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Sample records for acute spinal trauma

  1. Pediatric spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Wagner, Matthias W; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spinal trauma is unique. The developing pediatric spinal column and spinal cord deal with direct impact and indirect acceleration/deceleration or shear forces very different compared to adult patients. In addition children are exposed to different kind of traumas. Moreover, each age group has its unique patterns of injury. Familiarity with the normal developing spinal anatomy and kind of traumas is essential to correctly diagnose injury. Various imaging modalities can be used. Ultrasound is limited to the neonatal time period; plain radiography and computer tomography are typically used in the acute work-up and give highly detailed information about the osseous lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for disco-ligamentous and spinal cord injuries. Depending on the clinical presentation and timing of trauma the various imaging modalities will be employed. In the current review article, a summary of the epidemiology and distribution of posttraumatic lesions is discussed in the context of the normal anatomical variations due to progressing development of the child. PMID:25512255

  2. Skiing and spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Frymoyer, J W; Pope, M H; Kristiansen, T

    1982-07-01

    Spinal injury in skiers can either be acute or chronic. Acute spinal injury accounts for 3 to 3.6 per cent of all injuries occurring in Alpine skiing. Fewer acute injuries occur in cross-country skiing, and those that do usually are the result of a sudden, compressive force from a seated fall. The prevalence of chronic spinal trauma in skiing is unknown. Both cross-country and Alpine skiers appear to have greater complaints of mild to moderate low back pain as compared with their nonskiing counterparts. These differences may be the result of a complex interaction between recreational and occupational activities. Theoretical analyses suggest a risk for low-grade torsional injury to the Alpine skier's spine, whereas in cross-country skiing significant shear forces are applied to lumbar discs during the kick but not the double-poling phase.

  3. Olprinone Attenuates the Acute Inflammatory Response and Apoptosis after Spinal Cord Trauma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Emanuela; Mazzon, Emanuela; Paterniti, Irene; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Bramanti, Placido; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Olprinone hydrochloride is a newly developed compound that selectively inhibits PDE type III and is characterized by several properties, including positive inotropic effects, peripheral vasodilatory effects, and a bronchodilator effect. In clinical settings, olprinone is commonly used to treat congestive cardiac failure, due to its inotropic and vasodilating effects. The mechanism of these cardiac effects is attributed to increased cellular concentrations of cAMP. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacological action of olprinone on the secondary damage in experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Traumatic SCI is characterized by an immediate, irreversible loss of tissue at the lesion site, as well as a secondary expansion of tissue damage over time. Although secondary injury should be preventable, no effective treatment options currently exist for patients with SCI. Spinal cord trauma was induced in mice by the application of vascular clips (force of 24 g) to the dura via a four-level T5–T8 laminectomy. SCI in mice resulted in severe trauma characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, and production of inflammatory mediators, tissue damage, apoptosis, and locomotor disturbance. Olprinone treatment (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 and 6 h after the SCI significantly reduced: (1) the degree of spinal cord inflammation and tissue injury (histological score), (2) neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity), (3) nitrotyrosine formation, (4) pro-inflammatory cytokines, (5) NF-κB expression, (6) p-ERK1/2 and p38 expression and (7) apoptosis (TUNEL staining, FAS ligand, Bax and Bcl-2 expression). Moreover, olprinone significantly ameliorated the recovery of hind-limb function (evaluated by motor recovery score). Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that olprinone treatment reduces the development of inflammation and tissue injury associated with spinal cord trauma. PMID

  4. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the bones or disks have been weakened Fragments of bone (such as from broken vertebrae, which are the ... presses on the spinal cord (decompression laminectomy ) Remove bone fragments, disk fragments, or foreign objects Fuse broken spinal ...

  5. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  6. Significant clinical, neuropathological and behavioural recovery from acute spinal cord trauma by transplantation of a well-defined somatic stem cell from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Schira, Jessica; Gasis, Marcia; Estrada, Veronica; Hendricks, Marion; Schmitz, Christine; Trapp, Thorsten; Kruse, Fabian; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Müller, Hans Werner

    2012-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury and different stem cell types have been grafted into animal models and humans suffering from spinal trauma. Due to inconsistent results, it is still an important and clinically relevant question which stem cell type will prove to be therapeutically effective. Thus far, stem cells of human sources grafted into spinal cord mostly included barely defined heterogeneous mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord blood. Here, we have transplanted a well-defined unrestricted somatic stem cell isolated from human umbilical cord blood into an acute traumatic spinal cord injury of adult immune suppressed rat. Grafting of unrestricted somatic stem cells into the vicinity of a dorsal hemisection injury at thoracic level eight resulted in hepatocyte growth factor-directed migration and accumulation within the lesion area, reduction in lesion size and augmented tissue sparing, enhanced axon regrowth and significant functional locomotor improvement as revealed by three behavioural tasks (open field Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor score, horizontal ladder walking test and CatWalk gait analysis). To accomplish the beneficial effects, neither neural differentiation nor long-lasting persistence of the grafted human stem cells appears to be required. The secretion of neurite outgrowth-promoting factors in vitro further suggests a paracrine function of unrestricted somatic stem cells in spinal cord injury. Given the highly supportive functional characteristics in spinal cord injury, production in virtually unlimited quantities at GMP grade and lack of ethical concerns, unrestricted somatic stem cells appear to be a highly suitable human stem cell source for clinical application in central nervous system injuries. PMID:21903726

  7. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  8. [Who is who revisited: spinal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schueller, G

    2010-12-01

    The ideal classification of spinal trauma does not yet exist, primarily because the combination of morphological, biomechanical and clinical parameters in one single nomenclature has proved impossible. For radiologists and surgeons who work closely together, only a few classifications of injury patterns have been shown to be useful enough to provide rapid and stable therapy decisions. Many classifications are too complex to be practical for day-to-day practice, such as the Magerl classification, which has been adopted by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO). Not least because of this classification difficulty, eponyms and synonyms are widely used to describe trauma of the spine, comparable to the number of terms used to describe fractures of the upper and lower limbs. The members of trauma teams should be aware of the definitions of these terms as well as the strengths and limitations of the existing classifications of spinal trauma. PMID:20967415

  9. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  10. Acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morse, S D

    1982-08-01

    Two cases of the acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome are presented. A 63-year-old diabetic hypertensive man manifested the syndrome as a result of atraumatic ischemia of the cord. A 32-year-old health man developed it after sustaining a hyperextension injury in a baseball game. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this entity are reviewed. Knowledge of this entity is of major importance in the analysis and management of head and neck trauma, as well as in the recognition and management of atraumatic neurologic dysfunction due to ischemia, hemorrhage, or thrombosis.

  11. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  12. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H.; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome – a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems. PMID:25396073

  13. Spinal Traumas and their Treatments According to Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen; Movahhed, Mina; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-07-01

    Spinal Traumas have been categorized as disabling diseases that cause irretrievable personal and social problems. Having conducted a rather comprehensive diagnosis of the anatomy of the backbone and spinal cord as well as their functions, Avicenna (Ibn Sina, 980-1037) stated the levels and kinds of spinal impairments that are caused by spinal traumas in his great masterpiece Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). He also based his treatment process on his etiological diagnosis of such impairments. Avicenna had used the following methods to treat spinal traumas: food and drug therapy and regimental therapies such as massage, phlebotomy, cupping, dry sauna, and surgery. The authors of the present article review the bases of Avicenna's viewpoints regarding spinal traumas and their treatment.

  14. Photochemically induced spinal ischaemia: a model of spinal cord trauma in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olby, Natasha J.; Blakemore, W. F.

    1995-05-01

    Focal thrombosis was induced in the dorsal funiculus of the rat spinal cord by exposing the cord to light following intravenous injection of the photoactive dye, rose bengal. The light source was a 599 standing wave dye laser, pumped by an Innova 70 - 4 argon ion laser (Coherent Ltd, Cambridge, UK) and the light was delivered to the operative site via an optical fiber. The histological characteristics of the development and resolution of the lesion have been studied. Forty rats were examined with light and electron microscopy at various time points between 30 minutes and one month after irradiation and the lesion length was measured. Platelet aggregation, increased extracellular space in the white matter and vacuolation of the neurones and glia of the grey matter were present 30 minutes after injury. Progressive necrosis of the white and grey matter developed over the subsequent 24 hours to produce a fusiform lesion that occupied the dorsal funiculus and dorsal horns of the spinal cord at its center and tapered cranially and caudally along the dorsal columns for a total distance of seven millimeters. By one month after injury the area of necrosis had become a cyst lined by astrocytes ventrolaterally and meningeal cells dorsally. Measurements of lesion length showed a variability of 26%. This model of spinal cord trauma produces a lesion that is sufficiently reproducible to be suitable for performing studies aimed at tissue preservation and repair.

  15. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  16. PEEK biomaterials in trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; Devine, John N

    2007-11-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  17. Spinal nerve root β-APP staining in infants is not a reliable indicator of trauma.

    PubMed

    Squier, W; Scheimberg, I; Smith, C

    2011-10-10

    This preliminary communication describes seven babies with β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) positive axonal swellings in nerve roots at multiple levels of the spinal cord. All seven babies died of natural causes. Two died in utero providing evidence for nerve root injury in the absence of trauma, two died within one day of birth and the possibility of birth related injury has to be considered. Three babies were over one month of age and had no history or pathological evidence of trauma. These findings show that if axonal injury is carefully sought in every infant death, not just in babies where trauma is suspected, it will be found in a proportion of babies dying from natural diseases. While spinal nerve root axonal injury in infants may suggest trauma, it is not, in itself, diagnostic of trauma.

  18. Recent advances in managing a spinal cord injury secondary to trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Christopher S.; Martin, Allan R.; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) affect 1.3 million North Americans, producing devastating physical, social, and vocational impairment. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma is followed by a significant secondary injury which includes local ischemia, pro-apoptotic signaling, release of cytotoxic factors, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Expedient delivery of medical and surgical care during this critical period can improve long-term functional outcomes, engendering the concept of “Time is Spine”. We emphasize the importance of expeditious care while outlining the initial clinical and radiographic assessment of patients. Key evidence-based early interventions (surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation, and methylprednisolone) are also reviewed, including findings of the landmark Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS). We then describe other neuroprotective approaches on the edge of translation such as the sodium-channel blocker riluzole, the anti-inflammatory minocycline, and therapeutic hypothermia. We also review promising neuroregenerative therapies that are likely to influence management practices over the next decade including chondroitinase, Rho-ROCK pathway inhibition, and bioengineered strategies. The importance of emerging neural stem cell therapies to remyelinate denuded axons and regenerate neural circuits is also discussed. Finally, we outline future directions for research and patient care. PMID:27303644

  19. Recent advances in managing a spinal cord injury secondary to trauma.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Christopher S; Martin, Allan R; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) affect 1.3 million North Americans, producing devastating physical, social, and vocational impairment. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma is followed by a significant secondary injury which includes local ischemia, pro-apoptotic signaling, release of cytotoxic factors, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Expedient delivery of medical and surgical care during this critical period can improve long-term functional outcomes, engendering the concept of "Time is Spine". We emphasize the importance of expeditious care while outlining the initial clinical and radiographic assessment of patients. Key evidence-based early interventions (surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation, and methylprednisolone) are also reviewed, including findings of the landmark Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS). We then describe other neuroprotective approaches on the edge of translation such as the sodium-channel blocker riluzole, the anti-inflammatory minocycline, and therapeutic hypothermia. We also review promising neuroregenerative therapies that are likely to influence management practices over the next decade including chondroitinase, Rho-ROCK pathway inhibition, and bioengineered strategies. The importance of emerging neural stem cell therapies to remyelinate denuded axons and regenerate neural circuits is also discussed. Finally, we outline future directions for research and patient care. PMID:27303644

  20. [Spinal stroke in the acute myeloblast leucosis].

