy volunteers have shown that experimental sleep restriction is associated with an adverse impact on glucose homeostasis. Insulin sensitivity decreases rapidly and markedly without adequate compensation in beta cell function, resulting in an elevated risk of diabetes. Prospective epidemiologic studies in both children and adults are consistent with a causative role of short sleep in the increased risk of diabetes. Sleep curtailment is also associated with a dysregulation of the neuroendocrine control of appetite, with a reduction of the satiety factor leptin and an increase in the hunger-promoting hormone ghrelin. Thus, sleep loss may alter the ability of leptin and ghrelin to accurately signal caloric need, acting in concert to produce an internal misperception of insufficient energy availability. The adverse impact of sleep deprivation on appetite regulation is likely to be driven by increased activity in neuronal populations expressing the excitatory peptides orexins that promote both waling and feeding. Consistent with the laboratory evidence, multiple epidemiologic studies have shown an association between short sleep and higher body mass index after controlling for a variety of possible confounders. PMID:18591489

  3. Effects of sleep loss on emotion recognition: a dissociation between face and word stimuli.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Lisa; Martella, Diana; Marotta, Andrea; Sebastiani, Mara; Banaj, Nerisa; Fuentes, Luis J; Casagrande, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Short-term sleep deprivation, or extended wakefulness, adversely affects cognitive functions and behavior. However, scarce research has addressed the effects of sleep deprivation (SD) on emotional processing. In this study, we investigated the impact of reduced vigilance due to moderate sleep deprivation on the ability to recognize emotional expressions of faces and emotional content of words. Participants remained awake for 24 h and performed the tasks in two sessions, one in which they were not affected by sleep loss (baseline; BSL), and other affected by SD, according to a counterbalanced sequence. Tasks were carried out twice at 10:00 and 4:00 am, or at 12:00 and 6:00 am. In both tasks, participants had to respond to the emotional valence of the target stimulus: negative, positive, or neutral. The results showed that in the word task, sleep deprivation impaired recognition irrespective of the emotional valence of words. However, sleep deprivation impaired recognition of emotional face expressions mainly when they showed a neutral expression. Emotional face expressions were less affected by the sleep loss, but positive faces were more resistant than negative faces to the detrimental effect of sleep deprivation. The differential effects of sleep deprivation on recognition of the different emotional stimuli are indicative of emotional facial expressions being stronger emotional stimuli than emotional laden words. This dissociation may be attributed to the more automatic sensory encoding of emotional facial content.

  4. One night of sleep loss impairs innovative thinking and flexible decision making.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Y; Horne, J A

    1999-05-01

    Recent findings with clinically oriented neuropsychological tests suggest that one night without sleep causes particular impairment to tasks requiring flexible thinking and the updating of plans in the light of new information. This relatively little investigated field of sleep deprivation research has real-world implications for decision makers having lost a night's sleep. To explore this latter perspective further, we adapted a dynamic and realistic marketing decision making "game" embodying the need for these skills, and whereby such performance could be measured. As the task relied on the comprehension of a large amount of written information, a critical reasoning test was also administered to ascertain whether any failure at the marketing game might lie with information acquisition rather than with failures in decision making. Ten healthy highly motivated and trained participants underwent two counterbalanced 36 h trials, sleep vs no sleep. The critical reasoning task was unaffected by sleep loss, whereas performance at the game significantly deteri orated after 32-36 h of sleep loss, when sleep deprivation led to more rigid thinking, increased perseverative errors, and marked difficulty in appreciating an updated situation. At this point, and despite the sleep-deprived participants' best efforts to do well, their play collapsed, unlike that of the nonsleep-deprived participants. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Intact brown adipose tissue thermogenesis is required for restorative sleep responses after sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Kapás, Levente

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic signals related to feeding and body temperature regulation have profound effects on vigilance. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a key effector organ in the regulation of metabolism in several species, including rats and mice. Significant amounts of active BAT are also present throughout adulthood in humans. The metabolic activity of BAT is due to the tissue-specific presence of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1). To test the involvement of BAT thermogenesis in sleep regulation, we investigated the effects of two sleep-promoting stimuli in UCP-1-deficient mice. Sleep deprivation by gentle handling increased UCP-1 mRNA expression in BAT and elicited rebound increases in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and rapid-eye-movement sleep accompanied by elevated slow-wave activity of the electroencephalogram. The rebound sleep increases were significantly attenuated, by ~ 35-45%, in UCP-1-knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type (WT) mice with capsaicin-induced sensory denervation of the interscapular BAT pads showed similar impairments in restorative sleep responses after sleep deprivation, suggesting a role of neuronal sleep-promoting signaling from the BAT. Exposure of WT mice to 35 °C ambient temperature for 5 days led to increased sleep and body temperature and suppressed feeding and energy expenditure. Sleep increases in the warm environment were significantly suppressed, by ~ 50%, in UCP-1-KO animals while their food intake and energy expenditure did not differ from those of the WTs. These results suggest that the metabolic activity of the BAT plays a role in generating a metabolic environment that is permissive for optimal sleep. Impaired BAT function may be a common underlying cause of sleep insufficiency and metabolic disorders.

  6. Acute nicotine treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced learning and memory impairment in rat.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Helal, G; Alhaider, I A; Alzoubi, K H; Srivareerat, M; Tran, T T; Al-Rejaie, S S; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (SD) is implicated in impairment of spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). An increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by nonsmokers was observed during SD. Although nicotine treatment was reported to attenuate the impairment of learning and memory and LTP associated with several mental disorders, the effect of nicotine on SD-induced learning and memory impairment has not been studied. Modified multiple platform paradigm was used to induce SD for 24 or 48 h during which rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) twice a day. In the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, 24- or 48-h SD significantly impaired learning and short-term memory. In addition, extracellular recordings from CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus in urethane anesthetized rats showed a significant impairment of LTP after 24- and 48-h SD. Treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24 or 48 h did not enhance spatial learning and memory or affect magnitude of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. However, concurrent, acute treatment of rats with nicotine significantly attenuated SD-induced impairment of learning and STM and prevented SD-induced impairment of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. These results show that acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of sleep loss on cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity.

  7. Homer1a is a core brain molecular correlate of sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Maret, Stéphanie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Gurcel, Laure; Pradervand, Sylvain; Petit, Brice; Pfister, Corinne; Hagenbuchle, Otto; O'Hara, Bruce F; Franken, Paul; Tafti, Mehdi

    2007-12-11

    Sleep is regulated by a homeostatic process that determines its need and by a circadian process that determines its timing. By using sleep deprivation and transcriptome profiling in inbred mouse strains, we show that genetic background affects susceptibility to sleep loss at the transcriptional level in a tissue-dependent manner. In the brain, Homer1a expression best reflects the response to sleep loss. Time-course gene expression analysis suggests that 2,032 brain transcripts are under circadian control. However, only 391 remain rhythmic when mice are sleep-deprived at four time points around the clock, suggesting that most diurnal changes in gene transcription are, in fact, sleep-wake-dependent. By generating a transgenic mouse line, we show that in Homer1-expressing cells specifically, apart from Homer1a, three other activity-induced genes (Ptgs2, Jph3, and Nptx2) are overexpressed after sleep loss. All four genes play a role in recovery from glutamate-induced neuronal hyperactivity. The consistent activation of Homer1a suggests a role for sleep in intracellular calcium homeostasis for protecting and recovering from the neuronal activation imposed by wakefulness.

  8. Effects of acute administration of brotizolam in subjects with disturbed sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, T.; Zorick, F.; Koshorek, G. L.; Wittig, R.; Roth, T.

    1983-01-01

    1 Effects of ingestion of brotizolam (0.25 and 0.50 mg) over 1-3 days on polysomnographic measures of sleep were assessed in patients complaining of insomnia. 2 Brotizolam reduced latency to sleep, number of awakenings and wake during sleep, and increased total sleep time. It also increased stage 2 sleep and decreased slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. 3 Increasing the dose from 0.25 to 0.50 mg increased hypnotic efficacy, and there was a more consistent and reliable effect. 4 Discontinuation of brotizolam had minimal effects on sleep compared with placebo over the 3 nights after acute administration. 5 No side-effects or disruption of daytime function was found using questionnaires and objective tests of performance. PMID:6661383

  9. Changes in breathing and the pharynx after weight loss in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Suratt, P M; McTier, R F; Findley, L J; Pohl, S L; Wilhoit, S C

    1987-10-01

    The effect of weight loss following dietary restriction on disordered breathing on the pharyngeal airway is controversial in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We therefore prospectively studied eight patients before and after dietary-induced weight loss. Mean weight loss was 20.6 kg +/- 12.8 SD. After weight loss there were significant improvements in PO2 and PCO2 measured during wakefulness, and in the number of desaturation episodes per hour of sleep, average desaturation per episode, and number of movement arousals. The number of apneas and hypopneas significantly decreased in six of eight patients. There was a significant correlation between body mass index and number of disordered breathing events. Nasopharyngeal collapsibility and pulse flow resistance decreased in awake patients after weight loss. We conclude that moderate weight loss in obese patients with OSA improves oxygenation during both sleep and wakefulness, decreases the number of disordered breathing events in many patients, decreases the collapsibility of the nasopharyngeal airway.

  10. Polysomnographic measures of sleep in cocaine dependence and alcohol dependence: Implications for age‐related loss of slow wave, stage 3 sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F.; Olmstead, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and aims Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Design Cross‐sectional comparison. Setting Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA. Participants Abstinent cocaine‐dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol‐dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005–12. Measurements PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates included age, ethnicity, education, smoking, body mass index and depressive symptoms. Findings Compared with controls, both groups of substance dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep (P < 0.001). A substance dependence × age interaction was found in which both cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent groups showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than controls (P < 0.05 for all), and cocaine‐dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than alcoholics (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, REM sleep was increased in both substance‐dependent groups (P < 0.001), and cocaine and alcohol dependence were associated with earlier age‐related increase in REM sleep (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusions Cocaine and alcohol dependence appear to be associated with marked disturbances of sleep architecture, including increased rapid eye movement sleep and accelerated age‐related loss of slow wave, Stage 3 sleep. PMID:26749502

  11. Maternal Ube3a Loss Disrupts Sleep Homeostasis But Leaves Circadian Rhythmicity Largely Intact

    PubMed Central

    Ehlen, J. Christopher; Jones, Kelly A.; Pinckney, Lennisha; Gray, Cloe L.; Burette, Susan; Weinberg, Richard J.; Evans, Jennifer A.; Brager, Allison J.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS) suffer sleep disturbances that severely impair quality of life. Whether these disturbances arise from sleep or circadian clock dysfunction is currently unknown. Here, we explored the mechanistic basis for these sleep disorders in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome (Ube3am−/p+ mice). Genetic deletion of the maternal Ube3a allele practically eliminates UBE3A protein from the brain of Ube3am−/p+ mice, because the paternal allele is epigenetically silenced in most neurons. However, we found that UBE3A protein was present in many neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus—the site of the mammalian circadian clock—indicating that Ube3a can be expressed from both parental alleles in this brain region in adult mice. We found that while Ube3am−/p+ mice maintained relatively normal circadian rhythms of behavior and light-resetting, these mice exhibited consolidated locomotor activity and skipped the timed rest period (siesta) present in wild-type (Ube3am+/p+) mice. Electroencephalographic analysis revealed that alterations in sleep regulation were responsible for these overt changes in activity. Specifically, Ube3am−/p+ mice have a markedly reduced capacity to accumulate sleep pressure, both during their active period and in response to forced sleep deprivation. Thus, our data indicate that the siesta is governed by sleep pressure, and that Ube3a is an important regulator of sleep homeostasis. These preclinical findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that target mechanisms of sleep homeostasis may improve sleep quality in individuals with AS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of the UBE3A gene. Individuals with AS have severe sleep dysfunction that affects their cognition and presents challenges to their caregivers. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies have limited efficacy due to a poor understanding of the

  12. Circadian Misalignment Augments Markers of Insulin Resistance and Inflammation, Independently of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Leproult, Rachel; Holmbäck, Ulf; Van Cauter, Eve

    2014-01-01

    Shift workers, who are exposed to irregular sleep schedules resulting in sleep deprivation and misalignment of circadian rhythms, have an increased risk of diabetes relative to day workers. In healthy adults, sleep restriction without circadian misalignment promotes insulin resistance. To determine whether the misalignment of circadian rhythms that typically occurs in shift work involves intrinsic adverse metabolic effects independently of sleep loss, a parallel group design was used to study 26 healthy adults. Both interventions involved 3 inpatient days with 10-h bedtimes, followed by 8 inpatient days of sleep restriction to 5 h with fixed nocturnal bedtimes (circadian alignment) or with bedtimes delayed by 8.5 h on 4 of the 8 days (circadian misalignment). Daily total sleep time (SD) during the intervention was nearly identical in the aligned and misaligned conditions (4 h 48 min [5 min] vs. 4 h 45 min [6 min]). In both groups, insulin sensitivity (SI) significantly decreased after sleep restriction, without a compensatory increase in insulin secretion, and inflammation increased. In male participants exposed to circadian misalignment, the reduction in SI and the increase in inflammation both doubled compared with those who maintained regular nocturnal bedtimes. Circadian misalignment that occurs in shift work may increase diabetes risk and inflammation, independently of sleep loss. PMID:24458353

  13. Sleep Loss and Cytokines Levels in an Experimental Model of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Camila; Rydlewski, Mariana; Araújo, Mariana Silva; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2012-01-01

    Up to 80% of people develop a cutaneous condition closely connected to their exposure to stressful life events. Psoriasis is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disorder with multifactorial etiology, including genetic background, environmental factors, and immune system disturbances with a strong cytokine component. Moreover, psoriasis is variably associated with sleep disturbance and sleep deprivation. This study evaluated the influence of sleep loss in the context of an animal model of psoriasis by measuring cytokine and stress-related hormone levels. Male adult Balb/C mice with or without psoriasis were subjected to 48 h of selective paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD). Sleep deprivation potentiated the activities of kallikrein-5 and kallikrein-7 in the skin of psoriatic groups. Also, mice with psoriasis had significant increases in specific pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12) and decreases in the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) after PSD, which were normalized after 48 h of sleep rebound. Linear regression showed that IL-2, IL-6 and IL-12 levels predicted 66% of corticosterone levels, which were selectively increased in psoriasis mice subject to PSD. Kallikrein-5 was also correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, explaining 58% of IL-6 and IL-12 variability. These data suggest that sleep deprivation plays an important role in the exacerbation of psoriasis through modulation of the immune system in the epidermal barrier. Thus, sleep loss should be considered a risk factor for the development of psoriasis. PMID:23226485

  14. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  15. Sleep Loss and Its Effects on Health of Family Caregivers of Individuals with Primary Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shih-Yu; Clark, Patricia C.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep loss places caregivers at risk for poor health. Understanding correlates of sleep loss and relationships to health may enable improvement of health of caregivers of individuals with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBT). In this cross-sectional, descriptive study of 133 caregivers, relationships were examined between sleep loss and physical, mental, emotional, and social health at time of patient diagnosis. Sleep loss was not related to physical health. Shorter total sleep time was associated with greater fatigue and social support. Sleep quality was positively associated with quality of life. Further study is needed of the role of sleep loss in the PMBT caregiving trajectory and its long-term relationship with health outcomes. PMID:23633116

  16. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  17. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.

  18. Tired and apprehensive: anxiety amplifies the impact of sleep loss on aversive brain anticipation.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Harvey, Allison G; Nitschke, Jack B; Walker, Matthew P

    2013-06-26

    Anticipation is an adaptive process, aiding preparatory responses to potentially threatening events. However, excessive anticipatory responding and associated hyper-reactivity in the amygdala and insula are integral to anxiety disorders. Despite the co-occurrence of sleep disruption and anxiety disorders, the impact of sleep loss on affective anticipatory brain mechanisms, and the interaction with anxiety, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sleep loss amplifies preemptive responding in the amygdala and anterior insula during affective anticipation in humans, especially for cues with high predictive certainty. Furthermore, trait anxiety significantly determined the degree of such neural vulnerability to sleep loss: individuals with highest trait anxiety showed the greatest increase in anticipatory insula activity when sleep deprived. Together, these data support a neuropathological model in which sleep disruption may contribute to the maintenance and/or exacerbation of anxiety through its impact on anticipatory brain function. They further raise the therapeutic possibility that targeted sleep restoration in anxiety may ameliorate excessive anticipatory responding and associated clinical symptomatology.

  19. Homer1a is a core brain molecular correlate of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Stéphanie; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Gurcel, Laure; Pradervand, Sylvain; Petit, Brice; Pfister, Corinne; Hagenbuchle, Otto; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Franken, Paul; Tafti, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by a homeostatic process that determines its need and by a circadian process that determines its timing. By using sleep deprivation and transcriptome profiling in inbred mouse strains, we show that genetic background affects susceptibility to sleep loss at the transcriptional level in a tissue-dependent manner. In the brain, Homer1a expression best reflects the response to sleep loss. Time-course gene expression analysis suggests that 2,032 brain transcripts are under circadian control. However, only 391 remain rhythmic when mice are sleep-deprived at four time points around the clock, suggesting that most diurnal changes in gene transcription are, in fact, sleep–wake-dependent. By generating a transgenic mouse line, we show that in Homer1-expressing cells specifically, apart from Homer1a, three other activity-induced genes (Ptgs2, Jph3, and Nptx2) are overexpressed after sleep loss. All four genes play a role in recovery from glutamate-induced neuronal hyperactivity. The consistent activation of Homer1a suggests a role for sleep in intracellular calcium homeostasis for protecting and recovering from the neuronal activation imposed by wakefulness. PMID:18077435

  20. Tired and Apprehensive: Anxiety Amplifies the Impact of Sleep Loss on Aversive Brain Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Andrea N.; Greer, Stephanie M.; Saletin, Jared M.; Harvey, Allison G.; Nitschke, Jack B.

    2013-01-01

    Anticipation is an adaptive process, aiding preparatory responses to potentially threatening events. However, excessive anticipatory responding and associated hyper-reactivity in the amygdala and insula are integral to anxiety disorders. Despite the co-occurrence of sleep disruption and anxiety disorders, the impact of sleep loss on affective anticipatory brain mechanisms, and the interaction with anxiety, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sleep loss amplifies preemptive responding in the amygdala and anterior insula during affective anticipation in humans, especially for cues with high predictive certainty. Furthermore, trait anxiety significantly determined the degree of such neural vulnerability to sleep loss: individuals with highest trait anxiety showed the greatest increase in anticipatory insula activity when sleep deprived. Together, these data support a neuropathological model in which sleep disruption may contribute to the maintenance and/or exacerbation of anxiety through its impact on anticipatory brain function. They further raise the therapeutic possibility that targeted sleep restoration in anxiety may ameliorate excessive anticipatory responding and associated clinical symptomatology. PMID:23804084

  1. Loss of polyubiquitin gene Ubb leads to metabolic and sleep abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, K.-Y.; Fujiki, N.; Kazantzis, M.; Garza, J. C.; Bouley, D. M.; Stahl, A.; Lu, X.-Y.; Nishino, S.; Kopito, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Ubiquitin performs essential roles in a myriad of signalling pathways required for cellular function and survival. Recently, we reported that disruption of the stress-inducible ubiquitin-encoding gene Ubb reduces ubiquitin content in the hypothalamus and leads to adult-onset obesity coupled with a loss of arcuate nucleus neurones and disrupted energy homeostasis in mice. Neuropeptides expressed in the hypothalamus control both metabolic and sleep behaviours. In order to demonstrate that the loss of Ubb results in broad hypothalamic abnormalities, we attempted to determine whether metabolic and sleep behaviours were altered in Ubb knockout mice. Methods Metabolic rate and energy expenditure were measured in a metabolic chamber, and sleep stage was monitored via electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording. The presence of neurodegeneration and increased reactive gliosis in the hypothalamus were also evaluated. Results We found that Ubb disruption leads to early-onset reduced activity and metabolic rate. Additionally, we have demonstrated that sleep behaviour is altered and sleep homeostasis is disrupted in Ubb knockout mice. These early metabolic and sleep abnormalities are accompanied by persistent reactive gliosis and the loss of arcuate nucleus neurones, but are independent of neurodegeneration in the lateral hypothalamus. Conclusions Ubb knockout mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with hypothalamic dysfunction. Our data also indicate that Ubb is essential for the maintenance of the ubiquitin levels required for proper regulation of metabolic and sleep behaviours in mice. PMID:20002312

  2. Nonapnea Sleep Disorders and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Chang, Kai-Ting; Chang, Yu-Han; Lu, Tzongshi; Liang, Chan-Jung; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Hung, Chi-Chih; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Lin, Chang-Shen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonapnea sleep disorders (NASDs) and associated problems, which are highly prevalent in patients with kidney diseases, are associated with unfavorable medical sequelae. Nonetheless, whether NASDs are associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) development has not been thoroughly analyzed. We examined the association between NASD and AKI. We conducted a population-based study by using 1,000,000 representative data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the period from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. We studied the incidence and risk of AKI in 9178 newly diagnosed NASD patients compared with 27,534 people without NASD matched according to age, sex, index year, urbanization level, region of residence, and monthly income at a 1:3 ratio. The NASD cohort had an adjusted hazard ratio (hazard ratio [HR]; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–2.63) of subsequent AKI 1.74-fold higher than that of the control cohort. Older age and type 2 diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with an increased risk of AKI (P < 0.05). Among different types of NASDs, patients with insomnia had a 120% increased risk of developing AKI (95% CI = 1.38–3.51; P = 0.001), whereas patients with other sleep disorders had a 127% increased risk of subsequent AKI (95% CI = 1.07–4.80; P = 0.033). Men with NASDs were at a high risk of AKI (P < 0.05). This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that patients with NASDs are at higher risk of developing AKI than people without NASDs. PMID:26986132

  3. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  4. The effects of an acute bout of sleep on running economy and VO2 max.

    PubMed

    Pierce, E F; McGowan, R W; Barkett, E; Fry, R W

    1993-04-01

    Synchronized human sleep has been shown to decrease activation of the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in reduced levels of oxygen consumption. This is in direct conflict with sympathetic arousal, which coincides with the initiation of exercise. Although a considerable body of research has investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on exercise performance, the effects of an acute bout of sleep on exercise response have not been previously reported. This question appears relevant considering the occurrence of acute sleep bouts among athletes competing in prolonged multi-event competition (e.g. swimming, track and field). To investigate the effects of an acute bout of sleep on submaximal (running economy) and maximal oxygen consumption, seven male volunteers participated in a continuous, progressive treadmill test to volitional exhaustion immediately following a 1-h bout of sleep (SB) or no sleep (Control). The subjects served as their own controls and the order of trials was randomized. A MANOVA with repeated measures indicated no difference between groups for running economy or VO2 (P < 0.05). However, a significant interaction effect was observed in which SB resulted in greater running economy (lower VO2) through the first two stages of the protocol, while the control treatment yielded a greater economy throughout the remaining stages. While the implications of the findings are uncertain, they may indicate differences in psychological arousal or anxiety as a result of treatments or the possibility of a delayed sympathetic arousal in the early stages of exercise following sleep.

  5. Sleep on the job partially compensates for sleep loss in night-shift nurses.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Silva, Flaviany; Rotenberg, Lucia; Soares, Renata Elisa; Pessanha, Joseane; Ferreira, Flavia Leticia; Oliveira, Paula; Silva-Costa, Aline; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amelia

    2006-01-01

    Nursing personnel in Brazil are usually submitted to fixed 12 h shifts with no consecutive working days or nights. Moonlighting is common in this group, with a consequent increase in the number of working hours. The possibility of sleeping on the job during the night shift in the studied hospitals had already been described. The present study aims to analyze whether the time devoted to daily activities (sleep, rest, leisure, housework, commuting, personal needs, care of children or other people, non-paid work, and study) is related to the number of worked hours and to nap-taking during the night shift. The field study took place at two public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Workers filled out a structured form on time devoted to the above-mentioned activities for at least four consecutive days. The time devoted to sleep was analyzed according to its occurrence at home or on the job. Workers were classified according to the number of jobs (one job/two jobs) and the time dedicated to work according to the median of the whole series (below the median/above the median). All workers who had at least one working night were analyzed as to nap-taking on the job. They were classified according to the sleep occurrence during the night shift-the sleep group and the non-sleep group, both of which were compared to daytime workers. Statistical treatment of data included non-parametrical procedures. The study group comprised 144 workers (mean age: 35.7+/-10.5 years old; 91% women; 78% nurse assistants, the remainder registered nurses). They recorded their daily activities for 4-11 days; 829 cumulative days were analyzed for the whole group. A total of 165 working nights were analyzed; sleep or rest occurred during 112 (68%) of them, with mean sleep/rest duration of 141+/-86 min. Time devoted to sleep and leisure varied according to the number of working hours, being significantly reduced in those submitted to longer work hours (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Results

  6. Acute physical exercise under hypoxia improves sleep, mood and reaction time.

    PubMed

    de Aquino-Lemos, Valdir; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner T; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lira, Fabio S; Luz Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak performed under hypoxia (equivalent to an altitude of 4500 m for 28 h) on sleep, mood and reaction time. Forty healthy men were randomized into 4 groups: Normoxia (NG) (n = 10); Hypoxia (HG) (n = 10); Exercise under Normoxia (ENG) (n = 10); and Exercise under Hypoxia (EHG) (n = 10). All mood and reaction time assessments were performed 40 min after awakening. Sleep was reassessed on the first day at 14 h after the initiation of hypoxia; mood and reaction time were measured 28 h later. Two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak were performed for 60 min on the first and second days after 3 and 27 h, respectively, after starting to hypoxia. Improved sleep efficiency, stage N3 and REM sleep and reduced wake after sleep onset were observed under hypoxia after acute physical exercise. Tension, anger, depressed mood, vigor and reaction time scores improved after exercise under hypoxia. We conclude that hypoxia impairs sleep, reaction time and mood. Acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak under hypoxia improves sleep efficiency, reversing the aspects that had been adversely affected under hypoxia, possibly contributing to improved mood and reaction time.

  7. Sleep Is Increased By Weight Gain and Decreased By Weight Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhiwei; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Fang, Jidong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether weight loss could reverse excessive sleep in high-fat diet-induced obesity. Design: Three groups of mice participated in the study. A weight gain/loss group was fed with high-fat food for 6 weeks (weight gain), and regular food again for 4 weeks (weight loss). A control group and a weight gain only group were fed with regular food and high-fat food, respectively, for 10 weeks after the baseline. Participants: Adult male C57BL/6 mice. Measurements: The amounts of wake, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REM sleep (NREMS) were determined at week 0 (baseline), week 6, and week 10. Results: The weight gain/loss group displayed a significant decrease in wakefulness and increases in NREMS and episodes of NREMS during 6 weeks of weight gain, which were reversed during subsequent 4 weeks of weight loss. The weight gain only group displayed significant decrease in wakefulness and increase of NREMS and REMS at both week 6 and week 10. The control group did not show significant sleep alterations during the experiment. Conclusion: These observations indicate that sleep alterations induced by weight gain are reversed by weight loss in obese animals. These data may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the well-established association between obesity and sleepiness in humans and may lead to new therapeutic strategies for these 2 increasingly prevalent problems in the modern societies. Citation: Guan Z; Vgontzas AN; Bixler EO; Fang J. Sleep is increased by weight gain and decreased by weight loss in mice. SLEEP 2008;31(5):627-633. PMID:18517033

  8. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF POOR SLEEP AFTER INPATIENT POST-ACUTE REHABILITATION: THE ROLE OF DEPRESSION AND PRE-ILLNESS SLEEP QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the unique impact of poor sleep and symptoms of depression on sleep quality for up to one year after inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Two in-patient post-acute rehabilitation facilities Participants 245 individuals over age 65 years (mean age=80 years, 38% female) Interventions None. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) during the post-acute care stay twice to evaluate pre-illness sleep quality and sleep quality during the post-acute care stay, and again at 3, 6, 9 and 12-months follow-up. Demographics, symptoms of depression, cognitive functioning, and comorbidities were also assessed. Results Across time points, sleep was significantly disturbed for many individuals. Nested regression models predicting PSQI total score at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months showed that variables entered in Block 1 (age, gender, cognitive functioning and comorbidities) were significant predictors of poor sleep at 6-months, but not at 3, 9 or 12 months follow-up. Depression (Block 2) and pre-illness PSQI total score (Block 3) were significant predictors of PSQI total score at all follow-up time points. PSQI total score during post-acute care (Block 4) explained a significant proportion of variance only at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study confirms that chronic poor sleep is common among older adults during post-acute rehabilitation, and resolution of sleep disturbance after acute health events may be a lengthy process. Our findings expand understanding of the role of depressive symptoms and pre-existing sleep complaints in predicting poor sleep over time among these vulnerable older adults. PMID:22617164

  9. Upregulation of Gene Expression in Reward-Modulatory Striatal Opioid Systems by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity ‘epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food ‘snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding. PMID:23864029

  10. Upregulation of gene expression in reward-modulatory striatal opioid systems by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity 'epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food 'snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding.

  11. Chemogenetic inhibition of the medial prefrontal cortex reverses the effects of REM sleep loss on sucrose consumption.

    PubMed

    McEown, Kristopher; Takata, Yohko; Cherasse, Yoan; Nagata, Nanae; Aritake, Kosuke; Lazarus, Michael

    2016-12-06

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep loss is associated with increased consumption of weight-promoting foods. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to mediate reward anticipation. However, the precise role of the PFC in mediating reward responses to highly palatable foods (HPF) after REM sleep deprivation is unclear. We selectively reduced REM sleep in mice over a 25-48 hr period and chemogenetically inhibited the medial PFC (mPFC) by using an altered glutamate-gated and ivermectin-gated chloride channel that facilitated neuronal inhibition through hyperpolarizing infected neurons. HPF consumption was measured while the mPFC was inactivated and REM sleep loss was induced. We found that REM sleep loss increased HPF consumption compared to control animals. However, mPFC inactivation reversed the effect of REM sleep loss on sucrose consumption without affecting fat consumption. Our findings provide, for the first time, a causal link between REM sleep, mPFC function and HPF consumption.

  12. Is a purpose of REM sleep atonia to help regenerate intervertebral disc volumetric loss?

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Jerome CJ

    2009-01-01

    The nature of atonia in sleep continues to be enigmatic. This article discusses a new hypothesis for complete core muscle relaxation in REM sleep, suggesting a bottom-up recuperative perspective. That is, does the atonia in REM sleep provide a utility to help restore the mechanobiology and respective diurnal intervertebral disc hydraulic loss? By combining the effects of gravity with current compressive concepts in spinal stability, this article looks at vertebral approximation as a deleterious experience with an intrinsic biological need to keep vertebrae separated. Methods using polysomnography and recumbent MRI are discussed. PMID:19123938

  13. Eating behavior traits and sleep as determinants of weight loss in overweight and obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, M-L; Chaput, J-P; Drapeau, V; Tremblay, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations between eating behavior traits and weight loss according to sleep quality and duration in adults enrolled in common weight-loss interventions. Methods: Participants included overweight and obese men and women (n=150) (mean±s.d. age, 38.8±8.6 years; mean±s.d. body mass index (BMI), 33.3±3.5 kg m−2) who were subjected to a dietary intervention over a period of 12–16 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, eating behavior traits (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire), sleep quality (total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score) and sleep duration (hours per night, self-reported from the PSQI) were assessed at both baseline and post intervention. Linear regression analysis was used to quantify the relationships between eating behavior traits and changes in anthropometric markers for all subjects and by sleep categories (short sleep: <7 h per night vs recommended sleep: ⩾7 h per night; poor sleep quality: ⩾5 PSQI score vs good sleep quality: <5 PSQI score). We adjusted for age, sex and baseline BMI in analyses. Results: Baseline eating behavior traits were modest predictors of weight-loss success, but they were all significantly associated with their changes over the weight-loss intervention (P<0.01). The diet intervention induced significant changes in eating behavior traits and even more for those having a non-favorable eating behavior profile at baseline. We observed that changes in flexible control and strategic dieting behavior were constantly negatively associated with changes in body weight and fat mass (P<0.05) for recommended duration sleepers. The change in situational susceptibility to disinhibition was positively associated with the change in fat mass and body weight for those having healthy sleeping habits (P<0.05). For poor quality sleepers, the change in avoidance of fattening foods was negatively associated with changes in adiposity (P<0.05). Conclusion: Eating behavior traits and sleep may act

  14. Effect of Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmandi, Mohammad; Neiseh, Fatemeh; SadeghiShermeh, Mehdi; Ebadi, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep is one of the basic human needs and sleep deprivation causes nu-merous adverse effects on the human body and mind. Due to reduced sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, this study was carried out to determine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Methods: In this two-group controlled clinical trial, sixty patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran in 2010 were selected by purposeful sampling method and randomly allocated to two groups of case and control. In the case group, in the second night stay, the intervention of eye mask was done per night and by using the Petersburg's sleep quality index; sleep quality was evaluated during and at the end of hospitalization. Then data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient and SPSS software version 19. Results: Total sleep quality score of the case group was significantly decreased after intervention (4.86 ± 1.88) from before intervention (10.46 ± 4.09) (p < 0.000). In addi-tion, total score of sleep quality after intervention in the case group (4.86 ± 1.88) was significant different from the control group (8.43 ± 1.97) (p < 0.005). Conclusion: Using eye mask, as an economical and uncomplicated method, can improve sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units and can be used as an alternative method of treatment instead of drug therapy. PMID:25276688

  15. Are parenting behaviors associated with child sleep problems during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Maria C; Bastiani, Jessica; Williams, Lauren K

    2016-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a recognized common side effect in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although associated with treatment factors such as hospitalization and corticosteroids, sleep problems may also be influenced by modifiable environmental factors such as parenting behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine sleep problems in children undergoing treatment for ALL compared to healthy children and whether parenting practices are associated with sleep difficulties. Parents of 73 children aged 2-6 years who were (1) in the maintenance phase of ALL treatment (ALL group, n = 43) or (2) had no major medical illness (healthy control group, n = 30) participated in the study. Parents completed questionnaires measuring their child's sleep behavior and their own parenting practices. Parents of children undergoing ALL treatment reported significantly more child sleep problems; 48% of children with ALL compared to 23% of healthy children had clinical levels of sleep disturbance. Parents of the ALL group also reported significantly more lax parenting practices and strategies associated with their child's sleep including co-sleeping, comforting activities, and offering food and drink in the bedroom. Results of multivariate regression analysis indicated that, after controlling for illness status, parent-child co-sleeping was significantly associated with child sleep difficulties. Strategies employed by parents during ALL treatment may be a potential modifiable intervention target that could result in improved child sleep behaviors. Future research aimed at developing and testing parenting interventions aimed to improve child sleep in the context of oncology treatment is warranted.

  16. Quantity and quality of nocturnal sleep affect morning glucose measurement in acutely burned children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Khoury, Jane; Simakajornboon, Narong; Kagan, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia after severe burn injury has long been recognized, whereas sleep deprivation after burns is a more recent finding. The postburn metabolic effects of poor sleep are not clear despite reports in other populations demonstrating the association between sleep insufficiency and deleterious endocrine consequences. The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship between sleep and glucose dynamics exists in acutely burned children. Two overnight polysomnography runs (2200 to 0600) per subject were conducted in 40 patients with a mean (± SEM) age of 9.4 ± 0.7 years, 50.1 ± 2.9% TBSA burn, and 43.2 ± 3.6% full-thickness injury. Serum glucose was drawn in the morning (0600) immediately after the sleep test. Insulin requirements during the 24-hour period preceding the 0600 glucose measurement were recorded. Generalized linear models were used by the authors to evaluate percent time in each stage of sleep, percent wake time, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and morning serum glucose, accounting for insulin use. Increased time awake (P = .04, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and reduced time spent in stage 1 sleep (P = .03, linear) were associated with higher glucose levels. Sleep efficiency (P = .01, linear; P = .02, quadratic) and total sleep time (P = .01 linear; P = .02, quadratic) were inversely associated with glucose level. Morning glucose levels appear to be affected by the quality and quantity of overnight sleep in children who have sustained extensive burn injuries. Future research is needed to elucidate the metabolic and neuroendocrine consequences of sleep deprivation on metabolism after burns.

  17. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection.

    PubMed

    Deliens, Gaétane; Stercq, Fanny; Mary, Alison; Slama, Hichem; Cleeremans, Axel; Peigneux, Philippe; Kissine, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15) or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15), participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1) sarcastic from both the participant's and the addressee's perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic), (2) sarcastic from the participant's but not from the addressee's perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm) or (3) sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant's and from the addressee's perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep deprivation might

  18. Impact of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Sarcasm Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Alison; Slama, Hichem; Cleeremans, Axel; Peigneux, Philippe; Kissine, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sleep plays a pivotal role on health, cognition and emotional regulation. However, the interplay between sleep and social cognition remains an uncharted research area. In particular, little is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on sarcasm detection, an ability which, once altered, may hamper everyday social interactions. The aim of this study is to determine whether sleep-deprived participants are as able as sleep-rested participants to adopt another perspective in gauging sarcastic statements. At 9am, after a whole night of sleep (n = 15) or a sleep deprivation night (n = 15), participants had to read the description of an event happening to a group of friends. An ambiguous voicemail message left by one of the friends on another's phone was then presented, and participants had to decide whether the recipient would perceive the message as sincere or as sarcastic. Messages were uttered with a neutral intonation and were either: (1) sarcastic from both the participant’s and the addressee’s perspectives (i.e. both had access to the relevant background knowledge to gauge the message as sarcastic), (2) sarcastic from the participant’s but not from the addressee’s perspective (i.e. the addressee lacked context knowledge to detect sarcasm) or (3) sincere. A fourth category consisted in messages sarcastic from both the participant’s and from the addressee’s perspective, uttered with a sarcastic tone. Although sleep-deprived participants were as accurate as sleep-rested participants in interpreting the voice message, they were also slower. Blunted reaction time was not fully explained by generalized cognitive slowing after sleep deprivation; rather, it could reflect a compensatory mechanism supporting normative accuracy level in sarcasm understanding. Introducing prosodic cues compensated for increased processing difficulties in sarcasm detection after sleep deprivation. Our findings support the hypothesis that sleep

  19. Bone Loss in Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, Marlene; Nasrallah, Mona; Chami, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. Methods: We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. Results: OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. Conclusion: There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. Citation: Chakhtoura M, Nasrallah M, Chami H. Bone loss in obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: a review of literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):575–580. PMID:25580607

  20. A User Oriented Review of the Literature on the Effects of Sleep Loss, Work-Rest Schedules, and Recovery on Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    to the recent NATO/AGARD AGARDOGRAPH No. 193, "The Operational Consequences of Sleep Deprivation and Sleep Deficit" by L. C. Johnson and P. Naitoh...with less effect than complete sleep deprivation . Recovery from sleep loss effects must be considered if sleep loss is experienced, but one would be...to learn new concepts after 24 Iýours or more of sleep deprivation . This may be a result of perceptual lapses, memory disturbances, low motivation, or

  1. Sleep Loss, Circadian Mismatch, and Abnormalities in Reorienting of Attention in Night Workers with Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Howard, Ryan; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Drake, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Permanent night-shift workers may develop shift-work disorder (SWD). In the current study, we evaluated neurophysiological and behavioral indices of distractibility across times prior to the night shift (T1), during night hours (T2), and after acute sleep deprivation (T3) in permanent hospital night workers with and without SWD. Methods: Ten asymptomatic night workers (NW) and 18 NW with SWD participated in a 25-h sleep deprivation study. Circadian phase was evaluated by dim-light salivary melatonin onset (DLMO). Objective sleepiness was evaluated using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Electrophysiological distractibility was evaluated by brain event-related potentials (ERP), whereas behavioral distractibility was evaluated by performance on a visual task in an auditory-visual distraction paradigm. Statistical analyses: Comparisons of ERP results were performed by repeated-measures analysis of variance, and t-tests were used where appropriate. A Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of variables (MLST, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and DLMO) that deviated from normal. Results: First, in the SWD group, the reorienting negativity ERP amplitude was significantly attenuated compared to that in the NW group. Second, the SWD group had shorter MSLT during night shift hours (4.8 ± 4.9 min) compared to that in NW (7.8 ± 3.7 min; U = 47; z = -2.1; P < 0.03). Third, NW with SWD had a DLMO at 20:27 ± 5.0 h, whereas healthy NW had a DLMO at 05:00 ± 3.4 h (U = 43.5; z = -2.22, P < 0.03). Finally, acute sleep deprivation impaired behavioral performance and the P3a ERP in both groups. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate specific deficits in neurophysiological activity in the attentional domain among the shift-work disorder group relative to night workers. Citation: Gumenyuk V; Howard R; Roth T; Korzyukov O; Drake CL. Sleep loss, circadian mismatch, and abnormalities in reorienting of attention in night workers with shift work disorder. SLEEP 2014

  2. Loss of Gnas imprinting differentially affects REM/NREM sleep and cognition in mice.

    PubMed

    Lassi, Glenda; Ball, Simon T; Maggi, Silvia; Colonna, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry; Cero, Cheryl; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Tucci, Valter

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that imprinted genes are important in the regulation of sleep. However, the fundamental question of whether genomic imprinting has a role in sleep has remained elusive up to now. In this work we show that REM and NREM sleep states are differentially modulated by the maternally expressed imprinted gene Gnas. In particular, in mice with loss of imprinting of Gnas, NREM and complex cognitive processes are enhanced while REM and REM-linked behaviors are inhibited. This is the first demonstration that a specific overexpression of an imprinted gene affects sleep states and related complex behavioral traits. Furthermore, in parallel to the Gnas overexpression, we have observed an overexpression of Ucp1 in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) and a significant increase in thermoregulation that may account for the REM/NREM sleep phenotypes. We conclude that there must be significant evolutionary advantages in the monoallelic expression of Gnas for REM sleep and for the consolidation of REM-dependent memories. Conversely, biallelic expression of Gnas reinforces slow wave activity in NREM sleep, and this results in a reduction of uncertainty in temporal decision-making processes.

