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Sample records for acute spinal trauma

  1. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  2. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord injury; Compression of spinal cord; SCI; Cord compression ... them more likely to fall may also have spinal cord injury. ... vary depending on the location of the injury. Spinal cord injury causes weakness and loss of feeling at, and ...

  3. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can be removed or reduced before the spinal nerves are completely destroyed, paralysis may improve. Surgery may be needed to: Realign the spinal bones (vertebrae) Remove fluid or tissue that presses ...

  4. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  5. Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal instrumentation in thoraco lumbar trauma

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Kuzhimattam, Mathew John; Kumar, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report unique cases of Ogilvie's syndrome (acute intestinal pseudo-obstruction) following posterior spinal instrumentation in thoraco lumbar trauma. Materials and Methods: A single centre retrospective study. We reviewed the surgical data of 420 patients who underwent thoracolumbar spinal surgery over a period of four years. Two patients who developed post operative Ogilvie's syndromes were identified. Results: The clinical presentation and blood investigations ruled out any infectious pathology. Computed tomography scans ruled out the mechanical obstruction. All patients improved with conservative management. Conclusion: Ogilvie's syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with postoperative significant abdominal distension who had undergone posterior instrumentation for spinal trauma. Early recognition and appropriate conservative treatment would be necessary to prevent complications such as bowel ischemia and perforation. PMID:26692695

  6. [Who is who revisited: spinal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schueller, G

    2010-12-01

    The ideal classification of spinal trauma does not yet exist, primarily because the combination of morphological, biomechanical and clinical parameters in one single nomenclature has proved impossible. For radiologists and surgeons who work closely together, only a few classifications of injury patterns have been shown to be useful enough to provide rapid and stable therapy decisions. Many classifications are too complex to be practical for day-to-day practice, such as the Magerl classification, which has been adopted by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO). Not least because of this classification difficulty, eponyms and synonyms are widely used to describe trauma of the spine, comparable to the number of terms used to describe fractures of the upper and lower limbs. The members of trauma teams should be aware of the definitions of these terms as well as the strengths and limitations of the existing classifications of spinal trauma. PMID:20967415

  7. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  8. Imaging following acute knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, R; Roemer, F; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Swärd, P; Frobell, R B

    2014-10-01

    Joint injury has been recognized as a potent risk factor for the onset of osteoarthritis. The vast majority of studies using imaging technology for longitudinal assessment of patients following joint injury have focused on the injured knee joint, specifically in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury and meniscus tears where a high risk for rapid onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis is well known. Although there are many imaging modalities under constant development, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important instrument for longitudinal monitoring after joint injury. MR imaging is sensitive for detecting early cartilage degeneration and can evaluate other joint structures including the menisci, bone marrow, tendons, and ligaments which can be sources of pain following acute injury. In this review, focusing on imaging following acute knee trauma, several studies were identified with promising short-term results of osseous and soft tissue changes after joint injury. However, studies connecting these promising short-term results to the development of osteoarthritis were limited which is likely due to the long follow-up periods needed to document the radiographic and clinical onset of the disease. Thus, it is recommended that additional high quality longitudinal studies with extended follow-up periods be performed to further investigate the long-term consequences of the early osseous and soft tissue changes identified on MR imaging after acute knee trauma. PMID:25278054

  9. Thoracic spinal trauma and associated injuries: should early spinal decompression be considered?

    PubMed

    Petitjean, M E; Mousselard, H; Pointillart, V; Lassie, P; Senegas, J; Dabadie, P

    1995-08-01

    The relative benefits of conservative or surgical treatment in thoracic spinal trauma are still controversial. Owing to its anatomic relations, thoracic spinal trauma is specific regarding neurologic prognosis, the high incidence of associated injuries, and surgical management. Over a 30-month period, 49 patients sustained thoracic spinal trauma with neurologic impairment. The authors review population characteristics, associated injuries, and surgical management, and underline the high incidence of associated injuries, in particular, blunt chest trauma. In their opinion, early spinal decompression has no indication in complete paraplegia. Concerning partial paraplegia, early surgery may enhance neurologic recovery. Nevertheless, they suggest three main criteria in deciding whether or not to perform surgery early: the existence of residual spinal compression, the degree of neurologic impairment, and the presence of potential hemorrhagic lesions or blunt chest trauma, especially pulmonary contusion. PMID:7674409

  10. Spinal injuries in abusive head trauma: patterns and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Alison; Cowley, Laura; Maguire, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that there is an association between occult spinal injury and abusive head trauma (previously known as shaken baby syndrome). Consideration needs to be given to the nature of these injuries, the possible causal mechanisms and what investigations should be undertaken to delineate the full extent of spinal involvement in infants with suspected abusive head trauma. This association has the potential to influence our understanding of the biomechanics and subsequent neuropathology associated with abusive head trauma. PMID:25501732

  11. Management of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F C

    1977-06-01

    Based on the experience with 58 patients with acute spinal cord injuries, a system for rapidly evaluating such patients has been developed. With the knowledge that has been acquired clinically and experimentally of spinal cord injury and with the information provided by laminography and by either air or Pantopaque myelography, a reasonably certain diagnosis of the type of spinal cord injury may be made. Treatment designed to restore neurological function may then be instituted promptly. PMID:882906

  12. Operative treatment of 733 patients with acute thoracolumbar spinal injuries: comprehensive results from the second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study of the Spine Study Group of the German Association of Trauma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Knop, C.; Beisse, R.; Audigé, L.; Kandziora, F.; Pizanis, A.; Pranzl, R.; Gercek, E.; Schultheiss, M.; Weckbach, A.; Bühren, V.; Blauth, M.

    2010-01-01

    The second, internet-based multicenter study (MCSII) of the Spine Study Group of the German Association of Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie) is a representative patient collection of acute traumatic thoracolumbar (T1–L5) injuries. The MCSII results are an update of those obtained with the first multicenter study (MCSI) more than a decade ago. The aim of the study was to assess and bring into focus: the (1) epidemiologic data, (2) surgical and radiological outcome, and (3) 2-year follow-up (FU) results of these injuries. According to the Magerl/AO classification, there were 424 (57.8%) compression fractures (A type), 178 (24.3%) distractions injuries (B type), and 131 (17.9%) rotational injuries (C type). B and C type injuries carried a higher risk for neurological deficits, concomitant injuries, and multiple vertebral fractures. The level of injury was located at the thoracolumbar junction (T11–L2) in 67.0% of the case. 380 (51.8%) patients were operated on by posterior stabilization and instrumentation alone (POSTERIOR), 34 (4.6%) had an anterior procedure (ANTERIOR), and 319 (43.5%) patients were treated with combined posteroanterior surgery (COMBINED). 65% of patients with thoracic (T1–T10) and 57% with lumbar spinal (L3–L5) injuries were treated with a single posterior approach (POSTERIOR). 47% of the patients with thoracolumbar junction (T11–L2) injuries were either operated from posterior or with a combined posterior–anterior surgery (COMBINED) each. Short angular stable implant systems have replaced conventional non-angular stable instrumentation systems to a large extent. The posttraumatic deformity was restored best with COMBINED surgery. T-spine injuries were accompanied by a higher number and more severe neurologic deficits than TL junction or L-spine injuries. At the same time T-spine injuries showed less potential for neurologic recovery especially in paraplegic (Frankel/AISA A) patients. 5% of all patients

  13. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  14. Spinal Traumas and their Treatments According to Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen; Movahhed, Mina; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-07-01

    Spinal Traumas have been categorized as disabling diseases that cause irretrievable personal and social problems. Having conducted a rather comprehensive diagnosis of the anatomy of the backbone and spinal cord as well as their functions, Avicenna (Ibn Sina, 980-1037) stated the levels and kinds of spinal impairments that are caused by spinal traumas in his great masterpiece Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). He also based his treatment process on his etiological diagnosis of such impairments. Avicenna had used the following methods to treat spinal traumas: food and drug therapy and regimental therapies such as massage, phlebotomy, cupping, dry sauna, and surgery. The authors of the present article review the bases of Avicenna's viewpoints regarding spinal traumas and their treatment. PMID:25772611

  15. Clinicopathologic effects of a 21-aminosteroid compound (U74389G) and high-dose methylprednisolone on spinal cord function after simulated spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Coates, J R; Sorjonen, D C; Simpson, S T; Cox, N R; Wright, J C; Hudson, J A; Finn-Bodner, S T; Brown, S A

    1995-01-01

    A model simulating acute-compressive spinal cord trauma at the second lumbar spinal cord segment (100 g, 300 seconds) was used to evaluate the efficacy of a vehicle control, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS), and a 21-aminosteroid compound (U74389G). Dogs were allocated into one of five treatment groups (A to E) using ultrasonographic determination of spinal cord diameters to ensure even distribution of spinal cord diameters among the treatment groups. Initial dosages of the vehicle control (A), methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg of body weight) (B), or U74389G (30 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg, or 10 mg/kg of body weight) (C, D, or E, respectively) were administered intravenously 30 minutes after trauma. Dosages were reduced by one-half for 2 and 6 hour treatments. Then every 4 hours for 42 hours, dosages were reduced one-third and one-sixth from the original dose of methylprednisolone and U74389G, respectively. Neurological examinations were performed daily for 21 days. Histopathological examination of the traumatized spinal cord showed malacic and degenerative lesions. Although significant differences in some portions of the neurological and histopathologic examinations were observed, clinical efficacy for MPSS and U74389G could not be established in this model. PMID:7778252

  16. The radiology of pulmonary complications associated with acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Scher, A T

    1982-08-28

    Pulmonary complications after acute cervical spinal cord injury are common. Paralysis of the intercostal muscles leads to decreased respiratory function. In addition, injuries of the thoracic cage, pleura and lungs are commonly associated with spinal injuries. A survey of radiologically demonstrable pulmonary complications in 50 patients with acute tetraplegia has been made. Changes were present in 28% of the patients surveyed. The changes in pulmonary and haemodynamic function consequent upon cervical spinal cord injury are briefly described. Radiological manifestations of pulmonary complications due to decreased pulmonary function, direct pulmonary trauma and rare pulmonary complications of skeletal injury are reviewed. The value of routine and intensive radiographic monitoring of the chest in the patient with acute tetraplegia is emphasized, as clinical diagnosis is hampered in the absence of motor and sensory function. PMID:7112294

  17. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  18. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  19. Spinal cord infarction following minor trauma in children: fibrocartilaginous embolism as a putative cause.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Andrew; Gary, Matthew F; Chern, Joshua J; Grattan-Smith, J Damien

    2013-04-01

    Spinal cord infarctions following seemingly innocuous trauma in children are rare, devastating events. In the majority of these cases, the pathophysiology is enigmatic. The authors present 3 cases of pediatric spinal cord infarction that followed minor trauma. An analysis of the clinical, radiographic, and laboratory features of these cases suggests that thromboembolism of the nucleus pulposus into the spinal cord microcirculation is the likely mechanism. A review of the human and veterinary literature supports this notion. To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest pediatric series of myelopathy due to thromboembolism of the nucleus pulposus reported to date, and it is the first report of this condition occurring in an infant. PMID:23414133

  20. Recent advances in managing a spinal cord injury secondary to trauma.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Christopher S; Martin, Allan R; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) affect 1.3 million North Americans, producing devastating physical, social, and vocational impairment. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma is followed by a significant secondary injury which includes local ischemia, pro-apoptotic signaling, release of cytotoxic factors, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Expedient delivery of medical and surgical care during this critical period can improve long-term functional outcomes, engendering the concept of "Time is Spine". We emphasize the importance of expeditious care while outlining the initial clinical and radiographic assessment of patients. Key evidence-based early interventions (surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation, and methylprednisolone) are also reviewed, including findings of the landmark Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS). We then describe other neuroprotective approaches on the edge of translation such as the sodium-channel blocker riluzole, the anti-inflammatory minocycline, and therapeutic hypothermia. We also review promising neuroregenerative therapies that are likely to influence management practices over the next decade including chondroitinase, Rho-ROCK pathway inhibition, and bioengineered strategies. The importance of emerging neural stem cell therapies to remyelinate denuded axons and regenerate neural circuits is also discussed. Finally, we outline future directions for research and patient care. PMID:27303644

  1. Recent advances in managing a spinal cord injury secondary to trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Christopher S.; Martin, Allan R.; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) affect 1.3 million North Americans, producing devastating physical, social, and vocational impairment. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma is followed by a significant secondary injury which includes local ischemia, pro-apoptotic signaling, release of cytotoxic factors, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Expedient delivery of medical and surgical care during this critical period can improve long-term functional outcomes, engendering the concept of “Time is Spine”. We emphasize the importance of expeditious care while outlining the initial clinical and radiographic assessment of patients. Key evidence-based early interventions (surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation, and methylprednisolone) are also reviewed, including findings of the landmark Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS). We then describe other neuroprotective approaches on the edge of translation such as the sodium-channel blocker riluzole, the anti-inflammatory minocycline, and therapeutic hypothermia. We also review promising neuroregenerative therapies that are likely to influence management practices over the next decade including chondroitinase, Rho-ROCK pathway inhibition, and bioengineered strategies. The importance of emerging neural stem cell therapies to remyelinate denuded axons and regenerate neural circuits is also discussed. Finally, we outline future directions for research and patient care. PMID:27303644

  2. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  3. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  4. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  5. Cervical Spinal Injury In Pediatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Management In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Spinal injuries from blunt trauma are uncommon in pediatric patients, representing only about 1.5% of all blunt trauma patients. However, the potentially fatal consequences of spinal injuries make them of great concern to emergency clinicians. Clinical goals in the emergency department are to identify all injuries using selective imaging and to minimize further harm from spinal cord injury. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the age-related physiologic differences that affect patterns of injury and radiologic interpretation in children, as well as an appreciation of high-risk clinical clues and mechanisms. This issue reviews current approaches to prehospital immobilization, identification of low-risk patients who may be clinically cleared from immobilization, a rational approach to the use of radiologic imaging, and the existing evidence for medical management of spinal cord injuries. PMID:26894868

  6. Spinal Intradural Schwannoma with Acute Intratumoural Haemorrhage: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Kongwad, Lakshman I.; Valiathan, Manna G.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas account for around half of all intradural spinal tumours, with chronic progressive symptoms as the most common presenting features. Intratumoural haemorrhage as a presenting feature of spinal schwannoma is very rare and only 11 cases have been reported till date. Authors here report a previously asymptomatic 40-year-old male who presented with acute onset paraplegia 12 hours after a minor trauma. MR imaging revealed a C7-D3 intradural-extramedullary lesion with features of acute blood and showing no enhancement. Emergency laminectomy and complete removal of the mass was performed and histopathology revealed features of schwannoma with haemorrhage. Patient had modest improvement of his neurological deficits at a follow-up of 6 months. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:26894121

  7. Chinese Head Trauma Data Bank: Effect of Hyperthermia on the Outcome of Acute Head Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hyperthermia may accentuate the detrimental consequences of brain injury and worsen the outcome of patients with acute head trauma, especially severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We explored the effect of different magnitudes and durations of hyperthermia in the first 3 days after injury on the outcome of 7145 patients with acute head trauma, including 1626 with severe TBI. The differences in mortality and unfavorable outcome between the normothermia group, mild fever group, moderate fever group, and high fever group were statistically significant (p<0.001). The mortality and unfavorable outcome of severe TBI patients in the groups also differed significantly (p<0.001). The mortality and unfavorable outcome of patients with 1 day, 2 days, and 3 days of high fever were significantly increased (p<0.01). Our data strongly indicate that both degree and duration of early post-trauma hyperthermia are closely correlated with the outcome of acute TBI patients, especially severely injured ones, which indicates that hyperthermia may play a detrimental role in the delayed mechanisms of damage after acute TBI. Prevention of early hyperthermia after acute head trauma is therefore essential to the management of TBI patients. PMID:22026424

  8. Communication Disorders and Treatment in the Acute Trauma Center Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz-Cowley, Roberta; Stepanik, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shock Trauma Center of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems instituted a comprehensive speech-language pathology program to provide acute intervention for communicative disorders in a critical/intensive care environment. This article provides a profile of the Center, a review of communicative impairments, and examples…

  9. Acute ethanol intoxication and the trauma patient: hemodynamic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John; McCray, Victor; Davis, James; Jackson, Lascienya; Danos, Leigh Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many trauma patients are acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Animal studies have demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication inhibits the normal release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin in response to acute hemorrhage. Ethanol also increases nitric oxide release and inhibits antidiuretic hormone secretion. This article studies the effects of alcohol intoxication (measured by blood alcohol level, BAL) on the presentation and resuscitation of trauma patients with blunt hepatic injuries. A retrospective registry and chart review was conducted of all patients who presented with blunt liver injuries at an ACS-verified, level I trauma center. Data collected included admission BAL, systolic blood pressure, hematocrit, International Normalized Ratio (INR), liver injury grade, Injury Severity Score (ISS), intravenous fluid and blood product requirements, base deficit, and mortality. From September 2002 to May 2008, 723 patients were admitted with blunt hepatic injuries. Admission BAL was obtained in 569 patients, with 149 having levels >0.08%. Intoxicated patients were more likely to be hypotensive on admission (p = 0.01) despite a lower liver injury grade and no significant difference in ISS. There was no significant difference in the percent of intoxicated patients requiring blood transfusion. However, when blood was given, intoxicated patients required significantly more units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) than their nonintoxicated counterparts (p = 0.01). Intoxicated patients also required more intravenous fluid during their resuscitation (p = 0.002). Alcohol intoxication may impair the ability of blunt trauma patients to compensate for acute blood loss, making them more likely to be hypotensive on admission and increasing their PRBC and intravenous fluid requirements. All trauma patients should have BAL drawn upon admission and their resuscitation should be performed with an understanding of the physiologic alterations associated with acute alcohol

  10. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  11. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  12. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  13. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Lyalka, Vladimir F; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  14. Acute Management of Nutritional Demands after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven; Singer, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding nutritional management in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Specific metabolic challenges are present following spinal cord injury. The acute stage is characterized by a reduction in metabolic activity, as well as a negative nitrogen balance that cannot be corrected, even with aggressive nutritional support. Metabolic demands need to be accurately monitored to avoid overfeeding. Enteral feeding is the optimal route following SCI. When oral feeding is not possible, nasogastric, followed by nasojejunal, then by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, if necessary, is suggested. PMID:20373845

  15. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  16. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  17. Surgical repair following trauma to vascular graft causing spinal cord infarction

    PubMed Central

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Phoenix, Gokulan; Khatri, Chetan; Das, Saroj

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a background of vascular disease presented with signs of bilateral limb ischaemia. Following elective axillobifemoral bypass and hospital discharge, accidental axillary trauma causing a chest wall haematoma, the patient underwent an emergency graft repair. Postextubation, she reported with absent sensation in her legs. Spinal cord infarction was diagnosed through clinical assessment and exclusion of other causes. The aetiology of compromise to the spinal cord blood supply is unclear. Possibilities include intraoperative hypotension, inadvertent compromise to blood supply of thoracic radicular arteries, dislodged atherosclerotic emboli or a combination of these factors. Spinal cord infarction recognised early can be treated. Sedation to assist ventilation had obscured the problem early enough to consider treatment. Patients with vascular risk factors should be carefully managed intraoperatively to minimise hypotensive episodes and care should also be taken not to compromise blood flow of radicular arteries. PMID:24739653

  18. Computed tomography in trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  19. A systematic review of early prognostic factors for persistent pain following acute orthopedic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Fiona J; Watson, Wendy L; Newstead, Stuart V; McClure, Roderick J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute orthopedic trauma contributes substantially to the global burden of disease. OBJECTIVES: The present systematic review aimed to summarize the current knowledge concerning prognostic factors for the presence of persistent pain, pain severity and pain-related disability following acute orthopedic trauma involving a spectrum of pathologies to working-age adults. METHODS: The Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for level II prognostic studies published between January 1996 and October 2010. Studies that were longitudinal and reported results with multivariate analyses appropriate for prognostic studies were included. Studies that addressed two specific injury types that have been the subject of previous reviews, namely, injuries to the spinal column and amputations, were excluded. RESULTS: The searches yielded 992 studies; 10 studies met the inclusion criteria and were rated for methodological quality. Seventeen factors were considered in more than one cohort. There was strong evidence supporting the association of female sex, older age, high pain intensity, preinjury anxiety or depression, and fewer years of education with persistent pain outcomes. There was moderate evidence supporting the association between postinjury depression or anxiety with persistent pain, and that injury severity was not a risk factor for ongoing pain. CONCLUSION: Many individuals experience persistent pain following acute trauma. Due to the lack of studies, the use of different constructs to measure the same factor and the methodological limitations associated with many of the studies, the present review was only able to reliably identify a limited set of factors that predicted persistent pain. Recommendations for the conduct of future methodologically rigorous studies of persistent pain are provided. PMID:22518366

  20. Dynamics of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute depletion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Echeverry, Stefania; Shi, Xiang Qun; Yang, Mu; Yang, Qiu Zi; Wang, Guan Yun Frances; Chambon, Julien; Wu, Yi Chen; Fu, Kai Yuan; De Koninck, Yves; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding on the function of microglia has been revolutionized in the recent 20 years. However, the process of maintaining microglia homeostasis has not been fully understood. In this study, we dissected the features of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute partial depletion. By injecting intrathecally Mac-1-saporin, a microglia selective immunotoxin, we ablated 50% microglia in the spinal cord of naive mice. Spinal microglia repopulated rapidly and local homeostasis was re-established within 14 days post-depletion. Mac-1-saporin treatment resulted in microglia cell proliferation and circulating monocyte infiltration. The latter is indeed part of an acute, transient inflammatory reaction that follows cell depletion, and was characterized by an increase in the expression of inflammatory molecules and by the breakdown of the blood spinal cord barrier. During this period, microglia formed cell clusters and exhibited a M1-like phenotype. MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was essential in promoting this depletion associated spinal inflammatory reaction. Interestingly, ruling out MCP-1-mediated secondary inflammation, including blocking recruitment of monocyte-derived microglia, did not affect depletion-triggered microglia repopulation. Our results also demonstrated that newly generated microglia kept their responsiveness to peripheral nerve injury and their contribution to injury-associated neuropathic pain was not significantly altered. PMID:26961247

  1. Late Mortality During the First Year After Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Divanoglou, Anestis; Westgren, Ninni; Seiger, Åke; Hulting, Claes; Levi, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the possible impact of the system of care on mortality during the first year after acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Objective: To evaluate late mortality (ie, >7 days after trauma) during the first year after acute TSCI in 2 European Union (EU) regions, Thessaloniki in Greece and Stockholm in Sweden. Methods: This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS), which is a prospective, population-based study. Incidence cohorts of TSCI cases were identified and followed up in both study regions through STATSCIS. Data from Thessaloniki region were collected through physical examination, medical records review, and interviews with TSCI individuals and the medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved mainly from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry, as well as from direct contact with all intensive care facilities of the region. Results: The annual case mortality rate after acute TSCI was nearly 20% in Thessaloniki and 0% in Stockholm. The mean time of survival after trauma for the 12 mortality cases of Thessaloniki was 47 days (median  =  24, SD ± 67, range  =  8–228). Factors associated with mortality were higher age and presence of comorbid spinal disorders but also the inefficient transfer logistics, initially missed spinal instability, and unsuccessfully treated complications. Conclusions: The annual case mortality rate in Thessaloniki was dramatically higher than in Stockholm. The different approaches to care, one systematic and the other not, is postulated to be an important factor leading to such major discrepancies between the outcomes of these 2 EU regions. PMID:20486530

  2. Spinal aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as acute paraparesis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Luyuan; Tan, Lee A; Wewel, Joshua T; Kasliwal, Manish K; O'Toole, John E

    2016-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are benign but locally aggressive osseous lesions characterized by blood-filled cystic cavities that account for 1-2% of all bone tumors. While pain remains the most common presenting symptom of spinal ABC, extensive anterior column involvement can result in vertebral fractures, spinal instability, and neurological deficits from compression of neural elements. An exceedingly rare case of thoracic ABC presenting as acute paraparesis in a 21-year-old pregnant woman, that was successfully treated with urgent surgical decompression and stabilization, is reported, with discussion of management strategies and review of the pertinent literature. PMID:26846358

  3. Endoscopic treatment of spinal trauma at the thoracolumbar junction

    PubMed Central

    Beisse, Rudolf

    2007-01-01

    Attempts of treating unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar junction by posterior reduction and fixation alone often result in a significant loss of correction, especially in lesions where a severe destruction of the vertebral body and the intervertebral disc is present. The conventional open approaches like classic thoraco-phreno-lumbotomy produces additional iatrogenic trauma at the lateral chest and abdominal wall which not rarely leads to intercostal neuralgia, as well as post-thoracotomy syndromes. The endoscopic trans-diaphragmatic approach described below opens up the whole thoracolumbar junction to a minimally invasive procedure allowing one to perform all the procedures needed for a full reconstruction of the anterior column of the spine like corpectomy, decompression, vertebral body replacement and anterior plating. The key to address also the subdiaphragmal and retroperitoneal section of the thoracolumbar junction is a partial detachment of the diaphragm which runs along the attachment at the spine and the ribs. The technique was published first in 1998 and has been used now in 650 endoscopic procedures at the thoracolumbar junction out of a total of more than 1300 thoracoscopic operations of the spine in the BG Unfallklinik Murnau, Germany since 1996. PMID:21139778

  4. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson's disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) - predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  5. Gastric dysreflexia after acute experimental spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tong, M.; Holmes, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Gastric reflexes are mediated mainly by vago-vagal reflex circuits in the caudal medulla. Despite the fact that brainstem vago-vagal circuitry remains intact after spinal cord injury (SCI), patients with SCI at the cervical level most often present gastric stasis with an increased risk of reflux and aspiration of gastric contents. Using a miniature strain gauge sutured to the gastric surface; we tested gastric motility and reflexive gastric relaxation following oesophageal distension (oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex) in animals 3 days after a severe spinal contusion at either the third or ninth thoracic spinal segment (acute T3- or T9 SCI, respectively). Both basal gastric motility and the oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex were significantly diminished in animals with T3 SCI. Conversely, both basal gastric motility and the oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex were not significantly reduced in T9 SCI animals compared to controls. The reduced gastric motility and oesophageal-gastric reflex in T3 SCI rats was not ameliorated by celiac sympathectomy. Our results show that gastric stasis following acute SCI is independent of altered spinal sympathetic input to the stomach caudal to the lesion. Our data suggest that SCI may alter the sensitivity of vagal reflex function, perhaps by interrupting ascending spinosolitary input to brainstem vagal nuclei. PMID:19126185

  6. The Nature of Trauma Memories in Acute Stress Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmond, C. H.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Glucksman, E.; Thompson, P.; Dalgleish, T.; Smith, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increasing theoretical, clinical and research evidence for the role of trauma memory in the aetiology of acute pathological stress responses in adults. However, research into the phenomenology of trauma memories in young people is currently scarce. Methods: This study compared the nature of trauma narratives to narratives of…

  7. Transcutaneous gas tensions in the sacrum during the acute phase of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bogie, K M; Nuseibeh, I; Bader, D L

    1992-01-01

    The first few months following injury to the spinal cord requires constant care of the subject if tissue breakdown is to be avoided. The management of acute traumatic cases involves complete bedrest in a supine position with appropriately positioned pillows to minimize trauma to the bone prominences. This study assesses the effectiveness of the management procedure in terms of the tissue response at the sacrum of 15 acute spinal cord injured subjects. The measurement of mean interface pressures during a representative period of recumbency was performed and these were related to changes in transcutaneous gas tensions (TcPO2 and TcPCO2), which are reliable indices of tissue viability. A series of six variables was established which were compared to each other using non-parametric statistical analyses. It was shown that this group of subjects demonstrated a normal mechanism whereby the level of carbon dioxide was able to control the local vascular tone. The results also suggested that the practice of gapping at the sacrum should be revised to reduce mean sacral pressures and minimize the possibility of tissue breakdown, the risk of which is constant throughout the first three months following injury. PMID:1418189

  8. Traumatic spinal injuries in children at a single level 1 pediatric trauma centre: report of a 23-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Vassilyadi, Michael; Forbes, Jason K.; Moroz, Nicholas W.P.; Camacho, Alexandra; Moroz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background With a reported incidence of up to 10% compared to all spinal trauma, spinal injuries in children are less common than in adults. Children can have spine fractures with or without myelopathy, or spinal cord injuries without radiological abnormalities (SCIWORA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of children with spinal injuries treated at a level 1 pediatric trauma centre between 1990 and 2013. Results A total of 275 children were treated during the study period. The mean age at admission was 12 ± 4.5 years, and the male:female ratio was 1.4:1. Spinal injuries were more common in children of ages 12–16 years, with most injuries among ages 15–16 years. The top 3 mechanisms of spinal injury were motor vehicle–related trauma (53%), sports (28%) and falls (13%). Myelopathy occurred in 12% and SCIWORA occurred in 6%. The most common spine levels injured were L2–sacrum, followed by O–C2. Associated injuries, including head injuries (29%), and fractures/dislocations (27%) occurred in 55% of children. Overall mortality was 3%. Surgical intervention was required in 14%. Conclusion The creation of a pediatric spinal injury database using this 23-year retrospective review helped identify important clinical concepts; we found that active adolescent boys had the highest risk of spine injury, that noncontiguous spine injuries occured at a rate higher than reported previously and that nonaccidental spine injuries in children are under-reported. Our findings also emphasize the importance of maintaining a higher index of suspicion with trauma patients with multiple injuries and of conducting detailed clinical and radiographic examinations of the entire spine in children with a known spinal injury. PMID:27240286

  9. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson’s disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4–C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) – predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  10. Spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fernández, A; Massó, A; Beristain, M; G Esnal, I; Pardo, E; Carrillo, I; Lersundi, A

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of a patient with a vertebral fracture requires an accurate diagnosis and categorization of the problem. Treatment decisions must be based on clinical data and information about the lesion itself, which is provided by imaging studies and their interpretation. PMID:26857304

  11. Neuroprotection and Acute Spinal Cord Injury: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Edward D.; Springer, Joe E.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: It has long been recognized that much of the post-traumatic degeneration of the spinal cord following injury is caused by a multi-factorial secondary injury process that occurs during the first minutes, hours, and days after spinal cord injury (SCI). A key biochemical event in that process is reactive oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation (LP). In 1990 the results of the Second National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS II) were published, which showed that the administration of a high-dose regimen of the glucocorticoid steroid methylprednisolone (MP), which had been previously shown to inhibit post-traumatic LP in animal models of SCI, could improve neurological recovery in spinal-cord-injured humans. This resulted in the registration of high-dose MP for acute SCI in several countries, although not in the U.S. Nevertheless, this treatment quickly became the standard of care for acute SCI since the drug was already on the U.S. market for many other indications. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that the non-glucocorticoid 21-aminosteroid tirilazad could duplicate the antioxidant neuroprotective efficacy of MP in SCI models, and evidence of human efficacy was obtained in a third NASCIS trial (NASCIS III). In recent years, the use of high-dose MP in acute SCI has become controversial largely on the basis of the risk of serious adverse effects versus what is perceived to be on average a modest neurological benefit. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone was also tested in NASCIS II based upon the demonstration of its beneficial effects in SCI models. Although it did not a significant overall effect, some evidence of efficacy was seen in incomplete (i.e., paretic) patients. The monosialoganglioside GM1 has also been examined in a recently completed clinical trial in which the patients first received high-dose MP treatment. However, GM1 failed to show any evidence of a significant enhancement in the extent of neurological recovery over the level afforded by

  12. “No Clinical Puzzles More Interesting”: Harvey Cushing and Spinal Trauma, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 1896-1912

    PubMed Central

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Although Harvey Cushing played a central role in the establishment of neurosurgery in the United States, his work on the spine remains largely unknown. This article is not only the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at Johns Hopkins have been reported, but also the first time his management of spinal trauma has been described. We report on 12 patients that Cushing treated from 1898 to 1911 who have never been reported before, including blunt and penetrating injuries, complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions, and both immediate and delayed presentations. Cushing performed laminectomies within 24 hours on patients with immediate presentations—both complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions. Among those with delayed presentations, Cushing did laminectomies on patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. By the end of his tenure at Hopkins, Cushing advocated nonoperative treatment for all patients with complete spinal cord lesions. Four patients died while an inpatient, with meningitis and cystitis leading to the death of 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Cystitis was treated with intravesicular irrigation; an indwelling catheter was placed by a suprapubic cystostomy in four. Cushing was one of the first to report the use of x-ray in a spine patient, in a case that may have been one factor leading to his interest in the nervous system; Cushing also routinely obtained radiographs in those with spinal trauma. These cases illustrate Cushing's dedication to and rapport with his patients, even in the face of a dismal prognosis. PMID:21135734

  13. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  14. Acute traumatic spinal injury following bicycle accidents: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, Niall P; Green, Connor; Burke, Neil; Synnott, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Although the vast majority of injuries suffered while cycling are minor, acute spinal injuries have been reported. We describe three cases of acute spinal injury occurring while cycling. All three patients reported being thrown over the handlebars, while travelling downhill at speed. Two of the cases resulted in profound neurological deficit. These cases show that there is a spectrum of spinal injury due to bicycle accidents, ranging from no neurological deficit to profound insult, and from high cervical injury to mid-thoracic spinal injury. In cases of bicycle accidents, increased awareness of the possibility of such spinal injury is advisable. PMID:22822586

  15. Usefulness of navigated O-arm® in a teaching center for spinal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively high incidence of screw misplacement during spinal instrumentation due to distortion of normal anatomy following spinal trauma. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate and share the initial experience with the use of neuro-navigated 3D O-arm® (Medtronic, USA) as compared to traditional 2D fluoroscopy in atrauma center in India. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, consecutive patients of spinal injury who underwent screw fixation under O-arm guidance over nine-month period (July 2010 till March 2011) were evaluated for accuracy of screw placement. An equal number of consecutive patients prior to March 2011 who underwent screw fixation in 2D fluoroscopy were included for comparison. Patient demographics and radiology were reviewed and spinal injury was assessed using the ASIA grading in both the groups. Screw placement was assessed by postoperative CT scans of the relevant spine and accuracy of screw placement and breach of the medial or lateral cortex of the pedicle were recorded for each case. Results: In the O-arm group, there were 57 patients in whom 210 screws were inserted. None of the patients had screw mal-placement. In 2D fluoroscopy group, 57 patients had 268 screws insertions. 10 (3.73%) screws were found to be malpositioned in the postoperative CT scans (8 in thoracic spine and 2 in odontoid fractures). The malposition rate was highly significant in 2D fluoroscopy thoracolumbar (P = 0.0015) subgroup. One patient had neurological deterioration and three patients required repositioning of the screws. Conclusion: In a teaching center with multiple surgeons, the O-arm® imaging ensures accurate placement of screws as compared to traditional 2D fluoroscopy. PMID:27366260

  16. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  17. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  18. Assessment of acute trauma care training in Kenya.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jana B A; Gravelin, Sara; Jones, Tait; Gololov, Alex; Thomas, Michelle; Omondi, Benson; Bukusi, E

    2009-11-01

    An Acute Trauma Care (ATC) course was adapted for resource-limited healthcare systems based on the American model of initial care for injured patients. The course was taught to interested medical personnel in Kenya. This study undertook a survey of the participants' healthcare facilities to maximize the applicability of ATC across healthcare settings. The ATC course was conducted three times in Kenya in 2006. A World Health Organization (WHO) Needs Assessment survey was administered to 128 participants. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Ninety-two per cent had a physician available in the emergency department and 63 per cent had a clinical officer. A total of 71.7 per cent reported having a designated trauma room. A total of 96.7 per cent reported running water, but access was uninterrupted more often in private hospitals as opposed to public facilities (92.5 vs 63.6%, P = 0.0005). Private and public employees equally had an oxygen cylinder (95.6 vs 98.5%, P > 0.05), oxygen concentrator (69.2 vs 54.2%, P = 0.12), and oxygen administration equipment (95.7 vs 91.4%, P > 0.05) at their facilities. However, private employees were more likely to report that "all" of their equipment was in working order (53 vs 7.9%, P < 0.0001). Private employees were also more likely to report that they had access to information on emergency procedures and equipment (64.4 vs 33.3%, P = 0.001) and that they had learned new procedures (54.8 vs 25.4%, P = 0.002). Despite a perception of public facility lack, this survey showed that public institutions and private institutions have similar basic equipment availability. Yet, problems with equipment malfunction, lack of repair, and availability of required information and training are far greater in the public sector. The content of the ATC course is valid for both private and public sector institutions, but refinements of the course should focus on varying facets of inexpensive and alternative equipment resources

  19. Function and Mechanisms of Autophagy in Brain and Spinal Cord Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I.; Sarkar, Chinmoy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) are major causes of death and long-term disability worldwide. Despite important pathophysiological differences between these disorders, in many respects, mechanisms of injury are similar. During both TBI and SCI, some cells are directly mechanically injured, but more die as a result of injury-induced biochemical changes (secondary injury). Autophagy, a lysosome-dependent cellular degradation pathway with neuroprotective properties, has been implicated both clinically and experimentally in the delayed response to TBI and SCI. However, until recently, its mechanisms and function remained unknown, reflecting in part the difficulty of isolating autophagic processes from ongoing cell death and other cellular events. Recent Advances: Emerging data suggest that depending on the location and severity of traumatic injury, autophagy flux—defined as the progress of cargo through the autophagy system and leading to its degradation—may be either increased or decreased after central nervous system trauma. Critical Issues: While increased autophagy flux may be protective after mild injury, after more severe trauma inhibition of autophagy flux may contribute to neuronal cell death, indicating disruption of autophagy as a part of the secondary injury mechanism. Future Directions: Augmentation and/or restoration of autophagy flux may provide a potential therapeutic target for treatment of TBI and SCI. Development of those treatments will require thorough characterization of changes in autophagy flux, its mechanisms and function over time after injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 565–577. PMID:25808205

  20. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Acute Trauma to the Foot.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Laura W; Kransdorf, Mark J; Adler, Ronald; Appel, Marc; Beaman, Francesca D; Bernard, Stephanie A; Bruno, Michael A; Dempsey, Molly E; Fries, Ian B; Khoury, Viviane; Khurana, Bharti; Mosher, Timothy J; Roberts, Catherine C; Tuite, Michael J; Ward, Robert J; Zoga, Adam C; Weissman, Barbara N

    2015-06-01

    This ACR Appropriateness Criteria article offers imaging triage guidance for several variants of patients presenting with acute foot trauma. Patients meeting inclusion criteria for the Ottawa Rules should undergo a 3-view radiographic series. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy should undergo radiography, even though they do not meet the Ottawa Rules inclusion criteria. Patients with suspected midfoot and/or Lisfranc injury should undergo 3-view radiographs with weight bearing on at least the anterior-posterior view. Patients with suspected Lisfranc injury and normal radiographs should be considered for MRI and CT on a case-by-case basis. MRI or ultrasound could confirm cases of suspected acute tendon rupture. Radiography is the initial imaging modality for suspected plantar plate injury after metatarsal-phalangeal joint injury. Weight-bearing anterior-posterior, lateral, and sesamoid axial views may detect proximal migration of the hallux sesamoids. Ultrasound or MRI can directly evaluate the capsuloligamentous complex, specifically the plantar plate. Radiography can detect radiopaque penetrating foreign bodies, and ultrasound can be helpful in detecting those that are nonradiopaque. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures, by the panel. In instances in which evidence is lacking or is not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging and treatment. PMID:25935824

  1. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  2. Advances in the rehabilitation management of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ditunno, John F; Cardenas, Diana D; Formal, Christopher; Dalal, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive assessment and management of the secondary complications in the hours and days following spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to restoration of function in patients through intervention by a team of rehabilitation professionals. The recent certification of SCI physicians, newly validated assessments of impairment and function measures, and international databases agreed upon by SCI experts should lead to documentation of improved rehabilitation care. This chapter highlights recent advances in assessment and treatment based on evidence-based classification of literature reviews and expert opinion in the acute phase of SCI. A number of these reviews are the product of the Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine, which offers clinical practice guidelines for healthcare professionals. Recognition of and early intervention for problems such as bradycardia, orthostatic hypotension, deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, and early ventilatory failure will be addressed although other chapters may discuss some issues in greater detail. Early assessment and intervention for neurogenic bladder and bowel function has proven effective in the prevention of renal failure and uncontrolled incontinence. Attention to overuse and disuse with training and advanced technology such as functional electrical stimulation have reduced pain and disability associated with upper extremity deterioration and improved physical fitness. Topics such as chronic pain, spasticity, sexual dysfunction, and pressure sores will be covered in more detail in additional chapters. However, the comprehensive and integrated rehabilitation by specialized SCI teams of physicians, nurses, therapists, social workers, and psychologists immediately following SCI has become the standard of care throughout the world. PMID:23098713

  3. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  4. N-acetylcysteine amide preserves mitochondrial bioenergetics and improves functional recovery following spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir P; Sullivan, Patrick G; Pandya, Jignesh D; Goldstein, Glenn A; VanRooyen, Jenna L; Yonutas, Heather M; Eldahan, Khalid C; Morehouse, Johnny; Magnuson, David S K; Rabchevsky, Alexander G

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is becoming a pivotal target for neuroprotective strategies following contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and the pharmacological compounds that maintain mitochondrial function confer neuroprotection and improve long-term hindlimb function after injury. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of cell-permeating thiol, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a precursor of endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH), on mitochondrial function acutely, and long-term tissue sparing and hindlimb locomotor recovery following upper lumbar contusion SCI. Some designated injured adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=120) received either vehicle or NACA (75, 150, 300 or 600mg/kg) at 15min and 6h post-injury. After 24h the total, synaptic, and non-synaptic mitochondrial populations were isolated from a single 1.5cm spinal cord segment (centered at injury site) and assessed for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Results showed compromised total mitochondrial bioenergetics following acute SCI that was significantly improved with NACA treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum effects at 300mg/kg (n=4/group). For synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria, only 300mg/kg NACA dosage showed efficacy. Similar dosage (300mg/kg) also maintained mitochondrial GSH near normal levels. Other designated injured rats (n=21) received continuous NACA (150 or 300mg/kg/day) treatment starting at 15min post-injury for one week to assess long-term functional recovery over 6weeks post-injury. Locomotor testing and novel gait analyses showed significantly improved hindlimb function with NACA that were associated with increased tissue sparing at the injury site. Overall, NACA treatment significantly maintained acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and normalized GSH levels following SCI, and prolonged delivery resulted in significant tissue sparing and improved recovery of hindlimb function. PMID:24805071

  5. N-acetylcysteineamide Preserves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Improves Functional Recovery Following Spinal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir P.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Goldstein, Glenn A.; VanRooyen, Jenna L.; Yonutas, Heather M.; Eldahan, Khalid C.; Morehouse, Johnny; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is becoming a pivotal target for neuroprotective strategies following contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and the pharmacological compounds that maintain mitochondrial function confer neuroprotection and improve long-term hindlimb function after injury. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of cell-permeating thiol, N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a precursor of endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH), on mitochondrial function acutely, and long-term tissue sparing and hindlimb locomotor recovery following upper lumbar contusion SCI. Some designated injured adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=120) received either Vehicle or NACA (75, 150, 300 or 600 mg/kg) at 15min and 6hrs post-injury. After 24hr the total, synaptic, and non-synaptic mitochondrial populations were isolated from a single 1.5cm spinal cord segment (centered at injury site) and assessed for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Results showed compromised total mitochondrial bioenergetics following acute SCI that was significantly improved with NACA treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum effects at 300 mg/kg (n=4/group). For synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria, only 300 mg/kg NACA dosage showed efficacy. Similar dosage (300mg/kg) also maintained mitochondrial GSH near normal levels. Other designated injured rats (n=21) received continuous NACA (150 or 300mg/kg/day) treatment starting at 15min post-injury for one week to assess long-term functional recovery over 6 weeks post-injury. Locomotor testing and novel gait analyses showed significantly improved hindlimb function with NACA that were associated with increased tissue sparing at the injury site. Overall, NACA treatment significantly maintained acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and normalized GSH levels following SCI, and prolonged delivery resulted in significant tissue sparing and improved recovery of hindlimb function. PMID:24805071

  6. [Acute ischemic spinal cord disease. Spinal cord infarction. A clinical study and MRI in 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Pau Serradell, A

    1994-01-01

    Acute spinal cord infarction (ASCI) occurs infrequently and may have diverse causes. The diagnosis of ASCI, and particularly of an anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS) can be confirmed nowadays by MRI, whereas in the past only necropsy confirmation was possible. Pathophysiology and long-term prognosis may be better known at present and treatments more consistent. We present the longitudinal study and clinical features of 8 patients suffering from ASCI. All of them were personally studied and had MRI examinations, often with sequential studies. three groups must be considered: one included 4 cases of ASAS at cervical level, the second 2 cases of ASAS at thoracic level and the third group with infarction of the conus medullaris (ICM), one of them developed during surgical repair of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. Motor and sensory sequelae were assessed in each case together with possible etiological factors. In conclusion, recovery after ASAS tends to be dependent on the severity of the initial deficit. At cervical level, clinical and morphological findings argue in favour of an extrinsic selective compression of the C7 right radiculo-medullary artery as responsible for the ASA. At thoracic level, the artery preferentially occluded seems to be the sulco-commisural artery as a consequence of disc compression. Finally, an underlying peculiarity of the pattern of arterial supply is a probable predisposing factor for ICM. Generally, the long-term prognosis of ASCI is not necessarily bad. PMID:7801036

  7. The application of a trauma index to assess injury severity and prognosis in hospitalized patients with acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hailin; Ge, Wenhan; Li, Bing; Zhu, Yuanqun; Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the application value of a trauma index (TI) to assess condition and likelihood of death in hospitalized patients with acute trauma (AT). Methods: Trauma index scores and injury severity scores (ISS) were assessed in 1,802 randomly selected cases of AT-hospitalized patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to compare the clinical values of TI and ISS values to predict outcomes in AT-hospitalized patients. Results: The area under the ROC curve for TI scores was 0.896 (95% CI [0.881, 0.909]), while for ISS, it was 0.792 (95% CI [0.773, 0.811]). This difference was not statistically significant (z = 3.236, P = 0.001). Potentially critical disease conditions in AT-hospitalized patients were best identified when TI scores were ≥ 16 points and ISS values were ≥ 22 points. Conclusions: Trauma Index scores exhibited a higher resolution for outcome prediction in AT-hospitalized patients compared to ISS values. The implementation of this scale was simple, reliable, easy to learn, and could quickly identify disease, which is vital for early detection and treatment of critical trauma patients. PMID:26770541

  8. A novel experimental model of orthopedic trauma with acute kidney injury in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Mittwede, Peter N; Xiang, Lusha; Lu, Silu; Clemmer, John S; Hester, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after blunt traumatic injury in humans. Because limitations exist in studying trauma in human patients, animal models are necessary to elucidate mechanisms of remote organ injury after trauma. We developed a model of severe orthopedic trauma in lean (LZ) and obese (OZ) Zucker rats, in which OZ develop greater kidney dysfunction after trauma than LZ. Orthopedic trauma was inflicted via bilateral hindlimb soft tissue injury, fibula fracture, and injection of homogenized bone components. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured for 6 h after trauma, and again at 24 h after trauma. Urine was collected for 24 h before and after trauma to measure urine albumin excretion. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), and renal macrophage infiltration (ED-1 [CD68 Antibody] immunostaining) were measured in animals with and without trauma. MAP and HR were similar between LZ and OZ throughout the study, with the exception that OZ had a 18 mmHg lower pressure 24 h posttrauma. GFR and RPF were decreased significantly (∼50%), while urine albumin excretion, plasma IL-6, and renal ED-1-positive cells were increased in OZ 24 h after trauma compared to both OZ without trauma and LZ after trauma. In conclusion, these data are consistent with studies in humans that show that AKI develops more frequently in obese than in lean individuals. This model will be an important experimental tool to better understand the underlying mechanisms of poor outcomes after trauma in obese patients. PMID:24303169

  9. [Correction of neurotrophic disorders in patients, suffering consequences of a spinal cord and peripheral nerves trauma].