    PubMed

    Kotova, N A; Klimovich, A V; Krasnoruzhskiĭ, A I; Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Volkova, S A; Lalaian, T V

    2013-01-01

    Data of literature on the frequency of the nervous system lesions in different variants of leucosis are analyzed. A case of a man with petechial skin rash and bruises on the body, gingival hemorrhage and general sickness is described in details. The hematologic tests revealed acute myeloblast leucosis. A lumbar puncture revealed blood in the cerebrospinal fluid and MRI showed an epidural hematoma in lumbar segments 3 and 4. At this level, the hematoma compressed the dural bag and roots of the horse tail with accompanying vessels (the radicular medullar artery and large radicular veins). A paracentetic removal of the hematoma with the decompression of spinal roots was carried out. The blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid and symptoms of the left facial nerve lesion allowed to diagnose neuroleucosis. This case presented the mixed pathogenesis of myeloischemia. The epidural hematoma compressed not only the roots of the horse tail but the accompanying vessels (arteries and veins). The venous outflow obstruction along radicular veins worsened the microcirculation in the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord. Complex polychemotherapy in the combination with neuroprotectors (cortexin, gliatiline), antiaggregants and vitamins is recommended. PMID:23612398

  1. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  2. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  3. Spinal Intradural Schwannoma with Acute Intratumoural Haemorrhage: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Kongwad, Lakshman I.; Valiathan, Manna G.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas account for around half of all intradural spinal tumours, with chronic progressive symptoms as the most common presenting features. Intratumoural haemorrhage as a presenting feature of spinal schwannoma is very rare and only 11 cases have been reported till date. Authors here report a previously asymptomatic 40-year-old male who presented with acute onset paraplegia 12 hours after a minor trauma. MR imaging revealed a C7-D3 intradural-extramedullary lesion with features of acute blood and showing no enhancement. Emergency laminectomy and complete removal of the mass was performed and histopathology revealed features of schwannoma with haemorrhage. Patient had modest improvement of his neurological deficits at a follow-up of 6 months. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:26894121

  4. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  5. Current concepts in the immediate management of acute spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Tator, C H; Rowed, D W

    1979-01-01

    The management of acute spinal cord injuries has changed considerably during the past 10 years owing to new information about the pathophysiology of cord trauma and new diagnostic and treatment methods. It is now known that the cord suffers not only from the immediate physical effects of trauma, but also from secondary pathologic processes, such as ischemia and edema, which are treatable in the first few hours after injury. New neuroradiologic and neurophysiological techniques, such as the recording of the somatosensory evoked potential, increase the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis in the acute phase. Current immediate treatment includes the administration of steroids and mannitol, with careful attention to respiratory and cardiovascular homeostasis, to overcome post-traumatic ischemia and edema, and immobilization of the spine with devices such as the halo. New surgical procedures are used in selected cases to improve neurologic recovery, to provide rigid immobilization of the spine or to allow earlier mobilization of the patient. The care of spinal cord injuries in the acute phase is facilitated by multidisciplinary units. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B FIG. 3 PMID:117894

  6. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  7. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  8. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  9. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  10. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Garbossa, D.; Altieri, R.; Specchia, F. M. Calamo; Agnoletti, A.; Pilloni, G.; Lanotte, M.; Spaziante, R.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs. PMID:25685219

  11. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed

    Garbossa, D; Altieri, R; Specchia, F M Calamo; Agnoletti, A; Pilloni, G; Lanotte, M; Spaziante, R; Ducati, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs.

  12. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  13. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  14. Computed tomography in trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  15. Three‐dimensional scanning with dual‐source computed tomography in patients with acute skeletal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Duzgun; Tamam, Cuneyt; Gumus, Terman

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of multiplanar reformatted images and three‐dimensional images created after multidetector computed tomography examination in detecting acute post‐traumatic osseous pathology of the skeletal system. METHOD: Between October 2006 and December 2008, 105 patients with a history of acute trauma were referred to our service. Patients were evaluated with multidetector computed tomography using multiplanary reconstructed images initially (R‐I), and six months after this initial evaluation, three‐dimensional images were assessed of each patient (R‐II). Axial images were used for guiding as a reference Data obtained was recorded and graded according to importance levels of the pathologies. RESULTS: The R‐II score was higher in the non‐articular and highest in periartricular fractures of the extremities, and thoracic and pelvic cage injuries. For the spinal column, while R‐I data was more significant In patients referred with polytrauma, R‐II data, was more statistically significant, for short processing and adaptation time to acquiring immediate critical information. For all cases it was seen that three dimensional scans were more efficient in providing the orientation, within a short time. CONCLUSION: By dual source multidedector tomography systems trauma patients may be evaluated by multiplanary and three dimensionally reconstructed images. When used correctly, three dimensional imaging is advantageous and can help determine the exact nature and extension and also importance of osseous injuries. PMID:21120300

  16. Endoscopic treatment of spinal trauma at the thoracolumbar junction

    PubMed Central

    Beisse, Rudolf

    2007-01-01

    Attempts of treating unstable fractures of the thoracolumbar junction by posterior reduction and fixation alone often result in a significant loss of correction, especially in lesions where a severe destruction of the vertebral body and the intervertebral disc is present. The conventional open approaches like classic thoraco-phreno-lumbotomy produces additional iatrogenic trauma at the lateral chest and abdominal wall which not rarely leads to intercostal neuralgia, as well as post-thoracotomy syndromes. The endoscopic trans-diaphragmatic approach described below opens up the whole thoracolumbar junction to a minimally invasive procedure allowing one to perform all the procedures needed for a full reconstruction of the anterior column of the spine like corpectomy, decompression, vertebral body replacement and anterior plating. The key to address also the subdiaphragmal and retroperitoneal section of the thoracolumbar junction is a partial detachment of the diaphragm which runs along the attachment at the spine and the ribs. The technique was published first in 1998 and has been used now in 650 endoscopic procedures at the thoracolumbar junction out of a total of more than 1300 thoracoscopic operations of the spine in the BG Unfallklinik Murnau, Germany since 1996. PMID:21139778

  17. Dynamics of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute depletion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Echeverry, Stefania; Shi, Xiang Qun; Yang, Mu; Yang, Qiu Zi; Wang, Guan Yun Frances; Chambon, Julien; Wu, Yi Chen; Fu, Kai Yuan; De Koninck, Yves; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding on the function of microglia has been revolutionized in the recent 20 years. However, the process of maintaining microglia homeostasis has not been fully understood. In this study, we dissected the features of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute partial depletion. By injecting intrathecally Mac-1-saporin, a microglia selective immunotoxin, we ablated 50% microglia in the spinal cord of naive mice. Spinal microglia repopulated rapidly and local homeostasis was re-established within 14 days post-depletion. Mac-1-saporin treatment resulted in microglia cell proliferation and circulating monocyte infiltration. The latter is indeed part of an acute, transient inflammatory reaction that follows cell depletion, and was characterized by an increase in the expression of inflammatory molecules and by the breakdown of the blood spinal cord barrier. During this period, microglia formed cell clusters and exhibited a M1-like phenotype. MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was essential in promoting this depletion associated spinal inflammatory reaction. Interestingly, ruling out MCP-1-mediated secondary inflammation, including blocking recruitment of monocyte-derived microglia, did not affect depletion-triggered microglia repopulation. Our results also demonstrated that newly generated microglia kept their responsiveness to peripheral nerve injury and their contribution to injury-associated neuropathic pain was not significantly altered. PMID:26961247

  18. Dynamics of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute depletion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Echeverry, Stefania; Shi, Xiang Qun; Yang, Mu; Yang, Qiu Zi; Wang, Guan Yun Frances; Chambon, Julien; Wu, Yi Chen; Fu, Kai Yuan; De Koninck, Yves; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding on the function of microglia has been revolutionized in the recent 20 years. However, the process of maintaining microglia homeostasis has not been fully understood. In this study, we dissected the features of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute partial depletion. By injecting intrathecally Mac-1-saporin, a microglia selective immunotoxin, we ablated 50% microglia in the spinal cord of naive mice. Spinal microglia repopulated rapidly and local homeostasis was re-established within 14 days post-depletion. Mac-1-saporin treatment resulted in microglia cell proliferation and circulating monocyte infiltration. The latter is indeed part of an acute, transient inflammatory reaction that follows cell depletion, and was characterized by an increase in the expression of inflammatory molecules and by the breakdown of the blood spinal cord barrier. During this period, microglia formed cell clusters and exhibited a M1-like phenotype. MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was essential in promoting this depletion associated spinal inflammatory reaction. Interestingly, ruling out MCP-1-mediated secondary inflammation, including blocking recruitment of monocyte-derived microglia, did not affect depletion-triggered microglia repopulation. Our results also demonstrated that newly generated microglia kept their responsiveness to peripheral nerve injury and their contribution to injury-associated neuropathic pain was not significantly altered. PMID:26961247

  19. Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Shahid, Muhammad; Haque, Munirul; Qureshi, Masood

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an acute neurological emergency which carries significant morbidity unless diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Some cases of SSEH are idiopathic but there is a well-recognised association with deranged coagulation and abnormalities of clotting. In recent years there has been increasing availability of novel anti-platelet agents, often prescribed in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and following percutaneous coronary interventions and these agents also present an increased risk of SSEH. We present a case of SSEH following an acute presentation with chest pain and treatment with dual anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26807374

  20. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson's disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) - predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  1. The Nature of Trauma Memories in Acute Stress Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmond, C. H.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Glucksman, E.; Thompson, P.; Dalgleish, T.; Smith, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increasing theoretical, clinical and research evidence for the role of trauma memory in the aetiology of acute pathological stress responses in adults. However, research into the phenomenology of trauma memories in young people is currently scarce. Methods: This study compared the nature of trauma narratives to narratives of…

  2. Therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation in acute acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Vavrina, J; Müller, W

    1995-01-01

    Retrospectively 78 patients with uni- or bilateral acute acoustic trauma (AAT) were evaluated to assess the therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO). All subjects received saline or dextran (Rheomacodrex) infusions with Ginkgo extracts (Tebonin) and prednisone. Thirty six patients underwent additional hyperbaric oxygenation at a pressure of 2 atmospheres absolute for 60 minutes once daily. Both treatment groups were comparable as far as age, gender, initial hearing loss and prednisone dose are concerned. The delay of therapy onset was 15 hours in both groups and treatment was started within 72 hours in all cases. Control audiometry was performed after 6.5 days, when the HBO group had had 5 exposures to hyperbaric oxygenation. The average hearing gain in the group without HBO was 74.3 dB and in the group treated additionally with HBO 121.3 dB (P < 0.004). It is concluded, that hyperbaric oxygenation significantly improves hearing recovery after AAT. Therefore acute acoustic trauma with significant hearing threshold depression remains an otological emergency. Minimal therapy involving waiting for spontaneous recovery, which is mostly incomplete leaving a residual C5 or C6 and handicapping tinnitus, is not the treatment of choice. Randomized prospective clinical trials with a larger patient series are needed and further experimental studies are required to understand the physiological mechanisms of HBO responsible for the clinical success in AAT.

  3. Lumbar Spinal Chondroma Presenting with Acute Sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Choi, Byung Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman visited with lumbago and severe left leg pain that had been presented for 1 week. The patient complained of severe radiating pain on left L3 sensory dermatome area and reported aggravation of leg pain at 20 degrees of hip flexion by straight leg raising test (SLRT). However, there was no motor weakness on neurological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated contrast enhancing spinal extradural mass at L2-3 level that was iso-signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images (WI), hypo-SI on T2WI. She was not able to walk and sleep due to incapacitating pain. Thus, surgical removal was performed via left partial laminectomy. Postoperatively, the radiating pain was relieved completely. Histopathologic examination revealed that the tumor consisted of chondroma, which had mature hyaline cartilage with nests of benign-appearing cells and calcium deposits in lacunae. PMID:24891859

  4. Traumatic spinal injuries in children at a single level 1 pediatric trauma centre: report of a 23-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Vassilyadi, Michael; Forbes, Jason K.; Moroz, Nicholas W.P.; Camacho, Alexandra; Moroz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background With a reported incidence of up to 10% compared to all spinal trauma, spinal injuries in children are less common than in adults. Children can have spine fractures with or without myelopathy, or spinal cord injuries without radiological abnormalities (SCIWORA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of children with spinal injuries treated at a level 1 pediatric trauma centre between 1990 and 2013. Results A total of 275 children were treated during the study period. The mean age at admission was 12 ± 4.5 years, and the male:female ratio was 1.4:1. Spinal injuries were more common in children of ages 12–16 years, with most injuries among ages 15–16 years. The top 3 mechanisms of spinal injury were motor vehicle–related trauma (53%), sports (28%) and falls (13%). Myelopathy occurred in 12% and SCIWORA occurred in 6%. The most common spine levels injured were L2–sacrum, followed by O–C2. Associated injuries, including head injuries (29%), and fractures/dislocations (27%) occurred in 55% of children. Overall mortality was 3%. Surgical intervention was required in 14%. Conclusion The creation of a pediatric spinal injury database using this 23-year retrospective review helped identify important clinical concepts; we found that active adolescent boys had the highest risk of spine injury, that noncontiguous spine injuries occured at a rate higher than reported previously and that nonaccidental spine injuries in children are under-reported. Our findings also emphasize the importance of maintaining a higher index of suspicion with trauma patients with multiple injuries and of conducting detailed clinical and radiographic examinations of the entire spine in children with a known spinal injury. PMID:27240286

  5. A 10-year population survey of spinal trauma and spinal cord injuries after road accidents in the Rhône area.

    PubMed

    Lieutaud, Thomas; Ndiaye, Amina; Frost, Fanny; Chiron, Mireille

    2010-06-01

    Fatalities or injuries following motorized and non-motorized vehicle accidents (MNMVA) are reported by police or health care systems. However, limited data exist for spinal injuries. Using an epidemiological database of road accidents occurring in a defined geographic area, we measured the incidence of major spinal trauma (MST, Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score 2 or more), spinal cord injury (SCI, AIS score 4 or more), and associated lesions over a 10-year period (1997-2006). Among the 97,341 victims included, 21,623 (22.2%) suffered spinal trauma, but only 1523 (1.6%) and 144 (0.2%) sustained an MST or SCI, respectively, and among those 10% and 43% died, respectively, before reaching hospital facilities. Men were more likely to have SCI and die. Cervical injuries were more frequently observed for SCI (58%) than for MST (39%; p < 0.001). Motorcyclists were overrepresented in SCI (33%) compared to MST (21%; p < 0.001), and were at significant risk for fatality. Non-restrained car occupants were at risk of MST and SCI, whereas motorcyclists wearing helmets were not. The chest was the most frequently-injured body region. Nearly half of MNMVA victims suffering SCI die quickly after the crash. Young age, male gender, a motorcyclist, and non-restrained car occupant were risk factors for serious injury. These groups should be targeted in specific programs to decrease fatalities, spinal trauma, and SCI after MNMVA.