  3. Loss of Gnas Imprinting Differentially Affects REM/NREM Sleep and Cognition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Glenda; Ball, Simon T.; Maggi, Silvia; Colonna, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry; Cero, Cheryl; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Tucci, Valter

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that imprinted genes are important in the regulation of sleep. However, the fundamental question of whether genomic imprinting has a role in sleep has remained elusive up to now. In this work we show that REM and NREM sleep states are differentially modulated by the maternally expressed imprinted gene Gnas. In particular, in mice with loss of imprinting of Gnas, NREM and complex cognitive processes are enhanced while REM and REM–linked behaviors are inhibited. This is the first demonstration that a specific overexpression of an imprinted gene affects sleep states and related complex behavioral traits. Furthermore, in parallel to the Gnas overexpression, we have observed an overexpression of Ucp1 in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) and a significant increase in thermoregulation that may account for the REM/NREM sleep phenotypes. We conclude that there must be significant evolutionary advantages in the monoallelic expression of Gnas for REM sleep and for the consolidation of REM–dependent memories. Conversely, biallelic expression of Gnas reinforces slow wave activity in NREM sleep, and this results in a reduction of uncertainty in temporal decision-making processes. PMID:22589743

  4. Can Ayahuasca and sleep loss change sexual performance in male rats?

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, T A; Polesel, D N; Matos, G; Garcia, V A; Costa, J L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2014-10-01

    The ingestion of the beverage Ayahuasca usually occurs in religious ceremonies that are performed during the night leading to sleep deprivation. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the acute effects of Ayahuasca upon the sexual response of sleep deprived male rats. One group of sexually experienced male Wistar rats were submitted to a paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol for 96h, while another group spent the same amount of time in the home cage (CTRL). After this period, either saline or Ayahuasca drink (250, 500 and 1000μgmL(-1)) was administered by gavage and sexual behavior and hormonal concentrations were measured. Ayahuasca alone significantly decreased sexual performance at all doses. However, in sleep deprived rats, the lower dose increased sexual performance while the intermediate dose produced a detrimental effect on sexual response compared to the CTRL rats at the same dose. Regarding the hormonal analyses, a lower testosterone concentration was observed in sleep-deprived saline rats in relation to the CTRL group. Progesterone was significantly lower only in PSD rats at the dose 500μgmL(-1) compared with CTRL-500μgmL(-1) group. Corticosterone was unchanged among the groups evaluated. Our results suggest that Ayahuasca intake markedly impaired sexual performance alone, but, when combined with sleep deprivation, had significant, but heterogeneous, effects on male sexual response.

  5. Flight Schedule and the Circadian Clock Influence on Sleep Loss During Overnight Cargo Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Rosekind, Mark R.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    -0300) and were longer (average 19.2 h versus 14.8 h) than those in which they slept only once in the morning. Overnight cargo crew members are working around the time of the circadian nadir with an accumulating sleep debt. Two scheduling factors affect sleep loss during these operations: how long before the circadian wakeup signal crew members come off duty, and whether the layover lasts long enough to permit a second sleep episode in the early evening.

  6. Effects of 30-h sleep loss on cardiorespiratory functions at rest and in exercise.

    PubMed

    Chen, H I

    1991-02-01

    The effects of 30-h sleep deprivation on cardiorespiratory function either at rest or in exercise were studied in 15 young healthy male volunteers. All subjects performed 1-min incremental exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer until exhaustion and endurance exercise tests at 3/4 of their maximal work rates. Arterialized venous blood samples were withdrawn at rest and during exercise tests to investigate the influence of sleep loss on blood gases. In addition, resting plasma catecholamine levels were also measured in ten subjects. The results showed that 1) resting heart rate, plasma catecholamine levels, and blood pH were decreased while minute ventilation (VI) and CO2 production (VCO2) were increased after 30 h of sleep loss (P less than 0.05), and 2) the maximal exercise performance was reduced by sleeplessness, as indicated by the decreases in the maximal heart rate, peak VI, peak VCO2, peak O2 consumption, and time to exhaustion (P less than 0.05). However, no significant changes in exercise endurance, arterialized venous pH, and PCO2 were found in exercise after sleep deprivation either. We therefore conclude that 30-h sleep loss alters cardiorespiratory function at rest and the ability to perform maximal exercise but not exercise endurance.

  7. The Impact of Moderate Sleep Loss on Neurophysiologic Signals during Working-Memory Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael E.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Gevins, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Study Objectives This study examined how sleep loss affects neurophysiologic signals related to attention and working memory. Design Subjective sleepiness, resting-state electroencephalogram, and behavior and electroencephalogram during performance of working-memory tasks were recorded in a within-subject, repeated-measures design. Setting Data collection occurred in a computerized laboratory setting. Participants Sixteen healthy adults (mean age, 26 years; 8 female) Interventions Data from alert daytime baseline tests were compared with data from tests during a late-night, extended-wakefulness session that spanned up to 21 hours of sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results Alertness measured both subjectively and electrophysiologically decreased monotonically with increasing sleep deprivation. A lack of alertness-related changes in electroencephalographic measures of the overall mental effort exerted during task execution indicated that participants attempted to maintain high levels of performance throughout the late-night tests. Despite such continued effort, responses became slower, more variable, and more error prone within 1 hour after participants' normal time of sleep onset. This behavior failure was accompanied by significant degradation of event-related brain potentials related to the transient focusing of attention. Conclusions Moderate sleep loss compromises the function of neural circuits critical to subsecond attention allocation during working-memory tasks, even when an effort is made to maintain wakefulness and performance. Multivariate analyses indicate that combinations of working-memory-related behavior and neurophysiologic measures can be sensitive enough to permit reliable detection of such effects of sleep loss in individuals. Similar methods might prove useful for assessment of functional alertness in patients with sleep disorders. PMID:12405615

  8. Parkinson's disease detection using olfactory loss and REM sleep disorder features.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, R; Roy, S Dutta; Mandal, P K; Ghosh, S

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, there exists a prodromal or a premotor phase characterized by symptoms like olfactory loss and sleep disorders, which may last for years or even decades before the onset of motor clinical symptoms. Diagnostic tools based on machine learning using these features can be very useful as they have the potential in early diagnosis of the disease. In the paper, we use olfactory loss feature from 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and Sleep behavior disorder feature from Rapid eye movement sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ), obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Marker's Initiative (PPMI) database, to develop automated diagnostic models using Support Vector Machine (SVM) and classification tree methods. The advantage of using UPSIT and RBDSQ is that they are quick, cheap, and can be self-administered. Results show that the models performed with high accuracy and sensitivity, and that they have the potential to aid in early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Complete Vision Loss following Orbital Cellulitis Secondary to Acute Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Margaret L.; Hacopian, Alexander; Merritt, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 50-year-old woman with acute dacryocystitis that was complicated by posterior rupture of the lacrimal sac causing an orbital cellulitis with subsequent visual acuity of no light perception. Upon presentation, she was immediately started on broad-spectrum antibiotics and underwent surgical incision and drainage of the lacrimal sac abscess but never regained vision. There are 4 cases in the literature of permanent severe vision loss from acute dacryocystitis. Prompt diagnosis and close monitoring of acute dacryocystitis are therefore essential to prevent extension into the orbit and possible optic nerve compromise. PMID:27803829

  10. Sleep loss changes microRNA levels in the brain: A possible mechanism for state-dependent translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Christopher J.; Bohnet, Stewart G.; Meyerson, Joseph M.; Krueger, James M.

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼22 nucleotide) non-coding RNA strands that base pair with mRNA to degrade it or inhibit its translation. Because sleep and sleep loss induce changes in many mRNA species, we hypothesized that sleep loss would also affect miRNA levels in the brain. Rats were sleep-deprived for 8 h then decapitated; hippocampus, prefrontal and somatosensory cortices and hypothalamus tissues were harvested and frozen in liquid nitrogen. MiRNA was extracted and then characterized using microarrays. Several let-7 miRNA microarray results using hippocampus and prefrontal cortex samples were verified by PCR. From the array data it was determined that about fifty miRNA species were affected by sleep loss. For example, in the hippocampus of sleep-deprived rats, miRNA expression increased compared to cage control samples. In contrast, the majority of miRNA species in the somatosensory and prefrontal cortices decreased, while in the hypothalamus miRNA species were both up- and down-regulated after sleep deprivation. The number of miRNA species affected by sleep loss, their differential expression in separate brain structures and their predicted targets suggest that they have a role in site-specific sleep mechanisms. Current results are, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the homeostatic process, sleep, altering brain miRNA levels. PMID:17597302

  11. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Tudor, Jennifer C; Ferri, Sarah L; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-11-19

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object-location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object-location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation.

  12. Transiently Increasing cAMP Levels Selectively in Hippocampal Excitatory Neurons during Sleep Deprivation Prevents Memory Deficits Caused by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object–location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object–location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation. PMID:25411499

  13. Acute Total and Chronic Partial Sleep Deprivation: Effects on Neurobehavioral Functions, Waking EEG and Renin-Angiotensin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan

    1999-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation leads to decrements in neurobehavioral performance and changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations as well as the incidence of slow eye movements ad detected in the electro-oculogram (EOG) during wakefulness. Although total sleep deprivation is a powerful tool to investigate the association of EEG/EOG and neurobehavioral decrements, sleep loss during space flight is usual only partial. Furthermore exposure to the microgravity environment leads to changes in sodium and volume homeostasis and associated renal and cardio-endocrine responses. Some of these changes can be induced in head down tilt bedrest studies. We integrate research tools and research projects to enhance the fidelity of the simulated conditions of space flight which are characterized by complexity and mutual interactions. The effectiveness of countermeasures and physiologic mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral changes and renal-cardio endocrine changes are investigated in Project 3 of the Human Performance Team and Project 3 of the Cardiovascular Alterations Team respectively. Although the. specific aims of these two projects are very different, they employ very similar research protocols. Thus, both projects investigate the effects of posture/bedrest and sleep deprivation (total or partial) on outcome measures relevant to their specific aims. The main aim of this enhancement grant is to exploit the similarities in research protocols by including the assessment of outcome variables relevant to the Renal-Cardio project in the research protocol of Project 3 of the Human Performance Team and by including the assessment of outcome variables relevant to the Quantitative EEG and Sleep Deprivation Project in the research protocols of Project 3 of the Cardiovascular Alterations team. In particular we will assess Neurobehavioral Function and Waking EEG in the research protocols of the renal-cardio endocrine project and renin-angiotensin and cardiac function in the research

  14. Hormone treatment gives no benefit against cognitive changes caused by acute sleep deprivation in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Karakorpi, Maija; Alhola, Paula; Urrila, Anna Sofia; Kylmälä, Mervi; Portin, Raija; Kalleinen, Nea; Polo-Kantola, Päivi

    2006-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether hormone therapy (HT) gives any benefit against the possible impairment of cognitive performance when challenged by acute sleep deprivation. Twenty postmenopausal women volunteered (age range 59-72 years, mean=64.4 years, SD=4.4): 10 HT users and 10 nonusers. Eleven young women served as a control group for the cognitive age effect (age range 20-26 years, mean age 23.1 years, SD=1.6). The subjects spent four consecutive nights at the sleep laboratory and were exposed to acute sleep deprivation of 40 h. Measures of attention (reaction speed and vigilance), alertness, and mood were administered every 2 h during the daytime and every hour during the sleep deprivation night. Postmenopausal women performed slower than young controls, whereas young controls made more errors. In HT users, the recovery night did not fully restore the performance in the simple and two-choice reaction time tasks, but in nonusers it did so. Sleep deprivation had a detrimental, yet reversible effect on vigilance in all groups. In all groups, sleepiness started to increase after 15 h of sleep deprivation and remained elevated in the morning after the recovery night. Prolonged wakefulness or HT had no effect on mood. In conclusion, sleep deprivation impaired cognitive performance in postmenopausal as well as young women. Postmenopausal women kept up their performance at the expense of reaction speed and young women at the expense of accuracy. One night was not enough for HT users to recover from sleep deprivation. Thus, HT gave no benefit in maintaining the attention and alertness during sleep deprivation.

  15. Phenotypic vulnerability of energy balance responses to sleep loss in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Andrea M.; Dinges, David F.; Goel, Namni

    2015-01-01

    Short sleep duration is a risk factor for increased hunger and caloric intake, late-night eating, attenuated fat loss when dieting, and for weight gain and obesity. It is unknown whether altered energy-balance responses to sleep loss are stable (phenotypic) over time, and the extent to which individuals differ in vulnerability to such responses. Healthy adults experienced two laboratory exposures to sleep restriction separated by 60–2132 days. Caloric intake, meal timing and weight were objectively measured. Although there were substantial phenotypic differences among participants in weight gain, increased caloric intake, and late-night eating and fat intake, responses within participants showed stability across sleep restriction exposures. Weight change was consistent in both normal-weight and overweight adults. Weight change and increased caloric intake were more stable in men whereas late-night eating was consistent in both genders. This is the first evidence of phenotypic differential vulnerability and trait-like stability of energy balance responses to repeated sleep restriction, underscoring the need for biomarkers and countermeasures to predict and mitigate this vulnerability. PMID:26446681

  16. Sleep Deprivation Accelerates Delay-Related Loss of Visual Short-Term Memories Without Affecting Precision

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Natalie; Asplund, Christopher L.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is an important measure of information processing capacity and supports many higher-order cognitive processes. We examined how sleep deprivation (SD) and maintenance duration interact to influence the number and precision of items in VSTM using an experimental design that limits the contribution of lapses at encoding. Design: For each trial, participants attempted to maintain the location and color of three stimuli over a delay. After a retention interval of either 1 or 10 seconds, participants reported the color of the item at the cued location by selecting it on a color wheel. The probability of reporting the probed item, the precision of report, and the probability of reporting a nonprobed item were determined using a mixture-modeling analysis. Participants were studied twice in counterbalanced order, once after a night of normal sleep and once following a night of sleep deprivation. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Nineteen healthy college age volunteers (seven females) with regular sleep patterns. Interventions: Approximately 24 hours of total SD. Measurements and Results: SD selectively reduced the number of integrated representations that can be retrieved after a delay, while leaving the precision of object information in the stored representations intact. Delay interacted with SD to lower the rate of successful recall. Conclusions: Visual short-term memory is compromised during sleep deprivation, an effect compounded by delay. However, when memories are retrieved, they tend to be intact. Citation: Wee N; Asplund CL; Chee MWL. Sleep deprivation accelerates delay-related loss of visual short-term memories without affecting precision. SLEEP 2013;36(6):849-856. PMID:23729928

  17. Recovery sleep and performance following sleep deprivation with dextroamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J L; Caldwell, J A

    1997-06-01

    Twelve subjects were studied to determine the after-effects of using three 10-mg doses of dextroamphetamine to sustain alertness during sleep deprivation. Sleep architecture during recovery sleep was evaluated by comparing post-deprivation sleep after placebo. Performance and mood recovery were assessed by comparing volunteers who received dextroamphetamine first (during sleep deprivation) to those who received placebo first. Stages 1 and 2 sleep, movement time, REM latency, and sleep latency increased on the night after sleep deprivation with dextroamphetamine vs. placebo. Stage 4 was unaffected. Comparisons to baseline revealed more stage 1 during baseline than during either post-deprivation sleep period and more stage 2 during baseline than during sleep following placebo. Stage 4 sleep was lower during baseline and after dextroamphetamine than after placebo. Sleep onset was slowest on the baseline night. Next-day performance and mood were not different as a function of whether subjects received dextroamphetamine or placebo during deprivation. These data suggest dextroamphetamine alters post-deprivation sleep architecture when used to sustain alertness during acute sleep loss, but next-day performance and subjective mood ratings are not substantially affected. A recovery sleep period of only 8 h appears to be adequate to regain baseline performance levels after short-term sleep deprivation.

  18. A single night of partial sleep loss impairs fasting insulin sensitivity but does not affect cephalic phase insulin release in young men.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Lampola, Lauri; Axelsson, Emil K; Liethof, Lisanne; Hassanzadeh, Sara; Yeganeh, Adine; Broman, Jan-Erik; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The present study sought to investigate whether a single night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would alter fasting insulin sensitivity and cephalic phase insulin release (CPIR) in humans. A rise in circulating insulin in response to food-related sensory stimulation may prepare tissues to break down ingested glucose, e.g. by stimulating rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes. In addition, given insulin's anorexigenic properties once it reaches the brain, the CPIR may serve as an early peripheral satiety signal. Against this background, in the present study 16 men participated in two separate sessions: one night of PSD (4.25 h sleep) versus one night of full sleep (8.5 h sleep). In the morning following each sleep condition, subjects' oral cavities were rinsed with a 1-molar sucrose solution for 45 s, preceded and followed by blood sampling for repeated determination of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations (-3, +3, +5, +7, +10 and +20 min). Our main result was that PSD, compared with full sleep, was associated with significantly higher peripheral insulin resistance, as indicated by a higher fasting homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (+16%, P = 0.025). In contrast, no CPIR was observed in any of the two sleep conditions. Our findings indicate that a single night of PSD is already sufficient to impair fasting insulin sensitivity in healthy men. In contrast, brief oral cavity rinsing with sucrose solution did not change serum insulin concentrations, suggesting that a blunted CPIR is an unlikely mechanism through which acute sleep loss causes metabolic perturbations during morning hours in humans.

  19. Functional Equivalence of Sleep Loss and Time on Task Effects in Sustained Attention.

    PubMed

    Veksler, Bella Z; Gunzelmann, Glenn

    2017-03-22

    Research on sleep loss and vigilance both focus on declines in cognitive performance, but theoretical accounts have developed largely in parallel in these two areas. In addition, computational instantiations of theoretical accounts are rare. The current work uses computational modeling to explore whether the same mechanisms can account for the effects of both sleep loss and time on task on performance. A classic task used in the sleep deprivation literature, the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), was extended from the typical 10-min duration to 35 min, to make the task similar in duration to traditional vigilance tasks. A computational cognitive model demonstrated that the effects of time on task in the PVT were equivalent to those observed with sleep loss. Subsequently, the same mechanisms were applied to a more traditional vigilance task-the Mackworth Clock Task-providing a good fit to existing data. This supports the hypothesis that these different types of fatigue may produce functionally equivalent declines in performance.

  20. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis-an observational study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenxi; Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation.

  1. The Influence of Sleep Disordered Breathing on Weight Loss in a National Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Janney, Carol A.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Germain, Anne; Lai, Zongshan; Hoerster, Katherine D.; Goodrich, David E.; Klingaman, Elizabeth A.; Verchinina, Lilia; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the influence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) on weight loss in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE!, a nationally implemented behavioral weight management program delivered by the National Veterans Health Administration health system. Methods: This observational study evaluated weight loss by SDB status in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE! from May 2008–February 2012 who had at least two MOVE! visits, baseline weight, and at least one follow-up weight (n = 84,770). SDB was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Primary outcome was weight change (lb) from MOVE! enrollment to 6- and 12-mo assessments. Weight change over time was modeled with repeated-measures analyses. Results: SDB was diagnosed in one-third of the cohort (n = 28,269). At baseline, veterans with SDB weighed 29 [48] lb more than those without SDB (P < 0.001). On average, veterans attended eight MOVE! visits. Weight loss patterns over time were statistically different between veterans with and without SDB (P < 0.001); veterans with SDB lost less weight (−2.5 [0.1] lb) compared to those without SDB (−3.3 [0.1] lb; P = 0.001) at 6 months. At 12 mo, veterans with SDB continued to lose weight whereas veterans without SDB started to re-gain weight. Conclusions: Veterans with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) had significantly less weight loss over time than veterans without SDB. SDB should be considered in the development and implementation of weight loss programs due to its high prevalence and negative effect on health. Citation: Janney CA, Kilbourne AM, Germain A, Lai Z, Hoerster KD, Goodrich DE, Klingaman EA, Verchinina L, Richardson CR. The influence of sleep disordered breathing on weight loss in a national weight management program. SLEEP 2016;39(1):59–65. PMID:26350475

  2. Rapid loss of renal parenchyma after acute obstruction.

    PubMed

    Parvex, P; Pippi-Salle, J L; Goodyer, P R

    2001-12-01

    Urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is a frequent cause of renal failure in the pediatric population. We report a patient with type I/I cystinuria, followed prospectively from birth with yearly ultrasonography, who developed acute UTO due to a cystine stone at 10 years of age. In animal models of UTO, acute obstruction produces rapid loss of renal parenchyma secondary to apoptosis of tubular cells. Since we had prospectively obtained serial ultrasonographic measurements of renal growth, we were able to document sudden decrease in kidney size and function following UTO, suggesting that programmed cell death may similarly have caused the rapid irreversible loss of renal parenchyma in our patient. Despite surgical relief of the obstruction, kidney size decreased for at least 3-4 months. We speculate that anti-apoptotic drugs might be considered as a therapeutic strategy to protect ongoing renal parenchyma loss in UTO.

  3. Prevalence of Impaired Memory in Hospitalized Adults and Associations with In-Hospital Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calev, Hila; Spampinato, Lisa M; Press, Valerie G; Meltzer, David O; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective inpatient teaching requires intact patient memory, but studies suggest hospitalized adults may have memory deficits. Sleep loss among inpatients could contribute to memory impairment. Objective To assess memory in older hospitalized adults, and to test the association between sleep quantity, sleep quality and memory, in order to identify a possible contributor to memory deficits in these patients. Design Prospective cohort study Setting General medicine and hematology/oncology inpatient wards Patients 59 hospitalized adults at least 50 years of age with no diagnosed sleep disorder. Measurements Immediate memory and memory after a 24-hour delay were assessed using a word recall and word recognition task from the University of Southern California Repeatable Episodic Memory Test (USC-REMT). A vignette-based memory task was piloted as an alternative test more closely resembling discharge instructions. Sleep duration and efficiency overnight in the hospital were measured using actigraphy. Results Mean immediate recall was 3.8 words out of 15 (SD=2.1). Forty-nine percent of subjects had poor memory, defined as immediate recall score of 3 or lower. Median immediate recognition was 11 words out of 15 (IQR=9, 13). Median delayed recall score was 1 word and median delayed recognition was 10 words (IQR= 8–12). In-hospital sleep duration and efficiency were not significantly associated with memory. The medical vignette score was correlated with immediate recall (r=0.49, p<0.01) Conclusions About half of inpatients studied had poor memory while in the hospital, signaling that hospitalization might not be an ideal teachable moment. In-hospital sleep was not associated with memory scores. PMID:25872763

  4. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  5. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-03-05

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects.

  6. Acute sleep restriction effects on emotion responses in 30- to 36-month-old children.

    PubMed

    Berger, Rebecca H; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Cares, Stephanie R; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2012-06-01

    Early childhood is a period of dramatic change in sleep and emotion processing, as well as a time when disturbance in both domains are first detected. Although sleep is recognized as central in emotion processing and psychopathology, the great majority of experimental data have been collected in adults. We examined the effects of acute sleep restriction (nap deprivation) on toddlers' emotion expression. Ten healthy children (seven females; 30-36 months old) followed a strict sleep schedule (≥12.5 h time in bed per 24-h) for 5 days, before each of two randomly assigned afternoon emotion assessments following Nap and No-Nap conditions (resulting in an 11-day protocol). Children viewed emotion-eliciting pictures (five positive, three neutral, three negative) and completed puzzles (one solvable, one unsolvable). Children's faces were video-recorded, and emotion displays were coded. When sleep restricted, children displayed less confusion in response to neutral pictures, more negativity to neutral and negative pictures, and less positivity to positive pictures. Sleep restriction also resulted in a 34% reduction in positive emotion responses (solvable puzzle), as well as a 31% increase in negative emotion responses and a 39% decrease in confused responses (unsolvable puzzle). These findings suggest sleep is a key factor in how young children respond to their world. When sleep restricted, toddlers are neither able to take full advantage of positive experiences nor are they as adaptive in challenging contexts. If insufficient sleep consistently 'taxes' young children's emotion responses, they may not manage emotion regulation challenges effectively, potentially placing them at risk for future emotional/behavioral problems.

  7. Computational cognitive modeling of the temporal dynamics of fatigue from sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew M; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2017-02-16

    Computational models have become common tools in psychology. They provide quantitative instantiations of theories that seek to explain the functioning of the human mind. In this paper, we focus on identifying deep theoretical similarities between two very different models. Both models are concerned with how fatigue from sleep loss impacts cognitive processing. The first is based on the diffusion model and posits that fatigue decreases the drift rate of the diffusion process. The second is based on the Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational (ACT-R) cognitive architecture and posits that fatigue decreases the utility of candidate actions leading to microlapses in cognitive processing. A biomathematical model of fatigue is used to control drift rate in the first account and utility in the second. We investigated the predicted response time distributions of these two integrated computational cognitive models for performance on a psychomotor vigilance test under conditions of total sleep deprivation, simulated shift work, and sustained sleep restriction. The models generated equivalent predictions of response time distributions with excellent goodness-of-fit to the human data. More importantly, although the accounts involve different modeling approaches and levels of abstraction, they represent the effects of fatigue in a functionally equivalent way: in both, fatigue decreases the signal-to-noise ratio in decision processes and decreases response inhibition. This convergence suggests that sleep loss impairs psychomotor vigilance performance through degradation of the quality of cognitive processing, which provides a foundation for systematic investigation of the effects of sleep loss on other aspects of cognition. Our findings illustrate the value of treating different modeling formalisms as vehicles for discovery.

  8. The effect of weight loss on sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation in morbidly obese men.

    PubMed

    Harman, E M; Wynne, J W; Block, A J

    1982-09-01

    Four morbidly obese men who had been found to have significant sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation were restudied after an average weight loss of 108 kg (range 53-155 kg). In all subjects, weight loss was accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of episodes per hour of sleep-disordered breathing events. In three of the four subjects, there was improvment in the severity of desaturation accompanying abnormal breathing. The two subjects with daytime somnolence and hypercapnia prior to weight loss showed the most dramatic improvement in desaturation. This suggests that obesity is a cause, rather than an effect, of the sleep apnea syndrome.

  9. Poor Self-Reported Sleep Quality Predicts Mortality within One Year of Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the association between self-reported sleep quality among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and one-year survival. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration). Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, n = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Within one year of post-acute rehabilitation, 57 participants (23%) were deceased. Cox proportional hazards models showed that worse Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) total scores during the post-acute care stay were associated with increased mortality risk when controlling for amount of rehabilitation therapy received, comorbidities, and cognitive functioning (Hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.11 [1.02-1.20]). Actigraphically estimated sleep was unrelated to mortality risk. Conclusions: Poorer self-reported sleep quality, but not objectively estimated sleep parameters, during post-acute rehabilitation was associated with shorter survival among older adults. This suggests self-reported poor sleep may be an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for negative outcomes in these vulnerable older adults. Studies of interventions to improve sleep quality during inpatient rehabilitation should therefore be undertaken, and the long-term health benefits of improved sleep should be explored. Citation: Martin JL; Fiorentino L; Jouldjian S; Mitchell M; Josephson KR; Alessi CA. Poor self-reported sleep quality predicts mortality within one year of inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. SLEEP 2011;34(12):1715-1721. PMID:22131610

  10. Evidence for Neuroinflammatory and Microglial Changes in the Cerebral Response to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Schmidt, Michelle A.; Clegern, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep loss has pro-inflammatory effects, but the roles of specific cell populations in mediating these effects have not been delineated. We assessed the modulation of the electroencephalographic and molecular responses to sleep deprivation (S-DEP) by minocycline, a compound that attenuates microglial activation occurring in association with neuroinflammatory events. Design: Laboratory rodents were subjected to assessment of sleep and wake in baseline and sleep deprived conditions. Participants: Adult male CD-1 mice (30-35 g) subjected to telemetric electroencephalography. Interventions: Minocycline was administered daily. Mice were subjected to baseline data collection on the first day of minocycline administration and, on subsequent days, 2 S-DEP sessions, 1 and 3 h in duration, followed by recovery sleep. Following EEG studies, mice were euthanized either at the end of a 3 h S-DEP or as time-of day controls for sampling of brain messenger RNAs. Gene expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Measurements and Results: Minocycline-treated mice exhibited a reduction in time spent asleep, relative to saline-treated mice, in the 3-h interval immediately after administration. S-DEP resulted in an increase in EEG slow wave activity relative to baseline in saline-treated mice. This response to S-DEP was abolished in animals subjected to chronic minocycline administration. S-DEP suppressed the expression of the microglial-specific transcript cd11b and the neuroinflammation marker peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, in the brain at the mRNA level. Minocycline attenuated the elevation of c-fos expression by S-DEP. Brain levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs interleukin-1β (il-1β), interleukin-6 (il-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (tnfα) were unaffected by S-DEP, but were elevated in minocycline-treated mice relative to saline-treated mice. Conclusions: The anti-neuroinflammatory agent minocycline prevents either the buildup or

  11. Effects of Maintained Weight Loss on Sleep Dynamics and Neck Morphology in Severely Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Ballard, Robert D.; Weil, Kathleen M.; Shepard, Trudy Y.; Scherzinger, Ann L.; Stamm, Elizabeth R.; Sharp, Teresa A.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The goals of the study were to determine if moderate weight loss in severely obese adults resulted in 1) reduction in apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), 2) improved pharyngeal patency, 3) reduced total body oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) during sleep, and 4) improved sleep quality. The main outcome was the change in AHI from before to after weight loss. Fourteen severely obese (BMI>40 kg/m2) patients (3 males, 11 females) completed a highly controlled weight reduction program which included 3 months of weight loss and 3 months of weight maintenance. At baseline and post-weight loss, patients underwent pulmonary function testing, polysomnography, and MRI to assess neck morphology. Weight decreased from 134±6.6 kg to 118±6.1 kg (mean ± SEM; F=113.763, p<0.0001). There was a significant reduction in the AHI between baseline and post-weight loss (SUBJECT, F=11.11, p=0.007). Moreover, patients with worse sleep disordered breathing (SDB) at baseline had the greatest improvements in AHI (GROUP, F=9.00, p=0.005). Reductions in VO2 (285±12 to 234±16 ml/min; F=24.85, p<0.0001) and VCO2 (231±9 to 186±12 ml/min; F=27.74, p<0.0001) were also observed, and pulmonary function testing showed improvements in spirometry parameters. Sleep studies revealed improved minimum SaO2 (83.4±61.9% to 89.1±1.2%; F=7.59, p=0.016), and mean SaO2 (90.4±1.1% to 93.8±1.0%; F=6.89, p=0.022), and a significant increase in the number of arousals (8.1±1.4 at baseline, to 17.1±3.0 after weight loss; F=18.13, p=0.001). In severely obese patients, even moderate weight loss (~10%) boasts substantial benefit in terms of the severity of SDB and sleep dynamics. PMID:18948968

  12. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  13. Effect of obstructive sleep apnoea on severity and short-term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquin; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria José; Florés, Marina; Barceló, Antonia; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Castellà, Gerard; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of obstructive sleep apnoea on the severity and short-term prognosis of patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Obstructive sleep apnoea was defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >15 h(-1). We evaluated the acute coronary syndrome severity (ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, and plasma peak troponin) and short-term prognosis (length of hospitalisation, complications and mortality). We included 213 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (mean±sd AHI 30±14 h(-1), 61±10 years, 80% males) and 218 controls (AHI 6±4 h(-1), 57±12 years, 82% males). Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea exhibited a higher prevalence of systemic hypertension (55% versus 37%, p<0.001), higher body mass index (29±4 kg·m(-2) versus 26±4 kg·m(-2), p<0.001), and lower percentage of smokers (61% versus 71%, p=0.04). After adjusting for smoking, age, body mass index and hypertension, the plasma peak troponin levels were significantly elevated in the obstructive sleep apnoea group (831±908 ng·L(-1) versus 987±884 ng·L(-1), p=0.03) and higher AHI severity was associated with an increased number of diseased vessels (p=0.04). The mean length of stay in the coronary care unit was higher in the obstructive sleep apnoea group (p=0.03). This study indicates that obstructive sleep apnoea is related to an increase in the peak plasma troponin levels, number of diseased vessels, and length of stay in the coronary care unit.

  14. The influence of acute exercise on sleep following high caffeine intake.

    PubMed

    Youngstedt, S D; O'Connor, P J; Crabbe, J B; Dishman, R K

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of vigorous acute exercise on nocturnal sleep that had been disrupted by high doses (1200 mg) of caffeine throughout the daytime. Eight moderately fit, young males with a history of moderate caffeine use completed four conditions in a within-subjects, counterbalanced design: 60 min of (i) cycling at 60% VO(2peak) or (ii) quiet rest following placebo consumption, (iii) cycling, or (iv) quiet rest following the consumption of a high dose of caffeine. Each condition was performed twice from 1615-1715 h and followed by all-night polysomnographic recording. Subjects consumed two blinded 200-mg capsules of either lactose placebo or caffeine upon awakening, at 1600 h, and 2 h before bedtime. State anxiety was assessed at bedtime. Criterion scores consisted of the mean data across the two days in each condition. Sleep data were analyzed using a condition (exercise versus quiet rest) by drug (caffeine versus placebo) repeated-measures ANOVA. Caffeine-elicited sleep disturbance that was less than previously reported. Exercise attenuated selected sleep disturbances to a small degree. In general, the effects of exercise on sleep were not greater following caffeine compared to placebo. Indeed, increases in slow-wave sleep after exercise were approximately 1/3 smaller following caffeine treatment compared to placebo.

  15. Withania somnifera as a potential anxiolytic and immunomodulatory agent in acute sleep deprived female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Rachana; Manchanda, Shaffi; Gupta, Muskan; Saini, Vedangana; Sharma, Anuradha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2017-03-01

    Sleep is a profound regulator of cellular immunity, and the curtailment of sleep in present day lifestyle leads to disruption of neuro-immune-endocrine interactions. No therapeutic remedy is yet known for the amelioration of detrimental effects caused by sleep deprivation (SD). The current study was aimed to elucidate the effects of acute SD on immune function and its modulation by water extract from leaves of Withania somnifera (ASH-WEX). Three groups of animals, i.e. Vehicle-Undisturbed sleep (VUD), Vehicle-Sleep deprived (VSD) and ASH-WEX fed sleep deprived (WSD) rats were tested for their anxiety-like behaviour and further used for the study of inflammatory and apoptotic markers expression in piriform cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain. VSD animals showed high level of anxiety in elevated plus maze test, which was ameliorated in WSD group. The stress induced expression of inflammatory and immune response markers GFAP, TNFα, IL-6, OX-18 and OX-42 in VSD animals was found to be modulated by ASH-WEX. Further, the stress induced apoptosis was suppressed in WSD group as indicated by expression of NF-κB, AP-1, Bcl-xL and Cytochrome c. This study provides scientific validation to the anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties of ASH-WEX, which may serve as an effective dietary supplement for management of SD induced stress and associated functional impairments.

  16. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause.

    PubMed

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M; Baker, Fiona C

    2016-04-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on pre-sleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 years) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5 ± 2.3 years) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first 4 h of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered 4-6 h into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23 Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that pre-sleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also indicate

  17. Serum Amyloid A Production Is Triggered by Sleep Deprivation in Mice and Humans: Is That the Link between Sleep Loss and Associated Comorbidities?

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Edson M.; Visniauskas, Bruna; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L.; Chagas, Jair R.; Campa, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) was recently associated with metabolic endotoxemia, obesity and insulin resistance. Concurrently, insufficient sleep adversely affects metabolic health and is an independent predisposing factor for obesity and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated whether sleep loss modulates SAA production. The serum SAA concentration increased in C57BL/6 mice subjected to sleep restriction (SR) for 15 days or to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 72 h. Sleep restriction also induced the upregulation of Saa1.1/Saa2.1 mRNA levels in the liver and Saa3 mRNA levels in adipose tissue. SAA levels returned to the basal range after 24 h in paradoxical sleep rebound (PSR). Metabolic endotoxemia was also a finding in SR. Increased plasma levels of SAA were also observed in healthy human volunteers subjected to two nights of total sleep deprivation (Total SD), returning to basal levels after one night of recovery. The observed increase in SAA levels may be part of the initial biochemical alterations caused by sleep deprivation, with potential to drive deleterious conditions such as metabolic endotoxemia and weight gain. PMID:28335560

  18. Serum Amyloid A Production Is Triggered by Sleep Deprivation in Mice and Humans: Is That the Link between Sleep Loss and Associated Comorbidities?

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Edson M; Visniauskas, Bruna; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L; Chagas, Jair R; Campa, Ana

    2017-03-21

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) was recently associated with metabolic endotoxemia, obesity and insulin resistance. Concurrently, insufficient sleep adversely affects metabolic health and is an independent predisposing factor for obesity and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated whether sleep loss modulates SAA production. The serum SAA concentration increased in C57BL/6 mice subjected to sleep restriction (SR) for 15 days or to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 72 h. Sleep restriction also induced the upregulation of Saa1.1/Saa2.1 mRNA levels in the liver and Saa3 mRNA levels in adipose tissue. SAA levels returned to the basal range after 24 h in paradoxical sleep rebound (PSR). Metabolic endotoxemia was also a finding in SR. Increased plasma levels of SAA were also observed in healthy human volunteers subjected to two nights of total sleep deprivation (Total SD), returning to basal levels after one night of recovery. The observed increase in SAA levels may be part of the initial biochemical alterations caused by sleep deprivation, with potential to drive deleterious conditions such as metabolic endotoxemia and weight gain.

  19. Sleep Apnea Determines Soluble TNF-α Receptor 2 Response to Massive Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pallayova, Maria; Steele, Kimberley E.; Magnuson, Thomas H.; Schweitzer, Michael A.; Smith, Philip L.; Patil, Susheel P.; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of surgical weight loss (WL) on inflammatory biomarkers associated with sleep apnea remain unknown. We sought to determine if any bio-markers can predict amelioration of sleep apnea achieved by bariatric surgery. We hypothesized that surgical WL would substantially reduce severity of sleep apnea and levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Methods Twenty-three morbidly obese adults underwent anthropometric measurements, polysomnography, and serum biomarker profiling prior to and 1 year following bariatric surgery. We examined the effect of WL and amelioration of sleep apnea on metabolic and inflammatory markers. Results Surgical WL resulted in significant decreases in BMI (16.7±5.97 kg/m2/median 365 days), apnea–hypopnea index (AHI), CRP, IL-6, sTNFαR1, sTNFαR2, and leptin levels, while ghrelin, adiponectin, and soluble leptin receptor concentrations increased significantly. Utilizing an AHI cutoff of 15 events/h, we found significantly elevated levels of baseline sTNFαR2 and greater post-WL sTNFαR2 decreases in subjects with baseline AHI ≥15 events/h compared to those with AHI <15 events/h despite no significant differences in baseline BMI, age, and ΔBMI. In a multivariable linear regression model adjusting for sex, age, impaired glucose metabolism, ΔBMI, and follow-up period, the post-WL decreases in AHI were an independent predictor of the decreases in sTNFαR2 and altogether accounted for 46% of the variance of ΔsTNFαR2 (P=0.011) in the entire cohort. Conclusions Of all the biomarkers, the decrease in sTNFαR2 was independently determined by the amelioration of sleep apnea achieved by bariatric surgery. The results suggest that sTNFαR2 may be a specific sleep apnea biomarker across a wide range of body weight. PMID:21298510

  20. Fatigue on the flight deck: the consequences of sleep loss and the benefits of napping.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Beth M

    2014-01-01

    The detrimental effects of fatigue in aviation are well established, as evidenced by both the number of fatigue-related mishaps and numerous studies which have found that most pilots experience a deterioration in cognitive performance as well as increased stress during the course of a flight. Further, due to the nature of the average pilot's work schedule, with frequent changes in duty schedule, early morning starts, and extended duty periods, fatigue may be impossible to avoid. Thus, it is critical that fatigue countermeasures be available which can help to combat the often overwhelming effects of sleep loss or sleep disruption. While stimulants such as caffeine are typically effective at maintaining alertness and performance, such countermeasures do nothing to address the actual source of fatigue - insufficient sleep. Consequently, strategic naps are considered an efficacious means of maintaining performance while also reducing the individual's sleep debt. These types of naps have been advocated for pilots in particular, as opportunities to sleep either in the designated rest facilities or on the flight deck may be beneficial in reducing both the performance and alertness impairments associated with fatigue, as well as the subjective feelings of sleepiness. Evidence suggests that strategic naps can reduce subjective feelings of fatigue and improve performance and alertness. Despite some contraindications to implementing strategic naps while on duty, such as sleep inertia experienced upon awakening, both researchers and pilots agree that the benefits associated with these naps far outweigh the potential risks. This article is a literature review detailing both the health and safety concerns of fatigue among commercial pilots as well as benefits and risks associated with strategic napping to alleviate this fatigue.

  1. Effects of Night Work, Sleep Loss and Time on Task on Simulated Threat Detection Performance

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Rubinstein, Joshua; Fomberstein, Kenneth M.; Coble, Matthew C.; Ecker, Adrian; Avinash, Deepa; Dinges, David F.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of night work and sleep loss on a simulated luggage screening task (SLST) that mimicked the x-ray system used by airport luggage screeners. Design: We developed more than 5,800 unique simulated x-ray images of luggage organized into 31 stimulus sets of 200 bags each. 25% of each set contained either a gun or a knife with low or high target difficulty. The 200-bag stimuli sets were then run on software that simulates an x-ray screening system (SLST). Signal detection analysis was used to obtain measures of hit rate (HR), false alarm rate (FAR), threat detection accuracy (A′), and response bias (B″D). Setting: Experimental laboratory study Participants: 24 healthy nonprofessional volunteers (13 women, mean age ± SD = 29.9 ± 6.5 years). Interventions: Subjects performed the SLST every 2 h during a 5-day period that included a 35 h period of wakefulness that extended to night work and then another day work period after the night without sleep. Results: Threat detection accuracy A′ decreased significantly (P < 0.001) while FAR increased significantly (P < 0.001) during night work, while both A′ (P = 0.001) and HR decreased (P = 0.008) during day work following sleep loss. There were prominent time-on-task effects on response bias B″D (P = 0.002) and response latency (P = 0.004), but accuracy A′ was unaffected. Both HR and FAR increased significantly with increasing study duration (both P < 0.001), while response latency decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study provides the first systematic evidence that night work and sleep loss adversely affect the accuracy of detecting complex real world objects among high levels of background clutter. If the results can be replicated in professional screeners and real work environments, fatigue in luggage screening personnel may pose a threat for air traffic safety unless countermeasures for fatigue are deployed. Citation: Basner M; Rubinstein J

  2. Effect of Acute Intermittent CPAP Depressurization during Sleep in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jonathan C.; Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason; Schwartz, Alan R.; Smith, Philip L.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) describes intermittent collapse of the airway during sleep, for which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is often prescribed for treatment. Prior studies suggest that discontinuation of CPAP leads to a gradual, rather than immediate return of baseline severity of OSA. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of OSA recurrence during short intervals of CPAP depressurization during sleep. Methods Nine obese (BMI = 40.4 ± 3.5) subjects with severe OSA (AHI = 88.9 ± 6.8) adherent to CPAP were studied during one night in the sleep laboratory. Nasal CPAP was delivered at therapeutic (11.1 ± 0.6 cm H20) or atmospheric pressure, in alternating fashion for 1-hour periods during the night. We compared sleep architecture and metrics of OSA during CPAP-on and CPAP-off periods. Results 8/9 subjects tolerated CPAP withdrawal. The average AHI during CPAP-on and CPAP-off periods was 3.6 ± 0.6 and 15.8 ± 3.6 respectively (p<0.05). The average 3% ODI during CPAP-on and CPAP-off was 4.7 ± 2 and 20.4 ± 4.7 respectively (p<0.05). CPAP depressurization also induced more awake (p<0.05) and stage N1 (p<0.01) sleep, and less stage REM (p<0.05) with a trend towards decreased stage N3 (p = 0.064). Conclusion Acute intermittent depressurization of CPAP during sleep led to deterioration of sleep architecture but only partial re-emergence of OSA. These observations suggest carryover effects of CPAP. PMID:26731735

  3. Sleep laboratory studies in restless legs syndrome patients as compared with normals and acute effects of ropinirole. 1. Findings on objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality.