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    On clinical base of cathedra of the disasters medicine, military medicine, anesthesiology and reanimatology in 2010 - 2013 yrs 62 patients were treated for neurotrophic disorders, in 12 of them the method was applied, elaborated in the clinic. For neurotrophic ulcers in 5 patients autodermoplasty was performed, using splitted cutaneous flap, in 1 for the wound defect on a forearm--plasty, using rotational cutaneo-adipose flap, based on axial blood supply. In 44 patients after a spinal cord trauma a neurotrophic defects degree III - IV have formed. The kind of operative intervention was selected depending on size of the defect, the wound depth and functional peculiarities of the injured area. Introduction of a new method of treatment of neurotrophic ulcers of the lower extremities, using preparation of hyaluronic acid with sodium succinate, expands the perspectives of treatment in patients, suffering defects of cover tissues. Differentiated approach to choice of the wound closure method, caused by damage of central and peripheral neural system, have permitted to achieve positive results in 98.1% of patients. PMID:25507021

  10. [Correction of neurotrophic disorders in patients, suffering consequences of a spinal cord and peripheral nerves trauma].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, O V

    2014-08-01

    On clinical base of cathedra of the disasters medicine, military medicine, anesthesiology and reanimatology in 2010 - 2013 yrs 62 patients were treated for neurotrophic disorders, in 12 of them the method was applied, elaborated in the clinic. For neurotrophic ulcers in 5 patients autodermoplasty was performed, using splitted cutaneous flap, in 1 for the wound defect on a forearm--plasty, using rotational cutaneo-adipose flap, based on axial blood supply. In 44 patients after a spinal cord trauma a neurotrophic defects degree III - IV have formed. The kind of operative intervention was selected depending on size of the defect, the wound depth and functional peculiarities of the injured area. Introduction of a new method of treatment of neurotrophic ulcers of the lower extremities, using preparation of hyaluronic acid with sodium succinate, expands the perspectives of treatment in patients, suffering defects of cover tissues. Differentiated approach to choice of the wound closure method, caused by damage of central and peripheral neural system, have permitted to achieve positive results in 98.1% of patients. PMID:25417293

  11. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  12. Motor recover during the acute period of craniocerebral trauma using kinetotherapy.

    PubMed

    Franckeviciute, E V; Krisciunas, A J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the influences of age, gender, and the severity of brain trauma on recovery of motor function using kinetotherapy. The study included 131 patients (99 men and 32 women) investigated during the acute phase of trauma in the Department of Brain Trauma, Clinical Hospital, Kaunas Medical University. After stabilization, 80 patients were transferred to the neurorehabilitation clinic and 51 were transferred to other rehabilitation centers. Motor function in the patients was assessed using the Clinical Outcomes Variable Scale (COVS) at the beginning and end of the acute trauma period and during early rehabilitation, i.e., at the beginning, 25 days later, and on completion. During the acute trauma period, patients had impairments to the abilities to turn over, sit, maintain balance while sitting, to move horizontally and vertically, walk, and use mobility aids, along with reductions in walking duration and speed, and difficulty in wheelchair mobility and hand functions. Kinetotherapy yielded high or intermediate levels of efficacy in 90% of the patients. The efficacy of kinetotherapy was significantly greater in young patients than in elderly and old patients (p < 0.05). Gender and trauma severity had no statistically significant effects on the efficacy of kinetotherapy (p > 0.05). PMID:18802769

  13. Acute acoustic trauma: dynamics of hearing loss following cessation of exposure.

    PubMed

    Segal, S; Harell, M; Shahar, A; Englender, M

    1988-07-01

    The natural history of individuals with acute acoustic trauma who ceased to be exposed to impact noise was examined. Retrospective follow-up was carried out for 4 years on patients who were qualified as disabled following acoustic trauma with permanent threshold shift. Eight hundred forty-one individuals (1682 ears) were examined, of which 1514 ears with acoustic trauma were included in the study group; 150 individuals (300 ears) who continued to be exposed to impact noise even after discovery of acoustic trauma comprised the control group. In the latter, as long as exposure to gunfire continued, the severity of acoustic trauma increased. In the study group, during the first year after injury, changes were observed in hearing, whether improvement or deterioration; after this period, hearing loss appeared to be final. We suggest that, after 1 year following acute acoustic trauma, the associated hearing loss be considered as final, provided there is no further exposure to noise. This finding holds great importance from the medicolegal standpoint, an aspect that is unclear in the literature. It clarifies that beyond the period of 1 year after initial exposure, the pathologic process ceases (as long as there is no additional exposure to noise or gunfire). Further hearing deterioration beyond this period is not related to the initial acoustic trauma but rather to other factors. PMID:3177612

  14. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  15. Rock Climbing Injuries: Acute and Chronic Repetitive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Connie Y; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J

    2016-01-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity as a sport, and specific injuries related to its practice are becoming more common. Chronic repetitive injuries are more common than acute injuries, although acute injuries tend to be more severe. We review both acute and chronic upper and lower extremity injuries. Understanding the injury pattern in rock climbers is important for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26360057

  16. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma.

    PubMed

    Quong, Whitney L; Hynes, Sally L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2015-11-01

    The "stinger" or "burner" is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings. PMID:18087936

  18. Design, delivery, and evaluation of early interventions for children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to acute, potentially traumatic events is an unfortunately common experience for children and adolescents. Posttraumatic stress (PTS) responses following acute trauma can have an ongoing impact on child development and well-being. Early intervention to prevent or reduce PTS responses holds promise but requires careful development and empirical evaluation. Objectives The aims of this review paper are to present a framework for thinking about the design, delivery, and evaluation of early interventions for children who have been exposed to acute trauma; highlight targets for early intervention; and describe next steps for research and practice. Results and conclusions Proposed early intervention methods must (1) have a firm theoretical grounding that guides the design of intervention components; (2) be practical for delivery in peri-trauma or early post-trauma contexts, which may require creative models that go outside of traditional means of providing services to children; and (3) be ready for evaluation of both outcomes and mechanisms of action. This paper describes three potential targets for early intervention—maladaptive trauma-related appraisals, excessive early avoidance, and social/interpersonal processes—for which there is theory and evidence suggesting an etiological role in the development or persistence of PTS symptoms in children. PMID:25018860

  19. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhi-qiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Li, Hao-tian; Wang, Ji-quan; Fan, Zhong-kai; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We recorded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2–24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial fission protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2–24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were increased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the first 8 hours, but fission played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged. PMID:26981103

  20. Acute Brain Trauma in Mice Followed By Longitudinal Two-photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Paveliev, Mikhail; Kislin, Mikhail; Molotkov, Dmitry; Yuryev, Mikhail; Rauvala, Heikki; Khiroug, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Although acute brain trauma often results from head damage in different accidents and affects a substantial fraction of the population, there is no effective treatment for it yet. Limitations of currently used animal models impede understanding of the pathology mechanism. Multiphoton microscopy allows studying cells and tissues within intact animal brains longitudinally under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we describe two models of acute brain injury studied by means of two-photon imaging of brain cell behavior under posttraumatic conditions. A selected brain region is injured with a sharp needle to produce a trauma of a controlled width and depth in the brain parenchyma. Our method uses stereotaxic prick with a syringe needle, which can be combined with simultaneous drug application. We propose that this method can be used as an advanced tool to study cellular mechanisms of pathophysiological consequences of acute trauma in mammalian brain in vivo. In this video, we combine acute brain injury with two preparations: cranial window and skull thinning. We also discuss advantages and limitations of both preparations for multisession imaging of brain regeneration after trauma. PMID:24748024

  1. Cumulative exposure to prior collective trauma and acute stress responses to the Boston marathon bombings.

    PubMed

    Garfin, Dana Rose; Holman, E Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2015-06-01

    The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metropolitan Boston (n = 846) and New York City (n = 941) completed Internet-based surveys shortly after the Boston Marathon bombings. Cumulative direct exposure and indirect exposure to prior community trauma and acute stress symptoms were assessed. Acute stress levels did not differ between Boston and New York metropolitan residents. Cumulative direct and indirect, live-media-based exposure to 9/11, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook shooting were positively associated with acute stress responses in the covariate-adjusted model. People who experience multiple community-based traumas may be sensitized to the negative impact of subsequent events, especially in communities previously exposed to similar disasters. PMID:25896419

  2. Solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma causing vertebral artery compression and acute cerebellar infarct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxia; Ilaslan, Hakan; Hussain, Muhammad S; Bain, Mark; Bauer, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Osteochondroma is a common benign bone lesion, usually involving the long bones. Spinal involvement is rare. The clinical presentation of spinal osteochondroma varies according to the site of the lesion. The most common reported clinical presentation is secondary to encroachment of the lesion on the spinal canal or nerve roots. Less common presentations such as a palpable neck mass, dysphagia, sleep apnea, paralysis of left vocal cord or acute respiratory distress have been reported when the lesions compress the anatomic structures anteriorly. We describe a rare case of a young patient who presented with an emergent critical condition of acute cerebellar infarct as a result of vertebral artery compression caused by a solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma. PMID:25109381

  3. Acute myocardial infarction due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, R K; Singh, Arun; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sinha, Ajay; Saurabh; Kumar, Amit

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of blunt chest injury following a road accident leading to damage of the left main and left anterior descending coronary arteries causing acute myocardial infarction in a young person. PMID:12674188

  4. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  5. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  6. Acute Compartment Syndrome After Gastrocnemius Rupture (Tennis Leg) in a Nonathlete Without Trauma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Jun, Huang; Muliang, Ding; Deye, Song; Jiangdong, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious emergency that warrants urgent decompression, and tennis leg (i.e., rupture of the medial head of the gastrocnemius) is a known clinical condition that is usually treated symptomatically, with good results overall. In rare cases, acute compartment syndrome is associated with tennis leg after severe direct muscle trauma or severe exercise in athletes or physically active individuals. We present an unusual case of acute compartment syndrome secondary to tennis leg after the patient, a nonathlete, had disembarked from a truck without any trauma. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for atraumatic compartment syndrome, and timely surgical fasciotomy must be undertaken to avoid complications resulting from delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25435006

  7. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; NARISAWA, Ayumi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  8. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Karibe, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Motonobu; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Narisawa, Ayumi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-15

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  9. Subdural infusion of dexamethasone inhibits leukomyelitis after acute spinal cord injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kwiecien, Jm; Jarosz, B; Urdzikova, L M; Rola, R; Dabrowski, W

    2015-01-01

    Trauma in spinal cord injury often results in massive damage to the white matter and in damage to myelin that results in a severe phagocyte-rich infiltration apparently directed at removing immunologically toxic myelin debris. In the epidural balloon crush injury to the rat cranial thoracic spinal cord, the dorsal column was crushed, which at one week post-op resulted in its obliteration by a severe infiltration by a virtually pure population of macrophages that internalized all damaged myelin. A week-long subdural infusion of dexamethasone, a stable synthetic corticosteroid, resulted in remarkable inhibition of the macrophage infiltration of the crush cavity and in the lack of removal of myelin debris by phagocytosis. In this study we demonstrated that spinal cord injury results in a severe inflammatory response directed at massively damaged myelin, and we inhibited this response with a subdural infusion of a powerful anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. PMID:25909874

  10. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Management of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Anthony; Marcoux, Judith; Radhakrishna, Mohan; Pelletier, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the gold standard for imaging neurological tissues including the spinal cord. The use of MRI for imaging in the acute management of patients with spinal cord injury has increased significantly. This paper used a vigorous literature review with Downs and Black scoring, followed by a Delphi vote on the main conclusions. MRI is strongly recommended for the prognostication of acute spinal cord injury. The sagittal T2 sequence was particularly found to be of value. Four prognostication patterns were found to be predictive of neurological outcome (normal, single-level edema, multi-level edema, and mixed hemorrhage and edema). It is recommended that MRI be used to direct clinical decision making. MRI has a role in clearance, the ruling out of injury, of the cervical spine in the obtunded patient only if there is abnormality of the neurological exam. Patients with cervical spinal cord injuries have an increased risk of vertebral artery injuries but the literature does not allow for recommendation of magnetic resonance angiography as part of the routine protocol. Finally, time repetition (TR) and time echo (TE) values used to evaluate patients with acute spinal cord injury vary significantly. All publications with MRI should specify the TR and TE values used. PMID:20388006

  11. Different preoperative approaches for acute lumber spinal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lu-Feng; Yuan, Yan-Sheng; Li, En-Hui; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the long and short term effectiveness of different preoperative approaches for lumber spinal fractures and finds a better surgical method for the disease. Follow up records of 144 patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy or methylprednisolone infusion within 8 hours after the lubmer spinal injury were analyzed. Postoperative outcome immediately and 3, 6, 12, 36 months after the surgery were compared to evaluate the effectiveness two different approaches. The results indicated that there are no significant differences regarding age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) score as well as Frankel scores before the surgery, and significant differences VAS score as well as Frankel scores immediately after the surgery. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy within 8 hours after the injury can be more effective than methylprednisolone infusion in patients with lumber spinal injury. PMID:26309686

  12. Postoperative management and acute rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    McCagg, C

    1986-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity rates of patients with spinal cord injury have decreased greatly. Prior to World War II, few patients survived their acute injuries. Now even severely involved respiratory-dependent patients may return to live in the community. Advanced surgical procedures, when appropriately applied, are decreasing the time of immobility and preventing late spinal deformities. Exciting new developments in basic science research such as the use of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and functional electrical stimulation may alter the whole course of recovery for patients within the foreseeable future. It is likely, however, that the acute management of the patient with spinal cord injury will still demand systematic care by an experienced, multidisciplinary team of professionals. PMID:3945478

  13. Early Platelet Dysfunction: An Unrecognized Role in the Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Thomas, Scott; Sauaia, Angela; Evans, Ed; Harr, Jeffrey; Silliman, Christopher C.; Ploplis, Victoria; Castellino, Francis J.; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of platelet dysfunction, using an end-point of assembly into a stable thrombus, following severe injury. Background: Although the current debate on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has focused on the consumption or inhibition of coagulation factors, the question of early platelet dysfunction in this setting remains unclear. Study Design Prospective platelet function in assembly and stability of the thrombus was determined within 30 minutes of injury using whole blood samples from trauma patients at the point of care employing thrombelastography (TEG)-based platelet functional analysis. Results There were 51 patients in the study. There were significant differences in the platelet response between trauma patients and healthy volunteers such that there was impaired aggregation to these agonists. In trauma patients, the median ADP inhibition of platelet function was 86.1% (IQR: 38.6–97.7%), compared to 4.2 % (IQR 0–18.2%) in healthy volunteers. Following trauma, the impairment of platelet function in response to AA was 44.9% (IQR 26.6–59.3%), compared to 0.5% (IQR 0–3.02%) in volunteers (Wilcoxon non parametric test p<0.0001 for both tests). Conclusions In this study, we show that platelet dysfunction is manifest following major trauma, before significant fluid or blood administration. These data suggest a potential role for early platelet transfusion in severely injured patients at risk for postinjury coagulopathy. PMID:22520693

  14. Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired following burn trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Melanie G.; Fram, Ricki Y.; Herndon, David N.; Qian, Ting; Angel, Carlos; Green, Justin M.; Mlcak, Ronald; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial proteins and genes are damaged after burn injury in animals but have not previously been assessed in human burn patients. Methods The rates of maximal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity(ATP production) and uncoupled oxidation(heat production) for both palmitate and pyruvate were measured in muscle biopsies from 40 children sustaining burns >40% body surface area and from 13 healthy children controls. Results Maximal mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and palmitate were reduced in burn patients compared to controls (4.0±0.2:1.9±0.1 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min pyruvate; Control:Burn;P<0.001 and 3.0±0.1:0.9±0.03 µmolO2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min palmatyl CoA; Control:Burn;P=0.003). Uncoupled oxidation was the same between groups. Conclusions The maximal coupled mitochondrial oxidative capacity is severely impaired after burn injury, although there are no alterations in the rate of uncoupled oxidative capacity. It may be that the ratio of these indicates that a larger portion of energy production in trauma patients is wasted through uncoupling, rather than used for healing. PMID:18639661

  15. Acute inflammatory response in spinal cord following impact injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S L; Parrish, M E; Springer, J E; Doty, K; Dossett, L

    1998-05-01

    Numerous factors are involved in the spread of secondary damage in spinal cord after traumatic injury, including ischemia, edema, increased excitatory amino acids, and oxidative damage to the tissue from reactive oxygen species. Neutrophils and macrophages can produce reactive oxygen species when activated and thus may contribute to the lipid peroxidation that is known to occur after spinal cord injury. This study examined the rostral-caudal distribution of neutrophils and macrophages/microglia at 4, 6, 24, and 48 h after contusion injury to the T10 spinal cord of rat (10 g weight, 50 mm drop). Neutrophils were located predominantly in necrotic regions, with a time course that peaked at 24 h as measured with assays of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). The sharpest peak of MPO activity was localized between 4 mm rostral and caudal to the injury. Macrophages/microglia were visualized with antibodies against ED1 and OX-42. Numerous cells with a phagocytic morphology were present by 24 h, with a higher number by 48 h. These cells were predominantly located within the gray matter and dorsal funiculus white matter. The number of cells gradually declined through 6 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion. OX-42 staining also revealed reactive microglia with blunt processes, particularly at levels distant to the lesion. The number of macrophages/microglia was significantly correlated with the amount of tissue damage at each level. Treatments to decrease the inflammatory response are likely to be beneficial to recovery of function after traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:9582256

  16. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain. PMID:26454807

  17. Efficacy of Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Intravenous Morphine in Acute Limb Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mohammad; Mozaffarpour Noori, Ali; Sedaghat, Mojtaba; Safaie, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficient pain management is one of the most important components of care in the field of emergency medicine. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare intravenous paracetamol and intravenous morphine sulfate for acute pain reduction in patients with limb trauma. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, all patients (aged 18 years and older) with acute limb trauma and a pain score of greater than 3/10 in the emergency department were recruited; they received either 1 g intravenous paracetamol or 0.1 mg/kg intravenous morphine sulfate over 15 minutes. The primary outcome was the pain score measured on a numerical rating scale at 0, 15 and 30 minutes after commencing drug administration. The requirement for rescue analgesia and the frequency of adverse reactions were also recorded. Results: Sixty patients randomly received either IV paracetamol (n = 30) or IV morphine (n = 30). The mean reduction in numerical rating scale pain intensity scores at 30 minutes was 3.86 (± 1.61) for paracetamol, and 2.16 (± 1.39) for morphine. However, pain relief was significantly higher in the paracetamol group compared to the morphine group (P < 0.001). Four patients in the paracetamol group and 15 patients in the morphine group needed rescue analgesia and the difference was significant (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Intravenous paracetamol appears to provide better analgesia than intravenous morphine in acute limb trauma. Further larger studies are required. PMID:27218042

  18. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  19. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  20. Post-trauma Lipitor treatment prevents endothelial dysfunction, facilitates neuroprotection, and promotes locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Ravinder; Christie, Douglas K; Barbosa, Ernest; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar K

    2007-04-01

    We have previously reported neuroprotection in spinal cord injury (SCI) by Lipitor [atorvastatin (AT)]-pre-treatment. Though informative, pre-treatment studies find only limited clinical application as trauma occurrence is unpredictable. Therefore, this study investigates the efficacy of AT treatment post-SCI. In a rat model of contusion-SCI resulting in complete hindlimb paralysis, AT treatment (5 mg/kg; gavage) was begun 2, 4, or 6 h post-SCI followed by a once daily dose thereafter for 6 weeks. While the placebo vehicle (VHC)-SCI rats showed substantial functional deficit, AT-SCI animals exhibited significant functional recovery. AT diminished injury-induced blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) dysfunction with significantly reduced infiltration and tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-1beta/inducible nitric oxide synthase expression at site of injury. BSCB protection in AT-SCI was attributable to attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression - a central player in BSCB disruption. Furthermore, endothelial MMP9 expression was found to be RhoA/ROCK pathway-mediated and regulated by AT through an isoprenoid-dependent mechanism. Attenuation of these early inflammatory events reduced secondary damage. Significant reduction in axonal degeneration, myelin degradation, gliosis, and neuronal apoptosis with resultant enhancement in tissue sparing was observed in AT-SCI compared with VHC-SCI. In summary, this novel report presenting the efficacy of post-injury AT treatment might be of critical therapeutic value as effective treatments are currently unavailable for SCI. PMID:17217414

  1. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  2. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae.

    PubMed

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3-12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  3. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae

    PubMed Central

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3–12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  4. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  5. Acute refractory hypoxemia after chest trauma reversed by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Polytrauma often results in significant hypoxemia secondary to direct lung contusion or indirectly through atelectasis, systemic inflammatory response, large volume fluid resuscitation and blood product transfusion. In addition to causing hypoxemia, atelectasis and acute lung injury can lead to right ventricular failure through an acute increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Mechanical ventilation is often applied, accompanied with recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure in order to recruit alveoli and reverse atelectasis, while preventing excessive alveolar damage. This strategy should lead to the reversal of the hypoxemic condition and the detrimental heart–lung interaction that may occur. However, as described in this case report, hemodynamic instability and intractable alveolar atelectasis sometimes do not respond to conventional ventilation strategies. Case presentation We describe the case of a 21-year-old Caucasian man with severe chest trauma requiring surgical interventions, who developed refractory hypoxemia and overt right ventricular failure. After multiple failed attempts of recruitment using conventional ventilation, the patient was ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. This mode of ventilation allowed the reversal of the hemodynamic effects of severe hypoxemia and of the acute cor pulmonale. We use this case report to describe the physiological advantages of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in patients with chest trauma, and formulate the arguments to explain the positive effect observed in our patient. Conclusions High-frequency oscillatory ventilation can be used in the context of a blunt chest trauma accompanied by severe hypoxemia due to atelectasis. The positive effect is due to its capacity to recruit the collapsed alveoli and, as a result, the relief of increased pulmonary vascular resistance and subsequently the reversal of acute cor pulmonale. This approach may represent an

  6. Post-traumatic acute anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foo, D; Subrahmanyan, T S; Rossier, A B

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients with motor complete but sensory incomplete lesions following vertebral and spinal cord injuries are described. Sensory dissociation was present with more impairment of pain than touch or proprioception. The loss of pain sensation was complete in seven patients, but was incomplete in the other six subjects four of whom showed major motor recovery. The major point of interest of this study is to show that patients who retain not only touch but also pain sensation have a definitely better prognosis for neurological recovery. PMID:7290729

  7. The use of spinal manipulation to treat an acute on field athletic injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Sean A.; Kazemi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    This case describes the utilization of spinal manipulative therapy for an acute athletic injury during a Taekwondo competition. During the tournament, an athlete had a sudden, non-traumatic, ballistic movement of the cervical spine. This resulted in the patient having a locked cervical spine with limited active motion in all directions. The attending chiropractor assessed the athlete, and deemed manipulation was appropriate. After the manipulation, the athlete’s range of motion was returned and was able to finish the match. Spinal manipulation has multiple positive outcomes for an athlete with an acute injury including the increase of range of motion, decrease in pain and the relaxation of hypertonic muscles. However, there should be some caution when utilizing manipulation during an event. In the article the authors propose four criteria that should be met before utilizing manipulation for an acute, in competition, athletic injury. These include the lack of red flags, limited time for the intervention, preexisting doctor-patient relationship and the athlete has experience receiving spinal manipulation. Clinicians should be aware that manipulation may be an effective tool to treat an acute in competition athletic injury. The criteria set out in the article may help a practitioner decide if manipulation is a good option for them. PMID:27385835

  8. The use of spinal manipulation to treat an acute on field athletic injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Sean A; Kazemi, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    This case describes the utilization of spinal manipulative therapy for an acute athletic injury during a Taekwondo competition. During the tournament, an athlete had a sudden, non-traumatic, ballistic movement of the cervical spine. This resulted in the patient having a locked cervical spine with limited active motion in all directions. The attending chiropractor assessed the athlete, and deemed manipulation was appropriate. After the manipulation, the athlete's range of motion was returned and was able to finish the match. Spinal manipulation has multiple positive outcomes for an athlete with an acute injury including the increase of range of motion, decrease in pain and the relaxation of hypertonic muscles. However, there should be some caution when utilizing manipulation during an event. In the article the authors propose four criteria that should be met before utilizing manipulation for an acute, in competition, athletic injury. These include the lack of red flags, limited time for the intervention, preexisting doctor-patient relationship and the athlete has experience receiving spinal manipulation. Clinicians should be aware that manipulation may be an effective tool to treat an acute in competition athletic injury. The criteria set out in the article may help a practitioner decide if manipulation is a good option for them. PMID:27385835

  9. Spinal intramedullary hamartoma with acute presentation in a 13-month old infant: case report.

    PubMed

    Samak, Eslam M; Abdel Latif, Assem M; Ghany, Walid Abdel; Hewedi, Iman H; Amer, Aboubakr; Moharram, Hussein

    2016-08-01

    True hamartomas of the spinal cord are very rare, and although several have been reported in the literature, there are few detailed radiological and pathological descriptions of the condition. There is also considerable overlap with other entities, the most common being spinal cord teratomas. The authors report the case of a 13-month-old child with a supragluteal sacral dimple who presented with acute neurological deterioration. MRI of the spine revealed a big intramedullary lesion with heterogeneous signal intensity. A near-total resection was performed, and histopathological examination demonstrated findings consistent with a spinal cord hamartoma. The authors believe that careful preoperative evaluation and rigorous pathological examination are mandatory to establish diagnosis and direct further management of cases in which such a lesion is suspected. PMID:27127875

  10. Neuroprotective effects and impact on caspase-12 expression of tauroursodeoxycholic acid after acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Miao, Lei; Hei, Long; Lin, Leilei; Ding, Huiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on nerve function after acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, observe its effect on neuronal apoptosis and caspase-12 expression levels, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: We used a modified Allen’s weight-drop trauma method to establish a rat acute SCI model. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: group A (sham surgery group), group B (DMSO control group) and group C (TUDCA treatment group), with 36 rats in each group. At one minute and at 24 hours after successfully establishing the model, rats in group C received an intraperitoneal injection of TUDCA (200 mg/kg), while rats in group B received an equal amount of DMSO at the same time points. At 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury, a modified Tarlov scoring method and Rivlin’s oblique plate test were used to evaluate rat spinal cord nerve function recovery. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury. Specimens were obtained from the center of the injury sites; the pathological changes in spinal cord tissue were observed after hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL method, and the expression of caspase-12 was measured at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blots. Results: Group C differed significantly from group B in Tarlov scores and the oblique table test as early as 24 hours after the injury (P < 0.05). The TUNEL assay test results showed that neurons underwent apoptosis after SCI, which peaked at 24 hours. The ratios of apoptotic cells in group C were significantly lower than those in group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.01). The immunohistochemistry and Western blot results showed that the caspase-12 expression levels of group C were lower than those of group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TUDCA can inhibit the expression of caspase

  11. Posttraumatic stress following acute medical trauma in children: A proposed model of bio-psycho-social processes during the peri-trauma period

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Widaman, Keith; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children worldwide experience acute medical events. Children’s responses to these events range from transient distress to significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). While many models suggest explanations for the development and maintenance of PTSS in adults, very few have focused on children. Current models of child PTSS are primarily restricted to the post-trauma period, thus neglecting the critical peri-trauma period when screening and preventive interventions may be most easily implemented. Research on PTSS in response to pediatric medical trauma typically examines predictors in isolation, often overlooking potentially important interactions. This paper proposes a new model utilizing the bio-psycho-social framework and focusing on peri-trauma processes of acute medical events. Understanding the relationships among bio-psycho-social factors during peri-trauma can inform early identification of at-risk children, preventive interventions, and clinical care. Recommendations for future research, including the need to examine PTSS in the context of multiple influences, are discussed. PMID:25217001

  12. Evaluating initial spine trauma response: injury time to trauma center in PA, USA.

    PubMed

    Harrop, James S; Ghobrial, George M; Chitale, Rohan; Krespan, Kelly; Odorizzi, Laura; Fried, Tristan; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Cohen, Murray; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Historical perceptions regarding the severity of traumatic spinal cord injury has led to considerable disparity in triage to tertiary care centers. This article retrospectively reviews a large regional trauma database to analyze whether the diagnosis of spinal trauma affected patient transfer timing and patterns. The Pennsylvania Trauma database was retrospectively reviewed. All acute trauma patient entries for level I and II centers were categorized for diagnosis, mechanism, and location of injury, analyzing transportation modality and its influence on time of arrival. A total of 1162 trauma patients were identified (1014 blunt injuries, 135 penetrating injuries and 12 other) with a mean transport time of 3.9 hours and a majority of patients arriving within 7 hours (>75%). Spine trauma patients had the longest mean arrival time (5.2 hours) compared to blunt trauma (4.2 hours), cranial neurologic injuries (4.35 hours), and penetrating injuries (2.13 hours, p<0.0001). There was a statistically significant correlation between earlier arrivals and both cranial trauma (p=0.0085) and penetrating trauma (p<0.0001). The fastest modality was a fire rescue (0.93 hours) or police (0.63 hours) vehicle with Philadelphia County (1.1 hour) having the quickest arrival times. Most trauma patients arrived to a specialty center within 7 hours of injury. However subsets analysis revealed that spine trauma patients had the greatest transit times. Present research trials for spinal cord injuries suggest earlier intervention may lead to improved recovery. Therefore, it is important to focus on improvement of the transportation triage system for traumatic spinal patients. PMID:24932590

  13. A study of methylprednisolone neuroprotection against acute injury to the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sámano, C; Kaur, J; Nistri, A

    2016-02-19

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) has been proposed as a first-line treatment for acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Its clinical use remains, however, controversial because of the modest benefits and numerous side-effects. We investigated if MPSS could protect spinal neurons and glia using an in vitro model of the rat spinal cord that enables recording reflexes, fictive locomotion and morphological analysis of damage. With this model, a differential lesion affecting mainly either neurons or glia can be produced via kainate-evoked excitotoxicity or application of a pathological medium (lacking O2 and glucose), respectively. MPSS (6-10 μM) applied for 24 h after 1-h pathological medium protected astrocytes and oligodendrocytes especially in the ventrolateral white matter. This effect was accompanied by the return of slow, alternating oscillations (elicited by NMDA and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) reminiscent of a sluggish fictive locomotor pattern. MPSS was, however, unable to reverse even a moderate neuronal loss and the concomitant suppression of fictive locomotion evoked by kainate (0.1 mM; 1 h). These results suggest that MPSS could, at least in part, contrast damage to spinal glia induced by a dysmetabolic state (associated to oxygen and glucose deprivation) and facilitate reactivation of spinal networks. Conversely, when even a minority of neurons was damaged by excitotoxicity, MPSS did not protect them nor did it restore network function in the current experimental model. PMID:26701292

  14. Acute Presentation of Lumbar Spinal Schwannoma Due to Torsion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ryan; Ortmeier, Thomas C; Tapia-Zegarra, Gino G; Lindley, Timothy E; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannomas are common spinal tumors with insidious presentations, acute neurological deterioration is an extremely rare manifestation that can occur in the setting of tumor torsion and infarction. The present case reports an unusual presentation of a spinal schwannoma that underwent torsion and infarction. A 65-year-old male presented initially with acute radicular pain progressing to cauda equina syndrome and confusion. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed an intradural extramedullary lesion at the level of L1/L2 measuring 1.1x0.9 cm. Intraoperatively, a reddish mass was seen caudally twisted around itself. Gross total resection was achieved with a final diagnosis of schwannoma with areas of infarction. At his six week follow up clinical visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his neurological exam was normal. The neurosurgeon should be aware of such atypical radiographic and clinical presentation amongst the spectrum of clinical manifestation of these nerve sheath tumors.  PMID:27226945

  15. Acute Presentation of Lumbar Spinal Schwannoma Due to Torsion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Khanna, Ryan; Ortmeier, Thomas C; Tapia-Zegarra, Gino G; Lindley, Timothy E; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannomas are common spinal tumors with insidious presentations, acute neurological deterioration is an extremely rare manifestation that can occur in the setting of tumor torsion and infarction. The present case reports an unusual presentation of a spinal schwannoma that underwent torsion and infarction. A 65-year-old male presented initially with acute radicular pain progressing to cauda equina syndrome and confusion. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed an intradural extramedullary lesion at the level of L1/L2 measuring 1.1x0.9 cm. Intraoperatively, a reddish mass was seen caudally twisted around itself. Gross total resection was achieved with a final diagnosis of schwannoma with areas of infarction. At his six week follow up clinical visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his neurological exam was normal. The neurosurgeon should be aware of such atypical radiographic and clinical presentation amongst the spectrum of clinical manifestation of these nerve sheath tumors. PMID:27226945

  16. Direct-trauma model of posttraumatic syringomyelia with a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor.

    PubMed

    Wong, Johnny H Y; Song, Xin; Hemley, Sarah J; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of posttraumatic syringomyelia remains enigmatic and is not adequately explained by current theories. Experimental investigations require a reproducible animal model that replicates the human condition. Current animal models are imperfect because of their low reliability, severe neurological deficits, or dissimilar mechanism of injury. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible rodent model of posttraumatic syringomyelia using a spinal cord impactor that produces an injury that more closely mimics the human condition and does not produce severe neurological deficits. METHODS The study consisted of 2 parts. Seventy animals were studied overall: 20 in Experiment 1 and 48 in Experiment 2 after two rats with severe deficits were killed early. Experiment 1 aimed to determine the optimal force setting for inducing a cystic cavity without neurological deficits using a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor. Twenty animals received an impact that ranged from 50 to 150 kDyn. Using the optimal force for producing an initial cyst determined from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 aimed to compare the progression of cavities in animals with and those without arachnoiditis induced by kaolin. Forty-eight animals were killed at 1, 3, 6, or 12 weeks after syrinx induction. Measurements of cavity size and maximum anteroposterior and lateral diameters were evaluated using light microscopy. RESULTS In Experiment 1, cavities were present in 95% of the animals. The duration of limb weakness and spinal cord cavity size correlated with the delivered force. The optimal force chosen for Experiment 2 was 75 kDyn. In Experiment 2, cavities occurred in 92% of the animals. Animals in the kaolin groups developed larger cavities and more vacuolations and enlarged perivascular spaces than those in the nonkaolin groups. CONCLUSIONS This impact model reliably produces cavities that resemble human posttraumatic syringomyelia and is suitable for further

  17. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Sarda, Kanchan

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells) to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI) suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward application in patients. There is a huge base of preclinical evidence in vitro and in animal models which suggests the safety and clinical efficacy of cellular therapies after SCI. Despite this, data from clinical studies is not very encouraging and at times confounding. Here, we have attempted to cover preclinical and clinical evidence base dealing with safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell based interventions after SCI. The limitations of preclinical data and the reasons underlying its failure to translate in a clinical setting are also discussed. Based on the evidence base, it is suggested that a multifactorial approach is required to address this situation. Need for standardized, stringently designed multi-centric clinical trials for obtaining validated proof of evidence is also highlighted. PMID:25593357

  18. [Muscle-tendon echography in acute cervical sprain traumas. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Martino, F; Ettorre, G C; Cafaro, E; Macarini, L; Bancale, R; Sion, E

    1992-03-01

    Acute cervical sprain traumas can be divided into simple and severe, depending on the presence of organic lesions which can be documented by conventional radiologic techniques. Persistent painful symptomatology of the nape and the precise localization of pain, led us to suspect the presence of organic lesions due to tearing of the neck muscles in 94 patients who had suffered a simple cervical sprain. To demonstrate these post-traumatic lesions, the patients were subjected to US examinations of both the nape and the muscles at the base of the neck. In 13 cases (13.8%) muscular tearing lesions were demonstrated, which were characterized by hypoechoic lacunae (6 cases), by hyperechoic stripes (5 cases), and by muscular hernia (1 case); in 1 case, partial disconnection of a muscular insertion was demonstrated. Thus, we believe muscle-tendon US to be a valuable technique for both diagnostic and nosologic purposes, for the method allows simple cervical sprain to be discriminated from sprains which are complicated by organic muscular lesions. We suggest that the cervical sprain traumas where a muscular lesion due to tearing can be demonstrated be defined as "complex" traumas. PMID:1579667

  19. Specialized Respiratory Management for Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sandra Lynn; Shem, Kazuko; Crew, James

    2012-01-01

    Background: In individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), respiratory complications arise within hours to days of injury. Paralysis of the respiratory muscles predisposes the patient toward respiratory failure. Respiratory complications after cervical SCI include hypoventilation, hypercapnea, reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Ultimately, the patient must use increased work to breathe, which results in respiratory fatigue and may eventually require intubation for mechanical ventilation. Without specialized respiratory management for individuals with tetraplegia, recurrent pneumonias, bronchoscopies, and difficulty in maintaining a stable respiratory status will persist. Objective: This retrospective analysis examined the effectiveness of specialized respiratory management utilized in a regional SCI center. Methods: Individuals with C1-C4 SCI (N = 24) were the focus of this study as these neurological levels present with the most complicated respiratory status. Results: All of the study patients’ respiratory status improved with the specialized respiratory management administered in the SCI specialty unit. For a majority of these patients, respiratory improvements were noted within 1 week of admission to our SCI unit. Conclusion: Utilization of high tidal volume ventilation, high frequency percussive ventilation, and mechanical insufflation– exsufflation have demonstrated efficacy in stabilizing the respiratory status of these individuals. Optimizing respiratory status enables the patients to participate in rehabilitation therapies, allows for the opportunity to vocalize, and results in fewer days on mechanical ventilation for patients who are weanable. PMID:23459555

  20. Differential acute and chronic effects of burn trauma on murine skeletal muscle bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Herndon, David N; Bhattarai, Nisha; Ogunbileje, John O; Szczesny, Bartosz; Szabo, Csaba; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Sidossis, Labros S

    2016-02-01

    Altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial function contributes to the pathophysiological stress response to burns. However, the acute and chronic impact of burn trauma on skeletal muscle bioenergetics remains poorly understood. Here, we determined the temporal relationship between burn trauma and mitochondrial function in murine skeletal muscle local to and distal from burn wounds. Male BALB/c mice (8-10 weeks old) were burned by submersion of the dorsum in water (∼ 95 °C) to create a full thickness burn on ∼ 30% of the body. Skeletal muscle was harvested spinotrapezius underneath burn wounds (local) and the quadriceps (distal) of sham and burn treated mice at 3h, 24h, 4d and 10d post-injury. Mitochondrial respiration was determined in permeabilized myofiber bundles by high-resolution respirometry. Caspase 9 and caspase 3 protein concentration were determined by western blot. In muscle local to burn wounds, respiration coupled to ATP production was significantly diminished at 3h and 24h post-injury (P<0.001), as was mitochondrial coupling control (P<0.001). There was a 5- (P<0.05) and 8-fold (P<0.001) increase in respiration in response to cytochrome at 3h and 24h post burn, respectively, indicating damage to the outer mitochondrial membranes. Moreover, we also observed greater active caspase 9 and caspase 3 in muscle local to burn wounds, indicating the induction of apoptosis. Distal muscle mitochondrial function was unaltered by burn trauma until 10d post burn, where both respiratory capacity (P<0.05) and coupling control (P<0.05) were significantly lower than sham. These data highlight a differential response in muscle mitochondrial function to burn trauma, where the timing, degree and mode of dysfunction are dependent on whether the muscle is local or distal to the burn wound. PMID:26615714

  1. Thromboelastography Does Not Detect Preinjury Antiplatelet Therapy in Acute Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Daley, Mitchell J; Trust, Marc D; Peterson, Evan J; Luftman, Kevin; Miller, Andrew H; Ali, Sadia; Clark, Adam; Aydelotte, Jayson D; Coopwood, Thomas B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2016-02-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) with platelet mapping has been proposed as an assay to detect the presence of antiplatelet agents (APA), yet no study has evaluated TEG markers of platelet dysfunction in acute trauma patients stratified by the use of preinjury APA. We hypothesized that patients on preinjury APA would demonstrate prolonged TEG markers of platelet dysfunction compared with those not on preinjury APA. This retrospective review evaluated all trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center from February 2011 to April 2013 who received a TEG within the first 24 hours of admission. Patients were classified as receiving preinjury APA or no APA if their documented medications included either aspirin or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonists, including clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. A total of 129 patients were included (APA, n = 35; no APA n = 94) in the study. The time from admission to the first TEG was similar (APA 175 ± 289 minutes versus no APA 216 ± 321 minutes, P = 0.5). There was no significant difference in TEG markers of platelet dysfunction, including per cent ADP inhibition (APA 61.7 ± 25.8% versus no APA 62.3 ± 28.8%; P = 0.91) or per cent arachidonic acid inhibition (APA 58.2 ± 31% versus no APA 53.8 ± 34%; P = 0.54). Both groups had similar proportion of severe platelet dysfunction, defined as ADP inhibition greater than 70 per cent (APA 40% versus no APA 40%; P = 0.8) and arachidonic acid inhibition greater than 70 per cent (APA 40% versus no APA 39%; P = 0.89). In conclusion, platelet dysfunction after major trauma is common. Therefore, TEG alone should not be used to evaluate for the presence of APA due to apparent lack of specificity. PMID:26874143

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  3. Enhanced reading time efficiency by use of automatically unfolded CT rib reformations in acute trauma.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Schabel, Christoph; Othman, Ahmed; Bongers, Malte N; Schmehl, Jörg; Ditt, Hendrik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian; Notohamiprodjo, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Rationale of this study was to evaluate whether unfolded rib images enhance time efficiency in detection of rib fractures and time efficiency in patients with acute thoracic trauma. 51 subsequent patients with thoracic trauma underwent 64-slice computed tomography. 1mm thick axial slices were reformatted using a commercially available post-processing software application generating rotatable unfolded rib images. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by 3 readers and compared to multiplanar reformations of the original CT images. Reformation and evaluation times were recorded. 116 rib fractures were detected. The multiplanar reformation analysis yielded a sensitivity of 87.9%/93.9%/79.7% with a specificity of 97%/97%/82.2%, whilst the unfolded rib image analysis yielded a sensitivity of 94.8%/94.8%/92.2% and a specificity of 85.2/87.8%/82.4 (p=0.06/0.8/0.04) with high inter-observer agreement (k=0.79-0.85). The mean reading time for the multiplanar reformations was significantly longer (reader 1: 103.7 ± 27.1s/reader 2: 81.8 ± 40.6s/reader 3: 154.3 ± 39.2s) than the evaluation of the unfolded rib images (19.4 ± 4.9s/26.9 ± 15.0s/49.9 ± 18.7s; p<0.01). Concluding, the unfolded rib display reduces reading time for detection of rib fractures in acute thoracic trauma patients significantly and does not compromise the diagnostic accuracy significantly in experienced radiologists. However, unexperienced readers may profit from use of this display. PMID:26226916

  4. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  5. Clinical Predictors of Recovery after Blunt Spinal Cord Trauma: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro F.; Attabib, Najmedden; Ball, Jonathon; Bajammal, Sohail; Casha, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Several clinical, imaging, and therapeutic factors affecting recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been described. A systematic review of the topic is still lacking. Our primary aim was to systematically review clinical factors that may predict neurological and functional recovery following blunt traumatic SCI in adults. Such work would help guide clinical care and direct future research. Both Medline and Embase (to April 2008) were searched using index terms for various forms of SCI, paraplegia, or quadri/tetraplegia, and functional and neurological recovery. The search was limited to published articles that were in English and included human subjects. Article selection included class I and II evidence, blunt traumatic SCI, injury level above L1-2, baseline assessment within 72 h of injury, use of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system for clinical assessment, and functional and neurological outcome. A total of 1526 and 1912 citations were located from Medline and Embase, respectively. Two surgeons reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full text articles for each database. Ten articles were identified, only one of which was level 1 evidence. Age and gender were identified as two patient-related predictors. While motor and functional recovery decreased with advancing age for complete SCI, there was no correlation considering incomplete ones. Therefore, treatment should not be restructured based on age in incomplete SCI. Among injury-related predictors, severity of SCI was the most significant. Complete injuries correlated with increased mortality and worse neurological and functional outcomes. Other predictors included SCI level, energy transmitted by the injury, and baseline electrophysiological testing. PMID:19831845

  6. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  7. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the vertebral bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine problems include: pain that interferes with daily ...