  6. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  7. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson’s disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4–C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) – predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  8. Spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fernández, A; Massó, A; Beristain, M; G Esnal, I; Pardo, E; Carrillo, I; Lersundi, A

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of a patient with a vertebral fracture requires an accurate diagnosis and categorization of the problem. Treatment decisions must be based on clinical data and information about the lesion itself, which is provided by imaging studies and their interpretation. PMID:26857304

  9. Spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fernández, A; Massó, A; Beristain, M; G Esnal, I; Pardo, E; Carrillo, I; Lersundi, A

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of a patient with a vertebral fracture requires an accurate diagnosis and categorization of the problem. Treatment decisions must be based on clinical data and information about the lesion itself, which is provided by imaging studies and their interpretation.

  10. "No clinical puzzles more interesting": Harvey Cushing and spinal trauma, the Johns Hopkins Hospital 1896-1912.

    PubMed

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Pendleton, Courtney; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Although Harvey Cushing played a central role in the establishment of neurosurgery in the United States, his work on the spine remains largely unknown. This article is not only the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at Johns Hopkins have been reported, but also the first time his management of spinal trauma has been described. We report on 12 patients that Cushing treated from 1898 to 1911 who have never been reported before, including blunt and penetrating injuries, complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions, and both immediate and delayed presentations. Cushing performed laminectomies within 24 hours on patients with immediate presentations-both complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions. Among those with delayed presentations, Cushing did laminectomies on patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. By the end of his tenure at Hopkins, Cushing advocated nonoperative treatment for all patients with complete spinal cord lesions. Four patients died while an inpatient, with meningitis and cystitis leading to the death of 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Cystitis was treated with intravesicular irrigation; an indwelling catheter was placed by a suprapubic cystostomy in four. Cushing was one of the first to report the use of x-ray in a spine patient, in a case that may have been one factor leading to his interest in the nervous system; Cushing also routinely obtained radiographs in those with spinal trauma. These cases illustrate Cushing's dedication to and rapport with his patients, even in the face of a dismal prognosis. PMID:21135734

  11. Repeated Baclofen treatment ameliorates motor dysfunction, suppresses reflex activity and decreases the expression of signaling proteins in reticular nuclei and lumbar motoneurons after spinal trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Schreiberová, Andrea; Závodská, Monika; Gedrová, Štefánia; Hricová, Ľudmila; Pavel, Jaroslav; Gálik, Ján; Maršala, Martin; Lukáčová, Nadežda

    2014-03-01

    The interruption of supraspinal input to the spinal cord leads to motor dysfunction and the development of spasticity. Clinical studies have shown that Baclofen (a GABAB agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with side-effects and the development of tolerance. The aim of the present study was to assess if discontinued Baclofen treatment and its repeated application leads antispasticity effects, and whether such changes affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brainstem, nNOS and parvalbumin (PV) in lumbar α-motoneurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to Th9 spinal cord transection. Baclofen (30mg/b.w.) diluted in drinking water, was administered for 6 days, starting at week 1 after injury and then repeated till week 4 after injury. The behavior of the animals was tested (tail-flick test, BBB locomotor score) from 1 to 8 weeks. Our results clearly indicate the role of nitric oxide, produced by nNOS in the initiation and the maintenance of spasticity states 1, 6 and 8 weeks after spinal trauma. A considerable decrease of nNOS staining after Baclofen treatment correlates with improvement of motor dysfunction. The findings also show that parvalbumin and astrocytes participate in the regulation of ion concentrations in the sub-acute phase after the injury.

  12. Survey of 2582 Cases of Acute Orthopedic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanha, Mehran; Mobayen, Mohammadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Adeli, Alborz; Haghparast-Ghadim-Limudahi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic injuries are among the most common causes of mortality, morbidity, hospitalization, and economic burden in societies. Objectives: In this research, we study the prevalence of different types of trauma requiring orthopedic surgery. Patients and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 2582 patients with acute orthopedic injuries admitted to the orthopedic emergency ward at the Poursina Hospital (a referral center in Guilan province (northern Iran), during December 2010 through September 2011. Patients were examined and the data collection form was filled for each patient. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 19 and were listed in tables. Results: Of 2582 included cases, 1940 were male and 642 were female, with a mean age of 34.5 years. Most injuries were seen in the 25 to 44 year age group from rural areas. The highest frequency of trauma related to falls. On the other hand, bicycling and shooting had the lowest frequencies. There were 18 cases with limb amputation. Overall, 66.5% of patients had fractures, 5% had soft tissue lacerations, and 10% had dislocations. Conclusions: Identification of risk factors and methods of prevention is one of the most important duties of healthcare systems. Devising plans to minimize these risk factors and familiarizing people with them is prudent. PMID:25717444

  13. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy.

  14. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  15. Acute compartment syndrome in lower extremity musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Glasgow, Robert R

    2005-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating condition in which the pressure within an osseofascial compartment rises to a level that decreases the perfusion gradient across tissue capillary beds, leading to cellular anoxia, muscle ischemia, and death. A variety of injuries and medical conditions may initiate acute compartment syndrome, including fractures, contusions, bleeding disorders, burns, trauma, postischemic swelling, and gunshot wounds. Diagnosis is primarily clinical, supplemented by compartment pressure measurements. Certain anesthetic techniques, such as nerve blocks and other forms of regional and epidural anesthesia, reportedly contribute to a delay in diagnosis. Basic science data suggest that the ischemic threshold of normal muscle is reached when pressure within the compartment is elevated to 20 mm Hg below the diastolic pressure or 30 mm Hg below the mean arterial blood pressure. On diagnosis of impending or true compartment syndrome, immediate measures must be taken. Complete fasciotomy of all compartments involved is required to reliably normalize compartment pressures and restore perfusion to the affected tissues. Recognizing compartment syndromes requires having and maintaining a high index of suspicion, performing serial examinations in patients at risk, and carefully documenting changes over time.

  16. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N=162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD.

  17. Heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures in acute posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Suendermann, Oliver; Boellinghaus, Inga; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna; Gamer, Matthias; Briddon, Emma; Martin, Melanie Walwyn; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Physiological responses to trauma reminders are one of the core symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nevertheless, screening measures for PTSD largely rely on symptom self-reports. It has been suggested that psychophysiological assessments may be useful in identifying trauma survivors with PTSD (Orr and Roth, 2000). This study investigated whether heart rate (HR) responses to standardized trauma-related pictures distinguish between trauma survivors with and without acute PTSD. Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N = 162) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post-trauma while their ECG was recorded. At 1 and 6 months, structured clinical interviews assessed PTSD diagnoses. Participants completed self-report measures of PTSD severity and depression, peritraumatic responses, coping behaviors and appraisals. Trauma survivors with acute PTSD showed greater HR responses to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, as indicated by a less pronounced mean deceleration, greater peak responses, and a greater proportion showing HR acceleration of greater than 1 beat per minute. There were no group differences in HR responses to generally threatening or neutral pictures. HR responses to trauma-related pictures contributed to the prediction of PTSD diagnosis over and above what could be predicted from self-reports of PTSD and depression. HR responses to trauma-related pictures were related to fear and data-driven processing during the trauma, safety behaviors, suppression of trauma memories, and overgeneralized appraisals of danger. The results suggest that HR responses to standardized trauma-related pictures may help identify a subgroup of patients with acute PTSD who show generalized fear responses to trauma reminders. The early generalization of triggers of reexperiencing symptoms observed in this study is consistent with associative learning and cognitive models of PTSD. PMID

  18. Function and Mechanisms of Autophagy in Brain and Spinal Cord Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I.; Sarkar, Chinmoy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) are major causes of death and long-term disability worldwide. Despite important pathophysiological differences between these disorders, in many respects, mechanisms of injury are similar. During both TBI and SCI, some cells are directly mechanically injured, but more die as a result of injury-induced biochemical changes (secondary injury). Autophagy, a lysosome-dependent cellular degradation pathway with neuroprotective properties, has been implicated both clinically and experimentally in the delayed response to TBI and SCI. However, until recently, its mechanisms and function remained unknown, reflecting in part the difficulty of isolating autophagic processes from ongoing cell death and other cellular events. Recent Advances: Emerging data suggest that depending on the location and severity of traumatic injury, autophagy flux—defined as the progress of cargo through the autophagy system and leading to its degradation—may be either increased or decreased after central nervous system trauma. Critical Issues: While increased autophagy flux may be protective after mild injury, after more severe trauma inhibition of autophagy flux may contribute to neuronal cell death, indicating disruption of autophagy as a part of the secondary injury mechanism. Future Directions: Augmentation and/or restoration of autophagy flux may provide a potential therapeutic target for treatment of TBI and SCI. Development of those treatments will require thorough characterization of changes in autophagy flux, its mechanisms and function over time after injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 565–577. PMID:25808205

  19. Acute cerebrovascular accident after minor trauma in a 1 year old.

    PubMed

    Matthews, W; Freij, R; Hashemi, K

    2000-09-01

    Acute cerebrovascular accident in an otherwise well child is a rare presentation. A case is described where the diagnosis was delayed because of association with minor trauma and a misleading diagnosis of soft tissue injury.

  20. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  1. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  2. Acute dissociation and cardiac reactivity to script-driven imagery in trauma-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Martin; Cillien, Melanie; Hopper, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Potential acute protective functions of dissociation include modulation of stress-induced psychophysiological arousal. This study was designed to explore whether acute dissociative reactions during a stress experiment would override the effects of reexperiencing. Methods Psychophysiological reactions during exposure to script-driven trauma imagery were studied in relation to acute responses of reexperiencing and dissociative symptoms in 61 patients with histories of exposure to a variety of traumas. Acute symptomatic responses were assessed with the Responses to Script-Driven Imagery Scale (RSDI), and participants were divided into four groups by median splits of RSDI reexperiencing and dissociation subscale scores. Results In a comparison of the high RSDI reexperiencing groups with low versus high acute dissociative symptoms, the high dissociators exhibited significantly lower heart rate (HR) during trauma script and a significantly smaller script-induced decrease in parasympathetic cardiac activity. HR reactivity to the trauma script was negatively correlated with acute dissociative symptom severity. Conclusions Acute dissociative reactions are a potential moderator of response to experimental paradigms investigating psychologically traumatized populations. We therefore suggest that future research on psychophysiological stress reactions in traumatized samples should routinely assess for acute dissociative symptoms. PMID:23198029

  3. [Correction of neurotrophic disorders in patients, suffering consequences of a spinal cord and peripheral nerves trauma].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, O V

    2014-08-01

    On clinical base of cathedra of the disasters medicine, military medicine, anesthesiology and reanimatology in 2010 - 2013 yrs 62 patients were treated for neurotrophic disorders, in 12 of them the method was applied, elaborated in the clinic. For neurotrophic ulcers in 5 patients autodermoplasty was performed, using splitted cutaneous flap, in 1 for the wound defect on a forearm--plasty, using rotational cutaneo-adipose flap, based on axial blood supply. In 44 patients after a spinal cord trauma a neurotrophic defects degree III - IV have formed. The kind of operative intervention was selected depending on size of the defect, the wound depth and functional peculiarities of the injured area. Introduction of a new method of treatment of neurotrophic ulcers of the lower extremities, using preparation of hyaluronic acid with sodium succinate, expands the perspectives of treatment in patients, suffering defects of cover tissues. Differentiated approach to choice of the wound closure method, caused by damage of central and peripheral neural system, have permitted to achieve positive results in 98.1% of patients.