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Gruber, G; Saletu, M; Brandstätter, N; Hauer, C; Prause, W; Ritter, K; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G

    2000-01-01

    Although the restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder with a relatively high prevalence rate (8% in Austria) and leads to insomnia and excessive daytime tiredness, there is a paucity of sleep laboratory data concerning objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate 12 untreated RLS patients as compared with 12 normal controls and subsequently measure the acute effects of 0.5 mg ropinirole (Requip((R))) - a nonergoline dopamine agonist - as compared with placebo. In 3 nights (adaptation, placebo, ropinirole night) sleep induction, maintenance and architecture were measured objectively by polysomnography, subjective sleep and awakening quality were assessed by self-rating scales and visual-analog scales, and objective awakening quality was evaluated by a psychometric test battery. In polysomnography, RLS patients demonstrated, as compared with normal controls, a decreased total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficacy, increased wakefulness during the total sleep period and frequency of nocturnal awakenings, increased sleep stage S1, decreased S2 and increased stage shifts. Subjective sleep quality tended to decrease, and morning well-being, mood, affectivity and wakefulness were deteriorated. In the noopsyche, fine motor activity and reaction time performance were deteriorated. Ropinirole 0.5 mg induced, as compared with placebo, an increase in TST, sleep efficacy, S2 sleep and stage shifts. In the morning, somatic complaints increased slightly, while fine motor activity and reaction time performance improved. Our findings suggest a key-lock principle in the diagnosis/treatment of RLS and a dopaminergic mechanism in its pathogenesis, which is supported by the data on periodic leg movements during sleep and arousals of the subsequent paper.

  4. Chronotype, sleep loss, and diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in a simulated daylong driving.

    PubMed

    Oginska, Halszka; Fafrowicz, Magdalena; Golonka, Krystyna; Marek, Tadeusz; Mojsa-Kaja, Justyna; Tucholska, Kinga

    2010-07-01

    distinct diurnal variation (F = 2.950, p < .019), whereas E types showed a flattened diurnal curve. Cortisol values did not correlate with subjective assessments of workload, arousal, or sleepiness at any time-of-day. Diurnal cortisol pattern parameters (i.e., morning level, mean level, and range of diurnal changes) showed significant positive correlations with sleep length before the experiment (r = .48, .54, and .53, respectively) and with sleep index (r = .63, .64, and .56, respectively). The conclusions of this study are: (i) E-oriented types showed lower salivary cortisol levels and a flattened diurnal curve in comparison with M types; (ii) sleep loss was associated with lower morning cortisol and mean diurnal level, whereas higher cortisol levels were observed in rested individuals. In the context of stress theory, it may be hypothesized that rested subjects perceived the driving task as a challenge, whereas those with reduced sleep were not challenged, but bored/exhausted with the experimental situation.

  5. Classifying performance impairment in response to sleep loss using pattern recognition algorithms on single session testing

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Sullivan, Jason P.; Anderson, Clare; Cohen, Daniel A.; Barger, Laura K.; Lockley, Steven W.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently no “gold standard” marker of cognitive performance impairment resulting from sleep loss. We utilized pattern recognition algorithms to determine which features of data collected under controlled laboratory conditions could most reliably identify cognitive performance impairment in response to sleep loss using data from only one testing session, such as would occur in the “real world” or field conditions. A training set for testing the pattern recognition algorithms was developed using objective Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) data collected from laboratory studies during which subjects were sleep deprived for 26 – 52 hours. The algorithm was then tested in data from both laboratory and field experiments. The pattern recognition algorithm was able to identify performance impairment with a single testing session in individuals studied under laboratory conditions using PVT, KSS, length of time awake and time of day information with sensitivity and specificity as high as 82%. When this algorithm was tested on data collected under real-world conditions from individuals whose data were not in the training set, accuracy of predictions for individuals categorized with low performance impairment were as high as 98%. Predictions for medium and severe performance impairment were less accurate. We conclude that pattern recognition algorithms may be a promising method for identifying performance impairment in individuals using only current information about the individual’s behavior. Single testing features (e.g., number of PVT lapses) with high correlation with performance impairment in the laboratory setting may not be the best indicators of performance impairment under real-world conditions. Pattern recognition algorithms should be further tested for their ability to be used in conjunction with other assessments of sleepiness in real-world conditions to quantify performance impairment in

  6. Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans-Flynn, Erin; Gregory, Kevin; Arsintescu, Lucia; Whitmire, Alexandra; Leveton, Lauren B.; Vessey, William

    2015-01-01

    Sleep loss, circadian desynchronization, and work overload occur to some extent for ground and flight crews, prior to and during spaceflight missions. Ground evidence indicates that such risk factors may lead to performance decrements and adverse health outcomes, which could potentially compromise mission objectives. Efforts are needed to identify the environmental and mission conditions that interfere with sleep and circadian alignment, as well as individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. Specifically, this report highlights a collection of new evidence to better characterize the risk and reveals new gaps in this risk.

  7. Chemogenetic inhibition of the medial prefrontal cortex reverses the effects of REM sleep loss on sucrose consumption

    PubMed Central

    McEown, Kristopher; Takata, Yohko; Cherasse, Yoan; Nagata, Nanae; Aritake, Kosuke; Lazarus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep loss is associated with increased consumption of weight-promoting foods. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to mediate reward anticipation. However, the precise role of the PFC in mediating reward responses to highly palatable foods (HPF) after REM sleep deprivation is unclear. We selectively reduced REM sleep in mice over a 25–48 hr period and chemogenetically inhibited the medial PFC (mPFC) by using an altered glutamate-gated and ivermectin-gated chloride channel that facilitated neuronal inhibition through hyperpolarizing infected neurons. HPF consumption was measured while the mPFC was inactivated and REM sleep loss was induced. We found that REM sleep loss increased HPF consumption compared to control animals. However, mPFC inactivation reversed the effect of REM sleep loss on sucrose consumption without affecting fat consumption. Our findings provide, for the first time, a causal link between REM sleep, mPFC function and HPF consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20269.001 PMID:27919319

  8. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnea signs and symptoms in the US population

    PubMed Central

    Akinkugbe, Aderonke A.; Slade, Gary D.; Essick, Greg K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between tooth loss and signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a representative sample of the general US population. Methods Data were from 7305 men and women aged ≥25 years participating in the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tooth loss, occlusal contacts, and denture use were determined by dental examination. Four cardinal OSA signs and symptoms were evaluated by questions based on American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Adults with ≥2 signs/symptoms of OSA were classified at high-risk of OSA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % confidence limits (CL) from log binomial regression models estimated the strength of association between tooth loss and high-risk for OSA, adjusting for demographic characteristics, body mass index, dentures, and sleep duration. Results Prevalence of high-risk for OSA increased 2 % for each additional lost tooth (PR = 1.02, 95 % CL, 1.01, 1.03) among adults aged 25 to 65 years. When tooth loss was modeled as an ordinal variable with 0–4 lost teeth as the referent category, adjusted prevalence of high-risk for OSA was as follows: 25 % greater in those missing 5–8 teeth (PR = 1.25, 95 % CL, 1.07, 1.46); 36 % greater in those missing 9–31 teeth (PR = 1.36, 95 % CL, 1.06, 1.73); and 61 % greater in the edentulous (PR = 1.61, 95 % CL, 1.11, 2.33). Conclusion Tooth loss may be an independent risk factor for OSA. PMID:26779902

  9. Sleep disruption and its effect on lymphocyte redeployment following an acute bout of exercise.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Lesley A; Simpson, Richard J; Malone, Eva; Florida-James, Geraint D

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disruption and deprivation are common in contemporary society and have been linked with poor health, decreased job performance and increased life-stress. The rapid redeployment of lymphocytes between the blood and tissues is an archetypal feature of the acute stress response, but it is not known if short-term perturbations in sleep architecture affect lymphocyte redeployment. We examined the effects of a disrupted night sleep on the exercise-induced redeployment of lymphocytes and their subtypes. 10 healthy male cyclists performed 1h of cycling at a fixed power output on an indoor cycle ergometer, following a night of undisrupted sleep (US) or a night of disrupted sleep (DS). Blood was collected before, immediately after and 1h after exercise completion. Lymphocytes and their subtypes were enumerated using direct immunofluorescence assays and 4-colour flow cytometry. DS was associated with elevated concentrations of total lymphocytes and CD3(-)/CD56(+) NK-cells. Although not affecting baseline levels, DS augmented the exercise-induced redeployment of CD8(+) T-cells, with the naïve/early differentiated subtypes (KLRG1(-)/CD45RA(+)) being affected most. While the mobilisation of cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets (NK cells, CD8(+) T-cells γδ T-cells), tended to be larger in response to exercise following DS, their enhanced egress at 1h post-exercise was more marked. This occurred despite similar serum cortisol and catecholamine levels between the US and DS trials. NK-cells redeployed with exercise after DS retained their expression of perforin and Granzyme-B indicating that DS did not affect NK-cell 'arming'. Our findings indicate that short-term changes in sleep architecture may 'prime' the immune system and cause minor enhancements in lymphocyte trafficking in response to acute dynamic exercise.

  10. Excess diuresis and natriuresis during acute sleep deprivation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Hagstroem, Soren; Radvanska, Eva; Rittig, Soren; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2010-08-01

    The transition from wakefulness to sleep is associated with a pronounced decline in diuresis, a necessary physiological process that allows uninterrupted sleep. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute sleep deprivation (SD) on urine output and renal water, sodium, and solute handling in healthy young volunteers. Twenty young adults (10 male) were recruited for two 24-h studies under standardized dietary conditions. During one of the two admissions, subjects were deprived of sleep. Urine output, electrolyte excretions, and osmolar excretions were calculated. Activated renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin, and atrial natriuretic peptide were measured in plasma, whereas prostaglandin E(2) and melatonin were measured in urine. SD markedly increased the diuresis and led to excess renal sodium excretion. The effect was more pronounced in men who shared significantly higher diuresis levels during SD compared with women. Renal water handling and arginine vasopressin levels remained unaltered during SD, but the circadian rhythm of the hormones of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was significantly affected. Urinary melatonin and prostaglandin E(2) excretion levels were comparable between SD and baseline night. Hemodynamic changes were characterized by the attenuation of nocturnal blood pressure dipping and an increase in creatinine clearance. Acute deprivation of sleep induces natriuresis and osmotic diuresis, leading to excess nocturnal urine production, especially in men. Hemodynamic changes during SD may, through renal and hormonal processes, be responsible for these observations. Sleep architecture disturbances should be considered in clinical settings with nocturnal polyuria such as enuresis in children and nocturia in adults.

  11. Sleep after critical illness: Study of survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Agrawal, Anshu Kumar; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study aims to evaluate the sleep quality, architecture, sleep-related quality of life, and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors early after discharge. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, observational study, consecutive patients with ARDS discharged from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) underwent evaluation with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and overnight polysomnography. Patients having one or more of the following characteristics were classified as having abnormal sleep: ESS>10, PSQI>5, FOSQ <17.9, apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5, or AHI during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep ≥5. Results: Twenty patients (median interquartile range [IQR] age of 24 [22–28] years, 11 [55%] females) were included in the study. Acute febrile illness of unknown etiology with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome was the most common underlying etiology for ARDS. The median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 ratio and APACHE II scores on admission were 176 (151–191.5) and 14 (14–16), respectively. The median (IQR) duration of stay in the ICU was 10 days (7.3–19.5). The overall sleep efficiency (median [IQR], 54% [32.3–65.4%]) was poor. None of the patients had ESS>10, seven (35%) had global PSQI>5 and one had FOSQ <17.9. Ten (50%) patients had at least one characteristic that suggested abnormal sleep (4 insomnia, 2 central sleep apnea, 1 obstructive sleep apnea, 1 REM-SDB, and 2 with a high PSQI, but no specific sleep abnormality). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are common in ARDS survivors early after discharge from the ICU. PMID:27390455

  12. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M.; Baker, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on presleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 y) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5±2.3 y) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first four hours of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered four-six hours into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that presleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also

  13. Frontal predominance of a relative increase in sleep delta and theta EEG activity after sleep loss in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Foy, R.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation (40 h) on topographic and temporal aspects of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during sleep was investigated by all night spectral analysis in six young volunteers. The sleep-deprivation-induced increase of EEG power density in the delta and theta frequencies (1-7 Hz) during nonREM sleep, assessed along the antero-posterior axis (midline: Fz, Cz, Pz, Oz), was significantly larger in the more frontal derivations (Fz, Cz) than in the more parietal derivations (Pz, Oz). This frequency-specific frontal predominance was already present in the first 30 min of recovery sleep, and dissipated in the course of the 8-h sleep episode. The data demonstrate that the enhancement of slow wave EEG activity during sleep following extended wakefulness is most pronounced in frontal cortical areas.

  14. Activation of the prostaglandin system in response to sleep loss in healthy humans: Potential mediator of increased spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Monika; Lee, Erin; Cohen, Daniel; Mullington, Janet M.

    2009-01-01

    Insufficient duration of sleep is a highly prevalent behavioral pattern in society that has been shown to cause an increase in spontaneous pain and sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Prostaglandins (PG), in particular PGE2, are key mediators of inflammation and pain, and we investigated whether PGE2 is a potential mediator in sleep-loss induced changes in nociceptive processing. Twenty-four participants (7 females, age 35. 17.1yrs) stayed for 7 days in the Clinical Research Center. After two baseline days, participants were randomly assigned to either three days of 88 hours of total sleep deprivation (TSD, N=15) or 8 hours of sleep per night (N=9), followed by a night of recovery sleep. Participants rated the intensity of various pain-related symptoms every two hours across waking periods on computerized visual analog scales. PGE2 was measured in 24h-urine collections during baseline and third sleep deprivation day. Spontaneous pain, including headache, muscle pain, stomach pain, generalized body pain, and physical discomfort significantly increased by 5 to 14 units on a 100-unit scale during TSD, compared to the sleep condition. Urinary PGE2 metabolite significantly increased by about 30% in TSD over sleep condition. TSD-induced increase in spontaneous pain, in particular headache and muscle pain, was significantly correlated with increase in PGE2 metabolite. Activation of the PGE2 system appears to be a potential mediator of increased spontaneous pain in response to insufficient sleep. PMID:19560866

  15. Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin; Gregory, Kevin; Arsintescu, Lucia; Whitmire, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep loss, circadian desynchronization, and work overload occur to some extent for ground and flight crews, prior to and during spaceflight missions. Ground evidence indicates that such risk factors may lead to performance decrements and adverse health outcomes, which could potentially compromise mission objectives. Efforts are needed to identify the environmental and mission conditions that interfere with sleep and circadian alignment, as well as individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. Specifically, this report highlights a collection of new evidence to better characterize the risk and reveals new gaps in this risk as follows: Sleep loss is apparent during spaceflight. Astronauts consistently average less sleep during spaceflight relative to on the ground. The causes of this sleep loss remain unknown, however ground-based evidence suggests that the sleep duration of astronauts is likely to lead to performance impairment and short and long-term health consequences. Further research is needed in this area in order to develop screening tools to assess individual astronaut sleep need in order to quantify the magnitude of sleep loss during spaceflight; current and planned efforts in BHP's research portfolio address this need. In addition, it is still unclear whether the conditions of spaceflight environment lead to sleep loss or whether other factors, such as work overload lead to the reduced sleep duration. Future data mining efforts and continued data collection on the ISS will help to further characterize factors contributing to sleep loss. Sleep inertia has not been evaluated during spaceflight. Ground-based studies confirm that it takes two to four hours to achieve optimal performance after waking from a sleep episode. Sleep inertia has been associated with increased accidents and reduced performance in operational environments. Sleep inertia poses considerable risk during spaceflight when emergency

  16. Increased motor drive and sleep loss in mice lacking Kv3-type potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, F; Marks, G; Heintz, N; Joho, R H

    2004-04-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are widely expressed in the brain, including areas implicated in the control of motor activity and in areas thought to regulate arousal states. Although Kv3.1 and Kv3.3-single mutants show some physiological changes, previous studies revealed relatively subtle behavioral alterations suggesting that Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channel subunits may be encoded by a pair of redundant genes. In agreement with this hypothesis, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display a 'strong' mutant phenotype that includes motor dysfunction (ataxia, myoclonus, tremor) and hyperactivity when exposed to a novel environment. In this paper we report that Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice are also constitutively hyperactive. Compared to wildtype mice, double mutants display 'restlessness' that is particularly prominent during the light period, when mice are normally at rest, characterized by more than a doubling of ambulatory and stereotypic activity, and accompanied by a 40% sleep reduction. When we reinvestigated both single mutants, we observed constitutive increases of ambulatory and stereotypic activity in conjunction with sleep loss in Kv3.1-single mutants but not in Kv3.3-single mutants. These findings indicate that the absence of Kv3.1-channel subunits is primarily responsible for the increased motor drive and the reduction in sleep time.

  17. Sleep deprivation alters choice strategy without altering uncertainty or loss aversion preferences

    PubMed Central

    Mullette-Gillman, O'Dhaniel A.; Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A.; Liu, Jean C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences. PMID:26500479

  18. Can a Mathematical Model Predict an Individual’s Trait-like Response to Both Total and Partial Sleep Loss?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    CSR ) of 7 days of 3 h nightly time in bed. We then quantified the extent to which models developed using psychomotor vigilance task data under TSD...predicted performance data under CSR , and vice versa. The results showed that the models customized to an individual under one sleep-loss condition...chronic sleep restriction ( CSR ) [seven consec- utive days of 3 h nightly time in bed (TIB)]. In both studies, they quantified individual response to

  19. Epigenomics of Total Acute Sleep Deprivation in Relation to Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles and RNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Adrian E.; Mwinyi, Jessica; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite an established link between sleep deprivation and epigenetic processes in humans, it remains unclear to what extent sleep deprivation modulates DNA methylation. We performed a within-subject randomized blinded study with 16 healthy subjects to examine the effect of one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on the genome-wide methylation profile in blood compared with that in normal sleep. Genome-wide differences in methylation between both conditions were assessed by applying a paired regression model that corrected for monocyte subpopulations. In addition, the correlations between the methylation of genes detected to be modulated by TSD and gene expression were examined in a separate, publicly available cohort of 10 healthy male donors (E-GEOD-49065). Sleep deprivation significantly affected the DNA methylation profile both independently and in dependency of shifts in monocyte composition. Our study detected differential methylation of 269 probes. Notably, one CpG site was located 69 bp upstream of ING5, which has been shown to be differentially expressed after sleep deprivation. Gene set enrichment analysis detected the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways to be enriched among the differentially methylated genes. These results provide evidence that total acute sleep deprivation alters the methylation profile in healthy human subjects. This is, to our knowledge, the first study that systematically investigated the impact of total acute sleep deprivation on genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in blood and related the epigenomic findings to the expression data. PMID:27310475

  20. The Effects of Acute Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance on Acoustic Trauma-Induced Tinnitus in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L.; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a debilitating condition and often accompanied by anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance, such as insomnia, may be a risk factor/predictor for tinnitus-related distress and the two conditions may share common neurobiological mechanisms. This study investigated whether acute stress-induced sleep disturbance could increase the susceptibility to acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats. The animals were exposed to unilateral acoustic trauma 24 h before sleep disturbance being induced using the cage exchange method. Tinnitus perception was assessed behaviourally using a conditioned lick suppression paradigm 3 weeks after the acoustic trauma. Changes in the orexin system in the hypothalamus, which plays an important role in maintaining long-lasting arousal, were also examined using immunohistochemistry. Cage exchange resulted in a significant reduction in the number of sleep episodes and acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus with acoustic features similar to a 32 kHz tone at 100 dB. However, sleep disturbance did not exacerbate the perception of tinnitus in rats. Neither tinnitus alone nor tinnitus plus sleep disturbance altered the number of orexin-expressing neurons. The results suggest that acute sleep disturbance does not cause long-term changes in the number of orexin neurons and does not change the perception of tinnitus induced by acoustic trauma in rats. PMID:25162023

  1. Trauma-Related Context Increases Sleep Disturbances in People with Acute Stress Disorder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ephraim S; Hoffman, Yaakov S G; Shrira, Amit

    2016-04-06

    In this study, we addressed how sleep is related to acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms, and how the presence of a trauma related-context moderates this relationship. This study (N = 140) was carried out during the 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict, during which 70% of Israelis were exposed to missile attacks. Findings show that participants with clinical ASD symptom levels reported more sleep disturbances than participants without clinical ASD symptom levels. More critically, this effect was only evident among respondents who had a reinforced security room in their houses. While reinforced security rooms offer protection against indirect missile damage, their relevance is salient in negative traumatic situations, which individuals with a clinical level of ASD are more sensitive to. Conversely, in houses without a reinforced security room, there was no difference in subjective sleep reports between individuals with or without clinical levels of ASD symptoms. Results are discussed in reference to trauma being activated by context and the ensuing effects on sleep. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. NR2A at CA1 Synapses Is Obligatory for the Susceptibility of Hippocampal Plasticity to Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Longordo, Fabio; Kopp, Caroline; Mishina, Masayoshi; Luján, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    A loss in the necessary amount of sleep alters expression of genes and proteins implicated in brain plasticity, but key proteins that render neuronal circuits sensitive to sleep disturbance are unknown. We show that mild (4–6 h) sleep deprivation (SD) selectively augmented the number of NR2A subunits of NMDA receptors on postsynaptic densities of adult mouse CA1 synapses. The greater synaptic NR2A content facilitated induction of CA3-CA1 long-term depression in the theta frequency stimulation range and augmented the synaptic modification threshold. NR2A-knock-out mice maintained behavioral response to SD, including compensatory increase in post-deprivation resting time, but hippocampal synaptic plasticity was insensitive to sleep loss. After SD, the balance between synaptically activated and slowly recruited NMDA receptor pools during temporal summation was disrupted. Together, these results indicate that NR2A is obligatory for the consequences of sleep loss on hippocampal synaptic plasticity. These findings could advance pharmacological strategies aiming to sustain hippocampal function during sleep restriction. PMID:19605640

  3. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Alex C.; Duboué, Erik R.; McDonald, Daniel M.; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S.B.; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly inter-connected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, while starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms because starved period mutants sleep like wild type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food. PMID:20541409

  4. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Keene, Alex C; Duboué, Erik R; McDonald, Daniel M; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S B; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-07-13

    Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly interconnected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, whereas starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep, suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep-suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms as shown by the fact that starved period mutants sleep like wild-type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons, we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food.

  5. Is There a Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Selami; Turan, Mahfuz; Arısoy, Ahmet; Gunbatar, Hulya; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Asker, Selvi; Yıldız, Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 2–5%. Its main clinical features are loud snoring and breathing stoppage during sleep. Ischemia could be a consequence of noise-induced hearing loss because cochlear oxygen tension is reduced during and after noise exposure. In this study, we evaluated auditory function in patients affected by OSA and simple snoring. Material/Methods A total of 66 participants (male to female ratio: 40:26) were included in the study, of which 21 were in the control group, 18 were in the simple snoring group, and 27 were in the OSA patient group. Polysomnography and audiometric examination were performed in all participants. Results The mean ages of the participants in the control, simple snoring, and OSA groups were 39.14±9.9, 37.28±8.2, and 41.56±8.99 years, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences among groups regarding age or sex; however, there were statistically significant differences among groups in body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index scores, mean saturation, and duration under 90% saturation. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the patient group and the control and simple snoring groups concerning the mean saturation, duration under 90% saturation, and the extended high frequency of hearing. Conclusions These data show that snoring may cause hearing loss at extended high frequencies. PMID:27588548

  6. EEG and ocular correlates of circadian melatonin phase and human performance decrements during sleep loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Khalsa, S. B.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between slow eye movements (SEMs), eye blink rate, waking electroencephalogram (EEG) power density, neurobehavioral performance, and the circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin in a cohort of 10 healthy men during up to 32 h of sustained wakefulness. The time course of neurobehavioral performance was characterized by fairly stable levels throughout the first 16 h of wakefulness followed by deterioration during the phase of melatonin secretion. This deterioration was closely associated with an increase in SEMs. Frontal low-frequency EEG activity (1-7 Hz) exhibited a prominent increase with time awake and little circadian modulation. EEG alpha activity exhibited circadian modulation. The dynamics of SEMs and EEG activity were phase locked to changes in neurobehavioral performance and lagged the plasma melatonin rhythm. The data indicate that frontal areas of the brain are more susceptible to sleep loss than occipital areas. Frontal EEG activity and ocular parameters may be used to monitor and predict changes in neurobehavioral performance associated with sleep loss and circadian misalignment.

  7. Acute Wernicke encephalopathy and sensorineural hearing loss complicating bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Ashif; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2012-01-01

    Health-care professionals must be aware of the mandatory vitamin supplementation in patients status post bariatric surgery. A recent increase in the number of gastric bypass surgeries in US has been associated with a proportional increase in Wernicke encephalopathy reports. Subtle or atypical neurologic features are not uncommon. Our report is of a female patient with acute Wernicke encephalopathy accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss six weeks after bariatric surgery. The patient had only a partial recovery of her neurologic symptoms eightweeks after vigorous therapy for this condition. Symptomatic thiamine (vitamin B1) and vitamin B12 deficiencies are particularly concerning effects of bariatric procedures, as neurologic and cognitive deficits may be long lasting or even permanent despite aggressive replacement therapy.

  8. Predicting Performance during Chronic Sleep Loss: Identification of Factors Sensitive to Individual Fatigue Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    that predicted for Trials 2 – 8 and 10 – 20. During each day of the sleep restriction period, the lowest predicted level of performance effectiveness ...the study, masking any fatigue- related effects . Comparing and Contrasting Chronic Sleep Restriction with Total Sleep Deprivation The experiment...sensitive to the performance impairments associated with total sleep deprivation but on which participants actually improved during chronic sleep

  9. Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep Prior to a Noxious Inflammatory Insult Influence Characteristics and Duration of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insufficient sleep and chronic pain are public health epidemics. Sleep loss worsens pain and predicts the development of chronic pain. Whether previous, acute sleep loss and recovery sleep determine pain levels and duration remains poorly understood. This study tested whether acute sleep deprivation and recovery sleep prior to formalin injection alter post-injection pain levels and duration. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 48) underwent sleep deprivation or ad libitum sleep for 9 hours. Thereafter, rats received a subcutaneous injection of formalin or saline into a hind paw. In the recovery sleep group, rats were allowed 24 h between sleep deprivation and the injection of formalin. Mechanical and thermal nociception were assessed using the von Frey test and Hargreaves' method. Nociceptive measures were performed at 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days post-injection. Results: Formalin caused bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that persisted for up to 21 days post-injection. Sleep deprivation significantly enhanced bilateral allodynia. There was a synergistic interaction when sleep deprivation preceded a formalin injection. Rats allowed a recovery sleep period prior to formalin injection developed allodynia only in the injected limb, with higher mechanical thresholds (less allodynia) and a shorter recovery period. There were no persistent changes in thermal nociception. Conclusion: The data suggest that acute sleep loss preceding an inflammatory insult enhances pain and can contribute to chronic pain. The results encourage studies in a model of surgical pain to test whether enhancing sleep reduces pain levels and duration. Citation: Vanini G. Sleep deprivation and recovery sleep prior to a noxious inflammatory insult influence characteristics and duration of pain. SLEEP 2016;39(1):133–142. PMID:26237772

  10. Benefits of napping and an extended duration of recovery sleep on alertness and immune cells after acute sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Faraut, Brice; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Dyzma, Michal; Rousseau, Alexandre; David, Elodie; Stenuit, Patricia; Franck, Thierry; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Kerkhofs, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between sleep and the immune system may offer insight into why short sleep duration has been linked to negative health outcomes. We, therefore, investigated the effects of napping and extended recovery sleep after sleep restriction on the immune and inflammatory systems and sleepiness. After a baseline night, healthy young men slept for a 2-h night followed by either a standard 8-h recovery night (n=12), a 30-min nap (at 1 p.m.) in addition to an 8-h recovery night (n=10), or a 10-h extended recovery night (n=9). A control group slept 3 consecutive 8-h nights (n=9). Subjects underwent continuous electroencephalogram polysomnography and blood was sampled every day at 7 a.m. Leukocytes, inflammatory and atherogenesis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-8, myeloperoxidase, fibrinogen and apolipoproteins ApoB/ApoA), sleep patterns and sleepiness were investigated. All parameters remained unchanged in the control group. After sleep restriction, leukocyte and - among leukocyte subsets - neutrophil counts were increased, an effect that persisted after the 8-h recovery sleep, but, in subjects who had a nap or a 10-h recovery sleep, these values returned nearly to baseline. Inflammatory and atherogenesis biomarkers were unchanged except for higher myeloperoxidase levels after sleep restriction. The increased sleepiness after sleep restriction was reversed better in the nap and extended sleep recovery conditions. Saliva cortisol decreased immediately after the nap. Our results indicate that additional recovery sleep after sleep restriction provided by a midday nap prior to recovery sleep or a sleep extended night can improve alertness and return leukocyte counts to baseline values.

  11. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  12. High risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction1

    PubMed Central

    Andrechuk, Carla Renata Silva; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to stratify the risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated at a public, tertiary, teaching hospital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify related sociodemographic and clinical factors. Method: cross-sectional analytical study with 113 patients (mean age 59.57 years, 70.8% male). A specific questionnaire was used for the sociodemographic and clinical characterization and the Berlin Questionnaire for the stratification of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Results: the prevalence of high risk was 60.2% and the outcome of clinical worsening during hospitalization was more frequent among these patients. The factors related to high risk were body mass index over 30 kg/m2, arterial hypertension and waist circumference indicative of cardiovascular risk, while older age (60 years and over) constituted a protective factor. Conclusion: considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to clinical worsening, it is suggested that nurses should monitor, in their clinical practice, people at high risk for this syndrome, guiding control measures of modifiable factors and aiming to prevent the associated complications, including worsening of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26487128

  13. Effect of sleep deprivation on tolerance of prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Martin, B J

    1981-01-01

    Acute loss of sleep produces few apparent physiological effects at rest. Nevertheless, many anecdotes suggest that adequate sleep is essential for optimum endurance athletic performance. To investigate this question, heavy exercise performance after 36 h without sleep was compared with that after normal sleep in eight subjects. During prolonged treadmill walking at about 80% of the VO2 max, sleep loss reduced work time to exhaustion by an average of 11% (p = 0.05). This decrease occurred despite doubling monetary incentives for subjects during work after sleeplessness. Subjects appeared to fall into "resistant" and "susceptible" categories: four showed less than a 5% change in performance after sleep loss, while four others showed decrements in exercise tolerance ranging from 15 to 40%. During the walk, sleep loss resulted in significantly greater perceived exertion (p less than 0.05), even though exercise heart rate and metabolic rate (VO2 and VCO2) were unchanged. Minute ventilation was significantly elevated during exercise after sleep loss ( p less than 0.05). Sleep loss failed to alter the continuous slow rises in VE and heart rate that occurred as work was prolonged. These findings suggest that the psychological effects of acute sleep loss may contribute to decreased tolerance of prolonged heavy exercise.

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Obesity, and the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Bender, S. Patrick; Talmor, Daniel; Festic, Emir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of respiratory complications and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) among surgical patients. OSA is more prevalent among obese individuals; obesity can predispose to ARDS. Hypothesis: It is unclear whether OSA independently contributes towards the risk of ARDS among hospitalized patients. Methods: This is a pre-planned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort of 5,584 patients across 22 hospitals with at least one risk factor for ARDS at the time of hospitalization from a trial by the US Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. A total of 252 patients (4.5%) had a diagnosis of OSA at the time of hospitalization; of those, 66% were obese. Following multivariate adjustment in the logistic regression model, there was no significant relationship between OSA and development of ARDS (OR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.32-1.22). However, body mass index (BMI) was associated with subsequent ARDS development (OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 1.00-1.04, p = 0.03). Neither OSA nor BMI affected mechanical ventilation requirement or mortality. Conclusions: Prior diagnosis of OSA did not independently affect development of ARDS among patients with at least one predisposing condition, nor the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital mortality. Obesity appeared to independently increase the risk of ARDS. Citation: Karnatovskaia LV, Lee AS, Bender SP, Talmor D, Festic E. Obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(6):657-662. PMID:24932146

  15. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sankatsing, S.U.C.; Hanselaar, W.E.J.J.; van Steenwijk, R.P.; van der Sloot, J.A.P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem, but reoperation was performed in the absence of another explanation. After the third episode of acute pulmonary oedema occurred, the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) was considered and confirmed. After starting treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during his sleep the patient had no further episodes of acute respiratory failure. Our case demonstrates that acute pulmonary oedema after cardiothoracic surgery can be caused or at least be precipitated by OSAS and should be suspected in patients with unexplained episodes of (recurrent) pulmonary oedema. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:310-2.) PMID:18827875

  16. Sleepless in Chicago: Tracking the Effects of Adolescent Sleep Loss During the Middle School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredriksen, Katia; Rhodes, Jean; Reddy, Ranjini; Way, Niobe

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the sleep patterns of 2,259 students, aged 11 to 14 years, on trajectories of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and grades was longitudinally examined using latent growth cross-domain models. Consistent with previous research, sleep decreased over time. Students who obtained less sleep in sixth grade exhibited lower initial…

  17. Effects of sleep deprivation on brain bioenergetics, sleep, and cognitive performance in cocaine-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Trksak, George H; Bracken, Bethany K; Jensen, J Eric; Plante, David T; Penetar, David M; Tartarini, Wendy L; Maywalt, Melissa A; Dorsey, Cynthia M; Renshaw, Perry F; Lukas, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    In cocaine-dependent individuals, sleep is disturbed during cocaine use and abstinence, highlighting the importance of examining the behavioral and homeostatic response to acute sleep loss in these individuals. The current study was designed to identify a differential effect of sleep deprivation on brain bioenergetics, cognitive performance, and sleep between cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants. 14 healthy control and 8 cocaine-dependent participants experienced consecutive nights of baseline, total sleep deprivation, and recovery sleep in the research laboratory. Participants underwent ³¹P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain imaging, polysomnography, Continuous Performance Task, and Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Following recovery sleep, ³¹P MRS scans revealed that cocaine-dependent participants exhibited elevated global brain β-NTP (direct measure of adenosine triphosphate), α-NTP, and total NTP levels compared to those of healthy controls. Cocaine-dependent participants performed worse on the Continuous Performance Task and Digit Symbol Substitution Task at baseline compared to healthy control participants, but sleep deprivation did not worsen cognitive performance in either group. Enhancements of brain ATP levels in cocaine dependent participants following recovery sleep may reflect a greater impact of sleep deprivation on sleep homeostasis, which may highlight the importance of monitoring sleep during abstinence and the potential influence of sleep loss in drug relapse.

  18. Changes in sleep, food intake, and activity levels during acute painful episodes in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Miaskowski, Christine; Savedra, Marilyn; Beyer, Judith E; Treadwell, Marsha; Styles, Lori

    2006-02-01

    As part of a larger study that examined pain experience, pain management, and pain outcomes among children with sickle cell disease, functional status (sleep, food intake, and activity levels) was examined during hospitalization for acute painful episodes. Children were asked to rate the amount of pain they experienced as well as the amount of time they slept, the amount of food they ate, and the amount of activity they had everyday. Children reported high levels of pain, which showed only a small decrease throughout hospitalization, and had disrupted sleep and wake patterns, decreased food intake, and decreased activity levels. Nurses need to routinely monitor functional status during acute painful episodes so that strategies to promote adequate sleep, food intake, and activity may be incorporated to minimize long-term negative outcomes in children with sickle cell disease.

  19. The spread of sleep loss influences drug use in adolescent social networks.

    PubMed

    Mednick, Sara C; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2010-03-19

    Troubled sleep is a commonly cited consequence of adolescent drug use, but it has rarely been studied as a cause. Nor have there been any studies of the extent to which sleep behavior can spread in social networks from person to person to person. Here we map the social networks of 8,349 adolescents in order to study how sleep behavior spreads, how drug use behavior spreads, and how a friend's sleep behavior influences one's own drug use. We find clusters of poor sleep behavior and drug use that extend up to four degrees of separation (to one's friends' friends' friends' friends) in the social network. Prospective regression models show that being central in the network negatively influences future sleep outcomes, but not vice versa. Moreover, if a friend sleeps sleeps < or =7 hours by 11%. If a friend uses marijuana, it increases the likelihood of marijuana use by 110%. Finally, the likelihood that an individual uses drugs increases by 19% when a friend sleeps < or =7 hours, and a mediation analysis shows that 20% of this effect results from the spread of sleep behavior from one person to another. This is the first study to suggest that the spread of one behavior in social networks influences the spread of another. The results indicate that interventions should focus on healthy sleep to prevent drug use and targeting specific individuals may improve outcomes across the entire social network.

  20. The acute inhibition of rapid eye movement sleep by citalopram may impair spatial learning and passive avoidance in mice.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, A; Laloux, C; Derambure, P; Bordet, R; Monaca Charley, C

    2013-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is known to be essential for memory. Hence, REM sleep deprivation impairs memory processes. The frequently prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known to cause REM sleep deprivation and to impair cognitive performance in humans and rodents. We suggested that impaired memory processes by citalopram in C57/BL6 mice could be explained by the acute inhibition of REM sleep. We hypothesized that those acute citalopram 5 and 10 mg/kg injections induced REM sleep deprivation, altered cognitive performance in passive avoidance, impaired spatial memory compared to controls. Three experiments have been realized: (1) mice received successively physiological saline, injection of citalopram 5 and 10 mg/kg and were recorded by polysomnographic recording after each injection. (2) Cognitive performance was evaluated in the passive avoidance with two groups of mice. One group received citalopram before training and one, after training. (3) Spatial learning was evaluated with another group of animals in the Y-maze test. At 5 and 10 mg/kg, citalopram delayed REM sleep onset and decreased REM sleep amounts (vs. controls). The same doses were administrated in the passive avoidance test and have significantly shortened latency to enter the dark compartment. In the Y-maze, citalopram-treated mice showed a decreased percentage of time spent in the novel arm in contrast to the two other arms compared with controls. We showed that citalopram impaired cognitive performance in behavioral tasks. Those impairments could be linked to REM sleep deprivation induced by citalopram although causal relationship needs to be investigated in further studies.

  1. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotor-stimulant effects and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Luis P; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Hollais, André W; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Costa, Jacqueline M; Berro, Laís F; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Wuo-Silva, Raphael; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that a prolonged period (48 h) of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) potentiates amphetamine (AMP)-induced behavioral sensitization, an animal model of addiction-related neuroadaptations. In the present study, we examined the effects of an acute short-term deprivation of total sleep (TSD) (6h) on AMP-induced behavioral sensitization in mice and compared them to the effects of short-term PSD (6 h). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice underwent TSD (experiment 1-gentle handling method) or PSD (experiment 2-multiple platforms method) for 6 h. Immediately after the sleep deprivation period, mice were tested in the open field for 10 min under the effects of saline or 2.0 mg/kg AMP. Seven days later, to assess behavioral sensitization, all of the mice received a challenge injection of 2.0 mg/kg AMP and were tested in the open field for 10 min. Total, peripheral, and central locomotion, and grooming duration were measured. TSD, but not PSD, potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by an acute injection of AMP and this effect was due to an increased locomotion in the central squares of the apparatus. Similarly, TSD facilitated the development of AMP-induced sensitization, but only in the central locomotion parameter. The data indicate that an acute period of TSD may exacerbate the behavioral effects of AMP in mice. Because sleep architecture is composed of paradoxical and slow wave sleep, and 6-h PSD had no effects on AMP-induced hyperlocomotion or sensitization, our data suggest that the deprivation of slow wave sleep plays a critical role in the mechanisms that underlie the potentiating effects of TSD on both the acute and sensitized addiction-related responses to AMP.

  2. Effects of sleep loss, time of day, and extended mental work on implicit and explicit learning of sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuer, H.; Spijkers, W.; Kiesswetter, E.; Schmidtke, V.

    1998-01-01

    Tacit knowledge is part of many professional skills and can be studied experimentally with implicit-learning paradigms. The authors explored the effects of 2 different stressors, loss of sleep and mental fatigue, on implicit learning in a serial-response time (RT) task. In the 1st experiment, 1 night of sleep deprivation was shown to impair implicit but not explicit sequence learning. In the 2nd experiment, no impairment of both types of sequence learning was found after 1.5 hr of mental work. Serial-RT performance, in contrast, suffered from both stressors. These findings suggest that sleep deprivation induces specific risks for automatic, skill-based behavior that are not present in consciously controlled performance.

  3. Electroencephalographic studies of sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.; Agnew, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Various experimental studies on sleep are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) effect of altered day length on sleep, (2) effect of a partial loss of sleep on subsequent nocturnal sleep; (3) effect of rigid control over sleep-wake-up times; (4) sleep and wakefulness in a time-free environment; (5) distribution of spindles during a full night of sleep; and (6) effect on sleep and performance of swiftly changing shifts of work.