  8. Anterior spinal cord infarction owing to possible fibrocartilaginous embolism.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Ashok; Onikul, Ella; Ryan, Monique M; Prelog, Kristina; Taranath, Ajay; Chennapragada, Murthy

    2004-06-01

    Anterior spinal artery syndrome is characterised by acute flaccid quadriparesis or paraparesis, disturbance of pain and temperature sensation, and loss of sphincter control. Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a rarely recognised, but important cause of spinal cord infarction. Fibrocartilaginous embolisation usually occurs after minor trauma without major bony lesions, typically with an intervening symptom-free interval and progressive 'stroke-in-evolution' course. There is evidence that the embolus originates from the intervertebral disc, but the mechanism whereby disc fragments enter the spinal vessels is not well understood. We describe the evolution of MRI findings in a case of anterior spinal artery territory infarction thought to be secondary to fibrocartilaginous embolism. PMID:14747876

  9. Haemodynamic collapse in a patient with acute inferior myocardial infarction and concomitant traumatic acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoto; Dohi, Kaoru; Tanigawa, Takashi; Ito, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man suddenly collapsed and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. The cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempt succeeded in restoration of spontaneous circulation. The initial 12-lead electrocardiogram showed inferior acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The patient was initially diagnosed as having cardiogenic shock associated with inferior AMI. In spite of early coronary revascularisation, bradycardia and hypotension were sustained. After termination of sedation and extubation, he was found to have a quadriplegia and diagnosed with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, the patient was finally diagnosed with neurogenic shock caused by acute cervical SCI due to the traumatic injury preceded by loss of consciousness complicating inferior AMI. We should recognise that SCI has unique haemodynamic features that mimic those associated with inferior AMI, but requires very different treatment. PMID:24272986

  10. CRITICAL ROLE OF ACROLEIN IN SECONDARY INJURY FOLLOWING EX VIVO SPINAL CORD TRAUMA

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Kristin; Durkes, Abigail; Ouyang, Hui; Pond, Amber

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the initial, primary injury followed by secondary injury processes in which oxidative stress is a critical component. Secondary injury processes not only exacerbate pathology at the site of primary injury, but also result in spreading of injuries to the adjacent, otherwise healthy tissue. The lipid peroxidation byproduct acrolein has been implicated as one potential mediator of secondary injury. In order to further and rigorously elucidate the role of acrolein in secondary injury, a unique ex vivo model is utilized to isolate the detrimental effects of mechanical injury from toxins such as acrolein that are produced endogenously following SCI. We demonstrate that: 1) acrolein-lys adducts are capable of diffusing from compressed tissue to adjacent, otherwise uninjured tissue; 2) secondary injury by itself produces significant membrane damage and increased superoxide production; and 3) these injuries are significantly attenuated by the acrolein scavenger hydralazine. Furthermore, hydralazine treatment results in significantly less membrane damage 2 hours following compression injury, but not immediately after. These findings support our hypothesis that, following SCI, acrolein is increased to pathologic concentrations, contributes significantly to secondary injury, and thus represents a novel target for scavenging to promote improved recovery. PMID:18710419

  11. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tripi, Paul A; Kuestner, Matthew E; Poe-Kochert, Connie S; Rubin, Kasia; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group) (n=27) and remifentanil (study group) (n=27). Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours. Results The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog scale pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit and on postoperative days 1 and 3. Pain scores were higher in the remifentanil group on postoperative day 2 (2.9 vs 3.8). Postoperative morphine requirements were similar between the two groups (0.029 vs 0.017 mg/kg/48 h for the control group and the study group, respectively). Conclusion In patients receiving preincisional ITM during spinal surgery, intraoperative remifentanil does not increase

  12. Molecular Changes in Sub-lesional Muscle Following Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Nakul P; Samantaray, Supriti; Park, Sookyoung; Nozaki, Kenkichi; Smith, Joshua A; Cox, April; Krause, James; Banik, Naren L

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the molecular changes of sublesional muscle in the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI), a moderately severe injury (40 g cm) was induced in the spinal cord (T10 vertebral level) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (injury) and compared with sham (laminectomy only). Rats were sacrificed at 48 h (acute) post injury, and gastrocnemius muscles were excised. Morphological examination revealed no significant changes in the muscle fiber diameter between the sham and injury rats. Western blot analyses performed on the visibly red, central portion of the gastrocnemius muscle showed significantly higher expression of muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases (muscle ring finger-1 and muscle atrophy f-box) and significantly lower expression of phosphorylated Akt-1/2/3 in the injury group compared to the sham group. Cyclooxygenase 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and caspase-1, also had a significantly higher expression in the injury group; although, the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 did not show any significant difference between the sham and injury groups. These results suggest activation of protein degradation, deactivation of protein synthesis, and development of inflammatory reaction occurring in the sublesional muscles in the acute phase of SCI before overt muscle atrophy is seen. PMID:26290268

  13. Biomechanics of Human Thoracolumbar Spinal Column Trauma from Vertical Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W. J.; Stemper, Brian D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Maiman, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that dorsal spine injuries occur in motor vehicle crashes to restrained occupants. Compression/compression-flexion injuries occur in frontal crashes due to seat pan and vertical loading. While injuries, mechanisms and tolerances for neck injuries have been determined, thoraco-lumbar spine data are very limited. The objective of the study was to determine the biomechanical characteristics associated with such spinal injuries due to vertical loading. Upper thoracic (T2–T6), lower thoracic (T7–T11) and lumbar (T12-L5) columns from post mortem human surrogates were procured, fixed at the ends and dropped from three heights: the first two impacts designed as non-failure tests and the final was the failure test. Intermittent evaluations consisted of palpations and x-rays. Injuries were assessed using posttest x-rays and computed tomography scans. The age, stature, total body mass and body mass index of three PMHS were: 50 years, 164 cm, 66.9 kg, and 24.7 kg/m2. The mean peak forces from 24 tests for the upper and lower thoracic and lumbar spines for varying drop heights ranged from 1.6 to 4.3, 1.3 to 5.1, and 1.3 to 6.7 kN, respectively. All peak forces increased with increasing drop heights. Injuries to the three spines included unstable vertebral body and posterior element (bipedicular and lamina) compression fractures and posterior complex disruptions. Logistic regression analysis indicated that peak forces of 3.4 and 3.7 kN are associated with 50% probability of fracture. These results indicate the initial tolerance limits of dorsal spines under vertical loading. PMID:24406955

  14. Pharmacological Modulation of Acute Trauma Memories to Prevent PTSD: Considerations from a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Bryce; Cullen, Patrick K.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in American adults range from 6.4–6.8%. PTSD is associated with increased risk for comorbid major depression, substance use disorder, suicide, and a variety of other mental and physical health conditions. Given the negative sequelae of trauma/PTSD, research has focused on identifying efficacious interventions that could be administered soon after a traumatic event to prevent or reduce the subsequent incidence of PTSD. While early psychosocial interventions have been shown to be relatively ineffective, early (secondary) pharmacological interventions have shown promise. These pharmacological approaches are largely based on the hypothesis that disruption of altered stress hormone levels and the consequent formation of trauma memories could protect against the development of PTSD. The present manuscript reviews the literature regarding the role of peri-traumatic stress hormones as risk factors for the development of PTSD and reviews evidence for the efficacy of exogenously modulating stress hormone levels to prevent/buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. Whereas prior literature has focused primarily on either child or adult studies, the present review incorporates both child and adult studies in a developmental approach to understanding risk for PTSD and how pharmacological modulation of acute memories may buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:24513176

  15. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  16. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  17. Delayed antagonism of AMPA/kainate receptors reduces long-term functional deficits resulting from spinal cord trauma.

    PubMed

    Wrathall, J R; Teng, Y D; Marriott, R

    1997-06-01

    Excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors play a significant role in delayed neuronal death after ischemic and traumatic injury to the CNS. Focal microinjection experiments have demonstrated that 2,3-dihydro-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX), a highly selective and potent antagonist of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate ionotropic EAA receptors, i.e., those preferring alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) or kainate, can reduce histopathology and functional deficits when administered at 15 min after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Similarly, intravenous infusion of NBQX, beginning at 15 min postinjury (p.i.), results in a significant amelioration of the functional deficits produced by experimental SCI. However, if antagonists of AMPA/kainate receptors were to be used therapeutically for patients with SCI, administration would likely be delayed for several hours after injury. We therefore examined the effects of NBQX administered at 4 h after SCI on functional deficits and histopathology in a standardized rat model of contusive SCI. An incomplete SCI was produced in Sprague-Dawley rats at T8 with a weight-drop device (10 g x 2.5 cm). NBQX (15 nmol), or vehicle alone, was microinjected into the injury site 4 h later. Recovery of hind limb reflexes, postural control, and locomotor function was determined by a battery of behavioral tests performed for 8 weeks. Spinal cord tissue was then fixed by perfusion and used for morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses. Previous studies with acute NBQX treatment showed significant functional improvement by 1 week; the effects of delayed NBQX treatment on functional deficits were not discernible until 3-4 weeks after SCI. Thereafter, significant reductions in hindlimb deficits were demonstrated in two independent studies. The nature and magnitude of the reductions in chronic deficits were similar to those observed previously when NBQX was administered acutely at 15 min after SCI. Morphometric

  18. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  19. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  20. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  1. Relationship Between Depressive State and Treatment Characteristics of Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasufumi; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya; Wada, Futoshi; Sugita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients contributes to depression. Methods Using an administrative database, we assessed patients for whom the diagnosis was unspecified injuries of cervical spinal cord (International Classification of Diseases and Injuries-10th (ICD-10) code; S14.1). We categorized patients with codes for depressive episode (ICD-10 code; F32) or recurrent depressive disorder (F33), or those prescribed antidepressants (tricyclic, tetracyclic, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Serotonin Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, Trazodone, Sulpiride, or Mirtazapine) as having a depressive state. We compared the rate of each acute treatment between the depressive state group and the non-depressive state group using chi-square tests, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the acute treatment and depressive state. Results There were 151 patients who were judged to be in a depressive state, and the other 2115 patients were categorized into the non-depressive state group. Intervention of intravenous anesthesia, tracheostomy, artificial respiration, and gastrostomy had a significant positive correlation with depressive state. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that tracheostomy (odds ratio [OR] 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–4.38) and artificial respiration (OR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.32–3.93) were significantly associated with depressive state, and men had a 36% reduction in the risk of depressive state compared with women (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44–0.94), whereas age, wound-treatment, all of the orthopedic procedures, intravenous anesthesia, and gastrostomy were not associated with depressive state. Conclusions These findings suggest that tracheostomy, artificial respiration and female gender in the acute phase after cervical SCI might be associated with the development of depression. PMID:26567604

  2. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kjell, Jacob; Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew; Olson, Lars

    2015-11-01

    With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines--monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)--to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  3. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines—monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)—to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  4. Intraoperative Targeted Temperature Management in Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Jacqueline; Karpenko, Anna; Rincon, Fred

    2016-02-01

    Acute brain and spinal cord injuries affect hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. Though advances in pre-hospital and emergency and neurocritical care have improved the survival of some to these devastating diseases, very few clinical trials of potential neuro-protective strategies have produced promising results. Medical therapies such as targeted temperature management (TTM) have been trialed in traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI), acute ischemic stroke (AIS), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), but in no study has a meaningful effect on outcome been demonstrated. To this end, patient selection for potential neuro-protective therapies such as TTM may be the most important factor to effectively demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. The use of TTM as a strategy to treat and prevent secondary neuronal damage in the intraoperative setting is an area of ongoing investigation. In this review we will discuss recent and ongoing studies that address the role of TTM in combination with surgical approaches for different types of brain injury. PMID:26759319

  5. Interstitial Outburst of Angiogenic Factors During Skeletal Muscle Regeneration After Acute Mechanical Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ceafalan, Laura Cristina; Manole, Emilia; Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Codrici, Elena; Mihai, Simona; Gonzalez, Aldebarani; Popescu, Bogdan Ovidiu

    2015-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a key event during tissue regeneration, but the intimate mechanisms controlling this process are still largely unclear. Therefore, the cellular and molecular interplay along normal tissue regeneration should be carefully unveiled. To this matter, we investigated by xMAP assay the dynamics of some angiogenic factors known to be involved in tissue repair, such as follistatin (FST), Placental Growth Factor-2 (PLGF-2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), betacellulin (BTC), and amphiregulin (AREG) using an animal model that mimics acute muscle contusion injuries. In situ immunofluorescence was used for the evaluation and tissue distribution of their cellular sources. Tissue levels of explored factors increased significantly during degeneration and inflammatory stage of regeneration, peaking first week postinjury. However, except for PLGF-2 and EGF, their levels remained significantly elevated after the inflammatory process started to fade. Serum levels were significantly increased only after 24 h for AREG and EGF. Though, for all factors except FST, the levels in injured samples did not correlate with serum or contralateral tissue levels, excluding the systemic influence. We found significant correlations between the levels of EGF and AREG, BTC, FST and FST and AREG in injured samples. Interstitial cells expressing these factors were highlighted by in situ immunolabeling and their number correlated with measured levels dynamics. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic level variation along the regeneration process and a potential interplay between selected angiogenic factors. They are synthesized, at least partially, by cell populations residing in skeletal muscle interstitium during regeneration after acute muscle trauma. PMID:26260512

  6. Experimental Strategies to Bridge Large Tissue Gaps in the Injured Spinal Cord after Acute and Chronic Lesion.

    PubMed

    Brazda, Nicole; Estrada, Veronica; Voss, Christian; Seide, Klaus; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Hans Werner

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI) a scar forms in the lesion core which hinders axonal regeneration. Bridging the site of injury after an insult to the spinal cord, tumor resections, or tissue defects resulting from traumatic accidents can aid in facilitating general tissue repair as well as regenerative growth of nerve fibers into and beyond the affected area. Two experimental treatment strategies are presented: (1) implantation of a novel microconnector device into an acutely and completely transected thoracic rat spinal cord to readapt severed spinal cord tissue stumps, and (2) polyethylene glycol filling of the SCI site in chronically lesioned rats after scar resection. The chronic spinal cord lesion in this model is a complete spinal cord transection which was inflicted 5 weeks before treatment. Both methods have recently achieved very promising outcomes and promoted axonal regrowth, beneficial cellular invasion and functional improvements in rodent models of spinal cord injury. The mechanical microconnector system (mMS) is a multi-channel system composed of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with an outlet tubing system to apply negative pressure to the mMS lumen thus pulling the spinal cord stumps into the honeycomb-structured holes. After its implantation into the 1 mm tissue gap the tissue is sucked into the device. Furthermore, the inner walls of the mMS are microstructured for better tissue adhesion. In the case of the chronic spinal cord injury approach, spinal cord tissue - including the scar-filled lesion area - is resected over an area of 4 mm in length. After the microsurgical scar resection the resulting cavity is filled with polyethylene glycol (PEG 600) which was found to provide an excellent substratum for cellular invasion, revascularization, axonal regeneration and even compact remyelination in vivo. PMID:27077921

  7. Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Argelio; Gurling, James; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Burns, Anthony S.; Lewis, Rachel; Soril, Lesley; Fallah, Nader; Street, John T.; Bélanger, Lise; Townson, Andrea; Liang, Liping; Atkins, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery. PMID:24023623

  8. [Need for rheologically active, vasoactive and metabolically active substances in the initial treatment of acute acoustic trauma].

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1986-10-01

    Two rheologically active and 8 vasoactive and metabolically active substances were compared in eight independent studies, some of which were randomised and double blind, on 400 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma. The control group was given saline. Spontaneous recovery was excluded as far as possible. The following substances were tested: Dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch 40/0.5, naftidrofurylhydrogenoxalate, Vinpocetin, betahistine, pentoxifylline, flunaricine, Regeneresen AU 4 and 0.9% saline. All groups showed superior results to the control group in both long-term and short-term tests with respect to hearing gain and tinnitis improvement. The rheologically effective substances showed no statistically significant variations. None of the vasoactive or metabolically active substances used as adjunctive therapy improved the results achieved with rheologically effective substances alone. These results demonstrate that acute acoustic trauma can be most effectively treated by rheologically active substances; vasoactive and metabolically active substances are unnecessary. Hyperbaric oxygenation is advantageous as an adjunctive therapy. PMID:2432041

  9. Right coronary artery dissection and aneurysm presented as acute inferior myocardial infarction from an automobile airbag trauma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Hu, Wuming; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Xuyong; Xu, Jian; Ye, Shiyong; Xiang, Yijia; Lv, Linchun

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery dissection and aneurysm culminating in acute myocardial infarction are rare after blunt chest trauma. We are reporting a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with right inferior lobe contusion, pleural effusion, right interlobar fissure effusion, bone fracture of right fourth rib, and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction and who experienced blunt trauma in his right chest wall by an airbag deployment in a car accident. Coronary angiography showed an aneurysm in the middle of right coronary artery with 70% afferent narrowing just distal to the aneurysm with no visible atherosclerotic lesion. A 4.0×20 mm TEXUS Liberté stent in the lesion was deployed, and a good coronary flow was obtained without residual stenosis and the aneurysm vanished. PMID:26319191

  10. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W.; Choi, Seung W.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. Participants A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items Results The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items Conclusion The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available. PMID:26010967

  11. Risks associated with magnetic resonance imaging and cervical collar in comatose, blunt trauma patients with negative comprehensive cervical spine computed tomography and no apparent spinal deficit

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C Michael; Brocker, Brian P; Collier, B David; Gemmel, David J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In blunt trauma, comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8) with a negative comprehensive cervical spine (CS) computed tomography assessment and no apparent spinal deficit, CS clearance strategies (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and prolonged cervical collar use) are controversial. Methods We conducted a literature review to delineate risks for coma, CS instability, prolonged cervical collar use, and CS MRI. Results Based on our search of the literature, the numbers of functional survivor patients among those who had sustained blunt trauma were as follows: 350 per 1,000 comatose unstable patients (increased intracranial pressure [ICP], hypotension, hypoxia, or early ventilator-associated pneumonia); 150 per 1,000 comatose high-risk patients (age > 45 years or Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 5); and 600 per 1,000 comatose stable patients (not unstable or high risk). Risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable, high-risk, and stable patients were as follows: 2.5% for CS instability; 26.2% for increased intensive care unit complications with prolonged cervical collar use; 9.3% to 14.6% for secondary brain injury with MRI transportation; and 20.6% for aspiration during MRI scanning (supine position). Additional risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable patients were as follows: 35.8% for increased ICP with cervical collar; and 72.1% for increased ICP during MRI scan (supine position). Conclusion Blunt trauma coma functional survivor (independent living) rates are alarming. When a comprehensive CS computed tomography evaluation is negative and there is no apparent spinal deficit, CS instability is unlikely (2.5%). Secondary brain injury from the cervical collar or MRI is more probable than CS instability and jeopardizes cerebral recovery. Brain injury severity, probability of CS instability, cervical collar risk, and MRI risk assessments are essential when deciding whether CS MRI is appropriate and for determining the timing of

  12. Preliminary Study of Acute Changes in Emotion Processing in Trauma Survivors with PTSD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xie, Hong; Cotton, Andrew S.; Duval, Elizabeth R.; Tamburrino, Marijo B.; Brickman, Kristopher R.; Elhai, Jon D.; Ho, S. Shaun; McLean, Samuel A.; Ferguson, Eric J.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests traumatic experience can rapidly alter brain activation associated with emotion processing. However, little is known about acute changes in emotion neurocircuits that underlie PTSD symptom development. To examine acute alterations in emotion circuit activation and structure that may be linked to PTSD symptoms, thirty-eight subjects performed a task of appraisal of emotional faces as their brains were functionally and structurally studied with MRI at both two weeks and three months after motor vehicle collision (MVC). As determined by symptoms reported in the PTSD Checklist at three months, sixteen survivors developed probable PTSD, whereas the remaining 22 did not meet criteria for PTSD diagnosis (non-PTSD). The probable PTSD group had greater activation than the non-PTSD group in dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC and vmPFC) while appraising fearful faces within two weeks after MVC and in left insular cortex (IC) three months after MVC. dmPFC activation at two weeks significantly positively correlated with PTSD symptom severity at two weeks (R = 0.462, P = 0.006) and three months (R = 0.418, p = 0.012). Changes over time in dmPFC activation and in PTSD symptom severity were also significantly positively correlated in the probable PTSD group (R = 0.641, P = 0.018). A significant time by group interaction was found for volume changes in left superior frontal gyrus (SFG, F = 6.048, p = 0.019) that partially overlapped dmPFC active region. Between two weeks and three months, left SFG volume decreased in probable PTSD survivors. These findings identify alterations in frontal cortical activity and structure during the early post-trauma period that appear to be associated with development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:27415431

  13. Treatment of acute soft tissue trauma with a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (biphenylacetic acid 3% gel).

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Lee, P Y; Ngai, A T; Chiu, E H

    1991-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries. However, taken orally, NSAIDs have a definite incidence of gastro-intestinal toxicity. Since acute soft tissue trauma is normally localised, use of a topical NSAID may eliminate this undesirable side-effect. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical NSAID, biphenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam) in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Thirty-two patients (22 males and 10 females) with acute soft tissue trauma were enrolled at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, National University Hospital, Singapore from 7 June 1988 to 28 March 1989. Each patient was treated for a period of one week with bipenylacetic acid 3% gel (Traxam), 60 mg three times a day. Statistically significant improvement was found in pain, swelling and functional impairment in all patients assessed at day 3 and day 7 after the injury. The speed of recovery was enhanced. The medication was found to be well tolerated and safe. PMID:1776001

  14. [Instructor in the army and fortifications guard--risk occupations for acute acoustic trauma and for wearing a hearing aid].

    PubMed

    Rey, B; Künzli, N; Probst, R; Ackermann-Liebrich, U

    1999-01-01

    In the Swiss army instructors and fortifications guards are exposed to firearms' noise which harms the ear. It was investigated whether the decline in the cases of acute acoustic traumas in non-professional soldiers serving in the army from 1987 to 1996 also was detectable in army instructors and fortifications guards (professional soldiers) and whether these persons were wearing hearing aids (as an indicator of hearing loss) more often than the average of the male Swiss population. First, we analyzed a historical time series of the incidence density of acute acoustic traumas in non-professional soldiers as well as in army instructors and fortifications guards. Second, we compared the prevalence rate of wearing a hearing aid in army instructors and fortifications guards with the male Swiss population. The incidence density for acute acoustic traumas in army instructors and fortifications guards observed over ten years showed no significant change whereas among non-professional soldiers a strong decline (-12% per year) was observed. The prevalence rate of wearing a hearing aid in army instructors and fortifications guards was significantly higher (RR 3.91 [95% CI 3.09-4.96]) than in the male Swiss population. These results suggest increased hearing impairment among army instructors and fortifications guards which is probably due to the high exposure to impulse noise events (occupational disease). It is recommended that these persons be subjected to a compulsory prevention program. PMID:10588036

  15. Quantifying the internal deformation of the rodent spinal cord during acute spinal cord injury - the validation of a method.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of the rodent spinal cord subject to experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has almost completely been limited to naked-eye observations, and a single measure of gross spinal cord motion due to injury. This study introduces a novel method which utilizes MRI to quantify the deformation of the rodent spinal cord due to imposed, clinically-relevant injuries - specifically, cervical contusion and dislocation mechanisms. The image registration methods were developed using the Advanced Normalization Tools package, which incorporate rigid, affine and deformable registration steps. The proposed method is validated against a fiducial-based, 'gold-standard' measure of spinal cord tissue motion. The validation analysis yielded accuracy (and precision) values of 62 μm (49 μm), 73 μm (79 μm) and 112 μm (110 μm), for the medio-lateral, dorso-ventral and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. The internal morphological change of the spinal cord has never before been quantified, experimentally. This study demonstrates the capability of this method and its potential for future application to in vivo rodent models of SCI. PMID:25894327

  16. Efficiency of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in experimental acute acoustic trauma from firearms.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, J; Aarnisalo, A A; Ylikoski, J

    2000-01-01

    In acute acoustic trauma (AAT), excessive noise exposure causes rupture of cell membranes and decreased cochlear blood flow. This leads to decreased oxygen tension in inner ear fluids and reduction of a variety of different oxygen-dependent cellular activities. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO) may help the cells suffering from hypoxia to survive. We exposed male Wistar rats to 60 impulses of 162-dB SPL from a 7.62-mm assault rifle equipped with a blank adaptor. After the exposure, 15 animals were given HBO treatment for 90 min daily for 10 consecutive days at 0.25 MPa. After a survival time of 4 weeks, auditory brainstem responses were measured and the left cochleae processed for light microscopy. The impulse noise caused permanent damage to the cochlea of all animals, with the most severe lesions in the lower middle coil, where a significantly smaller number of hair cells was missing in the HBO-treated group. The morphological damage was also reflected in function, as measured by auditory brainstem responses, which showed the greatest threshold shifts at 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kHz. PMID:10909001

  17. Potential efficacy of early treatment of acute acoustic trauma with steroids and piracetam after gunshot noise.

    PubMed

    Psillas, George; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karvelis, Ioannis; Kekes, George; Vital, Victor; Constantinidis, John

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the early effect of the treatment of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) with steroids and piracetam in a sample of 52 young soldiers who were exposed to intense gunfire noise (G3 rifle). These patients were divided into three groups: (1) group A (20 patients) in which the treatment began within the first hour after the AAT, (2) group B (17 patients) in which the treatment started more than 1 h later and less than 16 h after the AAT and (3) group C (15 patients) in which the treatment began after 24 h or more. One month after the treatment onset, 36 (69%) patients of all the groups showed hearing improvement (complete-partial recovery) in the pure tone audiometry. The greater number of patients who showed complete recovery after AAT was noted in group A (65%) compared to group B (23.5%) and C (13.3%). Moreover, in group A, in the final audiogram, the averaged hearing threshold was statistically better (P < 0.001) than that of groups B and C. In spite of the lack of control group, our data demonstrated the possible effectiveness of the immediate onset of treatment of AAT. PMID:18463885

  18. Impulse noise and acute acoustic trauma in Finnish conscripts. Number of shots fired and safe distances.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, S; Lehtomäki, K M

    1997-01-01

    This prospective study of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) from exposure to impulse noise during compulsory military service focused on three issues the number of shot or explosion impulses that the conscript was exposed to at the time of AAT, distance of injured ear from causal firearm, and the circumstances under which AAT occurred protected ears. The series includes 449 consecutive, verified cases of AAT seen at the Central Military Hospital in Helsinki, Finland, in the period 1989-1993. AAT usually occurred during combat training (87%) as a result of exposure to impulses from small arms (83%). In 41%. AAT was caused by a single shot or detonation impulse. As many as 92% of all AATs occurred within 2 m of the causal firearm. Fourteen percent were wearing hearing protectors when the accident took place, but every third had badly fitting protectors or had neglected safety regulations and used insufficient protection. Of all AATs caused by one noise impulse in protected ears. 83% were attributable to heavy arms and only 14% to small arms. The results of the study suggest that combined use of earmuffs and earplugs in association with a safe distance of over 5 m from the noise source gives adequate protection against AAT. However, for conscripts using certain heavy arms e.g. hazooka. more effective hearing protection should be developed. PMID:9187006

  19. Conduction failure following spinal cord injury: functional and anatomical changes from acute to chronic stages

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas D.; Bartus, Katalin; Grist, John; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    In the majority of spinal cord injuries (SCIs) some axonal projections remain intact. We examined the functional status of these surviving axons, since they represent a prime therapeutic target. Using a novel electrophysiological preparation, adapted from techniques used to study primary demyelination, we quantified conduction failure across a SCI and studied conduction changes over time in adult rats with a moderate severity spinal contusion (150 kilodyne, Infinite Horizon impactor). By recording antidromically activated single units from teased dorsal root filaments we demonstrate complete conduction block in ascending dorsal column axons acutely (1-7 days) post-injury, followed by a period of restored conduction over the sub-acute phase (2-4 weeks), with no further improvements in conduction at chronic stages (3-6 months). By cooling the lesion site additional conducting fibres could be recruited, thus revealing a population of axons that are viable but unable to conduct under normal physiological conditions. Importantly, this phenomenon is still apparent at the most chronic (6 month) time point. The time course of conduction changes corresponded with changes in behavioural function, and ultrastructural analysis of dorsal column axons revealed extensive demyelination during the period of conduction block, followed by progressive remyelination. A proportion of dorsal column axons remained chronically demyelinated, suggesting that these are the axons recruited with the cooling paradigm. Thus, using a clinically relevant SCI model we have identified a population of axons present at chronic injury stages which are intact but fail to conduct and are therefore a prime target for therapeutic strategies to restore function. PMID:22171053

  20. Acute spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma presenting as paraplegia and complete recovery with non-operative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Zengin, Suat; Genc, Sinan; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Mete, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma (SSDH) with no underlying pathology is a very rare condition. Only 20 cases have been previously reported. It can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasia, or trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. It occurs most commonly in the thoracic spine and presents with sudden back pain radiating to the arms, legs or trunk, and varying degrees of motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. Although the main approach to management is surgical decompression, conservative management is used as well. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with sudden severe low back pain followed by rapid onset of complete paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an anterior subdural haematoma from T9 to L1 with cord compression. Corticosteroid treatment was administered. The patient showed substantial clinical improvement after 7 days of bed rest and an intense rehabilitation programme. An MRI scan and a computed tomography angiogram did not reveal any underlying pathology to account for the subdural haematoma. PMID:22065983

  1. Bladder response to acute sacral neuromodulation while treating rats in different phases of complete spinal cord injury: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ping; Fang, Youfang; Yu, Hongliu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Compared to conventional therapies, sacral neuromodulation (SNM) may offer an alternative, non-destructive treatment for SCI patients with bladder dysfunction. Understanding bladder response to SNM treatment for SCI in different phases may yield new insights for innovative use of this promising technique. Materials and Methods: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study to examine the effects of acute SNM on bladder reflex in complete SCI rats. All rats were anesthetized and set up for continuous saline infusion. Acute SNM treatment was implemented for about 6 hours for each rat. Cystometric parameters, including time between contractions, contraction duration, bladder peak pressure, and number of uninhibited contractions, were analyzed and compared within rats before and after SNM treatment. Results: For the spinally transected rats during early phase (less than two weeks post spinalization), the time between contractions and contraction duration both increased after SNM treatments, yet the increased amplitude was about or less than 20%. For the spinally transected rats with a longer days survival (about two to four weeks post spinalization), the time between contractions and contraction duration substantially increased after SNM treatment and the changes for their average values were more than 90%. For the spinally transected rats with a much longer days survival (more than five weeks post spinalization), the time between contractions and contraction duration increased after SNM treatments, yet the magnitude of changes were less than 30%. Conclusion: The present study suggested that the significant effectiveness of SNM for complete SCI played its role after the spinal shock phase and prior to the development of detrusor overactivity. It indicated that the time point of SNM treatment is necessary to be paid attention. PMID:26742980

  2. Role of spinal V1a receptors in regulation of arterial pressure during acute and chronic osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Veitenheimer, Britta; Osborn, John W

    2011-02-01

    Vasopressinergic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus project to areas in the spinal cord from which sympathetic nerves originate. This pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the regulation of mean arterial pressure (MAP), particularly under various conditions of osmotic stress. Several studies measuring sympathetic nerve activity support this hypothesis. However, the evidence that spinal vasopressin influences MAP under physiological or pathophysiological conditions in conscious animals is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in conscious rats, if the increases in MAP during acute or chronic osmotic stimuli are due to activation of spinal vasopressin (V1a) receptors. Three conditions of osmotic stress were examined: acute intravenous hypertonic saline, 24- and 48-h water deprivation, and 4 wk of DOCA-salt treatment. Rats were chronically instrumented with an indwelling catheter for intrathecal injections and a radiotelemeter to measure MAP. In normotensive rats, intrathecal vasopressin and V1a agonist increased MAP, heart rate, and motor activity; these responses were blocked by pretreatment with an intrathecal V1a receptor antagonist. However, when the intrathecal V1a antagonist was given during the three conditions of osmotic stress to investigate the role of "endogenous" vasopressin, the antagonist had no effect on MAP, heart rate, or motor activity. Contrary to the hypothesis suggested by previous studies, these findings indicate that spinal V1a receptors are not required for elevations of MAP under conditions of acute or chronic osmotic stress in conscious rats. PMID:21123759

  3. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute spinal cord injuries: use of rotating treatment tables

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.M.; Gonzalez, M.; Gentili, A.; Eismont, F.; Green, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 15 patients with acute spinal cord injuries was performed to test the hypothesis that rotating treatment tables prevent deep venous thrombosis in this population. Four of 5 control (nonrotated) patients developed distal and proximal thrombi, assessed by /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans and impedance plethysmography. In comparison, only 1 of 10 treated (rotated) patients developed both distal and proximal thrombosis. These results suggest but do not prove that rotating treatment tables prevent the development of proximal deep venous thrombosis in spinal cord-injured patients. Larger clinical trials are needed to confirm this heretofore undocumented benefit of rotating treatment tables.

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of the vascular system in the rat spinal cord with scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts. Part 2: Acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, I; Tator, C H; Lea, P J

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vascular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of acute spinal cord injury. Vascular corrosion casts of traumatized rat spinal cords at C7-T1 were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen rats were subjected to a 51g acute clip compression at C8-T1 and then underwent transcardial perfusion with polyester resin at 15 minutes, 4 hours, or 24 hours after injury. The injured spinal cord appeared almost avascular at the compression site, although the large vessels on the surface of the spinal cord were all intact. The sulcal arteries at the injury site frequently showed constriction, and the impressions of endothelial nuclei were more slender and less distinct in the constricted arterial casts. Extravasation of the injected resin at the injury site was observed most frequently in the 15-minute group. Poorly filled distal branches of the sulcal arteries were seen at the injury site in every group. Indeed, it was concluded that the disruption and occlusion of the sulcal arteries and their branches accounted for a considerable amount of the posttraumatic ischemia of the cord. Occlusion of the sulcal arteries in the anterior median sulcus at the injury site was more frequently observed in the 24-hour group than in earlier groups. This observation suggests that there was a progressive circulatory disturbance of the damaged sulcal arteries at the injury site. The 4- and 24-hour groups showed avascular areas extending longitudinally from the injury site in the posterior columns, probably the result of hemorrhage and venous obstruction. PMID:8367052

  5. Neuron specific enolase: a promising therapeutic target in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Haque, Azizul; Ray, Swapan K; Cox, April; Banik, Naren L

    2016-06-01

    Enolase is a multifunctional protein, which is expressed abundantly in the cytosol. Upon stimulatory signals, enolase can traffic to cell surface and contribute to different pathologies including injury, autoimmunity, infection, inflammation, and cancer. Cell-surface expression of enolase is often detected on activated macrophages, microglia/macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, promoting extracellular matrix degradation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and invasion of inflammatory cells in the sites of injury and inflammation. Inflammatory stimulation also induces translocation of enolase from the cytosolic pool to the cell surface where it can act as a plasminogen receptor and promote extracellular matrix degradation and tissue damage. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating debilitating condition characterized by progressive pathological changes including complex and evolving molecular cascades, and insights into the role of enolase in multiple inflammatory events have not yet been fully elucidated. Neuronal damage following SCI is associated with an elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is also known to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Thus, NSE is now considered as a biomarker in ischemic brain damage, and it has recently been suggested to be a biomarker in traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke and anoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and acute SCI as well. This review article gives an overview of the current basic research and clinical studies on the role of multifunctional enolase in neurotrauma, with a special emphasis on NSE in acute SCI. PMID:26847611

  6. Secondary adrenal insufficiency after glucocorticosteroid administration in acute spinal cord injury: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiqing; Trbovich, Michelle; Harrow, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Context/background A 61-year-old female with cervical stenosis underwent an elective cervical laminectomy with post-op worsening upper extremity weakness. Over the first 3 weeks post-op, she received two separate courses of intravenous steroids. Two days after cessation of steroids, she presented with non-specific symptoms of adrenal insufficiency (AI). Initial formal diagnostic tests of random cortisol level and 250 µg cosyntropin challenge were non-diagnostic; however, symptoms resolved with the initiation of empiric treatment with hydrocortisone. Ten days later, repeat cosyntropin (adrenocortocotropic hormone stimulation) test confirmed the diagnosis of AI. Findings AI is a potentially life-threatening complication of acute spinal cord injury (ASCI), especially in those receiving steroids acutely. Only three cases have been reported to date of AI occurring in ASCI after steroid treatment. The presenting symptoms can be non-specific (as in this patient) and easily confused with other common sequelae of ASCI such as orthostasis and diffuse weakness. The 250 µg cosyntropin simulation test may not the most sensitive test to diagnose AI in ASCI. Conclusion The non-specific presentations and variability of diagnosis criteria make diagnosis more difficult. One microgram cosyntropin simulation test may be more sensitive than higher dose. Clinicians should be aware that AI can be a potential life-threatening complication of ASCI post-steroid treatment. Prompt diagnosis and treatment can reverse symptoms and minimize mortality. PMID:24969098

  7. Mitochondrial Division Inhibitor 1 Ameliorates Mitochondrial Injury, Apoptosis, and Motor Dysfunction After Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Jia, Zhiqiang; Cao, Yang; Wang, Yansong; Li, Haotian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Bi, Jing; Lv, Gang; Fan, Zhongkai

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi-1) is the most effective pharmacological inhibitor of mitochondrial fission. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common and serious trauma, which lacks efficient treatment. This study aimed to detect the role of Mdivi-1 in neuronal injury and its underlying mechanism after acute SCI (ASCI) in rats. Western blot analysis showed that Bax levels on the mitochondrial outer membrane, and release of cytochrome C (cytC) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria began to increase significantly at 4 h after ASCI, then peaked at 16 h, and declined significantly from 16 to 24 h. However, the mitochondrial levels of Bcl-2 increased significantly at 2 h, peaked at 4 h, and subsequently significantly decreased from 4 to 24 h after ASCI. In addition, Mdivi-1(1.2 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the translocation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and Bax to the mitochondria, mitochondrial depolarization, decrease of ATP and reduced Glutathione, increase of the Malondialdehyde, cytC release, and AIF translocation at 16 h and 3 days after ASCI, and also inhibited the caspase-3 activation and decrease of the percentage of apoptotic cells at 16 h, 3 and 10 days, further, ameliorated the motor dysfunction greatly from 3 to 10 days after ASCI in rats. This neuroprotective effect was dose-dependent. However, Mdivi-1(1.2 mg/kg) had no effects on the translocation of Bcl-2 and fission protein 1 on the mitochondria, and did not affect the expression of total Drp1 at 16 h after ASCI. Our experimental findings indicated that Mdivi-1 can protect rats against ASCI, and that its underlying mechanism may be associated with inhibition of Drp1 translocation to the mitochondria, alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, and suppression of caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis. PMID:25968480

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid pretreatment confers protection and functional improvements after acute spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I; Walker, Robert L; Miranda, Jorge D; Leon, Marino De

    2012-02-10

    Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Pretreatment Confers Protection and Functional Improvements after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I.; Walker, Robert L.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  10. An injectable, calcium responsive composite hydrogel for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher A; Pomrenke, Rebecca D; McLane, Joshua S; Schaub, Nicholas J; DeSimone, Elise K; Ligon, Lee A; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2014-02-12

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca(2+) concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca(2+) to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (∼1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (∼1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca(2+) concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca(2+)-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression

  11. Validity of acute and chronic tactile sensory testing after spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Clark, Leslie M.; Hutchinson, Karen J.; Kloos, Anne D.; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs sensory systems causing allodynia. Measuring the development of allodynia in rodent models of SCI is challenging due to spinal shock and marked motor impairments. Assessment of SCI-induced allodynia is not standardized across labs, making interpretation of results difficult. Therefore, we validated sensory threshold assessment after SCI and developed a novel assessment of allodynia prior to motor recovery in a rat SCI model. One hundred fifty-six Sprague–Dawley rats received T8 laminectomy or mild to moderate SCI using the OSU SCI device (0.3 mm to 1.3mm cord displacement). To determine tactile thresholds, von Frey hairs (VFH) were applied in Up–Down or ascending order to the dorsal or plantar hindpaw. The most efficient and valid procedures that maintain high sensitivity and specificity were identified. Ten Up–Down VFH applications yielded stable thresholds; reducing the risk of threshold decay and unnecessary exposure to painful stimuli. Importantly, distraction of SCI-rats with food revealed differential decay of thresholds than when distraction is not provided. The new test uses dorsal VFH stimulation and is independent of trunk or hindlimb control. Acute dorsal VFH thresholds collected before recovery of hindlimb weight support accurately predicted plantar VFH thresholds measured at late timepoints (χ2=8.479; p<0.05). Thus, standardized testing early after SCI using the dorsal VFH test or later using 10 stimuli in the Up–Down test produces valid measures of tactile sensation across many SCI severities. Early detection of allodynia in experimental SCI will allow identification of mechanisms responsible for pain development and determine targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:20643128

  12. Validity of acute and chronic tactile sensory testing after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Clark, Leslie M; Hutchinson, Karen J; Kloos, Anne D; Fisher, Lesley C; Basso, D Michele