  4. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  5. Acute spinal cord ischemia during aortography treated with intravenous thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Lucas; Guttin, Jorge F

    2006-01-01

    Acute anterior spinal cord ischemia is a rare but disastrous complication of endovascular aortic procedures. Although intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute brain ischemia, its use for the treatment of spinal cord ischemia has not previously been reported. We report the case of a patient who developed anterior spinal cord ischemia during diagnostic aortography He was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 3 hours after the onset of symptoms. The patient had a rapid neurologic improvement and was discharged from the hospital 3 days after thrombolysis, regaining his ability to walk unassisted. We propose that acute spinal cord ischemia can be treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 3 hours after the onset of symptoms, as can any other case of acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in a patient with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Aktoz, Meryem; Tatli, Ersan; Barutcu, Ahmet; Ozkalayci, Flora; Umit, Elif; Altun, Armagan

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute coronary syndrome due to coronary slow flow after spinal cord injury. Data regarding the causes and clinical manifestations of coronary slow flow are inconclusive, but the autonomic nervous system is believed to be at least a contributing factor. The predominant vagal activity causes vasodilation and hemostasis, which can lead to acute coronary syndrome. We hereby call attention to hyperactive parasympathetic tonicity, which can lead to coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in acute spinal cord injury patients. PMID:21841878

  7. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  8. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Quong, Whitney L.; Hynes, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The “stinger” or “burner” is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings. PMID:18087936

  11. Design, delivery, and evaluation of early interventions for children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to acute, potentially traumatic events is an unfortunately common experience for children and adolescents. Posttraumatic stress (PTS) responses following acute trauma can have an ongoing impact on child development and well-being. Early intervention to prevent or reduce PTS responses holds promise but requires careful development and empirical evaluation. Objectives The aims of this review paper are to present a framework for thinking about the design, delivery, and evaluation of early interventions for children who have been exposed to acute trauma; highlight targets for early intervention; and describe next steps for research and practice. Results and conclusions Proposed early intervention methods must (1) have a firm theoretical grounding that guides the design of intervention components; (2) be practical for delivery in peri-trauma or early post-trauma contexts, which may require creative models that go outside of traditional means of providing services to children; and (3) be ready for evaluation of both outcomes and mechanisms of action. This paper describes three potential targets for early intervention—maladaptive trauma-related appraisals, excessive early avoidance, and social/interpersonal processes—for which there is theory and evidence suggesting an etiological role in the development or persistence of PTS symptoms in children. PMID:25018860

  12. The variation of acute treatment costs of trauma in high-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to assist health service planning, understanding factors that influence higher trauma treatment costs is essential. The majority of trauma costing research reports the cost of trauma from the perspective of the receiving hospital. There has been no comprehensive synthesis and little assessment of the drivers of cost variation, such as country, trauma, subgroups and methods. The aim of this review is to provide a synthesis of research reporting the trauma treatment costs and factors associated with higher treatment costs in high income countries. Methods A systematic search for articles relating to the cost of acute trauma care was performed and included studies reporting injury severity scores (ISS), per patient cost/charge estimates; and costing methods. Cost and charge values were indexed to 2011 cost equivalents and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parities. Results A total of twenty-seven studies were reviewed. Eighty-one percent of these studies were conducted in high income countries including USA, Australia, Europe and UK. Studies either reported a cost (74.1%) or charge estimate (25.9%) for the acute treatment of trauma. Across studies, the median per patient cost of acute trauma treatment was $22,448 (IQR: $11,819-$33,701). However, there was variability in costing methods used with 18% of studies providing comprehensive cost methods. Sixty-three percent of studies reported cost or charge items incorporated in their cost analysis and 52% reported items excluded in their analysis. In all publications reviewed, predictors of cost included Injury Severity Score (ISS), surgical intervention, hospital and intensive care, length of stay, polytrauma and age. Conclusion The acute treatment cost of trauma is higher than other disease groups. Research has been largely conducted in high income countries and variability exists in reporting costing methods as well as the actual costs. Patient populations studied and the cost methods

  13. Acute fatal coronary artery dissection following exercise-related blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Barbesier, Marie; Boval, Catherine; Desfeux, Jacques; Lebreton, Catherine; Léonetti, Georges; Piercecchi, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery injury such as acute coronary dissection is an uncommon and potentially life-threatening complication after blunt chest trauma. The authors report an unusual autopsy case of a 43-year-old healthy man who suddenly collapsed after receiving a punch to the chest during the practice of kung fu. The occurrence of the punch was supported by the presence of one recent contusion on the left lateral chest area at the external examination and by areas of hemorrhage next to the left lateral intercostal spaces at the internal examination. The histological examination revealed the presence of an acute dissection of the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Only few cases of coronary artery dissection have been reported due to trauma during sports activities such as rugby and soccer games, but never during the practice of martial arts, sports usually considered as safe and responsible for only minor trauma.

  14. Low-impact trauma causing acute compartment syndrome of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Aliano, Kristen; Gulati, Salil; Stavrides, Steve; Davenport, Thomas; Hines, George

    2013-05-01

    Compartment syndrome usually occurs in the muscles of an extremity as a consequence of trauma or reperfusion. However, it can also occur from minor injuries with resulting hematoma.We reviewed the charts of 5 individuals who presented to the emergency department after minimal or no known trauma and were ultimately diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome. None sustained fractures, and 2 had documented muscle tears. All patients were found to have hematomas in the affected compartment at the time of surgery. Low-impact trauma can cause acute compartment syndrome in the lower extremities. These cases could be the result of muscle hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, rather than muscle swelling itself. Anticoagulation therapy can increase the risk of hemorrhage.

  15. Cumulative exposure to prior collective trauma and acute stress responses to the Boston marathon bombings.

    PubMed

    Garfin, Dana Rose; Holman, E Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2015-06-01

    The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metropolitan Boston (n = 846) and New York City (n = 941) completed Internet-based surveys shortly after the Boston Marathon bombings. Cumulative direct exposure and indirect exposure to prior community trauma and acute stress symptoms were assessed. Acute stress levels did not differ between Boston and New York metropolitan residents. Cumulative direct and indirect, live-media-based exposure to 9/11, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook shooting were positively associated with acute stress responses in the covariate-adjusted model. People who experience multiple community-based traumas may be sensitized to the negative impact of subsequent events, especially in communities previously exposed to similar disasters. PMID:25896419

  16. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Hao-Tian; Wang, Ji-Quan; Fan, Zhong-Kai; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We recorded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2-24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial fission protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2-24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were increased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the first 8 hours, but fission played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged.

  17. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhi-qiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Li, Hao-tian; Wang, Ji-quan; Fan, Zhong-kai; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We recorded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2–24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial fission protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2–24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were increased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the first 8 hours, but fission played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged. PMID:26981103

  18. Solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma causing vertebral artery compression and acute cerebellar infarct.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxia; Ilaslan, Hakan; Hussain, Muhammad S; Bain, Mark; Bauer, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Osteochondroma is a common benign bone lesion, usually involving the long bones. Spinal involvement is rare. The clinical presentation of spinal osteochondroma varies according to the site of the lesion. The most common reported clinical presentation is secondary to encroachment of the lesion on the spinal canal or nerve roots. Less common presentations such as a palpable neck mass, dysphagia, sleep apnea, paralysis of left vocal cord or acute respiratory distress have been reported when the lesions compress the anatomic structures anteriorly. We describe a rare case of a young patient who presented with an emergent critical condition of acute cerebellar infarct as a result of vertebral artery compression caused by a solitary C1 spinal osteochondroma. PMID:25109381

  19. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  20. Acute Compartment Syndrome After Gastrocnemius Rupture (Tennis Leg) in a Nonathlete Without Trauma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Jun, Huang; Muliang, Ding; Deye, Song; Jiangdong, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious emergency that warrants urgent decompression, and tennis leg (i.e., rupture of the medial head of the gastrocnemius) is a known clinical condition that is usually treated symptomatically, with good results overall. In rare cases, acute compartment syndrome is associated with tennis leg after severe direct muscle trauma or severe exercise in athletes or physically active individuals. We present an unusual case of acute compartment syndrome secondary to tennis leg after the patient, a nonathlete, had disembarked from a truck without any trauma. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for atraumatic compartment syndrome, and timely surgical fasciotomy must be undertaken to avoid complications resulting from delayed diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Use of topically applied rt-PA in the evacuation of extensive acute spinal subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Little, C P; Patel, N; Nagaria, J; Kumar, R; Nanra, J; Bolger, C M

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, usually confined to a few vertebral levels. When the haematoma extends over several spinal segments, surgical decompression is a major undertaking. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) has previously been used in a number of surgical procedures, but not in the setting of acute spinal subdural haematoma. A minimally invasive technique of decompression, using topical rt-PA, is presented in two patients with extensive spinal intradural haematoma. Two patients receiving long-term anticoagulation therapy presented with acute-onset back pain progressing to paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated spinal subdural haematomas extending over 15 vertebral levels in one patient and 12 in the other. An angiography catheter was introduced into the subdural space through a limited laminectomy. Thrombolysis and evacuation of haematoma was then achieved by intermittent irrigation of the subdural space with rt-PA, followed by saline lavage. Postoperative imaging demonstrated satisfactory decompression in both patients. There was significant improvement of neurological function in one patient. Topical application of rt-PA for spinal subdural haematoma allows evacuation of the haematoma through a limited surgical exposure. Decompression of the subdural space by this minimally invasive technique may be advantageous over extensive surgery by minimising surgical exposure, reducing postoperative pain and risk of neuronal injury. This technique may be useful in patients presenting with compression extending over several vertebral levels or poor surgical candidates. PMID:12920622

  2. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Karibe, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Motonobu; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Narisawa, Ayumi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-15

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  3. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; NARISAWA, Ayumi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  4. Clinical and animal experiment studies to optimise the therapy for acute acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M

    1991-01-01

    Despite extensive educational measures and improved ear protection, acute acoustic trauma still represents a major problem for the young soldier in the Federal Armed Forces. The aim of the investigation was thus to establish the optimum therapeutic scheme that could be applied by the generally young and still inexperienced unit medical officer to patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma and to demonstrate the therapeutic scheme in animal experiments. In the clinical section, ten studies conducted on 500 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma made it possible to show that the combination of low-molecular dextran, or low-molecular hydroxyethyl starch, and hyperbaric oxygenation produced the best therapeutic results in terms of hearing gain and tinnitus elimination by a statistically significant margin. The studies only included patients who showed no tendency towards spontaneous recovery, with strict exclusion criteria being applied. Through animal experiments, it was seen that hyperbaric oxygenation, in the manner in which we conducted it (100% oxygen at 2.5 bar), leads to an increase in the oxygen partial pressure in the perilymph of the guinea pig cochlea. This is due partly to diffusion and partly to the blood flow. In a further experimental approach using animals, it proved possible to show that 60 hours after damage by acoustic trauma and hyperbaric oxygenation, the number of inner ear sensory cells that had suffered morphological damage in the animal was lower than without the hyperbaric oxygenation by a statistically significant margin. At the same time, valuable information was gained on the epidemiology of acute acoustic trauma.

  5. Compartment syndrome: a complication of acute extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Mabee, J R

    1994-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious potential complication of trauma to the extremities. Fractures, crush injuries, burns, and arterial injuries, among others, can result in increased tissue pressure within closed osseofascial or compartmental spaces. Prolonged exposure to elevated pressure can result in nerve and muscle necrosis. Extreme pain unrelieved with analgesia, subjective complaint of pressure, pain with passive muscle stretching, paresis, paresthesia, and intact pulses, in the presence of a physically tight compartment, should alert the physician to the presence of a compartment syndrome. The diagnosis is a clinical one, but it may be aided by measurements of intracompartmental tissue pressures. Compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency requiring prompt treatment by fasciotomy. Time is a critical factor; the longer the duration of elevated tissue pressure, the greater the potential for disastrous sequelae. Emergency medicine providers must be cognizant of this clinical syndrome so that early emergent surgical consultation can be obtained to avoid complications.

  6. Sponge-mediated Lentivirus Delivery to Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline M.; Palma, Jaime L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are have are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration. PMID:25724274

  7. Sponge-mediated lentivirus delivery to acute and chronic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aline M; Palma, Jaime L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-04-28

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration.

  8. [Modern aspects of pathogenesis of the trauma of the spinal cord and trunks of peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Shul'ga, A E; Norkin, I A; Ninel', V G; Puchin'ian, D M; Zaretskov, V V; Korshunova, G A; Ostrovskiĭ, V V; Smol'kin, A A

    2014-02-01

    In pathogenesis of the traumatic disease of the spinal cord, two mechanisms of the injuries of its neuronal apparatus are defined: primary (necrosis) and secondary (apoptosis). In the work a participation of a number of internal causes in the progression of apoptosis in injury of the spinal cord and peripheral nerve trunks, the role of those remains little-studied up to date, is discussed.