  4. Single night video-game use leads to sleep loss and attention deficits in older adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jasper; Kar, Kellyann; Perry, Ashleigh; Reynolds, Chelsea; Gradisar, Michael; Short, Michelle A

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated adolescent video-game use prior to bedtime and subsequent sleep, working memory and sustained attention performance. Participants were 21 healthy, good-sleeping adolescents (16 male) aged between 15 and 20 years (M = 17.6 years, SD = 1.8). Time spent video-gaming and subsequent sleep was measured across one night in the sleep laboratory. There were significant correlations between time spent video-gaming and sleep and between video-gaming and sustained attention, but not working memory. Sleep duration, in turn, had a significant negative association with sustained attention performance. Mediation analyses revealed that the relationship between video-gaming and sustained attention was fully mediated by sleep duration. These results indicate that video-gaming affected the ability to sustain attention only in as much as it affected sleep. In order to minimise negative consequences of video-game playing, video-games should be used in moderation, avoiding use close to the sleep period, to obviate detriments to sleep and performance.

  5. Sleepless in Chicago: tracking the effects of adolescent sleep loss during the middle school years.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Katia; Rhodes, Jean; Reddy, Ranjini; Way, Niobe

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the sleep patterns of 2,259 students, aged 11 to 14 years, on trajectories of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and grades was longitudinally examined using latent growth cross-domain models. Consistent with previous research, sleep decreased over time. Students who obtained less sleep in sixth grade exhibited lower initial self-esteem and grades and higher initial levels of depressive symptoms. Similarly, students who obtained less sleep over time reported heightened levels of depressive symptoms and decreased self-esteem. Sex of the student played a strong role as a predictor of hours of sleep, self-esteem, and grades. This study underscores the role of sleep in predicting adolescents' psychosocial outcomes and highlights the importance of using idiographic methodologies in the study of developmental processes.

  6. Post-learning REM sleep deprivation impairs long-term memory: reversal by acute nicotine treatment.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Alzoubi, K H; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-07-15

    Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) is associated with spatial learning and memory impairment. During REM-SD, an increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by non-smokers have been reported. We have shown recently that nicotine treatment prevented learning and memory impairments associated with REM-SD. We now report the interactive effects of post-learning REM-SD and/or nicotine. The animals were first trained on the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, then they were REM-sleep deprived using the modified multiple platform paradigm for 24h. During REM-SD period, the rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1mg/kg s.c. every 12h: a total of 3 injections). The animals were tested for long-term memory in the RAWM at the end of the REM-SD period. The 24h post-learning REM-SD significantly impaired long-term memory. However, nicotine treatment reversed the post-learning REM-SD-induced impairment of long-term memory. On the other hand, post-learning treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24h enhanced long-term memory. These results indicate that post-learning acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of REM-SD on cognitive abilities.

  7. Use of Stimulants to Ameliorate the Effects of Sleep Loss during Sustained Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    and caffeine increase sleep latencies (Mitler et al., 1986; Zwyghuizen-Doorenbos, Roehrs , Lipshutz, Timms, & Roth, 1990). Caffeine improved auditory...vigilance reaction time (RT) even after a restricted sleep of 5 hr (L. Rosenthal, Roehrs , Zwyghuizen-Doorenbos, Plath, & Roth, 1991). Based on these...Rosenthal. L.. Roehrs . T.. Zwvghuizen-Doorenbos. A.. Plath. D.. & Roth, T. (1991). Alerting effects of caffeine after normal and restricted sleep . Neurops

  8. Investigating the effect of acute sleep deprivation on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis response to a psychosocial stressor.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ivan; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2017-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been previously identified as one potential mechanism that may explain the link between sleep deprivation and negative health outcomes. However, few studies have examined the direct association between sleep deprivation and HPA-axis functioning, particularly in the context of stress. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between acute sleep deprivation and HPA-axis reactivity to a psychosocial stressor. Participants included 40 healthy, young adults between the ages of 18-29. The current protocol included spending two nights in the laboratory. After an adaptation night (night 1), participants were randomized into either a sleep deprivation condition (29 consecutive hours awake) or a control condition (night 2). Following the second night, all participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Salivary cortisol was collected before, during, and after the TSST. Results indicated that there were significant group differences in cortisol stress reactivity. Specifically, compared to participants in the control condition, participants in the sleep deprivation condition had greater baseline (i.e., pre-stress) cortisol, yet a blunted cortisol response to the TSST. Taken together, a combination of elevated baseline cortisol (and its subsequent effect on HPA-axis regulatory processes) and a relative 'ceiling' on the amount of cortisol a laboratory stressor can produce may explain why participants in the sleep deprivation condition demonstrated blunted cortisol responses.

  9. A test of the effects of acute sleep deprivation on general and specific self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms: an experimental extension.

    PubMed

    Babson, Kimberly A; Trainor, Casey D; Feldner, Matthew T; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2010-09-01

    Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite model of anxiety and depression, these findings replicate and extend prior research by suggesting sleep deprivation among individuals without current Axis I disorders increases both state symptoms of anxiety and depression specifically, and general distress more broadly. Extending this work to clinical samples and prospectively testing mechanisms underlying these effects are important future directions in this area of research.

  10. Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F

    2007-08-15

    Adequate sleep is essential for general healthy functioning. This paper reviews recent research on the effects of chronic sleep restriction on neurobehavioral and physiological functioning and discusses implications for health and lifestyle. Restricting sleep below an individual's optimal time in bed (TIB) can cause a range of neurobehavioral deficits, including lapses of attention, slowed working memory, reduced cognitive throughput, depressed mood, and perseveration of thought. Neurobehavioral deficits accumulate across days of partial sleep loss to levels equivalent to those found after 1 to 3 nights of total sleep loss. Recent experiments reveal that following days of chronic restriction of sleep duration below 7 hours per night, significant daytime cognitive dysfunction accumulates to levels comparable to that found after severe acute total sleep deprivation. Additionally, individual variability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep restriction appears to be stable, suggesting a trait-like (possibly genetic) differential vulnerability or compensatory changes in the neurobiological systems involved in cognition. A causal role for reduced sleep duration in adverse health outcomes remains unclear, but laboratory studies of healthy adults subjected to sleep restriction have found adverse effects on endocrine functions, metabolic and inflammatory responses, suggesting that sleep restriction produces physiological consequences that may be unhealthy.

  11. Socially isolated mice exhibit a blunted homeostatic sleep response to acute sleep deprivation compared to socially paired mice.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Navita; Nair, Deepti; Gozal, David; Ramesh, Vijay

    2012-05-15

    Sleep is an important physiological process underlying maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health. Consequently, sleep deprivation (SD) is associated with adverse consequences and increases the risk for anxiety, immune, and cognitive disorders. SD is characterized by increased energy expenditure responses and sleep rebound upon recovery that are regulated by homeostatic processes, which in turn are influenced by stress. Since all previous studies on SD were conducted in a setting of social isolation, the impact of the social contextual setting is unknown. Therefore, we used a relatively stress-free SD paradigm in mice to assess the impact of social isolation on sleep, wakefulness and delta electroencephalogram (EEG) power during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Paired or isolated C57BL/6J adult chronically-implanted male mice were exposed to SD for 6h and telemetric polygraphic recordings were conducted, including 18 h recovery. Recovery from SD in the paired group showed a significant decrease in wake and significant increase in NREM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM), and a similar, albeit less robust response occurred in the isolated mice. Delta power during NREM sleep was increased in both groups immediately following SD, but paired mice exhibited significantly higher delta power throughout the dark period. The increase in body temperature and gross motor activity observed during the SD procedure was decreased during the dark period. In both open field and elevated plus maze tests, socially isolated mice showed significantly higher anxiety than paired mice. The homeostatic processes altered by SD are differentially affected in paired and isolated mice, suggesting that the social context of isolation stress may adversely affect the quantity and quality of sleep in mice.

  12. Acute enhancement of non-rapid eye movement sleep in rats after drinking water contaminated with cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Unno, Katsuya; Yamoto, Kurumi; Takeuchi, Kouhei; Kataoka, Aya; Ozaki, Tomoya; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Honda, Kazuki; Miura, Nobuhiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal widely used or effused by industries. Serious environmental Cd pollution has been reported over the past two centuries, whereas the mechanisms underlying Cd-mediated diseases are not fully understood. Interestingly, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) after Cd exposure has been shown. Our group has demonstrated that sleep is triggered via accumulation of ROS during neuronal activities, and we thus hypothesize the involvement of Cd poisoning in sleep-wake irregularities. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of Cd intake (1-100 ppm CdCl₂ in drinking water) on rats by monitoring sleep encephalograms and locomotor activities. The results demonstrated that 100 ppm CdCl₂ administration for 28 h was sufficient to increase non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep and reduce locomotor activities during the night (the rat active phase). In contrast, free-running locomotor rhythms under constant dim red light and their re-entrainment to 12:12-h light/dark cycles were intact under chronic (1 month) 100 ppm CdCl₂ administrations, suggesting a limited influence on circadian clock movements at this dosage. The relative amount of oxidized glutathione increased in the brain after the 28-h 100 ppm CdCl₂ administrations similar to the levels in cultured astrocytes receiving H₂O₂ or CdCl₂ in culture medium. Therefore, we propose Cd-induced sleep as a consequence of oxidative stress. As oxidized glutathione is an endogenous sleep substance, we suggest that Cd rapidly induces sleepiness and influences activity performance by occupying intrinsic sleep-inducing mechanisms. In conclusion, we propose increased non-REM sleep during the active phase as an index of acute Cd exposure.

  13. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  14. Gray Matter-Specific Changes in Brain Bioenergetics after Acute Sleep Deprivation: A 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.; Harper, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Interventions: Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation, and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. Measurements and Results: PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to sleep deprivation with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in phosphocreatine after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. Citation: Plante DT, Trksak GH, Jensen JE, Penetar DM, Ravichandran C, Riedner BA, Tartarini WL, Dorsey CM, Renshaw PF, Lukas SE, Harper DG. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla. SLEEP 2014

  15. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a high density EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.; Peterson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Results Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Conclusions Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. Significance These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. PMID:26596212

  16. The Use of Drugs to Reduce Hearing Loss Following Acute Acoustic Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-15

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0485 TITLE: The Use of Drugs to Reduce Hearing Loss Following Acute Acoustic...Final 25 June 2010 – 24 October 2013 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Use of Drugs to Reduce Hearing Loss Following Acute Acoustic Trauma...was to apply the same drug administration protocol to groups of animals exposed to a lower level continuous noise. Data from the treated and control

  17. Acute sleep deprivation: the effects of the AMPAKINE compound CX717 on human cognitive performance, alertness and recovery sleep.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Julia; Stanley, Neil; James, Lynette M; Wright, Nicola; Johnsen, Sigurd; Arbon, Emma L; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2012-08-01

    AMPA receptor modulation is a potential novel approach to enhance cognitive performance. CX717 is a positive allosteric modulator of the AMPA receptor that has shown efficacy in rodent and primate cognition models. CX717 (100 mg, 300 mg and 1000 mg) and placebo were studied in 16 healthy male volunteers (18-45 years) in a randomized, crossover study. Cognitive function, arousal and recovery sleep (by polysomnography) were assessed during the extended wakefulness protocol. Placebo condition was associated with significant decrements in cognition, particularly at the circadian nadir (between 03:00 and 05:00). Pre-specified primary and secondary analyses (general linear mixed modelling, GLMM) at each separate time point did not reveal consistent improvements in performance or objective alertness with any dose of CX717. Exploratory repeated measures analysis, a method used to take into account the influence of individual differences, demonstrated an improvement in attention-based task performance following the 1000 mg dose. Analysis of the recovery sleep showed that CX717 1000 mg significantly reduced stage 4 and slow-wave sleep (p ≤ 0.05) with evidence of reduced electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave and spindle activity. The study suggests that CX717 only at the 1000 mg dose may counteract effects of sleep deprivation on attention-based tasks and that it may interfere with subsequent recovery sleep.

  18. Long-Term Effect of Weight Loss on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Samuel T.; Reboussin, David M.; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard P.; Zammit, Gary; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Jakicic, John M.; Wing, Rena R.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Foster, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine whether the initial benefit of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity at 1 year is maintained at 4 years. Design: Randomized controlled trial with follow-up at 1, 2, and 4 years. Setting: 4 Look AHEAD clinical centers. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four obese adults with type 2 diabetes and OSA. Interventions: Intensive lifestyle intervention with a behavioral weight loss program or diabetes support and education. Measurements: Change in apnea-hypopnea index on polysomnogram. Results: The intensive lifestyle intervention group's mean weight loss was 10.7 ± 0.7 (standard error), 7.4 ± 0.7, and 5.2 ± 0.7 kg at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively, compared to a less than 1-kg weight loss for the control group at each time (P < 0.001). Apnea-hypopnea index difference between groups was 9.7 ± 2.0, 8.0 ± 2.0, and 7.7 ± 2.3 events/h at 1, 2 and 4 years respectively (P < 0.001). Change in apnea-hypopnea index over time was related to the amount of weight loss (P < 0.0001) and intervention, independent of weight loss (P = 0.001). Remission of OSA at 4 years was 5 times more common with intensive lifestyle intervention (20.7%) than diabetes support and education (3.6%). Conclusions: Among obese adults with type 2 diabetes and OSA, intensive lifestyle intervention produced greater reductions in weight and apnea-hypopnea index over a 4 year period than did diabetes support and education. Beneficial effects of intensive lifestyle intervention on apneahypopnea index at 1 year persisted at 4 years, despite an almost 50% weight regain. Effect of intensive lifestyle intervention on apnea-hypopnea index was largely, but not entirely, due to weight loss. Citation: Kuna ST; Reboussin DM; Borradaile KE; Sanders MH; Millman RP; Zammit G; Newman AB; Wadden TA; Jakicic JM; Wing RR; Pi-Sunyer FX; Foster GD; Sleep AHEAD Research Group. Long-term effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnea severity in obese patients with type 2 diabetes

  19. Loss of Melanopsin Photoreception and Antagonism of the Histamine H3 Receptor by Ciproxifan Inhibit Light-Induced Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Colas, Damien; Ikeme, Jesse; Ruby, Norman F.; Heller, H. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Light has direct effects on sleep and wakefulness causing arousal in diurnal animals and sleep in nocturnal animals. In the present study, we assessed the modulation of light-induced sleep by melanopsin and the histaminergic system by exposing mice to millisecond light flashes and continuous light respectively. First, we show that the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes is dose dependent as a function of light flash number. We found that exposure to 60 flashes of light occurring once every 60 seconds for 1-h (120-ms of total light over an hour) induced a similar amount of sleep as a continuous bright light pulse. Secondly, the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes was attenuated in the absence of melanopsin when animals were presented with flashes occurring every 60 seconds over a 3-h period beginning at ZT13. Lastly, the acute administration of a histamine H3 autoreceptor antagonist, ciproxifan, blocked the induction of sleep by a 1-h continuous light pulse during the dark period. Ciproxifan caused a decrease in NREMS delta power and an increase in theta activity during both sleep and wake periods respectively. The data suggest that some form of temporal integration occurs in response to millisecond light flashes, and that this process requires melanopsin photoreception. Furthermore, the pharmacological data suggest that the increase of histaminergic neurotransmission is sufficient to attenuate the light-induced sleep response during the dark period. PMID:26083020

  20. Loss of Melanopsin Photoreception and Antagonism of the Histamine H3 Receptor by Ciproxifan Inhibit Light-Induced Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Colas, Damien; Ikeme, Jesse; Ruby, Norman F; Heller, H Craig

    2015-01-01

    Light has direct effects on sleep and wakefulness causing arousal in diurnal animals and sleep in nocturnal animals. In the present study, we assessed the modulation of light-induced sleep by melanopsin and the histaminergic system by exposing mice to millisecond light flashes and continuous light respectively. First, we show that the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes is dose dependent as a function of light flash number. We found that exposure to 60 flashes of light occurring once every 60 seconds for 1-h (120-ms of total light over an hour) induced a similar amount of sleep as a continuous bright light pulse. Secondly, the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes was attenuated in the absence of melanopsin when animals were presented with flashes occurring every 60 seconds over a 3-h period beginning at ZT13. Lastly, the acute administration of a histamine H3 autoreceptor antagonist, ciproxifan, blocked the induction of sleep by a 1-h continuous light pulse during the dark period. Ciproxifan caused a decrease in NREMS delta power and an increase in theta activity during both sleep and wake periods respectively. The data suggest that some form of temporal integration occurs in response to millisecond light flashes, and that this process requires melanopsin photoreception. Furthermore, the pharmacological data suggest that the increase of histaminergic neurotransmission is sufficient to attenuate the light-induced sleep response during the dark period.

  1. Sleep disorders and acute nocturnal delirium in the elderly: a comorbidity not to be overlooked.

    PubMed

    Terzaghi, Michele; Sartori, Ivana; Rustioni, Valter; Manni, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a disturbance of consciousness and cognition that results in a confusional state. It tends to fluctuate in intensity and is often observed in older patients. Sleep is a window of vulnerability for the occurrence of delirium and sleep disorders can play a role in its appearance. In particular, delirious episodes have been associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, which is reported to be frequent in the elderly. Hereby, we present a case-report documenting the sudden onset of a confusional state triggered by obstructive sleep apnoea-induced arousal, together with a review of the literature on the topic. We emphasise that, among the many pathogenic factors implicated in delirium, it is worth considering the possible link between nocturnal delirium and the occurrence of impaired arousals. Indeed, the complex confusional manifestations of delirium could be due, in part, to persistence of dysfunctional sleep activity resulting in an inability to sustain full arousal during behavioural wakefulness. Arousals can be triggered by sleep disturbances or other medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware that older patients may present disordered sleep patterns, and make investigation of sleep patterns and disorders potentially affecting sleep continuity a key part of their clinical workup, especially in the presence of cognitive comorbidities. Correct diagnosis and optimal treatment of sleep disorders and disrupted sleep can have a significant impact in the elderly, improving sleep quality and reducing the occurrence of abnormal sleep-related behaviours.

  2. REM sleep loss associated changes in orexin-A levels in discrete brain areas in rats.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rachna; Khanday, Mudasir Ahmad; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2015-03-17

    Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) serves house-keeping function of the brain and its loss affects several pathophysiological processes. Relative levels of neurotransmitters including orexin A (Orx-A) in various parts of the brain in health and diseases are among the key factors for modulation of behaviors, including REMS. The level of neurotransmitter in an area in the brain directly depends on number of projecting neurons and their firing rates. The locus coeruleus (LC), the site of REM-OFF neurons, receives densest, while the pedunculo-pontine area (PPT), the site of REM-ON neurons receives lesser projections from the Orx-ergic neurons. Further, the Orx-ergic neurons are active during waking and silent during REMS and NREMS. Therefore, the level of Orx-A in discrete regions of the brain is likely to be different during normal and altered states, which in turn is likely to be responsible for altered behaviors in health and diseases, including in relation to REMS. Therefore, in the present study, we estimated Orx-A level in LC, cortex, posterior hypothalamus (PH), hippocampus, and PPT after 96 h REMSD, in post-deprivation recovered rats and in control rats. This is the first report of estimation of Orx-A in different brain regions after prolonged REMSD. It was observed that after REMSD the Orx-A level increased significantly in LC, cortex and PH which returned to normal level after recovery; however, the level did not change in the hippocampus and PPT. The Orx-A induced modulation of REMS could be secondary to increased waking.

  3. D1 Receptor Activation in the Mushroom Bodies Rescues Sleep Loss Induced Learning Impairments in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Seugnet, Laurent; Suzuki, Yasuko; Vine, Lucy; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Background Extended wakefulness disrupts acquisition of short term memories in mammals. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms triggered by extended waking and restored by sleep are unknown. Moreover, the neuronal circuits that depend on sleep for optimal learning remain unidentified. Results Learning was evaluated using Aversive Phototaxic Suppression (APS). In this task, flies learn to avoid light that is paired with an aversive stimulus (quinine /humidity). We demonstrate extensive homology in sleep deprivation induced learning impairment between flies and humans. Both 6 h and 12 h of sleep deprivation are sufficient to impair learning in Canton-S (Cs) flies. Moreover, learning is impaired at the end of the normal waking-day in direct correlation with time spent awake. Mechanistic studies indicate that this task requires intact mushroom bodies (MBs) and requires the Dopamine D1-like receptor (dDA1). Importantly, sleep deprivation induced learning impairments could be rescued by targeted gene expression of the dDA1 receptor to the MBs. Conclusion These data provide direct evidence that extended wakefulness disrupts learning in Drosophila. These results demonstrate that it is possible to prevent the effects of sleep deprivation by targeting a single neuronal structure and identify cellular and molecular targets adversely affected by extended waking in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:18674913

  4. Acute versus chronic grief: the case of pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Lasker, J N; Toedter, L J

    1991-10-01

    Conceptual and measurement problems in identifying those at risk of chronic grief are reviewed, and results are presented of a longitudinal study of people who have experienced pregnancy loss. Coping resources, particularly prior mental health and social support, were the best predictors of low scores on subscales of the Perinatal Grief Scale that indicate chronic grief reactions. Results also offer some evidence of delayed grief responses, especially among men and those who experienced early losses.

  5. Obese Veterans Enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Outpatient Weight Loss Clinic Are Likely to Experience Disordered Sleep and Posttraumatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie B.; Levy, James R.; Farrell-Carnahan, Leah; Nichols, Michelle G.; Raman, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to characterize sleep patterns, the quality and duration of sleep, and estimate the prevalence of common sleep disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a hospital-based Veterans Affairs MOVE! (Managing Overweight Veterans Everywhere) clinic. Methods: Participants completed five instruments: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Smith's Measure of Morningness/Eveningness, Restless Legs Syndrome Rating Scale, the STOP Questionnaire, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist – Civilian Version (PCL-C). Results: Enrolled Veterans (n = 96) were mostly male (78%), African American (49%), mean age 58 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, and mean body mass index (BMI) 38.4 kg/m2 (SD 8.4). By PSQI, 89% rated sleep quality as “poor” (mean = 11.1, SD = 5.1), consistent with severely impaired sleep. Most were at high risk for sleep disorders including restless leg syndrome (53%), obstructive sleep apnea (66%), and circadian sleep disorders (72%). Forty-seven percent endorsed clinically significant symptoms of PTSD. Hypotheses-generating regression models suggest sleep latency (minutes before falling asleep) was associated with BMI (p = 0.018). Bedtime, getting up time, hours of sleep, waking up in the middle of the night or early morning, having to get up to use the bathroom, inability to breathe comfortably, cough or snore loudly, feeling too cold or too hot, having bad dreams, pain, and frequency of having trouble sleeping, were not significantly associated with BMI. Conclusions: Our cross-sectional study suggests that sleep difficulties are common among Veterans referred to a weight loss program at a Veterans Affairs Hospital. Controlled studies are needed to investigate whether the results are generalizable and whether obesity among veterans is a risk factor for sleep disorders and PTSD. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 943. Citation: Mayer SB

  6. Effect of repeated normobaric hypoxia exposures during sleep on acute mountain sickness, exercise performance, and sleep during exposure to terrestrial altitude.

    PubMed

    Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen R; Beidleman, Beth A; Demes, Robby; Staab, Janet E; Jones, Juli E; Cymerman, Allen

    2011-02-01

    There is an expectation that repeated daily exposures to normobaric hypoxia (NH) will induce ventilatory acclimatization and lessen acute mountain sickness (AMS) and the exercise performance decrement during subsequent hypobaric hypoxia (HH) exposure. However, this notion has not been tested objectively. Healthy, unacclimatized sea-level (SL) residents slept for 7.5 h each night for 7 consecutive nights in hypoxia rooms under NH [n = 14, 24 ± 5 (SD) yr] or "sham" (n = 9, 25 ± 6 yr) conditions. The ambient percent O(2) for the NH group was progressively reduced by 0.3% [150 m equivalent (equiv)] each night from 16.2% (2,200 m equiv) on night 1 to 14.4% (3,100 m equiv) on night 7, while that for the ventilatory- and exercise-matched sham group remained at 20.9%. Beginning at 25 h after sham or NH treatment, all subjects ascended and lived for 5 days at HH (4,300 m). End-tidal Pco(2), O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))), AMS, and heart rate were measured repeatedly during daytime rest, sleep, or exercise (11.3-km treadmill time trial). From pre- to posttreatment at SL, resting end-tidal Pco(2) decreased (P < 0.01) for the NH (from 39 ± 3 to 35 ± 3 mmHg), but not for the sham (from 39 ± 2 to 38 ± 3 mmHg), group. Throughout HH, only sleep Sa(O(2)) was higher (80 ± 1 vs. 76 ± 1%, P < 0.05) and only AMS upon awakening was lower (0.34 ± 0.12 vs. 0.83 ± 0.14, P < 0.02) in the NH than the sham group; no other between-group rest, sleep, or exercise differences were observed at HH. These results indicate that the ventilatory acclimatization induced by NH sleep was primarily expressed during HH sleep. Under HH conditions, the higher sleep Sa(O(2)) may have contributed to a lessening of AMS upon awakening but had no impact on AMS or exercise performance for the remainder of each day.

  7. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and loss of the RUNX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Berger, Roland; Busson, Maryvonne; Dastugue, Nicole; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Michaux, Lucienne; Hagemeijer, Anne; Quilichini, Benoît; Benattar, Laurence; Bernard, Olivier; Romana, Serge P

    2006-01-01

    Since the RUNX1 gene contributes to megakaryopoiesis and acquired trisomy 21 is the most frequent numerical chromosome anomaly in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMLK), a systematic study of RUNX1 abnormalities was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in AMLK patients. Four abnormalities were detected among 15 patients. One copy of RUNX1 was completeley or partially lost in three patients and translocated onto Xq24 in the fourth. The possible consequences of RUNX1 haploinsufficiency are discussed.

  8. Ghrelin, Sleep Reduction and Evening Preference: Relationships to CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Garaulet, Marta; Sánchez-Moreno, Carmen; Smith, Caren E.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Nicolás, Francisco; Ordovás, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK), an essential element of the positive regulatory arm in the human biological clock, is involved in metabolic regulation. The aim was to investigate the behavioral (sleep duration, eating patterns and chronobiological characteristics) and hormonal (plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations) factors which could explain the previously reported association between the CLOCK 3111T/C SNP and weight loss. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 1495 overweight/obese subjects (BMI: 25–40 kg/m2) of 20–65 y. who attended outpatient obesity clinics in Murcia, in southeastern Spain. We detected an association between the CLOCK 3111T/C SNP and weight loss, which was particularly evident after 12–14 weeks of treatment (P = 0.038). Specifically, carriers of the minor C allele were more resistant to weight loss than TT individuals (Mean±SEM) (8.71±0.59 kg vs 10.4±0.57 kg) C and TT respectively. In addition, our data show that minor C allele carriers had: 1. shorter sleep duration Mean ± SEM (7.0±0.05 vs 7.3±0.05) C and TT respectively (P = 0.039), 2. higher plasma ghrelin concentrations Mean ± SEM (pg/ml) (1108±49 vs 976±47)(P = 0.034); 3. delayed breakfast time; 4. evening preference and 5. less compliance with a Mediterranean Diet pattern, as compared with TT homozygotes. Conclusions/Significance Sleep reduction, changes in ghrelin values, alterations of eating behaviors and evening preference that characterized CLOCK 3111C carriers could be affecting weight loss. Our results support the hypothesis that the influence of the CLOCK gene may extend to a broad range of variables linked with human behaviors. PMID:21386998

  9. Correlates and Escitalopram Treatment Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the correlates of sleep disturbance and to assess escitalopram treatment effects of depression on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design: A cross-sectional study in patients with ACS within 2 w post-ACS, and a 24-w double-blind controlled trial of escitalopram against placebo for patients with ACS who have comorbid depressive disorders. Setting: A university hospital in South Korea. Participants: There were 1,152 patients with ACS who were consecutively recruited. Of 446 patients with comorbid depressive disorders, 300 were randomized to the trial. Measurements and Results: Sleep disturbance was evaluated by the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed, including cardiovascular risk factors, current cardiac status, and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were most strongly and consistently associated with sleep disturbance. In addition, older age, female sex, hypertension, and more severe ACS status were associated with certain aspects of sleep disturbance. Escitalopram was significantly superior to placebo for improving sleep disturbance over the 24-w treatment period. These effects were substantially explained by improvement in depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Depression screening is indicated in patients with acute coronary syndrome with sleep disturbance. Successful treatment of depression has beneficial effects on sleep outcomes in these patients. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrial.gov identifier for the 24-w drug trial, NCT00419471. Citation: Kim JM, Stewart R, Bae KY, Kang HJ, Kim SW, Shin IS, Hong YJ, Ahn Y, Jeong MH, Yoon JS. Correlates and escitalopram treatment effects on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1105–1111. PMID:25581916

  10. The Association of Lesion Location and Sleep Related Breathing Disorder in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Teuber, Anja; Wersching, Heike; Young, Peter; Dittrich, Ralf; Ritter, Martin; Dziewas, Rainer; Minnerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) are common in patients with ischemic stroke and are associated with poor outcome. SRBD after stroke were assumed to be a direct consequence of injury of specific central nervous system structures. However, whether specific locations of ischemic infarcts cause SRBD is yet unknown. We therefore investigated the association of ischemic lesion location with SRBD. Methods Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated on our stroke unit were included in a prospective observational study. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and polygraphy in the acute phase after stroke. SRBD was defined by an apnea—hypopnea index (AHI) ≥10. MRI were evaluated using standardized maps to depict voxel-wise probability distribution of infarction for patients with and without SRBD. Groups were compared using logistic regression analysis. Results Of 142 patients included, 86 (59%) had a SRBD. Age, body mass index and prevalence of arterial hypertension were significantly higher in patients with SRBD. There was no statistically significant association between any lesion location and SRBD. Conclusion We found no association of lesion location and SRBD in stroke patients, whereas established risk factors for SRBD, known from general population, were significantly associated with SRBD. Given the high prevalence of SRBD in stroke patients, these findings suggest that cerebral ischemia facilitates the occurrence of SRBD in patients with pre-existing risk factors rather than causing it by damaging specific central nervous system structures. Our findings can be used to identify stroke patients who might benefit from polygraphy screening. PMID:28135315

  11. Short-term memory deficits correlate with hippocampal-thalamic functional connectivity alterations following acute sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Chengyang, Li; Daqing, Huang; Jianlin, Qi; Haisheng, Chang; Qingqing, Meng; Jin, Wang; Jiajia, Liu; Enmao, Ye; Yongcong, Shao; Xi, Zhang

    2016-07-21

    Acute sleep restriction heavily influences cognitive function, affecting executive processes such as attention, response inhibition, and memory. Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between hippocampal activity and short-term memory function. However, the specific contribution of the hippocampus to the decline of short-term memory following sleep restriction has yet to be established. In the current study, we utilized resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the association between hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) and the decline of short-term memory following total sleep deprivation (TSD). Twenty healthy adult males aged 20.9 ± 2.3 years (age range, 18-24 years) were enrolled in a within-subject crossover study. Short-term memory and FC were assessed using a Delay-matching short-term memory test and a resting-state fMRI scan before and after TSD. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed using fMRI data for the left and right hippocampus to identify differences in hippocampal FC following TSD. Subjects demonstrated reduced alertness and a decline in short-term memory performance following TSD. Moreover, fMRI analysis identified reduced hippocampal FC with the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), temporal regions, and supplementary motor area. In addition, an increase in FC between the hippocampus and bilateral thalamus was observed, the extent of which correlated with short-term memory performance following TSD. Our findings indicate that the disruption of hippocampal-cortical connectivity is linked to the decline in short-term memory observed after acute sleep restriction. Such results provide further evidence that support the cognitive impairment model of sleep deprivation.

  12. Melatonin acutely improves the neuroendocrine architecture of sleep in blind individuals.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan; Smolnik, Rüdiger; Herms, Markus; Born, Jan; Fehm, Horst L

    2003-11-01

    In blind individuals, the absence of light cues results in disturbances of sleep and sleep-related neuroendocrine patterns. The Zeitgeber influence of light on the timing of sleep is assumed to be mediated by melatonin, a hormone of the pineal gland, whose secretion is inhibited by light and enhanced during darkness. Here, we investigated whether a single administration of melatonin improves sleep and associated neuroendocrine patterns in blind individuals. In a double-blind crossover study, 12 totally blind subjects received 5 mg melatonin and placebo orally 1 h before bedtime starting at 2300 h. The dose used enhanced blood melatonin concentrations to clearly supraphysiological levels. Melatonin increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency (P < 0.05, respectively) and reduced time awake (P < 0.05). The increment in total sleep time was primarily due to an increase in stage 2 sleep (P < 0.01) and a slight increase in rapid eye movement sleep (P < 0.06). Most important, melatonin normalized in parallel the temporal pattern of ACTH and cortisol plasma concentration. While after placebo, ACTH and cortisol levels did not differ between early and late sleep, melatonin induced the typical suppression of pituitary-adrenal activity during early sleep and a distinct rise during late sleep (P < 0.01, respectively). Cortisol nadir values were also decreased after melatonin (P < 0.05). We conclude from these data that in totally blind individuals the single administration of a clearly pharmacological dose of melatonin can improve sleep function by synchronizing in time the inhibition of pituitary-adrenal activity with central nervous sleep processes.

  13. Ventral medullary control of rapid eye movement sleep and atonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael C; Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Guo, Chun-Ni; Chang, Catie; Fuller, Patrick M; Lu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Discrete populations of neurons at multiple levels of the brainstem control rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the accompanying loss of postural muscle tone, or atonia. The specific contributions of these brainstem cell populations to REM sleep control remains incompletely understood. Here we show in rats that viral vector-based lesions of the ventromedial medulla at a level rostral to the inferior olive (pSOM) produced violent myoclonic twitches and abnormal electromyographic spikes, but not complete loss of tonic atonia, during REM sleep. Motor tone during non-REM (NREM) sleep was unaffected in these same animals. Acute chemogenetic activation of pSOM neurons in rats robustly and selectively suppressed REM sleep but not NREM sleep. Similar lesions targeting the more rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) did not affect sleep or atonia, while chemogenetic stimulation of the RVM produced wakefulness and reduced sleep. Finally, selective activation of vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) pSOM neurons in mice produced complete suppression of REM sleep whereas their loss increased EMG spikes during REM sleep. These results reveal a key contribution of the pSOM and specifically the VGAT+ neurons in this region in REM sleep and motor control.

  14. Successful physical exercise-induced weight loss is modulated by habitual sleep duration in the elderly: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Monique; Sobieray, Uwe; Becke, Andreas; Düzel, Emrah; Cohrs, Stefan; Müller, Notger G

    2017-02-01

    Although it is widely accepted that physical exercise promotes weight loss, physical exercise alone had been found to result in only marginal weight loss compared to no treatment. Interestingly, both subjective and objective sleep duration have been shown to be negatively correlated to the body mass index (BMI). Despite this growing evidence of a relation between sleep duration and body weight, the role of habitual sleep duration in physical exercise-induced weight loss has not been studied so far. Twenty-two healthy elderly good sleepers aged 61-76 years (mean 68.36 years, 55 % female, BMI mean 25.15 kg/m(2)) either took part in a 12-week aerobic endurance training (3 × 30 min/week) or in a relaxation control (2 × 45 min/week). The BMI was assessed prior to and after intervention. Subjects maintained sleep logs every morning/evening during the training period, allowing for calculation of habitual sleep duration. Besides a significant main effect of the type of training, a significant interaction of type of training and habitual sleep duration was observed: while after treadmill training subjects who slept less than 7.5 h/night during intervention reduced their BMI by nearly 4 %, a comparable decrease in the BMI was found neither in subjects who slept more than 7.5 h nor after relaxation training independent of sleep duration. Sleep duration itself did not change in any group. Although results should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size, this is the first study to indicate that physical exercise might compensate for disturbed body weight regulation associated with short sleep duration.

  15. Behavioral training promotes multiple adaptive processes following acute hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Peter; Rosenior-Patten, Onayomi; Dahmen, Johannes C; Bell, Olivia; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The brain possesses a remarkable capacity to compensate for changes in inputs resulting from a range of sensory impairments. Developmental studies of sound localization have shown that adaptation to asymmetric hearing loss can be achieved either by reinterpreting altered spatial cues or by relying more on those cues that remain intact. Adaptation to monaural deprivation in adulthood is also possible, but appears to lack such flexibility. Here we show, however, that appropriate behavioral training enables monaurally-deprived adult humans to exploit both of these adaptive processes. Moreover, cortical recordings in ferrets reared with asymmetric hearing loss suggest that these forms of plasticity have distinct neural substrates. An ability to adapt to asymmetric hearing loss using multiple adaptive processes is therefore shared by different species and may persist throughout the lifespan. This highlights the fundamental flexibility of neural systems, and may also point toward novel therapeutic strategies for treating sensory disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12264.001 PMID:27008181

  16. Evaluating the Workload of On-Call Psychiatry Residents: Which Activities Are Associated with Sleep Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Brian K.; Cooke, Erinn O.; Sharfstein, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the workload inventory of on-call psychiatry residents and to evaluate which activities were associated with reductions in on-call sleep. Method: A prospective cohort study was conducted, following 20 psychiatry residents at a 231-bed psychiatry hospital, from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.…

  17. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Smith, Kelly E.; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Jackson, Garrett J.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Miller, Diane B.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:25956251

  18. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy.

  19. Acute and Chronic Stress: The Effects of Loss of Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-31

    items? 1 not hard 2 3 4 5 6 7 hard 7. How important is it to you to do well on the EFT? 1 not important 2 3 4 5 6 7 important GV <JLJb ABC 0 E ABC D E 229...the research on the effects of 5 unemployment that supports the notion that long-term unemployment is associated with chronic stress and loss of control...found to be associated with unemployment rates as well, usually at lags between 1 and 5 years (Brenner, 1971; Brenner & Mooney, 1983). In addition

  20. Treatment of obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS): effect of weight loss and interference of otorhinolaryngoiatric pathology.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, R; Colella, P; Cirignotta, F; Mondini, S; Gerardi, R; Buratti, P; Rinaldi Ceroni, A; Tartari, F; Schiavina, M; Melchionda, N

    1990-03-01

    The role of weight loss in the therapy of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) was investigated in 23 affected patients with various degrees of obesity (body mass index range 26.6-61.0) free of cranio-facial malformations. Weight loss resulted 18.5 +/- 14.7 (s.d.) kg and was significantly correlated with baseline BMI value (r = 0.94; P less than 0.0001). Weight loss significantly reduced the number of apneas + hypopneas per hour of sleep ((A + H)I) from 66.5 +/- 23.0 to 33.0 +/- 26.2 (P less than 0.0001) and improved the mean of oxygen desaturation peaks during apneas (mSaO2) from 81.9 +/- 6.9 to 87.6 +/- 3.9; P less than 0.001). A significant correlation was found between weight loss and changes in the (A + H)I (r = -0.55; P less than 0.01) and the mSaO2 (r = 0.46; P less than 0.05). The (A + H)I significantly improved in both patients who lost more than 10 kg (basal BMI: 42.3 +/- 10.0) and in those who lost less than 10 kg (basal BMI: 30.2 +/- 2.3), whereas the mSaO2 improved only in the former. Obese patients with moderate to heavy ORL pathological findings had worse pretreatment and final OSAS parameters than those with absent or mild ORL lesions. However, both groups showed a significant, although quantitatively different, improvement of the (A + H)I and mSaO2 after weight loss. Compared to those who were cured or improved after the treatment, patients who failed to obtain significant effects on OSAS clinical presentation also had a significantly higher prevalence of ORL pathology. It is concluded that: (1) weight loss improves parameters and clinical presentation of OSAS in the majority of affected obese patients; (2) a relationship exists between the entity of weight loss and that of improvement of the syndrome; (3) weight loss must be encouraged even in patients with mild to moderate overweight; (4) the presence of ORL pathology may represent a confusing factor in the interpretation of the results obtained after weight loss.

  1. Acute unilateral visual loss due to a single intranasal methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, J; Salu, P; Leblanc, A; Bervoets, S

    1999-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 35 year old male with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) presented himself three days after a single intranasal methamphetamine abusus. Directly upon awakening the day after the recreational use of this drug, he discovered an acute and severe visual loss of his right eye. This unilateral loss of vision was permanent and eventually lead to a pale and atrophic optic nerve head. The characteristics of this visual loss, together with the aspect of the optic nerve head was very similar to the classical non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We suggest a direct ischemic episode to the short posterior ciliary arteries due to this single intranasal abuse of methamphetamine as the underlying pathogenesis of this acute and permanent visual loss.

  2. Acute bithalamic infarct manifesting as sleep-like coma: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Honig, Asaf; Eliahou, Ruth; Eichel, Roni; Shemesh, Ari Aharon; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Auriel, Eitan

    2016-12-01

    Bilateral thalamic infarction (BTI) typically presents as a sleep-like coma (SLC) without localizing signs, posing a diagnostic challenge that may lead the treating physician to search for toxic or metabolic causes and delay treatment. We review our experience with BTI of different etiologies, and emphasize the critical role of timely imaging, diagnosis, and management in a series of 12 patients with a presentation of SLC and acute BTI who were managed in our Medical Centers from 2006-2015. In 11/12, urgent head CT scans showed normal brain tissue, while diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI revealed symmetric bilateral thalamic hyperintense lesions with variable degrees of brainstem involvement. In 1/12, CT scans revealed a contralateral subacute stroke from a thalamic infarct 1month earlier with a unilateral hyperintense lesion on DWI-MRI. From clinical and imaging findings (DWI-MRI, CT angiography and venography), etiology was attributed to embolic causes (cardio-embolism, artery-to-artery mechanism), small vessel disease, or deep sinus vein thrombosis secondary to dural arteriovenous (AV) fistula. Three patients had good outcomes after prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment in <3hours (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in two patients cardio-embolic etiology and neuro-endovascular repair in one patient with venous infarction due to a dural AV fistula). The diagnosis was made beyond the therapeutic window in seven patients, who were left with significant neurological sequelae. Higher awareness of BTI presenting as SLC is warranted. Optimal patient management includes urgent DWI-MRI. In cases of BTI, further imaging workup is indicated to provide a comprehensive assessment for etiology. Early diagnosis and prompt, targeted intervention are crucial.