    2010-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs sensory systems causing allodynia. Measuring the development of allodynia in rodent models of SCI is challenging due to spinal shock and marked motor impairments. Assessment of SCI-induced allodynia is not standardized across labs, making interpretation of results difficult. Therefore, we validated sensory threshold assessment after SCI and developed a novel assessment of allodynia prior to motor recovery in a rat SCI model. One hundred fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats received T8 laminectomy or mild to moderate SCI using the OSU SCI device (0.3 mm to 1.3 mm cord displacement). To determine tactile thresholds, von Frey hairs (VFH) were applied in Up-Down or ascending order to the dorsal or plantar hindpaw. The most efficient and valid procedures that maintain high sensitivity and specificity were identified. Ten Up-Down VFH applications yielded stable thresholds; reducing the risk of threshold decay and unnecessary exposure to painful stimuli. Importantly, distraction of SCI-rats with food revealed differential decay of thresholds than when distraction is not provided. The new test uses dorsal VFH stimulation and is independent of trunk or hindlimb control. Acute dorsal VFH thresholds collected before recovery of hindlimb weight support accurately predicted plantar VFH thresholds measured at late timepoints (chi(2)=8.479; p<0.05). Thus, standardized testing early after SCI using the dorsal VFH test or later using 10 stimuli in the Up-Down test produces valid measures of tactile sensation across many SCI severities. Early detection of allodynia in experimental SCI will allow identification of mechanisms responsible for pain development and determine targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:20643128

  13. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  14. Neuroligin 2 regulates spinal GABAergic plasticity in hyperalgesic priming, a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young V; Megat, Salim; Moy, Jamie K; Asiedu, Marina N; Mejia, Galo L; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J

    2016-06-01

    Plasticity in inhibitory receptors, neurotransmission, and networks is an important mechanism for nociceptive signal amplification in the spinal dorsal horn. We studied potential changes in GABAergic pharmacology and its underlying mechanisms in hyperalgesic priming, a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain. We find that while GABAA agonists and positive allosteric modulators reduce mechanical hypersensitivity to an acute insult, they fail to do so during the maintenance phase of hyperalgesic priming. In contrast, GABAA antagonism promotes antinociception and a reduction in facial grimacing after the transition to a chronic pain state. During the maintenance phase of hyperalgesic priming, we observed increased neuroligin (nlgn) 2 expression in the spinal dorsal horn. This protein increase was associated with an increase in nlgn2A splice variant mRNA, which promotes inhibitory synaptogenesis. Disruption of nlgn2 function with the peptide inhibitor, neurolide 2, produced mechanical hypersensitivity in naive mice but reversed hyperalgesic priming in mice previously exposed to brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Neurolide 2 treatment also reverses the change in polarity in GABAergic pharmacology observed in the maintenance of hyperalgesic priming. We propose that increased nlgn2 expression is associated with hyperalgesic priming where it promotes dysregulation of inhibitory networks. Our observations reveal new mechanisms involved in the spinal maintenance of a pain plasticity and further suggest that disinhibitory mechanisms are central features of neuroplasticity in the spinal dorsal horn. PMID:26859820

  15. Psychobiology of PTSD in the Acute Aftermath of Trauma: Integrating Research on Coping, HPA Function and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Rao, Uma

    2012-01-01

    Research on the psychobiological sequelae of trauma has typically focused on long-term alterations in individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Far less is known about the nature and course of psychobiological risk factors for PTSD during the acute aftermath of trauma. In this review, we summarize data from prospective studies focusing on the relationships among sympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, coping strategies and PTSD symptoms during the early recovery (or non-recovery) phase. Findings from pertinent studies are integrated to inform psychobiological profiles of PTSD-risk in children and adults in the context of existing models of PTSD-onset and maintenance. Data regarding bidirectional relations between coping strategies and stress hormones is reviewed. Limitations of existing literature and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:23380312

  16. Enhancing the population impact of collaborative care interventions: Mixed method development and implementation of stepped care targeting posttraumatic stress disorder and related comorbidities after acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick; Jurkovich, Gregory; Russo, Joan; Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wang, Jin; Wagner, Amy; Stephens, Kari; Dunn, Chris; Uehara, Edwina; Petrie, Megan; Engel, Charles; Davydow, Dimitri; Katon, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a stepped collaborative care intervention targeting PTSD and related co-morbidities to enhance the population impact of early trauma-focused interventions. Method We describe the design and implementation of the Trauma Survivors Outcomes & Support Study (TSOS II). An interdisciplinary treatment development team was comprised of trauma surgical, clinical psychiatric and mental health services “change agents” who spanned the boundaries between front-line trauma center clinical care and acute care policy. Mixed method clinical epidemiologic and clinical ethnographic studies informed the development of PTSD screening and intervention procedures. Results Two-hundred and seven acutely injured trauma survivors with high early PTSD symptom levels were randomized into the study. The stepped collaborative care model integrated care management (i.e., posttraumatic concern elicitation and amelioration, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation) with cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy targeting PTSD. The model was feasibly implemented by front-line acute care MSW and ARNP providers. Conclusions Stepped care protocols targeting PTSD may enhance the population impact of early interventions developed for survivors of individual and mass trauma by extending the reach of collaborative care interventions to acute care medical settings and other non-specialty posttraumatic contexts. PMID:21596205

  17. Daily acute intermittent hypoxia elicits functional recovery of diaphragm and inspiratory intercostal muscle activity after acute cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Opazo, A.; Vinit, S; Dougherty, B.J.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major cause of mortality after spinal cord injury is respiratory failure. In normal rats, acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces respiratory motor plasticity, expressed as diaphragm (Dia) and second external intercostal (T2 EIC) long-term facilitation (LTF). Dia (not T2 EIC) LTF is enhanced by systemic adenosine 2A (A2a) receptor inhibition in normal rats. We investigated the respective contributions of Dia and T2 EIC to daily AIH-induced functional recovery of breathing capacity with/without A2a receptor antagonist (KW6002, i.p.) following C2 hemisection (C2HS). Rats received daily AIH (dAIH: 10, 5-min episodes, 10.5% O2; 5-min normoxic intervals; 7 successive days beginning 7 days post-C2HS) or daily normoxia (dNx) with/without KW6002, followed by weekly (reminder) presentations for 8 weeks. Ventilation and EMGs from bilateral diaphragm and T2 EIC muscles were measured with room air breathing (21% O2) and maximum chemoreceptor stimulation (MCS: 7% CO2, 10.5% O2). dAIH increased tidal volume (Vt) in C2HS rats breathing room air (dAIH + vehicle: 0.47 ± 0.02, dNx + vehicle: 0.40 ± 0.01ml/100 g; p<0.05) and MCS (dAIH + vehicle: 0.83 ± 0.01, dNx + vehicle: 0.73 ± 0.01ml/100g; p<0.001); KW6002 had no significant effect. dAIH enhanced contralateral (uninjured) diaphragm EMG activity, an effect attenuated by KW6002, during room air breathing and MCS (p<0.05). Although dAIH enhanced contralateral T2 EIC EMG activity during room air breathing, KW6002 had no effect. dAIH had no statistically significant effects on diaphragm or T2 EIC EMG activity ipsilateral to injury. Thus, two weeks post-C2HS: 1) dAIH enhances breathing capacity by effects on contralateral diaphragm and T2 EIC activity; and 2) dAIH-induced recovery is A2a dependent in diaphragm, but not T2 EIC. Daily AIH may be a useful in promoting functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury, but A2a receptor antagonists (eg. caffeine) may undermine its effectiveness shortly after

  18. Computed tomography-defined abdominal adiposity is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Shashaty, Michael G. S.; Kalkan, Esra; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Reilly, John P.; Holena, Daniel N.; Cummins, Kathleen; Lanken, Paul N.; Feldman, Harold I.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after major trauma. Since BMI is non-specific, reflecting lean, fluid, and adipose mass, we evaluated the use of computed tomography (CT) to determine if abdominal adiposity underlies the BMI-AKI association. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Level I Trauma Center of a university hospital. Patients Patients older than 13 years with an Injury Severity Score ≥16 admitted to the trauma intensive care unit were followed for development of AKI over five days. Those with isolated severe head injury or on chronic dialysis were excluded. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Clinical, anthropometric, and demographic variables were collected prospectively. CT images at the level of the L4-5 intervertebral disc space were extracted from the medical record and used by two operators to quantitate visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT, respectively) areas. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) creatinine and dialysis criteria. Of 400 subjects, 327 (81.8%) had CT scans suitable for analysis: 264/285 (92.6%) blunt trauma subjects, 63/115 (54.8%) penetrating trauma subjects. VAT and SAT areas were highly correlated between operators (ICC>0.999, p<0.001 for each) and within operator (ICC>0.999, p<0.001 for each). In multivariable analysis, the standardized risk of AKI was 15.1% (95% CI 10.6%,19.6%), 18.1% (14%,22.2%), and 23.1% (18.3%,27.9%) at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of VAT area, respectively (p=0.001), with similar findings when using SAT area as the adiposity measure. Conclusions Quantitation of abdominal adiposity using CT scans obtained for clinical reasons is feasible and highly reliable in critically ill trauma patients. Abdominal adiposity is independently associated with AKI in this population, confirming that excess adipose tissue contributes to the BMI-AKI association. Further studies of the potential

  19. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  20. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research. PMID:26967029

  1. Lumbar spinal surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (intervertebral discs). ... Lumbar (lower back) spine disease is usually caused by herniated ... bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and ...

  2. Proton Therapy for Spinal Ependymomas: Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Amsbaugh, Mark J.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Zhu, Ron; Wages, Cody; Crawford, Cody N.; Palmer, Matthew; De Gracia, Beth; Woo Shiao; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report acute toxicities and preliminary outcomes for pediatric patients with ependymomas of the spine treated with proton beam therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Eight pediatric patients received proton beam irradiation between October 2006 and September 2010 for spinal ependymomas. Toxicity data were collected weekly during radiation therapy and all follow-up visits. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: All patients had surgical resection of the tumor before irradiation (7 subtotal resection and 1 gross total resection). Six patients had World Health Organization Grade I ependymomas, and two had World Health Organization Grade II ependymomas. Patients had up to 3 surgical interventions before radiation therapy (range, 1-3; median, 1). Three patients received proton therapy after recurrence and five as part of their primary management. The entire vertebral body was treated in all but 2 patients. The mean radiation dose was 51.1 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45 to 54 cobalt gray equivalents). With a mean follow-up of 26 months from the radiation therapy start date (range, 7-51 months), local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were all 100%. The most common toxicities during treatment were Grade 1 or 2 erythema (75%) and Grade 1 fatigue (38%). No patients had a Grade 3 or higher adverse event. Proton therapy dramatically reduced dose to all normal tissues anterior to the vertebral bodies in comparison to photon therapy. Conclusion: Preliminary outcomes show the expected control rates with favorable acute toxicity profiles. Proton beam therapy offers a powerful treatment option in the pediatric population, where adverse events related to radiation exposure are of concern. Extended follow-up will be required to assess for late recurrences and long-term adverse effects.

  3. Clinical and radiological factors affecting progressive collapse of acute osteoporotic compression spinal fractures.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sergei; Smorgick, Yossi; Mirovsky, Yigal; Anekstein, Yoram; Blecher, Ronen; Tal, Sigal

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporotic compression spine fractures have a different clinical course and outcomes when compared to spinal fractures occurring in the younger population. Only a few studies have investigated the risk factors for progressive osteoporotic compression spine fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological factors related to progressive collapse following acute osteoporotic compression spine fractures. We retrospectively identified all patients treated for thoracolumbar fractures in our institution between January 2008 and July 2013. Included cases were examined by plain radiographs and CT scans. For each patient we classified the fracture according to the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. The difference between initial and final height loss and initial and final local kyphosis was documented as height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. The presence of old fractures and intravertebral cleft were also documented. The study included 153 patients, comprising 102 women and 51 men. The mean patient age was 68.9years. The mean length of follow up was 15months. A statistically significant correlation was found between patient age, final height loss, height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. Height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference were significantly correlated to type of fracture according to the AO classification system. The height loss difference was 18.1% in A1 type fractures, 27.1% in A2 type fractures, 24.2% in A3 type fractures and 25.7% in A4 type fractures. During a minimum 3-month follow up of conservative treatment for acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, age and the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System were predictive factors for progressive collapse. PMID:27387197

  4. Use of spinal manipulation in a rheumatoid patient presenting with acute thoracic pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chadwick L. R.; Mior, Silvano A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited research related to spinal manipulation of uncomplicated thoracic spine pain and even less when pain is associated with comorbid conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of trial evidence, clinical experience and appropriate selection of the type of intervention is important to informing the appropriate management of these cases. Case presentation: We present a case of a patient with long standing rheumatoid arthritis who presented with acute thoracic pain. The patient was diagnosed with costovertebral joint dysfunction and a myofascial strain of the surrounding musculature. The patient was unresponsive to treatment involving a generalized manipulative technique; however, improved following the administration of a specific applied manipulation with modified forces. The patient was deemed recovered and discharged with ergonomic and home care recommendations. Discussion: This case demonstrates a clinical situation where there is a paucity of research to guide management, thus clinicians must rely on experience and patient preferences in the selection of an appropriate and safe therapeutic intervention. The case highlights the need to contextualize the apparent contraindication of manipulation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and calls for further research. Finally the paper advances evidence based decision making that balances the available research, clinical experience, as well as patient preferences. PMID:26136606

  5. The relation between acute persisting spinal paralysis and poliomyelitis vaccine (oral): results of a WHO enquiry*

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The present report presents the findings in 8 countries at the end of the first 5 years of an international investigation into the possible relationship between acute persisting spinal paralysis and the use of oral poliomyelitis vaccine. The most striking finding was the high association with type 3 virus in the recipient cases and with type 2 virus in the “contacts” and “possible contacts”. Most of the cases in the recipient groups occurred in children under 5 years of age in all countries, but in the “contact” groups in the countries in which vaccination is offered through the year, many of the cases occurred in the non-immune parents of recently vaccinated infants. There were marked differences among countries, and it was not possible to pinpoint a single factor as the sole cause. However, the quality of the vaccine clearly played an important role. For some time, and certainly at the beginning of this enquiry, some of the countries were using vaccine from the same source without continuous external control and were using seed viruses at high passage levels. The situation changed during the enquiry and the incidence of paralytic cases decreased. The enquiry will be continued and particular efforts will be made to establish the cause of the associated paralysis. The findings of the enquiry confirm that oral Sabin poliomyelitis vaccines are among the safest vaccines in use today. PMID:1086727

  6. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation. PMID:20213297

  7. Carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da; Huang, Ying; Li, Bin; Jia, Changqing; Liang, Feng; Fu, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to permanent functional deficits via mechanical injury and secondary mechanisms, but the therapeutic strategy for SCI is limited. Carvedilol has been shown to possess multiple biological and pharmacological properties. The of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of carvedilol in SCI rats. An acute SCI rat model was established and neurological function was tested. After carvedilol (10 mg/kg, oral gavage) treatment for 21 days, the status of osteoporosis, neuron damage, astrocyte activation, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated in rats. Carvedilol significantly improved locomotor activity that was decreased by SCI. In addition, carvedilol promoted bone growth by regulating the expression of nuclear factor-κB ligand (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand; RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inactivating osteoclasts and thereby increasing bone mineral density in tibias. In addition, carvedilol reduced SCI-induced neural damage, increased neuron number and reduced astrocyte activation in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the production and mRNA expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were significantly reduced, reduced glutathione content and superoxide dismutase activity were markedly increased and malondialdehyde content was markedly decreased in the spinal cords of carvedilol-treated rats. These results indicate that carvedilol exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects in SCI rats. In addition, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand was reduced by carvedilol treatment, which, in turn, reduced cleaved caspase 3 expression and finally decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. In conclusion, carvedilol promotes neurological function, reduces bone loss and attenuates cell damage after acute SCI in rats. PMID:25424914

  8. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injury Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Wu, Guangyao; Zhou, Xin; Li, Jielan; Wen, Zhi; Lin, Fuchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity. Results Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores. Conclusion Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as

  9. (18)F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury.

    PubMed

    von Leden, Ramona E; Selwyn, Reed G; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2016-05-16

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel biomarker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [(18)F] Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24h and 15days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6h post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24h and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target. PMID:27084688

  10. 18F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    von Leden, Ramona E.; Selwyn, Reed G.; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M.; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel bio-marker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24 hours and 15 days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6 hours post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24 hours and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target. PMID:27084688

  11. The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma is due to Impaired Initial Thrombin Generation but not Clot Formation or Clot Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Droz, Nathan; Fragoso, Miguel; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma (ACOT) has been described as a very early hypocoagulable state, but the mechanism remains controversial. One proposed mechanism is tissue hypoperfusion leading to protein C activation, with subsequent inhibition of Factors V and VIII. Variability in trauma has impeded the use of clinical data towards the elucidation of the mechanisms of ACOT, but thrombelastography (TEG) may provide insight by assessing hemostatic function from initial thrombin activation to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that, in a controlled animal model of trauma/hemorrhagic shock, clotting factor dysfunction is the predominant mechanism in early ACOT. Methods Rats anesthetized by inhaled isoflurane (n=6) underwent laparotomy, and hemorrhage was induced to maintain a MAP of 35 mmHg for 30 minutes. Rats were then resuscitated with twice their shed blood volume in normal saline. TEG was performed at baseline, shock, and post-resuscitation periods. No heparin was given. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA with post-hoc Fisher’s test. Results Coagulation factor function was significantly impaired in the early stages of trauma/hemorrhagic shock. TEG R and SP-values were significantly increased from baseline to shock (p<0.001) and from shock to post-resuscitation periods (p<0.05). Delta (R-SP), a measure of thrombin generation, showed a significant increase (p<0.05) from baseline to shock. No significant changes were found in K, Angle, MA, and LY30 values. Conclusion Clotting factor derangement leading to impaired thrombin generation is the principle etiology of ACOT in this model and not the dynamics of clot formation, fibrin cross-linking, clot strength/platelet function, or fibrinolysis. PMID:21550061

  12. Acute Delivery of EphA4-Fc Improves Functional Recovery after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Spanevello, Mark Damien; Tajouri, Sophie Ines; Mirciov, Cornel; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Pearse, Martin John; Fabri, Louis Jerry; Owczarek, Catherine Mary; Hardy, Matthew Philip; Bradford, Rebecca Anne; Ramunno, Melanie Louise; Turnley, Ann Maree; Ruitenberg, Marc Jan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Blocking the action of inhibitory molecules at sites of central nervous system injury has been proposed as a strategy to promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery. We have previously shown that genetic deletion or competitive antagonism of EphA4 receptor activity promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery in a mouse model of lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. Here we have assessed the effect of blocking EphA4 activation using the competitive antagonist EphA4-Fc in a rat model of thoracic contusive spinal cord injury. Using a ledged tapered balance beam and open-field testing, we observed significant improvements in recovery of locomotor function after EphA4-Fc treatment. Consistent with functional improvement, using high-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging at 16.4T, we found that rats treated with EphA4-Fc had a significantly increased cross-sectional area of the dorsal funiculus caudal to the injury epicenter compared with controls. Our findings indicate that EphA4-Fc promotes functional recovery following contusive spinal cord injury and provides further support for the therapeutic benefit of treatment with the competitive antagonist in acute cases of spinal cord injury. PMID:23557244

  13. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after acute acoustic trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Kim, Se Hyung; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Jung, Jae Yun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-level laser radiation on rescuing hair cells of the cochlea after acute acoustic trauma and hearing loss. Nine rats were exposed to noise. Starting the following day, the left ears (NL ears) of the rats were irradiated at an energy output of 100 to 165 mW/cm2 for 60 min for 12 days in a row. The right ears (N ears) were considered as the control group. Frequency-specific hearing levels were measured before the noise exposure and also after the 1st, 3rd to 5th, 8th to 10th and 12th irradiations. After the 12th treatment, hair cells were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Compared to initial hearing levels at all frequencies, thresholds increased markedly after noise exposure. After the 12th irradiation, hearing threshold was significantly lower for the NL ears compared to the N ears. When observed using an electron microscope, the number of hair cells in the middle turn of the NL ears was significantly larger than that of the N ears. Our findings suggest that low-level laser irradiation promotes recovery of hearing thresholds after acute acoustic trauma.

  14. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  15. Acute myocardial infarction due to left anterior descending coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Oghlakian, Gerard; Maldjian, Pierre; Kaluski, Edo; Saric, Muhamed

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac complications of chest trauma range from arrhythmias to valvular avulsions to myocardial contusion, rupture, and rarely myocardial infarction. We describe a case of a young patient with blunt chest trauma after a motor vehicle accident in whom the diagnosis of myocardial infarction was established a week later because no electrocardiogram or cardiac biomarkers were obtained on presentation. Retrospective review of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest done on presentation demonstrated a perfusion defect in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Subsequent coronary angiography demonstrated dissection in the proximal LAD. Our case illustrates the importance of electrocardiography and contrast-enhanced chest CT in initial evaluation of patients with blunt chest trauma and suspected injury to the coronary arteries. PMID:19214607

  16. Success of free flap anastomoses performed within the zone of trauma in acute lower limb reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bendon, Charlotte L; Giele, Henk P

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, in free flap cover of lower limb injuries, every attempt is made to perform anastomoses proximal to the zone of injury. We report on the success of anastomoses within the zone of trauma, at the level of the fracture, avoiding further dissection and exposure. The records of free flap reconstructions for fractures of the lower extremity at a tertiary trauma centre between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 48 lower limb fractures required free flap reconstruction, performed at 28 days post injury (0-275 days). Anastomoses were proximal (21), distal (5) or within the zone of trauma (22). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in return to theatre, revision of anastomosis or flap survival between groups. Of the 22 performed within the zone of injury, five returned to theatre but only two for revision of anastomosis and 20 (91%) of these flaps survived. Of the 48 free flaps, arterial anastomoses were end to end in 34 (71%) and end to side in 14 (30%). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in return to theatre, revision of anastomosis or flap survival between the end-to-end and end-to-side groups. There was a tendency for arterial anastomoses to be performed end to end outside the zone of trauma (23/26) compared to within the zone of trauma (11/22). Our data suggest that free flap anastomoses can be performed safely in the zone of trauma in lower limb injuries. PMID:27108076

  17. The acute management of trauma hemorrhage: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, trauma is a leading cause of death and disability. Haemorrhage is responsible for up to 40% of trauma deaths. Recent strategies to improve mortality rates have focused on optimal methods of early hemorrhage control and correction of coagulopathy. We undertook a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) which evaluated trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock within the first 24 hours of injury and appraised how the interventions affected three outcomes: bleeding and/or transfusion requirements; correction of trauma induced coagulopathy and mortality. Methods Comprehensive searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 7, 2010), Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and the National Health Service Blood and Transplant Systematic Review Initiative (NHSBT SRI) RCT Handsearch Database. Results A total of 35 RCTs were identified which evaluated a wide range of clinical interventions in trauma hemorrhage. Many of the included studies were of low methodological quality and participant numbers were small. Bleeding outcomes were reported in 32 studies; 7 reported significantly reduced transfusion use following a variety of clinical interventions, but this was not accompanied by improved survival. Minimal information was found on traumatic coagulopathy across the identified RCTs. Overall survival was improved in only three RCTs: two small studies and a large study evaluating the use of tranexamic acid. Conclusions Despite 35 RCTs there has been little improvement in outcomes over the last few decades. No clear correlation has been demonstrated between transfusion requirements and mortality. The global trauma community should consider a coordinated and strategic approach to conduct well designed studies with pragmatic endpoints. PMID:21392371

  18. [Rehabilitation care for children after trauma in the earthquake disaster].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Min

    2013-06-01

    For the children who suffer trauma in earthquake, rehabilitation care aims to promote functional recovery, shorten hospital stay, and reduce the incidence of complications or disability by evidence-based, multidisciplinary, and comprehensive early rehabilitation intervention on the basis of first aid and clinical treatment. Children are likely to suffer traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury, limb fracture, and amputation in the earthquake disaster, so the clinical rehabilitation care designed considering the characteristics of children should be provided immediately after acute phase of trauma to promote functional recovery. PMID:23791056

  19. The use of the BiPAP biphasic positive airway pressure system in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tromans, A M; Mecci, M; Barrett, F H; Ward, T A; Grundy, D J

    1998-07-01

    In recent years there has been increasing demand on our Intensive Care Unit (ICU) facilities, mainly due to improved resuscitation techniques in the pre-hospital management of spinal cord injury (SCI). This has resulted in an increasing number of high tetraplegic and paraplegic patients with respiratory problems who have survived the initial injury, but have subsequently required ventilatory support, often for several weeks. In view of the continuing pressure on ICU beds and a consequent need for alternative means of providing ventilatory support within the spinal centre rather than within the ICU setting, there was a requirement to provide a simple means of ventilatory support suitable for use within the ward setting. Ventilatory assistance using BiPAP appeared to fulfil these criteria, enabling patients to be managed at reduced cost. We present our experience using this system in 28 acute SCI patients over a 4 year period. PMID:9670384

  20. The association between spinal cord trauma-sensitive miRNAs and pain sensitivity, and their regulation by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Eric R.; Woller, Sarah A.; Hook, Michelle A.; Grau, James W.; Miranda, Rajesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a common sequela to spinal cord injury (SCI). Moreover, drugs like morphine, though critical for pain management, elicit pro-inflammatory effects that exacerbate chronic pain symptoms. Previous reports showed that SCI results in the induction and suppression of several microRNAs (miRNAs), both at the site of injury, as well as in segments of the spinal cord distal to the injury site. We hypothesized that morphine would modulate the expression of these miRNAs, and that expression of these SCI-sensitive miRNAs may predict adaptation of distal nociceptive circuitry following SCI. To determine whether morphine treatment further dysregulates SCI-sensitive miRNAs, their expression was examined by qRT-PCR in sham controls and in response to vehicle and morphine treatment following contusion in rats, at either 2 or 15 days post-SCI. Our data indicated that expression of miR1, miR124, and miR129-2 at the injury site predicted the nociceptive response mediated by spinal regions distal to the lesion site, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the interaction of SCI with adaptation of functionally intact distal sensorimotor circuitry. Moreover, the SCI-induced miRNA, miR21 was induced by subsequent morphine administration, representing an alternate, and hitherto unidentified, maladaptive response to morphine exposure. Contrary to predictions, mRNA for the pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R), an identified target of SCI-sensitive miRNAs, was also induced following SCI, indicating dissociation between miRNA and target gene expression. Moreover, IL6R mRNA expression was inversely correlated with locomotor function suggesting that inflammation is a predictor of decreased spinal cord function. Collectively, our data indicate that miR21 and other SCI-sensitive miRNAs may constitute therapeutic targets, not only for improving functional recovery following SCI, but also for attenuating the effects of SCI on pain sensitivity. PMID:24867772

  1. Assessment of Disability in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Given the importance of accurately and reliably assessing disability in future clinical trials, which will test therapeutic strategies in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), we sought to appraise comprehensively studies that focused on the psychometric properties (i.e., reliability, validity, and responsiveness) of all previously used outcome measures in the SCI population. The search strategy included Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Two reviewers independently assessed each study regarding eligibility, level of evidence (using Sackett's criteria), and quality. Of 363 abstracts captured in our search, 36 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eight different outcome measures were used to assess disability in the SCI population, including Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Spinal cord Injury Measure (SCIM), Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI), Quadriplegia Index of Function (QIF), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Timed Up & Go (TUG), 6-min walk test (6MWT), and 10-m walk test (10MWT). While 19 of 36 studies provided level-4 evidence, the remaining 17 articles were classified as level-2b evidence. Most of the instruments showed convergent construct validity in the SCI population, but criterion validity was not examined due to the lack a gold standard for assessment of disability. All instruments were tested in the rehabilitation and/or community setting, but only FIM was examined in the acute care setting. Based on our results of quality assessment, the SCIM has the most appropriate performance regarding the instrument's psychometric properties. Nonetheless, further investigations are required to confirm the adequate performance of the SCIM as a comprehensive measure of functional recovery in patients with SCI in rehabilitative care. The expert panel of the Spinal Cord Injury Solutions Network (SCISN) that participated in the modified Delphi process endorsed these conclusions. PMID:20367251

  2. Stability of trauma-related symptoms during acute substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eva; Odenwald, Michael; Proescholdt, Margit; Haubold, Anja; Bohnacker, Isabelle; Flögel, Marlene; Linde, Andreas; Müller, Sandra; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Lang, Undine; Walter, Marc; Vogel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and reports of traumatic childhood experiences decline during substance withdrawal. A convenience sample of 34 inpatients of the Psychiatric University Clinics in Basel was recruited and general psychopathological and trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Checklist, Post-Traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in the 1st and 3rd week of substance use treatment. The average age of the sample was 41.9 (SD = 9.1) years, and 26.5% were female. Hyperarousal (Mt1 = 4.51 versus Mt2 = 3.61; z = -2.38, p = .017) and avoidance symptoms (Mt1 = 6.24 versus Mt2 = 4.27; z = -2.59, p = .010) declined significantly, but re-experiencing symptoms (Mt1 = 4.00 versus Mt2 = 3.45; z = -.50, p = .617) did not. Post-traumatic stress disorder assessment, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition criteria, remained constant for 28 of 34 patients. Likewise, self-reported childhood trauma experiences decreased, yet the number of elevated subscale scores remained stable. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are not adequately treated by substance withdrawal alone. Trauma-specific diagnostics can be initiated with sufficient quality as early as the first week of withdrawal treatment. PMID:26670631

  3. Diagnosis of acute dental trauma: the importance of standardized documentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Frances M; Kahler, Bill

    2015-10-01

    In 1985 Andreasen and Andreasen published a paper on the diagnosis of luxation injuries and outlined the importance of standardized clinical, radiographic, and photographic techniques. Now 30 years later, these recommendations remain current in the International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) guidelines for the management of dental trauma and describe circumstances surrounding the time of injury, the extent of trauma (e.g., type of luxation injury), healing potential (e.g., stage of root development) as well as information concerning subsequent treatment. The purpose of this review was to include findings for other types of trauma and to discuss more recent studies that augment and/or improve on the original findings from 30 years ago. The present review discusses the use of a standardized clinical registration (pulpal sensibility testing, laser Doppler flowmetry, mobility testing), radiographic survey, and photographic registration of the traumatized patient. Moreover, the value of digital radiographs and recent developments in computer tomography with respect to possible enhancement of the trauma diagnosis are discussed. PMID:26058528

  4. Transcriptional activation of endothelial cells by TGFβ coincides with acute microvascular plasticity following focal spinal cord ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard L; Maddie, Melissa A; Dincman, Toros A; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R

    2009-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction, loss of vascular support, ischaemia and sub-acute vascular instability in surviving blood vessels contribute to secondary injury following SCI (spinal cord injury). Neither the precise temporal profile of the cellular dynamics of spinal microvasculature nor the potential molecular effectors regulating this plasticity are well understood. TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) isoforms have been shown to be rapidly increased in response to SCI and CNS (central nervous system) ischaemia, but no data exist regarding their contribution to microvascular dysfunction following SCI. To examine these issues, in the present study we used a model of focal spinal cord ischaemia/reperfusion SCI to examine the cellular response(s) of affected microvessels from 30 min to 14 days post-ischaemia. Spinal endothelial cells were isolated from affected tissue and subjected to focused microarray analysis of TGFβ-responsive/related mRNAs 6 and 24 h post-SCI. Immunohistochemical analyses of histopathology show neuronal disruption/loss and astroglial regression from spinal microvessels by 3 h post-ischaemia, with complete dissolution of functional endfeet (loss of aquaporin-4) by 12 h post-ischaemia. Coincident with this microvascular plasticity, results from microarray analyses show 9 out of 22 TGFβ-responsive mRNAs significantly up-regulated by 6 h post-ischaemia. Of these, serpine 1/PAI-1 (plasminogen-activator inhibitor 1) demonstrated the greatest increase (>40-fold). Furthermore, uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator), another member of the PAS (plasminogen activator system), was also significantly increased (>7.5-fold). These results, along with other select up-regulated mRNAs, were confirmed biochemically or immunohistochemically. Taken together, these results implicate TGFβ as a potential molecular effector of the anatomical and functional plasticity of microvessels following SCI. PMID:19663807

  5. Transcriptional activation of endothelial cells by TGFβ coincides with acute microvascular plasticity following focal spinal cord ischaemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard L; Maddie, Melissa A; Dincman, Toros A; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R

    2009-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction, loss of vascular support, ischaemia and sub-acute vascular instability in surviving blood vessels contribute to secondary injury following SCI (spinal cord injury). Neither the precise temporal profile of the cellular dynamics of spinal microvasculature nor the potential molecular effectors regulating this plasticity are well understood. TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) isoforms have been shown to be rapidly increased in response to SCI and CNS (central nervous system) ischaemia, but no data exist regarding their contribution to microvascular dysfunction following SCI. To examine these issues, in the present study we used a model of focal spinal cord ischaemia/reperfusion SCI to examine the cellular response(s) of affected microvessels from 30 min to 14 days post-ischaemia. Spinal endothelial cells were isolated from affected tissue and subjected to focused microarray analysis of TGFβ-responsive/related mRNAs 6 and 24 h post-SCI. Immunohistochemical analyses of histopathology show neuronal disruption/loss and astroglial regression from spinal microvessels by 3 h post-ischaemia, with complete dissolution of functional endfeet (loss of aquaporin-4) by 12 h post-ischaemia. Coincident with this microvascular plasticity, results from microarray analyses show 9 out of 22 TGFβ-responsive mRNAs significantly up-regulated by 6 h post-ischaemia. Of these, serpine 1/PAI-1 (plasminogen-activator inhibitor 1) demonstrated the greatest increase (>40-fold). Furthermore, uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator), another member of the PAS (plasminogen activator system), was also significantly increased (>7.5-fold). These results, along with other select up-regulated mRNAs, were confirmed biochemically or immunohistochemically. Taken together, these results implicate TGFβ as a potential molecular effector of the anatomical and functional plasticity of microvessels following SCI. PMID:19663807

  6. Early Acute Kidney Injury based on Serum Creatinine or Cystatin C in Intensive Care Unit after Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Farid; Sabetian, Golnar; Abbasi, Ghasem; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Salehi, Alireza; Khosravi, Abbas; Geramizadeh, Bita; Taregh, Shuja Ulhaq; Javadpour, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in critically ill patients and is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently, serum cystatin C has been shown to be superior to creatinine in early detection of renal function impairment. We compared estimated GFR based on serum cystatin C with estimated GFR based on serum creatinine for early detection of renal dysfunction according to the RIFLE criteria. Methods: During 9 months, three hundred post trauma patients that were referred to the intensive care unit of a referral trauma hospital were recruited. Serum creatinine and serum cystatin C were measured and the estimated GFR within 24 hours of ICU admission was calculated. The primary outcome was the incidence of AKI according to the RIFLE criteria within 2nd to 7th day of admission. Results: During the first week of ICU admission, 21% of patients experienced AKI. After adjusting for major confounders, only the patients with first day’s serum cystatin level higher than 0.78 mg/l were at higher risk of first week AKI (OR=6.14, 95% CI: 2.5-14.7, P<0.001). First day’s serum cystatin C and injury severity score were the major risk factors for ICU mortality (OR=3.54, 95% CI: 1.7-7.4, P=0.001) and (OR=4.6, 95% CI: 1.5-14, P=0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Within 24 hours after admission in ICU due to multiple trauma, high serum cystatin C level may have prognostic value in predicting early AKI and mortality during ICU admission. However, such correlation was not seen neither with creatinine nor cystatin C based GFR. PMID:26538776

  7. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  8. Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment I: Prospective Study in Acutely Traumatized Persons.

    PubMed

    Frewen, Paul; Hegadoren, Kathy; Coupland, Nick J; Rowe, Brian H; Neufeld, Richard W J; Lanius, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework referred to as a 4-D model has been described for classifying posttraumatic stress symptoms into those potentially occurring within normal waking consciousness (NWC) versus those thought to intrinsically exemplify dissociative experiences, specifically, trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC). As a further test of this theoretical distinction, this prospective study evaluated whether TRASC and NWC forms of distress incrementally and prospectively predicted functional impairment at 6 and 12 weeks following presentation at hospital emergency departments in the acute aftermath of traumatic events in 180 persons. Establishing the clinical significance of both TRASC and NWC-distress symptoms, we found that 6-week markers of TRASC and NWC-distress independently predicted 12-week self-reported levels of social and occupational impairment. We also observed broad support for various predictions of the 4-D model except that, in contrast with hypotheses, childhood trauma history was generally more strongly correlated with symptoms of NWC-distress than with TRASC. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:26378486

  9. Comparison of the Protective Effects of Radix Astragali, α-Lipoic Acid, and Vitamin E on Acute Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Min; Lai, Huangwen; Yang, Chuanhong; Huang, Weiyi; Wang, Jian; Fu, Xiaoyan; He, Qinglian

    2012-01-01

    Objective Oxidative damage is a critical role which involves hearing loss induced by impulse noise. That exogenous antioxidant agents reduce noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been well demonstrated in both animal studies and clinical practices. Choosing a stronger and more effective antioxidant is very important for treatment of NIHL. Vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali are the most commonly used anti-oxidants for cochlear oxidative damage from acoustic trauma. In this study, the protective effects of radix astragali, α-lipoic acid, and vitamin E on acute acoustic trauma are investigated. Methods Guinea pigs in the experimental groups were intragastrically administered vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali. Auditory thresholds were assessed by sound-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) at click and tone bursts of 8, 16 and 32 kHz, 24 hours before and 72 hours after exposure to impulse noise. Cochlear malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were detected. Hair cell damage was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results Vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali significantly reduced ABR deficits, reduced hair cell damage, and decreased the concentrations of MDA. α-lipoic acid and radix astragali were better than vitamin E, and there were no significant differences between α-lipoic acid and radix astragali. Conclusions α-lipoic acid or radix astragali are recommended for treatment of NIHL. PMID:24179406

  10. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  11. The Effects of NMDA Antagonists on Neuronal Activity in Cat Spinal Cord Evoked by Acute Inflammation in the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Hans-Georg; Grubb, Blair D.; Neugebauer, Volker; Oppmann, Maria

    1991-01-01

    In alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized, spinalized cats we examined the effects of NMDA antagonists on the discharges of 71 spinal neurons which had afferent input from the knee joint. These neurons were rendered hyperexcitable by acute arthritis in the knee induced by kaolin and carrageenan. They were located in the deep dorsal and ventral horn and some of them had ascending axons. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists ketamine and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), were administered ionophoretically, and ketamine was also administered intravenously. In some of the experiments the antagonists were tested against the agonists NMDA and quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonists consisted of a significant reduction in the resting activity of neurons and/or the responses of the same neurons to mechanical stimulation of the inflamed knee. Intravenous ketamine was most effective in suppressing the resting and mechanically evoked activity in 25 of 26 neurons tested. Ionophoretically applied ketamine had a suppressive effect in 11 of 21 neurons, and AP5 decreased activity in 17 of 24 cells. The reduction in the resting and/or the mechanically evoked discharges was achieved with doses of the antagonists which suppressed the responses to NMDA but not those to quisqualate. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the enhanced responses and basal activity of spinal neurons induced by inflammation in the periphery. PMID:12106256

  12. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  13. Biocompatibility of reduced graphene oxide nanoscaffolds following acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Ali H.; Fridley, Jared S.; Mata, Javier A.; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Luerssen, Thomas G.; Perlaky, Laszlo; Kent, Thomas A.; Tour, James M.; Jea, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graphene has unique electrical, physical, and chemical properties that may have great potential as a bioscaffold for neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury. These nanoscaffolds have previously been shown to be biocompatible in vitro; in the present study, we wished to evaluate its biocompatibility in an in vivo spinal cord injury model. Methods: Graphene nanoscaffolds were prepared by the mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide. Twenty Wistar rats (19 male and 1 female) underwent hemispinal cord transection at approximately the T2 level. To bridge the lesion, graphene nanoscaffolds with a hydrogel were implanted immediately after spinal cord transection. Control animals were treated with hydrogel matrix alone. Histologic evaluation was performed 3 months after the spinal cord transection to assess in vivo biocompatibility of graphene and to measure the ingrowth of tissue elements adjacent to the graphene nanoscaffold. Results: The graphene nanoscaffolds adhered well to the spinal cord tissue. There was no area of pseudocyst around the scaffolds suggestive of cytotoxicity. Instead, histological evaluation showed an ingrowth of connective tissue elements, blood vessels, neurofilaments, and Schwann cells around the graphene nanoscaffolds. Conclusions: Graphene is a nanomaterial that is biocompatible with neurons and may have significant biomedical application. It may provide a scaffold for the ingrowth of regenerating axons after spinal cord injury. PMID:27625885

  14. Lung protective ventilation strategies: have we applied them in trauma patients at risk for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gillis, Robert C; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, Rebecca C; Cole, Frederic J; Collins, Jay N; Britt, L D

    2007-04-01

    Lung protective ventilation strategies for patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are well documented, and many medical centers fail to apply these strategies in ALI/ARDS. The objective of this study was to determine if we apply these strategies in trauma patients at risk for ALI/ARDS. We undertook a retrospective review of trauma patients mechanically ventilated for > or = 4 days with an ICD-9 for traumatic pneumothorax, hemothorax, lung contusion, and/or fractured ribs admitted from May 1, 1999 through April 30, 2000 (Group 1), the pre-ARDS Network study, and from May 1, 2003 through April 30, 2004 (Group 2), the post-ARDS Network study. Tidal volume (VT)/kg admission body weight, VT/kg ideal body weight (IBW), and plateau and peak pressures were analyzed with respect to mortality. VT/Kg admission body weight and IBW were significantly reduced when comparing Group 1 with Group 2 (9.27 to 8.03 and 11.67 to 10.04, respectively). VT/kg IBW was greater (P < 0.01) for patients who died in Group 1 (13.81) compared with patients who lived (10.29) or died (9.89) in Group 2. Peak and plateau pressures were greater (P < 0.01) in patients who died in Group 1 than patients who lived or died in Group 2. A strict ARDS Network ventilation strategy (VT < 6 mL/kg) is not followed, rather a low plateau/peak pressure strategy is used, which is a form of lung protective ventilation. PMID:17439026

  15. [Unilateral, paramedian spinal contusion after athletic injury with complete recovery].

    PubMed

    Ebert, B; Badke, A

    1995-03-01

    The acute injury of the spinal column and the spinal cord asks for immediate diagnostic techniques and adequate therapeutical intensive care in order to secure the possibility of a maximum of neurologic recovery. An impact trauma of the spinal cord in sports accidents can cause an incomplete paraplegia. In some cases, morphologic lesions of the myelon cannot be detected. We present an exceptional and striking case of a 15-year old young woman who suffered from a contusio spinalis after high jump with the clinical signs of an incomplete, sensomotoric paraplegia which showed a strictly unilateral and paramedian border at the right side of her body for about two weeks. Additionally, the diagnostic possibilities of physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and neurophysiologic diagnostic techniques in detecting spinal cord injuries are demonstrated. PMID:7778020

  16. Intravenous Infusion of Magnesium Chloride Improves Epicenter Blood Flow during the Acute Stage of Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Muradov, Johongir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80–90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury. PMID:23302047

  17. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  18. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings. PMID:26882960

  19. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Beth A.; Kohl, Krista L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N=479) between the ages of 8 to 17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and one month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01), and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, re-experiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), re-experiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's rho = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery. PMID:24337685

  20. Quality of Care Delivered Before versus After A Quality Improvement Intervention for Acute Geriatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Cryer, Henry; Chan, Chiao-Li; Roth, Carol; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Background Older trauma injury patients had improved recovery after we implemented routine geriatric consultation for patients ≥ age 65 at a level-1 academic trauma center. The intervention aimed to improve quality of geriatric care. However, the specific care processes that improved are unknown. Study Design Prospective observation comparing medical care after (December 2007-November 2009) versus before (December 2006-November 2007) implementation of the geriatric consult-based intervention. To measure quality-of-care (QOC) we used 33 previously-validated care-process quality indicators (QIs) from the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) study, measured by review of medical records for 76 Geriatric Consult [GC] versus 71 control group patients. As pre-specified subgroup analyses, we aggregated QIs by type: geriatric (e.g., delirium screening) versus non-geriatric condition-based care (e.g., thrombosis prophylaxis) and compared QI scores by type of care. Last, we aggregated QI scores into overall, geriatric, and non-geriatric QOC scores for each patient (# QIs passed/# QIs eligible), and compared patient-level QOC for the GC versus control group, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, comorbidity, and injury severity. Results 63% of the GC versus 11% of the control group patients received a geriatric consultation. We evaluated 2505 QIs overall (1664 geriatric-type and 841 non-geriatric QIs). In general, fewer geriatric-type QIs were passed than non-geriatric QIs (71% vs 81%, p<.001). We provided better overall-QOC to the GC (77%) than control group patients (73%, p<.05). However, the difference was not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.08). We improved geriatric-QOC for the GC (74%) compared to the control group (68%, p<.01), a difference that was significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.01). Conclusion Geriatricians and surgeons can collaboratively improve geriatric QOC for older trauma patients. PMID:25840534

  1. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  2. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  3. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  4. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Moura, Álvaro Vieira; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Reá-Neto, Álvaro; Oliveira, Mirella Cristine; da Silva Júnior, Walderi Monteiro; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Herminia Scola, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax), along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients. PMID:24141836

  5. The early risk of multiple sclerosis following isolated acute syndromes of the brainstem and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Miller, D H; Ormerod, I E; Rudge, P; Kendall, B E; Moseley, I F; McDonald, W I

    1989-11-01

    A combined clinical and magnetic resonance imaging follow-up study was undertaken to determine the risk of early progression to multiple sclerosis in patients who present with clinically isolated lesions of the brainstem or spinal cord. Progression to multiple sclerosis was seen in 13 patients (57%) who had a brainstem syndrome and in 14 patients (42%) who had a spinal cord syndrome after mean intervals of 15 and 16 months, respectively. The risk of progression was increased by the presence of oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with either syndrome and by the presence of disseminated brain lesions, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging, in those with a spinal cord syndrome. Follow-up revealed evidence of multiphasic disease in 24 (69%) of 35 patients who had disseminated lesions on magnetic resonance imaging scans at presentation, suggesting that multiple sclerosis is the usual cause of such lesions. PMID:2817838

  6. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure.