  9. Spinal distribution of c-Fos activated neurons expressing enkephalin in acute and chronic pain models.

    PubMed

    Hossaini, Mehdi; Duraku, Liron S; Kohli, Somesh K; Jongen, Joost L M; Holstege, Jan C

    2014-01-16

    The endogenous opioid enkephalin is known to inhibit spinal nociceptive transmission. Here we investigated activation of spinal enkephalinergic neurons by determining the proportions of c-Fos expressing (activated) spinal neurons that were enkephalinergic after different acute and chronic peripheral nociceptive stimuli. The number of c-Fos-activated neurons in the dorsal horn was increased after hind paw injection of capsaicin, formalin or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 1.5 hrs - 4 days). The numbers of these neurons that were enkephalinergic increased after paraformaldehyde, and at 20 hrs, but not 1.5 hrs or 4 days post-CFA as compared to saline. In the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, c-Fos expression was increased acutely (2 hrs) and chronically (2 weeks), and a greater number of these were enkephalinergic in the nerve-injured animals acutely compared to controls (sham-SNI). Combining all acute (=2 hrs) versus chronic (≥20 hrs) treatment groups, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of activated neurons that were enkephalinergic in superficial layers, but a significant increase in the deeper layers of the dorsal horn in the chronic treatment group. It is concluded that the overall percentage of c-Fos activated neurons that contained enkephalin was not significantly different between acute and chronic pain phases. However, the shift in localization of these neurons within the spinal dorsal horn indicates a noxious stimulus directed activation pattern.

  10. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  11. Spinal cord ependymoma presenting with neurological deficits in the setting of trauma.

    PubMed

    Saad, Amin F; Nickell, Larry T; Finn, S Sam; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Ependymomas represent 4% of all primary central nervous system neoplasms in adults, with 30% occurring in the spinal cord. We describe a young man with neurological deficits following a motor vehicle accident who was found to have an intramedullary cervicothoracic ependymoma.

  12. Spinal cord ependymoma presenting with neurological deficits in the setting of trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Larry T.; Finn, S. Sam; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Ependymomas represent 4% of all primary central nervous system neoplasms in adults, with 30% occurring in the spinal cord. We describe a young man with neurological deficits following a motor vehicle accident who was found to have an intramedullary cervicothoracic ependymoma. PMID:24982562

  13. Effects of deep barbiturate coma on acute spinal cord injury in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Schieppati, M; Giovanelli, M A

    1984-04-01

    The effects of barbiturate administration on experimental balloon-induced spinal cord injury were tested in cats. Somatosensory evoked potentials from sciatic nerve stimulation were obtained before trauma and every 60 minutes after it up to the sixth hour, when the animals were killed. Eight cats received no barbiturate treatment. On histologic examination the traumatic lesion was found to be extensive (mean, 72.8% of total cross section of the cord area), sparing dorsal columns only in six cats. Somatosensory evoked potentials were absent in two cats and profoundly modified (that is, the late waves were absent) in six cats at the sixth hour. Eight cats were given a continuous infusion for 1 hour of intravenous thiopental sodium (total dose, 65-90 mg/kg) starting 30 minutes after trauma. In these eight cats, the extent of the traumatic lesion was significantly reduced (8.8% of the cord area). Among them, three animals presented with unaltered somatosensory evoked potentials (that is, with the presence of both primary components and late waves) at the sixth hour. It was concluded that thiopental sodium improves the response of the spinal cord to trauma, both at an anatomic and at a functional level.

  14. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  15. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae

    PubMed Central

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3–12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  16. Acute trauma induced disc displacement without reduction and its sequelae.

    PubMed

    He, DongMei; Yang, XiuJuan; Wang, FeiYu; Yang, Chi; Dong, MinJun

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic temporomandibular joint disc displacement (ATDD) and its sequelae are not familiar for most surgeons. This study is to discuss its sequelae in cases without disc reduction after failed conservative treatment. From 2010 to 2015, 26 patients with 34 joints were included in the study. All patients had at least 3 months conservative treatment. Their maximal incisor opening (MIO) was measured during follow-ups and MRI examination was used to check the condylar bone degeneration. The mean follow-up for conservative treatment after admission was 8.69 months, the patients reached an average of 25.7 mm MIO. MRI showed condylar bone intact in 8 joints (23.5%), condylar surface bone destruction (Wilks IV, V stages) in 14 joints (41.2%), and severe bone resorption in 12 joints (35.3%). 15 patients with 23 joints were asked for surgical treatment after a mean conservative treatment of 5.4 months (3-12 months) to improve mouth opening and relieve chronic pain. 12 joints had total joint replacement (TJR). 11 joints had disc repositioning. Their mean MIO before operation was 19.8 mm and significantly improved to 33.9 mm after operation (p = 0.0000). ATDD may cause severe osteoarthritis or ankylosis. Disc repositioning and TJR could significantly improve MIO. PMID:27582054

  17. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive systems--how acute pain may become chronic.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Lars Jørgen; Svendsen, Frode; Fiskå, Atle; Haugan, Frøydis; Hole, Kjell; Tjølsen, Arne

    2005-11-01

    Chronic pain is a major problem since it is difficult to treat and the understanding of the underlying neurobiology is sparse. The mechanisms underpinning the transition of acute into chronic pain remain unclear. However, long-term potentiation (LTP) in spinal nociceptive systems may be one such mechanism. Here, we briefly review the literature regarding LTP in spinal nociceptive systems including our own data on LTP in deep convergent nociceptive neurons. Furthermore, we discuss the role of this phenomenon in understanding the neurobiology of chronic pain and the possible therapeutic implications.

  18. Penetrating neck trauma causing tracheal rupture, spinal cord injury, and massive pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Archan, Sylvia; Gumpert, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    We describe a case in which tracheal, esophageal, and spinal cord injuries associated with massive pneumocephalus were caused by a flying chainsaw segment. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the medical literature. The management challenges inherent in this exceedingly rare combination of injuries are discussed, and a novel theory explaining the possible pathophysiological mechanism that led to pneumocephalus in our patient is put forth.

  19. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  20. Posttraumatic stress following acute medical trauma in children: A proposed model of bio-psycho-social processes during the peri-trauma period

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Widaman, Keith; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children worldwide experience acute medical events. Children’s responses to these events range from transient distress to significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). While many models suggest explanations for the development and maintenance of PTSS in adults, very few have focused on children. Current models of child PTSS are primarily restricted to the post-trauma period, thus neglecting the critical peri-trauma period when screening and preventive interventions may be most easily implemented. Research on PTSS in response to pediatric medical trauma typically examines predictors in isolation, often overlooking potentially important interactions. This paper proposes a new model utilizing the bio-psycho-social framework and focusing on peri-trauma processes of acute medical events. Understanding the relationships among bio-psycho-social factors during peri-trauma can inform early identification of at-risk children, preventive interventions, and clinical care. Recommendations for future research, including the need to examine PTSS in the context of multiple influences, are discussed. PMID:25217001

  1. Evaluating initial spine trauma response: injury time to trauma center in PA, USA.

    PubMed

    Harrop, James S; Ghobrial, George M; Chitale, Rohan; Krespan, Kelly; Odorizzi, Laura; Fried, Tristan; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Cohen, Murray; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Historical perceptions regarding the severity of traumatic spinal cord injury has led to considerable disparity in triage to tertiary care centers. This article retrospectively reviews a large regional trauma database to analyze whether the diagnosis of spinal trauma affected patient transfer timing and patterns. The Pennsylvania Trauma database was retrospectively reviewed. All acute trauma patient entries for level I and II centers were categorized for diagnosis, mechanism, and location of injury, analyzing transportation modality and its influence on time of arrival. A total of 1162 trauma patients were identified (1014 blunt injuries, 135 penetrating injuries and 12 other) with a mean transport time of 3.9 hours and a majority of patients arriving within 7 hours (>75%). Spine trauma patients had the longest mean arrival time (5.2 hours) compared to blunt trauma (4.2 hours), cranial neurologic injuries (4.35 hours), and penetrating injuries (2.13 hours, p<0.0001). There was a statistically significant correlation between earlier arrivals and both cranial trauma (p=0.0085) and penetrating trauma (p<0.0001). The fastest modality was a fire rescue (0.93 hours) or police (0.63 hours) vehicle with Philadelphia County (1.1 hour) having the quickest arrival times. Most trauma patients arrived to a specialty center within 7 hours of injury. However subsets analysis revealed that spine trauma patients had the greatest transit times. Present research trials for spinal cord injuries suggest earlier intervention may lead to improved recovery. Therefore, it is important to focus on improvement of the transportation triage system for traumatic spinal patients.

  2. Acute Operative Management of Humeral Shaft Fractures: Analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Paul E; Kim, Tae Won; Gay, Andre N; Mehta, Samir

    2015-06-01

    Advances in surgical techniques have increased the role of early surgical intervention for isolated diaphyseal humerus fractures. The goal of this study was to investigate the following: (1) the current trend of operative treatment; (2) factors that affect surgical treatment; and (3) the effect of surgical fixation on length of stay, complication rates, and hospital disposition. The National Trauma Data Bank from 2004 to 2006 was analyzed. All patients with multiple injuries that included closed humeral shaft fractures and all patients with isolated humeral shaft fractures were included. Of 2312 total closed humeral shaft fractures, 1662 had a documented procedure code. A total of 47% of patients underwent surgical treatment. Surgically treated patients were on average 3.5 years older than those treated nonoperatively (P=.007). A total of 49% of white patients underwent early surgery vs 39% of nonwhite patients (P<.001). The operative group had a mean Injury Severity Score of 8.33 vs 9.0 in the nonoperative group (P=.04). Treatment at a Level I trauma center decreased the likelihood of surgery compared with treatment at a non-Level I trauma center (45% vs 57%, P<.001). Mean length of stay was 4.6 days for operative treatment vs 3.9 days for nonoperative treatment (P=.02). Of patients who underwent surgery, 78% were discharged to home compared with 69% of those managed nonoperatively (P<.001). Acute operative management of humeral shaft fractures correlated with a lower Injury Severity Score, a decreased length of stay, and less rehabilitation placement. Furthermore, older patients, white patients, and patients treated at a non-Level I trauma center were more likely to undergo acute surgical management. The reasons for these disparities are unclear and warrant further investigation.

  3. The use of spinal manipulation to treat an acute on field athletic injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Sean A.; Kazemi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    This case describes the utilization of spinal manipulative therapy for an acute athletic injury during a Taekwondo competition. During the tournament, an athlete had a sudden, non-traumatic, ballistic movement of the cervical spine. This resulted in the patient having a locked cervical spine with limited active motion in all directions. The attending chiropractor assessed the athlete, and deemed manipulation was appropriate. After the manipulation, the athlete’s range of motion was returned and was able to finish the match. Spinal manipulation has multiple positive outcomes for an athlete with an acute injury including the increase of range of motion, decrease in pain and the relaxation of hypertonic muscles. However, there should be some caution when utilizing manipulation during an event. In the article the authors propose four criteria that should be met before utilizing manipulation for an acute, in competition, athletic injury. These include the lack of red flags, limited time for the intervention, preexisting doctor-patient relationship and the athlete has experience receiving spinal manipulation. Clinicians should be aware that manipulation may be an effective tool to treat an acute in competition athletic injury. The criteria set out in the article may help a practitioner decide if manipulation is a good option for them. PMID:27385835

  4. Neuroprotective effects and impact on caspase-12 expression of tauroursodeoxycholic acid after acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Miao, Lei; Hei, Long; Lin, Leilei; Ding, Huiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on nerve function after acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, observe its effect on neuronal apoptosis and caspase-12 expression levels, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: We used a modified Allen’s weight-drop trauma method to establish a rat acute SCI model. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: group A (sham surgery group), group B (DMSO control group) and group C (TUDCA treatment group), with 36 rats in each group. At one minute and at 24 hours after successfully establishing the model, rats in group C received an intraperitoneal injection of TUDCA (200 mg/kg), while rats in group B received an equal amount of DMSO at the same time points. At 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury, a modified Tarlov scoring method and Rivlin’s oblique plate test were used to evaluate rat spinal cord nerve function recovery. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury. Specimens were obtained from the center of the injury sites; the pathological changes in spinal cord tissue were observed after hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL method, and the expression of caspase-12 was measured at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blots. Results: Group C differed significantly from group B in Tarlov scores and the oblique table test as early as 24 hours after the injury (P < 0.05). The TUNEL assay test results showed that neurons underwent apoptosis after SCI, which peaked at 24 hours. The ratios of apoptotic cells in group C were significantly lower than those in group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.01). The immunohistochemistry and Western blot results showed that the caspase-12 expression levels of group C were lower than those of group B at 24 hours, three days, and five days after injury (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TUDCA can inhibit the expression of caspase

  5. Acute and long-term behavioral correlates of underwater trauma--potential relevance to stress and post-stress syndromes.