  3. Interactive associations of depression and sleep apnea with adverse clinical outcomes after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Carney, Robert M.; Watanabe, Eiichi; Kawai, Kiyohiro; Kodama, Itsuo; Stein, Phyllis K.; Watkins, Lana L.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression and sleep apnea (SA) are common among patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and both are associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that there is an interaction between depression and SA in relation to prognosis in post-AMI patients. Methods Participants were 337 depressed and 379 nondepressed post-AMI patients who participated in a substudy of the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) clinical trial. SA was identified from Holter ECG at the entry by an algorithm that detects cyclic variation of heart rate. Results During a median follow-up of 25 months, 43 (6.0%) of patients died and 83 (11.6%) either died or experienced a recurrent AMI. Among 94 patients with both depression and SA, these endpoints occurred in 20 (21.3%) and 25 (26.6%), the prevalence that was 6.9 and 3.9 times higher than predicted probabilities by ENRICHD clinical risk scores (P <.001 for both). In the patients with depression alone, SA alone, or neither, the frequencies did not differ significantly from the predicted probability. Although both depression and SA predicted death and the combined endpoint, we observed depression by SA interactions (P = .03 and .02). SA independently predicted these endpoints in depressed (P <.001 and P = .001), but not in nondepressed patients (P = .73 and .84). Similarly, depression independently predicted these endpoints in SA (P <.001 for both), but not in non-SA patients (P = .61 and .12). Conclusion The combination of depression and SA estimated by CVHR is associated with long-term adverse clinical outcomes after AMI. PMID:23023681

  4. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy.

  5. Decreased salivary alpha-amylase levels are associated with performance deficits during sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Pajcin, Maja; Banks, Siobhan; White, Jason M; Dorrian, Jill; Paech, Gemma M; Grant, Crystal; Johnson, Kayla; Tooley, Katie; Fidock, Justin; Kamimori, Gary H; Della Vedova, Chris B

    2017-04-01

    During sleep deprivation, neurobehavioral functions requiring sustained levels of attention and alertness are significantly impaired. Discrepancies between subjective measures of sleepiness and objective performance during sustained operations have led to interest in physiological monitoring of operator performance. Alertness, vigilance, and arousal are modulated by the wake-promoting actions of the central noradrenergic system. Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been proposed as a sensitive peripheral measure of noradrenergic activity, but limited research has investigated the relationship between sAA and performance. In a laboratory-controlled environment, we investigated the relationship between sAA levels, subjective sleepiness, and performance during two days (50h) of total sleep deprivation. Beginning at 09:00, twelve healthy participants (5 females) aged 22.5±2.5years (mean±SD) provided saliva samples, recorded ratings of subjective sleepiness, completed a brief 3-min psychomotor vigilance task (PVT-B) and performed a 40-min simulated driving task, at regular 3h intervals during wakefulness. Ratings of subjective sleepiness exhibited a constant linear increase (p<0.001) during sleep deprivation. In contrast, sAA levels showed a marked diurnal profile, with levels increasing during the day (p<0.001) and steadily declining in the evening and early-morning (p<0.001). PVT-B (mean reaction time and mean slowest 10% reaction time) and simulated driving performance (speed deviation and lane deviation) also exhibited diurnal profiles across the two days of sleep deprivation. Performance peaked in the afternoon (p<0.001) and then steadily worsened as wakefulness continued into the evening and early-morning (p<0.001). Further analysis revealed that higher sAA levels in the hour preceding each performance assessment were associated with better PVT-B and driving performance (p<0.001). These findings suggest that sAA measures may be suitable indicators of performance

  6. Acute-onset unilateral psychogenic hearing loss in adults: report of six cases and diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Kataoka, Chinatsu; Tazoe, Mami; Takei, Yasuhiko; Nagai, Keiichi; Kohno, Naoyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    We encountered 6 rare cases of acute-onset unilateral psychogenic hearing loss in adults. All were women in their 20s and 30s. Three cases had severe hearing impairment characterized by hearing loss at every frequency; 2 cases had profound hearing impairment, and 1 case had low-frequency hearing impairment. Of the 6 cases, 3 had a history of hearing loss, and 1 had a history of psychogenic visual disturbance. All 6 cases were initially diagnosed as having idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss; all subsequently received steroid therapy. Three cases were not diagnosed as being psychogenic in origin until otoacoustic emissions and auditory brain responses were performed. Although the presence of distinctive clinical features (age, gender, and past history) is important for suspecting psychogenic hearing loss, objective audiological tests such as otoacoustic emissions are essential for diagnosing some cases. Compared to the existing reports of similar cases, our cases had a poorer prognosis (only 2 cases were cured).

  7. A Randomized Study on the Effect of Weight Loss on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Reboussin, David; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background The belief that weight loss improves obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has limited empirical support. The purpose of this 4-center study was to assess the effects of weight loss on OSA over a 1-year period. Methods The study included 264 participants with type 2 diabetes and a mean (SD) age of 61.2 (6.5) years, weight of 102.4 (18.3) kg, body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 36.7 (5.7), and an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 23.2 (16.5) events per hour. The participants were randomly assigned to either a behavioral weight loss program developed specifically for obese patients with type 2 diabetes (intensive lifestyle intervention [ILI]) or 3 group sessions related to effective diabetes management (diabetes support and education [DSE]). Results The ILI participants lost more weight at 1 year than did DSE participants (10.8 kg vs 0.6 kg; P < .00l). Relative to the DSE group, the ILI intervention was associated with an adjusted (SE) decrease in AHI of 9.7 (2.0) events per hour (P < .001). At 1 year, more than 3 times as many participants in the ILI group than in the DSE group had total remission of their OSA, and the prevalence of severe OSA among ILI participants was half that of the DSE group. Initial AHI and weight loss were the strongest predictors of changes in AHI at 1 year (P<.01). Participants with a weight loss of 10 kg or more had the greatest reductions in AHI. Conclusions Physicians and their patients can expect that weight loss will result in significant and clinically relevant improvements in OSA among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00194259 PMID:19786682

  8. Recovery Sleep Does Not Mitigate the Effects of Prior Sleep Loss on Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kozachik, Sharon L.; Opp, Mark R.; Page, Gayle G.

    2016-01-01

    Society has a rapidly growing accumulative sleep debt due to employment obligations and lifestyle choices that limit sleep opportunities. The degree to which poor sleep may set the stage for adverse symptom outcomes among more than 1.7 million persons who will be diagnosed with cancer is not entirely understood. Paclitaxel (PAC), a commonly used chemotherapy agent, is associated with painful, debilitating peripheral neuropathy of the hands and feet, which may persist long after adjuvant therapy is completed. The aims of this preclinical study were to determine the accumulative and sustained effects of sleep restriction on PAC-induced mechanical sensitivity in animals and whether there are male–female differences in mechanical sensitivity in PAC-injected animals. Sixty-two adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 31 females) were assigned to three cycles of intraperitoneal injections of PAC (1 mg/kg) versus vehicle (VEH; 1 ml/kg) every other day at light onset for 7 days, followed by seven drug-free days and to sleep restriction versus unperturbed sleep. Sleep restriction involved gentle handling to maintain wakefulness during the first 6 hr of lights on immediately following an injection; otherwise, sleep was unperturbed. Mechanical sensitivity was assessed via von Frey filaments, using the up–down method. Mechanical sensitivity data were Log10 transformed to meet the assumption of normality for repeated measures analysis of variance. Chronic sleep restriction of the PAC-injected animals resulted in significantly increased mechanical sensitivity that progressively worsened despite sleep recovery opportunities. If these relationships hold in humans, targeted sleep interventions employed during a PAC protocol may improve pain outcomes. PMID:25037450

  9. Sleep Loss and Fatigue in Shift Work and Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Shift work is highly prevalent in industrialized societies (>20%) but, when it includes night work, it has pronounced negative effects on sleep, subjective and physiological sleepiness, performance, accident risk, as well as on health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer. The reason is the conflict between the day oriented circadian physiology and the requirement for work and sleep at the “wrong” biological time of day. Other factors that negatively impact work shift sleepiness and accident risk include long duration shifts greater than 12 hours and individual vulnerability for phase intolerance that may lead to a diagnosis of shift work disorder; i.e., those shift workers with the greatest sleepiness and performance impairment during the biological night and insomnia during the biological day. Whereas some countermeasures may be used to ameliorate the negative impact of shift work on nighttime sleepiness and daytime insomnia (combined countermeasures may be the best available), there seems at present to be no way to eliminate most of the negative effects of shift work on human physiology and cognition. PMID:20640236

  10. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  11. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chernyshev, Oleg Y; McCarty, David E; Moul, Douglas E; Liendo, Cesar; Caldito, Gloria C; Munjampalli, Sai K; Kelley, Roger E; Chesson, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is critical for optimal clinical outcomes, but in-laboratory conventional polysomnograms (PSG) are not routinely practical. Though portable out-of-center type III cardiopulmonary sleep studies (out-of-center cardiopulmonary sleep testing [OCST]) are widely available, these studies have not been validated in patients who have recently suffered from AIS. We hypothesized that OCST in patients with AIS would yield similar results when compared to conventional PSG. Methods Patients with AIS had simultaneous type III OCST and PSG studies performed within 72 hours from symptom onset. The accuracy of OCST was compared to PSG using: chi-square tests, receiver operatory characteristic curves, Bland–Altman plot, paired Student’s t-test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Results Twenty-one out of 23 subjects with AIS (age 61±9.4 years; 52% male; 58% African-American) successfully completed both studies (9% technical failure). Nearly all (95%) had Mallampati IV posterior oropharynx; the mean neck circumference was 16.8±1.6 in. and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 30±7 kg/m2. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI) provided by OCST was similar to that provided by PSG (19.8±18.0 vs 22.0±22.7, respectively; P=0.49). On identifying subjects by OCST with an AHI ≥5 on PSG, OCST had the following parameters: sensitivity 100%, specificity 85.7%, PPV 93%, and NPV 100%. On identifying subjects with an AHI ≥15 on PSG, OCST parameters were as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 83.3%, PPV 81.8%, and NPV 100%. Bland–Altman plotting showed an overall diagnostic agreement between OCST and PSG modalities for an AHI cutoff >5, despite fine-grained differences in estimated AHIs. Conclusion Compared with PSG, OCST provides similar diagnostic information when run simultaneously in AIS

  12. Tinospora cordifolia ameliorates anxiety-like behavior and improves cognitive functions in acute sleep deprived rats

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rachana; Manchanda, Shaffi; Gupta, Muskan; Kaur, Taranjeet; Saini, Vedangana; Sharma, Anuradha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) leads to the spectrum of mood disorders like anxiety, cognitive dysfunctions and motor coordination impairment in many individuals. However, there is no effective pharmacological remedy to negate the effects of SD. The current study examined whether 50% ethanolic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (TCE) can attenuate these negative effects of SD. Three groups of adult Wistar female rats - (1) vehicle treated-sleep undisturbed (VUD), (2) vehicle treated-sleep deprived (VSD) and (3) TCE treated-sleep deprived (TSD) animals were tested behaviorally for cognitive functions, anxiety and motor coordination. TSD animals showed improved behavioral response in EPM and NOR tests for anxiety and cognitive functions, respectively as compared to VSD animals. TCE pretreatment modulated the stress induced-expression of plasticity markers PSA-NCAM, NCAM and GAP-43 along with proteins involved in the maintenance of LTP i.e., CamKII-α and calcineurin (CaN) in hippocampus and PC regions of the brain. Interestingly, contrary to VSD animals, TSD animals showed downregulated expression of inflammatory markers such as CD11b/c, MHC-1 and cytokines along with inhibition of apoptotic markers. This data suggests that TCE alone or in combination with other memory enhancing agents may help in managing sleep deprivation associated stress and improving cognitive functions. PMID:27146164

  13. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down syndrome and acute leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Gannutz, L.

    1995-11-06

    Acute leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) is often associated with additional changes in the number of structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose leukemic karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient 1 developed acute lymphocytic leukemia (type L1); disomy for chromosome 21 was evident in all blast cells examined. Loss of the paternal chromosome in the leukemic clone produced maternal uniparental disomy with isodisomy over a 25-cM interval. The second patient had acute monoblastic leukemia (type M5) with tetrasomy 21 in all leukemic cells. DNA polymorphism analysis showed duplicate paternal chromosomes in the constitutional genotype. The maternal chromosome was subsequently duplicated in the leukemic clone. The distinct inheritance patterns of chromosome 21 in the blast cells of these patients would appear to indicate that leukemogenesis occurred by different genetic mechanisms in each individual. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... about getting enough sleep. You learn to change negative thoughts and beliefs about sleep into positive thoughts ... problems, such as anxiety or depression . Loss of social support . Alcohol use (drinking). Side effects of medicines. Conditions ...

  15. Weight loss and brown adipose tissue reduction in rat model of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Denis; Vasconcellos, Luiz FT; de Oliveira, Patricia G; Konrad, Signorá P

    2008-01-01

    Background - Obesity is related to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), but its roles in OSAHS as cause or consequence are not fully clarified. Isocapnic intermittent hypoxia (IIH) is a model of OSAHS. We verified the effect of IIH on body weight and brown adipose tissue (BAT) of Wistar rats. Methods Nine-month-old male breeders Wistar rats of two groups were studied: 8 rats submitted to IIH and 5 control rats submitted to sham IIH. The rats were weighed at the baseline and at the end of three weeks, after being placed in the IIH apparatus seven days per week, eight hours a day, in the lights on period, simulating an apnea index of 30/hour. After experimental period, the animals were weighed and measured as well as the BAT, abdominal, perirenal, and epididymal fat, the heart, and the gastrocnemius muscle. Results Body weight of the hypoxia group decreased 17 ± 7 grams, significantly different from the variation observed in the control group (p = 0,001). The BAT was 15% lighter in the hypoxia group and reached marginally the alpha error probability (p = 0.054). Conclusion Our preliminary results justify a larger study for a longer time in order to confirm the effect of isocapnic intermittent hypoxia on body weight and BAT. PMID:18671859

  16. THE TIME COURSE OF ADENOSINE, NITRIC OXIDE (NO) AND INDUCIBLE NO SYNTHASE CHANGES IN THE BRAIN WITH SLEEP LOSS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE NREM SLEEP HOMEOSTATIC CASCADE

    PubMed Central

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; McCarley, Robert W.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Basheer, Radhika

    2011-01-01

    Both adenosine and nitric oxide (NO) are known for their role in sleep homeostasis, with the basal forebrain (BF) wakefulness center as an important site of action. Previously we reported a cascade of homeostatic events, wherein sleep deprivation (SD) induces the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent NO in BF, leading to enhanced release of extracellular adenosine. In turn, increased BF adenosine leads to enhanced sleep intensity, as measured by increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM) EEG delta activity. However, the presence and time course of similar events in cortex has not been studied, although a frontal cortical role for the increase in NREM recovery sleep EEG delta power is known. Accordingly, we performed simultaneous hourly microdialysis sample collection from BF and frontal cortex (FC) during 11h SD. We observed that both areas showed sequential increases in iNOS and NO, followed by increases in adenosine. BF increases began at 1h SD, while FC increases began at 5h SD. iNOS and Fos-double labeling indicated that iNOS induction occurred in BF and FC wake-active neurons. These data support the role of BF adenosine and NO in sleep homeostasis and indicate the temporal and spatial sequence of sleep homeostatic cascade for NO and adenosine. PMID:21062286

  17. Vicious circle of acute radiation toxicities and weight loss predicts poor prognosis for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Jiang, Xiong-ying; Qiu, Bo; Shen, Lu-Jun; Chen, Chen; Xia, Yun-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Weight loss during radiotherapy has been known as a negative prognostic factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients, but the factors related to weight loss during radiotherapy were not fully understood. Methods: A total of 322 newly diagnosed NPC patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between June 2002 and August 2006 were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier methods and log-rank test were applied for survival analysis; a multiple regression was used to identify the factors related to weight loss during radiotherapy. Results: The mean and median values of weight loss (%) during radiotherapy were 6.85% and 6.70%. NPC patients with critical weight loss (> 5.4%) have poorer overall survival (OS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) than the patients without critical weight loss (p = 0.002 and 0.021, respectively). Pre-radiotherapy weight, acute mucosal toxicity, acute pharynx and esophagus toxicity, and acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity were related to the weight loss during radiotherapy independently (p = 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.009, respectively). Conclusions: Acute radiation toxicities had significant and independent impact on weight loss during radiotherapy. The vicious circle of acute radiation toxicities and weight loss had bad effect on prognosis of NPC patients. PMID:28382146

  18. The body weight loss during acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia in sea level residents.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Wood, Helen; Yang, Hui-Huang; Liu, Yi-Ning; Wang, Xiu-Juan; Babb, Tony

    2010-12-25

    Weight loss is frequently observed after acute exposure to high altitude. However, the magnitude and rate of weight loss during acute exposure to high altitude has not been clarified in a controlled prospective study. The present study was performed to evaluate weight loss at high altitude. A group of 120 male subjects [aged (32±6) years] who worked on the construction of the Golmud-Lhasa Railway at Kunlun Mountain (altitude of 4 678 m) served as volunteer subjects for this study. Eighty-five workers normally resided at sea level (sea level group) and 35 normally resided at an altitude of 2 200 m (moderate altitude group). Body weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference were measured in all subjects after a 7-day stay at Golmud (altitude of 2 800 m, baseline measurements). Measurements were repeated after 33-day working on Kunlun Mountain. In order to examine the daily rate of weight loss at high altitude, body weight was measured in 20 subjects from the sea level group (sea level subset group) each morning before breakfast for 33 d at Kunlun Mountain. According to guidelines established by the Lake Louise acute mountain sickness (AMS) consensus report, each subject completed an AMS self-report questionnaire two days after arriving at Kunlun Mountain. After 33-day stay at an altitude of 4 678 m, the average weight loss for the sea level group was 10.4% (range 6.5% to 29%), while the average for the moderate altitude group was 2.2% (-2% to 9.1%). The degree of weight loss (Δ weight loss) after a 33-day stay at an altitude of 4 678 m was significantly correlated with baseline body weight in the sea level group (r=0.677, P<0.01), while the correlation was absent in the moderate altitude group (r=0.296, P>0.05). In the sea level subset group, a significant weight loss was observed within 20 d, but the weight remained stable thereafter. AMS-score at high altitude was significantly higher in the sea level group (4.69±2.48) than that in the moderate

  19. Carbohydrate-Binding Non-Peptidic Pradimicins for the Treatment of Acute Sleeping Sickness in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Reichardt, Niels C.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments available for African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited, with poor efficacy and unacceptable safety profiles. Here, we report a new approach to address treatment of this disease based on the use of compounds that bind to parasite surface glycans leading to rapid killing of trypanosomes. Pradimicin and its derivatives are non-peptidic carbohydrate-binding agents that adhere to the carbohydrate moiety of the parasite surface glycoproteins inducing parasite lysis in vitro. Notably, pradimicin S has good pharmaceutical properties and enables cure of an acute form of the disease in mice. By inducing resistance in vitro we have established that the composition of the sugars attached to the variant surface glycoproteins are critical to the mode of action of pradimicins and play an important role in infectivity. The compounds identified represent a novel approach to develop drugs to treat HAT. PMID:27662652

  20. Suppression of preoptic sleep-regulatory neuronal activity during corticotropin-releasing factor-induced sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma; Suntsova, Natalia; Kumar, Sunil; McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is implicated in sleep and arousal regulation. Exogenous CRF causes sleep suppression that is associated with activation of at least two important arousal systems: pontine noradrenergic and hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. It is not known whether CRF also impacts sleep-promoting neuronal systems. We hypothesized that CRF-mediated changes in wake and sleep involve decreased activity of hypothalamic sleep-regulatory neurons localized in the preoptic area. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CRF on sleep-wake measures and c-Fos expression in GABAergic neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) in different experimental conditions. Administration of CRF (0.1 nmol) during baseline rest phase led to delayed sleep onset and decreases in total amount and mean duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Administration of CRF during acute sleep deprivation (SD) resulted in suppression of recovery sleep and decreased c-Fos expression in MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons. Compared with vehicle controls, intracerebroventricular CRF potentiated disturbances of both NREM and REM sleep in rats exposed to a species-specific psychological stressor, the dirty cage of a male conspecific. The number of MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing c-Fos was reduced in the CRF-treated group of dirty cage-exposed rats. These findings confirm the involvement of CRF in wake-sleep cycle regulation and suggest that increased CRF signaling in the brain 1) negatively affects homeostatic responses to sleep loss, 2) exacerbates stress-induced disturbances of sleep, and 3) suppresses the activity of sleep-regulatory neurons of the MnPN and VLPO.

  1. Prediction of Vigilant Attention and Cognitive Performance Using Self-Reported Alertness, Circadian Phase, Hours since Awakening, and Accumulated Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Eduardo B.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Wyatt, James K.; Phillips, Andrew J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep restriction causes impaired cognitive performance that can result in adverse consequences in many occupational settings. Individuals may rely on self-perceived alertness to decide if they are able to adequately perform a task. It is therefore important to determine the relationship between an individual’s self-assessed alertness and their objective performance, and how this relationship depends on circadian phase, hours since awakening, and cumulative lost hours of sleep. Healthy young adults (aged 18–34) completed an inpatient schedule that included forced desynchrony of sleep/wake and circadian rhythms with twelve 42.85-hour “days” and either a 1:2 (n = 8) or 1:3.3 (n = 9) ratio of sleep-opportunity:enforced-wakefulness. We investigated whether subjective alertness (visual analog scale), circadian phase (melatonin), hours since awakening, and cumulative sleep loss could predict objective performance on the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), an Addition/Calculation Test (ADD) and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST). Mathematical models that allowed nonlinear interactions between explanatory variables were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Subjective alertness was the single best predictor of PVT, ADD, and DSST performance. Subjective alertness alone, however, was not an accurate predictor of PVT performance. The best AIC scores for PVT and DSST were achieved when all explanatory variables were included in the model. The best AIC score for ADD was achieved with circadian phase and subjective alertness variables. We conclude that subjective alertness alone is a weak predictor of objective vigilant or cognitive performance. Predictions can, however, be improved by knowing an individual’s circadian phase, current wake duration, and cumulative sleep loss. PMID:27019198

  2. The effect of acute sleep deprivation and fatigue in cardiovascular perfusion students: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Ashley B; Snyder, Alexandra C; Fernandez, Adam L; Boan, Andrea D; Malek, Angela M; Sistino, Joseph J

    2012-09-01

    Sleep deprivation as a result of long working hours has been associated with an increased risk of adverse events in healthcare professions but not in cardiovascular perfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on cardiovascular perfusion students. Testing with high-fidelity simulation after 24 hours of sleep deprivation allowed investigators to assess user competency and the effect of fatigue on performance. After informed consent, seven senior perfusion students were enrolled in the study (three declined to participate). The qualitative portion of the study included a focus group session, whereas the quantitative portion included administration of questionnaires, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), as well as clinical skills assessment using high-fidelity simulation. Subjects were assessed at three different intervals of sleep deprivation over a 24-hour period: baseline (6:00 AM), 12 hours (6:00 PM), 16 hours (10:00 PM), and 24 hours (6:00 AM) of wakefulness. During each scenario, normally monitored bypass parameters, including mean arterial pressure, activated clotting times, partial pressures of oxygen, partial pressures of carbon dioxide, and venous flow, were manipulated, and the subjects were required to return the parameters to normal levels. In addition, the scenario required calculation of the final protamine dose (using a dose-response curve) and detection of electrocardiography changes. Each task was varied at the different simulation sessions to decrease the effect of learning. Despite any lack of sleep, we hypothesized that, because of repetition, the times to complete the task would decrease at each session. We also hypothesized that the ESS and SSS scores would increase over time. We expected that the students would anticipate which tasks were being evaluated and would react more quickly. The average ESS scores progressively increased at each time period

  3. The Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation and Fatigue in Cardiovascular Perfusion Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Ashley B.; Snyder, Alexandra C.; Fernandez, Adam L.; Boan, Andrea D.; Malek, Angela M.; Sistino, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Sleep deprivation as a result of long working hours has been associated with an increased risk of adverse events in healthcare professions but not in cardiovascular perfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of sleep deprivation on cardiovascular perfusion students. Testing with highfidelity simulation after 24 hours of sleep deprivation allowed investigators to assess user competency and the effect of fatigue on performance. After informed consent, seven senior perfusion students were enrolled in the study (three declined to participate). The qualitative portion of the study included a focus group session, whereas the quantitative portion included administration of questionnaires, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), as well as clinical skills assessment using high-fidelity simulation. Subjects were assessed at three different intervals of sleep deprivation over a 24-hour period: baseline (6:00 am), 12 hours (6:00 pm), 16 hours (10:00 pm), and 24 hours (6:00 am) of wakefulness. During each scenario, normally monitored bypass parameters, including mean arterial pressure, activated clotting times, partial pressures of oxygen, partial pressures of carbon dioxide, and venous flow, were manipulated, and the subjects were required to return the parameters to normal levels. In addition, the scenario required calculation of the final protamine dose (using a dose–response curve) and detection of electrocardiography changes. Each task was varied at the different simulation sessions to decrease the effect of learning. Despite any lack of sleep, we hypothesized that, because of repetition, the times to complete the task would decrease at each session. We also hypothesized that the ESS and SSS scores would increase over time. We expected that the students would anticipate which tasks were being evaluated and would react more quickly. The average ESS scores progressively increased at each time

  4. Effects of acute microinjections of thyroid hormone to the preoptic region of hypothyroid adult male rats on sleep, motor activity and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Steven X; Giannopoulos, Phillip F; James, Thomas D; Martin, Joseph V

    2013-06-21

    Thyroid hormones induce short-latency nongenomic effects in adult brain tissue, suggesting that their acute administration would affect brain activity in intact animals. The influence on EEG-defined sleep of acute restoration of l-3,3'5-triiodothyronine (T3) to a sleep-regulatory brain region, the preoptic region, was examined in hypothyroid rats. Sleep parameters were monitored for 48 h weekly: for 24 h immediately following a control microinjection and for an additional 24h after a second microinjection including a T3 dose to the preoptic region or lateral ventricle. Male albino rats were implanted with EEG and EMG electrodes, abdominal temperature/activity transponders and unilateral lateral ventricle cannulae or bilateral preoptic region cannulae, and were given 0.02% n-propythiouracil (PTU) in their drinking water for 4 weeks. For histologically-confirmed bilateral preoptic region cannula placements (N=7), effects of T3 (especially a 3 μg dose) were apparent within 10h of injection as decreases in REM, NREM and total sleep and increases in waking and activity. Minimal effects of lateral ventricle T3 microinjection were demonstrated (N=5). Significant effects due to the time of day on the experimental measures were seen in both lateral ventricle and preoptic region groups, but these effects did not interact with the effect of administered hormone dose. These effects of T3 microinjection to the preoptic region were demonstrated after acute injections and within hours of injection rather than after chronic administration over days.

  5. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Ali; Naseri, Mahdi; Salaree, Mohammad Mahdi; Nehrir, Batool

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67) years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups) during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses. PMID:28032074

  6. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Ali; Naseri, Mahdi; Salaree, Mohammad Mahdi; Nehrir, Batool

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67) years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups) during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses.

  7. The acute effects of light on murine sleep during the dark phase: importance of melanopsin for maintenance of light-induced sleep.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M; Colas, Damien; Heller, H Craig

    2013-06-01

    Light exerts a direct effect on sleep and wakefulness in nocturnal and diurnal animals, with a light pulse during the dark phase suppressing locomotor activity and promoting sleep in the former. In the present study, we investigated this direct effect of light on various sleep parameters by exposing mice to a broad range of illuminances (0.2-200 μW/cm(2) ; equivalent to 1-1000 lux) for 1 h during the dark phase (zeitgeber time 13-14). Fitting the data with a three-parameter log model indicated that ~0.1 μW/cm(2) can generate half the sleep response observed at 200 μW/cm(2). We observed decreases in total sleep time during the 1 h following the end of the light pulse. Light reduced the latency to sleep from ~30 min in darkness (baseline) to ~10 min at the highest intensity, although this effect was invariant across the light intensities used. We then assessed the role of melanopsin during the rapid transition from wakefulness to sleep at the onset of a light pulse and the maintenance of sleep with a 6-h 20 μW/cm(2) light pulse. Even though the melanopsin knockout mice had robust induction of sleep (~35 min) during the first hour of the pulse, it was not maintained. Total sleep decreased by almost 65% by the third hour in comparison with the first hour of the pulse in mice lacking melanopsin, whereas only an 8% decrease was observed in wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings highlight the selective effects of light on murine sleep, and suggest that melanopsin-based photoreception is primarily involved in sustaining light-induced sleep.

  8. Analysis of audio-vestibular assessment in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Im, Gi Jung; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study demonstrated excellent hearing recovery following the combined treatment of diuretic and oral steroid, and electrocochleography (ECoG) was significantly higher than normal side. This study reports characteristics of acute low-tone hearing loss (ALHL) that show the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG, and excellent recovery, even-though low-tone hearing loss is worse, which can be different compared with sudden deafness. Objective To analyze ALHL without vertigo, this study compared the ALHL group with all patients exhibiting low-tone hearing loss and ear fullness. Hearing changes and vestibular functions were analyzed. Materials and methods ALHL was defined as a mean hearing loss of ≥ 30 dB at 125, 250, and 500 Hz, and ≤ 20 dB at 2, 4, and 8 kHz. From 156 cases of low-tone hearing loss of more than 10 dB without vertigo, 31 met the ALHL criteria and were subjected to audio-vestibular assessments including PTA, ECoG, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and caloric testing. Results In ALHL, low-tone hearing loss was 42.7 ± 9.5 dB, and 83.9% of ALHL significantly recovered by more than 10 dB. The ECoG in ALHL was 0.334 ± 0.11 (higher than 0.25 ± 0.08 on the normal side) and ECoG abnormality was 35.5% (the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG value).

  9. translin is required for metabolic regulation of sleep

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Bethany A.; Masek, Pavel; Mehta, Aradhana; Heidker, Rebecca; Bollinger, Wesley; Gingras, Robert M.; Kim, Young-Joon; Ja, William W.; Suter, Beat; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Keene, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of sleep or feeding has enormous health consequences. In humans, acute sleep loss is associated with increased appetite and insulin insensitivity, while chronically sleep-deprived individuals are more likely to develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, metabolic state potently modulates sleep and circadian behavior; yet, the molecular basis for sleep-metabolism interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the identification of translin (trsn), a highly conserved RNA/DNA binding protein, as essential for starvation-induced sleep suppression. Strikingly, trsn does not appear to regulate energy stores, free glucose levels, or feeding behavior suggesting the sleep phenotype of trsn mutant flies is not a consequence of general metabolic dysfunction or blunted response to starvation. While broadly expressed in all neurons, trsn is transcriptionally upregulated in the heads of flies in response to starvation. Spatially restricted rescue or targeted knockdown localizes trsn function to neurons that produce the tachykinin-family neuropeptide Leucokinin. Manipulation of neural activity in Leucokinin neurons revealed these neurons to be required for starvation-induced sleep suppression. Taken together, these findings establish trsn as an essential integrator of sleep and metabolic state, with implications for understanding the neural mechanism underlying sleep disruption in response to environmental perturbation. PMID:27020744

  10. Hearing loss during osteosarcoma chemotherapy: when acute ifosfamide toxicity revealed unnoticed methotrexate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Guillaume; Chappé, Céline; Taque, Sophie; Bruneau, Bertrand; Gandemer, Virginie

    2014-03-01

    Ifosfamide and methotrexate are widely used for the treatment of pediatric osteosarcoma. However, both these chemotherapeutic drugs can cause encephalopathy. A 17-year-old girl presented with profound hearing loss and dizziness during a postoperative course of ifosfamide, 20 days after a course of methotrexate. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral white matter hypersignal in Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery sequences. The clinical evolution was rapidly favorable after methylene blue infusion. This is the second reported case of acute deafness, possibly associated with ifosfamide, whereas MRI data revealed unnoticed chronic methotrexate toxicity. Systematic MRI screening and hearing evaluation may be useful in such cases.

  11. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Chiara F.; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Attianese, Greta M.P. Giordano; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:27323395

  12. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Chiara F; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Giordano Attianese, Greta M P; Cooper, Laurence J N; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-08-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy.

  13. Developmental differences in EEG and sleep responses to acute ethanol administration and its withdrawal (hangover) in adolescent and adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N

    2013-12-01

    Age-related differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the increased risk for the development of alcoholism seen in teens that begin drinking at an early age. The present study evaluated the acute and protracted (hangover) effects of ethanol in adolescent (P33-P40) and adult (P100-P107) Wistar rats, using the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). Six minutes of EEG was recorded during waking, 15 min after administration of 0, 1.5, or 3.0 g/kg ethanol, and for 3 h at 20 h post ethanol, during the rats' next sleep cycle. Significantly higher overall frontal and parietal cortical power was seen in a wide range of EEG frequencies in adolescent rats as compared to adult rats in their waking EEG. Acute administration of ethanol did not produce differences between adolescents and adults on behavioral measures of acute intoxication. However, it did produce a significantly less intense acute EEG response to ethanol in the theta frequencies in parietal cortex in the adolescents as compared to the adults. At 20 h following acute ethanol administration, during the rats' next sleep cycle, a decrease in slow-wave frequencies (1-4 Hz) was seen and the adolescent rats were found to display more reduction in the slow-wave frequencies than the adults did. The present study found that adolescent rats, as compared to adults, demonstrate low sensitivity to acute ethanol administration in the theta frequencies and more susceptibility to disruption of slow-wave sleep during hangover. These studies may lend support to the idea that these traits may contribute to increased risk for alcohol use disorders seen in adults who begin drinking in their early teenage years.

  14. Predicting Risk in Space: Genetic Markers for Differential Vulnerability to Sleep Restriction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F

    2012-08-01

    Several laboratories have found large, highly reliable individual differences in the magnitude of cognitive performance, fatigue and sleepiness, and sleep homeostatic vulnerability to acute total sleep deprivation and to chronic sleep restriction in healthy adults. Such individual differences in neurobehavioral performance are also observed in space flight as a result of sleep loss. The reasons for these stable phenotypic differential vulnerabilities are unknown: such differences are not yet accounted for by demographic factors, IQ or sleep need, and moreover, psychometric scales do not predict those individuals cognitively vulnerable to sleep loss. The stable, trait-like (phenotypic) inter-individual differences observed in response to sleep loss-with intraclass correlation coefficients accounting for 58%-92% of the variance in neurobehavioral measures- point to an underlying genetic component. To this end, we utilized multi-day highly controlled laboratory studies to investigate the role of various common candidate gene variants-each independently-in relation to cumulative neurobehavioral and sleep homeostatic responses to sleep restriction. These data suggest that common genetic variations (polymorphisms) involved in sleep-wake, circadian, and cognitive regulation may serve as markers for prediction of inter-individual differences in sleep homeostatic and neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep restriction in healthy adults. Identification of genetic predictors of differential vulnerability to sleep restriction-as determined from candidate gene studies-will help identify astronauts most in need of fatigue countermeasures in space flight and inform medical standards for obtaining adequate sleep in space. This review summarizes individual differences in neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep deprivation and ongoing genetic efforts to identify markers of such differences.

  15. Acupuncture as a primary and independent treatment in the acute phases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is an otological emergency defined as a rapid hearing loss, seriously affects patient's social life. To data, no study has reported the treatment by acupuncture alone in the acute phase. In this report, Acupuncture and Moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer is outlined. The patient was a 26-year-old young woman who had an SSHL coupled with ear fullness. The patient had no past medical history, but she had undergone variable emotions and had a history of excessive noise exposure. The patient refused to receive any medicine especially steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. She just only received acupuncture treatment. Her symptoms and outcome measurements were improved every week and completely recovered after the last week. Even though the article presents a single case and is based on self-reports, there are very clear trends on how patients with SSHL responded to acupuncture treatments. PMID:27368045

  16. Derivation of a Predictive Model for Graft Loss Following Acute Kidney Injury in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Amber O.; van Walraven, Carl; Fergusson, Dean; Garg, Amit X.; Knoll, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in the kidney transplant population. Objective: To derive a multivariable survival model that predicts time to graft loss following AKI. Design: Retrospective cohort study using health care administrative and laboratory databases. Setting: Southwestern Ontario (1999-2013) and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (1996-2013). Patients: We included first-time kidney only transplant recipients who had a hospitalization with AKI 6 months or greater following transplant. Measurements: AKI was defined using the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria (stage 1 or greater). The first episode of AKI was included in the analysis. Graft loss was defined by return to dialysis or repeat kidney transplant. Methods: We performed a competing risk survival regression analysis using the Fine and Gray method and modified the model into a simple point system. Graft loss with death as a competing event was the primary outcome of interest. Results: A total of 315 kidney transplant recipients who had a hospitalization with AKI 6 months or greater following transplant were included. The median (interquartile range) follow-up time was 6.7 (3.3-10.3) years. Graft loss occurred in 27.6% of the cohort. The final model included 6 variables associated with an increased risk of graft loss: younger age, increased severity of AKI, failure to recover from AKI, lower baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased time from kidney transplant to AKI admission, and receipt of a kidney from a deceased donor. The risk score had a concordance probability of 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.82). The predicted 5-year risk of graft loss fell within the 95% CI of the observed risk more than 95% of the time. Limitations: The CIs of the estimates were wide, and model overfitting is possible due to the limited sample size; the risk score requires validation to determine its clinical utility. Conclusions: Our prognostic risk score uses commonly available

  17. Genetic Dissociation of Daily Sleep and Sleep Following Thermogenetic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dubowy, Christine; Moravcevic, Katarina; Yue, Zhifeng; Wan, Joy Y.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep rebound—the increase in sleep that follows sleep deprivation—is a hallmark of homeostatic sleep regulation that is conserved across the animal kingdom. However, both the mechanisms that underlie sleep rebound and its relationship to habitual daily sleep remain unclear. To address this, we developed an efficient thermogenetic method of inducing sleep deprivation in Drosophila that produces a substantial rebound, and applied the newly developed method to assess sleep rebound in a screen of 1,741 mutated lines. We used data generated by this screen to identify lines with reduced sleep rebound following thermogenetic sleep deprivation, and to probe the relationship between habitual sleep amount and sleep following thermogenetic sleep deprivation in Drosophila. Methods: To develop a thermogenetic method of sleep deprivation suitable for screening, we thermogenetically stimulated different populations of wake-promoting neurons labeled by Gal4 drivers. Sleep rebound following thermogenetically-induced wakefulness varies across the different sets of wake-promoting neurons that were stimulated, from very little to quite substantial. Thermogenetic activation of neurons marked by the c584-Gal4 driver produces both strong sleep loss and a substantial rebound that is more consistent within genotypes than rebound following mechanical or caffeine-induced sleep deprivation. We therefore used this driver to induce sleep deprivation in a screen of 1,741 mutagenized lines generated by the Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. Flies were subjected to 9 h of sleep deprivation during the dark period and released from sleep deprivation 3 h before lights-on. Recovery was measured over the 15 h following sleep deprivation. Following identification of lines with reduced sleep rebound, we characterized baseline sleep and sleep depth before and after sleep deprivation for these hits. Results: We identified two lines that consistently exhibit a blunted increase in the

  18. The Effect of Acute Weight Loss on Body Composition, Self-Esteem and Appearance Esteem before Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Gülsüm; Özdemir, Mehmet; Tanir, Halil; Salim, Emrullah

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss in human body accompanies physical and psychological differences. In this study, it was aimed to see whether acute weight loss (dehydration) affected self-esteem and appearance esteem in the elite wrestlers before competitions. 38 professional wrestlers who had international competition experiences and were required to be in a lower…

  19. AICA syndrome with facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ikegami-Takada, Tomoko; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Doi, Tadashi; Takada, Yohei; Tomoda, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of infarction of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with peripheral facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss. A 39-year-old female presented with vertigo and sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness of the right ear. An audiogram revealed a severe hearing loss at all tested frequencies in the right ear. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the left side was also observed. Otoneurological examinations showed sensorineural hearing loss of the right ear and horizontal and rotatory gaze nystagmus toward the left side, and a caloric reflex test demonstrated canal paresis. Initially, we diagnosed the patient for sudden deafness with vertigo. However, right peripheral facial palsy appeared 2 days later. An eye tracking test (ETT) and optokinetic pattern test (OKP) showed centralis abnormality. The patient's brain was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angioglaphy (MRA) and showed an infarction localized in the pons and cerebellum. MRI and MRA revealed infarction of the right cerebellar hemisphere indicating occlusion of the AICA. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed with AICA syndrome but demonstrated regression following steroid and edaravone treatment. We suggest that performing MRI and MRA in the early stage of AICA syndrome is important for distinguishing cerebellar infarction resulting from vestibular disease.

  20. Allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Prashar, Rohini; Putchakayala, Krishna G; Kane, William J; Denny, Jason E; Kim, Dean Y; Malinzak, Lauren E

    2017-02-24

    We report a rare case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma that occurred 12 years after kidney transplantation. A 67-year-old Caucasian male with a past surgical history of kidney transplant presented to the emergency department at a local hospital with left lower abdominal tenderness. He recalled that his cat, which weighs 15 lbs, jumped on his abdomen 7 d prior. On physical examination, a small tender mass was noticed at the incisional site of the kidney transplant. He was producing a normal amount of urine without hematuria. His serum creatinine level was slightly elevated from his baseline. Computer tomography revealed a large subscapular hematoma around the transplant kidney. The patient was observed to have renal trauma grade II at the hospital over a period of three days, and he was finally transferred to a transplant center after his urine output significantly decreased. Doppler ultrasound demonstrated an extensive peri-allograft hypoechoic area and abnormal waveforms with absent arterial diastolic flow and a patent renal vein. Despite surgical decompression, the allograft failed to respond appropriately due to the delay in surgical intervention. This is the third reported case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney following kidney transplantation. This case reinforces that kidney care differs if the kidney is solitary or a transplant. Early recognition and aggressive treatments are mandatory, especially in a case with Doppler signs that are suggestive of compression.