    PubMed

    Barber, Beth A; Kohl, Krista L; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2014-03-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N = 479) between the ages of 8-17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and 1 month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01) and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, reexperiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), reexperiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's ρ = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery. PMID:24337685

  7. A Comparison of Spinal Iba1 and GFAP expression in Rodent Models of Acute and Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Sandoval, Alfonso; Chai, Nu; Nutile-McMenemy, Nancy; DeLeo, Joyce A.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of acute and chronic pain is still deficient. The modulation of glial cells may provide novel targets to treat pain. We hypothesize that astrocytes and microglia participate in the initiation and maintenance of both, acute surgical and chronic neuropathic pain. Rats underwent paw incision, L5 nerve exposure or L5 nerve transection surgery. Behavioral mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-ionized calcium binding adaptor protein, Iba-1 (microglia), and anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP (astrocytes) on day 1, 4 and 7 after surgery. Following paw incision and at spinal L5 segment GFAP expression was increased in laminae I-II and Iba1 in deep laminae on day 1, in the entire dorsal horn on day 4 and dissipate on day 7 after paw incision in parallel with the allodynia. L5 nerve transection induced mechanical allodynia from day 1 to 7 which correlated with Iba-1 increases on day 1, 4 (entire dorsal horn) and day 7 after nerve injury (deep laminae of the dorsal horn) at spinal L5 segment. Conversely, GFAP increased at later time points from day 4 (deep laminae) and on day 7 (entire dorsal horn). Our data demonstrates that astrocytes (GFAP expression) play a role in the initiation of acute pain and the maintenance of chronic pain while Iba-1 increases closely correlated with the early phase of neuropathic pain. Iba1 and GFAP increased rostrally, at L3 segment, after paw incision (day 4) and only Iba1 increased following L5 nerve transection (day 7). PMID:18538310

  8. Change in Neuroplasticity-Related Proteins in Response to Acute Activity-Based Therapy in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Knoblach, Susan M.; Feather, Jillenne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Activity-based therapy (ABT) focuses on regaining motor and sensory function below the level of the lesion in persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI). This is accomplished through repetitive training of specific motor tasks. Research has shown that ABT may increase neuroplasticity in the rat and human spinal cord. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine acute alterations in neuroplasticity-related proteins during ABT in persons with SCI. Methods: Volunteers were current participants in an ABT program and consisted of 12 men and 3 women (age, 31.8 ± 10.9 years) with chronic SCI (injury duration, 63.9 ± 54.4 months). A single 2-hour bout of ABT consisted of standing load bearing, body weight-supported treadmill training, whole body vibration, and functional electrical stimulation. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and immediately after completion of each modality to determine serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prolactin, and cortisol. Results: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was used to examine differences in proteins over time. Results revealed baseline levels of BDNF (2.37 ± 1.41 ng/mL) that were lower than previous research has demonstrated in persons with SCI. No change in BDNF or cortisol was found, although prolactin was significantly reduced in response to ABT. Conclusion: Despite the length of the bout, acute changes in BDNF were not observed. Whether different intensities or modalities of ABT may promote acute increases in serum BDNF in individuals with SCI remains to be determined and further study is merited. PMID:25477737

  9. [THE WAYS OF OBJECTIVIZATION OF LIGHT CRANIO-CEREBRAL TRAUMA IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Andreyev, O A; Skobska, O E; Kadzhaya, N V

    2015-11-01

    In the analysis 41 injured persons were included, ageing (37.3 ± 0.5) yrs old at average with light cranio-cerebral trauma. The patients were examined in accordance to actual recommendations of Ukrainian Ministry of Health, using a tonal the threshold audiometry, computeric stabilography (CS). In accordance to data of computeric tomography, concussion of brain (CB) revealed in 32 patients, contusion of brain of light degree--in 9. Using the method of the factor analysis the factors were established, which have determined 55.1% of integral dispersion of the variants values. The changes of basal principles of statokinesiograms (SKG)--enhancement of the oscillations amplitude of common centre of pressure in sagital square and a square of SKG in a modified functional Romberg test with closed eyes--may be applied as objective criteria of a CB diagnosis. PMID:26939417

  10. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis caused by blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Treuth, Gregory M; Baibars, Motaz; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to the emergency department following an anterior chest trauma. He had significant chest pain and chest X-ray was significant for revealed multiple rib fractures and negative. CT scan of the chest ruled out pulmonary embolism or aortic dissection. However, few hours later he developed hypotension requiring admission to medical intensive care unit and intravenous vasopressors. Further workup showed ST elevation myocardial infarction involving the anterior ECG leads. Emergent coronary angiography was performed with intervention to the mid-left anterior descending occlusion. Cardiogenic shock resolved and patient was discharged few days later. One-year follow-up with echocardiogram showed stable ischaemic cardiomyopathy with improved left ventricular ejection fraction to 50%. PMID:24769662

  11. Low-Level Primary Blast Causes Acute Ocular Trauma in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kirstin; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Groth, Sylvia L; Glickman, Randolph D; Lund, Brian J; Reilly, Matthew A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether clinically significant ocular trauma can be induced by a survivable isolated primary blast using a live animal model. Both eyes of 18 Dutch Belted rabbits were exposed to various survivable low-level blast overpressures in a large-scale shock tube simulating a primary blast similar to an improvised explosive device. Eyes of the blast-exposed rabbits (as well as five control rabbits) were thoroughly examined before and after blast to detect changes. Clinically significant changes in corneal thickness arose immediately after blast and were sustained through 48 h, suggesting possible disruption of endothelial function. Retinal thickness (RT) increased with increasing specific impulse immediately after exposure. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was inversely correlated with the specific impulse of the blast wave. These findings clearly indicate that survivable primary blast causes ocular injuries with likely visual functional sequelae of clinical and military relevance. PMID:26393900

  12. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaz, S; Aksu, B; Karaca, T; Cemek, M; Tarladacalisir, Y-T; Ayaz, A; Metin, M-S; Basaran, UN; Ayvaz, A-T; Aksu, F; Pul, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: We studied whether methylene blue (MB) treatment blunts chest trauma-induced lung injury in rats. Material and Methods: Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 200-300g, were used. The rats were divided into five groups (n=8): control, early contusion (EC), early contusion + methylene blue (2 mg/kg, EC+MB), late contusion (LC), and late contusion + methylene blue (2 mg/kg, LC+MB). Results: Histopathological analysis showed increased hemorrhage, alveolar wall thickness, edema, and inflammatory cell infiltrates in the EC and LC rats, which decreased upon MB treatment. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that MB reduced activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the number of active terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. A significant increase was observed in the malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the EC group compared to the control group (p<0.05). In addition, a significant decrease was reported in the glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels (p<0.01), but no significant difference was observed in the catalase (CAT) levels among the groups. The MDA level was significantly higher in the LC group compared to the control group, whereas the GSH level was significantly lower compared to the control group. The NO level in the EC+MB group was significantly lower when compared to the NO level in the EC group (p<0.05). Conclusion: The present study provides evidence that MB might serve as a therapeutic treatment for blunt chest trauma. PMID:25125953

  13. [Anesthetic management of posterior lumbar spinal fusion in a patient suspected of having acute exacerbation of chronic interstitial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Mayuko; Takenami, Tamie; Otsuka, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Norito; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Matsumoto, Shigehiro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2014-02-01

    A patient complicated with interstitial pneumonia required emergency posterior lumbar spinal fusion. The blood gas analysis showed relatively benign values (PaO2 81 torr, PaCO2 44 torr, under room air), but the honeycombing lungs were noted in the bilateral lung fields on CT, and the KL-6 level was high (1,000 U x ml(-1)), for which the acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was suspected. Sivelestat sodium administration was initiated during the surgery and continued postoperatively. During surgery, setting the FIO2 at 0.34, the P/F ratio and intra-airway pressure could be maintained at 500 and 25 mmHg, respectively. To reduce postoperative respiratory complication, anesthesia was maintained with desflurane, which is dissipated easily, and 0.5% ropivacaine 15 ml was subcutaneously injected to the surgical field at the time of wound closure to reduce the total doses of intraoperative fentanyl and postoperative analgesics. After the completion of surgery, the endotracheal tube was removed with head elevated position, and the patient was transported back to the ward. No acute exacerbation occurred thereafter, and the patient was discharged 67 days after surgery. The prediction of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia is difficult. Moreover, there is no established preventive method, although the mortality is high. Therefore, physicians should be thoroughly informed about the currently available evidence, including developmental factors. PMID:24601111

  14. [Magnetic resonance tomography in late sequelae of spinal and spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, A K; Akhadov, T A; Sachkova, I Iu; Belov, S A; Chernenko, O A; Panova, M M

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance tomography (MRT) helped obtain a high-resolution image characterized by high sensitivity in respect of soft tissue contrast visualization and providing direct imaging of the spinal cord and its radicles. This method is useful in the diagnosis of injuries to the spine and cord. A total of 64 patients of both sexes aged 6 to 67 were examined. The primary diagnosis of traumatic changes in the spine and cord was confirmed by MRT in only 62% of cases. Two groups of patients were singled out: with acute and chronic injuries, subdivided into subgroups with and without spinal cord dysfunction. The detected changes were divided into extramedullary (traumatic disk hernias, compression of the cord or radicles with a dislocated bone fragment, epidural hematoma) and intramedullary (edema, hemorrhages, spinal cord disruption); MRT diagnosis of intramedullary changes is particularly important, more so in the absence of bone injuries. In remote periods after the trauma the clinical picture was determined by spinal canal stenosis, cicatricial atrophic and adhesive changes eventually blocking the liquor space. Intramedullary changes presented as spinal cord cysts or syringomyelia. A classification of the detected changes by the types of injuries and their aftereffects is presented in the paper. The authors emphasize the desirability of MRT in spinal injuries with signs of cord dysfunction. PMID:7801568

  15. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-long; Zhang, Qing-shan; Zhu, Kai-di; Sun, Jian-feng; Zhang, Ze-peng; Sun, Jian-wen; Zhang, Ke-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen's method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage. PMID:26199614

  16. Delayed Visceral and Spinal Cord Malperfusion after Axillo-Bifemoral Bypass for Complicated Acute Type B Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Hideyuki; Katahira, Seiichiro; Hoshino, Takeshi; Hanzawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We describe a successfully treated case of acute type B aortic dissection complicated with lower extremity, visceral, and spinal cord malperfusion. To restore perfusion to both lower extremities, we performed an emergency right axillo-bifemoral bypass. Furthermore, we performed total arch replacement, including primary entry closure, because of delayed visceral organ ischemia. Unexpectedly, delayed paraplegia occurred after hospital discharge; however, the patient recovered without any neurologic sequelae after early introduction of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Because another episode of organ malperfusion in the long term cannot be anticipated, and even though the previous organ malperfusion episode was treated successfully, close observation is mandatory for detecting clinical manifestations in combination with the availability of imaging modalities. PMID:25298840

  17. Time course of diffusion weighted image and apparent diffusion coefficient in acute spinal cord infarction: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Sho; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Mera, Hidekazu; Tsugawa, Jun; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2016-05-31

    An 80-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with acute onset of flaccid paraplegia and sensory and urinary disturbances that developed soon after acute pain in her lower back and leg. Neurological examination revealed, severe flaccid paraplegia, bladder and rectal disturbances and dissociated sensory loss below the level of L1 spinal cord segment. MR imaging with T2 weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) on day 2 showed hyper signal intensity in the spinal cord at the vertebral level of L1 while initial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) showed decreased signal intensity in the lesion. We diagnosed spinal cord infarction, and anticoagulant and neuroprotective agents were administrated. Serial MRI findings revealed that the DWI signal of the lesion attenuated with time, and pseudo-normalization of the ADC occurred approximately 1 month after onset. These findings were similar to those seen in brain infarction. Our patient demonstrated serial MRI changes of spinal cord infarction showing anterior spinal cord syndrome. PMID:27098903

  18. Protective effect of P188 in the Model of Acute Trauma to Human Ankle Cartilage: the Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sarvottam; Shoemaker, Thomas; Hakimiyan, Arnavaz A.; Rappoport, Lev; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Oegema, Theodore R.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Chubinskaya, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Since P188 poloxamer is effective in promoting cell survival in models of acute trauma the objectives were to understand the mechanism of its action focusing on GSK3 activation, IL-6 and p38 signaling. Design Sixteen normal human tali were impacted using 4mm diameter indenter with an impulse of 1Ns. 8mm cartilage plugs containing the 4mm impacted core and 4mm adjacent non-impacted ring were removed and cultured with or without P188. Cell lysates were analyzed using Western blots with antibodies against total and phosphorylated ERK, JNK, p38, ATF-2, GSK3, Stat1 and Stat3. Additional tests were performed with the p38 inhibitor (p38i) SB203580. Results Studied pathways were activated after impaction with the peak of activity at 1hour. P188 completely attenuated phosphorylation of Stat1 and ATF-2 and inhibited p38, Stat3, JNK, ERK, and GSK3. The p38i partially offset phosphorylation of Stat3, GSK3, and ERK suggesting a role of p38 in these three pathways. Additionally, the p38i improved cell survival (p=0.053) and reduced apoptosis (by about 20%, p=0.046, vs almost 40% by P188) thus confirming that P188 acts (at least in part) via p38 pathway. Conclusion Our results report a novel mechanism through which P188 exerts its protective effects on cartilage in the model of acute injury. In addition to its effect on cellular membrane, P188 affects stress-related p38 signaling, apoptosis-related GSK3, and inflammation-related IL-6 signaling. Taken together these findings suggest that P188 alone or in combination with pro-anabolic agents may have a therapeutic potential in preventing progressive cartilage degeneration and the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:20736797

  19. Improved clinicopathologic assessments of acute liver damage due to trauma in Indian ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis).

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan M; Holthaus, Lisa; Barron, Heather Wilson; Divers, Stephen J; McBride, Michael; Almy, Frederic; Bush, Sharon; Latimer, Kenneth S

    2012-06-01

    Increased activities of certain biochemical enzymes (alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) have been associated with blunt liver injury in many species. To evaluate changes in plasma hepatic biochemical parameters in acute avian liver disease caused by trauma and to compare biochemical changes with histologic lesions in hepatic parenchyma, 30 healthy fasted Indian ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) were divided into 2 groups, and traumatic liver injury was caused by endoscopic liver biopsy (group 1) or by liver biopsy and crushing injury to the hepatic parenchyma with endoscopic forceps (group 2) in anesthetized birds. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, and 120 hours in alternate groups to compare analyte values after injury with those at baseline. Results showed consistently decreased plasma ALP activity (excluding 1 time point) throughout the study, which was thought to be associated with isoflurane administration. Plasma glutamate dehydrogenase activity initially increased but rapidly declined thereafter and was attributed to acute focal hepatocellular injury. In both groups, increases in plasma AST, ALT, and LDH activities was most likely caused by muscle injury because creatine kinase activity was concurrently increased. Compared with baseline values, bile acid concentration and y-glutamyl transferase activity were not affected by liver biopsy or crush injury. Plasma sorbitol dehydrogenase activity was the most specific indicator of liver injury in both groups. Histologic changes correlated poorly with biochemical results, possibly because the small area of hepatic parenchyma that was damaged did not affect enzyme values substantially. PMID:22872978

  20. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  1. Quantitative analysis of cellular inflammation after traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence for a multiphasic inflammatory response in the acute to chronic environment

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kevin D.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Galvan, Manuel D.; Salazar, Desirée L.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system results in the disruption of the blood brain/spinal barrier, followed by the invasion of cells and other components of the immune system that can aggravate injury and affect subsequent repair and regeneration. Although studies of chronic neuroinflammation in the injured spinal cord of animals are clinically relevant to most patients living with traumatic injury to the brain or spinal cord, very little is known about chronic neuroinflammation, though several studies have tested the role of neuroinflammation in the acute period after injury. The present study characterizes a novel cell preparation method that assesses, quickly and effectively, the changes in the principal immune cell types by flow cytometry in the injured spinal cord, daily for the first 10 days and periodically up to 180 days after spinal cord injury. These data quantitatively demonstrate a novel time-dependent multiphasic response of cellular inflammation in the spinal cord after spinal cord injury and are verified by quantitative stereology of immunolabelled spinal cord sections at selected time points. The early phase of cellular inflammation is comprised principally of neutrophils (peaking 1 day post-injury), macrophages/microglia (peaking 7 days post-injury) and T cells (peaking 9 days post-injury). The late phase of cellular inflammation was detected after 14 days post-injury, peaked after 60 days post-injury and remained detectable throughout 180 days post-injury for all three cell types. Furthermore, the late phase of cellular inflammation (14–180 days post-injury) did not coincide with either further improvements, or new decrements, in open-field locomotor function after spinal cord injury. However, blockade of chemoattractant C5a-mediated inflammation after 14 days post-injury reduced locomotor recovery and myelination in the injured spinal cord, suggesting that the late inflammatory response serves a reparative function. Together, these

  2. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during "Target" sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-03-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory "oddball" attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  3. Management of the open abdomen: clinical recommendations for the trauma/acute care surgeon and general surgeon.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Luis G

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the surgical approach to managing abdominal injuries was to assess the extent of trauma, repair any damage and close the abdomen in one definitive procedure rather than leave the abdomen open. With advances in medicine, damage control surgery using temporary abdominal closure methods is being used to manage the open abdomen (OA) when closure is not possible. Although OA management is often observed in traumatic injuries, the extension of damage control surgery concepts, in conjunction with OA, for the management of the septic patient requires that the general surgeon who is faced with these challenges has a comprehensive knowledge of this complex subject. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to the acute care and general surgeon on the use of OA negative pressure therapy (OA-NPT; ABTHERA™ Open Abdomen Negative Pressure Therapy System, KCI, an ACELITY Company, San Antonio, TX) for OA management. A literature review of published evidence, clinical recommendations on managing the OA and a case study demonstrating OA management using OA-NPT have been included. PMID:27547961

  4. The axon as a physical structure in health and acute trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Collins, Jessica M

    2016-10-01

    The physical structure of neurons - dendrites converging on the soma, with an axon conveying activity to distant locations - is uniquely tied to their function. To perform their role, axons need to maintain structural precision in the soft, gelatinous environment of the central nervous system and the dynamic, flexible paths of nerves in the periphery. This requires close mechanical coupling between axons and the surrounding tissue, as well as an elastic, robust axoplasm resistant to pinching and flattening, and capable of sustaining transport despite physical distortion. These mechanical properties arise primarily from the properties of the internal cytoskeleton, coupled to the axonal membrane and the extracellular matrix. In particular, the two large constituents of the internal cytoskeleton, microtubules and neurofilaments, are braced against each other and flexibly interlinked by specialised proteins. Recent evidence suggests that the primary function of neurofilament sidearms is to structure the axoplasm into a linearly organised, elastic gel. This provides support and structure to the contents of axons in peripheral nerves subject to bending, protecting the relatively brittle microtubule bundles and maintaining them as transport conduits. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of axons are myelinated, and this thick jacket of membrane wrappings alters the form, function and internal composition of the axons to which it is applied. Together these structures determine the physical properties and integrity of neural tissue, both under conditions of normal movement, and in response to physical trauma. The effects of traumatic injury are directly dependent on the physical properties of neural tissue, especially axons, and because of axons' extreme structural specialisation, post-traumatic effects are usually characterised by particular modes of axonal damage. The physical realities of axons in neural tissue are integral to both normal function and their response to

  5. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed.

  6. Critical ischemia time in a model of spinal cord section. A study performed on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Martinez, David; Rosales Corral, Sergio A.; Flores Soto, Mario E.; Velarde Silva, Gustavo; Portilla de Buen, Eliseo

    2006-01-01

    Vascular changes after acute spinal cord trauma are important factors that predispose quadriplegia, in most cases irreversible. Repair of the spinal blood flow helps the spinal cord recovery. The average time to arrive and perform surgery is 3 h in most cases. It is important to determine the critical ischemia time in order to offer better functional prognosis. A spinal cord section and vascular clamping of the spinal anterior artery at C5–C6 model was used to determine critical ischemia time. The objective was to establish a critical ischemia time in a model of acute spinal cord section. Four groups of dogs were used, anterior approach and vascular clamp of spinal anterior artery with 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of ischemia and posterior hemisection of spinal cord at C5–C6 was performed. Clinical evaluation was made during 12 weeks and morphological evaluation at the end of this period. We obtained a maximal neurological coordination at 23 days average. Two cases showed sequels of right upper limb paresis at 1 and 3 ischemia hours. There was nerve conduction delay of 56% at 3 h of ischemia. Morphological examination showed 25% of damaged area. The VIII and IX Rexed’s laminae were the most affected. The critical ischemia time was 3 h. Dogs with 4 h did not exhibit any recovery. PMID:17024402

  7. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  8. A review and update on the guidelines for the acute management of cervical spinal cord injury - Part II.

    PubMed

    Yue, John K; Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Upadhyayula, Pavan S; Readdy, William J; Dhall, Sanjay S

    2016-09-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating worldwide disease with an estimated annual incidence of 10 to 83 affected individuals per million inhabitants. These injuries typically impact younger individuals and reduce quality-adjusted life years with estimated lifetime costs exceeding $4 million per person. Hence it is critical to establish and refine clear practice guidelines for acute management of SCI. In 2013 the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) released a revision of the 2002 guidelines for Cervical SCI. In the present report we explore seven subsections for management of specific cervical injury types, review key supporting literature, and provide an update on recent studies since the publication of the 2013 guidelines. Our review finds a paucity of Level I and Level II treatment recommendations for cervical spine injuries, with the exception of subaxial cervical spine injury classification and surgical management for Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly. We recommend the systematic implementation of large randomized controlled studies across diverse demographics and ethnicities, injury mechanisms and morphologies to address pressing limitations in the current literature. The cohesive effort to adopt the 2013 AANS/CNS Guidelines and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Common Data Elements for SCI as part of a multicenter international approach will enable reproducible data collection and robust analyses toward achieving this goal. PMID:26354186

  9. Co-incidence of acute appendicitis and appendiceal transection after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Sam; Forootan, Hamid Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a history of bicycle handlebar injury to the left side of his abdomen was brought to the Emergency Department of our center. On admission, his vital signs were stable and abdominal examination revealed ecchymosis and tenderness of the injured areas. Mild to moderate free fluid and two small foci of free air in the anterior aspect of the abdomen, in favor of pneumoperitoneum, were detected in abdominopelvic sonography and CT-scan, respectively. In less than 6 hours, the patient developed generalized peritonitis. Therefore, exploratory laparotomy was promptly performed, which revealed appendiceal transection and rupture of the small bowel mesentery. Appendectomy and small bowel mesoplasty were done, with pathological diagnosis of acute appendicitis and periappendicitis. After surgery, the patient had a non-complicated hospital course. This rare case highlights the significance of the early management of appendiceal traumatic injuries in order to prevent further complicated events, especially in patients who are much more exposed to this risk due to their traumatic background. PMID:24293790

  10. Effects of acute cortisol administration on perceptual priming of trauma-related material.

    PubMed

    Holz, Elena; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Streb, Markus; Pfaltz, Monique; Michael, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They reflect excessive and uncontrolled retrieval of the traumatic memory. Acute elevations of cortisol are known to impair the retrieval of already stored memory information. Thus, continuous cortisol administration might help in reducing intrusive memories in PTSD. Strong perceptual priming for neutral stimuli associated with a "traumatic" context has been shown to be one important learning mechanism that leads to intrusive memories. However, the memory modulating effects of cortisol have only been shown for explicit declarative memory processes. Thus, in our double blind, placebo controlled study we aimed to investigate whether cortisol influences perceptual priming of neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 160) watched either neutral or "traumatic" picture stories on a computer screen. Neutral objects were presented in between the pictures. Memory for these neutral objects was tested after 24 hours with a perceptual priming task and an explicit memory task. Prior to memory testing half of the participants in each group received 25 mg of cortisol, the other half received placebo. In the placebo group participants in the "traumatic" stories condition showed more perceptual priming for the neutral objects than participants in the neutral stories condition, indicating a strong perceptual priming effect for neutral stimuli presented in a "traumatic" context. In the cortisol group this effect was not present: Participants in the neutral stories and participants in the "traumatic" stories condition in the cortisol group showed comparable priming effects for the neutral objects. Our findings show that cortisol inhibits perceptual priming for neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. These findings indicate that cortisol influences PTSD-relevant memory processes and thus further support the idea that administration

  11. Effects of Acute Cortisol Administration on Perceptual Priming of Trauma-Related Material

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Markus; Pfaltz, Monique; Michael, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They reflect excessive and uncontrolled retrieval of the traumatic memory. Acute elevations of cortisol are known to impair the retrieval of already stored memory information. Thus, continuous cortisol administration might help in reducing intrusive memories in PTSD. Strong perceptual priming for neutral stimuli associated with a “traumatic” context has been shown to be one important learning mechanism that leads to intrusive memories. However, the memory modulating effects of cortisol have only been shown for explicit declarative memory processes. Thus, in our double blind, placebo controlled study we aimed to investigate whether cortisol influences perceptual priming of neutral stimuli that appeared in a “traumatic” context. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 160) watched either neutral or “traumatic” picture stories on a computer screen. Neutral objects were presented in between the pictures. Memory for these neutral objects was tested after 24 hours with a perceptual priming task and an explicit memory task. Prior to memory testing half of the participants in each group received 25 mg of cortisol, the other half received placebo. In the placebo group participants in the “traumatic” stories condition showed more perceptual priming for the neutral objects than participants in the neutral stories condition, indicating a strong perceptual priming effect for neutral stimuli presented in a “traumatic” context. In the cortisol group this effect was not present: Participants in the neutral stories and participants in the “traumatic” stories condition in the cortisol group showed comparable priming effects for the neutral objects. Our findings show that cortisol inhibits perceptual priming for neutral stimuli that appeared in a “traumatic” context. These findings indicate that cortisol influences PTSD-relevant memory processes and thus further support

  12. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  13. Concussive Brain Trauma in the Mouse Results in Acute Cognitive Deficits and Sustained Impairment of Axonal Function

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Jennifer A.; DiLeonardi, Ann Mae; Fox, Douglas P.; Tessler, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Concussive brain injury (CBI) accounts for approximately 75% of all brain-injured people in the United States each year and is particularly prevalent in contact sports. Concussion is the mildest form of diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) and results in transient cognitive dysfunction, the neuropathologic basis for which is traumatic axonal injury (TAI). To evaluate the structural and functional changes associated with concussion-induced cognitive deficits, adult mice were subjected to an impact on the intact skull over the midline suture that resulted in a brief apneic period and loss of the righting reflex. Closed head injury also resulted in an increase in the wet weight:dry weight ratio in the cortex suggestive of edema in the first 24 h, and the appearance of Fluoro-Jade-B-labeled degenerating neurons in the cortex and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus within the first 3 days post-injury. Compared to sham-injured mice, brain-injured mice exhibited significant deficits in spatial acquisition and working memory as measured using the Morris water maze over the first 3 days (p<0.001), but not after the fourth day post-injury. At 1 and 3 days post-injury, intra-axonal accumulation of amyloid precursor protein in the corpus callosum and cingulum was accompanied by neurofilament dephosphorylation, impaired transport of Fluoro-Gold and synaptophysin, and deficits in axonal conductance. Importantly, deficits in retrograde transport and in action potential of myelinated axons continued to be observed until 14 days post-injury, at which time axonal degeneration was apparent. These data suggest that despite recovery from acute cognitive deficits, concussive brain trauma leads to axonal degeneration and a sustained perturbation of axonal function. PMID:21299360

  14. The neuroprotective effect of treatment with curcumin in acute spinal cord injury: laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Cho, Dae-Chul; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating the effects of curcumin on the histological changes and functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Following either sham operation or SCI, 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three groups: sham group, curcumin-treated group, and vehicle-injected group. Locomotor function was assessed according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale in rats who had received daily intraperitoneal injections of 200 mg/kg curcumin or an equivalent volume of vehicle for 7 days following SCI. The injured spinal cord was then examined histologically, including quantification of cavitation. BBB scores were significantly higher in rats receiving curcumin than receiving vehicle (P < 0.05). The cavity volume was significantly reduced in the curcumin group as compared to the control group (P = 0.039). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly elevated in the curcumin group as compared to the vehicle group but was not significantly different from the sham group (P < 0.05, P > 0.05, respectively) at one and two weeks after SCI. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated in the vehicle group as compared to the sham group (P < 0.05 at 1 and 2 weeks). MDA activity was significantly reduced in the curcumin group at 2 weeks after SCI when compared to the vehicle group (P = 0.004). The numbers of macrophage were significantly decreased in the curcumin group (P = 0.001). This study demonstrated that curcumin enhances early functional recovery after SCI by diminishing cavitation volume, anti-inflammatory reactions, and antioxidant activity. PMID:24477066

  15. A phase I/IIa clinical trial of a recombinant Rho protein antagonist in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Michael G; Theodore, Nicholas; Harrop, James; Maurais, Gilles; Kuntz, Charles; Shaffrey, Chris I; Kwon, Brian K; Chapman, Jens; Yee, Albert; Tighe, Allyson; McKerracher, Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence have validated the Rho pathway as important in controlling the neuronal response to growth inhibitory proteins after central nervous system (CNS) injury. A drug called BA-210 (trademarked as Cethrin(®)) blocks activation of Rho and has shown promise in pre-clinical animal studies in being used to treat spinal cord injury (SCI). This is a report of a Phase I/IIa clinical study designed to test the safety and tolerability of the drug, and the neurological status of patients following the administration of a single dose of BA-210 applied during surgery following acute SCI. Patients with thoracic (T2-T12) or cervical (C4-T1) SCI were sequentially recruited for this dose-ranging (0.3 mg to 9 mg Cethrin), multi-center study of 48 patients with complete American Spinal Injury Association assessment (ASIA) A. Vital signs; clinical laboratory tests; computed tomography (CT) scans of the spine, head, and abdomen; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine, and ASIA assessment were performed in the pre-study period and in follow-up periods out to 1 year after treatment. The treatment-emergent adverse events that were reported were typical for a population of acute SCI patients, and no serious adverse events were attributed to the drug. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed low levels of systemic exposure to the drug, and there was high inter-patient variability. Changes in ASIA motor scores from baseline were low across all dose groups in thoracic patients (1.8±5.1) and larger in cervical patients (18.6±19.3). The largest change in motor score was observed in the cervical patients treated with 3 mg of Cethrin in whom a 27.3±13.3 point improvement in ASIA motor score at 12 months was observed. Approximately 6% of thoracic patients converted from ASIA A to ASIA C or D compared to 31% of cervical patients and 66% for the 3-mg cervical cohort. Although the patient numbers are small, the observed motor recovery in this open-label trial

  16. Effects of Wharton's jelly cells of the human umbilical cord on acute spinal cord injury in rats, and expression of interleukin-1β and nerve growth factor in spinal cord tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-08-01

    To study the effects of Wharton's jelly cells (WJCs) on acute spinal cord injury (SCI), 81 rats were divided into a sham surgery group, a model group, and a WJC transplantation group (n = 27). Motor functions of the model and WJC transplantation groups were partially recovered, and the recovery was better in the latter group. The WJC transplantation group had integral spinal cord tissues. Compared with the model group, the WJC transplantation group expressed significantly less interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and more nerve growth factor (NGF) (P < 0.05). WJC transplantation changed the microenvironment of the SCI site, inhibited IL-1β expression, increased NGF expression, promoted the recovery of neurological function, and relieved secondary SCI. PMID:25801039

  17. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  18. The Complement Receptor C5aR Controls Acute Inflammation and Astrogliosis following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Faith H; Gordon, Richard; Lao, Hong W; Biggins, Patrick J; Taylor, Stephen M; Franklin, Robin J M; Woodruff, Trent M; Ruitenberg, Marc J

    2015-04-22

    This study investigated the role of the complement activation fragment C5a in secondary pathology following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI). C5ar(-/-) mice, which lack the signaling receptor for C5a, displayed signs of improved locomotor recovery and reduced inflammation during the first week of SCI compared with wild-type mice. Intriguingly, the early signs of improved recovery in C5ar(-/-) mice deteriorated from day 14 onward, with absence of C5aR ultimately leading to poorer functional outcomes, larger lesion volumes, reduced myelin content, and more widespread inflammation at 35 d SCI. Pharmacological blockade of C5aR with a selective antagonist (C5aR-A) during the first 7 d after SCI improved recovery compared with vehicle-treated mice, and this phenotype was sustained up to 35 d after injury. Consistent with observations made in C5ar(-/-) mice, these improvements were, however, lost if C5aR-A administration was continued into the more chronic phase of SCI. Signaling through the C5a-C5aR axis thus appears injurious in the acute period but serves a protective and/or reparative role in the post-acute phase of SCI. Further experiments in bone marrow chimeric mice suggested that the dual and opposing roles of C5aR on SCI outcomes primarily relate to its expression on CNS-resident cells and not infiltrating leukocytes. Additional in vivo and in vitro studies provided direct evidence that C5aR signaling is required during the postacute phase for astrocyte hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and glial scar formation. Collectively, these findings highlight the complexity of the inflammatory response to SCI and emphasize the importance of optimizing the timing of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25904802

  19. Assessment of Impairment in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The most common primary end-point of the trial on treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is the degree of impairment. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Standards have been widely used to assess motor function and pin-prick and light-touch sensory function. In addition, pain assessment is another clinically relevant aspect of the impairment in individuals with SCI. Given this, we sought to systematically review the studies that focused on the psychometric properties of ASIA Standards and all previously used outcome measures of pain in the SCI population in the acute care setting. For the primary literature search strategy, the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were sought out. Subsequently, a secondary search strategy was carried out using the articles listed in the references of meta-analysis, systematic, and non-systematic review articles. Two reviewers (JCF and VN) independently selected the articles that fulfill the inclusion and exclusion, assessed the level of evidence of each article, and appraised the psychometric properties of each instrument. Divergences during those steps were solved by consensus between both reviewers. Of 400 abstracts captured in our primary search strategy on the ASIA Standards, 16 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. An additional 40 references were obtained from two prior systematic reviews on ASIA Standards. While 45 of 56 of the studies on ASIA Standards provided level 4 evidence, there were 11 level 2b evidence studies. Convergent construct validity (n = 34), reliability (n = 12), and responsiveness (n = 10) were the most commonly studied psychometric properties of the ASIA Standards, but two prior studies examined their content validity. Of the 267 abstracts yielded in our primary search on pain assessment, 24 articles with level 4 evidence fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was no study that examined pain assessment in the acute

  20. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  1. Efficacy of Acute Intermittent Hypoxia on Physical Function and Health Status in Humans with Spinal Cord Injury: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Harness, Eric T.; White, Ailish C.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in a loss of motor and sensory function and is consequent with reductions in locomotion, leading to a relatively sedentary lifestyle which predisposes individuals to premature morbidity and mortality. Many exercise modalities have been employed to improve physical function and health status in SCI, yet they are typically expensive, require many trained clinicians to implement, and are thus relegated to specialized rehabilitation centers. These characteristics of traditional exercise-based rehabilitation in SCI make their application relatively impractical considering the time-intensive nature of these regimens and patients' poor access to exercise. A promising approach to improve physical function in persons with SCI is exposure to acute intermittent hypoxia (IH) in the form of a small amount of sessions of brief, repeated exposures to low oxygen gas mixtures interspersed with normoxic breathing. This review summarizes the clinical application of IH in humans with SCI, describes recommended dosing and potential side effects of IH, and reviews existing data concerning the efficacy of relatively brief exposures of IH to modify health and physical function. Potential mechanisms explaining the effects of IH are also discussed. Collectively, IH appears to be a safe, time-efficient, and robust approach to enhance physical function in chronic, incomplete SCI. PMID:26167303

  2. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J C; Vignoli, Josiane A; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  3. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men

    PubMed Central

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25847920

  4. Different profiles of acute stress disorder differentially predict posttraumatic stress disorder in a large sample of female victims of sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Shevlin, Mark; Hyland, Philip; Elklit, Ask

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to test the dimensional structure of acute stress disorder (ASD). Latent profile analysis was conducted on scores from the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (Bryant, Moulds, & Guthrie, 2000) using a large sample of female victims of sexual trauma. Four distinct classes were found. Two of the classes represented high and low levels of ASD, and the high ASD class was associated with a high probability of subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There were 2 intermediate classes that were differentiated by the number of arousal symptoms, and the class with high levels of arousal symptoms had a higher risk of PTSD. The results suggested that ASD is best described by qualitatively and quantitatively differing subgroups in this sample, whereas previous research has assumed ASD to be dimensional. This may explain the limited success of using ASD to predict subsequent PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24978131

  5. Silencing of fas, fas-associated via death domain, or caspase 3 differentially affects lung inflammation, apoptosis, and development of trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Messer, Mirko Philipp; Kellermann, Philipp; Weber, Sascha Jörn; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Klohs, Bettina; Schultze, Anke; Braumüller, Sonja; Huber-Lang, Markus Stefan; Perl, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Activation of Fas signaling is a potentially important pathophysiological mechanism in the development of septic acute lung injury (ALI). However, so far the optimal targets within this signaling cascade remain elusive. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo gene silencing of Fas, Fas-associated via death domain (FADD), or caspase 3 by intratracheal administration of small interfering RNA would ameliorate ALI in a clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of trauma induced septic lung injury. Male C57Bl/6 mice received small interfering (Fas, FADD, caspase 3) or control RNA 24 h before and 12 h after blunt chest trauma or sham procedures. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture 24 h after chest trauma. Twelve or 24 h later, lung tissue, plasma, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were harvested. During ALI, lung apoptosis (active caspase 3 Western blotting, TUNEL staining) was substantially increased when compared with sham. Silencing of caspase 3 or FADD both markedly reduced pulmonary apoptosis. Fas- and FADD-small interfering RNA administration substantially decreased lung cytokine concentration, whereas caspase 3 silencing did not reduce lung inflammation. In addition, Fas silencing markedly decreased lung neutrophil infiltration. Interestingly, only in response to caspase 3 silencing, ALI-induced lung epithelial barrier dysfunction was substantially improved, and histological appearance was beneficially affected. Taken together, downstream inhibition of lung apoptosis via caspase 3 silencing proved to be superior in mitigating ALI when compared with upstream inhibition of apoptosis via Fas or FADD silencing, even in the presence of additional anti-inflammatory effects. This indicates a major pathophysiological role of lung apoptosis and suggests the importance of other than Fas-driven apoptotic pathways in trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:23247118

  6. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome. Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test. The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  7. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine.

    PubMed

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome.Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test.The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  8. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  9. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  10. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Belley-Côté, Emilie P.; Fallah, Nader; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous meta-analyses of methylprednisolone (MPS) for patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs) have not addressed confidence in the quality of evidence used for pooled effect estimates, and new primary studies have been recently published. We aimed to determine whether MPS improves motor recovery and is associated with increased risks for adverse events. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library, and two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data, and evaluated risk of bias. We pooled outcomes from randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled observational studies separately and used the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to evaluate confidence. We included four RCTs and 17 observational studies. MPS was not associated with an increase in long-term motor score recovery (two RCTs: 335 participants; mean difference [MD], −1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], −4.75 to 2.53; p = 0.55, low confidence; two observational studies: 528 participants; MD, 1.37; 95% CI, −3.08 to 5.83; p = 0.55, very low confidence) or improvement by at least one motor grade (three observational studies: 383 participants; risk ratio [RR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.53–1.33; p = 0.46, very low confidence). Evidence from two RCTs demonstrated superior short-term motor score improvement if MPS was administered within 8 h of injury (two RCTs: 250 participants; MD, 4.46; 95% CI, 0.97–7.94; p = 0.01, low confidence), but risk of bias and imprecision limit confidence in these findings. Observational studies demonstrated a significantly increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding (nine studies: 2857 participants; RR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.13–4.19; p = 0.02, very low confidence), but RCTs did not. Pooled evidence does not demonstrate a significant long-term benefit for MPS in patients with acute TSCIs and suggests it may be associated with increased gastrointestinal bleeding. These

  11. High-affinity NGF receptor in the rat spinal cord during acute and chronic phases of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: a possible functional significance.

    PubMed

    Oderfeld-Nowak, B; Zaremba, M; Lipkowski, A W; Kwiatkowska-Patzer, B; Triaca, V; Aloe, L

    2003-03-01

    The biological effects of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) are primarily mediated via its high affinity receptor-TrkA. In the present study, we examined the effect of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) upon the expression of TrkA in neuronal and non-neuronal cells of the spinal cord of Lewis rats during the acute (14 days postimmunization) and chronic (12 months postimmunization) phases of the disease. In the normal spinal cord, both of mature and aged rats, we found TrkA immunoreaction (TrkA-IR) in the motoneurons of the Rexed lamina IX and in both oligo- and astroglia cells. In the acute phase of the disease, we found a reduction of TrkA immunoreactivity in motoneurons and its up-regulation in oligodendroglia, mainly in the white matter. We also confirmed our previous findings concerning the up-regulation of TrkA-IR in astroglia. Both neuronal and non-neuronal changes of TrkA immunoreactivity had a transient character: they were not seen in the chronic phase of the disease. Our results suggest that both neuronal and glial TrkA expression changes depend on inflammation. Moreover, our data indicate that, during the acute phase of EAE, the glial cells become more receptive to NGF, pointing to glia as an important target for pharmacological manipulations, particularly for exogenously administered NGF. PMID:12825322

  12. Analysis of Diagnostic Angiography and Angioembolization in the Acute Management of Renal Trauma Using a National Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, James M.; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Smith, Thomas G.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To our knowledge data on diagnostic angiography and angioembolization after renal trauma have been limited to single institution series with small numbers. We used the National Trauma Data Bank® to investigate national patterns of diagnostic angiography and angioembolization after blunt and penetrating renal trauma. Materials and Methods All renal injuries treated between 2002 and 2007 were identified in the National Trauma Data Bank by Abbreviated Injury Scale codes and converted to American Association for the Surgery of Trauma renal injury grades. Diagnostic angiography and angioembolization were identified by ICD-9 codes and examined. Initial angioembolization was considered a failure if subsequent therapy was needed. Repeat diagnostic angiography was not considered a failure. Results A total of 9,002 renal injuries were available for analysis. A total of 165 patients (2%) underwent diagnostic angiography after renal injury, including 77 (47%) who underwent concomitant angioembolization. Of the patients 78% sustained grade III–V renal injuries. Of the 77 patients with initial angioembolization 68 required successive therapy. Repeat angioembolization was the most common management choice (29% of patients). Secondary angioembolization was durable during the index hospitalization with success in 35 of 36 cases. Successive therapy was required after initial angioembolization for all grade IV and V renal injuries in 48 patients. The overall renal salvage rate was 92%, including 88% for grade IV and V injuries. Conclusions Successive therapy is common after initial management of renal injury by angioembolization. Close observation is highly recommended after initial angioembolization for grade IV–V renal injuries. National agreement on the use of diagnostic angiography and angioembolization is needed since these procedures may be overused after grade I–III renal injuries. PMID:21334643

  13. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... help your pain during flare-ups. Treatments for back pain caused by spinal stenosis include: Medicines that may ...