    PubMed

    Richter-Levin, G

    1998-06-01

    As a consequence of a brief but significantly extreme stressor, an individual will experience a stress response, which may sometimes develop into Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Though a rat model for ASD and PTSD is not expected to encompass the richness and complexity of the disorders in humans, it will enable the study of the common underlying mechanisms that generate the disorders, the study of pre-trauma etiological aspects of the disorders and the screening of drugs with potential relevance to the treatment of the disorders. One well-documented aspect of PTSD is the enhancing influence of contextual elements on the appearance of symptoms of the post-stress trauma. To exploit this effect, we have chosen to assess the effects of an underwater trauma in the Morris water maze since the effects of such trauma on memory and attention can be later evaluated in the context of the trauma. At both 1 h and 3 weeks after the trauma, significant behavioral deficits were observed in the water maze. The effects of the underwater trauma on the performance of rats in the water maze were context specific. Underwater trauma in a different (out-of-context) water container had no effects on the ability of rats to perform a spatial memory task in the water maze. An elevated level of anxiety was found in the plus maze test, independently of whether the trauma was performed in the water maze or in a different (out-of-context) water container. The results indicate that a within-context underwater trauma has both acute and lasting behavioral consequences which can be assessed using a spatial memory test in the context of the trauma. The results are discussed in relation to their relevance to stress and PTSD.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kawakyu-O'Connor, Daniel; Bordia, Ritu; Nicola, Refky

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine is increasingly being used in the evaluation of spinal emergencies because it is highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of acute conditions of the spine. The prompt and accurate recognition allows for appropriate medical and surgical intervention. This article reviews the MR imaging features of common emergent conditions, such as spinal trauma, acute disc herniation, infection, and tumors. In addition, we describe common MR imaging sequences, discuss challenges encountered in emergency imaging of the spine, and illustrate multiple mimics of acute conditions. PMID:27150322

  7. Direct-trauma model of posttraumatic syringomyelia with a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor.

    PubMed

    Wong, Johnny H Y; Song, Xin; Hemley, Sarah J; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of posttraumatic syringomyelia remains enigmatic and is not adequately explained by current theories. Experimental investigations require a reproducible animal model that replicates the human condition. Current animal models are imperfect because of their low reliability, severe neurological deficits, or dissimilar mechanism of injury. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible rodent model of posttraumatic syringomyelia using a spinal cord impactor that produces an injury that more closely mimics the human condition and does not produce severe neurological deficits. METHODS The study consisted of 2 parts. Seventy animals were studied overall: 20 in Experiment 1 and 48 in Experiment 2 after two rats with severe deficits were killed early. Experiment 1 aimed to determine the optimal force setting for inducing a cystic cavity without neurological deficits using a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor. Twenty animals received an impact that ranged from 50 to 150 kDyn. Using the optimal force for producing an initial cyst determined from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 aimed to compare the progression of cavities in animals with and those without arachnoiditis induced by kaolin. Forty-eight animals were killed at 1, 3, 6, or 12 weeks after syrinx induction. Measurements of cavity size and maximum anteroposterior and lateral diameters were evaluated using light microscopy. RESULTS In Experiment 1, cavities were present in 95% of the animals. The duration of limb weakness and spinal cord cavity size correlated with the delivered force. The optimal force chosen for Experiment 2 was 75 kDyn. In Experiment 2, cavities occurred in 92% of the animals. Animals in the kaolin groups developed larger cavities and more vacuolations and enlarged perivascular spaces than those in the nonkaolin groups. CONCLUSIONS This impact model reliably produces cavities that resemble human posttraumatic syringomyelia and is suitable for further

  8. Acute Page kidney immediately following blunt trauma to a solitary pediatric kidney

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, Nicole; Daugherty, Michael; Riddell, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Page kidney refers to the occurrence of hypertension secondary to renal compression and is usually associated with a subcapsular or perinephric hematoma. It generally occurs weeks to months after the initial injury. We report on a case of Page kidney occurring acutely after Grade IV blunt renal trauma in a pediatric patient with a solitary kidney following a tobogganing accident. The child was initially managed conservatively and discharged after six days bed-rest. He re-presented post-injury Day 12 with recurrent hematuria, anemia, hypertension, and renal failure that required eventual, and successful, surgical exploration.

  9. Repair of an acute blunt popliteal artery trauma via endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Sciarretta, Jason D; Salsamendi, Jason; Karmacharya, Jagajan; Romano, Andrea; Namias, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Popliteal vascular trauma remains a challenging entity and carries the greatest risk of limb loss among the lower extremity vascular injuries. Operative management of patients presenting with traumatic popliteal vascular injuries continues to evolve. We present a case of successful endovascular repair with stent grafting of an acute blunt popliteal artery injury. Endovascular repair of traumatic popliteal vascular injuries appears as an attractive alternative to surgical repair in a very selective group of patients. Further investigation is still needed to define the safety and feasibility of endovascular approach in the management of traumatic popliteal vascular injuries.

  10. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Right Coronary Artery Dissection due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mubang, Ronnie N.; Hillman Terzian, W. T.; Cipolla, James; Keeney, Scott; Lukaszczyk, John J.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the frequent occurrence of blunt chest trauma, associated cardiac injuries are relatively rare. The most common presentation of blunt cardiac injury is benign arrhythmia (e.g., sinus tachycardia), followed in decreasing frequency by increasingly severe arrhythmias and finally physically evident injuries to the heart muscle, the conducting system, cardiac valves, and/or coronary vessels. Here we present an unusual case of a patient who sustained a right coronary artery dissection and associated acute myocardial infarction following a motor vehicle crash. PMID:27293529

  11. Acute Presentation of Lumbar Spinal Schwannoma Due to Torsion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ryan; Ortmeier, Thomas C; Tapia-Zegarra, Gino G; Lindley, Timothy E; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannomas are common spinal tumors with insidious presentations, acute neurological deterioration is an extremely rare manifestation that can occur in the setting of tumor torsion and infarction. The present case reports an unusual presentation of a spinal schwannoma that underwent torsion and infarction. A 65-year-old male presented initially with acute radicular pain progressing to cauda equina syndrome and confusion. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed an intradural extramedullary lesion at the level of L1/L2 measuring 1.1x0.9 cm. Intraoperatively, a reddish mass was seen caudally twisted around itself. Gross total resection was achieved with a final diagnosis of schwannoma with areas of infarction. At his six week follow up clinical visit, the patient was asymptomatic and his neurological exam was normal. The neurosurgeon should be aware of such atypical radiographic and clinical presentation amongst the spectrum of clinical manifestation of these nerve sheath tumors.  PMID:27226945

  12. Stem cell therapy in spinal trauma: Does it have scientific validity?

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Sarda, Kanchan

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based interventions aim to use special regenerative cells (stem cells) to facilitate neuronal function beyond the site of the injury. Many studies involving animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI) suggest that certain stem cell-based therapies may restore function after SCI. Currently, in case of spinal cord injuries, new discoveries with clinical implications have been continuously made in basic stem cell research, and stem cell-based approaches are advancing rapidly toward application in patients. There is a huge base of preclinical evidence in vitro and in animal models which suggests the safety and clinical efficacy of cellular therapies after SCI. Despite this, data from clinical studies is not very encouraging and at times confounding. Here, we have attempted to cover preclinical and clinical evidence base dealing with safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell based interventions after SCI. The limitations of preclinical data and the reasons underlying its failure to translate in a clinical setting are also discussed. Based on the evidence base, it is suggested that a multifactorial approach is required to address this situation. Need for standardized, stringently designed multi-centric clinical trials for obtaining validated proof of evidence is also highlighted. PMID:25593357

  13. Behavioural training during acute brain trauma rehabilitation: an empirical case study.

    PubMed

    Slifer, K J; Cataldo, M D; Kurtz, P F

    1995-01-01

    Operant conditioning-based behavioural interventions are commonly used for the behavioural problems of individuals with mental retardation. There is also growing evidence of the benefits of these interventions for treating some of the behavioural problems of individuals with acquired cognitive deficits resulting from brain trauma. However, the effects of behavioural interventions on behavioural problems occurring during acute neurorehabilitation, when orientation and memory are most impaired, have not been studied. In this empirical case study, operant conditioning-based procedures were applied with an 8-year-old girl recovering from brain trauma and related neurosurgery. Screaming, non-compliance and aggression, which were disrupting rehabilitation therapies and follow-up neuroimaging, were treated using differential positive reinforcement techniques. Beneficial behavioural intervention effects were demonstrated using single-subject experimental methods. Aberrant behaviour during physical and occupational therapies was reduced, and cooperation with a computerized tomography (CT) scan without sedation was accomplished using operant behavioural intervention. Results support the use of operant interventions early in recovery from brain trauma, and highlight the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration for the implementation and further study of early behavioural interventions.

  14. Acute Muscle Trauma due to Overexercise in an Otherwise Healthy Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Henning; Wirth, Clemens; Ruf, Katharina; Hebestreit, Helge; Beer, Meinrad

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Although the pulmonary and gastrointestinal manifestations of the disease remain in the focus of treatment, recent studies have shown expression of the CFTR gene product in skeletal muscle cells and observed altered intramuscular Ca2+ release dynamics in CFTR-deficient animal models. Physical exercise is beneficial for maintaining fitness and well-being in CF patients and constitutes one aspect of modern multimodal treatment, which has considerably increased life span and reduced morbidity. We report on a case of acute muscle trauma resulting from excessive dumbbell exercise in a young adult with cystic fibrosis and describe clinical, laboratory and imaging characteristics of acute exercise-induced muscle injury. PMID:22606534

  15. Clinical Predictors of Recovery after Blunt Spinal Cord Trauma: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro F.; Attabib, Najmedden; Ball, Jonathon; Bajammal, Sohail; Casha, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Several clinical, imaging, and therapeutic factors affecting recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been described. A systematic review of the topic is still lacking. Our primary aim was to systematically review clinical factors that may predict neurological and functional recovery following blunt traumatic SCI in adults. Such work would help guide clinical care and direct future research. Both Medline and Embase (to April 2008) were searched using index terms for various forms of SCI, paraplegia, or quadri/tetraplegia, and functional and neurological recovery. The search was limited to published articles that were in English and included human subjects. Article selection included class I and II evidence, blunt traumatic SCI, injury level above L1-2, baseline assessment within 72 h of injury, use of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system for clinical assessment, and functional and neurological outcome. A total of 1526 and 1912 citations were located from Medline and Embase, respectively. Two surgeons reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full text articles for each database. Ten articles were identified, only one of which was level 1 evidence. Age and gender were identified as two patient-related predictors. While motor and functional recovery decreased with advancing age for complete SCI, there was no correlation considering incomplete ones. Therefore, treatment should not be restructured based on age in incomplete SCI. Among injury-related predictors, severity of SCI was the most significant. Complete injuries correlated with increased mortality and worse neurological and functional outcomes. Other predictors included SCI level, energy transmitted by the injury, and baseline electrophysiological testing. PMID:19831845

  16. Thromboelastography Does Not Detect Preinjury Antiplatelet Therapy in Acute Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Daley, Mitchell J; Trust, Marc D; Peterson, Evan J; Luftman, Kevin; Miller, Andrew H; Ali, Sadia; Clark, Adam; Aydelotte, Jayson D; Coopwood, Thomas B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2016-02-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) with platelet mapping has been proposed as an assay to detect the presence of antiplatelet agents (APA), yet no study has evaluated TEG markers of platelet dysfunction in acute trauma patients stratified by the use of preinjury APA. We hypothesized that patients on preinjury APA would demonstrate prolonged TEG markers of platelet dysfunction compared with those not on preinjury APA. This retrospective review evaluated all trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center from February 2011 to April 2013 who received a TEG within the first 24 hours of admission. Patients were classified as receiving preinjury APA or no APA if their documented medications included either aspirin or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonists, including clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. A total of 129 patients were included (APA, n = 35; no APA n = 94) in the study. The time from admission to the first TEG was similar (APA 175 ± 289 minutes versus no APA 216 ± 321 minutes, P = 0.5). There was no significant difference in TEG markers of platelet dysfunction, including per cent ADP inhibition (APA 61.7 ± 25.8% versus no APA 62.3 ± 28.8%; P = 0.91) or per cent arachidonic acid inhibition (APA 58.2 ± 31% versus no APA 53.8 ± 34%; P = 0.54). Both groups had similar proportion of severe platelet dysfunction, defined as ADP inhibition greater than 70 per cent (APA 40% versus no APA 40%; P = 0.8) and arachidonic acid inhibition greater than 70 per cent (APA 40% versus no APA 39%; P = 0.89). In conclusion, platelet dysfunction after major trauma is common. Therefore, TEG alone should not be used to evaluate for the presence of APA due to apparent lack of specificity. PMID:26874143