  1. Allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Prashar, Rohini; Putchakayala, Krishna G; Kane, William J; Denny, Jason E; Kim, Dean Y; Malinzak, Lauren E

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma that occurred 12 years after kidney transplantation. A 67-year-old Caucasian male with a past surgical history of kidney transplant presented to the emergency department at a local hospital with left lower abdominal tenderness. He recalled that his cat, which weighs 15 lbs, jumped on his abdomen 7 d prior. On physical examination, a small tender mass was noticed at the incisional site of the kidney transplant. He was producing a normal amount of urine without hematuria. His serum creatinine level was slightly elevated from his baseline. Computer tomography revealed a large subscapular hematoma around the transplant kidney. The patient was observed to have renal trauma grade II at the hospital over a period of three days, and he was finally transferred to a transplant center after his urine output significantly decreased. Doppler ultrasound demonstrated an extensive peri-allograft hypoechoic area and abnormal waveforms with absent arterial diastolic flow and a patent renal vein. Despite surgical decompression, the allograft failed to respond appropriately due to the delay in surgical intervention. This is the third reported case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney following kidney transplantation. This case reinforces that kidney care differs if the kidney is solitary or a transplant. Early recognition and aggressive treatments are mandatory, especially in a case with Doppler signs that are suggestive of compression. PMID:28280700

  2. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down Syndrome and acute leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Seip, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Acute leukemia in patients with Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome; DS) may often result in additional karyotypic changes in the number or structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose immunoblast karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient L.E. developed acute lymphocytic leukemia concomitant with the loss of a single copy of chromosome 21. Trisomy 21 in this individual was due to maternal meiosis I nondisjunction. A recombination event resulted in reduction of maternal alleles to homozygosity distal to D21S167. Loss of the paternal chromosomes in the leukemia clone produced uniparental maternal disomy with isodisomy over a 25cM interval. This could, in theory, permit the unopposed expression of one or more homozygous recessive maternal tumor-associated genes, thus providing an explanation for leukemogenesis in this patient. Patient E.H. was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia and consistently displayed tetrasomy 21 in the blast cell population. The DS karyotype probably arose from a mitotic error in which the paternal chromosome was duplicated. DNA polymorphism analysis indicated that the additional chromosome in the leukemia clone was of maternal origin. The presence of equal numbers of maternal and paternal chromosomes in the tetraploid blast clone would not appear to be consistent with the expression of a mutant tumor suppressor gene in this patient. Although tetrasomy 21 could be a non-specific karyotypic abnormality unrelated to leukemogenesis, it is possible that monoblastic leukemia may be a consequence of increased expression of one or more genes on this chromosome.

  3. Semantic congruence reverses effects of sleep restriction on associative encoding.

    PubMed

    Alberca-Reina, Esther; Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes

    2014-04-01

    Encoding and memory consolidation are influenced by factors such as sleep and congruency of newly learned information with prior knowledge (i.e., schema). However, only a few studies have examined the contribution of sleep to enhancement of schema-dependent memory. Based on previous studies showing that total sleep deprivation specifically impairs hippocampal encoding, and that coherent schemas reduce the hippocampal consolidation period after learning, we predict that sleep loss in the pre-training night will mainly affect schema-unrelated information whereas sleep restriction in the post-training night will have similar effects on schema-related and unrelated information. Here, we tested this hypothesis by presenting participants with face-face associations that could be semantically related or unrelated under different sleep conditions: normal sleep before and after training, and acute sleep restriction either before or after training. Memory was tested one day after training, just after introducing an interference task, and two days later, without any interference. Significant results were evident on the second retesting session. In particular, sleep restriction before training enhanced memory for semantically congruent events in detriment of memory for unrelated events, supporting the specific role of sleep in hippocampal memory encoding. Unexpectedly, sleep restriction after training enhanced memory for both related and unrelated events. Although this finding may suggest a poorer encoding during the interference task, this hypothesis should be specifically tested in future experiments. All together, the present results support a framework in which encoding processes seem to be more vulnerable to sleep loss than consolidation processes.

  4. Acute Versus Chronic Loss of Mammalian Azi1/Cep131 Results in Distinct Ciliary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Emma A.; Keighren, Margaret; Ford, Matthew J.; Davey, Tracey; Jarman, Andrew P.; Smith, Lee B.; Jackson, Ian J.; Mill, Pleasantine

    2013-01-01

    Defects in cilium and centrosome function result in a spectrum of clinically-related disorders, known as ciliopathies. However, the complex molecular composition of these structures confounds functional dissection of what any individual gene product is doing under normal and disease conditions. As part of an siRNA screen for genes involved in mammalian ciliogenesis, we and others have identified the conserved centrosomal protein Azi1/Cep131 as required for cilia formation, supporting previous Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster mutant studies. Acute loss of Azi1 by knock-down in mouse fibroblasts leads to a robust reduction in ciliogenesis, which we rescue by expressing siRNA-resistant Azi1-GFP. Localisation studies show Azi1 localises to centriolar satellites, and traffics along microtubules becoming enriched around the basal body. Azi1 also localises to the transition zone, a structure important for regulating traffic into the ciliary compartment. To study the requirement of Azi1 during development and tissue homeostasis, Azi1 null mice were generated (Azi1Gt/Gt). Surprisingly, Azi1Gt/Gt MEFs have no discernible ciliary phenotype and moreover are resistant to Azi1 siRNA knock-down, demonstrating that a compensation mechanism exists to allow ciliogenesis to proceed despite the lack of Azi1. Cilia throughout Azi1 null mice are functionally normal, as embryonic patterning and adult homeostasis are grossly unaffected. However, in the highly specialised sperm flagella, the loss of Azi1 is not compensated, leading to striking microtubule-based trafficking defects in both the manchette and the flagella, resulting in male infertility. Our analysis of Azi1 knock-down (acute loss) versus gene deletion (chronic loss) suggests that Azi1 plays a conserved, but non-essential trafficking role in ciliogenesis. Importantly, our in vivo analysis reveals Azi1 mediates novel trafficking functions necessary for flagellogenesis. Our study highlights the importance of both acute

  5. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

  6. Src family kinases involved in CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Cyril; Sebaihi, Soumia; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Fouquet, Stéphane; Kitabgi, Patrick; Pohl, Michel; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2014-05-01

    Functional interactions between the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and opioid receptors have been reported in the brain, leading to a decreased morphine analgesic activity. However the cellular mechanisms responsible for this loss of opioid analgesia are largely unknown. Here we examined whether Src family-kinases (SFK)-linked mechanisms induced by CXCR4 contributed to the loss of acute morphine analgesia and could represent a new physiological anti-opioid signaling pathway. In this way, we showed by immunohistochemistry and western blot that CXCL12 rapidly activated SFK phosphorylation in vitro in primary cultured lumbar rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but also in vivo in the DRG and the spinal cord. We showed that SFK activation occurred in a sub population of sensory neurons, in spinal microglia but also in spinal nerve terminals expressing mu-(MOR) and delta-opioid (DOR) receptor. In addition we described that CXCR4 is detected in MOR- and DOR-immunoreactive neurons in the DRG and spinal cord. In vivo, we demonstrated that an intrathecal administration of CXCL12 (1μg) significantly attenuated the subcutaneous morphine (4mg/kg) analgesia. Conversely, pretreatment with a potent CXCR4 antagonist (5μg) significantly enhanced morphine analgesia. Similar effects were obtained after an intrathecal injection of a specific SFK inhibitor, PP2 (10μg). Furthermore, PP2 abrogated CXCL12-induced decrease in morphine analgesia by suppressing SFK activation in the spinal cord. In conclusion, our data highlight that CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia is linked to Src family kinases activation.

  7. Sleep and adult neurogenesis: implications for cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Anka D; Meerlo, Peter; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus plays a critical role in learning and memory throughout life, in part by the integration of adult-born neurons into existing circuits. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is regulated by numerous environmental, physiological, and behavioral factors known to affect learning and memory. Sleep is also important for learning and memory. Here we critically examine evidence from correlation, deprivation, and stimulation studies that sleep may be among those factors that regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. There is mixed evidence for correlations between sleep variables and rates of hippocampal cell proliferation across the day, the year, and the lifespan. There is modest evidence that periods of increased sleep are associated with increased cell proliferation or survival. There is strong evidence that disruptions of sleep exceeding 24 h, by total deprivation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic restriction or fragmentation, significantly inhibit cell proliferation and in some cases neurogenesis. The mechanisms by which sleep disruption inhibits neurogenesis are not fully understood. Although sleep disruption procedures are typically at least mildly stressful, elevated adrenal corticosterone secretion is not necessary for this effect. However, procedures that prevent both elevated corticosterone and interleukin 1β signaling have been found to block the effect of sleep deprivation on cell proliferation. This result suggests that sleep loss impairs hippocampal neurogenesis by the presence of wake-dependent factors, rather than by the absence of sleep-specific processes. This would weigh against a hypothesis that regulation of neurogenesis is a function of sleep. Nonetheless, impaired neurogenesis may underlie some of the memory and mood effects associated with acute and chronic sleep disruptions.

  8. The Impact of Acute Loss of Weight on Eustachian Tube Function

    PubMed Central

    Pascoto, Gabriela; Abreu, Cassiana; Silva, Maria Laura; Weber, Raimar; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue; Stamm, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The eustachian tube is one of the key structures responsible for the functional balance of the middle ear. Some clinical conditions associated with tubal malfunction can cause extremely unpleasant symptoms. These symptoms could be triggered by acute loss of weight, for example, after bariatric surgery. Objective To evaluate the frequency and intensity of auditory tube dysfunction symptoms in obese patients after bariatric surgery. Methods Nineteen patients with accepted formal indications for bariatric surgery underwent a hearing evaluation (otoscopy, tonal and vocal audiometry, and impedanceometry) and a hearing questionnaire before, at the time of, 3 months after surgery (first postoperative evaluation), and 6 months (second postoperative evaluation) after surgery. Patients with a history of ear disease or ear surgery were excluded. Results None of the patients reported tubal dysfunction symptoms before surgery. Postsurgical results showed that 5 (26.3%) patients presented symptoms related to dysfunction of the eustachian tube at the first postoperative evaluation. After the 6-month follow-up, 9 (47.3%) patients reported symptoms of tubal dysfunction. Conclusion This study suggests that bariatric surgery can cause symptoms of eustachian tube dysfunction, probably due to rapid weight loss and the consequent loss of peritubal fat. PMID:25992125

  9. Acute vision loss and choroidal filling delay in the absence of giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Ling; Lee, Iris; Lee, Michael S; Van Stavern, Greg P; McClelland, Collin M

    2016-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a visually devastating disease that often progresses to severe bilateral vision loss if untreated. Diagnosis of GCA is made challenging by the protean nature of the disease and the lack of a simple test that is both highly sensitive and specific. Choroidal filling delay on fluorescein angiography (FA) has been touted as a highly characteristic feature of GCA-related vision loss, although knowledge of both the sensitivity and specificity of this finding remains unproven. We report our experience of delayed choroidal filling on FA in a series of seven patients referred to an academic neuro-ophthalmology practice due to concern for GCA. Despite the FA findings, our examination, diagnostic testing, and long-term follow-up excluded the diagnosis of GCA in all cases, suggesting that choroidal perfusion abnormalities may occur in the absence of GCA. When evaluating a patient for acute vision loss, the astute clinician must remain cognizant of the limitations of FA in the diagnosis of GCA. PMID:27695279

  10. On the Need of Objective Vigilance Monitoring: Effects of Sleep Loss on Target Detection and Task-Negative Activity Using Combined EEG/fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Czisch, Michael; Wehrle, Renate; Harsay, Helga A.; Wetter, Thomas C.; Holsboer, Florian; Sämann, Philipp G.; Drummond, Sean P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep loss affects attention by reducing levels of arousal and alertness. The neural mechanisms underlying the compensatory efforts of the brain to maintain attention and performance after sleep deprivation (SD) are not fully understood. Previous neuroimaging studies of SD have not been able to separate the effects of reduced arousal from the effects of SD on cerebral responses to cognitive challenges. Here, we used a simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approach to study the effects of 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Specifically, we focused on changes in selective attention processes as induced by an active acoustic oddball task, with the ability to isolate runs with objective EEG signs of high (SDalert) or reduced (SDsleepy) vigilance. In the SDalert condition, oddball task-related activity appears to be sustained by compensatory co-activation of insular regions, but task-negative activity in the right posterior node of the default mode network is altered following TSD. In the SDsleepy condition, oddball task-positive activity was massively impaired, but task-negative activation was showing levels comparable with the control condition after a well-rested night. Our results suggest that loss of strict negative correlation between oddball task-positive and task-negative activation reflects the effects of TSD, while the actual state of vigilance during task performance can affects either task-related or task-negative activity, depending on the exact vigilance level. PMID:22557992

  11. Predicting risk in space: Genetic markers for differential vulnerability to sleep restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F.

    2012-08-01

    Several laboratories have found large, highly reliable individual differences in the magnitude of cognitive performance, fatigue and sleepiness, and sleep homeostatic vulnerability to acute total sleep deprivation and to chronic sleep restriction in healthy adults. Such individual differences in neurobehavioral performance are also observed in space flight as a result of sleep loss. The reasons for these stable phenotypic differential vulnerabilities are unknown: such differences are not yet accounted for by demographic factors, IQ or sleep need, and moreover, psychometric scales do not predict those individuals cognitively vulnerable to sleep loss. The stable, trait-like (phenotypic) inter-individual differences observed in response to sleep loss—with intraclass correlation coefficients accounting for 58-92% of the variance in neurobehavioral measures—point to an underlying genetic component. To this end, we utilized multi-day highly controlled laboratory studies to investigate the role of various common candidate gene variants—each independently—in relation to cumulative neurobehavioral and sleep homeostatic responses to sleep restriction. These data suggest that common genetic variations (polymorphisms) involved in sleep-wake, circadian, and cognitive regulation may serve as markers for prediction of inter-individual differences in sleep homeostatic and neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep restriction in healthy adults. Identification of genetic predictors of differential vulnerability to sleep restriction—as determined from candidate gene studies—will help identify astronauts most in need of fatigue countermeasures in space flight and inform medical standards for obtaining adequate sleep in space. This review summarizes individual differences in neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep deprivation and ongoing genetic efforts to identify markers of such differences.

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MEN DURING SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The effects of 84 hours of sleep deprivation were examined in a group of six young men and compared with a group of six controls. Subjects were... sleep deprivation , physiological regulating systems are relatively unaffected by sleep loss. (Author)

  13. Central Sleep Apnoea Is Related to the Severity and Short-Term Prognosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Galera, Estefanía; Seminario, Asunción; Torres, Gerard; Dalmases, Mireia; Montserrat, Josep M.; Garmendia, Onintza; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relation of central sleep apnoea (CSA) to the severity and short-term prognosis of patients who experience acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods Observational study with cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Patients acutely admitted to participating hospitals because of ACS underwent respiratory polygraphy during the first 24 to 72 h. CSA was defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >15 events•h-1 (>50% of central apnoeas). ACS severity (Killip class, ejection fraction, number of diseased vessels and peak plasma troponin) was evaluated at baseline, and short-term prognosis (length of hospitalization, complications and mortality) was evaluated at discharge. Results A total of 68 CSA patients (AHI 31±18 events•h−1, 64±12 years, 87% males) and 92 controls (AHI 7±5 events•h−1, 62±12 years, 84% males) were included in the analyses. After adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension and smoking status, patients diagnosed with CSA spent more days in the coronary unit compared with controls (3.7±2.9 vs. 1.5±1.7; p<0.001) and had a worse Killip class (Killip I: 16% vs. 96%; p<0.001). No differences were observed in ejection fraction estimates. Conclusions CSA patients exhibited increased ACS severity as indicated by their Killip classification. These patients had a worse prognosis, with longer lengths of stay in the coronary care units. Our results highlight the relevance of CSA in patients suffering ACS episodes and suggest that diagnosing CSA may be a useful strategy to improve the management of certain ACS patients. PMID:27880845

  14. Impact of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Survival after Acute Coronary Syndrome: Insights from the ERICO Registry

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Flavia C; Goulart, Alessandra C.; Drager, Luciano F.; Staniak, Henrique L.; Santos, Itamar de Souza; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Bensenor, Isabela M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a very often clinical condition that can be associated with high mortality risk, particularly in coronary heart disease (CHD). The diagnosis of OSA is not always accessible via the gold-standard method polysomnography. Objective To evaluate long-term influence of the high risk for OSA on fatal and non-fatal outcomes after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Registry Strategy (ERICO) Study using the Berlin questionnaire as a surrogate. Methods Berlin questionnaire, a screening questionnaire for OSA, was applied in 639 cases of ACS 30 days after the index event. Cox regression proportional-hazards model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause, cardiovascular and CHD (myocardial infarction) mortality, as well as, the combined endpoint of fatal or recurrent non-fatal CHD. Results The high-risk group for OSA had higher frequencies of previous personal/family history of CHD and diabetes, in addition to a poorer event-free survival, as compared to the low-risk group (p-log-rank=0.03). The HR for fatal or recurrent non-fatal CHD was 4.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.18 - 15.36) in patients at high risk for OSA compared to those at low risk for OSA after a 2.6-year mean follow-up. Conclusions Using Berlin questionnaire, we were able to identify high risk for OSA as an independent predictor of non-fatal reinfarction or CHD mortality in post-ACS individuals in a long-term follow-up. PMID:28146212

  15. Acute Feasibility of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation in Severely Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Borel, Anne-Laure; Grangier, Angélique; Wuyam, Bernard; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are closely interconnected conditions both leading to high cardiovascular risk. Inactivity is frequent and physical activity programs remain difficult in these patients. We investigated the acute feasibility of two neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) modalities in extremely inactive obese patients with OSA. Design. A randomized cross-over study, with two experimental sessions (one per condition: multipath NMES versus conventional NMES). Setting. Outpatient research hospital. Subjects. Twelve patients with obesity, already treated for OSA. Interventions. No intervention. Measures. Feasibility outcomes included NMES current intensity, knee extension force evoked by NMES, and self-reported discomfort. Results. We found higher current intensity, a trend to significantly higher evoked force and lower discomfort during multipath NMES versus conventional NMES, suggesting better tolerance to the former NMES modality. However, patients were rapidly limited in the potential of increasing current intensity of multipath NMES. Conclusion. Both NMES modalities were feasible and relatively well tolerated by obese patients with OSA, even if multipath NMES showed a better muscle response/discomfort ratio than conventional NMES. There is an urgent need for a proof-of-concept study and interventional randomized controlled trials comparing NMES therapy versus current care to justify its utilization in obese and apneic patients with low physical activity levels. PMID:28194410

  16. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  17. Effects of acute microinjections of the thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine to the preoptic region of adult male rats on sleep, thermoregulation and motor activity.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas D; Moffett, Steven X; Scanlan, Thomas S; Martin, Joseph V

    2013-06-01

    The decarboxylated thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) has been reported as having behavioral and physiological consequences distinct from those of thyroid hormones. Here, we investigate the effects of T1AM on EEG-defined sleep after acute administration to the preoptic region of adult male rats. Our laboratory recently demonstrated a decrease in EEG-defined sleep after administration of 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) to the same brain region. After injection of T1AM or vehicle solution, EEG, EMG, activity, and core body temperature were recorded for 24h. Sleep parameters were determined from EEG and EMG data. Earlier investigations found contrasting systemic effects of T3 and T1AM, such as decreased heart rate and body temperature after intraperitoneal T1AM injection. However, nREM sleep was decreased in the present study after injections of 1 or 3 μg T1AM, but not after 0.3 or 10 μg, closely mimicking the previously reported effects of T3 administration to the preoptic region. The biphasic dose-response observed after either T1AM or T3 administration seems to indicate shared mechanisms and/or functions of sleep regulation in the preoptic region. Consistent with systemic administration of T1AM, however, microinjection of T1AM decreased body temperature. The current study is the first to show modulation of sleep by T1AM, and suggests that T1AM and T3 have both shared and independent effects in the adult mammalian brain.

  18. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL.

  19. Acute Effects of Self-Selected Regimen of Rapid Body Mass Loss in Combat Sports Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Timpmann, Saima; Ööpik, Vahur; Pääsuke, Mati; Medijainen, Luule; Ereline, Jaan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the acute effects of the self-selected regimen of rapid body mass loss (RBML) on muscle performance and metabolic response to exercise in combat sports athletes. Seventeen male athletes (20.8 ± 1.0 years; mean ± SD) reduced their body mass by 5.1 ± 1.1% within 3 days. The RBML was achieved by a gradual reduction of energy and fluid intake and mild sauna procedures. A battery of tests was performed before (Test 1) and immediately after (Test 2) RBML. The test battery included the measurement of the peak torque of knee extensors for three different speeds, assessment of total work (Wtot) performed during a 3-min intermittent intensity knee extension exercise and measurements of blood metabolites (ammonia, lactate, glucose and urea). Absolute peak torque was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 at angular velocities of 1.57 rad·s-1 (218.6 ± 40.9 vs. 234.4 ± 42.2 N·m; p = 0.013) and 3.14 rad·s-1 (100.3 ± 27.8 vs. 111.7 ± 26.2 N·m; p = 0.008). The peak torque in relation to body mass remained unchanged for any speed. Absolute Wtot was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 (6359 ± 2326 vs. 7452 ± 3080 J; p = 0.003) as well as Wtot in relation to body mass (89.1 ± 29.9 vs. 98.6 ± 36.4 J·kg-1; p = 0.034), respectively. As a result of RBML, plasma urea concentration increased from 4.9 to 5.9 mmol·l-1 (p = 0.003). The concentration of ammonia in a post-test sample in Test 2 tended to be higher in comparison with Test 1 (80.9 ± 29.1 vs. 67.6 ± 26.5 mmol·l-1; p = 0.082). The plasma lactate and glucose responses to exercise were similar in Test 1 and Test 2. We conclude that the self-selected regimen of RBML impairs muscle performance in 3-min intermittent intensity exercise and induces an increase in blood urea concentration in experienced male combat sports athletes. Key pointsPrevious studies have revealed a negative effect of rapid body mass loss on performance. However, there are some performance characteristics

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. PMID:27668104

  1. Thermogenic effect of an acute ingestion of a weight loss supplement

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kang, Jie; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Rashti, Stefanie L; Tranchina, Christopher P; Faigenbaum, Avery D

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of a weight loss supplement on resting oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory quotient (RQ), caloric expenditure (kcal), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) in healthy and physically active individuals. Methods Ten subjects (5 male, 5 female; 20.2 ± 1.2 y; 172.2 ± 8.9 cm; 71.5 ± 17.2 kg; 17.3 ± 2.6% body fat) underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory after at least 3-h post-absorptive state and were provided either 3 capsules of the weight loss supplement (SUP), commercially marketed as Meltdown® or 3 capsules of a placebo (P). Subjects then rested in a semi-recumbent position for three hours. VO2 and HR were determined every 5 min during the first 30 min and every 10 min during the next 150 min. BP was determined every 15 min during the first 30 min and every 30 min thereafter. The profile of mood states was assessed every 30 min. Results Area under the curve analysis revealed a significant 28.9% difference in VO2 between SUP and P for the three hour study period. In addition, a significant difference in energy expenditure was also seen between SUP (1.28 ± 0.33 kcal·min-1) and P (1.00 ± 0.32 kcal·min-1). A trend (p = 0.06) towards a greater utilization of stored fat as an energy source was also demonstrated (0.78 ± 0.23 kcal·min-1 and 0.50 ± 0.38 kcal·min-1 in P and SUP, respectively). Significant elevations in HR were seen during hours two and three of the study, and significantly higher average systolic BP was observed between SUP (118.0 ± 7.3 mmHg) and P (111.4 ± 8.2 mmHg). No significant differences were seen in diastolic blood pressure at any time point. Significant increases in tension and confusion were seen in SUP. Conclusion Results indicate a significant increase in energy expenditure in young, healthy individuals following an acute ingestion of a weight

  2. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure ( zhǐ yā) with valerian ( xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint ( xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1-1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate ( shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella ( yìn táng), Wind Pool ( fēng chí), and Gushing Spring ( yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night.

  3. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure (指壓 zhǐ yā) with valerian (纈草 xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint (穴位 xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1–1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate (神門 shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella (印堂 yìn táng), Wind Pool (風池 fēng chí), and Gushing Spring (湧泉 yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night. PMID:26587395

  4. Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Low-Tone Sensorineural Hearing Loss According to Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jinkyung; Yum, Gunhwee; Im, Ha-Young; Jung, Jong Yoon; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We compared improvements in hearing thresholds in acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) patients after two different treatments: steroid alone and steroid and diuretic combined. We analyzed how the duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment affected hearing loss improvement and investigated the relation between presence of vertigo in ALHL patients and ALHL progression to Ménière's disease (MD). Subjects and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 47 ALHL patients aged 21 to 76 years. Patients received either orally administered steroid alone (n=12) or steroid and diuretic combined (n=35). We compared improvements in the two groups' hearing thresholds at three lower frequencies (125, 250, and 500 Hz) after participants had received one month of each respective treatment. Results Our two treatments did not show any statistical difference in hearing loss improvement after one month. Forty percent of ALHL patients with vertigo developed MD, which was a significantly higher rate than the 12.5% of ALHL patients without vertigo who developed MD. The shorter duration between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of treatment significantly increased improvement in the sum of lower frequency hearing threshold after one month. Conclusions The current study suggests that steroid and diuretic administered together and steroid alone similarly improve the hearing threshold in ALHL patients after one month. We concluded that patients should initiate ALHL treatment as soon as they experience symptoms. ALHL patients should also be notified of their higher risk of developing MD. PMID:27144234

  5. Difficulty swallowing and lack of receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy predict acute weight loss in human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Denise L; Bica, Ioana; Knox, Tamsin A; Wanke, Christine; Tchetgen, Eric; Spiegelman, Donna; Silva, Marisela; Gorbach, Sherwood; Wilson, Ira B

    2003-11-15

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, symptoms of underlying illness may promote weight loss through decreased caloric intake, increased metabolic needs, or nutrient malabsorption. We evaluated disease symptoms as predictors of acute weight loss (i.e., loss of > or =5% of weight). HIV-infected men and women (n=415) were telephoned every 5 weeks to obtain information about weight and recent symptoms. Weight change between each pair of consecutive calls (telephone intervals, 2814) was calculated. Acute weight loss occurred across 4.5% of intervals and among 24% of individuals. Patients reported > or =1 symptom before 58% of telephone intervals. The most common symptoms or symptom complexes before intervals were diarrhea (21% of patients), anorexia (17%), upper respiratory symptoms (16%), skin symptoms (12%), and abdominal pain (12%). Trouble swallowing (6%) and oral symptoms (7%) were less common. Risk of acute weight loss was significantly increased when oral symptoms or trouble swallowing were present, and it was decreased when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was used or when diarrhea was not present. Even when HAART is being administered, clinicians should remain vigilant regarding weight loss, oral symptoms, and trouble swallowing.

  6. Diet/Energy Balance Affect Sleep and Wakefulness Independent of Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Isaac J.; Pack, Allan I.; Veasey, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Excessive daytime sleepiness commonly affects obese people, even in those without sleep apnea, yet its causes remain uncertain. We sought to determine whether acute dietary changes could induce or rescue wake impairments independent of body weight. Design: We implemented a novel feeding paradigm that generates two groups of mice with equal body weight but opposing energetic balance. Two subsets of mice consuming either regular chow (RC) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 w were switched to the opposite diet for 1 w. Sleep recordings were conducted at Week 0 (baseline), Week 8 (pre-diet switch), and Week 9 (post-diet switch) for all groups. Sleep homeostasis was measured at Week 8 and Week 9. Participants: Young adult, male C57BL/6J mice. Measurements and Results: Differences in total wake, nonrapid eye movement (NREM), and rapid eye movement (REM) time were quantified, in addition to changes in bout fragmentation/consolidation. At Week 9, the two diet switch groups had similar body weight. However, animals switched to HFD (and thus gaining weight) had decreased wake time, increased NREM sleep time, and worsened sleep/wake fragmentation compared to mice switched to RC (which were in weight loss). These effects were driven by significant sleep/wake changes induced by acute dietary manipulations (Week 8 → Week 9). Sleep homeostasis, as measured by delta power increase following sleep deprivation, was unaffected by our feeding paradigm. Conclusions: Acute dietary manipulations are sufficient to alter sleep and wakefulness independent of body weight and without effects on sleep homeostasis. Citation: Perron IJ, Pack AI, Veasey S. Diet/energy balance affect sleep and wakefulness independent of body weight. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1893–1903. PMID:26158893

  7. Sleep deprivation and antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The mood-improving effect of sleep deprivation (SD) in depression is even today still not fully understood. Despite the fact that mood and cognitive functions are lowered by prolonged sleep loss and despite convincing data that insomnia is a strong risk factor for subsequent depression,1 acute SD for one night or even partial SD in the second half of the night improves mood in about 60% of depressed patients the day after.2,3 In this respect, among alt types of antidepressant treatments, SD elicits the fastest results, faster even than electroconvulsive therapy. Many authors correlate the likelihood of responding to SD with clinical variables. A summary of predictors is listed in Table I. PMID:22033748

  8. Loss of miR-29b following acute ischemic stroke contributes to neural cell death and infarct size

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Rink, Cameron; Ghoorkhanian, Reza; Gnyawali, Surya; Heigel, Mallory; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Chalfant, Charles E; Chan, Yuk Cheung; Banerjee, Jaideep; Huang, Yue; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione depletion and 12-lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of arachidonic acid are known to be implicated in neurodegeneration associated with acute ischemic stroke. The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of miR-29 in neurodegeneration associated with acute ischemic stroke. Neural cell death caused by arachidonic acid insult of glutathione-deficient cells was preceded by a 12-lipoxygenase-dependent loss of miR-29b. Delivery of miR-29b mimic to blunt such loss was neuroprotective. miR-29b inhibition potentiated such neural cell death. 12-Lipoxygenase knockdown and inhibitors attenuated the loss of miR-29b in challenged cells. In vivo, stroke caused by middle-cerebral artery occlusion was followed by higher 12-lipoxygenase activity and loss of miR-29b as detected in laser-captured infarct site tissue. 12-Lipoxygenase knockout mice demonstrated protection against such miR loss. miR-29b gene delivery markedly attenuated stroke-induced brain lesion. Oral supplementation of α-tocotrienol, a vitamin E 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor, rescued stroke-induced loss of miR-29b and minimized lesion size. This work provides the first evidence demonstrating that loss of miR-29b at the infarct site is a key contributor to stroke lesion. Such loss is contributed by activity of the 12-lipoxygenase pathway providing maiden evidence linking arachidonic acid metabolism to miR-dependent mechanisms in stroke. PMID:23632968

  9. Sleep walking

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep cycle has stages, from light drowsiness to deep sleep. During the stage called rapid eye movement ( ... REM sleep. Sleepwalking (somnambulism) most often occurs during deep, non-REM sleep (called N3 sleep) early in ...

  10. Loss of promoter IV-driven BDNF expression impacts oscillatory activity during sleep, sensory information processing and fear regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J L; Hardy, N F; Jimenez, D V; Maynard, K R; Kardian, A S; Pollock, C J; Schloesser, R J; Martinowich, K

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is characterized by hyperarousal, sensory processing impairments, sleep disturbances and altered fear regulation; phenotypes associated with changes in brain oscillatory activity. Molecules associated with activity-dependent plasticity, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), may regulate neural oscillations by controlling synaptic activity. BDNF synthesis includes production of multiple Bdnf transcripts, which contain distinct 5′ noncoding exons. We assessed arousal, sensory processing, fear regulation and sleep in animals where BDNF expression from activity-dependent promoter IV is disrupted (Bdnf-e4 mice). Bdnf-e4 mice display sensory hyper-reactivity and impaired electrophysiological correlates of sensory information processing as measured by event-related potentials (ERP). Utilizing electroencephalogram, we identified a decrease in slow-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep, suggesting impaired sleep homeostasis. Fear extinction is controlled by hippocampal–prefrontal cortical BDNF signaling, and neurophysiological communication patterns between the hippocampus (HPC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) correlate with behavioral performance during extinction. Impaired fear extinction in Bdnf-e4 mice is accompanied by increased HPC activation and decreased HPC–mPFC theta phase synchrony during early extinction, as well as increased mPFC activation during extinction recall. These results suggest that activity-dependent BDNF signaling is critical for regulating oscillatory activity, which may contribute to altered behavior. PMID:27552586

  11. Health consequences of shift work and insufficient sleep.

    PubMed

    Kecklund, Göran; Axelsson, John

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises the literature on shift work and its relation to insufficient sleep, chronic diseases, and accidents. It is based on 38 meta-analyses and 24 systematic reviews, with additional narrative reviews and articles used for outlining possible mechanisms by which shift work may cause accidents and adverse health. Evidence shows that the effect of shift work on sleep mainly concerns acute sleep loss in connection with night shifts and early morning shifts. A link also exists between shift work and accidents, type 2 diabetes (relative risk range 1.09-1.40), weight gain, coronary heart disease (relative risk 1.23), stroke (relative risk 1.05), and cancer (relative risk range 1.01-1.32), although the original studies showed mixed results. The relations of shift work to cardiometabolic diseases and accidents mimic those with insufficient sleep. Laboratory studies indicate that cardiometabolic stress and cognitive impairments are increased by shift work, as well as by sleep loss. Given that the health and safety consequences of shift work and insufficient sleep are very similar, they are likely to share common mechanisms. However, additional research is needed to determine whether insufficient sleep is a causal pathway for the adverse health effects associated with shift work.

  12. Sleep Physiology in Toddlers: Effects of Missing a Nap on Subsequent Night Sleep.

    PubMed

    Lassonde, Jonathan M; Rusterholz, Thomas; Kurth, Salome; Schumacher, Allyson M; Achermann, Peter; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-10-01

    The shift from a biphasic to a monophasic sleep schedule is a fundamental milestone in early childhood. This transition, however, may result in periods of acute sleep loss as children may nap on some but not all days. Although data indicating the behavioral consequences of nap deprivation in young children are accumulating, little is known about changes to sleep neurophysiology following daytime sleep loss. This study addresses this gap in knowledge by examining the effects of acute nap deprivation on subsequent nighttime sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) parameters in toddlers. Healthy children (n=25; 11 males; ages 30-36 months) followed a strict sleep schedule for ≥5 days before sleep EEG recordings performed on 2 non-consecutive days: one after 13 h of prior wakefulness and another at the same clock time but preceded by a daytime nap. Total slow-wave energy (SWE) was computed as cumulative slow-wave activity (SWA; EEG power in 0.75-4.5 Hz range) over time. Nap and subsequent night SWE were added and compared to SWE of the night after a missed nap. During the night following a missed nap, children fell asleep faster (11.9 ± 8.7 versus 37.3 ± 22.1 min; d=1.6, p=0.01), slept longer (10.1 ± 0.7 versus 9.6 ± 0.6 h; d=0.7, p<0.01) and exhibited greater SWA (133.3 ± 37.5 versus 93.0 ± 4.7 %; d=0.9, p<0.01) compared to a night after a daytime nap. SWE for combined nap and subsequent night sleep did not significantly differ from the night following nap deprivation (12141.1 ± 3872.9 versus 11588 ± 3270.8 µV(2*)h; d=0.6, p=0.12). However, compared to a night following a missed nap, children experienced greater time in bed (13.0±0.8 versus 10.9±0.5; d=3.1, p<0.01) and total sleep time (11.2±0.8 versus 10.1±0.7; d=1.4, p<0.01). Shorter sleep latency, longer sleep duration, and increased SWA in the night following a missed nap indicate that toddlers experience a physiologically meaningful homeostatic challenge after prolonged wakefulness. Whether toddlers

  13. Sleep Physiology in Toddlers: Effects of Missing a Nap on Subsequent Night Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Lassonde, Jonathan M.; Rusterholz, Thomas; Kurth, Salome; Schumacher, Allyson M.; Achermann, Peter; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2016-01-01

    The shift from a biphasic to a monophasic sleep schedule is a fundamental milestone in early childhood. This transition, however, may result in periods of acute sleep loss as children may nap on some but not all days. Although data indicating the behavioral consequences of nap deprivation in young children are accumulating, little is known about changes to sleep neurophysiology following daytime sleep loss. This study addresses this gap in knowledge by examining the effects of acute nap deprivation on subsequent nighttime sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) parameters in toddlers. Healthy children (n=25; 11 males; ages 30–36 months) followed a strict sleep schedule for ≥5 days before sleep EEG recordings performed on 2 non-consecutive days: one after 13 h of prior wakefulness and another at the same clock time but preceded by a daytime nap. Total slow-wave energy (SWE) was computed as cumulative slow-wave activity (SWA; EEG power in 0.75–4.5 Hz range) over time. Nap and subsequent night SWE were added and compared to SWE of the night after a missed nap. During the night following a missed nap, children fell asleep faster (11.9 ± 8.7 versus 37.3 ± 22.1 min; d=1.6, p=0.01), slept longer (10.1 ± 0.7 versus 9.6 ± 0.6 h; d=0.7, p<0.01) and exhibited greater SWA (133.3 ± 37.5 versus 93.0 ± 4.7 %; d=0.9, p<0.01) compared to a night after a daytime nap. SWE for combined nap and subsequent night sleep did not significantly differ from the night following nap deprivation (12141.1 ± 3872.9 versus 11588 ± 3270.8 µV2*h; d=0.6, p=0.12). However, compared to a night following a missed nap, children experienced greater time in bed (13.0±0.8 versus 10.9±0.5; d=3.1, p<0.01) and total sleep time (11.2±0.8 versus 10.1±0.7; d=1.4, p<0.01). Shorter sleep latency, longer sleep duration, and increased SWA in the night following a missed nap indicate that toddlers experience a physiologically meaningful homeostatic challenge after prolonged wakefulness. Whether toddlers

  14. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Schenk, Tino; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Rohde, Christian; Pabst, Caroline; Sauer, Tim; Lerdrup, Mads; Tavor, Sigal; Stölzel, Friedrich; Herold, Sylvia; Ehninger, Gerhard; Köhler, Gabriele; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Urlaub, Henning; Serve, Hubert; Dugas, Martin; Spiekermann, Karsten; Vick, Binje; Jeremias, Irmela; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Hansen, Klaus; Zelent, Arthur; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Müller, Lutz P; Thiede, Christian; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of histone H3K27 trimethylation as a novel pathway of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs in AML. Low EZH2 protein levels correlated with poor prognosis in AML patients. Suppression of EZH2 protein expression induced chemoresistance of AML cell lines and primary cells in vitro and in vivo. Low EZH2 levels resulted in derepression of HOX genes, and knockdown of HOXB7 and HOXA9 in the resistant cells was sufficient to improve sensitivity to TKIs and cytotoxic drugs. The endogenous loss of EZH2 expression in resistant cells and primary blasts from a subset of relapsed AML patients resulted from enhanced CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of EZH2 at Thr487. This interaction was stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and followed by proteasomal degradation of EZH2 in drug-resistant cells. Accordingly, inhibitors of HSP90, CDK1 and the proteasome prevented EZH2 degradation, decreased HOX gene expression and restored drug sensitivity. Finally, patients with reduced EZH2 levels at progression to standard therapy responded to the combination of bortezomib and cytarabine, concomitant with the re-establishment of EZH2 expression and blast clearance. These data suggest restoration of EZH2 protein as a viable approach to overcome treatment resistance in this AML patient population.

  15. Effect of acute sleep deprivation and recovery on Insulin-like Growth Factor-I responses and inflammatory gene expression in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Chennaoui, Mounir; Drogou, Catherine; Sauvet, Fabien; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Scofield, Denis E; Nindl, Bradley C

    2014-01-01

    Acute sleep deprivation in humans has been found to increase inflammatory markers and signaling pathways in the periphery through a possible Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). In addition, short duration sleep has been associated with low circulating total Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations. We aimed to determine whether a total sleep deprivation (TSD) protocol with recovery altered whole-blood gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, as well as TLR-4 expression, and to examine the relationship with circulating concentrations of the IGF-I system. Twelve healthy men participated in a five-day TSD (two control nights followed by one night of sleep deprivation and one night of recovery). Blood was sampled at 0800, before and after sleep deprivation (D2 and D4), and after recovery (D5). It is shown that 25 h of sleep deprivation (D4) induced significant increases in mRNA levels of TNF-α and its soluble receptor R1 (P<0.01 respectively), as well as TLR-4 (P<0.05), while IL-6 mRNA levels remained unchanged. Circulating concentrations of free IGF-I were decreased at D4 (P<0.001). One night of recovery was sufficient to restore basal expression levels for TNF-α, sTNF-R1, TLR-4 and circulating IGF-I. Changes in TLR-4 mRNA levels during the protocol correlated positively with those of TNF-α and sTNF-R1 (r=0.393 and r=0.490 respectively), and negatively with circulating free IGF-I (r=-0.494). In conclusion, 25 h of sleep deprivation in healthy subjects is sufficient to induce transient and reversible genomic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and its R1 receptor, and its mediator TLR-4, with a possible link to IGF-I axis inhibition.

  16. Sleep in athletes and the effects of Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Roky, Rachida; Herrera, Christopher Paul; Ahmed, Qanta

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is now considered as a new frontier in performance enhancement. This article presents background content on sleep function, sleep needs and methods of sleep investigation along with data on the potential effects of Ramadan fasting on sleep in normal individuals and athletes. Accumulated sleep loss has negative impacts on cognitive function, mood, daytime sleepiness and performance. Sleep studies in athletes fasting during Ramadan are very rare. Most of them have demonstrated that during this month, sleep duration decreased and sleep timing shifted. But the direct relation between sleep changes and performance during Ramadan is not yet elucidated. Objective sleep patterns can be investigated using polysomnography, actigraphy, and standardised questionnaires and recorded in daily journals or sleep logs. The available data on sleep indicate that team doctors and coaches should consider planning sleep schedule and napping; implementing educational programmes focusing on the need for healthy sleep; and consider routine screening for sleep loss in athletes of all age groups and genders.

  17. Alteration of frequency range for binaural beats in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Karino, Shotaro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Ito, Ken; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2005-01-01

    The effect of acute low-tone sensorineural hearing loss (ALHL) on the interaural frequency difference (IFD) required for perception of binaural beats (BBs) was investigated in 12 patients with unilateral ALHL and 7 patients in whom ALHL had lessened. A continuous pure tone of 30 dB sensation level at 250 Hz was presented to the contralateral, normal-hearing ear. The presence of BBs was determined by a subjective yes-no procedure as the frequency of a loudness-balanced test tone was gradually adjusted around 250 Hz in the affected ear. The frequency range in which no BBs were perceived (FRNB) was significantly wider in the patients with ALHL than in the controls, and FRNBs became narrower in the recovered ALHL group. Specifically, detection of slow BBs with a small IFD was impaired in this limited (10 s) observation period. The significant correlation between the hearing level at 250 Hz and FRNBs suggests that FRNBs represent the degree of cochlear damage caused by ALHL.