  14. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  15. THE EFFECT OF MONOSIALOGANGLYOSIDE (GM-1) ADMINISTRATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    BARROS, TARCÍSIO ELOY PESSOA; ARAUJO, FERNANDO FLORES DE; HIGINO, LUCAS DA PAZ; MARCON, RAPHAEL MARTUS; CRISTANTE, ALEXANDRE FOGAÇA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of monosialoganglioside (GM-1) in spinal cord trauma patients seen in our service who have not been treated with methylprednisolone. Methods: Thirty patients with acute spinal cord trauma were randomly divided into two groups. In Group 1, patients received 200 mg GM-1 in the initial assessment and thereafter received 100 mg intravenous per day for 30 days and Group 2 (control) received saline. Patients were evaluated periodically (at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year and two years), using a standardized neurological assessment of the American Spinal Injury Association / International Spinal Cord Society. Results: The comparative statistical analysis of motor indices, sensitive indices for pain and touch according to the standardization of ASIA / ISCOS showed that the assessments at 6 weeks, 6 months and 2 years, GM-Group 1 patients had higher rates than the control group regarding sensitivity to pain and touch, with no statistically significant difference from the motor index. Conclusion: The functional assessment showed improvement in the sensitive indices of patients treated with GM1 after post-traumatic spinal cord injury compared to patients who received placebo. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Case Studies Series. PMID:27217811

  16. The coagulopathy of trauma.

    PubMed

    Maegele, M

    2014-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death, with uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination being the primary causes of preventable deaths during the first 24 h following trauma. Death usually occurs quickly, typically within the first 6 h after injury. One out of four patients arriving at the Emergency Department after trauma is already in hemodynamic and hemostatic depletion. This early manifestation of hemostatic depletion is referred to as the coagulopathy of trauma, which may distinguished as: (i) acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and (ii) iatrogenic coagulopathy (IC). The principle drivers of ATC have been characterized by tissue trauma, inflammation, hypoperfusion/shock, and the acute activation of the neurohumoral system. Hypoperfusion leads to an activation of protein C with cleavage of activated factors V and VIII and the inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), with subsequent fibrinolysis. Endothelial damage and activation results in Weibel-Palade body degradation and glycocalyx shedding associated with autoheparinization. In contrast, there is an IC which occurs secondary to uncritical volume therapy, leading to acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. This coagulopathy may, then, be an integral part of the "vicious cycle" when combined with acidosis and hypothermia. The awareness of the specific pathophysiology and of the principle drivers underlying the coagulopathy of trauma by the treating physician is paramount. It has been shown that early recognition prompted by appropriate and aggressive management can correct coagulopathy, control bleeding, reduce blood product use, and improve outcome in severely injured patients. This paper summarizes: (i) the current concepts of the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy of trauma, including ATC and IC, (ii) the current strategies available for the early identification of patients at risk for coagulopathy and ongoing life-threatening hemorrhage after trauma, and (iii) the current and updated European

  17. Parent and Child Agreement for Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Psychopathology in a Prospective Study of Children and Adolescents Exposed to Single-Event Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined…

  18. Epidermal growth factor attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier disruption via PI3K/Akt/Rac1 pathway after acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhou, Yulong; Zhu, Sipin; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Hongxue; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Wang, Zhouguang; Li, Xiaokun; Xiao, Jian; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) elicits blood cell infiltration such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. Previous studies show that epidermal growth factor (EGF) produces potent neuroprotective effects in SCI models. However, little is known that whether EGF contributes to the integrity of BSCB. The present study is performed to explore the mechanism of BSCB permeability changes which are induced by EGF treatment after SCI in rats. In this study, we demonstrate that EGF administration inhibits the disruption of BSCB permeability and improves the locomotor activity in SCI model rats. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathways by a specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppresses EGF-induced Rac1 activation as well as tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) expression. Furthermore, the protective effect of EGF on BSCB is related to the activation of Rac1 both in vivo and in vitro. Blockade of Rac1 activation with Rac1 siRNA downregulates EGF-induced TJ and AJ proteins expression in endothelial cells. Taken together, our results indicate that EGF treatment preserves BSCB integrity and improves functional recovery after SCI via PI3K-Akt-Rac1 signalling pathway. PMID:26769343

  19. Use of 3D imaging in CT of the acute trauma patient: impact of a PACS-based software package.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Lucey, Brain C; Stuhlfaut, Joshua W; Varghese, Jose C

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a picture archiving and communication systems (PACS)-based software package on the requests for 3D reconstructions of multidetector CT (MDCT) data sets in the emergency radiology of a level 1 trauma center, we reviewed the number and type of physician requests for 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets for patients admitted after sustaining multiple trauma, during a 12-month period (January 2003-December 2003). During the first 5 months of the study, 3D reconstructions were performed in dedicated workstations located separately from the emergency radiology CT interpretation area. During the last 7 months of the study, reconstructions were performed online by the attending radiologist or resident on duty, using a software package directly incorporated into the PACS workstations. The mean monthly number of 3D reconstructions requested during the two time periods was compared using Student's t test. The monthly mean +/- SD of 3D reconstructions performed before and after 3D software incorporation into the PACS was 34+/-7 (95% CI, 10-58) and 132+/-31 (95% CI, 111-153), respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). In the multiple trauma patient, implementation of PACS-integrated software increases utilization of 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets. PMID:16028324

  20. Reduced Formation of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Migration of Mononuclear Phagocytes in the Cochleae of Chinchilla after Antioxidant Treatment in Acute Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Choi, Chul-Hee; Chen, Kejian; Cheng, Weihua; Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Inhibition of inflammation and free radical formation in the cochlea may be involved in antioxidant treatment in acute acoustic trauma. Procedure. Chinchilla were exposed to 105 dB sound pressure level octave band noise for 6 hours. One group of chinchilla was treated with antioxidants after noise exposure. Auditory brainstem responses, outer hair cell counts, and immunohistochemical analyses of biomarkers in the cochlea were conducted. Results. The antioxidant treatment significantly reduced hearing threshold shifts, outer hair cell loss, numbers of CD45+ cells, as well as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and nitrotyrosine formation in the cochlea. Conclusion. Antioxidant treatment may provide protection to sensory cells by inhibiting formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen products and migration of mononuclear phagocytes in the cochlea. The present study provides further evidence of effectiveness of antioxidant treatment in reducing permanent hearing loss. PMID:21961007

  1. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J.; Molina, Daniel Quiros; Ganzer, Patrick D.; Houlé, John D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impaired sensory fiber transmission leads to chronic, debilitating neuropathic pain. Sensory afferents are responsive to neurotrophic factors, molecules that are known to promote survival and maintenance of neurons, and regulate sensory neuron transduction of peripheral stimuli. A subset of primary afferent fibers responds only to the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of ligands (GFLs) and are non-peptidergic. In peripheral nerve injury models, restoration of GDNF or artemin (another GFL) to pre-injury levels within the spinal cord attenuates neuropathic pain. One noninvasive approach to increase the levels of GFLs in the spinal cord is through exercise (Ex), and to date exercise training is the only ameliorative, nonpharmacological treatment for SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was three fold: 1) to determine whether exercise affects the onset of SCI-induced neuropathic pain; 2) to examine the temporal profile of GDNF and artemin in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn regions associated with forepaw dermatomes after SCI and Ex; and 3) to characterize GFL-responsive sensory fiber plasticity after SCI and Ex. Adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats received a moderate, unilateral spinal cord contusion at C5. A subset of rats was exercised (SCI+Ex) on automated running wheels for 20 minutes, 5d/week starting at 5 days post injury (dpi), continuing until 9 or 37 dpi. Hargreaves' and von Frey testing was performed preoperatively and weekly post SCI. Forty-two percent of rats in the unexercised group exhibited tactile allodynia of the forepaws while the other 58% retained normal sensation. The development of SCI-induced neuropathic pain correlated with a marked decrease in the levels of GDNF and artemin in the spinal cord and DRGs. Additionally, a dramatic increase in the density and the distribution throughout the dorsal horn of GFL-responsive afferents was observed in rats with SCI

  2. Effectiveness of 4-hydroxy phenyl N-tert-butylnitrone (4-OHPBN) alone and in combination with other antioxidant drugs in the treatment of acute acoustic trauma in chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chul-Hee; Chen, Kejian; Vasquez-Weldon, Angelica; Jackson, Ronald L; Floyd, Robert A; Kopke, Richard D

    2008-05-01

    Acute acoustic trauma (AAT) results in oxidative stress to the cochlea through overproduction of cellular reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and other free radical species appearing from 1 h to 10 days after noise exposure. It has been shown that N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a glutathione prodrug, and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), a mitochondrial biogenesis agent, are effective in reducing noise-induced hearing loss. Phenyl N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN), a nitrone-based free radical trap, appears to suppress oxidative stress in a variety of disorders and several biological models. In this study, we tested whether 4-hydroxy PBN (4-OHPBN), a major metabolite of PBN, administered 4 h after noise exposure is effective in treating noise-induced hearing loss and whether a combination of antioxidant drugs (4-OHPBN plus NAC and 4-OHPBN plus NAC plus ALCAR) provides greater efficacy in attenuating AAT since each agent addresses different injury mechanisms. Chinchilla were exposed to a 105 dB octave-band noise centered at 4 kHz for 6 h. 4-OHPBN and combinations of antioxidant drugs were intraperitoneally administered beginning 4 h after noise exposure. Hearing threshold shifts in auditory brainstem responses and missing outer hair cell counts were obtained. 4-OHPBN reduced threshold shifts in a dose-dependent manner while both drug combinations showed greater effects. These results demonstrate that 4-OHPBN and combinations of antioxidants can effectively treat acute acoustic trauma and drug combinations may increase the effectiveness of treatment and decrease the required individual medication dose. PMID:18328271

  3. Involvement of spinal α2 -adrenoceptors in prolonged modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious stimulation in the anaesthetized rabbit.

    PubMed

    Harris, John

    2016-03-01

    The role of spinal α2 -adrenoceptors in mediating long-lasting modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious chemical stimulation of distant heterotopic and local homotopic locations has been investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rabbits. Reflexes evoked in the ankle extensor muscle medial gastrocnemius (MG) by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral heel, and reflexes elicited in the ankle flexor tibialis anterior and the knee flexor semitendinosus by stimulation at the base of the ipsilateral toes, could be inhibited for over 1 h after mustard oil (20%) was applied to either the snout or into the contralateral MG. The heel-MG response was also inhibited after applying mustard oil across the plantar metatarsophalangeal joints of the ipsilateral foot, whereas this homotopic stimulus facilitated both flexor responses. Mustard oil also caused a significant pressor effect when applied to any of the three test sites. The selective α2 -adrenoceptor antagonist, RX 821002 (100-300 μg, intrathecally), had no effect on reflexes per se, but did cause a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure. In the presence of the α2 -blocker, inhibitory and facilitatory effects of mustard oil on reflexes were completely abolished. These data imply that long-lasting inhibition of spinal reflexes following acute noxious stimulation of distant locations involves activation of supraspinal noradrenergic pathways, the effects of which are dependent on an intact α2 -adrenoceptor system at the spinal level. These pathways and receptors also appear to be involved in facilitation (sensitization) as well as inhibition of reflexes following a noxious stimulus applied to the same limb. PMID:26804327

  4. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Putzier, M; Pumberger, M; Hermann, K G; Diekhoff, T

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. PMID:27270922

  5. Imaging in orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken Y.; Ngai, Philip; Echegoyen, Julio C.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital trauma is one of the most common reasons for ophthalmology specialty consultation in the emergency department setting. We survey the literature from 1990 to present to describe the role of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their associated angiography in some of the most commonly encountered orbital trauma conditions. CT orbit can often detect certain types of foreign bodies, lens dislocation, ruptured globe, choroidal or retinal detachments, or cavernous sinus thrombosis and thus complement a bedside ophthalmic exam that can sometimes be limited in the setting of trauma. CT remains the workhorse for acute orbital trauma owing to its rapidity and ability to delineate bony abnormalities; however MRI remains an important modality in special circumstances such as soft tissue assessment or with organic foreign bodies. PMID:23961028

  6. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B.; Cap, Andrew P.; Rasmussen, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military–civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a “state of the science” review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. PMID:26428845

  7. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers.

    PubMed

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M; Karanikas, Alexia T; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B; Cap, Andrew P; Rasmussen, Todd E

    2015-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military-civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a "state of the science" review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. PMID:26428845

  8. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  9. Local Delivery of High-Dose Chondroitinase ABC in the Sub-Acute Stage Promotes Axonal Outgrowth and Functional Recovery after Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chu-Hsun; Lin, Chi-Te; Lee, Meng-Jen; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ming-Chao; Lin, Yi-Lo; Chen, Ching-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are glial scar-associated molecules considered axonal regeneration inhibitors and can be digested by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to promote axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously demonstrated that intrathecal delivery of low-dose ChABC (1 U) in the acute stage of SCI promoted axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this study, high-dose ChABC (50 U) introduced via intrathecal delivery induced subarachnoid hemorrhage and death within 48 h. However, most SCI patients are treated in the sub-acute or chronic stages, when the dense glial scar has formed and is minimally digested by intrathecal delivery of ChABC at the injury site. The present study investigated whether intraparenchymal delivery of ChABC in the sub-acute stage of complete spinal cord transection would promote axonal outgrowth and improve functional recovery. We observed no functional recovery following the low-dose ChABC (1 U or 5 U) treatments. Furthermore, animals treated with high-dose ChABC (50 U or 100 U) showed decreased CSPGs levels. The extent and area of the lesion were also dramatically decreased after ChABC treatment. The outgrowth of the regenerating axons was significantly increased, and some partially crossed the lesion site in the ChABC-treated groups. In addition, retrograde Fluoro-Gold (FG) labeling showed that the outgrowing axons could cross the lesion site and reach several brain stem nuclei involved in sensory and motor functions. The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scores revealed that the ChABC treatment significantly improved functional recovery compared to the control group at eight weeks after treatment. Our study demonstrates that high-dose ChABC treatment in the sub-acute stage of SCI effectively improves glial scar digestion by reducing the lesion size and increasing axonal regrowth to the related functional nuclei, which promotes locomotor recovery. Thus, our results will aid in

  10. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Akpınar, Aykut; Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  11. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  12. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  14. Guanosine reduces apoptosis and inflammation associated with restoration of function in rats with acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bendjelloul, Farid; Ballerini, Patrizia; D’Alimonte, Iolanda; Nargi, Elenora; Jiang, Cai; Huang, Xinjie; Rathbone, Michel P.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in progressive waves of secondary injuries, cascades of noxious pathological mechanisms that substantially exacerbate the primary injury and the resultant permanent functional deficits. Secondary injuries are associated with inflammation, excessive cytokine release, and cell apoptosis. The purine nucleoside guanosine has significant trophic effects and is neuroprotective, antiapoptotic in vitro, and stimulates nerve regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether systemic administration of guanosine could protect rats from some of the secondary effects of spinal cord injury, thereby reducing neurological deficits. Systemic administration of guanosine (8 mg/kg per day, i.p.) for 14 consecutive days, starting 4 h after moderate spinal cord injury in rats, significantly improved not only motor and sensory functions, but also recovery of bladder function. These improvements were associated with reduction in the inflammatory response to injury, reduction of apoptotic cell death, increased sparing of axons, and preservation of myelin. Our data indicate that the therapeutic action of guanosine probably results from reducing inflammation resulting in the protection of axons, oligodendrocytes, and neurons and from inhibiting apoptotic cell death. These data raise the intriguing possibility that guanosine may also be able to reduce secondary pathological events and thus improve functional outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury in humans. PMID:18404454

  15. Pseudo-Orbital Apex Syndrome in the Acute Trauma Setting Due to Ipsilateral Dissection of Internal Carotid Artery.

    PubMed

    Anders, Ursula M; Taylor, Elise J; Martel, Joseph R; Martel, James B

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic causes of orbital apex and superior orbital fissure syndrome are uncommon. The authors present the first case of a traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome simulating orbital apex syndrome, with loss of vision from posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A 35-year-old man was initially felt to have a right orbital apex syndrome with left craniofacial and orbital trauma. CT revealed left orbital fractures, a right superior orbital fissure fracture, a retained metallic foreign body in the right sphenoid sinus, and a right frontoparietal subdural hematoma. CT angiography showed a secondary dissection and occlusion of the right internal carotid artery from osseous erosion of the posterolateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. Internal carotid artery dissection is a possible, though rare, cause of ischemic optic neuropathy. The right pseudo-orbital apex syndrome resulted from a mechanical superior orbital fissure syndrome and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy from an internal carotid artery dissection. PMID:25216200

  16. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  17. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  18. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection (ESI) involves injecting medicine directly into the space around your spinal nerves or spinal cord. Spinal stenosis symptoms often become worse over time, but this may happen slowly. If the pain ...

  19. RNA-Seq Characterization of Spinal Cord Injury Transcriptome in Acute/Subacute Phases: A Resource for Understanding the Pathology at the Systems Level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenian; Deng, Shuyun; Lu, Hezuo; Zheng, Yiyan; Yang, Guodong; Kim, Dong; Cao, Qilin; Wu, Jia Qian

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disease without effective treatment. To generate a comprehensive view of the mechanisms involved in SCI pathology, we applied RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to characterize the temporal changes in global gene expression after contusive SCI in mice. We sequenced tissue samples from acute and subacute phases (2 days and 7 days after injury) and systematically characterized the transcriptomes with the goal of identifying pathways and genes critical in SCI pathology. The top enriched functional categories include “inflammation response,” “neurological disease,” “cell death and survival” and “nervous system development.” The top enriched pathways include LXR/RXR Activation and Atherosclerosis Signaling, etc. Furthermore, we developed a systems-based analysis framework in order to identify key determinants in the global gene networks of the acute and sub-acute phases. Some candidate genes that we identified have been shown to play important roles in SCI, which demonstrates the validity of our approach. There are also many genes whose functions in SCI have not been well studied and can be further investigated by future experiments. We have also incorporated pharmacogenomic information into our analyses. Among the genes identified, the ones with existing drug information can be readily tested in SCI animal models. Therefore, in this study we have described an example of how global gene profiling can be translated to identifying genes of interest for functional tests in the future and generating new hypotheses. Additionally, the RNA-Seq enables splicing isoform identification and the estimation of expression levels, thus providing useful information for increasing the specificity of drug design and reducing potential side effect. In summary, these results provide a valuable reference data resource for a better understanding of the SCI process in the acute and sub-acute phases. PMID:23951329

  20. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Chung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jang Woon; Ha, Kee Yong

    2016-09-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  1. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  2. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    should be evaluated with great care. Neurovascular examination related to trauma of the spinal cord, peripheral nerves as well as vascular involvement should be carried out also in extremity injuries. Physical examination should be completed by localization of all stabwounds, in- and outshot openings as well as recto-vaginal examination and inspection of the oropharynx. PMID:14524152

  3. Involvement of protein kinase C and Src tyrosine kinase in acute tolerance to ethanol inhibition of spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, W-K; Lin, H-H; Lai, C-C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein kinases in the development of acute tolerance to the effects of ethanol on spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated pressor responses during prolonged ethanol exposure. Experimental approach: Blood pressure responses induced by intrathecal injection of NMDA were recorded. The levels of several phosphorylated residues on NMDA receptor NR1 (GluN1) (NR1) and NMDA receptor NR2B (GluN2B) (NR2B) subunits were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Key results: Ethanol inhibited spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses at 10 min, but the inhibition was significantly reduced at 40 min following continuous infusion. This effect was dose-dependently blocked by chelerythrine [a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, 1–1000 pmol] or PP2 (a Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 1–100 pmol) administered intrathecally 10 min following ethanol infusion. A significant increase in the immunoreactivity of phosphoserine 896 of NR1 subunits (pNR1-Ser896) and phosphotyrosine 1336 of NR2B subunits (pNR2B-Tyr1336) was found in neurons of intermediolateral cell column during the development of tolerance. Levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 were also significantly increased in lateral horn regions of the spinal cord slices incubated with ethanol for 40 min in vitro. The increases in pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 levels were inhibited by post-treatment with chelerythrine and PP2, respectively, both in the in vivo and in vitro studies. Conclusions and implications: The results suggest that activation of PKC and Src tyrosine kinase during prolonged ethanol exposure leading to increases in the levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 may contribute to acute tolerance to inhibition by ethanol of NMDA receptor function. PMID:19703167

  4. Systematic, theoretically-grounded development and feasibility testing of an innovative, preventive web-based game for children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Winston, Flaura K.; Hildenbrand, Aimee K.; Kohser, Kristen L.; March, Sonja; Kenardy, Justin; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of children are affected by acute medical events annually, creating need for resources to promote recovery. While web-based interventions promise wide reach and low cost for users, development can be time- and cost-intensive. A systematic approach to intervention development can help to minimize costs and increase likelihood of effectiveness. Using a systematic approach, our team integrated evidence on the etiology of traumatic stress, an explicit program theory, and a user-centered design process to intervention development. Objective To describe evidence and the program theory model applied to the Coping Coach intervention and present pilot data evaluating intervention feasibility and acceptability. Method Informed by empirical evidence on traumatic stress prevention, an overarching program theory model was articulated to delineate pathways from a) specific intervention content to b) program targets and proximal outcomes to c) key longer-term health outcomes. Systematic user-testing with children ages 8–12 (N = 42) exposed to an acute medical event and their parents was conducted throughout intervention development. Results Functionality challenges in early prototypes necessitated revisions. Child engagement was positive throughout revisions to the Coping Coach intervention. Final pilot-testing demonstrated promising feasibility and high user-engagement and satisfaction. Conclusion Applying a systematic approach to the development of Coping Coach led to the creation of a functional intervention that is accepted by children and parents. Development of new e-health interventions may benefit from a similar approach. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of Coping Coach in achieving targeted outcomes of reduced trauma symptoms and improved health-related quality of life. PMID:25844276

  5. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during “Target” sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory “oddball” attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  6. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  7. Spinal cord schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myelopathy is increasingly being recognized as a common neurological complication of schistosomiasis. Schistosome eggs reach the spinal cord either as egg emboli or as eggs produced by ectopic worms. This leads to inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation around the eggs. Patients with spinal schistosomiasis may not have clinical evidence of schistosomiasis. The typical clinical picture is that of lumbar pain preceded by other symptoms by hours or up to 3 weeks. Patients may present with paraparesis, urinary retention or paraplegia. Definitive diagnosis of spinal cord schistosomiasis is by detection of the eggs in a spinal cord biopsy or at autopsy. However, most cases are diagnosed based on a presumptive diagnosis that depends on a suggestive clinical picture, history or evidence of active schistosomiasis and exclusion of other conditions. Investigations include stools and urine examination for schistosome eggs, blood tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment of cases is mainly by praziquantel, corticosteroids, surgical intervention and rehabilitation.

  8. A Systematic Review of Experimental Strategies Aimed at Improving Motor Function after Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Cortes, Mar; Guest, James; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-03-01

    While various approaches have been proposed in clinical trials aimed at improving motor function after spinal cord injury in humans, there is still limited information regarding the scope, methodological quality, and evidence associated with single-intervention and multi-intervention approaches. A systematic review performed using the PubMed search engine and the key words "spinal cord injury motor recovery" identified 1973 records, of which 39 were selected (18 from the search records and 21 from reference list inspection). Study phase ( clinicaltrials.org criteria) and methodological quality (Cochrane criteria) were assessed. Studies included proposed a broad range of single-intervention (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) and multi-intervention approaches (that combined more than one strategy). The highest evidence level was for Phase III studies supporting the role of multi-intervention approaches that contained a rehabilitation component. Quality appraisal revealed that the percentage of selected studies classified with high risk of bias by Cochrane criteria was as follows: random sequence generation = 64%; allocation concealment = 77%; blinding of participants and personnel = 69%; blinding of outcome assessment = 64%; attrition = 44%; selective reporting = 44%. The current literature contains a high proportion of studies with a limited ability to measure efficacy in a valid manner because of low methodological strength in all items of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment. Recommendations to decrease bias are discussed and include increased methodological rigor in the study design and recruitment of study participants, and the use of electrophysiological and imaging measures that can assess functional integrity of the spinal cord (and may be sufficiently sensitive to detect changes that occur in response to therapeutic

  9. Structural and biochemical abnormalities in the absence of acute deficits in mild primary blast-induced head trauma.

    PubMed

    Walls, Michael K; Race, Nicholas; Zheng, Lingxing; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha M; Acosta, Glen; Park, Jonghyuck; Shi, Riyi

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT), if not fatal, is nonetheless potentially crippling. It can produce a wide array of acute symptoms in moderate-to-severe exposures, but mild BINT (mBINT) is characterized by the distinct absence of acute clinical abnormalities. The lack of observable indications for mBINT is particularly alarming, as these injuries have been linked to severe long-term psychiatric and degenerative neurological dysfunction. Although the long-term sequelae of BINT are extensively documented, the underlying mechanisms of injury remain poorly understood, impeding the development of diagnostic and treatment strategies. The primary goal of this research was to recapitulate primary mBINT in rodents in order to facilitate well-controlled, long-term investigations of blast-induced pathological neurological sequelae and identify potential mechanisms by which ongoing damage may occur postinjury. METHODS A validated, open-ended shock tube model was used to deliver blast overpressure (150 kPa) to anesthetized rats with body shielding and head fixation, simulating the protective effects of military-grade body armor and isolating a shock wave injury from confounding systemic injury responses, head acceleration, and other elements of explosive events. Evans Blue-labeled albumin was used to visualize blood-brain barrier (BBB) compromise at 4 hours postinjury. Iba1 staining was used to visualize activated microglia and infiltrating macrophages in areas of peak BBB compromise. Acrolein, a potent posttraumatic neurotoxin, was quantified in brain tissue by immunoblotting and in urine through liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry at 1, 2, 3, and 5 days postinjury. Locomotor behavior, motor performance, and short-term memory were assessed with open field, rotarod, and novel object recognition (NOR) paradigms at 24 and 48 hours after the blast. RESULTS Average speed, maximum speed, and distance traveled in an open-field exploration paradigm did not show

  10. Evaluation of the survival of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells and the growth factors produced upon intramedullary transplantation in rat models of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kiyotaka; Harada, Yasuji; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Michishita, Masaki; Kanno, Nobuo; Yogo, Takuya; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Hara, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) transplantation has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in the chronic stage of spinal cord injury (SCI). However, no previous study has evaluated its effects in the acute stage, even though cell death occurs mainly within 1week after injury in all neuronal cells. Moreover, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the survival of intramedullary transplanted allogeneic BM-MNCs and the production of growth factors after transplantation to clarify the therapeutic potential of intramedullary transplanted BM-MNCs and their protective effects in acute SCI. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic SCI and received intramedullary transplantation of EGFP(+)BM-MNCs (n=6), BM-MNCs (n=10), or solvent (n=10) immediately after injury. To evaluate the transplanted BM-MNCs and their therapeutic effects, immunohistochemical evaluations were performed at 3 and 7days post-injury (DPI). BM-MNCs were observed at the injected site at both 3 (683±83 cells/mm(2)) and 7 DPI (395±64 cells/mm(2)). The expression of hepatocyte growth factor was observed in approximately 20% transplanted BM-MNCs. Some BM-MNCs also expressed monocyte chemotactic protein-1 or vascular endothelial growth factor. The demyelinated area and number of cleaved caspase-3-positive cells were significantly smaller in the BM-MNC-transplanted group at 3 DPI. Hindlimb locomotor function was significantly improved in the BM-MNC-transplanted group at 7 DPI. These results suggest that intramedullary transplantation of BM-MNCs is an efficient method for introducing a large number of growth factor-producing cells that can induce neuroprotective effects in the acute stage of SCI. PMID:27473980

  11. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  12. Increased Risk of Post-Trauma Stroke after Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-07-01

    This study determines whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an independent risk factor for an increased risk of post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) stroke during 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year follow-ups, respectively, after adjusting for other covariates. Clinical data for the analysis were from the National Health Insurance Database 2000, which covered a total of 2121 TBI patients and 101 patients with a diagnosis of TBI complicated with ARDS (TBI-ARDS) hospitalized between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to record stroke occurrences after discharge from the hospital. The prognostic value of TBI-ARDS was evaluated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. The main outcome found that stroke occurred in nearly 40% of patients with TBI-ARDS, and the hazard ratio for post-TBI stroke increased fourfold during the 5-year follow-up period after adjusting for other covariates. The increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the ARDS group was considerably higher than in the TBI-only cohort. This is the first study to report that post-traumatic ARDS yielded an approximate fourfold increased risk of stroke in TBI-only patients. We suggest intensive and appropriate medical management and intensive follow-up of TBI-ARDS patients during the beginning of the hospital discharge. PMID:26426583

  13. Acute Lumbar Burst Fracture Treated by Minimally Invasive Lateral Corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Thiago

    2013-01-01

    Burst fractures in acute spinal traumas are a difficult problem to solve. Different approaches and techniques have been utilized, but with high incidence of morbidity and mortality, besides unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results. Mini-open approaches recently emerged and have been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of several spinal conditions. Here we report a case of acute lumbar burst fracture at L2 treated by minimally invasive true lateral approach posteriorly instrumented with percutaneous pedicle screws. The minimum disruptive access in addition to a rigid construction allowed a lumbar corpectomy without the morbidity of standard open approaches, lowering surgery costs and accelerating the patient recovery with successfully clinical and radiological results. PMID:23634314

  14. Beneficial effects of αB-crystallin in spinal cord contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Klopstein, Armelle; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Redensek, Adriana; David, Samuel; Navarro, Xavier; López-Vales, Rubèn

    2012-10-17

    αB-crystallin is a member of the heat shock protein family that exerts cell protection under several stress-related conditions. Recent studies have revealed that αB-crystallin plays a beneficial role in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, brain ischemia, and Alexander disease. Whether αB-crystallin plays a role in modulating the secondary damage after CNS trauma is not known. We report here that αB-crystallin mediates protective effects after spinal cord injury. The levels of αB-crystallin are reduced in spinal cord tissue following contusion lesion. In addition, administration of recombinant human αB-crystallin for the first week after contusion injury leads to sustained improvement in locomotor skills and amelioration of secondary tissue damage. We also provide evidence that recombinant human αB-crystallin modulates the inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, leading to increased infiltration of granulocytes and reduced recruitment of inflammatory macrophages. Furthermore, the delivery of recombinant human αB-crystallin promotes greater locomotor recovery even when the treatment is initiated 6 h after spinal cord injury. Our findings suggest that administration of recombinant human αB-crystallin may be a good therapeutic approach for treating acute spinal cord injury, for which there is currently no effective treatment. PMID:23077034

  15. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  16. The influence of time in captivity, food intake and acute trauma on blood analytes of juvenile Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, John P; Tuomi, Pam A; Mellish, Jo-Ann E

    2015-01-01

    The Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus, has experienced regionally divergent population trends over recent decades. One potential mechanism for this disparity is that local factors cause reduced health and, therefore, reduced survival of individuals. The use of blood parameters to assess sea lion health may help to identify whether malnutrition, disease and stress are important drivers of current trends, but such assessments require species-specific knowledge of how parameters respond to various health challenges. We used principal components analysis to identify which key blood parameters (principal analytes) best described changes in health for temporarily captive juvenile Steller sea lions in known conditions. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the changes in principal analytes with food intake, time in captivity and acute trauma associated with hot-iron branding and transmitter implant surgery. Of the 17 blood parameters examined, physiological changes for juvenile sea lions were best described using the following six principal analytes: red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, globulin, platelets, glucose and total bilirubin. The white blood cell counts and total bilirubin declined over time in captivity, whereas globulin increased. Elevated red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts and total bilirubin and reduced globulin values were associated with lower food intake. After branding, white blood cell counts were elevated for the first 30 days, while globulin and platelets were elevated for the first 15 days only. After implant surgery, red blood cell counts and globulin remained elevated for 30 days, while white blood cell counts remained elevated during the first 15 days only. Glucose was unassociated with the factors we studied. These results were used to provide expected ranges for principal analytes at different levels of food intake and in response to the physical challenges of branding and implant surgery

  17. The influence of time in captivity, food intake and acute trauma on blood analytes of juvenile Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John P.; Tuomi, Pam A.; Mellish, Jo-Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    The Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus, has experienced regionally divergent population trends over recent decades. One potential mechanism for this disparity is that local factors cause reduced health and, therefore, reduced survival of individuals. The use of blood parameters to assess sea lion health may help to identify whether malnutrition, disease and stress are important drivers of current trends, but such assessments require species-specific knowledge of how parameters respond to various health challenges. We used principal components analysis to identify which key blood parameters (principal analytes) best described changes in health for temporarily captive juvenile Steller sea lions in known conditions. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the changes in principal analytes with food intake, time in captivity and acute trauma associated with hot-iron branding and transmitter implant surgery. Of the 17 blood parameters examined, physiological changes for juvenile sea lions were best described using the following six principal analytes: red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, globulin, platelets, glucose and total bilirubin. The white blood cell counts and total bilirubin declined over time in captivity, whereas globulin increased. Elevated red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts and total bilirubin and reduced globulin values were associated with lower food intake. After branding, white blood cell counts were elevated for the first 30 days, while globulin and platelets were elevated for the first 15 days only. After implant surgery, red blood cell counts and globulin remained elevated for 30 days, while white blood cell counts remained elevated during the first 15 days only. Glucose was unassociated with the factors we studied. These results were used to provide expected ranges for principal analytes at different levels of food intake and in response to the physical challenges of branding and implant surgery

  18. Simulated activity but real trauma: a systematic review on Nintendo Wii injuries based on a case report of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian A; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for "Wii (trauma or injury or fracture)." Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations. PMID:25816033

  19. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  20. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Choi SB, Cwinn AA. Pelvic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Vora ...

  1. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Arash; Sperl, André; Heller, Raban; Kunzmann, Kevin; Graeser, Viola; Akbar, Michael; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury. PMID:27447486

  2. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Sperl, André; Heller, Raban; Kunzmann, Kevin; Graeser, Viola; Akbar, Michael; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury. PMID:27447486

  3. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A CERVICAL SPINAL FRACTURE IN A BENNETT'S WALLABY (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS).

    PubMed

    Kragness, Brandy J; Graham, Jennifer E; Bedenice, Daniela; Restifo, Melissa M; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2016-03-01

    Macropods are susceptible to trauma, and fractures of the cervical vertebrae due to collisions are relatively common. A 4-yr-old, intact male Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) was presented acutely nonambulatory and tetraparetic but with motor function present in all limbs. Cervical radiographs revealed a C4 vertebral fracture. Surgical stabilization was obtained through a ventral midline approach whereby the vertebral bodies were distracted and then secured with screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Postoperative radiographs revealed restoration of the spinal canal and appropriate implant placement. The patient was discharged 4 days postoperatively and gradually recovered full neurologic function per the owner over the ensuing 10 wk. Subsequent radiographs obtained 10.5 mo postoperatively revealed a healed fracture with stable implants. The ventral spinal distraction and stabilization technique using screws and PMMA, as are used in the domestic dog, was successful in this wallaby despite its smaller vertebral size and comparable lack of soft-tissue support. PMID:27010308

  4. A Grading System To Evaluate Objectively the Strength of Pre-Clinical Data of Acute Neuroprotective Therapies for Clinical Translation in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena B.; Tsai, Eve; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Magnuson, David K.; Reier, Paul J.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Blight, Andrew R.; Oudega, Martin; Guest, James D.; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The past three decades have seen an explosion of research interest in spinal cord injury (SCI) and the development of hundreds of potential therapies that have demonstrated some promise in pre-clinical experimental animal models. A growing number of these treatments are seeking to be translated into human clinical trials. Conducting such a clinical trial, however, is extremely costly, not only for the time and money required to execute it, but also for the limited resources that will then no longer be available to evaluate other promising therapies. The decision about what therapies have sufficient pre-clinical evidence of efficacy to justify testing in humans is therefore of utmost importance. Here, we have developed a scoring system for objectively grading the body of pre-clinical literature on neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. The components of the system include an evaluation of a number of factors that are thought to be important in considering the “robustness” of a therapy's efficacy, including the animal species and injury models that have been used to test it, the time window of efficacy, the types of functional improvements effected by it, and whether efficacy has been independently replicated. The selection of these factors was based on the results of a questionnaire that was performed within the SCI research community. A modified Delphi consensus-building exercise was then conducted with experts in pre-clinical SCI research to refine the criteria and decide upon how to score them. Finally, the grading system was applied to a series of potential neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. This represents a systematic approach to developing an objective method of evaluating the extent to which the pre-clinical literature supports the translation of a particular experimental treatment into human trials. PMID:20507235

  5. The use of an electronic von Frey device for evaluation of sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and those with acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, S A; Hettlich, B F; Waln, A

    2013-08-01

    The utility and inter-session repeatability of sensory threshold measurements using an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer (VFA) were assessed in a group of six neurologically normal dogs. Sensory threshold values obtained in neurologically normal dogs were compared to those of dogs with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by intervertebral disc extrusion (n=6) and to a group of neurologically normal dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=6). Sensory threshold values in neurologically normal dogs were 155.8 ± 37.7 g and 154.7 ± 67.2 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively. The difference in mean sensory threshold values obtained for the group when two distinct testing sessions were compared was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Mean sensory threshold values for the group with SCI were significantly higher than those for neurologically normal dogs at 351.1 ± 116.5 g and 420.3 ± 157.7 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively (P=0.01). A comparison of sensory threshold values for the group with CCLR and neurologically normal dogs was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The modified dorsal technique for VFA described here represents a reliable method to assess sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and in those with SCI. PMID:23246235

  6. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction. PMID:22790805

  7. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  8. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: The classical clinical presentation, neuroradiographic features, and conservative vs. surgical management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord (CSS) injury remain controversial. Methods: CSS injuries, occurring in approximately 9.2% of all cord injuries, are usually attributed to significant hyperextension trauma combined with congenital/acquired cervical stenosis/spondylosis. Patients typically present with greater motor deficits in the upper vs. lower extremities accompanied by patchy sensory loss. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) scans usually show hyperintense T2 intramedullary signals reflecting acute edema along with ligamentous injury, while noncontrast computed tomography (CT) studies typically show no attendant bony pathology (e.g. no fracture, dislocation). Results: CSS constitute only a small percentage of all traumatic spinal cord injuries. Aarabi et al. found CSS patients averaged 58.3 years of age, 83% were male and 52.4% involved accidents/falls in patients with narrowed spinal canals (average 5.6 mm); their average American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score was 63.8, and most pathology was at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (71%). Surgery was performed within 24 h (9 patients), 24–48 h (10 patients), or after 48 h (23 patients). In the Brodell et al. study of 16,134 patients with CSS, 39.7% had surgery. In the Gu et al. series, those with CSS and stenosis/ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) exhibited better outcomes following laminoplasty. Conclusions: Recognizing the unique features of CSS is critical, as the clinical, neuroradiological, and management strategies (e.g. conservative vs. surgical management: early vs. late) differ from those utilized for other spinal cord trauma. Increased T2-weighted MR images best document CSS, while CT studies confirm the absence of fracture/dislocation. PMID:26005576

  9. The PanAM study: a multi-center, double-blinded, randomized, non-inferiority study of paracetamol versus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in treating acute musculoskeletal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute musculoskeletal trauma, including strains, sprains or contusions, occur frequently. Pain management is a crucial component of treatment. However, there is no convincing evidence which drug is superior in managing pain in these patients. The aim of the PanAM Study is to compare analgesic efficacy of three strategies of pain management: paracetamol, diclofenac, or a combination of both in patients with acute musculoskeletal trauma. Methods/design The PanAM Study is a multi-center, double blind randomized controlled trial with non-inferiority design. Included are adult patients presenting to an academic, urban Emergency Department or to a General Practice with acute, blunt, traumatic limb injury. In total, 547 patients will be included using a predefined list of exclusion criteria, to be allocated by randomization to treatment with paracetamol + placebo diclofenac, diclofenac + placebo paracetamol or paracetamol + diclofenac. The hypothesis is that paracetamol will not be inferior to treatment with diclofenac, or the combination of both. Primary outcome will be between-group differences in decrease in pain, measured with Numerical Rating Scales at baseline and at 90 minutes after study drug administration. Secondary outcomes are Numerical Rating Scales at 30 and 60 minutes and measured frequently during three consecutive days after discharge; occurrence of adverse effects; patient satisfaction and an analysis of quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Recruitment started July 2013 and is expected to last a year. Discussion With this multi-center randomized clinical trial we will investigate whether treatment with paracetamol alone is not inferior to diclofenac alone or a combination of both drugs in adult patients with acute musculoskeletal trauma. The main relevance of the trial is to demonstrate the benefits and risks of three commonly used treatment regimens for musculoskeletal trauma. Data that lead to the prevention of severe Non

  10. Effects of electromyostimulation on muscle and bone in men with acute traumatic spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Arija-Blázquez, Alfredo; Ceruelo-Abajo, Silvia; Díaz-Merino, María S.; Godino-Durán, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Dhier, Luís; Martin, José L. R.; Florensa-Vila, José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 14 weeks of electromyostimulation (EMS) training (47 minutes/day, 5 days/week) on both muscle and bone loss prevention in persons with recent, complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, experimental, controlled, single-blind randomized trial with external blind evaluation by third parties. Methods Eight men with recent SCI (8 weeks from injury; ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) “A”) were randomized into the intervention or the control groups. Cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Bone mineral density changes were assessed with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Several bone biomarkers (i.e. total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, insulin-growth factor I, osteocalcin, serum type I collagen C-telopeptide), lipid, and lipoprotein profiles were quantified. A standard oral glucose tolerance test was performed before and after the 14-week training. All analyses were conducted at the beginning and after the intervention. Results The intervention group showed a significant increase in QF muscle size when compared with the control group. Bone losses were similar in both groups. Basal levels of bone biomarkers did not change over time. Changes in lipid and lipoprotein were similar in both groups. Glucose and insulin peaks moved forward after the training in the intervention group. Conclusions This study indicates that skeletal muscle of patients with complete SCI retains the ability to grow in response to a longitudinal EMS training, while bone does not respond to similar external stimulus. Increases in muscle mass might have induced improvements in whole body insulin-induced glucose uptake. PMID:24090427

  11. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  12. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  13. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  14. Correlations between severity of clinical signs and histopathological changes in 60 dogs with spinal cord injury associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Henke, D; Vandevelde, M; Doherr, M G; Stöckli, M; Forterre, F

    2013-10-01

    The outcome of spinal surgery in dogs with absent voluntary motor function and nociception following intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation is highly variable, which likely attests to differences in the severity of spinal cord damage. This retrospective study evaluated the extent to which neurological signs correlated with histologically detected spinal cord damage in 60 dogs that were euthanased because of thoracolumbar IVD herniation. Clinical neurological grades correlated significantly with the extent of white matter damage (P<0.001). However, loss of nociception also occurred in 6/31 (19%) dogs with relatively mild histological changes. The duration of clinical signs, Schiff-Sherrington posture, loss of reflexes and pain on spinal palpation were not significantly associated with the severity of spinal cord damage. Although clinical-pathological correlation was generally good, some clinical signs frequently thought to indicate severe cord injury did not always correlate with the degree of cord damage, suggesting functional rather than structural impairment in some cases. PMID:23702280