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  18. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of acute urogenital and genitalia tract traumas: 10-year clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qingsong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report our 10-year diagnosis and treatment experience of acute urogenital and genitalia tract traumas and outline the management of the traumatic injury. Methods: We reviewed the diagnoses and treatments of 208 cases of acute kidney, ureter, bladder, urethra, or male genitalia injuries in our department between March 2002 and March 2012. The patient data including general information, injury position and mechanism, diagnosis and treatment, the follow-up information was analyzed and summarized. Results: Of 62 patients with renal injury examined by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) examination, 45 were treated conservatively, 9 with superselective arterial embolization, and 8 with nephrectomy. Intravenous pyelogram (IVP) was conducted in two patients with ureteral injury, one was treated with cystoscopic ureteral catheterization and the other with ureteric reimplantation. Bladder injury (6 patients) confirmed with a waterflood susceptibility test combined with CT scans underwent laparotomy and the bladder suturing was done. Of 92 patients with urethral injury, 6 were treated with a nonoperative approach (indwelling catheter), 18 with urethral realignment, 35 with cystoscopic urethral realignment, 29 with end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty, and 4 with urethral repairmen. Of the 24 cases with penile injuries, 1 underwent conservative treatment, 8 were treated with debridement and suture ligation, and 15 were managed with suture repair of the penis white membrane. Of the 24 cases with penile injuries, 1 underwent conservative treatment, 8 were treated with debridement and suture ligation, and 15 were managed with suture repair of the penis white membrane. During the follow-up period, 62 patients with renal injury had normal renal function. Neither of the two patients with ureteral injury developed hydronephrosis. Twenty-nine patients with urethral injury suffered from urethral structure. All patients with vesical or genital injury recovered

  20. CRITICAL ROLE OF ACROLEIN IN SECONDARY INJURY FOLLOWING EX VIVO SPINAL CORD TRAUMA

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Kristin; Durkes, Abigail; Ouyang, Hui; Pond, Amber

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the initial, primary injury followed by secondary injury processes in which oxidative stress is a critical component. Secondary injury processes not only exacerbate pathology at the site of primary injury, but also result in spreading of injuries to the adjacent, otherwise healthy tissue. The lipid peroxidation byproduct acrolein has been implicated as one potential mediator of secondary injury. In order to further and rigorously elucidate the role of acrolein in secondary injury, a unique ex vivo model is utilized to isolate the detrimental effects of mechanical injury from toxins such as acrolein that are produced endogenously following SCI. We demonstrate that: 1) acrolein-lys adducts are capable of diffusing from compressed tissue to adjacent, otherwise uninjured tissue; 2) secondary injury by itself produces significant membrane damage and increased superoxide production; and 3) these injuries are significantly attenuated by the acrolein scavenger hydralazine. Furthermore, hydralazine treatment results in significantly less membrane damage 2 hours following compression injury, but not immediately after. These findings support our hypothesis that, following SCI, acrolein is increased to pathologic concentrations, contributes significantly to secondary injury, and thus represents a novel target for scavenging to promote improved recovery. PMID:18710419

  1. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  2. The use of autologous neurogenically-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of paraplegic dogs without nociception due to spinal trauma

    PubMed Central

    BESALTI, Omer; AKTAS, Zeynep; CAN, Pinar; AKPINAR, Eylul; ELCIN, Ayse Eser; ELCIN, Yasar Murat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of percutaneous transplanted autologous neurogenically-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (NIBM-MSCs) in paraplegic dogs without deep pain perception (DPP) secondary to external spinal trauma. Thirteen client owned dogs that had failed in improvement neurologically at least 42 days after conservative management, decompression and decompression-stabilization were included in the study. Each dog received two doses of autologous 5.0 × 106 NIBM-MSCs suspension, which were positive to 2′,3′-Cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), as well as to Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and beta III tubulin. The cells were injected into the spinal cord through the hemilaminectomy or laminectomy defects percutaneously with 21 days interval for 2 times. The results were evaluated using Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale (TSCIS), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) at the admission time, cell transplantation procedures and during 2, 5, 7 and 12th months after the second cell transplantation. Improvement after cell transplantation in gait, nociception, proprioception, SEP and MEP results was observed in just 2 cases, and only gait score improvement was seen in 6 cases, and no improvement was recorded in 5 cases. All progresses were observed until 2nd month after the second cell transplantation, however, there was no improvement after this period. In conclusion, percutaneous transplantation of autologous NIBM-MSCs is a promising candidate modality for cases with spinal cord injury after spinal trauma and poor prognosis. PMID:27301583

  3. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting.

  4. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  5. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tripi, Paul A; Kuestner, Matthew E; Poe-Kochert, Connie S; Rubin, Kasia; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group) (n=27) and remifentanil (study group) (n=27). Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours. Results The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog scale pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit and on postoperative days 1 and 3. Pain scores were higher in the remifentanil group on postoperative day 2 (2.9 vs 3.8). Postoperative morphine requirements were similar between the two groups (0.029 vs 0.017 mg/kg/48 h for the control group and the study group, respectively). Conclusion In patients receiving preincisional ITM during spinal surgery, intraoperative remifentanil does not increase

  6. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure. PMID:25687701

  7. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure.

  8. Pharmacological Modulation of Acute Trauma Memories to Prevent PTSD: Considerations from a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Bryce; Cullen, Patrick K.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in American adults range from 6.4–6.8%. PTSD is associated with increased risk for comorbid major depression, substance use disorder, suicide, and a variety of other mental and physical health conditions. Given the negative sequelae of trauma/PTSD, research has focused on identifying efficacious interventions that could be administered soon after a traumatic event to prevent or reduce the subsequent incidence of PTSD. While early psychosocial interventions have been shown to be relatively ineffective, early (secondary) pharmacological interventions have shown promise. These pharmacological approaches are largely based on the hypothesis that disruption of altered stress hormone levels and the consequent formation of trauma memories could protect against the development of PTSD. The present manuscript reviews the literature regarding the role of peri-traumatic stress hormones as risk factors for the development of PTSD and reviews evidence for the efficacy of exogenously modulating stress hormone levels to prevent/buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. Whereas prior literature has focused primarily on either child or adult studies, the present review incorporates both child and adult studies in a developmental approach to understanding risk for PTSD and how pharmacological modulation of acute memories may buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:24513176

  9. Molecular Changes in Sub-lesional Muscle Following Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Nakul P; Samantaray, Supriti; Park, Sookyoung; Nozaki, Kenkichi; Smith, Joshua A; Cox, April; Krause, James; Banik, Naren L

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the molecular changes of sublesional muscle in the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI), a moderately severe injury (40 g cm) was induced in the spinal cord (T10 vertebral level) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (injury) and compared with sham (laminectomy only). Rats were sacrificed at 48 h (acute) post injury, and gastrocnemius muscles were excised. Morphological examination revealed no significant changes in the muscle fiber diameter between the sham and injury rats. Western blot analyses performed on the visibly red, central portion of the gastrocnemius muscle showed significantly higher expression of muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases (muscle ring finger-1 and muscle atrophy f-box) and significantly lower expression of phosphorylated Akt-1/2/3 in the injury group compared to the sham group. Cyclooxygenase 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and caspase-1, also had a significantly higher expression in the injury group; although, the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 did not show any significant difference between the sham and injury groups. These results suggest activation of protein degradation, deactivation of protein synthesis, and development of inflammatory reaction occurring in the sublesional muscles in the acute phase of SCI before overt muscle atrophy is seen. PMID:26290268

  10. Involvement of spinal cord opioid mechanisms in the acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen in mice.

    PubMed

    Heeman, Jacqueline H; Zhang, Yangmiao; Shirachi, Donald Y; Quock, Raymond M

    2013-12-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) can elicit an antinociceptive response in models of acute pain. We have demonstrated that this antinociceptive effect is centrally-mediated and is dependent on opioid receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of endogenous opioid peptides and opioid receptors specifically in the spinal cord in the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 in mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were exposed to HBO2 (100% oxygen at 3.5atm absolute) for 11min and their antinociceptive responsiveness was determined using the glacial acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. HBO2-induced antinociception was sensitive to antagonism by intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment with the κ- and μ-selective opioid antagonists norbinaltorphimine and β-funaltrexamine, respectively, but not the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole. The antinociceptive effect of HBO2 was also significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with a rabbit antiserum against rat dynorphin1-13 but not antisera against β-endorphin or methionine-enkephalin. Based on these experimental findings, the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 appears to involve neuronal release of dynorphin and activation of κ- and μ-opioid receptors in the spinal cord. PMID:24113418

  11. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  12. Transitioning the complex trauma patient from the ICU: acute care nurses' perceptions of readiness.

    PubMed

    Garlow, Laura; Day, Angela; Payne, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Trauma centers improve patient outcomes through the provision of expert care by trauma surgeons and nurses. While the American College of Surgeons stipulates that trauma centers must have qualified nurses, there is no clear definition of qualified, nor is there a recommendation for trauma nurse readiness beyond the emergency department or intensive care. In a newly designated level II trauma center, it was recognized that nurses were unprepared to provide care to complex trauma patients. This study explored nurses' perceptions of their knowledge, skills and confidence in complex trauma care utilizing a novel transitional care model.

  13. [Aortic valve injury due to blunt trauma--treatment in acute phase].

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Ohuchi, H; Fukuda, I

    1996-10-01

    Aortic valve injury due to blunt trauma is rare and often difficult to diagnose. Therefore, most reported cases are operated on months or years after initial injury. Reported below is the case of a 55-year-old male, who was involved in a head-on collision with a bus. He was transported to Tsukuba Medical Center by ambulance, 34 minutes after the accident. The patient presented acute shock without obvious evidence of hemorrhaging. On physical examination a murmur was detected. The murmur was evaluated by Doppler echocardiography and revealed aortic regurgitation. On further physical examination he had gross hematuria and intratracheal bleeding. Computerized tomography (CT) showed evidence of contusions to his lungs, liver, and kidneys. The individual was diagnosed with an aortic valve injury, causing aortic insufficiency. It was necessary to continuously monitor the patients' hemodynamic state, assessing when conditions to operate were most favorable. However, in the hyper-acute phase the bleeding is difficult to control. We waited for his platelet count to recover before operating on the fifth day. When the patient underwent valve repair using extracorporeal circulation (ECC), aprotinin was added to the procedure. The surgery revealed a large laceration on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. Repair to the valve was impossible, so replacement of the aortic valve was required. A Carbomedics mechanical valve (phi 21 mm) was inserted. The patient did well after surgery, and eventually returned to work. To date, in Japan, there are eleven such cases of aortic valve injury on file. However, this is the first reported case that involved operating during the acute phase. This case demonstrates that, with careful evaluation of coexisting injuries and control of bleeding, successful treatment of aortic valve injury using ECC is possible, even in the acute phase. PMID:8940844

  14. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  15. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  16. FGF-1 Triggers Pannexin-1 Hemichannel Opening in Spinal Astrocytes of Rodents and Promotes Inflammatory Responses in Acute Spinal Cord Slices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2016-01-01

    We show here that the growth factor FGF-1 is proinflammatory in the spinal cord and explore the inflammatory mechanisms. FGF-1 applied to rat spinal astrocytes in culture initiates calcium signaling and induces secretion of ATP that within minutes increases membrane permeability to ethidium (Etd+) and Ca2+ by activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) that open pannexin hemichannels (Px1 HCs) that release further ATP; by 7 h treatment, connexin 43 hemichannels (Cx43 HCs) are also opened. In acute mouse spinal cord slices ex vivo, we found that FGF-1 treatment for 1 h increases the percentage of GFAP-positive astrocytes that show enhanced Px1 HC-mediated Etd+ uptake. This response to FGF-1 was not observed in astrocytes in slices of cerebral cortex. FGF-1-induced dye uptake by astrocytes is prevented by BAPTA-AM or a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. Furthermore, in spinal cord slices, P2X7R antagonists (BBG and A740003) and Px1 HC blockers (10Panx1 and carbenoxolone) prevent the increase in Etd+ uptake by astrocytes, whereas Gap19, a selective Cx43 HC blocker, has no effect on dye uptake at this time. Microglia are not required for the increase in Etd+ uptake by astrocytes induced by FGF-1, although they are activated by FGF-1 treatment. The morphological signs of microglia activation are inhibited by P2X7R antagonists and 10Panx1 and are associated with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in cord slices treated with FGF-1. The FGF-1 initiated cascade may play an important role in spinal cord inflammation in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We find that FGF-1 elevates [Ca2+]i in spinal astrocytes, which causes vesicular release of ATP and activation of P2X7Rs to trigger opening of Px1 HCs, which release further ATP. This regenerative response occurs in astrocyte cultures and in acute spinal cord slices. In the latter, FGF-1 application promotes the activation of microglia and increases the production of proinflammatory cytokines through mechanisms depending on P2X7

  17. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman presenting with acute epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Yasuomi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    A 26-year-old woman in week 31 of pregnancy presented to the emergency room with acute onset of paraplegia. Her medical history was unremarkable. Neurological examination revealed complete paraplegia, total sensory loss below the T7 dermatome, and significant vesicorectal dysfunction. MRI revealed an intraspinal mass from T3 to T4, which was hyperintense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Blood examination found no abnormality. She underwent emergent hemilaminectomy and removal of the hematoma. Intraoperatively, unusually ectatic venous vessels were found adhered to the lower surface of the epidural clot. No concurrent vascular malformations were identified and the dura mater was intact. The histological diagnosis was angiolipoma. Postoperatively her neurological deficits showed remarkable improvement, and she gave birth to a healthy baby. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman may be complicated with acute epidural hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation can be performed safely with a good functional prognosis.