  18. p53 loss promotes acute myeloid leukemia by enabling aberrant self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Zuber, Johannes; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Lintault, Laura; Kogan, Scott C.; Shannon, Kevin; Lowe, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor limits proliferation in response to cellular stress through several mechanisms. Here, we test whether the recently described ability of p53 to limit stem cell self-renewal suppresses tumorigenesis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer in which p53 mutations are associated with drug resistance and adverse outcome. Our approach combined mosaic mouse models, Cre-lox technology, and in vivo RNAi to disable p53 and simultaneously activate endogenous KrasG12D—a common AML lesion that promotes proliferation but not self-renewal. We show that p53 inactivation strongly cooperates with oncogenic KrasG12D to induce aggressive AML, while both lesions on their own induce T-cell malignancies with long latency. This synergy is based on a pivotal role of p53 in limiting aberrant self-renewal of myeloid progenitor cells, such that loss of p53 counters the deleterious effects of oncogenic Kras on these cells and enables them to self-renew indefinitely. Consequently, myeloid progenitor cells expressing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53 become leukemia-initiating cells, resembling cancer stem cells capable of maintaining AML in vivo. Our results establish an efficient new strategy for interrogating oncogene cooperation, and provide strong evidence that the ability of p53 to limit aberrant self-renewal contributes to its tumor suppressor activity. PMID:20595231

  19. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep.

    PubMed

    Eugene, Andy R; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of sleep is a serious concern that people need to be aware of. When one sleeps, the brain reorganizes and recharges itself, and removes toxic waste byproducts which have accumulated throughout the day. This evidence demonstrates that sleeping can clear the brain and help maintain its normal functioning. Multiple studies have been done to determine the effects of total sleep deprivation; more recently some have been conducted to show the effects of sleep restriction, which is a much more common occurrence, have the same effects as total sleep deprivation. Each phase of the sleep cycle restores and rejuvenates the brain for optimal function. When sleep is deprived, the active process of the glymphatic system does not have time to perform that function, so toxins can build up, and the effects will become apparent in cognitive abilities, behavior, and judgment. As a background for this paper we have reviewed literature and research of sleep phases, effects of sleep deprivation, and the glymphatic system of the brain and its restorative effect during the sleep cycle.

  20. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of sleep is a serious concern that people need to be aware of. When one sleeps, the brain reorganizes and recharges itself, and removes toxic waste byproducts which have accumulated throughout the day. This evidence demonstrates that sleeping can clear the brain and help maintain its normal functioning. Multiple studies have been done to determine the effects of total sleep deprivation; more recently some have been conducted to show the effects of sleep restriction, which is a much more common occurrence, have the same effects as total sleep deprivation. Each phase of the sleep cycle restores and rejuvenates the brain for optimal function. When sleep is deprived, the active process of the glymphatic system does not have time to perform that function, so toxins can build up, and the effects will become apparent in cognitive abilities, behavior, and judgment. As a background for this paper we have reviewed literature and research of sleep phases, effects of sleep deprivation, and the glymphatic system of the brain and its restorative effect during the sleep cycle. PMID:26594659

  1. The Inevitability of Sleep: Using Manet's Last Paintings to Envision a Pedagogy of Loss and Mourning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author offers Manet's last paintings as metaphors for a bygone, psychically healthy conception of loss and mourning, what is called the pre-Freudian, Victorian notion of loss (Otto 2008), which contrasts with the post-Freudian, Modern notion of loss and mourning (Otto 2008). Otto argues this liminal, transitional moment…

  2. Postural responses without versus with acute external cervical spine fixation: a comparative study in healthy subjects and patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Bohne, Silvia; Heine, Sabrina; Volk, G Fabian; Stadler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Using a diagnostic prospective cohort single center study design, the influence of a cervical collar on standing balance during dynamic postural perturbations in healthy adults and patients with acute unilateral vestibular dysfunction was measured in 31 healthy subjects and 27 patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss. The main outcome measures were completed standard protocols on the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and Motor Control Test (MCT) of the NeuroCom Equitest(®) computerized posturography platform measured without and with acute cervical fixation, respectively. Paired t test showed no significant difference during the six conditions of neither the SOT scores nor analyzing the SOT strategies or during the MCT between the non-fixed and fixed neck in healthy subjects and in the patients (all p > 0.05). Older healthy subjects showed decreased SOT scores but equal MCT results. The age effect was more dominant in the patients when wearing the collar. Gender had no influence whether in healthy individuals nor in patients. In almost all conditions of the SOT but only in some MCT subtests patients had significantly lower scores than healthy subjects without collar and with collar (all p < 0.05). In conclusion, the SOT but only some subtest of the MCT could clearly distinguish between healthy adults and patient with acute unilateral vestibular loss. Equilibrium scores did not change significantly when the cervical spine was fixed with a collar. Acute fixation of the neck with a collar seems not to affect standing balance, even not when vestibular, visual and/or somatosensory input are also reduced.

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss: a complication of acute otitis media in adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Hyun; Park, Sung Joon; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    We aim to evaluate the incidence and clinical manifestations of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in adult patients with acute otitis media (AOM). Seventy-five patients (age > 18 years; 83 ears) diagnosed with AOM between January 2008 and March 2011 at our clinic were enroled and retrospectively reviewed. We detected audiometrically confirmed SNHL during the course of AOM in eight patients. The clinical course, treatment, and audiometric final outcome of each case were reviewed. SNHL was associated with AOM in 8 out of 83 ears (9.3%). The mean age of patients was 57.5 years, and the mean follow-up period was 21.1 months (range 0.6-46.3 months). The most common symptom was tinnitus. Mean bone conduction hearing threshold was 39.5 dB in pure tone audiometry. All patients showed high-frequency HL, and three showed pan-frequency HL. All patients were treated with oral antibiotics at the initial visit. Seven ears were treated with a combination of oral steroids. Myringotomy was also performed. Seven of eight patients showed improvement; however, 8 kHz thresholds were not improved. This suggested that the inflammation spread through the round window. The mean duration of recovery was 18.6 days. SNHL associated with AOM in adult patients occurs during the early phases of the disease course. High-frequency hearing was commonly affected and was well treated with oral antibiotics, myringotomy, and steroid therapy. Audiometry can be helpful for treating adult patients with AOM. Active treatment, including myringotomy, should be performed during the early phase, if SNHL is suspected.

  4. Heart-rate response to sympathetic nervous stimulation, exercise, and magnesium concentration in various sleep conditions.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Kazuto; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Yoneyama, Kihei; Osada, Naohiko; Tanabe, Kazuhiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism of impaired exercise tolerance in chronic sleep-restricted conditions by investigating variables related to heart-rate (HR) response to sympathetic nervous stimulation. Sixteen healthy men (mean age 21.5 years) were tested in a control state, acute sleep-loss state, and chronic sleep-restricted state. Participants underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing in each state. Their norepinephrine (NE) concentration was measured before and immediately after exercise. Intracellular magnesium (Mg) concentration was measured in a resting state. Exercise duration was shorter and the ratio of HR response to the percentage increase in NE was higher in the chronic sleep-restricted state than in the control state. Intracellular Mg gradually decreased from control to chronic sleep restriction. There was a negative correlation between peak exercise duration and the ratios of HR response to the rate of increase in NE. Intracellular Mg was positively correlated with the ratios of HR response to the increase in NE both in control and in acute sleep loss. The authors conclude that the impaired exercise tolerance in a chronic sleep-restricted state is caused by hypersensitivity of the HR response to sympathetic nervous stimulation, which showed a compensation for decreased intracellular Mg concentration.

  5. Astrocyte-derived Adenosine and A1 Receptor Activity Contribute to Sleep Loss-Induced Deficits in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Florian, Cédrick; Vecsey, Christopher G.; Halassa, Michael M.; Haydon, Philip G.; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) can have a negative impact on cognitive function, but the mechanism(s) by which SD modulates memory remain unclear. We have previously shown that astrocyte-derived adenosine is a candidate molecule involved in the cognitive deficits following a brief period of SD (Halassa et al., 2009). In this study, we examined whether genetic disruption of SNARE-dependent exocytosis in astrocytes (dnSNARE mice) or pharmacological blockade of A1 receptor signaling using an adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (CPT) could prevent the negative effects of 6 hours of SD on hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and hippocampus-dependent spatial object recognition memory. We found that SD impaired L-LTP in wild-type mice but not in dnSNARE mice. Similarly, this deficit in L-LTP resulting from SD was prevented by a chronic infusion of CPT. Consistent with these results, we found that hippocampus-dependent memory deficits produced by SD were rescued in dnSNARE mice and CPT-treated mice. These data provide the first evidence that astrocytic ATP and adenosine A1R activity contribute to the effects of SD on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory, and suggest a new therapeutic target to reverse the hippocampus-related cognitive deficits induced by sleep loss. PMID:21562257

  6. Sleep Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... PDF 474KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

  7. Sleep Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  8. Sleep stages, memory and learning.

    PubMed

    Dotto, L

    1996-04-15

    Learning and memory can be impaired by sleep loss during specific vulnerable "windows" for several days after new tasks have been learned. Different types of tasks are differentially vulnerable to the loss of different stages of sleep. Memory required to perform cognitive procedural tasks is affected by the loss of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep on the first night after learning occurs and again on the third night after learning. REM-sleep deprivation on the second night after learning does not produce memory deficits. Declarative memory, which is used for the recall of specific facts, is not similarly affected by REM-sleep loss. The learning of procedural motor tasks, including those required in many sports, is impaired by the loss of stage 2 sleep, which occurs primarily in the early hours of the morning. These findings have implications for the academic and athletic performance of students and for anyone whose work involves ongoing learning and demands high standards of performance.

  9. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Alcalá, Marta; Antonijoan, Rosa M.; Giménez, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE). Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships. PMID:27089346

  10. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joan F; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A; Alcalá, Marta; Antonijoan, Rosa M; Giménez, Sandra

    2016-04-14

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE). Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships.

  11. Estimating individual optimal sleep duration and potential sleep debt

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Nakazaki, Kyoko; Motomura, Yuki; Oba, Kentaro; Katsunuma, Ruri; Terasawa, Yuri; Enomoto, Minori; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hida, Akiko; Mishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that dynamics of sleep time obtained over consecutive days of extended sleep in a laboratory reflect an individual’s optimal sleep duration (OSD) and that the difference between OSD and habitual sleep duration (HSD) at home represents potential sleep debt (PSD). We found that OSD varies among individuals and PSD showed stronger correlation with subjective/objective sleepiness than actual sleep time, interacting with individual’s vulnerability of sleep loss. Furthermore, only 1 h of PSD takes four days to recover to their optimal level. Recovery from PSD was also associated with the improvement in glycometabolism, thyrotropic activity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Additionally, the increase (rebound) in total sleep time from HSD at the first extended sleep would be a simple indicator of PSD. These findings confirmed self-evaluating the degree of sleep debt at home as a useful clinical marker. To establish appropriate sleep habits, it is necessary to evaluate OSD, vulnerability to sleep loss, and sleep homeostasis characteristics on an individual basis. PMID:27775095

  12. Estimating individual optimal sleep duration and potential sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Nakazaki, Kyoko; Motomura, Yuki; Oba, Kentaro; Katsunuma, Ruri; Terasawa, Yuri; Enomoto, Minori; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hida, Akiko; Mishima, Kazuo

    2016-10-24

    In this study, we hypothesized that dynamics of sleep time obtained over consecutive days of extended sleep in a laboratory reflect an individual's optimal sleep duration (OSD) and that the difference between OSD and habitual sleep duration (HSD) at home represents potential sleep debt (PSD). We found that OSD varies among individuals and PSD showed stronger correlation with subjective/objective sleepiness than actual sleep time, interacting with individual's vulnerability of sleep loss. Furthermore, only 1 h of PSD takes four days to recover to their optimal level. Recovery from PSD was also associated with the improvement in glycometabolism, thyrotropic activity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Additionally, the increase (rebound) in total sleep time from HSD at the first extended sleep would be a simple indicator of PSD. These findings confirmed self-evaluating the degree of sleep debt at home as a useful clinical marker. To establish appropriate sleep habits, it is necessary to evaluate OSD, vulnerability to sleep loss, and sleep homeostasis characteristics on an individual basis.

  13. Sleep-related breathing disorders in acute respiratory failure assisted by non-invasive ventilatory treatment: utility of portable polysomnographic system.

    PubMed

    Resta, O; Guido, P; Foschino Barbaro, M P; Picca, V; Talamo, S; Lamorgese, V

    2000-02-01

    In the majority of patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit with acute respiratory failure (ARF), the aetiology for ARF is quite evident. In a minority of patients no obvious aetiology is apparent at presentation. In this group a previously unrecognized sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) may be the cause of the ARF. In spite of clinical suspicion SRBD remains infrequently diagnosed in ARF also because the technology necessary for this type of diagnosis (polysomnography) is usually unavailable in Intensive Care Units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of portable polysomnography system (PSGp) in a group of patients with ARF of unclear aetiology and with a clinical suspicion of SRBD. We studied a selected group of 14 patients (eight males, six females) admitted to an Intermediate Intensive care unit with varying degree of acute respiratory failure. Mean (SD) age was 57 (13) years, pH 7.28 (0.04), PaO2 5.6 (0.7) kPa), PaO2 (8.8 (1.6) kPa), Body mass index 42.7 (9.6) kg m(-2). The patients had no history of skeletal, neuromuscular or cardiovascular disease. None of them had a history of overt chronic lung diseases or had obvious respiratory tract infections. They were submitted to cardiac and respiratory functional evaluation and to nightly PSGp (VITALOG HMS 5000, Respironics Inc., Redwood City, CA, U.S.A.) which was performed in an intermediate intensive care unit. Ten subjects had obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAS), with mean respiratory disorder index h(-1) (RDI) 60.1 (25.9) [in five associated with obesity-hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)]; two had central sleep apnoea with mean RDI 45 (28.3) (one with hypothyroidism and one with cerebral multiple infarctions and right hemidiaphragmatic paralysis) and two had OHS with mean RDI 12.5 (3.5). Nocturnal hypoventilation was present in almost all patients. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was effective in three patients. Eight patients needed to be treated with BILEVEL (Bi

  14. Effects of acute microinjections of thyroid hormone to the preoptic region of euthyroid adult male rats on sleep and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joseph V; Giannopoulos, Phillip F; Moffett, Steven X; James, Thomas D

    2013-06-21

    In adult brain tissue, thyroid hormones are known to have multiple effects which are not mediated by chronic influences of the hormones on heterodimeric thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. Previous work has shown that acute microinjections of l-triiodothyronine (T3) to the preoptic region significantly influence EEG-defined sleep in hypothyroid rats. The current study examined the effects of similar microinjections in euthyroid rats. In 7 rats with histologically confirmed microinjection sites bilaterally placed in the preoptic region, slow-wave sleep time was significantly decreased, but REM and waking were increased as compared to vehicle-injected controls. The EEG-defined parameters were significantly influenced by the microinjections in a biphasic dose-response relationship; the lowest (0.3μg) and highest (10μg) doses tested were without significant effect while intermediate doses (1 and 3μg) induced significant differences from controls. There were significant diurnal variations in the measures, yet no significant interactions between the effect of hormone and time of day were demonstrated. Core body temperature was not significantly altered in the current study. The demonstration of effects of T3 within hours instead of days is consistent with a rapid mechanism of action such as a direct influence on neurotransmission. Since the T3-mediated effects were robust in the current work, euthyroid rats retain thyroid hormone sensitivity which would be needed if sleep-regulatory mechanisms in the preoptic region are continuously modulated by the hormones. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled LInked: BRES-D-12-01552 & BRES-D-12-01363R2.

  15. Sleep and Rest Requirements: Physiological Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, David F.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Sleep is a vital physiological need which must be met to insure optimal functioning. A single night of significantly shortened sleep negatively impacts performance, alertness, and mood. Restricted sleep studies have shown that even a relatively small amount of sleep loss over several consecutive days can be additive and result in a cumulative sleep debt with similar detrimental effects. Compounding the problem of sleep loss in the operational environment is the poor correlation between subjective reports of sleepiness and objective measures of physiological sleep need. Some of the factors determining how sleepy an individual is at a given point in time are: (1) individual characteristics (e.g., amount of prior sleep and wakefulness, circadian phase, age), (2) environmental conditions (e.g., noise, temperature, amount of social interaction), and (3) task variables (e.g., signal rate, workload). Although sleep need can be masked with medications, the only way to reduce it is with sleep itself. The timing of the sleep period can affect sleep duration and quality and thus its restorative strength. The data are clear that increasing sleep time results in improved alertness. This paper will briefly review the scientific findings on sleep need, the effects of sleep loss, napping strategies, and the implications of incorporating physiologically sound sleep and rest strategies into the operational aviation environment.

  16. Modeling Murine Gastric Metaplasia Through Tamoxifen-Induced Acute Parietal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Jose B.; Burclaff, Joseph; Mills, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Parietal cell loss represents the initial step in the sequential progression toward gastric adenocarcinoma. In the setting of chronic inflammation, the expansion of the mucosal response to parietal cell loss characterizes a crucial transition en route to gastric dysplasia. Here, we detail methods for using the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen as a novel tool to rapidly and reversibly induce parietal cell loss in mice in order to study the mechanisms that underlie these pre-neoplastic events. PMID:27246044

  17. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M.; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S. Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K.; Skoultchi, Arthur I.; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain–hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl−/− mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl−/− mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl−/− mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep. PMID:20921407

  18. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-10-19

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain-hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl(-/-) mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl(-/-) mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl(-/-) mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep.

  19. Sleep duration, sleep quality and body weight: parallel developments.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Adam, Tanja C; Hursel, Rick; Rutters, Femke; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-09-10

    The increase in obesity, including childhood obesity, has developed over the same time period as the progressive decrease in self-reported sleep duration. Since epidemiological studies showed an inverse relationship between short or disturbed sleep and obesity, the question arose, how sleep duration and sleep quality are associated with the development of obesity. In this review, the current literature on these topics has been evaluated. During puberty, changes in body mass index (BMI) are inversely correlated to changes in sleep duration. During adulthood, this relationship remains and at the same time unfavorable metabolic and neuro-endocrinological changes develop, that promote a positive energy balance, coinciding with sleep disturbance. Furthermore, during excessive weight loss BMI and fat mass decrease, in parallel, and related with an increase in sleep duration. In order to shed light on the association between sleep duration, sleep quality and obesity, until now it only has been shown that diet-induced body-weight loss and successive body-weight maintenance contribute to sleep improvement. It remains to be demonstrated whether body-weight management and body composition improve during an intervention concomitantly with spontaneous sleep improvement compared with the same intervention without spontaneous sleep improvement.

  20. Sustained Sleep Fragmentation Induces Sleep Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Maxime O.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is an integral feature of sleep apnea and other prevalent sleep disorders. Although the effect of repetitive arousals on cognitive performance is well documented, the effects of long-term SF on electroencephalography (EEG) and molecular markers of sleep homeostasis remain poorly investigated. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of chronic SF and characterized its effect on EEG spectral frequencies and the expression of genes previously linked to sleep homeostasis including clock genes, heat shock proteins, and plasticity-related genes. Design: N/A. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants : Sixty-six C57BL6/J adult mice. Interventions: Instrumental sleep disruption at a rate of 60/h during 14 days Measurements and Results: Locomotor activity and EEG were recorded during 14 days of SF followed by recovery for 2 days. Despite a dramatic number of arousals and decreased sleep bout duration, SF minimally reduced total quantity of sleep and did not significantly alter its circadian distribution. Spectral analysis during SF revealed a homeostatic drive for slow wave activity (SWA; 1–4 Hz) and other frequencies as well (4–40 Hz). Recordings during recovery revealed slow wave sleep consolidation and a transient rebound in SWA, and paradoxical sleep duration. The expression of selected genes was not induced following chronic SF. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increased sleep pressure confirming that altered quality with preserved quantity triggers core sleep homeostasis mechanisms. However, it did not induce the expression of genes induced by sleep loss, suggesting that these molecular pathways are not sustainably activated in chronic diseases involving SF. Citation: Baud MO, Magistretti PJ, Petit JM. Sustained sleep fragmentation induces sleep homeostasis in mice. SLEEP 2015;38(4):567–579. PMID:25325477

  1. Passive transfer of narcolepsy: anti-TRIB2 autoantibody positive patient IgG causes hypothalamic orexin neuron loss and sleep attacks in mice.

    PubMed

    Katzav, Aviva; Arango, Maria T; Kivity, Shaye; Tanaka, Susumu; Givaty, Gili; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Honda, Makoto; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (a sudden weakening of posture muscle tone usually triggered by emotion) caused by the loss of orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. Autoimmune mechanisms are implicated in narcolepsy by increased frequency of specific HLA alleles and the presence of specific autoantibody (anti-Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) antibodies) in the sera of patients with narcolepsy. Presently, we passively transferred narcolepsy to naïve mice by injecting intra-cerebra-ventricularly (ICV) pooled IgG positive for anti-TRIB2 antibodies. Narcolepsy-IgG-injected mice had a loss of the NeuN (neuronal marker), synaptophysin (synaptic marker) and orexin-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus area in narcolepsy compared to control-IgG-injected mice and these changes were associated with narcolepsy-like immobility attacks at four weeks post injection and with hyperactivity and long term memory deficits in the staircase and novel object recognition tests. Similar behavioral and cognitive deficits are observed in narcoleptic patients. This is the first report of passive transfer of experimental narcolepsy to naïve mice induced by autoantibodies and supports the autoimmune pathogenesis in narcolepsy.

  2. Sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jonathan C; Chopra, Swati; Schwartz, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Sleep apnoea is a disorder characterised by repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep caused by airway occlusion (obstructive sleep apnoea) or altered control of breathing (central sleep apnoea). In this Clinical Year in Review, we summarise high-impact research from the past year pertaining to management, diagnosis and cardio-metabolic consequences of sleep apnoea.

  3. Acute bilateral glaucoma and panuveitis as a side effect of topiramate for weight loss treatment.

    PubMed

    Pikkel, Yoav Yechezkel

    2014-04-17

    A 54-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with acute angle-closure glaucoma and panuveitis in both eyes after being treated with topiramate for binge eating and obesity. This case report emphasises the hazardous side effects of treatment with topiramate with unusual indication and the precaution a caretaker must take when treating a patient.

  4. Recognising sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    How, C H; Hsu, P P; Tan, K L

    2015-03-01

    Most people spend a third of their lives sleeping, and thus, sleep has a major impact on all of us. As sleep is a function and not a structure, it is challenging to treat and prevent its complications. Sleep apnoea is one such complication, with serious and potentially life-threatening consequences. Local studies estimate that about 15% of Singapore's population is afflicted with sleep apnoea. The resulting sleep fragmentation may result in poor quality of sleep, leading to daytime sleepiness. Sleep apnoea may also be the underlying cause of high blood pressure, memory loss, poor concentration and work performance, motor vehicle accidents, and marital problems. Evaluation involves a sleep study, followed by patient education, and an individualised step-wise management approach should be explored. Many patients will require follow-up for a long period of time, as management options may not offer a permanent cure; other contributory causes may arise at different phases of their lives, compounded by genetic and hormonal issues, ethnicity and the modern hazards of a fast-paced society.

  5. Jet Lag in Military Operations: Field Trial of L-Tryptophan in Reducing Sleep-Loss Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    REDUCING BLEEP -LOSS EFFECTS Cheryl L. Spinweber, Schuyler C. Webb, and J. Christian Gillin Naval Health Research Center P.O. Box 85122 San Diego, CA 52138...States. Performance measures included 4-choice reaction time (RT), and addition task (AT), the Williams Word Memory Test (STM), and the Digit Symbol...Substitution Test (DSST). Baseline data were collected 2 weeks prior to deployment on 3 consecutive days (B1, B2, B3), on the 2 days immediately prior to

  6. Prefrontal Cortex to Accumbens Projections in Sleep Regulation of Reward

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Yao; Cai, Li; Li, Yizhi; Chen, Bo; Dong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sleep profoundly affects the emotional and motivational state. In humans and animals, loss of sleep often results in enhanced motivation for reward, which has direct implications for health risks as well as potential benefits. Current study aims at understanding the mechanisms underlying sleep deprivation (SDe)-induced enhancement of reward seeking. We found that after acute SDe, mice had an increase in sucrose seeking and consumption but not food intake, suggesting a selective enhancement of motivation for reward. In the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain region regulating emotional and motivational responses, we observed a decrease in the ratio of the overall excitatory over inhibitory synaptic inputs onto NAc principle neurons after SDe. The shift was partly mediated by reduced glutamatergic transmission of presynaptic origin. Further analysis revealed that there was selective reduction of the glutamate release probability at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-to-NAc synapses, but not those from the hippocampus, thalamus, or the basal lateral amygdala. To reverse this SDe-induced synaptic alteration, we expressed the stabilized step function opsin (SSFO) in the mPFC; optogenetic stimulation of SSFO at mPFC-to-NAc projection terminals persistently enhanced the action potential-dependent glutamate release. Intra-NAc optogenetic stimulation of SSFO selectively at mPFC-to-NAc terminals restored normal sucrose seeking in mice after SDe without affecting food intake. These results highlight the mPFC-to-NAc projection as a key circuit-based target for sleep to regulate reward-motivated behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sleep loss, a costly challenge of modern society, has profound physiological and psychological consequences, including altered reward processing of the brain. The current study aims at understanding the mechanisms underlying sleep deprivation-induced enhancement of reward seeking. We identify that the medial prefrontal cortex (m

  7. Effect of Repeated Normobaric Hypoxia Exposures during Sleep on Acute Mountain Sickness, Exercise Performance, and Sleep during Exposure to Terrestrial Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    no NH treatment during subsequent HH residence at 4,559 m. One interpretation suggested for the lack of effectiveness was a loss of VEacc prior to HH...assignment until the end of the study. No differences between groups existed for age, weight , height, PETCO2 during rest under SL and NH (1 h of exposure...Peak (4,300 m). Table 1. Volunteer characteristics NH Treatment (n 14) Sham Treatment (n 9) Age, yr 24 5 25 6 Weight , kg 76 15 75 16

  8. Changes in Serum TSH and Free T4 during Human Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Lynn; Nedeltcheva, Arlet; Imperial, Jacqueline; Penev, Plamen D.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine whether recurrent sleep restriction is accompanied by changes in measures of thyroid function. Design: Two-period crossover intervention study. Setting: University clinical research center and sleep laboratory. Participants: 11 healthy volunteers (5F/6M) with a mean (± SD) age of 39 ± 5 y and BMI 26.5 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Intervention: Randomized exposure to 14 days of sedentary living with ad libitum food intake and 5.5- vs. 8.5-h overnight sleep opportunity. Measurements and Results: Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) were measured at the end of each intervention. Partial sleep restriction was accompanied by a modest but statistically significant reduction in TSH and free T4, seen mainly in the female participants of the study. Conclusions: Compared to the well-known rise in TSH and thyroid hormone concentrations during acute sleep loss, tests obtained after 14 days of partial sleep restriction did not show a similar activation of the human thyroid axis. Citation: Kessler L; Nedeltcheva A; Imperial J; Penev PD. Changes in serum TSH and free T4 during human sleep restriction. SLEEP 2010;33(8):1115-1118. PMID:20815195

  9. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  10. Effect of sleeping alone on sleep quality in female bed partners of snorers.

    PubMed

    Blumen, M; Quera Salva, M A; d'Ortho, M-P; Leroux, K; Audibert, P; Fermanian, C; Chabolle, F; Lofaso, F

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to objectively measure the effect of sleeping alone for one night on sleep quality in female bed partners of male snorers. Females complaining of poor sleep due to snoring by their bed partner and having no known hearing loss or snoring were included in a prospective multicentre cross-sectional study. 23 females underwent one polysomnography recording while sleeping with their bed partner and another while sleeping alone. Their sleep parameters were compared between the two nights. We excluded seven couples because the female partner snored for >10% of the sleep time (n = 6) or had obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (n = 1). In the remaining 16 females, sleep time, sleep efficiency, arousal index and percentages of deep sleep (stages 3-4) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were not significantly different between the two nights. Percentages of light sleep (non-REM stage 2) and awakening index were lower when sleeping alone (p = 0.023 and p = 0.046, respectively). Sleep quality was decreased and sleep fragmentation increased in females sleeping with male snorers. Some females had unrecognised snoring. However, our data do not suggest that objective sleep quality improves substantially in the female nonsnoring partner when she sleeps alone for one night.

  11. Noradrenaline from Locus Coeruleus Neurons Acts on Pedunculo-Pontine Neurons to Prevent REM Sleep and Induces Its Loss-Associated Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khanday, Mudasir Ahmad; Somarajan, Bindu I.; Mehta, Rachna

    2016-01-01

    Normally, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) does not appear during waking or non-REMS. Isolated, independent studies showed that elevated noradrenaline (NA) levels inhibit REMS and induce REMS loss-associated cytomolecular, cytomorphological, psychosomatic changes and associated symptoms. However, the source of NA and its target in the brain for REMS regulation and function in health and diseases remained to be confirmed in vivo. Using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-siRNA and virus-coated TH-shRNA in normal freely moving rats, we downregulated NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC) REM-OFF neurons in vivo. These TH-downregulated rats showed increased REMS, which was prevented by infusing NA into the pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT), the site of REM-ON neurons, normal REMS returned after recovery. Moreover, unlike normal or control-siRNA- or shRNA-injected rats, upon REMS deprivation (REMSD) TH-downregulated rat brains did not show elevated Na-K ATPase (molecular changes) expression and activity. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first in vivo findings in an animal model confirming that NA from the LC REM-OFF neurons (1) acts on the PPT REM-ON neurons to prevent appearance of REMS, and (2) are responsible for inducing REMSD-associated molecular changes and symptoms. These observations clearly show neuro-physio-chemical mechanism of why normally REMS does not appear during waking. Also, that LC neurons are the primary source of NA, which in turn causes some, if not many, REMSD-associated symptoms and behavioral changes. The findings are proof-of-principle for the first time and hold potential to be exploited for confirmation toward treating REMS disorder and amelioration of REMS loss-associated symptoms in patients. PMID:27957531

  12. Reversal of the neurological deficit in acute stroke with the signal of efficacy trial of auto-BPAP to limit damage from suspected sleep apnea (Reverse-STEAL): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the negative impact of sleep apnea on the clinical course of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is well known, data regarding non-invasive ventilation in acute patients are scarce. Several studies have shown its tolerability and safety, yet no controlled randomized sequential phase studies exist that aim to establish the efficacy of early non-invasive ventilation in AIS patients. Methods/design We decided to examine our hypothesis that early non-invasive ventilation with auto-titrating bilevel positive airway pressure (auto-BPAP) positively affects short-term clinical outcomes in AIS patients. We perform a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled, third rater- blinded, parallel-group trial. Patients with AIS with proximal arterial obstruction and clinically suspected sleep apnea will be randomized to standard stroke care alone or standard stroke care plus auto-BPAP. Auto-BPAP will be initiated within 24 hours of stroke onset and performed for a maximum of 48 hours during diurnal and nocturnal sleep. Patients will undergo unattended cardiorespiratory polygraphy between days three and five to assess sleep apnea. Our primary endpoint will be any early neurological improvement on the NIHSS at 72 hours from randomization. Safety, tolerability, short-term and three-months functional outcomes will be assessed as secondary endpoints by un-blinded and blinded observers respectively. Discussion We expect that this study will advance our understanding of how early treatment with non-invasive ventilation can counterbalance, or possibly reverse, the deleterious effects of sleep apnea in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The study will provide preliminary data to power a subsequent phase III study. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01812993 PMID:23941576

  13. Managing acute phosphorus loss with fertilizer source and placement: Proof of concept

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface water eutrophication is a pervasive global problem, with P losses from agriculture often identified as a contributor. This study was conducted to evaluate the implications of fertilizer source and placement on potential soluble P (SP) runoff. National P Runoff Project protocols were used f...

  14. [Acute hearing loss in the orchestral musician : Noise trauma or idiopathic sudden deafness?].

    PubMed

    Brusis, T

    2011-07-01

    During an orchestral performance musicians are exposed to high noise levels, which may exceed the intensity which could evoke hearing impairment after many years of exposure. From experience the degree of hearing loss in musicians is in general less than would be expected from the levels of exposure. The likelihood that an orchestral musician would develop a noise-induced hearing loss is much lower than for an industrial worker in a noise-intense factory. On the other hand it has to be considered that it is imperative for musicians to have non-impaired hearing to practise their profession. In some cases a sudden onset of hearing loss is traced to the noise stress of a loud performance. In such cases, the high noise levels predominantly produced by brass instruments or drums were assumed to be the cause. This publication presents five cases of expert opinions, where previous expert opinions had assumed noise or a blast trauma as the cause for the hearing loss. By careful analysis, a noise or a blast trauma was not regarded as probable in any of the cases. Interestingly, three of the five musicians had a normal contralateral hearing. In one case normal bilateral hearing was observed without the typical c(5) notch although the musician had been subject to noise stress in an orchestra for years.

  15. Sleep As A Strategy For Optimizing Performance.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Angela M; Deuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is an essential component of maintaining, sustaining, and optimizing cognitive and physical performance during and after demanding training and strenuous missions. Getting sufficient amounts of rest and sleep is key to recovery. This article focuses on sleep and discusses (1) why getting sufficient sleep is important, (2) how to optimize sleep, and (3) tools available to help maximize sleep-related performance. Insufficient sleep negatively impacts safety and readiness through reduced cognitive function, more accidents, and increased military friendly-fire incidents. Sufficient sleep is linked to better cognitive performance outcomes, increased vigor, and better physical and athletic performance as well as improved emotional and social functioning. Because Special Operations missions do not always allow for optimal rest or sleep, the impact of reduced rest and sleep on readiness and mission success should be minimized through appropriate preparation and planning. Preparation includes periods of "banking" or extending sleep opportunities before periods of loss, monitoring sleep by using tools like actigraphy to measure sleep and activity, assessing mental effectiveness, exploiting strategic sleep opportunities, and consuming caffeine at recommended doses to reduce fatigue during periods of loss. Together, these efforts may decrease the impact of sleep loss on mission and performance.

  16. Sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Malvy, D; Chappuis, F

    2011-07-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a vector-borne disease that flourishes in impoverished, rural parts of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei and is transmitted by tsetse flies of the genus Glossina. The majority of cases are caused by T. b. gambiense, which gives rise to the chronic, anthroponotic endemic disease in Western and Central Africa. Infection with T. b. rhodesiense leads to the acute, zoonotic form of Eastern and Southern Africa. The parasites live and multiply extracellularly in the blood and tissue fluids of their human host. They have elaborated a variety of strategies for invading hosts, to escape the immune system and to take advantage of host growth factors. HAT is a challenging and deadly disease owing to its complex epidemiology and clinical presentation and, if left untreated, can result in high death rates. As one of the most neglected tropical diseases, HAT is characterized by the limited availability of safe and cost-effective control tools. No vaccine against HAT is available, and the toxicity of existing old and cumbersome drugs precludes the adoption of control strategies based on preventive chemotherapy. As a result, the keystones of interventions against sleeping sickness are active and passive case-finding for early detection of cases followed by treatment, vector control and animal reservoir management. New methods to diagnose and treat patients and to control transmission by the tsetse fly are needed to achieve the goal of global elimination of the disease.

  17. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharina J.; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  18. Effect of oxcarbazepine on sleep architecture.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Mexicano, Graciela; González, Valentín; Hernandez, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The most common side effects following administration of antiepileptic drugs involve alterations in sleep architecture and varying degrees of daytime sleepiness. Oxcarbazepine is a drug that is approved as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. However, there is no information about its effects on sleep pattern organization; therefore, the objective of this work was to analyze such effects. Animals (Wistar rats) exhibited three different behavioral and electrophysiological states of vigilance: wakefulness, slow wave sleep (SWS), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Oral treatment with oxcarbazepine (100 mg/kg) produced an increment in total sleep time throughout the recording period. This increment involved both SWS and REM sleep. Mean duration of the REM sleep phase was not affected. In contrast, the frequency of this sleep phase increased significantly across the 10-hour period. REM sleep latency shortened significantly. Results obtained in this work indicate that oxcarbazepine's acute effects point to hypnotic properties.

  19. Obesity and short sleep: unlikely bedfellows?

    PubMed

    Horne, J

    2011-05-01

    The link between habitual short sleep and obesity is critically examined from a sleep perspective. Sleep estimates are confounded by 'time in bed', naps; the normal distribution of sleep duration. Wide categorizations of 'short sleep', with claims that <7 h sleep is associated with obesity and morbidity, stem from generalizations from 5 h sleepers (<8% of adults) and acute restriction studies involving unendurable sleepiness. Statistically significant epidemiological findings are of questionable clinical concern, even for 5 h sleepers, as any weight gains accumulate slowly over years; easily redressed by e.g. short exercise exposures, contrasting with huge accumulations of 'lost' sleep. Little evidence supports 'more sleep', alone, as an effective treatment for obesity. Impaired sleep quality and quantity are surrogates for many physical and psychological disorders, as can be obesity. Advocating more sleep, in these respects, could invoke unwarranted use of sleep aids including hypnotics. Inadequate sleep in obese children is usually symptomatic of problems not overcome by increasing sleep alone. Interestingly, neuropeptides regulating interactions between sleep, locomotion and energy balance in normal weight individuals, are an avenue for investigation in some obese short sleepers. The real danger of inadequate sleep lies with excessive daytime sleepiness, not obesity.

  20. Combination of acute preoperative plateletpheresis, cell salvage, and aprotinin minimizes blood loss and requirement during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Ji, Hongwen; Lin, Jing; Lenehan, Eric; Ji, Bingyang; Liu, Jinping; Liu, Jin; Long, Cun; Crane, Terry A

    2005-03-01

    Acute preoperative plateletpheresis (APP), cell salvage (CS) technique, and the use of aprotinin have been individually reported to be effective in reducing blood loss and blood component transfusion while improving hematological profiles in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In this prospective randomized clinical study, the efficacy of these combined approaches on reducing blood loss and transfusion requirements was evaluated. Seventy patients undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were randomly divided into four groups: a control group (group I, n = 10) did not receive any of the previously mentioned approaches. An APP and CS group (group II, n = 20) experienced APP in which preoperative platelet-rich plasma was collected and reinfused after reversal of heparin, along with the cell salvage technique throughout surgery. The third group (group III, n = 22) received aprotinin in which 5,000,000 KIU Trasylol was applied during surgery, and a combination group (group IV, n = 18) was treated with all three approaches, i.e., APP, CS, and aprotinin. Compared with group I (896+/-278 mL), the postoperative total blood loss was significantly reduced in groups II, III, and IV (468+/-136, 388+/-122, 202+/-81 mL, respectively, p < 0.05). The requirements of packed red blood cells in the three approached groups (153+/-63, 105+/-178, 0+/-0 mL, respectively) also were reduced when compared with group I (343+/-118 mL, p < 0.05). In group I, six patients (6/10) received fresh-frozen plasma and three patients (3/10) received platelet transfusion, whereas no patients in the other three groups required fresh-frozen plasma and platelet. In conclusion, both plateletpheresis concomitant with cell salvage and aprotinin contribute to the improvement of postoperative hemostasis, and the combination of these two approaches could minimize postoperative blood loss and requirement.

  1. Cetacean sleep: an unusual form of mammalian sleep.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Manger, Paul R; Ridgway, Sam H; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2008-10-01

    Our knowledge of the form of lateralized sleep behavior, known as unihemispheric slow wave sleep (USWS), seen in all members of the order Cetacea examined to date, is described. We trace the discovery of this phenotypically unusual form of mammalian sleep and highlight specific aspects that are different from sleep in terrestrial mammals. We find that for cetaceans sleep is characterized by USWS, a negligible amount or complete absence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and a varying degree of movement during sleep associated with body size, and an asymmetrical eye state. We then compare the anatomy of the mammalian somnogenic system with what is known in cetaceans, highlighting areas where additional knowledge is needed to understand cetacean sleep. Three suggested functions of USWS (facilitation of movement, more efficient sensory processing and control of breathing) are discussed. Lastly, the possible selection pressures leading to this form of sleep are examined, leading us to the suggestion that the selection pressure necessitating the evolution of cetacean sleep was most likely the need to offset heat loss to the water from birth and throughout life. Aspects such as sentinel functions and breathing are likely to be proximate evolutionary phenomenon of this form of sleep.

  2. Loss of chromosome Y in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: age related or neoplastic phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anurag; Parihar, Mayur; Remani, Arun S; Mishra, Deepak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in the bone marrow has long been considered as an age-related phenomenon with an incidence of more than 25% in males beyond the age of 80 years. Though reported as an acquired abnormality in myeloid neoplasms, it has rarely been described in B-lymphoblastic leukemia which primarily is a disease of the young. We describe here in three cases of pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia with LOY. Conventional cytogenetic studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using centromeric probes for chromosome X and Y on peripheral blood samples ruled out constitutional LOY in all the three cases favoring it to be a neoplastic phenomenon.

  3. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  4. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep.

  5. Sleep and waking during acute histamine H3 agonist BP 2.94 or H3 antagonist carboperamide (MR 16155) administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Monti, J M; Jantos, H; Ponzoni, A; Monti, D

    1996-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of histamine H3 receptor agonist BP 2.94 or H3 receptor antagonist carboperamide (MR 16155) given by oral route on sleep and waking in rats surgically prepared for long-term recordings. BP 2.94 produced a significant increase of slow-wave sleep (SWS) that was related to slight decreases of waking, light sleep, and REM sleep. Carboperamide significantly increased waking and decreased SWS and REM sleep. Pretreatment with carboperamide prevented the effect of BP 2.94 on SWS. It is suggested that the effects of BP 2.94 or carboperamide on sleep and waking could depend on changes in the availability of histamine at the postsynaptic H1 receptor. Alternatively, activation or blockade of the H3 heteroreceptors found in the central catecholamine, indolamine, and acetylcholine nerve endings could inhibit or increase the release of noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, and acetylcholine. This would secondarily result in changes of sleep variables.

  6. Acute canine distemper encephalitis is associated with rapid neuronal loss and local immune activation.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Bastien-Hamel, Louis-Etienne; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-04-01

    For most virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), immune-mediated damage, the route of inoculation and death of infected cells all contribute to the pathology observed. To investigate the role of these factors in early canine distemper neuropathogenesis, we infected ferrets either intranasally or intraperitoneally with the neurovirulent canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the virus primarily targeted the olfactory bulb, brainstem, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas only occasional foci were detected in the cortex. The infection led to widespread neuronal loss, which correlated with the clinical signs observed. Increased numbers of activated microglia, reactive gliosis and different pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected areas, suggesting that the presence and ultimate death of infected cells at early times after infection trigger strong local immune activation, despite the observed systemic immunosuppression.