  15. Shock trauma.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    1984-09-01

    Trauma - accidental or intentional injury - is a major health and social problem. It is still the chief cause of death in people between the ages of 1 and 38 years. In the United States, the mortality due to trauma between the ages of 15 and 24 years increased by 13% from 1960 to 1978. During the same period, the mortality for people aged 25 to 64 years declined by 16%. Murders have increased from 8464 in 1960, to 26 000 in 1982. The overall death rate of American teenagers and young adults is 50% higher than that of their counterparts in Britain, Sweden and Japan. Trauma affects young, productive citizens, and the estimated costs for death, disability and loss of productivity exceed $230 million a day. The most tragic statistic is that at least 40% of the deaths are needless and preventable if better treatment and prevention programs were available. Trauma deaths that might be prevented are those due to motor vehicle accidents, homicide, burns, and alcohol and drug abuse. In this paper suggestions for prevention are made. They include improved crash worthiness of motor vehicles, revocation of drunk drivers' licences, use of devices that limit drunk drivers, increased tax on alcohol and random breathalyser tests, and the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets. Control of hand-guns and burn characteristics of cigarettes could also reduce deaths. The problems and issues in trauma care can be divided into two broad categories: system and professional. System problems include prehospital care, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and prevention. Professional problems include education, research, economics, and quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478325

  16. The SCIentinel study - prospective multicenter study to define the spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) - study protocol and interim feasibility data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections are the leading cause of death in the acute phase following spinal cord injury and qualify as independent risk factor for poor neurological outcome (“disease modifying factor”). The enhanced susceptibility for infections is not stringently explained by the increased risk of aspiration in tetraplegic patients, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, or by high-dose methylprednisolone treatment. Experimental and clinical pilot data suggest that spinal cord injury disrupts the balanced interplay between the central nervous system and the immune system. The primary hypothesis is that the Spinal Cord Injury-induced Immune Depression Syndrome (SCI-IDS) is 'neurogenic’ including deactivation of adaptive and innate immunity with decreased HLA-DR expression on monocytes as a key surrogate parameter. Secondary hypotheses are that the Immune Depression Syndrome is i) injury level- and ii) severity-dependent, iii) triggers transient lymphopenia, and iv) causes qualitative functional leukocyte deficits, which may endure the post-acute phase after spinal cord injury. Methods/Design SCIentinel is a prospective, international, multicenter study aiming to recruit about 118 patients with acute spinal cord injury or control patients with acute vertebral fracture without neurological deficits scheduled for spinal surgery. The assessment points are: i) <31 hours, ii) 31–55 hours, iii) 7 days, iv) 14 days, and v) 10 weeks post-trauma. Assessment includes infections, concomitant injury, medication and neurological classification using American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) and neurological level. Laboratory analyses comprise haematological profiling, immunophenotyping, including HLA-DR expression on monocytes, cytokines and gene expression of immune modulators. We provide an administrative interim analysis of the recruitment schedule of the trial. Discussion The objectives are to characterize the dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune

  17. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Odrick R.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Ana E.; Salgado, Iris K.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  18. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Odrick R; Torrado, Aranza I; Santiago, Jose M; Rodriguez, Ana E; Salgado, Iris K; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-12-15

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  19. Penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  20. Penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  1. Spinal Plasticity following Intermittent Hypoxia: Implications for Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dale-Nagle, Erica A.; Hoffman, Michael S.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Vinit, Stéphane; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity is a fundamental property of the neural system controlling breathing. One frequently studied model of respiratory plasticity is long-term facilitation of phrenic motor output (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF arises from spinal plasticity, increasing respiratory motor output through a mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in or near phrenic motor neurons. Since intermittent hypoxia induces spinal plasticity, we are exploring the potential to harness repetitive AIH as a means of inducing functional recovery in conditions causing respiratory insufficiency, such as cervical spinal injury. Since repetitive AIH induces phenotypic plasticity in respiratory and motor neurons, it may restore respiratory motor function in patients with incomplete spinal injury. PMID:20536940

  2. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis. PMID:24966260

  3. Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott; Shea, John F

    2003-09-01

    Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery is becoming increasingly more popular because this anaesthetic technique allows the patient to self-position and avoid neurological injury that may occur with prone positioning under general anaesthesia. Spinal anaesthesia reduces intraoperative surgical blood loss, improves perioperative haemodynamic stability and reduces pain in the immediate postoperative period. This leads to a reduced need for analgesics and a reduction in the incidence of nausea and vomiting in the postoperative setting. Spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgery also decreases the incidence of lower extremity thrombo-embolic complications and does not increase the occurrence of problems with micturition. These benefits increase the patient's satisfaction, and they expedite discharge of the patient from the hospital. Combination anaesthetic techniques, using both subarachnoid and epidural dosing schemes, may be beneficial for improving postoperative pain control and add further to the benefit of spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgical procedures. PMID:14529005

  4. Neurologic foundations of spinal cord fusion (GEMINI).

    PubMed

    Canavero, Sergio; Ren, XiaoPing; Kim, C-Yoon; Rosati, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Cephalosomatic anastomosis has been carried out in both monkeys and mice with preservation of brain function. Nonetheless the spinal cord was not reconstructed, leaving the animals unable to move voluntarily. Here we review the details of the GEMINI spinal cord fusion protocol, which aims at restoring electrophysiologic conduction across an acutely transected spinal cord. The existence of the cortico-truncoreticulo-propriospinal pathway, a little-known anatomic entity, is described, and its importance concerning spinal cord fusion emphasized. The use of fusogens and electrical stimulation as adjuvants for nerve fusion is addressed. The possibility of achieving cephalosomatic anastomosis in humans has become reality in principle. PMID:27180142

  5. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  6. Ventilatory strategies in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shubhangi; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Lung injury in trauma patients can occur because of direct injury to lung or due to secondary effects of injury elsewhere for example fat embolism from a long bone fracture, or due to response to a systemic insult such as; acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to sepsis or transfusion related lung injury. There are certain special situations like head injury where the primary culprit is not the lung, but the brain and the ventilator strategy is aimed at preserving the brain tissue and the respiratory system takes a second place. The present article aims to delineate the strategies addressing practical problems and challenges faced by intensivists dealing with trauma patients with or without healthy lungs. The lung protective strategies along with newer trends in ventilation are discussed. Ventilatory management for specific organ system trauma are highlighted and their physiological base is presented. PMID:24550626

  7. Nanomedicine for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds. PMID:23945984

  8. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  9. Posttraumatic Inflammation as a Key to Neuroregeneration after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Child, Christopher; Bruckner, Thomas; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Daniel, Volker; Biglari, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines might have a large impact on the secondary phase and on the neurological outcome of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). We measured the serum levels of different cytokines (Interferon-γ, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) over a 12-week period in 40 acute traumatic SCI patients: at admission on average one hour after initial trauma; at four, nine, 12, and 24 h; Three, and seven days after admission; and two, four, eight, and twelve weeks after admission. This was done using a Luminex Performance Human High Sensitivity Cytokine Panel. SCI was classified using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) at time of admission and after 12 weeks. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in patients without neurological remission and in patients with an initial AIS A (p < 0.05). This study shows significant differences in cytokine concentrations shown in traumatic SCI patients with different neurological impairments and within a 12-week period. IL-8 and IL-10 are potential peripheral markers for neurological remission and rehabilitation after traumatic SCI. Furthermore our cytokine expression pattern of the acute, subacute, and intermediate phase of SCI establishes a possible basis for future studies to develop standardized monitoring, prognostic, and tracking techniques. PMID:25860946

  10. Inhibition of spinal c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) improves locomotor activity of spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Martini, Alessandra C; Forner, Stefânia; Koepp, Janice; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2016-05-16

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been implicated in central nervous system injuries, yet the roles within neurodegeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI) still remain partially elucidated. We aimed to investigate the changes in expression of the three MAPKs following SCI and the role of spinal c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in motor impairment following the lesion. SCI induced at the T9 level resulted in enhanced expression of phosphorylated MAPKs shortly after trauma. SCI increased spinal cord myeloperoxidase levels, indicating a local neutrophil infiltration, and elevated the number of spinal apoptotic cells. Intrathecal administration of a specific inhibitor of JNK phosphorylation, SP600125, given at 1 and 4h after SCI, reduced the p-JNK expression, the number of spinal apoptotic cells and many of the histological signs of spinal injury. Notably, restoration of locomotor performance was clearly ameliorated by SP600125 treatment. Altogether, the results demonstrate that SCI induces activation of spinal MAPKs and that JNK plays a major role in mediating the deleterious consequences of spinal injury, not only at the spinal level, but also those regarding locomotor function. Therefore, inhibition of JNK activation in the spinal cord shortly after trauma might constitute a feasible therapeutic strategy for the functional recovery from SCI. PMID:27080425

  11. Racial disparities in outcomes after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lad, Shivanand P; Umeano, Odera A; Karikari, Isaac O; Somasundaram, Aravind; Bagley, Carlos A; Gottfried, Oren N; Isaacs, Robert E; Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Patil, Chirag G; Huang, Kevin; Boakye, Maxwell

    2013-03-15

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is an acute trauma to the neural elements resulting in temporary or permanent sensory and motor deficit. Studies have indicated that although 66% of SCI occur in Caucasians, there are a growing number of other racial groups affected by SCI. Furthermore, there has been a lack of research concerning racial disparities in outcomes following SCI. As such, a retrospective analysis using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2000 to 2009 was performed. African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans were included in the study. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (OR) to examine the relationship between racial backgrounds and mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, length of hospital stay, in-hospital complications, and patient disposition. Our results showed that significant differences were found in length of hospital stay, with African American and Hispanic populations having longer hospital stays than Caucasian and Asians. For all type complications, African Americans (OR 1.228, confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.356) and Native Americans (OR 1.618, CI 1.083-2.419) were more likely than Caucasian and Hispanic patients to have in-hospital complications. For disposition status, African Americans (OR 0.844, CI 0.730-0.976) and Asians (OR 0.475, CI 0.297-0.760) were much less likely than Caucasians or Hispanic populations to be discharged to an acute rehabilitation program. The results from this large-scale study (n=18,671) demonstrate a number of racial disparities following SCI at the national level, including rate of complications, length of stay, and disposition to acute rehabilitation centers. This should raise awareness to cultural differences but also serve as an opportunity to reduce gaps in care across ethnicities for this universally life-altering condition. PMID:23113561

  12. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted. PMID:20453174

  13. Chronic spinal compression model in minipigs: a systematic behavioral, qualitative, and quantitative neuropathological study.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Roman; Juhas, Stefan; Keshavarzi, Sassan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Johe, Karl; Marsala, Silvia; Scadeng, Miriam; Lazar, Peter; Tomori, Zoltan; Schulteis, Gery; Beattie, Michael; Ciacci, Joseph D; Marsala, Martin

    2012-02-10

    The goal of the present study was to develop a porcine spinal cord injury (SCI) model, and to describe the neurological outcome and characterize the corresponding quantitative and qualitative histological changes at 4-9 months after injury. Adult Gottingen-Minnesota minipigs were anesthetized and placed in a spine immobilization frame. The exposed T12 spinal segment was compressed in a dorso-ventral direction using a 5-mm-diameter circular bar with a progressively increasing peak force (1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 kg) at a velocity of 3 cm/sec. During recovery, motor and sensory function were periodically monitored. After survival, the animals were perfusion fixed and the extent of local SCI was analyzed by (1) post-mortem MRI analysis of dissected spinal cords, (2) qualitative and quantitative analysis of axonal survival at the epicenter of injury, and (3) defining the presence of local inflammatory changes, astrocytosis, and schwannosis. Following 2.5-kg spinal cord compression the animals demonstrated a near complete loss of motor and sensory function with no recovery over the next 4-9 months. Those that underwent spinal cord compression with 2 kg force developed an incomplete injury with progressive partial neurological recovery characterized by a restricted ability to stand and walk. Animals injured with a spinal compression force of 1.5 kg showed near normal ambulation 10 days after injury. In fully paralyzed animals (2.5 kg), MRI analysis demonstrated a loss of spinal white matter integrity and extensive septal cavitations. A significant correlation between the magnitude of loss of small and medium-sized myelinated axons in the ventral funiculus and neurological deficits was identified. These data, demonstrating stable neurological deficits in severely injured animals, similarities of spinal pathology to humans, and relatively good post-injury tolerance of this strain of minipigs to spinal trauma, suggest that this model can successfully be used to study

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  15. Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms but not generalized anxiety symptoms are associated with severity of exposure to war trauma: A study of civilians under fire.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Liat; Besser, Avi; Neria, Yuval

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and generalized anxiety symptoms (GAS) may ensue following trauma. While they are now thought to represent different psychopathological entities, it is not clear whether both GAS and PTSS show a dose-response to trauma exposure. The current study aimed to address this gap in knowledge and to investigate the moderating role of subjects' demographics in the exposure-outcome associations. The sample included 249 civilian adults, assessed during the 2014 Israel-Gaza military conflict. The survey probed demographic information, trauma exposure, and symptoms. PTSS but not GAS was associated with exposure severity. Women were at higher risk for both PTSS and GAS than men. In addition, several demographic variables were only associated with PTSS levels. PTSS dose-response effect was moderated by education. These findings are in line with emerging neurobiological and cognitive research, suggesting that although PTSS and GAS have shared risk factors they represent two different psychopathological entities. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:26343559

  16. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... all. They include Pain in your neck or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in your arms or legs Pain going down the leg Foot problems Doctors diagnose spinal stenosis with a physical exam and ...

  17. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  18. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  19. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  20. Late Intrathoracic Tracheal Stricture After Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Life-Threatening Condition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Ikram; Aldulaijan, Fozan W; Alhajji, Zahra; Cheema, Ahsan; Mutairi, Hadi

    2016-02-01

    Tracheal injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare but life-threatening condition. If diagnosed and treated early, the outcome is excellent. We report a case of an 18-year-old man who sustained a fracture of the right femur in a traffic accident. He underwent operation under spinal anesthesia and was discharged home after 2 weeks. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with acute respiratory distress, stridor, and drowsiness. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercarbia (PCO2 of 80 mm Hg; PO2 of 60 mm Hg). He was intubated with difficulty and ventilated. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest showed a very tight supracarinal tracheal stricture. Emergency surgical resection of the tracheal stricture was performed, and an end-to-end anastomosis was fashioned. The patient had an excellent recovery. PMID:26777938

  1. Trauma-induced heterotopic bone formation and the role of the immune system: A review.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Casey T; Agarwal, Shailesh; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Wong, Victor W; Loder, Shawn; Li, John; Delano, Matthew J; Levi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Extremity trauma, spinal cord injuries, head injuries, and burn injuries place patients at high risk of pathologic extraskeletal bone formation. This heterotopic bone causes severe pain, deformities, and joint contractures. The immune system has been increasingly implicated in this debilitating condition. This review summarizes the various roles immune cells and inflammation play in the formation of ectopic bone and highlights potential areas of future investigation and treatment. Cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune system such as neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, B cells, and T cells have all been implicated as having a role in ectopic bone formation through various mechanisms. Many of these cell types are promising areas of therapeutic investigation for potential treatment. The immune system has also been known to also influence osteoclastogenesis, which is heavily involved in ectopic bone formation. Chronic inflammation is also known to have an inhibitory role in the formation of ectopic bone, whereas acute inflammation is necessary for ectopic bone formation. PMID:26491794

  2. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  3. Biomechanics of penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that injuries and deaths due to penetrating projectiles have become a national and an international epidemic in Western society. The application of biomedical engineering to solve day-to-day problems has produced considerable advances in safety and mitigation/prevention of trauma. The study of penetrating trauma has been largely in the military domain where war-time specific applications were advanced with the use of high-velocity weapons. With the velocity and weapon caliber in the civilian population at half or less compared with the military counterpart, wound ballistics is a largely different problem in today's trauma centers. The principal goal of the study of penetrating injuries in the civilian population is secondary prevention and optimized emergency care after occurrence. A thorough understanding of the dynamic biomechanics of penetrating injuries quantifies missile type, caliber, and velocity to hard and soft tissue damage. Such information leads to a comprehensive assessment of the acute and long-term treatment of patients with penetrating injuries. A review of the relevant military research applied to the civilian domain and presentation of new technology in the biomechanical study of these injuries offer foundation to this field. Relevant issues addressed in this review article include introduction of the military literature, the need for secondary prevention, environmental factors including projectile velocity and design, experimental studies with biological tissues and physical models, and mathematical simulations and analyses. Areas of advancement are identified that enables the pursuit of biomechanics research in order to arrive at better secondary prevention strategies. PMID:9719858

  4. An efficient device to experimentally model compression injury of mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Zeng, Xiang; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Han, InBo; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Teng, Yang D

    2015-09-01

    We report an efficient and effective device to reproducibly model clinically relevant spinal cord injury (SCI) via controlled mechanical compression. In the present study, following skin incision, dorsal laminectomy was performed to expose T10 spinal cord of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-250 g). The vertebral column was suspended and stabilized by Allis clamps at T8 and 12 spinous processes. A metal impounder was then gently loaded onto T10 dura (20, 35 or 50 g × 5 min; n=7/group), resulting in acute mild, moderate, or severe standing weight compression, respectively. Neurobehavioral outcomes were evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale and inclined plane test for coordinated hindlimb function, and a battery of spinal reflex tests for sensorimotor functions, at 1 day following SCI and weekly thereafter for 7 weeks. Quantitative histopathology was used to assess injury-triggered loss of white matter, gray matter and ventral horn motor neurons. Immunocytochemical levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the cervical and lumbar regions were measured to determine the distal segment impact of T10 compression. The data demonstrates that the standardized protocol generates weight-dependent hindlimb motosensory deficits and neurodegeneration primarily at and near the lesion epicenter. Importantly, there are significantly increased GFAP and APP expressions in spinal cord segments involved in eliciting post-SCI allodynia. Therefore, the described system reliably produces compression trauma in manners partially emulating clinical quasi-static insults to the spinal cord, providing a pragmatic model to investigate pathophysiological events and potential therapeutics for compression SCI. PMID:26210871

  5. HDAC6 Regulates the Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy to Prevent Oxidative Damage in Injured Neurons after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Yarong; Teng, Xiaomei; Yang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia- (HI-) induced oxidative stress plays a role in secondary pathocellular processes of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) due to HI from many kinds of mechanical trauma. Increasing evidence suggests that the histone deacetylase-6 (HDAC6) plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both physiological and abnormal, stressful, pathological conditions. This paper found that inhibition of HDAC6 accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in response to the HI. Deficiency of HDAC6 hindered the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) activity to resistance of HI-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, this study provided the experimental evidence for the potential role of HDAC6 in the regulation of CMA by affecting HSP90 acetylation. Therefore, HDAC6 plays an important role in the function of CMA pathway under the HI stress induced by SCI and it may be a potential therapeutic target in acute SCI model. PMID:26649145

  6. Imaging of trauma of the spine.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Flanders, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of imaging in spine trauma is to gauge the extent of bony, vascular, and neurologic compromise. Neurologic and mechanical stability are key pieces of information that must be efficiently communicated to the referring clinician. From immobilization and steroid therapy, to vascular repair and emergent surgical intervention, clinical outcomes of spine-injured patients depend on timely and well-chosen imaging studies. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) has essentially replaced radiography in clearance of the spine and is the gold standard in evaluation of the bony spinal column. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is typically reserved for patients with neurologic deficits or for obtunded/impaired patients in whom the neurologic exam is not reliable, even in the absence of osseous injury on CT. MRI is the only available imaging modality that is able to clearly depict the internal architecture of the spinal cord, and, as such, has a central role in depicting parenchymal changes resulting from injury. Intramedullary edema and hemorrhage have been shown to correlate with the degree of neurologic deficit and prognosis. Moreover, advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion and diffusion tensor imaging, have shifted the focus to determining structural and functional integrity of neural structures. Here, we review the role of imaging in spine trauma, as well as the key radiologic features of injury to the spinal column and spinal cord. PMID:27430440

  7. Approach to Modeling, Therapy Evaluation, Drug Selection, and Biomarker Assessments for a Multicenter Pre-Clinical Drug Screening Consortium for Acute Therapies in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Patrick M; Bramlett, Helen M; Dixon, C Edward; Shear, Deborah A; Dietrich, W Dalton; Schmid, Kara E; Mondello, Stefania; Wang, Kevin K W; Hayes, Ronald L; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the signature injury in both the Iraq and Afghan wars and the magnitude of its importance in the civilian setting is finally being recognized. Given the scope of the problem, new therapies are needed across the continuum of care. Few therapies have been shown to be successful. In severe TBI, current guidelines-based acute therapies are focused on the reduction of intracranial hypertension and optimization of cerebral perfusion. One factor considered important to the failure of drug development and translation in TBI relates to the recognition that TBI is extremely heterogeneous and presents with multiple phenotypes even within the category of severe injury. To address this possibility and attempt to bring the most promising therapies to clinical trials, we developed Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT), a multicenter, pre-clinical drug screening consortium for acute therapies in severe TBI. OBTT was developed to include a spectrum of established TBI models at experienced centers and assess the effect of promising therapies on both conventional outcomes and serum biomarker levels. In this review, we outline the approach to TBI modeling, evaluation of therapies, drug selection, and biomarker assessments for OBTT, and provide a framework for reports in this issue on the first five therapies evaluated by the consortium. PMID:26439468

  8. [Major respiratory tract traumas].

    PubMed

    Petrov, D; Obretenov, E; Kalaĭdzhiev, G; Plochev, M; Kostadinov, D

    2002-01-01

    Between 1988 and 2000 a total of 33 patients with traumatic tracheobronchial lesions were diagnosed and treated. The trauma was penetrating in 7 (stab and gun-shot), blunt in 10 (car accidents, compression and falling from heights) and iatrogenic in 16 of them (postintubational--15, after foreign body extraction--1). The main clinical and radiological features were subcutaneous emphysema, hemoptysis, respiratory insufficiency, pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients by early fiberoptic bronchoscopy. "Watch and see" tactics with massive antibiotics therapy was followed in 4 (12%) patients. A surgical treatment was carried out in 29 (88%) patients as follows: simple repair--19 (58%), left pneumonectomy--2 (6%), tracheal resection and anastomosis "end to end"--2 (6%), tracheostomy--1 (3%), thoracocenthesis and drainage--3 (9%) and cervical mediastinotomy--2 (6%). The operative mortality was 9%. The cause of death in these 3 patients were associated brain and spinal cord injuries. In the rest of patients the early and long-term postoperative results were considered very good. PMID:12515032

  9. Recognising metastatic spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a potentially life changing oncological emergency. Neurological function and quality of life can be preserved if patients receive an early diagnosis and rapid access to acute interventions to prevent or reduce nerve damage. Symptoms include developing spinal pain, numbness or weakness in arms or legs, or unexplained changes in bladder and bowel function. Community nurses are well placed to pick up on the 'red flag' symptoms of MSCC and ensure patients access prompt, timely investigations to minimise damage. PMID:25839873

  10. Spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Melancia, João Levy; Francisco, António Fernandes; Antunes, João Lobo

    2014-01-01

    Narrowing of the spinal canal or foramina is a common finding in spine imaging of the elderly. Only when symptoms of neurogenic claudication and/or cervical myelopathy are present is a spinal stenosis diagnosis made, either of the lumbar spine, cervical spine or both (only very rarely is the thoracic spine involved). Epidemiological data suggest an incidence of 1 case per 100 000 for cervical spine stenosis and 5 cases per 100 000 for lumbar spine stenosis. Cervical myelopathy in patients over 50 years of age is most commonly due to cervical spine stenosis. Symptomatic spinal narrowing can be congenital, or, more frequently, acquired. The latter may be the result of systemic illneses, namely endocrinopathies (such as Cushing disease or acromegaly), calcium metabolism disorders (including hyporarthyroidism and Paget disease), inflammatory diseases (such as rheumathoid arthritis) and infectious diseases. Physical examination is more often abnormal in cervical spondylotic myeloptahy whereas in lumbar spinal stenosis it is typically normal. Therefore spinal stenosis diagnosis relies on the clinical picture corresponding to conspicuous causative changes identified by imaging techniques, most importantly CT and MRI. Other ancillary diagnostic tests are more likely to be yielding for establishing a differential diagnosis, namely vascular claudication. Most patients have a progressive presentation and are offered non operative management as first treatment strategy. Surgery is indicated for progressive intolerable symptoms or, more rarely, for the neurologically catastrophic initial presentations. Surgical strategy consists mainly of decompression (depending on the anatomical level and type of narrowing: laminectomy, foraminotomy, discectomy, corporectomy) with additional instrumentation should spinal stability and sagittal balance be at risk. For cervical spine stenosis the main objective of surgery is to halt disease progression. There is class 1b evidence that surgery

  11. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  12. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  13. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  14. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  15. The trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of psychological trauma: intrusive memories and beyond.

    PubMed

    James, Ella L; Lau-Zhu, Alex; Clark, Ian A; Visser, Renée M; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Holmes, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of psychological trauma is fundamental to clinical psychology. Following traumatic event(s), a clinically significant number of people develop symptoms, including those of Acute Stress Disorder and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The trauma film paradigm offers an experimental psychopathology model to study both exposure and reactions to psychological trauma, including the hallmark symptom of intrusive memories. We reviewed 74 articles that have used this paradigm since the earliest review (Holmes & Bourne, 2008) until July 2014. Highlighting the different stages of trauma processing, i.e. pre-, peri- and post-trauma, the studies are divided according to manipulations before, during and after film viewing, for experimental as well as correlational designs. While the majority of studies focussed on the frequency of intrusive memories, other reactions to trauma were also modelled. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of trauma, consider ethical issues, and suggest future directions. By understanding the basic mechanisms underlying trauma symptom development, we can begin to translate findings from the laboratory to the clinic, test innovative science-driven interventions, and in the future reduce the debilitating effects of psychopathology following stressful and/or traumatic events. PMID:27289421

  16. Trauma-Sensitive Schools: An Evidence-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Jacqui L.; Bush, Kelly A.; Kersevich, Sonia E.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a common and pervasive problem. There is a positive correlation between ACEs and difficulties across the lifespan. Unlike healthy forms of stress, ACEs have a detrimental impact on the developing brain. There are three types of trauma: acute, chronic, and complex. Most ACEs are considered complex trauma,…

  17. The Sanctuary Model of Trauma-Informed Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Sandra L.; Sreedhar, Sarah Yanosy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Sanctuary Model[R], a trauma-informed method for creating or changing an organizational culture. Although the model is based on trauma theory, its tenets have application in working with children and adults across a wide diagnostic spectrum. Originally developed in a short-term, acute inpatient psychiatric setting for…

  18. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  19. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. PMID:25937552

  20. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  1. ‘Pseudofailure’ of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this ‘Pseudofailure’, as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  2. Rural trauma management.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R

    1989-05-01

    Rural trauma is a major problem in the United States. Up to 70 percent of trauma fatalities occur in rural areas, even though 70 percent of the population live in urban areas. Over the past 3 decades, numerous studies have defined the concept of preventable trauma death in both rural and urban populations. With the development of a regional trauma care system in Oregon, preventable trauma mortality should decrease. An effort was made to improve the quality of trauma care in Clatsop County, Oregon, a community of 30,000 people with 2 small rural hospitals. To obtain this goal, four steps were taken: (1) physician and nurse education was improved, (2) trauma protocols promoting prompt resuscitation and stabilization of patients were established, (3) regular trauma case reviews were conducted, and (4) emergency medical technician and prehospital management were coordinated. This study reviews the trail from sporadic, uncoordinated rural trauma care to the designation process. PMID:2712202

  3. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kasım Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients. Overview of Literature Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability. Methods Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia. Results There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need

  4. Relationship between trauma narratives and trauma pathology.

    PubMed

    Amir, N; Stafford, J; Freshman, M S; Foa, E B

    1998-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between posttrauma pathology and the level of articulation (complexity) in rape narratives recounted by victims shortly after the assault. Degree of articulation was operationalized as the reading level of the narrative as determined by a computer program. Shortly after the trauma, reading level was correlated with severity of anxiety but not with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Degree of the narrative articulation shortly after the trauma, however, was related to severity of later PTSD. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the less developed trauma narratives hinder recovery from trauma. PMID:9565923

  5. [Long-term survival after severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W; Mutschler, M; Graw, M; Lefering, R

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival after severe trauma is rarely addressed in German trauma journals although knowledge of life expectancy and identification of factors contributing to increased mortality are important for lifetime care management, development of service models, and targeting health promotion and prevention interventions. As reliable data in Germany are lacking, we compiled data mainly from the USA and Australia to describe life expectancy, risk factors, and predictors of outcome in patients experiencing traumatic spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and polytrauma. Two years after trauma, life expectancy in all three categories was significantly lower than that of the general population. It depends strongly on severity of disability, age, and gender and is quantifiable. Whereas improvements in medical care have led to a marked decline in short-term mortality, surprisingly long-term survival in severe trauma has not changed over the past 30 years. Therefore, there is need to intensify long-term trauma patient care and to find new strategies to limit primary damage. PMID:27342106

  6. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  7. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  8. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  9. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  12. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  13. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  14. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  15. A Comparison of Open and Percutaneous Techniques in the Operative Fixation of Spinal Fractures Associated with Ankylosing Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, Scott D.; Obafemi-Afolabi, Abimbola; Gelb, Daniel; Ludwig, Steven; Emery, Sanford E.; France, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The operative care of patients with ankylosing spinal conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) after a spine fracture is not well represented in the literature. This work seeks to determine the effect of minimally invasive techniques on patients with spinal fractures and ankylosing spinal conditions through a retrospective case-control analysis. Methods The operative logs from 1996-2013 of seven fellowship-trained spine surgeons from two academic, Level I trauma centers were reviewed for cases of operatively treated thoracic and lumbar spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders. Results A total of 38 patients with an ankylosing spinal condition and a spinal fracture were identified. The minimally invasive group demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in estimated blood loss, operative time, and need for transfusion when compared to either the hybrid or open group. There was no difference between the three subgroups in overall hospital stay or mortality. Conclusions Patients with ankylosing spinal conditions present unique challenges for operative fixation of spinal fractures. Minimally invasive techniques for internal fixation offer less blood loss, operative time, and need for transfusion compared to traditional techniques; however, no difference in hospital stay or mortality was reflected in this series of patients. Level of Evidence: 4. Clinical Relevance Ankylosing spinal disorders are increasingly common in an aging population. PMID:27441181

  16. Activated Platelets in Heparinized Shed Blood: The “Second-Hit” of Acute Lung Injury in Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock Models

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fragoso, Miguel; Gamboni, Fabia; Liang, Xiayuan; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The return of heparinized shed blood in trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) models remains controversial due to potential anti-inflammatory properties. Although ubiquitous as an anticoagulant, heparin is ineffective on cellular coagulation as an antithrombotic agent. Therefore, we hypothesized that returning heparinized shed blood would paradoxically enhance ALI following T/HS due to the infusion of activated platelets. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital, underwent laparotomy and hemorrhage-induced shock (MAP of 30 mmHg × 45 min). Animals were resuscitated with a combination of normal saline (NS) and returned shed blood. Shed blood was collected in either 80U/kg of heparin, 800U/kgof heparin, citrate, or diluted 1:8 with NS. An additional group of animals were pretreated with a platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonist (clopidogrel) prior to T/HS. BAL, lung MPO assays, pulmonary immunofluorescence, and blood smears were conducted. Results BAL protein increased in animals resuscitated with heparinized shed blood (p<0.0001). Blood smears and platelet function assays revealed platelet aggregates and increased platelet activation. Animals pretreated with a platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonist were protected from post-injury ALI (p<0.0001). Animals with return of shed blood had increased pulmonary PMN sequestration (p<0.0001). Pulmonary immunofluorescence demonstrated microthrombi only in the T/HS group receiving heparinized shed blood (p<0.0001). Conclusion The return of heparinized shed blood functions as a “second-hit” to enhance ALI, with activated platelets propagating microthrombi and pulmonary PMN recruitment. PMID:21841533

  17. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil in experimental spinal cord injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Hasan; Degirmenci, Selim; Ak, Ahmet; Bayir, Aysegul; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Uyar, Mehmet; Akinci, Murat; Acar, Demet; Kocacan, Metin; Akyurek, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprotective agents such as methylprednisolone and sildenafil may limit damage after spinal cord injury. We evaluated the effects of methylprednisolone and sildenafil on biochemical and histologic changes after spinal cord injury in a rabbit model. Female New Zealand rabbits (32 rabbits) were allocated to 4 equal groups: laminectomy only (sham control) or laminectomy and spinal trauma with no other treatment (trauma control) or treatment with either methylprednisolone or sildenafil. Gelsolin and caspase-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were determined, and spinal cord histology was evaluated at 24 hours after trauma. There were no differences in mean cerebrospinal fluid or plasma levels of caspase-3 between the groups or within the groups from 0 to 24 hours after injury. From 0 to 24 hours after trauma, mean cerebrospinal fluid gelsolin levels significantly increased in the sildenafil group and decreased in the sham control and the trauma control groups. Mean plasma gelsolin level was significantly higher at 8 and 24 hours after trauma in the sildenafil than other groups. Histologic examination indicated that general structural integrity was better in the methylprednisolone in comparison with the trauma control group. General structural integrity, leptomeninges, white and grey matter hematomas, and necrosis were significantly improved in the sildenafil compared with the trauma control group. Caspase-3 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood were not increased but gelsolin levels were decreased after spinal cord injury in trauma control rabbits. Sildenafil caused an increase in gelsolin levels and may be more effective than methylprednisolone at decreasing secondary damage to the spinal cord. PMID:25725143

  18. Patterns of Errors Contributing to Trauma Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Russell L.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; McIntyre, Lisa K.; Foy, Hugh M.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify patterns of errors contributing to inpatient trauma deaths. Methods: All inpatient trauma deaths at a high-volume level I trauma center from 1996 to 2004 inclusive were audited. Data were collected with daily trauma registry chart abstraction, weekly morbidity and mortality reports, hospital quality assurance reports, and annual trauma registry analyses of risk of death using TRISS and HARM methodology. Deaths that met criteria for low to medium probability of mortality or those with quality of care concerns were analyzed for errors and then subjected to 3-stage peer review at weekly departmental, monthly hospital, and annual regional forums. Patterns of errors were constructed from the compiled longitudinal data. Results: In 9 years, there were 44,401 trauma patient admissions and 2594 deaths (5.8%), of which 601 met low to medium mortality risks. Sixty-four patients (0.14% admissions, 2.47% deaths) had recognized errors in care that contributed to their death. Important error patterns included: failure to successfully intubate, secure or protect an airway (16%), delayed operative or angiographic control of acute abdominal/pelvic hemorrhage (16%), delayed intervention for ongoing intrathoracic hemorrhage (9%), inadequate DVT or gastrointestinal prophylaxis (9%), lengthy initial operative procedures rather than damage control surgery in unstable patients (8%), over-resuscitation with fluids (5%), and complications of feeding tubes (5%). Resulting data-directed institutional and regional trauma system policy changes have demonstrably reduced the incidence of associated error-related deaths. Conclusions: Preventable deaths will occur even in mature trauma systems. This review has identified error patterns that are likely common in all trauma systems, and for which policy interventions can be effectively targeted. PMID:16926563

  19. Helping Youth Overcome Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jamie C.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of trauma can roll on unchecked like a spirit of death. In its path are strewn its once vibrant victims. Human bonds are rent asunder by the disgrace of trauma. These are the youngsters who have been verbally bashed, physically battered, sexually assaulted, and spiritually exploited. Other traumas of childhood neglect include: (1)…

  20. Riluzole for the treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury: rationale for and design of the NACTN Phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Michael G; Wilson, Jefferson R; Frankowski, Ralph F; Toups, Elizabeth G; Aarabi, Bizhan; Harrop, James S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Harkema, Susan J; Guest, James D; Tator, Charles H; Burau, Keith D; Johnson, Michele W; Grossman, Robert G

    2012-09-01

    In the immediate period after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) a variety of secondary injury mechanisms combine to gradually expand the initial lesion size, potentially leading to diminished neurological outcomes at long-term follow-up. Riluzole, a benzothiazole drug, which has neuroprotective properties based on sodium channel blockade and mitigation of glutamatergic toxicity, is currently an approved drug that attenuates the extent of neuronal degeneration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, several preclinical SCI studies have associated riluzole administration with improved functional outcomes and increased neural tissue preservation. Based on these findings, riluzole has attracted considerable interest as a potential neuroprotective drug for the treatment of SCI. Currently, a Phase I trial evaluating the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of riluzole in human SCI patients is being conducted by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury. The current review summarizes the existing preclinical and clinical literature on riluzole, provides a detailed description of the Phase I trial, and suggests potential opportunities for future investigation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00876889. PMID:22985381

  1. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided. PMID:21735271

  2. Schwann cells generated from neonatal skin-derived precursors or neonatal peripheral nerve improve functional recovery after acute transplantation into the partially injured cervical spinal cord of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Joseph S; Bretzner, Frederic; Biernaskie, Jeff; Assinck, Peggy; Jiang, Yuan; Arisato, Hiroki; Plunet, Ward T; Borisoff, Jaimie; Liu, Jie; Miller, Freda D; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2015-04-29

    The transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs) holds considerable promise as a therapy for spinal cord injury, but the optimal source of these cells and the best timing for intervention remains debatable. Previously, we demonstrated that delayed transplantation of SCs generated from neonatal mouse skin-derived precursors (SKP-SCs) promoted repair and functional recovery in rats with thoracic contusions. Here, we conducted two experiments using neonatal rat cells and an incomplete cervical injury model to examine the efficacy of acute SKP-SC transplantation versus media control (Experiment 1) and versus nerve-derived SC or dermal fibroblast (Fibro) transplantation (Experiment 2). Despite limited graft survival, by 10 weeks after injury, rats that received SCs from either source showed improved functional recovery compared with media- or fibroblast-treated animals. Compared with media treatment, SKP-SC-transplanted rats showed enhanced rubrospinal tract (RST) sparing/plasticity in the gray matter (GM) rostral to injury, particularly in the absence of immunosuppression. The functional benefits of SC transplantations over fibroblast treatment correlated with the enhanced preservation of host tissue, reduced RST atrophy, and/or increased RST sparing/plasticity in the GM. In summary, our results indicate that: (1) early transplantation of neonatal SCs generated from skin or nerve promotes repair and functional recovery after incomplete cervical crush injury; (2) either of these cell types is preferable to Fibros for these purposes; and (3) age-matched SCs from these two sources do not differ in terms of their reparative effects or functional efficacy after transplantation into the injured cervical spinal cord. PMID:25926450

  3. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Esenciales: hojas informativas de fácil lectura) Other Information Back Pain Order a NIAMS publication to be mailed Health ... as effective as conventional, nonoperative treatments for acute back pain. Acupuncture. This treatment involves stimulating certain places on ...