  7. Relationship between Sleep Habits and Nighttime Sleep among Healthy Preschool Children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ming Jae

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: We examined the nighttime sleep habits associated with insufficient sleep quantity and poor sleep quality among healthy preschool-aged Taiwanese children. Materials and Methods: The study population of this cross-sectional survey was a stratified random sample of 3 to 6-year-old preschool children from 19 cities and counties in Taiwan. A caregiver-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on preschooler sleep quantity (sleep duration and sleep latency) and sleep quality (sleep disturbances and disruption) and potentially related sleep habits. Results: Of the 1253 children for whom analysable survey data were collected (children's mean age: 5.03 ± 1.27 years), more than half (53.07%) engaged in bedtime television (TV)-viewing, 88.95% required a sleep reminder, 43.85% exhibited bedtime resistance, 93.6% engaged in co-sleeping (bed-sharing or room-sharing), and only 33.72% slept in a well darkened bedroom. Bedtime TV-viewing, co-sleeping, bedroom light exposure, and bedtime resistance were the primary predictors, without a bedtime TV-viewing habit was the strongest predictor analysed; it explained 15.2% and 19.9% of the variance in adequate sleep quantity and improved sleep quality in preschool children. Conclusion: Sleep loss and poor sleep quality in preschool children could be alleviated, at least partly, by curtailing bedtime TV-viewing, limiting light exposure during sleeping, and reducing bed-sharing habit.

  8. The impact of disaster work on community volunteers: The role of peri-traumatic distress, level of personal affectedness, sleep quality and resource loss, on post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and subjective health.

    PubMed

    Thormar, Sigridur B; Gersons, Berthold P R; Juen, Barbara; Djakababa, Maria Nelden; Karlsson, Thorlakur; Olff, Miranda

    2014-12-01

    Disaster work has shown to cause PTSD symptoms and subjective health complaints in professional emergency personnel. However, very little is known about how disaster work affects community volunteers. This first time longitudinal study examined factors contributing to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSD) and subjective health complaints in volunteers working in an earthquake setting. At six and eighteen months post disaster, a sample of 506 Indonesian Red Cross volunteers were assessed using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised and the Subjective Health Complaints Inventory. Factors analyzed in relation to the outcomes included: peri-traumatic distress, level of personal affectedness by the disaster, sleep quality and loss of resources as a consequence of the disaster. At 18 months post-disaster the findings showed high levels of PTSD symptoms and subjective health complaints. Quality of sleep was related to both outcomes but resource loss only to PTSD symptoms. Neither peri-traumatic distress nor level of affectedness by the disaster (external versus directly affected volunteers), were predictive of symptoms. This study indicates that characteristics of disaster work e.g. low quality of sleep, may be an important contributor to PTSD symptoms and subjective health complaints in volunteers.

  9. Effects of a selective sleep deprivation on subsequent anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Mougin, F; Bourdin, H; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Didier, J M; Toubin, G; Kantelip, J P

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a partial sleep deprivation on a subsequent supramaximal exercise evaluated from the 30 second Wingate test, and on the following recovery. To take into account the active muscle mass, the Wingate test was performed against a constant braking force related to the data of a force-velocity test conducted on a Monark cycle ergometer (Model 814 E with weights) one week before the experimental test. Eight highly trained athletes were enrolled for this study. The changes in ventilatory and metabolic responses were analyzed during and upon completion of physical 30 second exercise, taking place after two nights, in other words, after a reference night and after a night with reduced sleep. Partial sleep deprivation was obtained by delaying bedtime until 3 a.m. The 30 second Wingate test was performed between 9 a.m. and noon the following days, using a Monark ergometer (Model 814 F). The analyses of change scores disclosed that there were no main significant effects for measures of ventilation, lactates and pH(v) levels under the two experimental conditions. The peak power, the mean power output and the peak velocity recorded after partial sleep deprivation were not modified in comparison with the values obtained after the reference night. These findings suggest that acute sleep loss did not contribute to alterations in supramaximal exercise.

  10. Adult obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; McSharry, David G.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is an increasingly common disorder of repeated upper airway collapse during sleep, which leads to oxygen desaturation and disrupted sleep. Symptoms include snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleepiness. Pathogenesis varies; predisposing factors include small upper airway lumen, unstable respiratory control, low arousal threshold, small lung volume, and dysfunctional upper airway dilator muscles. Risk factors include obesity, male sex, age, menopause, fluid retention, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and smoking. Obstructive sleep apnoea causes sleepiness, road traffic accidents, and probably systemic hypertension. It has also been linked to myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and diabetes mellitus though not definitively. Continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice, with adherence of 60–70%. Bi-level positive airway pressure or adaptive servo-ventilation can be used for patients who are intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure. Other treatments include dental devices, surgery, and weight loss. PMID:23910433

  11. Clock genes and sleep.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Shostak, Anton; Oster, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In most species--from cyanobacteria to humans--endogenous clocks have evolved that drive 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. In mammals, these circadian rhythms are regulated by a hierarchical network of cellular oscillators controlled by a set of clock genes organized in a system of interlocked transcriptional feedback loops. One of the most prominent outputs of the circadian system is the synchronization of the sleep-wake cycle with external (day-) time. Clock genes also have a strong impact on many other biological functions, such as memory formation, energy metabolism, and immunity. Remarkably, large overlaps exist between clock gene and sleep (loss) mediated effects on these processes. This review summarizes sleep clock gene interactions for these three phenomena, highlighting potential mediators linking sleep and/or clock function to physiological output in an attempt to better understand the complexity of diurnal adaptation and its consequences for health and disease.

  12. Association between sleep quality and psychiatric disorders in patients with subjective tinnitus in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaping; Yao, Jie; Zhang, Zhili; Wang, Wenxuan

    2016-10-01

    The study aimed to investigate the relationship between quality of sleep and psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression in patients with subjective tinnitus. Early intervention is associated with improved therapeutic outcomes. We used Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS) and tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) in 543 patients [224 male (41.3 %); 319 female (58.7 %)] with subjective tinnitus enrolled in the ENT outpatient clinic from 2013 to 2015. Tinnitus characteristics and hearing status were recorded. A binary step-wise logistic regression analysis was performed. Two hundred cases (36.8 %) including 65 men (32.5 %) and 135 women (67.5 %) were diagnosed with sleep disorders. The PSQI score was the highest in patients with anxiety plus depression. Prolonged sleep latency and daytime dysfunction were positively associated with anxiety and depression. Increased sleep latency score was associated with 1.521- and 1.667-fold increased risk of anxiety and depression. Increase in the daytime dysfunction score was associated with 1.941- and 1.477-fold increases in the risk of anxiety and depression, respectively. Psychiatric and sleep disorders are highly prevalent in patients with subjective tinnitus. The most severe sleep impairment was found in patients with anxiety plus depression, resulting from prolonged sleep latency and severe daytime dysfunction. Acute duration, young people, hearing loss, impaired sleep, and severity of tinnitus were the major risk factors for tinnitus accompanied with anxiety symptoms. Severity of tinnitus and sleep impairment appeared to be the major risk factors of tinnitus accompanied with depression symptoms.

  13. Sleep Talking (Somniloquy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep Hallucinations Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Exploding ... Sleep Behavior Disorder Sleep Paralysis Nightmares Bedwetting Sleep Hallucinations Exploding Head Syndrome Sleep Talking Sleep Talking – Overview ...

  14. [Acute diarrhea: stool water loss in hospitalized infants and its correlation with etiologic agents and lactose content in the diet].

    PubMed

    Palma, D; Oliva, C A; Taddei, J A; Fagundes-Neto, U

    1997-01-01

    Forty weaned male infants were studied during their first year of life, all hospitalized with acute diarrhea in the Gastroenterology and Metabolism Unit of the Hospital "Umberto I", São Paulo, SP, Brazil. We evaluated and quantified water fecal losses, employing the metabolic bed technique, relating the feeding formula employed with the different causal enteropathogenic agents. 67.5% of the studied infants were under six months and 40% under three months of age. Two groups were randomly assembled to receive, lactose or lactose free feeding formulae. Twenty one patients received a lactose-containing formula (Ninho 10%) and the other 19 children were fed caseine (Portagen) formulae. According to coproculture results and identification of enteropathogenic agents, we divided the studied infants relating feeding formula with the presence or absence of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC): I-13 with positive coproculture for EPEC and diets which included lactose--(L/EPEC+); II--eight with negative coproculture for EPEC and diets which included lactose--(L/EPEC-); III--seven with positive coproculture for EPEC and lactose free diets--(G/EPEC+); IV--12 with negative coproculture for EPEC and lactose free diets. (G/EPEC-). The most frequently isolated agent at coproculture was EPEC, in 20 of the cases (50%), followed by Campylobacter (7.5%). It was also possible to observe that the frequencies of EIEC, Salmonella and Rotavirus were all equal (2.5%). Mixed infections occurred only between EPEC and EIEC, registering a frequency of 5%. The EIEC samples, associated to EPEC 0111 were serotyped as 0 28 ac: H- and 0 152:H-. The use of metabolic bed made the evaluation of fecal volumes possible by a simple and quick technique, thus allowing a closer clinical monitoring, as well as a more reliable evaluation of the patients hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Average acceptance volumes of the formulae--either with or without lactose--were always below the amount recommended

  15. Genetic Analysis of Histamine Signaling in Larval Zebrafish Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacological studies in mammals and zebrafish suggest that histamine plays an important role in promoting arousal. However, genetic studies using rodents with disrupted histamine synthesis or signaling have revealed only subtle or no sleep/wake phenotypes. Studies of histamine function in mammalian arousal are complicated by its production in cells of the immune system and its roles in humoral and cellular immunity, which can have profound effects on sleep/wake states. To avoid this potential confound, we used genetics to explore the role of histamine in regulating sleep in zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate in which histamine production is restricted to neurons in the brain. Similar to rodent genetic studies, we found that zebrafish that lack histamine due to mutation of histidine decarboxylase (hdc) exhibit largely normal sleep/wake behaviors. Zebrafish containing predicted null mutations in several histamine receptors also lack robust sleep/wake phenotypes, although we are unable to verify that these mutants are completely nonfunctional. Consistent with some rodent studies, we found that arousal induced by overexpression of the neuropeptide hypocretin (Hcrt) or by stimulation of hcrt-expressing neurons is not blocked in hdc or hrh1 mutants. We also found that the number of hcrt-expressing or histaminergic neurons is unaffected in animals that lack histamine or Hcrt signaling, respectively. Thus, while acute pharmacological manipulation of histamine signaling has been shown to have profound effects on zebrafish and mammalian sleep, our results suggest that chronic loss of histamine signaling due to genetic mutations has only subtle effects on sleep in zebrafish, similar to rodents. PMID:28275716

  16. Sleep Disturbances

    MedlinePlus

    ... middle of the night. Sleep in a cool dark place and use the bed only for sleeping ... in Parkinson's Navigating Employment, Insurance, Financial and Legal Matters PD Take Three: Tips from the Health Care ...

  17. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  18. Sleeping sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001362.htm Sleeping sickness To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sleeping sickness is an infection caused by germs carried ...

  19. The cognitive cost of sleep lost

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, John G.; Strecker, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of literature supports the intuitive notion that a good night’s sleep can facilitate human cognitive performance the next day. Deficits in attention, learning & memory, emotional reactivity, and higher-order cognitive processes, such as executive function and decision making, have all been documented following sleep disruption in humans. Thus, whilst numerous clinical and experimental studies link human sleep disturbance to cognitive deficits, attempts to develop valid and reliable rodent models of these phenomena are fewer, and relatively more recent. This review focuses primarily on the cognitive impairments produced by sleep disruption in rodent models of several human patterns of sleep loss/sleep disturbance. Though not an exclusive list, this review will focus on four specific types of sleep disturbance: total sleep deprivation, experimental sleep fragmentation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic sleep restriction. The use of rodent models can provide greater opportunities to understand the neurobiological changes underlying sleep loss induced cognitive impairments. Thus, this review concludes with a description of recent neurobiological findings concerning the neuroplastic changes and putative brain mechanisms that may underlie the cognitive deficits produced by sleep disturbances. PMID:21875679

  20. Sleep in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Flávia Gabe; Nguyen, Xuân-Lan; Pichereau, Claire; Maury, Eric; Fleury, Bernard; Fagondes, Simone

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poor sleep quality is a consistently reported by patients in the ICU. In such a potentially hostile environment, sleep is extremely fragmented and sleep architecture is unconventional, with a predominance of superficial sleep stages and a limited amount of time spent in the restorative stages. Among the causes of sleep disruption in the ICU are factors intrinsic to the patients and the acute nature of their condition, as well as factors related to the ICU environment and the treatments administered, such as mechanical ventilation and drug therapy. Although the consequences of poor sleep quality for the recovery of ICU patients remain unknown, it seems to influence the immune, metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological systems. There is evidence that multifaceted interventions focused on minimizing nocturnal sleep disruptions improve sleep quality in ICU patients. In this article, we review the literature regarding normal sleep and sleep in the ICU. We also analyze sleep assessment methods; the causes of poor sleep quality and its potential implications for the recovery process of critically ill patients; and strategies for sleep promotion. PMID:26785964

  1. Changes in mechanisms proposed to mediate fat loss following an acute bout of high-intensity interval and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cameron B; Zelt, Jason G E; Castellani, Laura N; Little, Jonathan P; Jung, Mary E; Wright, David C; Tschakovsky, Michael E; Gurd, Brendon J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of endurance exercise (END; 65% V̇O2peak for 60 min) and high-intensity interval exercise (HIE; four 30 s Wingates separated by 4.5 min of active rest) on cardiorespiratory, hormonal, and subjective appetite measures that may account for the previously reported superior fat loss with low volume HIE compared with END. Recreationally active males (n = 18) completed END, HIE, and control (CON) protocols. On each test day, cardiorespiratory measures including oxygen uptake (V̇O2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and heart rate were recorded and blood samples were obtained at baseline (BSL), 60 min after exercise, and 180 min after exercise (equivalent times for CON). Subjective measures of appetite (hunger, fullness, nausea, and prospective consumption) were assessed using visual analogue scales, administered at BSL, 0, 60, 120, and 180 min after exercise. No significant differences in excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) were observed between conditions. RER was significantly (P < 0.05) depressed in HIE compared with CON at 60 min after exercise, yet estimates of total fat oxidation over CON were not different between HIE and END. No differences in plasma adiponectin concentrations between protocols or time points were present. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated immediately after exercise in HIE compared with CON. Several subjective measures of appetite were significantly (P < 0.05) depressed immediately following HIE. Our data indicate that increases in EPOC or fat oxidation following HIE appear unlikely to contribute to the reported superior fat loss compared with END.

  2. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain's sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype. Design: We measured the frequency of transitions in patients with narcolepsy between sleep-wake states and to/from REM and NREM sleep stages. Patients were subdivided by the presence of +/- cataplexy and +/- hypocretin-1 deficiency. Setting: Sleep laboratory studies conducted from 2001-2011. Patients: In total 63 narcolepsy patients were included in the study. Cataplexy was present in 43 of 63 patients and hypocretin-1 deficiency was present in 37 of 57 patients. Measurements and Results: Hypocretin-deficient patients with narcolepsy had a significantly higher frequency of sleep-wake transitions (P = 0.014) and of transitions to/from REM sleep (P = 0.044) than patients with normal levels of hypocretin-1. Patients with cataplexy had a significantly higher frequency of sleep-wake transitions (P = 0.002) than those without cataplexy. A multivariate analysis showed that transitions to/from REM sleep were predicted mainly by hypocretin-1 deficiency (P = 0.011), whereas sleep-wake transitions were predicted mainly by cataplexy (P = 0.001). Conclusions: In human narcolepsy, hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are both associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake and REM sleep control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches. Citation: Sorensen GL; Knudsen S; Jennum P. Sleep transitions in hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1173-1177. PMID:23904677

  3. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  4. Acute onset of bilateral visual loss during sildenafil therapy in a young infant with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffuri, Marcella; Cristofaletti, Alessandra; Mansoldo, Caterina; Biban, Paolo

    2014-06-03

    We report a case of posterior non-arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION) causing bilateral visual loss in a 7-month-old female infant, after a therapeutic course with sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5i). The patient was affected by a complex cyanotic congenital heart defect and had undergone cavopulmonary anastomosis (Glenn operation) 3 months ago. After 2 months of recurring chylothorax, a course of oral sildenafil was administered, with the hypothesis that pulmonary vascular resistances were increased. Approximately 4 weeks later the acute onset of visual worsening and poor pupillary light reflex prompted the diagnosis of posterior NAION. Despite a rapid cessation of PDE5i and systemic treatment with corticosteroids, no visual recovery was noticed at 2-year follow-up. NAION has been associated with PDE5i therapy in adults, but to the best of our knowledge it is almost unheard of in children. We suggest close monitoring of visual function in children undergoing treatment with sildenafil.

  5. Pro-inflammatory-Related Loss of CXCL12 Niche Promotes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemic Progression at the Expense of Normal Lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Purizaca, Jessica; Enciso, Jennifer; Dozal, David; Sandoval, Antonio; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Perez-Koldenkova, Vadim; Quintela-Núñez Del Prado, Henry; Rios de Los Ríos, Jussara; Mayani, Héctor; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Guzman, Monica L; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric oncology, notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is currently one of the health-leading concerns worldwide and a biomedical priority. Decreasing overall leukemia mortality in children requires a comprehensive understanding of its pathobiology. It is becoming clear that malignant cell-to-niche intercommunication and microenvironmental signals that control early cell fate decisions are critical for tumor progression. We show here that the mesenchymal stromal cell component of ALL bone marrow (BM) differ from its normal counterpart in a number of functional properties and may have a key role during leukemic development. A decreased proliferation potential, contrasting with the strong ability of producing pro-inflammatory cytokines and an aberrantly loss of CXCL12 and SCF, suggest that leukemic lymphoid niches in ALL BM are unique and may exclude normal hematopoiesis. Cell competence ex vivo assays within tridimensional coculture structures indicated a growth advantage of leukemic precursor cells and their niche remodeling ability by CXCL12 reduction, resulting in leukemic cell progression at the expense of normal niche-associated lymphopoiesis.

  6. Pro-inflammatory-Related Loss of CXCL12 Niche Promotes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemic Progression at the Expense of Normal Lymphopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Purizaca, Jessica; Enciso, Jennifer; Dozal, David; Sandoval, Antonio; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Perez-Koldenkova, Vadim; Quintela-Núñez del Prado, Henry; Rios de los Ríos, Jussara; Mayani, Héctor; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Guzman, Monica L.; Pelayo, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric oncology, notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is currently one of the health-leading concerns worldwide and a biomedical priority. Decreasing overall leukemia mortality in children requires a comprehensive understanding of its pathobiology. It is becoming clear that malignant cell-to-niche intercommunication and microenvironmental signals that control early cell fate decisions are critical for tumor progression. We show here that the mesenchymal stromal cell component of ALL bone marrow (BM) differ from its normal counterpart in a number of functional properties and may have a key role during leukemic development. A decreased proliferation potential, contrasting with the strong ability of producing pro-inflammatory cytokines and an aberrantly loss of CXCL12 and SCF, suggest that leukemic lymphoid niches in ALL BM are unique and may exclude normal hematopoiesis. Cell competence ex vivo assays within tridimensional coculture structures indicated a growth advantage of leukemic precursor cells and their niche remodeling ability by CXCL12 reduction, resulting in leukemic cell progression at the expense of normal niche-associated lymphopoiesis. PMID:28111575

  7. Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs when inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance, inadequate alertness, and deterioration in health. It is incompletely understood why humans need sleep, although some theories include energy conservation, restoration, and information processing. Sleep deprivation has many deleterious health effects. Residency programs have enacted strict work restrictions because of medically related errors due to sleep deprivation. Because obstetrics is an unpredictable specialty with long irregular hours, enacting a hospitalist program enhances patient safety, decreases malpractice risk, and improves the physician's quality of life by allowing obstetricians to get sufficient rest.

  8. Acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on 24-hour blood pressure and catecholamines in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Minemura, H; Akashiba, T; Yamamoto, H; Akahoshi, T; Kosaka, N; Horie, T

    1998-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the 24-hour blood pressure and the secretion of catecholamines in urine and plasma, we investigated the changes in the 24-hour blood pressure and urinary and plasma concentrations of epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) in 26 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with and without nasal CPAP. Nasal CPAP resulted in significant decreases in the daytime diastolic pressure (from 86 +/-16 mmHg to 83+/-12 mmHg), the nighttime diastolic pressure (from 81+/-12 mmHg to 77+/-9 mmHg) and the nighttime systolic pressures (from 125+/-15 mmHg to 120+/-10 mmHg). There was no significant difference between patients with and without CPAP in the daytime or nighttime urinary E level, but patients who received CPAP showed a significant decrease in daytime urinary NE level (from 156+/-112 microg/14h to 119+/-101 microg/14h) and nighttime urinary NE level (from 143+/-91 microg/10h to 112+/-65 microg/10h). The morning plasma level of NE also decreased (from 371+/-181 pg/ml to 273 +/-148 pg/ml) in patients who received nasal CPAP (p<0.02), but the plasma level of E remained unchanged. There were no correlations between PSG parameters and the reductions in blood pressure and the catecholamine levels induced by nasal CPAP. These findings suggest that OSA contributes, at least in part, to the development of systemic hypertension by increasing sympathetic nervous activity.

  9. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL.

  10. Effect of Patient Sex on the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Newly Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Admitted by an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Terán, Joaquín; Masa, Juan Fernando; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background The cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) differ by sex. We hypothesized that sex influences the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with OSA. OSA was defined as an apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI)>15 events·h-1. We evaluated the severity of ACS according to the ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, number of stents implanted and plasma peak troponin level. Methods We included 663 men (mean±SD, AHI 37±18 events·h-1) and 133 women (AHI 35±18 events·h-1) with OSA. Results The men were younger than the women (59±11 versus 66±11 years, p<0.0001), exhibited a higher neck circumference (p<0.0001), and were more likely to be smokers and alcohol users than women (p<0.0001, p = 0.0005, respectively). Body mass index and percentage of hypertensive patients or diabetics were similar between sexes. We observed a slight tendency for a higher Killip classification in women, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). For men, we observed that the number of diseased vessels and the number of stents implanted were higher (p = 0.02, p = 0.001, respectively), and a decrease in the ejection fraction (p = 0.002). Conclusions This study shows that sex in OSA influences the severity of ACS. Men show a lower ejection fraction and an increased number of diseased vessels and number of stents implanted. PMID:27416494

  11. Pain-related diseases and sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roizenblatt, M.; Rosa Neto, N.S.; Tufik, S.; Roizenblatt, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pain and sleep share mutual relations under the influence of cognitive and neuroendocrine changes. Sleep is an important homeostatic feature and, when impaired, contributes to the development or worsening of pain-related diseases. The aim of the present review is to provide a panoramic view for the generalist physician on sleep disorders that occur in pain-related diseases within the field of Internal Medicine, such as rheumatic diseases, acute coronary syndrome, digestive diseases, cancer, and headache. PMID:22760852

  12. Sleep in the ICU: potential mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Kimberly A

    2009-07-01

    Patients in the ICU are known to have severely disrupted sleep with disturbed circadian pattern, decreased nocturnal sleep time, abnormally increased stages 1 and 2 sleep, and reduced or absent deep sleep. Recent data reveal that a subpopulation of critically ill patients manifests unique EEG sleep patterns. The etiology of sleep disruption in the ICU includes the inherent nature of the environment, medications, ventilator-patient interaction, and the effect of acute illness. How sleep disruption contributes to outcomes in critically ill patients, such as recovery time and weaning from mechanical ventilation, is unknown. This article reviews the literature describing sleep in ICU patients, including recent investigations in patients who require mechanical ventilation, factors that affect sleep in critically ill patients, and the potential mechanisms and clinical implications of disturbed sleep in the ICU setting with directions to consider for future investigations.

  13. Differential modulation of global and local neural oscillations in REM sleep by homeostatic sleep regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bowon; Kocsis, Bernat; Hwang, Eunjin; Kim, Youngsoo; Strecker, Robert E.; McCarley, Robert W.; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Homeostatic rebound in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep normally occurs after acute sleep deprivation, but REM sleep rebound settles on a persistently elevated level despite continued accumulation of REM sleep debt during chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Using high-density EEG in mice, we studied how this pattern of global regulation is implemented in cortical regions with different functions and network architectures. We found that across all areas, slow oscillations repeated the behavioral pattern of persistent enhancement during CSR, whereas high-frequency oscillations showed progressive increases. This pattern followed a common rule despite marked topographic differences. The findings suggest that REM sleep slow oscillations may translate top-down homeostatic control to widely separated brain regions whereas fast oscillations synchronizing local neuronal ensembles escape this global command. These patterns of EEG oscillation changes are interpreted to reconcile two prevailing theories of the function of sleep, synaptic homeostasis and sleep dependent memory consolidation. PMID:28193862

  14. Sleep and Performance Measures in Soldiers Undergoing Military Relevant Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    and disorientation commonly experienced on waking from sleep ), and the “fog of war.” All of these conditions have detrimental effects on human...by Caldwell et al.) reviewed numerous studies on the effects of sustained work and sleep loss, and indicated that sleep deprivation: 1) increases... effects ), and sleep inertia (i.e., temporary grogginess after awakening). The SAFTE™ model proposes that every individual has a “ sleep reservoir” for

  15. Sleep in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Cologan, Victor; Schabus, Manvel; Ledoux, Didier; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre; Laureys, Steven

    2010-04-01

    From a behavioral as well as neurobiological point of view, sleep and consciousness are intimately connected. A better understanding of sleep cycles and sleep architecture of patients suffering from disorders of consciousness (DOC) might therefore improve the clinical care for these patients as well as our understanding of the neural correlations of consciousness. Defining sleep in severely brain-injured patients is however problematic as both their electrophysiological and sleep patterns differ in many ways from healthy individuals. This paper discusses the concepts involved in the study of sleep of patients suffering from DOC and critically assesses the applicability of standard sleep criteria in these patients. The available literature on comatose and vegetative states as well as that on locked-in and related states following traumatic or non-traumatic severe brain injury will be reviewed. A wide spectrum of sleep disturbances ranging from almost normal patterns to severe loss and architecture disorganization are reported in cases of DOC and some patterns correlate with diagnosis and prognosis. At the present time the interactions of sleep and consciousness in brain-injured patients are a little studied subject but, the authors suggest, a potentially very interesting field of research.

  16. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  17. [Relationships between sleep and addiction].

    PubMed

    Cañellas, Francesca; de Lecea, Luis

    2012-01-01

    While it is well known that there is an interaction between sleep disorders and substance abuse, it is certainly more complex than was previously thought. There is a positive relationship both between having a substance use disorder and suffering from a sleep disorder, and vice versa. The effects on sleep depend on the substance used, but it has been shown that both during use and in withdrawal periods consumers have various sleep problems, and basically more fragmented sleep. We know that sleep problems must be taken into account to prevent addiction relapses. Recent research shows that the hypocretinergic system defined by neuropeptide hypocretin / orexin (Hcrt / ox), located in the lateral hypothalamus and involved in, among other things, the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, may play an important role in addictive behaviors. Different studies have demonstrated interactions between the hypocretinergic system, acute response to stress circuits and reward systems. We also know that selective optogenetic activation of the hypocretinergic system increases the probability of transition from sleep to wakefulness, and is sufficient for initiating an addictive compulsive behavior relapse. Hypocretinergic system activation could explain the hyperarousal associated with stress and addiction. Improved knowledge of this interaction would help us to understand better the mechanisms of addiction and find new strategies for the treatment of addictions.

  18. Factors Associated with the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss after Acute Primary Angle Closure: A Prospective EDI-OCT Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Hyen; Kim, Hyunjoong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the factors associated with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss in eyes with acute primary angle-closure (APAC), particularly focusing on the influence of the change in the anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (LCD). Methods After the initial presentation, 30 eyes with unilateral APAC were followed up at the following specific time points over a 12-month period: 1 week, 1~2 months, 2~3 months, 5~6 months, and 11~12 months. These follow-ups involved intraocular pressure measurements, enhanced depth-imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scanning of the optic disc, and measurements of the circumpapillary RNFL thickness. The prelaminar tissue thickness (PLT) and LCD were determined in the SD-OCT images obtained at each follow-up visit. Results Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant pattern of decrease in the global RNFL thickness, PLT, and LCD (all p<0.001). The global RNFL thickness decreased continuously throughout the follow-up period, while the PLT decreased until 5~6 months and did not change thereafter. The LCD reduced until 2~3 months and then also remained steady. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that symptoms with a longer duration before receiving laser peripheral iridotomy (LI) (p = 0.049) and a larger LCD reduction (p = 0.034) were significant factors associated with the conversion to an abnormal RNFL thickness defined using OCT normative data. Conclusion Early short-term decreases in the PLT and LCD and overall long-term decrease in the peripapillary RNFL were observed during a 12-month follow-up after an APAC episode. A longer duration of symptoms before receiving LI treatment and larger LCD reduction during follow-up were associated with the progressive RNFL loss. The LCD reduction may indicate a prior presence of significant pressure-induced stress that had been imposed on the optic nerve head at the time of APAC episode. Glaucomatous progression should be suspected in

  19. Sleep deprivation increases cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Hamidovic, Ajna; de Wit, Harriet

    2009-09-01

    Loss of sleep may impair the ability to abstain from drug use, through any of a number of mechanisms. Sleep loss may increase drug use by impairing attention and inhibitory control, increasing the value of drug rewards over other rewards, or by inducing mood states that facilitate use of a drug. In the present study, we examined whether sleep deprivation (SD) would increase smoking in cigarette smokers, and whether it would do so by impairing attention or inhibitory control. Healthy cigarette smokers (N=14) were tested in a two-session within subject study, after overnight SD or after a normal night's sleep. Subjects were tested in both conditions in randomized order, after abstaining from cigarettes for 48 hours. The procedure was designed to model the human relapse situation. On each 6-h laboratory session after sleep or no sleep, subjects completed mood and craving questionnaires, tasks measuring behavioral inhibition and attention, and a choice procedure in which they chose between money and smoking cigarettes. SD increased self-reported fatigue and decreased arousal, it increased the number of cigarettes subjects chose to smoke, impaired behavioral inhibition and attention. However, the impairments in inhibition or attention were not related to the increase in smoking. It is possible that SD increases smoking because smokers expect that it will reduce sleepiness. Thus, the findings suggest that sleep loss may increase the likelihood of smoking during abstinence not through inhibitory or attentional mechanisms but because of the potential of nicotine to reduce subjective sleepiness.

  20. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), −6, −12, and −18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and −6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven. PMID:22039518

  1. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  2. Joint bleeding in factor VIII deficient mice causes an acute loss of trabecular bone and calcification of joint soft tissues which is prevented with aggressive factor replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Anthony G.; Sun, Junjiang; Hannah, William B.; Livingston, Eric W.; Heymann, Dominique; Bateman, Ted A.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While chronic degenerative arthropathy is the main morbidity of hemophilia, a very high prevalance of low bone density is also seen in men and boys with hemophilia. The current study investigates bone degradation in the knee joint of hemophilic mice resulting from hemarthrosis and the efficacy of aggressive treatment with factor VIII in the period surrounding injury to prevent bone pathology. Methods Skeletally mature factor VIII knock-out mice were subjected to knee joint hemorrhage induced by puncture of the left knee joint capsule. Mice received either intravenous Factor VIII treatment or placebo immediately prior to injury and at hours 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 after hemorrhage. Mice were euthanized two-weeks after injury and the joint morphology and loss of bone in the proximal tibia was assessed using microCT imaging. Results Quantitative microCT imaging of the knee joint found acute bone loss at the proximal tibia following injury including loss of trabecular bone volumetric density and bone mineral density, as well as trabecular connectivity density, number, and thickness. Unexpectedly, joint injury also resulted in calcification of the joint soft tissues including the tendons, ligaments, menisci, and cartilage. Treatment with factor VIII prevented this bone and soft tissue degeneration. Conclusion Knee joint hemorrhage resulted in acute changes of adjacent bone including loss of bone density and mineralization of joint soft tissues. The rapid calcification and loss of bone has implications for the initiation and progression of osteoarthritic degradation following joint bleeding. PMID:24712867

  3. American Sleep Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Disorders Book Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Changing Bad Sleep Habits Asthma and Sleep ...

  4. The Sleep-Promoting and Hypothermic Effects of Glycine are Mediated by NMDA Receptors in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Noriaki; Okuro, Masashi; Karakawa, Sachie; Tsuneyoshi, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Noriko; Takeda, Tomoko; Bannai, Makoto; Nishino, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The use of glycine as a therapeutic option for improving sleep quality is a novel and safe approach. However, despite clinical evidence of its efficacy, the details of its mechanism remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the site of action and sleep-promoting mechanisms of glycine in rats. In acute sleep disturbance, oral administration of glycine-induced non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and shortened NREM sleep latency with a simultaneous decrease in core temperature. Oral and intracerebroventricular injection of glycine elevated cutaneous blood flow (CBF) at the plantar surface in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in heat loss. Pretreatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists AP5 and CGP78608 but not the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine inhibited the CBF increase caused by glycine injection into the brain. Induction of c-Fos expression was observed in the hypothalamic nuclei, including the medial preoptic area (MPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) shell after glycine administration. Bilateral microinjection of glycine into the SCN elevated CBF in a dose-dependent manner, whereas no effect was observed when glycine was injected into the MPO and dorsal subparaventricular zone. In addition, microinjection of D-serine into the SCN also increased CBF, whereas these effects were blocked in the presence of L-701324. SCN ablation completely abolished the sleep-promoting and hypothermic effects of glycine. These data suggest that exogenous glycine promotes sleep via peripheral vasodilatation through the activation of NMDA receptors in the SCN shell. PMID:25533534

  5. SLEEP DEPRIVATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report was confined to considering the effects of sleep deprivation , in man, with particular reference to studies of the resulting biochemical...have a limited value when taken separately: the biochemical and physiological changes that occur in response to sleep deprivation may depend...three separate heads: first, the biochemical changes resulting from sleep deprivation ; secondly, the physiological ones; and last, the changes in performance and behaviour. (Author)

  6. Loss of extracellular superoxide dismutase leads to acute lung damage in the presence of ambient air: a potential mechanism underlying adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Lob, Heinrich E; Landmesser, Ulf; Guzik, Tomasz J; Martin, W David; Ozumi, Kiyoski; Wall, Susan M; Wilson, David Scott; Murthy, Niren; Gravanis, Michael; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2008-10-01

    The extracellular superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) is highly expressed in both blood vessels and lungs. In different models of pulmonary injury, SOD3 is reduced; however, it is unclear whether this contributes to lung injury. To study the role of acute SOD3 reduction in lung injury, the SOD3 gene was deleted in adult mice by using the Cre-Lox technology. Acute reduction of SOD3 led to a fivefold increase in lung superoxide, marked inflammatory cell infiltration, a threefold increase in the arterial-alveolar gradient, respiratory acidosis, histological changes similar to those observed in adult respiratory distress syndrome, and 85% mortality. Treatment with the SOD mimetic MnTBAP and intranasal administration of SOD-containing polyketal microparticles reduced mortality, prevented the histological alterations, and reduced lung superoxide levels. To understand how mice with the SOD3 embryonic deletion survived without lung injury, gene array analysis was performed. These data demonstrated the up-regulation of 37 genes and down-regulation of nine genes, including those involved in cell signaling, inflammation, and gene transcription in SOD3-/- mice compared with either mice with acute SOD3 reduction or wild-type controls. These studies show that SOD3 is essential for survival in the presence of ambient oxygen and that acute loss of this enzyme can lead to severe lung damage. Strategies either to prevent SOD3 inactivation or to augment its levels might prove useful in the treatment of acute lung injury.

  7. Effects of cumulative stressful and acute variation episodes of farm climate conditions on late embryo/early fetal loss in high producing dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolaria, Pilar; López-Gatius, Fernando; García-Ispierto, Irina; Bech-Sàbat, Gregori; Angulo, Eduardo; Carretero, Teresa; Sánchez-Nadal, Jóse Antonio; Yániz, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible relationships between farm climate conditions, recorded from day 0 to day 40 post-artificial insemination (AI), and late embryo/early fetal loss in high producing dairy cows. Pregnancy was diagnosed by rectal ultrasonography between 28 and 34 days post-AI. Fetal loss was registered when a further 80- to 86-day diagnosis proved negative. Climate variables such as air temperature and relative humidity (RH) were monitored in the cubicles area for each 30-min period. Temperature-humidity indices (THI); cumulative stressful values and episodes of acute change (defined as the mean daily value 1.2 times higher or lower than the mean daily values of the 10 previous days) of the climate variables were calculated. The data were derived from 759 cows in one herd. A total of 692 pregnancies (91.2%) carried singletons and 67 (8.8%) carried twins. No triplets were recorded. Pregnancy loss was recorded in 6.7% (51/759) of pregnancies: 5.6% (39/692) in single and 17.9% (12/67) in twin pregnancies. Using logistic regression procedures, a one-unit increase in the daily cumulative number of hours for the THI values higher than 85 during days 11-20 of gestation caused a 1.57-fold increase in the pregnancy loss, whereas the likelihood of fetal loss increased by a factor of 1.16 for each additional episode of acute variation for the maximum THI values during gestation days 0-40. THI values higher than 85 and episodes of acute variation for the maximum THI values were only recorded during the warm and cool periods, respectively. The presence of twins led to a 3.98-fold increase in pregnancy loss. In conclusion, our findings show that cumulative stressful and episodes of acute variation of climatic conditions can compromise the success of gestation during both the cool and warm periods of the year. Twin pregnancy was confirmed as a main factor associated with pregnancy loss.

  8. Effects of work-related sleep restriction on acute physiological and psychological stress responses and their interactions: A review among emergency service personnel.

    PubMed

    Wolkow, Alexander; Ferguson, Sally; Aisbett, Brad; Main, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Emergency work can expose personnel to sleep restriction. Inadequate amounts of sleep can negatively affect physiological and psychological stress responses. This review critiqued the emergency service literature (e.g., firefighting, police/law enforcement, defense forces, ambulance/paramedic personnel) that has investigated the effect of sleep restriction on hormonal, inflammatory and psychological responses. Furthermore, it investigated if a psycho-physiological approach can help contextualize the significance of such responses to assist emergency service agencies monitor the health of their personnel. The available literature suggests that sleep restriction across multiple work days can disrupt cytokine and cortisol levels, deteriorate mood and elicit simultaneous physiological and psychological responses. However, research concerning the interaction between such responses is limited and inconclusive. Therefore, it is unknown if a psycho-physiological relationship exists and as a result, it is currently not feasible for agencies to monitor sleep restriction related stress based on psycho- physiological interactions. Sleep restriction does however, appear to be a major stressor contributing to physiological and psychological responses and thus, warrants further investigation.

  9. Chronic Stress is Prospectively Associated with Sleep in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Martica H.; Casement, Melynda D.; Troxel, Wendy M.; Matthews, Karen A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Krafty, Robert T.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evaluate whether levels of upsetting life events measured over a 9-y period prospectively predict subjective and objective sleep outcomes in midlife women. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Four sites across the United States. Participants: 330 women (46–57 y of age) enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Upsetting life events were assessed annually for up to 9 y. Trajectory analysis applied to life events data quantitatively identified three distinct chronic stress groups: low stress, moderate stress, and high stress. Sleep was assessed by self-report and in-home polysomnography (PSG) during the ninth year of the study. Multivariate analyses tested the prospective association between chronic stress group and sleep, adjusting for race, baseline sleep complaints, marital status, body mass index, symptoms of depression, and acute life events at the time of the Sleep Study. Women characterized by high chronic stress had lower subjective sleep quality, were more likely to report insomnia, and exhibited increased PSG-assessed wake after sleep onset (WASO) relative to women with low to moderate chronic stress profiles. The effect of chronic stress group on WASO persisted in the subsample of participants without baseline sleep complaints. Conclusions: Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep disturbance in midlife women, even after adjusting for acute stressors at the time of the sleep study and other factors known to disrupt sleep. These results are consistent with current models of stress that emphasize the cumulative effect of stressors on health over time. Citation: Hall MH, Casement MD, Troxel WM, Matthews KA, Bromberger JT, Kravitz HM, Krafty RT, Buysse DJ. Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep in midlife women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1645–1654. PMID:26039965

  10. [The importance of sleep in the mental health].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Yuji

    2014-02-01

    Japanese average sleeping time is decreasing year by year. The National Sleep Foundation of United States of America released that Japan reports the least amount of sleep. Japanese reports sleeping about 30 to 40 minutes less on workdays than those in the other countries surveyed, averaging 6 hours 22 minutes of sleep. There are many reports that insomnia has been suggested to cause depression and other mental disorders. And epidemiological evidence supports a link between sleep loss and obesity. Obesity is one of risk factors of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome which causes cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders and so on. Sleep loss and sleep insufficiency can cause mental disorders and be impaired cognitive function and performance.

  11. The effects of sleep restriction and sleep deprivation in producing false memories.

    PubMed

    Chatburn, Alex; Kohler, Mark J; Payne, Jessica D; Drummond, Sean P A

    2017-01-01

    False memory has been claimed to be the result of an associative process of generalisation, as well as to be representative of memory errors. These can occur at any stage of memory encoding, consolidation, or retrieval, albeit through varied mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to experimentally determine: (i) if cognitive dysfunction brought about by sleep loss at the time of stimulus encoding can influence false memory production; and (ii) whether this relationship holds across sensory modalities. Subjects undertook both the Deese-Roedigger-McDermott (DRM) false memory task and a visual task designed to produce false memories. Performance was measured while subjects were well-rested (9h Time in Bed or TIB), and then again when subjects were either sleep restricted (4h TIB for 4 nights) or sleep deprived (30h total SD). Results indicate (1) that partial and total sleep loss produced equivalent effects in terms of false and veridical verbal memory, (2) that subjects performed worse after sleep loss (regardless of whether this was partial or total sleep loss) on cued recognition-based false and veridical verbal memory tasks, and that sleep loss interfered with subjects' ability to recall veridical, but not false memories under free recall conditions, and (3) that there were no effects of sleep loss on a visual false memory task. This is argued to represent the dysfunction and slow repair of an online verbal associative process in the brain following inadequate sleep.