  4. Thromboprophylaxis in spinal surgery: a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is the most common complication following major joint surgery. While attention has been focused upon the incidence of thromboembolic disease following total hip or knee arthroplasty or emergency surgery for hip fracture, there exists a gap in the medical literature examining the incidence of VTE in spinal surgery. Evidence suggests that the prevalence of DVT after spinal surgery is higher than generally recognized but with a shortage of epidemiological data, guidelines for optimal prophylaxis are limited. This survey, of individuals attending the 2009 British Association of Spinal Surgeons Annual Meeting, sought to examine prevailing trends in VTE thromboprophylaxis in spinal surgery, adherence to guideline outlined by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and to compare selections made by orthopaedic and neurosurgeons. Methods We developed a questionnaire with eight clinical scenarios. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select which method(s) of thromboprophylaxis they would employ for each scenario. Chi squared analysis was used for statistical comparison of the questionnaire responses. Results 73% of neurosurgical respondents' and 31% of orthopaedic surgeons employed low molecular weight heparin (p < 0.001). Neurosurgeons also selected anti-embolism stockings more frequently (79% v 50%) while orthopaedic surgeons preferred mechanical prophylaxis (26% v 9%). There was no significant difference between trauma and non-trauma scenarios (p = 0.05). Conclusion There is no clear consensus in thromboprophylaxis in spinal surgery. There was a significant difference in selections across surgical disciplines with neurosurgeons more closely adhering to national guidelines. Further research examining the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism in spinal surgery and the risks-benefit relationship of thromboprophylaxis is warranted. PMID:22458927

  5. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  6. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system. PMID:23210554

  7. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  8. Demystifying damage control in musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Bates, P; Parker, P; McFadyen, I; Pallister, I

    2016-05-01

    Trauma care has evolved rapidly over the past decade. The benefits of operative fracture management in major trauma patients are well recognised. Concerns over early total care arose when applied broadly. The burden of additional surgical trauma could constitute a second hit, fuelling the inflammatory response and precipitating a decline into acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Temporary external fixation aimed to deliver the benefits of fracture stabilisation without the risk of major surgery. This damage control orthopaedics approach was advocated for those in extremis and a poorly defined borderline group. An increasing understanding of the physiological response to major trauma means there is now a need to refine our treatment options. A number of large scale retrospective reviews indicate that early definitive fracture fixation is beneficial in the majority of major trauma patients. It is recommended that patients are selected appropriately on the basis of their response to resuscitation. The hope is that this approach (dubbed 'safe definitive fracture surgery' or 'early appropriate care') will herald an era when care is individualised for each patient and their circumstances. The novel Damage Control in Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery course at The Royal College of Surgeons of England aims to equip senior surgeons with the insights and mindset necessary to contribute to this key decision making process as well as also the technical skills to provide damage control interventions when needed, relying on the improved techniques of damage control resuscitation and advances in the understanding of early appropriate care. PMID:27023640

  9. Radionuclide evaluation of lung trauma.

    PubMed

    Lull, R J; Tatum, J L; Sugerman, H J; Hartshorne, M F; Boll, D A; Kaplan, K A

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging procedures can play a significant role in evaluating the pulmonary complications that are seen in trauma patients. A quantitative method for measuring increased pulmonary capillary permeability that uses Tc-99m HSA allows early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and accurately differentiates this condition from pneumonia or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. This technique may be of great value in following the response to therapy. The use of 133Xe to diagnose inhalation injury remains an important diagnostic tool, particularly at hospitals with specialized burn units. Regional decreases in ventilation-perfusion images reliably localize aspirated foreign bodies. Radionuclide techniques that are used to demonstrate gastropulmonary aspiration remain controversial and require further clinical evaluation. Pulmonary perfusion imaging, although nonspecific, may provide the earliest clue for correct diagnosis of fat embolism, air embolism, contusion, or laceration. Furthermore, the possibility of perfusion abnormality due to these uncommon conditions must be remembered whenever trauma patients are evaluated for pulmonary thromboembolism with scintigraphy. Occasionally, liver or spleen scintigraphy may be the most appropriate procedure when penetrating chest trauma also involves these subdiaphragmatic organs. PMID:6226097

  10. Coronary Thrombosis without Dissection following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sibel, Michael; Thomas, Peter; Burt, Francis; Cipolla, James; Puleo, Peter; Baker, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest resulting in coronary thrombosis and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a rare but well-described occurrence in adults. Angiography in such cases has generally disclosed complete epicardial coronary occlusion with thrombus, indistinguishable from the findings commonly found in spontaneous plaque rupture due to atherosclerotic disease. In all previously reported cases in which coronary interrogation with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in association with acute revascularization, coronary artery dissection was implicated as the etiology of coronary thrombosis. We present the first case report of blunt trauma-associated coronary thrombosis without underlying atherosclerosis or coronary dissection, as documented by IVUS imaging. PMID:27006836

  11. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  12. Rehabilitation and treatment of spinal cord tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Vishwa S.; Lofton, LaTanya

    2013-01-01

    Context Due to advances in acute oncological treatment, patients with spinal cord tumors exhibit improved survival. However, these patients have not received the full benefits of rehabilitation services to address their neurological deficits and rehabilitation goals. Objective To evaluate the epidemiology and pathophysiology of spinal cord tumors, address methods of acute oncological management, review treatment for neurological sequelae, and understand the implications as they relate to rehabilitation. Methods An extensive literature review was performed regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute oncological management, neurological sequelae, and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord tumors. Databases used included pubmed.gov and OVID, as well as individual journal and textbook articles. Results Access to treatment should be increased given improved survival and functional deficits for patients with spinal cord tumors. Individuals can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation programs, in spite of increased medical co-morbidity and neurological deficits. Specific areas of improvement include functionality, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adjustments to treatment plans must incorporate medical complications from cancer and its treatment, perceived quality of life, and prognosis. Conclusions Patients with spinal cord tumors who participate in rehabilitation programs show general improvement in function, mood, quality of life, and survival. Adaptations to care plans should be made to accommodate medical co-morbidities from cancer and its treatment, patient perceptions, and prognosis. PMID:23433329

  13. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates trauma-/haemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury through inhibiting oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent inflammatory/MMP-9 pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Wang, Ling; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most serious complications in traumatic patients and is an important part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a peptide with a wide range of biological activity. In this study, we investigated local changes in oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) pathway in rats with trauma/haemorrhagic shock (TH/S)-induced ALI and evaluated the effects of pretreatment with rhBNP. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group, model group, low-dosage rhBNP group and high-dosage rhBNP group (n = 12 for each group). Oxidative stress and MPO activity were measured by ELISA kits. MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography analysis. NF-κB activity was determined using Western blot assay. With rhBNP pretreatment, TH/S-induced protein leakage, increased MPO activity, lipid peroxidation and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity were inhibited. Activation of antioxidative enzymes was reversed. The phosphorylation of NF-κB and the degradation of its inhibitor IκB were suppressed. The results suggested that the protection mechanism of rhBNP is possibly mediated through upregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and inhibition of NF-κB activation. More studies are needed to further evaluate whether rhBNP is a suitable candidate as an effective inhaling drug to reduce the incidence of TH/S-induced ALI. PMID:26852688

  14. The challenge in management of hemorrhagic shock in trauma.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Mathews; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-04-01

    Transfusion and resuscitation practices in trauma have undergone a sea change over the past decade. New understanding of transfusion physiology and experiences in military trauma over the last decade has identified key factors taken as challenges in trauma. The most important challenge remains acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) which sets in early after a trauma and spirals the patient into shock and continued bleeding. World wide trauma is the leading cause of mortality. More than 6 million deaths occur due to trauma out of which 20% are due to uncontrollable bleeding. Out of the hospital admissions in trauma 20% develop coagulopathy. Mortality is three to four times higher in a patient with coagulopathy and thus prevention and correction of coagulopathy is the central goal of the management of hemorrhagic shock in trauma. Damage control resuscitation (DCR), a strategy combining the techniques of permissive hypotension, hemostatic resuscitation and damage control surgery has been widely adopted as the preferred method of resuscitation in patients with haemorrhagic shock. The over-riding goals of DCR are to mitigate metabolic acidosis, hypothermia and coagulopathy, This article looks at the importance of acute traumatic coagulopathy, its etiology, diagnosis, effects and resuscitation strategies to prevent it and to see the background behind this shift. PMID:24843206

  15. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Zizka, J; Eliás, P; Michl, A; Harrer, J; Cesák, T; Herman, A

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. PMID:11471620

  16. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  17. Clinical Analysis of Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Spinal Surgery in the Thoracic or Thoracolumbar Spinal Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jin; Ryoo, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Whang, Choong Jin

    2007-01-01

    Objective Thoracoscopic spinal surgery provides minimally invasive approaches for effective vertebral decompression and reconstruction of the thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, while surgery related morbidity can be significantly lowered. This study analyzes clinical results of thoracoscopic spinal surgery performed at our institute. Methods Twenty consecutive patients underwent video-assisted thoracosopic surgery (VATS) to treat various thoracic and thoracolumbar pathologies from April 2000 to July 2006. The lesions consisted of spinal trauma (13 cases), thoracic disc herniation (4 cases), tuberculous spondylitis (1 case), post-operative thoracolumbar kyphosis (1 case) and thoracic tumor (1 case). The level of operation included upper thoracic lesions (3 cases), midthoracic lesions (6 cases) and thoracolumbar lesions (11 cases). We classified the procedure into three groups: stand-alone thoracoscopic discectomy (3 cases), thoracoscopic fusion (11 cases) and video assisted mini-thoracotomy (6 cases). Results Analysis on the Frankel performance scale in spinal trauma patients (13 cases), showed a total of 7 patients who had neurological impairment preoperatively : Grade D (2 cases), Grade C (2 cases), Grade B (1 case), and Grade A (2 cases). Four patients were neurologically improved postoperatively, two patients were improved from C to E, one improved from grade D to E and one improved from grade B to grade D. The preoperative Cobb's and kyphotic angle were measured in spinal trauma patients and were 18.9±4.4° and 18.8±4.6°, respectively. Postoperatively, the angles showed statistically significant improvement, 15.1±3.7° and 11.3±2.4°, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion Although VATS requires a steep learning curve, it is an effective and minimally invasive procedure which provides biomechanical stability in terms of anterior column decompression and reconstruction for anterior load bearing, and preservation of intercostal muscles and diaphragm. PMID

  18. Repeated early thrombolysis in cervical spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Etgen, Thorleif; Höcherl, Constanze

    2016-07-01

    Specific therapy of acute spinal ischemia is not established. We report the first case of an MRI-verified cervical spinal ischemia treated by thrombolysis and review the literature. A 72-year old woman with right-sided motor hemiparesis and trunk ataxia was treated by intravenous thrombolysis with full recovery. Three days later she developed again a severe right-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis and a second off-label intravenous thrombolysis was repeated. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right-sided posterior-lateral cervical spinal ischemia. Spinal ischemia may clinically present with a cerebral-stroke-like picture challenging diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Systemic thrombolysis might be a treatment option in acute spinal ischemia. In addition, early repeated systemic thrombolysis may be considered in selected strokes. PMID:26762860

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  1. Proteomic Analysis of the Spatio-temporal Based Molecular Kinetics of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Identifies a Time- and Segment-specific Window for Effective Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Stephanie; Cizkova, Dasa; Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Nataf, Serge; Pays, Laurent; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Maass, Peter; Kobarg, Jan H; Kobeissy, Firas; Mériaux, Céline; Wisztorski, Maxence; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Cigankova, Viera; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a major debilitating health issue with a direct socioeconomic burden on the public and private sectors worldwide. Although several studies have been conducted to identify the molecular progression of injury sequel due from the lesion site, still the exact underlying mechanisms and pathways of injury development have not been fully elucidated. In this work, based on OMICs, 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, cytokines arrays, confocal imaging we established for the first time that molecular and cellular processes occurring after SCI are altered between the lesion proximity, i.e. rostral and caudal segments nearby the lesion (R1-C1) whereas segments distant from R1-C1, i.e. R2-C2 and R3-C3 levels coexpressed factors implicated in neurogenesis. Delay in T regulators recruitment between R1 and C1 favor discrepancies between the two segments. This is also reinforced by presence of neurites outgrowth inhibitors in C1, absent in R1. Moreover, the presence of immunoglobulins (IgGs) in neurons at the lesion site at 3 days, validated by mass spectrometry, may present additional factor that contributes to limited regeneration. Treatment in vivo with anti-CD20 one hour after SCI did not improve locomotor function and decrease IgG expression. These results open the door of a novel view of the SCI treatment by considering the C1 as the therapeutic target. PMID:27250205

  2. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  3. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of which can be serious (eg, dependency, misuse and overdose). Methods and analysis OPAL is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded trial that will investigate the judicious use of an opioid analgesic in 346 participants with acute low back pain and/or neck pain who are slow to recover. Participants will be recruited from general practice and randomised to receive the opioid analgesic (controlled release oxycodone plus naloxone up to 20 mg per day) or placebo in addition to guideline-based care (eg, reassurance and advice of staying active) for up to 6 weeks. Participants will be followed-up for 3 months for effectiveness outcomes. The primary outcome will be pain severity. Secondary outcomes will include physical functioning and time to recovery. Medication-related adverse events will be assessed and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. We will additionally assess long-term use and risk of misuse of opioid analgesics for up to 12 months. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Trial results will be disseminated by publications and conference presentations, and via the media. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000775516: Pre-results. PMID:27558901

  4. Pain management in trauma: A review study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Heidari Zadie, Zahra; Euasobhon, Pramote; Ketumarn, Penkae; Karbasfrushan, Ali; Amini-Saman, Javad; Mohammadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Pain in trauma has a role similar to the double-edged sword. On the one hand, pain is a good indicator to determine the severity and type of injury. On the other hand, pain can induce sever complications and it may lead to further deterioration of the patient. Therefore, knowing how to manage pain in trauma patients is an important part of systemic approach in trauma. The aim of this manuscript is to provide information about pain management in trauma in the Emergency Room settings. Methods: In this review we searched among electronic and manual documents covering a 15-yr period between 2000 and 2016. Our electronic search included Pub Med, Google scholar, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. We looked for articles in English and in peer-reviewed journals using the following keywords: acute pain management, trauma, emergency room and injury. Results: More than 3200 documents were identified. After screening based on the study inclusion criteria, 560 studies that had direct linkage to the study aim were considered for evaluation based World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder chart. Conclusions: To provide adequate pain management in trauma patients require: adequate assessment of age-specific pharmacologic pain management; identification of adequate analgesic to relieve moderate to severe pain; cognizance of serious adverse effects of pain medications and weighting medications against their benefits, and regularly reassessing patients and reevaluating their pain management regimen. Patient-centered trauma care will also require having knowledge of barriers to pain management and discussing them with the patient and his/her family to identify solutions. PMID:27414816

  5. Reconstruction after pancreatic trauma by pancreaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Gonzalo Martín; Morillas, Patricia Jiménez; Pino, José C. Rodríguez; Canis, José M. Morón; Argenté, Francesc X. González

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic lesions are very infrequent after closed abdominal trauma (5% of cases) with a complication rate that affects 30–40% of patients, and a mortality rate that can reach 39%. In our experience, closed abdominal traumatisms occurring at typical popular horse-riding festivals in our region constitute a high risk of pancreatic trauma. The purpose of the present paper is to raise awareness about our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic lesions secondary to closed abdominal traumatism. Presentation of case We present the clinical cases of two young patients who, after suffering blunt abdominal trauma secondary to the impact of a horse during the celebration of typical horse-riding festival, were diagnosed with pancreatic trauma type III. The treatment was surgical in both cases and consisted in performing a pancreaticogastric anastomosis with preservation of the distal pancreas and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful and, at present, both patients are asymptomatic. Discussion Signs and symptoms caused by pancreatic lesion are unspecific and difficult to objectify. With some limitations CT is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis and staging in the acute phase. The Wirsung section is indication for surgical treatment. The most extended surgical procedure in these cases is the resection of pancreatic body, tail, and spleen. Conclusion The identification of a pancreatic injury after closed abdominal trauma requires a high suspicion based on the injury mechanism. A safer option may be the distal pancreatic preservation with pancreaticogastric anastomosis in grade III lesions with healthy pancreatic tissue. PMID:25744560

  6. Late presentation of jejunal perforation after thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kouritas, Vasileios K; Matheos, Efthimiou; Baloyiannis, Ioannis; Spyridakis, Michalis; Desimonas, Nikolaos; Hatzitheofilou, Kostas

    2009-11-01

    Jejunal perforation is extremely rare in trauma especially without initial involvement of the abdomen. We present the case of a delayed jejunal perforation after thoracic trauma with no initial indication of abdominal trauma in a 55-year-old man who was admitted to our department after a road traffic accident. The patient sustained thoracic trauma with rib fractures of the left hemithorax and hemopneumothorax and a mild head injury. On the fourth day of his in-hospital stay, he complained of severe abdominal pain and signs of acute abdomen were observed. He underwent emergency laparotomy where a perforation of the jejunum near the ligament of Treitz was noticed and sutured. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Physicians treating trauma should always have a high degree of suspicion regarding rare abdominal injuries, with delayed presentation, even if no abdominal involvement is noticed during the initial survey. PMID:19931795

  7. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, S; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC]) and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches. PMID:25593358

  8. A Clinical Perspective and Definition of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be complete or incomplete. The level of injury in SCI is defined as the most caudal segment with motor function rated at greater than or equal to 3/5, with pain and temperature preserved. The standard neurological classification of SCI provided by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) assigns grades from ASIA A (complete SCI) through ASIA E (normal sensory/motor), with B, C, and D representing varying degrees of injury between these extremes. The most common causes of SCI include trauma (motor vehicle accidents, sports, violence, falls), degenerative spinal disease, vascular injury (anterior spinal artery syndrome, epidural hematoma), tumor, infection (epidural abscess), and demyelinating processes (). (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B91)(Figure is included in full-text article.). PMID:27015067

  9. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  10. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The vertebrae are the bones that make up the spinal column, which surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The ... disks are soft tissues that sit between each vertebrae and act as cushions between vertebrae, and absorb ...

  11. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  12. Mitigation of sensory and motor deficits by acrolein scavenger phenelzine in a rat model of spinal cord contusive injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Park, Jonghyuck; Butler, Breanne; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Zheng, Lingxing; Tang, Jonathan; McCain, Robyn; Zhang, Wenpeng; Ouyang, Zheng; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are no effective therapies available for the excruciating neuropathic pain that develops after spinal cord injuries (SCI). As such, a great deal of effort is being put into the investigation of novel therapeutic targets that can alleviate this pain. One such target is acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde produced as a byproduct of oxidative stress and inflammation that is capable of activating the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel, known to be involved in the transmission and propagation of chronic neuropathic pain. One anti-acrolein agent, hydralazine, has already been shown to reduce neuropathic pain behaviors and offer neuroprotection after SCI. This study investigates another acrolein scavenger, phenelzine, for its possible role of alleviating sensory hypersensitivity through acrolein suppression. The results show that phenelzine is indeed capable of attenuating neuropathic pain behaviors in acute, delayed, and chronic administration schedules after injury in a rat model of SCI. In addition, upon the comparison of hydralazine to phenelzine, both acrolein scavengers displayed a dose-dependent response in the reduction of acrolein in vivo. Finally, phenelzine proved capable of providing locomotor function recovery and neuroprotection of spinal cord tissue when administered immediately after injury for 2 weeks. These results indicate that phenelzine may be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain after SCI and likely a viable alternative to hydralazine. We have shown that phenelzine can attenuate neuropathic pain behavior in acute, delayed, and chronic administration in post-SCI rats. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction in an acrolein metabolite in urine and an acrolein adduct in spinal cord tissue, and the suppression of TRPA1 over-expression in central and peripheral locations post-trauma. Acrolein scavenging might be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce post-SCI neuropathic pain. PMID:27060873

  13. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  15. Traumatic spinal cord injuries in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dincer, F; Oflazer, A; Beyazova, M; Celiker, R; Basgöze, O; Altioklar, K

    1992-09-01

    Spinal cord lesions have various aetiologies, and trauma is one of the leading causes. Patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) often have motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunctions and require a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. In this study 1694 SCI patients were investigated, including the frequency, and the distribution by age, sex, profession, aetiology, clinical status and year of occurrence. Traumatic SCI is more frequent among males than females and among those between the ages of 15 and 39 years. Regarding the aetiology, traffic accident comprised 35.41% of the total cases, the second most common cause was falls with 29.51%, and the third was high velocity bullet wounds: 21.95%. PMID:1408341

  16. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  17. Blood supply and vascular reactivity of the spinal cord under normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Feuerstein, Jeanne S; Theodore, Nicholas; Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2011-09-01

    The authors present a review of spinal cord blood supply, discussing the anatomy of the vascular system and physiological aspects of blood flow regulation in normal and injured spinal cords. Unique anatomical functional properties of vessels and blood supply determine the susceptibility of the spinal cord to damage, especially ischemia. Spinal cord injury (SCI), for example, complicating thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair is associated with ischemic trauma. The rate of this devastating complication has been decreased significantly by instituting physiological methods of protection. Traumatic SCI causes complex changes in spinal cord blood flow, which are closely related to the severity of injury. Manipulating physiological parameters such as mean arterial blood pressure and intrathecal pressure may be beneficial for patients with an SCI. Studying the physiopathological processes of the spinal cord under vascular compromise remains challenging because of its central role in almost all of the body's hemodynamic and neurofunctional processes. PMID:21663407

  18. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  19. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency. PMID:24918830

  20. Basic trauma life support.

    PubMed

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  1. Imaging of Abusive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shekdar, Karuna

    2016-06-01

    "Shaken baby syndrome" is a term often used by the physicians and public to describe abusive trauma inflicted on infants and young children. Advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and the associated clinical spectrum of injury has lead us to modify our terminology and address it as "abusive trauma" (AT). Pediatric abusive head trauma is defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of an infant or a young child (< 5 y age) due to inflicted blunt impact and/or violent shaking. This chapter focuses on the imaging aspects of childhood abusive trauma along with a brief description of the mechanism and pathophysiology of abusive injury. The diagnosis of AT is not always obvious, and abusive injuries in many infants may remain unrecognized. Pediatricians should be cognizant of AT since pediatricians play a crucial role in the diagnosis, management and prevention of AT. PMID:26882906

  2. Trauma registry reengineered.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Bolig, Nicole; Hixson, Heather; McWilliams, Nate; Rummerfield, Heather; Stratton, Elaine; Woodruff, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A successful trauma registry balances accuracy of abstraction and timeliness of case submissions to achieve quality performance. Staffing to achieve quality performance is a challenge at times based on competitive institutional need. The aim of this performance improvement timing study was to identify trauma registry job responsibilities and redesign the responsibilities to create increased abstraction time and maintain accuracy of data abstraction. The outcome is measured by case submission rates with existing staffing and interrater reliability outcomes. PMID:25397337

  3. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  4. The use of massive transfusion protocol for trauma and non-trauma patients in a civilian setting: what can be done better?

    PubMed Central

    Wijaya, Ramesh; Cheng, Hui Min Gloria; Chong, Chee Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Massive transfusion protocol (MTP) is increasingly used in civilian trauma cases to achieve better haemostatic resuscitation in patients requiring massive blood transfusions (MTs), with improved survival outcomes. However, in non-trauma patients, evidence for MTP is lacking. This study aims to assess the outcomes of a newly established MTP in a civilian setting, for both trauma and non-trauma patients, in an acute surgical care unit. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis was performed on 46 patients for whom MTP was activated in Changi General Hospital, Singapore. The patients were categorised into trauma and non-trauma groups. Assessment of Blood Consumption (ABC) score was used to identify MTP trauma patients and analyse over-activation rates. RESULTS Only 39.1% of all cases with MTP activation eventually received MTs; 39.8% of the MTs were for non-trauma patients. Mean fresh frozen plasma to packed red blood cells (pRBC) ratio achieved with MTP was 0.741, while mean platelet to pRBC ratio was 0.213. The 24-hour mortality rate for all patients who received an MT upon MTP activation was 33.3% (trauma vs. non-trauma group: 45.5% vs. 14.3%). The ABC scoring system used for trauma patients had a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 41.2%, respectively. CONCLUSION MTP may be used for both trauma and non-trauma patients in acute care surgery. Scoring systems to predict the need for an MT, improved compliance to predefined transfusion ratios and regular reviews of the MTP are necessary to optimise MTPs and to improve the outcomes of patients receiving MTs. PMID:27211577

  5. Complete nonsurgical resolution of a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Silber, S H

    1996-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEH) are heralded by spinal pain and progressive cord compression syndromes which may lead to permanent neurological disability or death if emergent neurosurgical intervention is delayed. It therefore must be considered early in the differential diagnosis of acute spinal cord compression syndrome. A case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as an acute myelopathy in a clarinet player who chronically used a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is presented. The case was remarkable for the rare complete spontaneous resolution of neurological function. Approximately 250 cases of SSEH have been reported in the medical literature, although only a handful of these patients have recovered spontaneously. This is the sixth report of such an event. The etiologies, contributing factors, disease progression, and treatment recommendations are discussed. PMID:8768163

  6. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  7. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  8. Level-I Trauma Center Effects on Return-to-Work Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Sergio I.; Salkever, David; MacKenzie, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Injury is the leading cause of death for persons aged 1-44 years in the United States. Injuries have a substantial economic cost. For that reason, regional systems of trauma care in which the more acutely injured patients are transported to Level-I (L-I) trauma centers (TCs) has been widely advocated. However, the cost of TC care is…

  9. Care of post-traumatic spinal cord injury patients in India: An analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, VK; Nigam, V; Goyal, T D; Chhabra, HS

    2007-01-01

    Background: The spinal cord injured patients if congregated early in spinal units where better facilities and dedicated expert care exist the outcome of treatment and rehabilitation, can be improved. The objective of this study is to find out the various factors responsible for a delay in the presentation of spinal injury patients to the specialized spinal trauma units and to suggest steps to improve the quality of care of the spinal trauma patients in the Indian setup. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of traumatic spinal cord injury admitted for rehabilitation between August 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled into the study and their data was analyzed. Results: Eighty-five per cent of the spinal cord injured patients were males and the mean age was 34 years (range 13-56 years). Twenty-nine (48.33%) of the spinal injuries occurred due to fall from height. There was an average of 45 days (range 0-188 days) of delay in presentation to a specialized spinal unit and most of the time the cause for the delay was unawareness on the part of patients and/or doctors regarding specialized spinal units. In 38 (62.5%) cases the mode of transportation of the spinal cord injured patient to the first visited hospital was by their own conveyance and the attendants of the patients did not have any idea about precautions essential to prevent neurological deterioration. Seventeen (28.33%) patients were given injection solumedrol with conservative treatment, 35 (60%) patients were given only conservative treatment and seven patients were operated (11.66%) upon at initially visited hospital. Of the seven patients operated five were fixed with posterior Harrington instrumentation (71.42%) and two (28.57%) were operated by short segment posterior pedicle screw fixation. None of the patients were subjected to physiotherapy-assisted transfers or wheel chair skills or even basic postural training, proper bladder/ bowel training program and sitting balance. Conclusion: Awareness on the part

  10. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  11. Acrolein contributes to TRPA1 up-regulation in peripheral and central sensory hypersensitivity following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Chen, Zhe; Muratori, Breanne; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2015-12-01

    Acrolein, an endogenous aldehyde, has been shown to be involved in sensory hypersensitivity after rat spinal cord injury (SCI), for which the pathogenesis is unclear. Acrolein can directly activate a pro-algesic transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel that exists in sensory neurons. Both acrolein and TRPA1 mRNA are elevated post SCI, which contributes to the activation of TRPA1 by acrolein and consequently, neuropathic pain. In the current study, we further showed that, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA exists not only in dorsal root ganglias but also in both peripheral (paw skin) and central endings of primary afferent nerves (dorsal horn of spinal cord). This is the first indication that pain signaling can be over-amplified in the peripheral skin by elevated expressions of TRPA1 following SCI, in addition over-amplification previously seen in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Furthermore, we show that acrolein alone, in the absence of physical trauma, could lead to the elevation of TRPA1 mRNA at various locations when injected to the spinal cord. In addition, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA could be mitigated using acrolein scavengers. Both of these attributes support the critical role of acrolein in elevating TRPA1 expression through gene regulation. Taken together, these data indicate that acrolein is likely a critical causal factor in heightening pain sensation post-SCI, through both the direct binding of TRPA1 receptor, and also by boosting the expression of TRPA1. Finally, our data also further support the notion that acrolein scavenging may be an effective therapeutic approach to alleviate neuropathic pain after SCI. We propose that the trauma-mediated elevation of acrolein causes neuropathic pain through at least two mechanisms: acrolein stimulates the production of transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in both central and peripheral locations, and it activates TRPA1 channels directly. Therefore, acrolein appears to be a critical

  12. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  13. A Direct Comparison of Three Clinically Relevant Treatments in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hosier, Hillary; Peterson, David; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Smith, Bradley R.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent preclinical studies have identified three treatments that are especially promising for reducing acute lesion expansion following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): riluzole, systemic hypothermia, and glibenclamide. Each has demonstrated efficacy in multiple studies with independent replication, but there is no way to compare them in terms of efficacy or safety, since different models were used, different laboratories were involved, and different outcomes were evaluated. Here, using a model of lower cervical hemicord contusion, we compared safety and efficacy for the three treatments, administered beginning 4 h after trauma. Treatment-associated mortality was 30% (3/10), 30% (3/10), 12.5% (1/8), and 0% (0/7) in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively. For survivors, all three treatments showed overall favorable efficacy, compared with controls. On open-field locomotor scores (modified Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores), hypothermia- and glibenclamide-treated animals were largely indistinguishable throughout the study, whereas riluzole-treated rats underperformed for the first two weeks; during the last four weeks, scores for the three treatments were similar, and significantly different from controls. On beam balance, hypothermia and glibenclamide treatments showed significant advantages over riluzole. After trauma, rats in the glibenclamide group rapidly regained a normal pattern of weight gain that differed markedly and significantly from that in all other groups. Lesion volumes at six weeks were: 4.8±0.7, 3.5±0.4, 3.1±0.3 and 2.5±0.3 mm3 in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively; measurements of spared spinal cord tissue confirmed these results. Overall, in terms of safety and efficacy, systemic hypothermia and glibenclamide were superior to riluzole. PMID:26192071

  14. Tageted bipolar radiofrequency decompression with vertebroplasty for intractable radicular pain due to spinal metastasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seong Jin; Lee, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal tumors are usually quite difficult to treat. In patients with metastatic spinal tumors, conventional radiotherapy fails to relieve pain in 20–30% of cases and open surgery often causes considerable trauma and complications, which delays treatment of the primary disease. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is considered to be useful in achieving rapid pain control and preventing further vertebral collapse due to spinal metastasis. However, symptoms of intraspinal neural compression can be contraindications to PVP. To overcome this problem, we performed PVP following targeted bipolar radiofrequency decompression, and examined the effect of the combined treatment in relieving severe radicular pain related to spinal cord compression caused by malignant metastatic tumors. PMID:27482319

  15. Tageted bipolar radiofrequency decompression with vertebroplasty for intractable radicular pain due to spinal metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong Jin; Park, Hahck Soo; Lee, Eun Young

    2016-08-01

    Metastatic spinal tumors are usually quite difficult to treat. In patients with metastatic spinal tumors, conventional radiotherapy fails to relieve pain in 20-30% of cases and open surgery often causes considerable trauma and complications, which delays treatment of the primary disease. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is considered to be useful in achieving rapid pain control and preventing further vertebral collapse due to spinal metastasis. However, symptoms of intraspinal neural compression can be contraindications to PVP. To overcome this problem, we performed PVP following targeted bipolar radiofrequency decompression, and examined the effect of the combined treatment in relieving severe radicular pain related to spinal cord compression caused by malignant metastatic tumors. PMID:27482319

  16. Thermoelectric device for treatment of radiculitis and spinal massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Kobylyansky, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Results of development of a thermoelectric device that enables controlled cyclic temperature impact on the damaged area of human organism are presented. Unlike the existing medical devices employing direct supply current for thermoelectric module, the present device controls supply current according to time dependence of temperature change assigned by doctor. It is established that such a device is an efficient means of therapy at herniation of intervertebral disks with marked radiculitis and tunicary syndromes, at meningitis, other spinal diseases and back traumas.

  17. Classification of Liver Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Hanna, Sherif S.; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    The classification of liver injuries is important for clinical practice, clinical research and quality assurance activities. The Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma proposed the OIS for liver trauma in 1989. The purpose ofthe present study was to apply this scale to a cohort ofliver trauma patients managed at a single Canadian trauma centre from January 1987 to June 1992.170 study patients were identified and reviewed. The mean age was 30, with 69% male and a mean ISS of 33.90% had a blunt mechanism ofinjury. The 170 patients were categorized into the 60IS grades ofliver injury. The number of units of blood transfused, the magnitude of the operative treatment required, the liver-related complications and the liver-related mortality correlated well with the OIS grade. The OIS grade was unable to predict the need for laparotomy or the length of stay in hospital. We conclude that the OIS is a useful, practical and important tool for the categorization of liver injuries, and it may prove to be the universally accepted classification scheme in liver trauma. PMID:8809585

  18. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. PMID:25241267

  19. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  20. Induced hypothermia for trauma-related ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Gagandeep; Gopal, Palepu B.; Kamat, Akshata S.; Mulavisala, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of 27-year-old male with lung contusions related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) managed by ARDSNet guidelines and additional hypothermia. On 4th day, post trauma partial pressure of oxygen dropped to 38 mm of mercury (Hg), not improving even on high positive end-expiratory pressure of 18 cm water (H2O), inverse ratio ventilation and fraction of inspired oxygen of 1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was ruled out due to the risk of hemorrhage from trauma sites. Thereafter, hypothermia along with muscle paralysis was considered to reduce total body oxygen consumption. Patient's condition improved under hypothermia, and he was extubated and taken up for fracture fixation surgeries and discharged later in stable condition. PMID:26195862

  1. Circulating Histones Are Mediators of Trauma-associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Simon T.; Zhang, Nan; Manson, Joanna; Liu, Tingting; Dart, Caroline; Baluwa, Florence; Wang, Susan Siyu; Brohi, Karim; Kipar, Anja; Yu, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury is a common complication after severe trauma, which predisposes patients to multiple organ failure. This syndrome largely accounts for the late mortality that arises and despite many theories, the pathological mechanism is not fully understood. Discovery of histone-induced toxicity in mice presents a new dimension for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To investigate the pathological roles of circulating histones in trauma-induced lung injury. Methods: Circulating histone levels in patients with severe trauma were determined and correlated with respiratory failure and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Their cause–effect relationship was studied using cells and mouse models. Measurements and Main Results: In a cohort of 52 patients with severe nonthoracic blunt trauma, circulating histones surged immediately after trauma to levels that were toxic to cultured endothelial cells. The high levels were significantly associated with the incidence of acute lung injury and SOFA scores, as well as markers of endothelial damage and coagulation activation. In in vitro systems, histones damaged endothelial cells, stimulated cytokine release, and induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase release. Cellular toxicity resulted from their direct membrane interaction and resultant calcium influx. In mouse models, cytokines and markers for endothelial damage and coagulation activation significantly increased immediately after trauma or histone infusion. Pathological examinations showed that lungs were the predominantly affected organ with edema, hemorrhage, microvascular thrombosis, and neutrophil congestion. An anti-histone antibody could reduce these changes and protect mice from histone-induced lethality. Conclusions: This study elucidates a new mechanism for acute lung injury after severe trauma and proposes that circulating histones are viable therapeutic targets for improving survival

  2. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  3. Thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation as a rare cause of isolated intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Entwistle, John J; Arnold, Michael A; Pierson, Christopher R; Governale, Lance S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare vascular lesions that most frequently present with back pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. Neurological decline is typically secondary to progressive radiculopathy, myelopathy, venous thrombosis, and stroke. Few case reports have described thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformations that present with both subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. This is the first reported case of a thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation presenting with isolated intraventricular hemorrhage on initial imaging followed by acute and fatal rehemorrhage. PMID:24784978

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vilaas S; Reis, Martin N; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Broder, Joshua; Choudhri, Asim F; Kendi, A Tuba; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Prall, J Adair; Raksin, Patricia B; Roth, Christopher J; Sharma, Aseem; West, O Clark; Wintermark, Max; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Neuroimaging plays an important role in the management of head trauma. Several guidelines have been published for identifying which patients can avoid neuroimaging. Noncontrast head CT is the most appropriate initial examination in patients with minor or mild acute closed head injury who require neuroimaging as well as patients with moderate to severe acute closed head injury. In short-term follow-up neuroimaging of acute traumatic brain injury, CT and MRI may have complementary roles. In subacute to chronic traumatic brain injury, MRI is the most appropriate initial examination, though CT may have a complementary role in select circumstances. Advanced neuroimaging techniques are areas of active research but are not considered routine clinical practice at this time. In suspected intracranial vascular injury, CT angiography or venography or MR angiography or venography is the most appropriate imaging study. In suspected posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, high-resolution noncontrast skull base CT is the most appropriate initial imaging study to identify the source, with cisternography reserved for problem solving. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27262056

  5. Trauma Boot Camp: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moftakhar, Yasmin; Dobbins IV, Arthur L; Khan, Ramisha; Dasgupta, Rahul; Blanda, Rachel; Marchand, Tiffany; Ahmed, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interns are often unprepared to effectively communicate in the acute trauma setting. Despite the many strengths of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program, the main shortcoming within the course is the deficiency of teamwork and leadership training. In this study, we describe the creation of an interdisciplinary boot camp in which interns' basic trauma knowledge, level of confidence, and teamwork skills are assessed. Methods: We designed a one-day, boot camp curriculum for interns of various specialties with the purpose of improving communication and teamwork skills for effective management of acute trauma patients. Our curriculum consisted of a one-day, twelve-hour experience, which included trauma patient simulations, content expert lectures, group discussion of video demonstrations, and skill development workstations. Baseline and acquired knowledge were assessed through the use of confidence surveys, cognitive questionnaires, and a validated evaluation tool of teamwork and leadership skills for trauma Results: Fifteen interns entered the boot camp with an overall confidence score of 3.2 (1-5 scale) in the management of trauma cases. At the culmination of the study, there was a significant increase in the overall confidence level of interns in role delegation, leadership, Crisis Resource Management (CRM) principles, and in the performance of primary and secondary surveys. No significant changes were seen in determining and effectively using the Glasgow Coma Scale, Orthopedic splinting/reduction skills, and effective use of closed-loop communication. Conclusion: An intensive one-day trauma boot camp demonstrated significant improvement in self-reported confidence of CRM concepts, role delegation, leadership, and performance of primary and secondary surveys. Despite the intensive curriculum, there was no significant improvement in overall teamwork and leadership performance during simulated cases. Our boot camp curriculum offers educators a

  6. [Spinal and spinal cord injuries. Therapeutic approach in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Bouger, D; Dukuly, L; Ndong-Launay, M

    1991-01-01

    The authors present their experience with 81 cases (66.4%) of acute cervical spine injuries (C.S.I.) and 41 cases (33.6%) of acute thoracolumbar spine injuries (T.L.S.I.) treated by a multidisciplinary approach, at Jeanne Ebori Hospital (Libreville, Gabon) between the years 1981 and 1987. Traffic accidents were the leading cause of injury. The largest group consisted of patients in their third decade. The anatomic localizations were: upper cervical spine: 22 cases (27%); lower cervical spine: 56 (69%); upper thoracic spine: 11 (26.8%); lower thoracic spine or thoracolumbar area: 19 (46.3%); lumbar spine: 7 (17%). There were osteoligamental lesions in 3 cases (3.7%) of C.S.I. and 4 (9.7%) of T.L.S.I. Clinically, 44 patients (54.3%) with C.S.I. and 37 (90.2%) with T.L.S.I. had neurological deficits. Surgical indications depended upon the osseous as well as neurologic lesions. There were five important steps in the treatment of spinal injuries associated with neurological deficit: (1) immobilization, (2) medical stabilization, (3) spinal alignment (skeletal traction), (4) operative decompression if there was proven cord compression, and (5) spinal stabilization. Twenty patients (24.6%) with cervical injuries were treated conservatively (traction, collar, kinesitherapy); 53 (65.4%) underwent a surgical intervention (anterior approach - 21, posterior fusion - 30, combined approach - 2); and in 8 patients (9.8%) refraining from surgery seemed the best alternative. After lengthy multidisciplinary discussion, the authors elected not to operate on tetraplegic patients with respiratory problems that necessitated assisted ventilation, because of its fatal outcome. Of injuries to the thoracolumbar spine, 13 (31.7%) were treated conservatively (bedrest, orthopedic treatment). Twenty-eight patients (68.2%) with unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures associated with neurologic deficit required acute surgical intervention (stabilization with or without decompression of the neural

  7. The Sur1-Trpm4 Channel in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Simard, J Marc; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Aarabi, Bizhan; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2013-08-17

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major unsolved challenge in medicine. Impact trauma to the spinal cord shears blood vessels, causing an immediate 'primary hemorrhage'. During the hours following trauma, the region of hemorrhage enlarges progressively, with delayed or 'secondary hemorrhage' adding to the primary hemorrhage, and effectively doubling its volume. The process responsible for the secondary hemorrhage that results in early expansion of the hemorrhagic lesion is termed 'progressive hemorrhagic necrosis' (PHN). PHN is a dynamic process of auto destruction whose molecular underpinnings are only now beginning to be elucidated. PHN results from the delayed, progressive, catastrophic failure of the structural integrity of capillaries. The resulting 'capillary fragmentation' is a unique, pathognomonic feature of PHN. Recent work has implicated the Sur1-Trpm4 channel that is newly upregulated in penumbral microvessels as being required for the development of PHN. Targeting the Sur1-Trpm4 channel by gene deletion, gene suppression, or pharmacological inhibition of either of the two channel subunits, Sur1 or Trpm4, yields exactly the same effects histologically and functionally, and exactly the same unique, pathognomonic phenotype - the prevention of capillary fragmentation. The potential advantage of inhibiting Sur1-Trpm4 channels using glibenclamide is a highly promising strategy for ameliorating the devastating sequelae of spinal cord trauma in humans. PMID:24834370

  8. Compressive myelopathy associated with ectasia of the vertebral and spinal arteries in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bozynski, C C; Vasquez, L; O'Brien, D P; Johnson, G C

    2012-09-01

    A 4-year-old dog was presented for acute, progressive tetraparesis and cervical hyperesthesia. Symmetrical tubular structures coursing along the lateroventral aspects of the spinal cord at the fourth and fifth cervical vertebrae were identified in magnetic resonance images. At necropsy, vertebral arteries and their spinal branches were severely ectatic bilaterally, and the cervical spinal cord was compressed. Histologically, the ectatic branches of the vertebral and ventral spinal arteries were surrounded by fibrosis with scant mononuclear cell infiltrates and hemorrhage. Spinal branches of the vertebral arteries had focally severe reduction in the tunica media. A thrombus was in an arterial branch. Smaller vessels in adjacent tissue had fibrinoid degeneration. Axonal degeneration was detected in the affected spinal cord and nerve roots. The segmental degenerative radiculomyelopathy in this dog was attributed to anomalous ectasia of the vertebral and ventral spinal arteries. PMID:21856870

  9. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  10. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  11. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  12. Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed. PMID:12174987

  13. Sexual and Reproductive Function in Spinal Cord Injury and Spinal Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Theodore H.; Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J. Mason; Palumbo, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data. PMID:26605025

  14. Sexual and Reproductive Function in Spinal Cord Injury and Spinal Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Albright, Theodore H; Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-09-28

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data. PMID:26605025

  15. Evaluation of preventable trauma death in emergency department of Imam Reza hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Changiz; Rad, Bahram Samadi; Vahdati, Samad Shams; Ghaffarzad, Amir; Masoud, Armita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trauma is considered as a worldwide problem despite socio-economic development. Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are the most important cause of trauma. Trauma related deaths are mostly preventable. This study aimed to investigate the causes and prevention of death in trauma patients. METHODS: This retrospective, descriptive-analytic study assessed 100 trauma patients referred to our emergency department (ED) from January 2013 to Januanry 2015. The included patients were those with trauma died after arrival at our ED. Age, sex, cause of trauma, clinical causes of death, causes of death defined by autopsy, way of transfer to the ED, time of ambulance arrival at the scene of trauma, and time elapsed to enter the ED from the scene of trauma were studied. RESULTS: In the 100 patients, 21 (21%) patients were female and 79 (79%) male. Forty-three patients were older than 60 years. Trauma was largely due to pedestrian accidents in 31% of the patients, and 33% had a hypo-volemic shock. About 80% of deaths were due to intra-cranial hemorrhage (ICH) or intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and spinal injuries were not preventable. Autopsy revealed that 28% of the patients suffered from internal injuries. Autopsy revealed that 19% of the deaths were not preventable and 81% were considered preventable. In our patients, 76 were transferred to the hospital by emergency medicine services (EMS). Analysis of time for ambulance arrival to the scene and frequency of death revealed that 52.2% of the deaths occurred between 11 and 15 minutes. Analysis of time for admission to the ED from the scene of trauma showed that 74.6% deaths occurred between 6 and 10 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of hospital preventable deaths is about 80%, a high mortality rate, which denotes a lack of proper diagnosis and treatment. The time for arrival of EMS at the scene of trauma is longer than that in other countries. PMID:27313809

  16. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  17. Extradural Giant Multiloculated Arachnoid Cyst Causing Spinal Cord Compression in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Serdar; Anik, Ihsan; Gocmen, Selcuk; Sirin, Sait

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are rare expanding lesions in the spinal canal. Enlargement may cause progressive signs and symptoms caused by spinal cord compression. They are associated with trauma, surgery, arachnoiditis, and neural tube defects. Most nontraumatic spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are thought to be congenital. Design: Case report and literature review. Findings: A 9-year-old boy with mild paraparesis was found to have an extradural multiloculated arachnoid cyst with fibrous septa at T4-L3 levels and anterior compression and displacement of the spinal cord. Conclusions: Definitive treatment of arachnoid cyst entails radical cyst removal and dura cleft repair. Formation of a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula may require external lumbar drainage. PMID:18795482

  18. Human Spinal Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-07-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. Humans have direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. PMID:27023730

  19. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes. PMID:23192074

  20. Trauma care documentation: a comprehensive guide.

    PubMed

    Southard, P; Frankel, P

    1989-01-01

    The medical record serves numerous functions. It provides chronologic evidence of patient evaluation, treatment, and response to therapy, and a means to review the quality of the care. Communication among members of the health care team regarding the patient's status and plan of care also occurs by means of the medical record. The medical and legal importance of a comprehensive, accurate trauma resuscitation record cannot be overemphasized. The success of this type of documentation will depend on the design of the record and the understanding of the personnel involved. In addition, nursing managers responsible for the fiscal accountability of their departments understand the value of accurate documentation. The trauma resuscitation record can be used to demonstrate to insurance companies the reason for charging trauma patients additional fees. Inadequate documentation can cause charges to be disallowed by the third-party payors. Perhaps one of the most important functions of the medical record is to assist in protecting the legal interest of the patient and the health care provider. Minimum documentation for care provided in the emergency department must include patient identification, how the patient arrived, care that was rendered before arrival, pertinent history, chronologic notation of results of physical examination including vital signs, and the results of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and tests. The physician's orders and diagnostic impression should be recorded. It is important that the patient's response to the interventions, not just the intervention itself, be described. The patient's disposition and condition on discharge from the emergency department must be documented. For the trauma patient, mechanisms of injury, GCS, trauma score (or essential components), spinal immobilization, and the status of airway, breathing, and circulatory systems also must be recorded. The importance of accurate and comprehensive documentation on every medical

  1. Epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1977-01-01

    Accidents are the cause of some 50 deaths per 100 000 population each year in the US; some 3% of these are from traumatic spinal cord injury alone. Traumatic spinal cord injury in socioeconomically advanced countries, has a probably annual incidence rate of 3 per 100 000 population. Males are affected five times as often as females, and in the US, Negroes have twice the rates of whites. Half the cases are due to motor vehicle accidents, 1/4 to falls, and 1/10 to sports injuries. Maximal ages at risk are 15 to 34; only for cord damage due to falls do this risk differ, and here elderly are the more prone. Associated injuries are common in traumatic cord injury, and head injury and pulmonary dysfunction are frequent causes of the acute deaths in traumatic SCI which is why complete quadriplegia has a high early case-fatality ratio. Late deaths in SCI are principally the direct or indirect result of the neurogenic bladder. With treatment in comprehensive spinal cord injury centers, more than 4 of 5 traumatic SCI patients will survive ten years with an average of almost 18 years. Median survival may be almost 14 years for complete quadriplegia, 17 for complete paraplegia, 19 for incomplete quadriplegia, 20 for incomplete paraplegia and 28 for cauda equina lesions. Prevalence is likely to be some 50 per 100 000 population with about 20 per 100 000 completely paralyzed (3 quadriplegic and 19 paraplegic). Some 4 out of 5 survivors of traumatic SCI should be able to live at home and perform gainful work after such treatment. PMID:616527

  2. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  3. Pediatric head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2011-01-01

    Head injury in children accounts for a large number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Falls are the most common type of injury, followed by motor-vehicle-related accidents. In the present study, we discuss the evaluation, neuroimaging and management of children with head trauma. Furthermore, we present the specific characteristics of each type of pediatric head injury. PMID:21887034

  4. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  5. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques. PMID:26449103

  6. Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Manickam; Weathers, William M

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. Computed tomography and radiography are the main forms of imaging assessment, but the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become more common in the emergency room (ER) setting for evaluation of low-velocity/sports-related injury and high-velocity injury. The superior soft tissue contrast and detail provided by MR imaging gives clinicians a powerful tool in the management of acute MSK injury in the ER. This article provides an overview of techniques and considerations when using MR imaging in the evaluation of some of the common injuries seen in the ER setting. PMID:27150325

  7. Pathological studies of spinal nerve ganglia in relation to intractable intercostal pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, F P

    1978-07-01

    Pathological examination, by light and electron microscopy, of spinal nerve ganglia surgically removed in treatment of intractable intercostal pain, has shown changes in sensory cells, whether the etiology of the pain has been trauma related to intercostal nerve, or infection by herpes zoster virus. The possible role of the sensory cell changes in accounting for causalgic type pain is discussed. PMID:684607

  8. Supporting the early use of echocardiography in blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This case reports a very unusual mechanism of cardiac rupture following an episode of multiple blunt chest trauma. The patient, a professional jockey, was trampled by horses, and although shocked on hospital admission, he did not present with signs and symptoms that were consistent with cardiogenic shock. This case highl