  18. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1%) were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures) 276 (60.9%) were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4%) required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%). Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range) number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17) and 6 (1–22). Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11) and 8 (1–39). Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient with trauma

  19. Mechanism of injury and treatment of trauma-associated acute compartment syndrome of the foot.

    PubMed

    Brink, F; Bachmann, S; Lechler, P; Frink, M

    2014-10-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the foot represents a rare complication following trauma of the lower extremity. Early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent poor outcome. The study was conducted to describe etiology and treatment of foot ACS. In the current study, patients diagnosed with and treated for ACS between 1st December 2000 and 30th September 2007 were included. Mechanism of injury, additional injuries and treatment was analyzed. We included 31 patients (21 males) with a mean age of 33.8 ± 16.9 years. Most injuries were caused by a motor vehicle accident, while nearly 20 % occurred after a low-energy mechanism. Multiple injuries with a mean ISS of 19.5 ± 11.0 were present in 14 patients. Superficial infections occurred in 6 feet, while a deep infection only developed in one patient. Acute compartment syndrome of the foot has a low incidence. A thorough clinical examination in patients on risk is required to provide timely diagnosis and adequate surgical decompression.

  20. Spinal cord spectroscopy and diffusion-based tractography to assess acute disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, O; Wheeler-Kingshott, C A; McLean, M A; Cercignani, M; Wimpey, K; Miller, D H; Thompson, A J

    2007-08-01

    There is a need to assess spinal cord involvement in multiple sclerosis with new imaging techniques in order to understand better the underlying pathology. We aimed to evaluate whether quantitative MRI measures, obtained using single-voxel (1)H-MR spectroscopy of the cervical cord and diffusion-based tractography of the major spinal cord pathways, in patients with a cervical cord relapse, differed from controls and correlated with acute disability. Fourteen patients at the onset of a cervical cord relapse with at least one lesion between C1 and C3 were imaged on a 1.5 T scanner and clinically assessed on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), 9-hole peg test (HPT) and timed 25-foot walk test. Thirteen age- and gender-matched control subjects were also scanned. Metabolite concentrations, including total N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr) and myo-Inositol (m-Ins), were quantified at C1-C3. Probabilistic tractography was performed at C1-C3 to track the lateral cortico-spinal tracts in the lateral columns, the anterior cortico-spinal tracts and the anterior spino-thalamic fasciculi in the anterior columns, and the bilateral fasciculus gracilis and cuneatus in the posterior columns. Diffusion- and tractography-derived measures of these tracts, including fractional anisotropy and voxel-based connectivity, which reflect fibre integrity, were obtained. These MRI measures were compared between patients and controls using the Mann-Whitney test. Univariate correlations between MRI measures and disability were assessed using the Spearman's rho correlation coefficient. Multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate which MRI measures independently correlated with the clinical scores, adjusting also for cross-sectional cord area, age and gender. Patients showed lower tNAA of the cervical cord, lower connectivity and lower fractional anisotropy of the lateral cortico-spinal tracts and posterior

  1. Relationship Between Depressive State and Treatment Characteristics of Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasufumi; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya; Wada, Futoshi; Sugita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients contributes to depression. Methods Using an administrative database, we assessed patients for whom the diagnosis was unspecified injuries of cervical spinal cord (International Classification of Diseases and Injuries-10th (ICD-10) code; S14.1). We categorized patients with codes for depressive episode (ICD-10 code; F32) or recurrent depressive disorder (F33), or those prescribed antidepressants (tricyclic, tetracyclic, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Serotonin Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, Trazodone, Sulpiride, or Mirtazapine) as having a depressive state. We compared the rate of each acute treatment between the depressive state group and the non-depressive state group using chi-square tests, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the acute treatment and depressive state. Results There were 151 patients who were judged to be in a depressive state, and the other 2115 patients were categorized into the non-depressive state group. Intervention of intravenous anesthesia, tracheostomy, artificial respiration, and gastrostomy had a significant positive correlation with depressive state. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that tracheostomy (odds ratio [OR] 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–4.38) and artificial respiration (OR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.32–3.93) were significantly associated with depressive state, and men had a 36% reduction in the risk of depressive state compared with women (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44–0.94), whereas age, wound-treatment, all of the orthopedic procedures, intravenous anesthesia, and gastrostomy were not associated with depressive state. Conclusions These findings suggest that tracheostomy, artificial respiration and female gender in the acute phase after cervical SCI might be associated with the development of depression. PMID:26567604

  2. A model for the future care of acute spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Botterell, E H; Jousse, A T; Kraus, A S; Thompson, M G; WynneJones, M; Geisler, W O

    1975-11-01

    This is a review of the total care of those acute spinal cord injury patients in Ontario during the years 1969 and 1970, from extrication and transportation following the accident to death, or the completion of primary definitive rehabilitation. Information was extracted from the available ambulance records, the patients and many of the responsible physicians were interviewed personally. The study was detailed and intensive and included a review of each patient's hospital records in each hospital up to discharge from the rehabilitation programme into the community, or to a chronic care unit. The data was compiled in accordance with a detailed and lengthy questionnaire developed for this study. The incidence of acute cord injuries in Ontario in 1969 and 1970 amounted to 244; in 1969, 15.9 per million population and in 1970, 13.6 per million. As in other studies road accidents took first place, followed by falls from a height; sports injuries ranked third and 65.7% of these were caused by diving into shallow water. Age incidence, and incidence by month, day of week and time of day were identified. Fridays and Saturday afternoons in July and August are particularly hazardous. The study continued to the end of 1974 by which time 34 deaths had been recorded. Peak incidence of death occurred within fourteen days of injury. The most common cause of death was respiratory in origin. Geographical distribution was identified and the type of hospital treating the acutely injured patient. Fourteen percent of persons with spinal column injury suffered progressive or sequential spinal cord damage both prior to and following medical contact. The incidence of pressure sores and genitourinary sepsis and calculosis was high in all types of hospitals. The effect of operative treatment was noted in cases of complete quadriplegia and paraplegia. Of the 133 survivors who undertook a rehabilitation program, 84% returned to their homes and 59% achieved gainful employemnt or ongoing

  3. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines—monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)—to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  4. Intraoperative Targeted Temperature Management in Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Jacqueline; Karpenko, Anna; Rincon, Fred

    2016-02-01

    Acute brain and spinal cord injuries affect hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. Though advances in pre-hospital and emergency and neurocritical care have improved the survival of some to these devastating diseases, very few clinical trials of potential neuro-protective strategies have produced promising results. Medical therapies such as targeted temperature management (TTM) have been trialed in traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI), acute ischemic stroke (AIS), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), but in no study has a meaningful effect on outcome been demonstrated. To this end, patient selection for potential neuro-protective therapies such as TTM may be the most important factor to effectively demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. The use of TTM as a strategy to treat and prevent secondary neuronal damage in the intraoperative setting is an area of ongoing investigation. In this review we will discuss recent and ongoing studies that address the role of TTM in combination with surgical approaches for different types of brain injury. PMID:26759319

  5. Spinal epidural neurostimulation for treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain: initial and long term results.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R R; Siqueira, E B; Cerullo, L J

    1979-09-01

    Spinal epidural neurostimulation, which evolved from dorsal column stimulation, has been found to be effective in the treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain. Urban and Hashold have shown that it is a safe, simplified alternative to dorsal column stimulation, especially because laminectomy is not required if the electrodes are inserted percutaneously. Percutaneous epidural neurostimulation is also advantageous because there can be a diagnostic trial period before permanent internalization and implantation. This diagnostic and therapeutic modality has been used in 36 patients during the past 3 years at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Eleven of these patients had acute intractable pain, which was defined as pain of less than 1 year in duration. Initial postimplantation results from the 36 patients indicate that spinal epidural neurostimulation is most effective in treating the intractable pain of diabetes, arachnoiditis, and post-traumatic and postamputation neuroma. Long term follow-up, varying from 1 year to 3 years postimplantation in the 20 initially responding patients, indicates that the neurostimulation continues to provide significant pain relief (50% or greater) in a majority of the patients who experienced initial significant pain relief.

  6. Speed and spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Healy, D G; Connolly, P; Stephens, M M; O'Byrne, J M; McManus, F; McCormack, D

    2004-09-01

    Road traffic accidents (RTA) are a significant cause of spinal trauma. On the 31st of October 2002 a new penalty system for speed related driving offences was introduced in Ireland. Our intention was to assess the effects of the introduction of this system on the activity of the National Spinal Injuries Centre (NSIC) with a retrospective review of all admissions from November 1998 until October 2003. The number of new acute admissions to the spinal injury unit during the study period was 831. In the first 6 months of the new system the number of RTA related admissions fell significantly to 17 compared to an average of 33 in the preceding 4 years. However, this effect was not maintained in the second 6 months. The fall in spinal injuries following RTA in the first 6 months of the new system parallels the pattern of road death reduction in this period. This suggests that driving behaviour can be modified with direct benefits in reducing spinal injuries. However, this effect has not persisted in the second 6 months of the new system suggesting that to maintain this change the perception and familiarity of a penalty are important factors in its impact.

  7. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  8. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  9. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W.; Choi, Seung W.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. Participants A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items Results The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items Conclusion The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available. PMID:26010967

  10. Risks associated with magnetic resonance imaging and cervical collar in comatose, blunt trauma patients with negative comprehensive cervical spine computed tomography and no apparent spinal deficit

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C Michael; Brocker, Brian P; Collier, B David; Gemmel, David J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In blunt trauma, comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8) with a negative comprehensive cervical spine (CS) computed tomography assessment and no apparent spinal deficit, CS clearance strategies (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and prolonged cervical collar use) are controversial. Methods We conducted a literature review to delineate risks for coma, CS instability, prolonged cervical collar use, and CS MRI. Results Based on our search of the literature, the numbers of functional survivor patients among those who had sustained blunt trauma were as follows: 350 per 1,000 comatose unstable patients (increased intracranial pressure [ICP], hypotension, hypoxia, or early ventilator-associated pneumonia); 150 per 1,000 comatose high-risk patients (age > 45 years or Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 5); and 600 per 1,000 comatose stable patients (not unstable or high risk). Risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable, high-risk, and stable patients were as follows: 2.5% for CS instability; 26.2% for increased intensive care unit complications with prolonged cervical collar use; 9.3% to 14.6% for secondary brain injury with MRI transportation; and 20.6% for aspiration during MRI scanning (supine position). Additional risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable patients were as follows: 35.8% for increased ICP with cervical collar; and 72.1% for increased ICP during MRI scan (supine position). Conclusion Blunt trauma coma functional survivor (independent living) rates are alarming. When a comprehensive CS computed tomography evaluation is negative and there is no apparent spinal deficit, CS instability is unlikely (2.5%). Secondary brain injury from the cervical collar or MRI is more probable than CS instability and jeopardizes cerebral recovery. Brain injury severity, probability of CS instability, cervical collar risk, and MRI risk assessments are essential when deciding whether CS MRI is appropriate and for determining the timing of

  11. [Need for rheologically active, vasoactive and metabolically active substances in the initial treatment of acute acoustic trauma].

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1986-10-01

    Two rheologically active and 8 vasoactive and metabolically active substances were compared in eight independent studies, some of which were randomised and double blind, on 400 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma. The control group was given saline. Spontaneous recovery was excluded as far as possible. The following substances were tested: Dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch 40/0.5, naftidrofurylhydrogenoxalate, Vinpocetin, betahistine, pentoxifylline, flunaricine, Regeneresen AU 4 and 0.9% saline. All groups showed superior results to the control group in both long-term and short-term tests with respect to hearing gain and tinnitis improvement. The rheologically effective substances showed no statistically significant variations. None of the vasoactive or metabolically active substances used as adjunctive therapy improved the results achieved with rheologically effective substances alone. These results demonstrate that acute acoustic trauma can be most effectively treated by rheologically active substances; vasoactive and metabolically active substances are unnecessary. Hyperbaric oxygenation is advantageous as an adjunctive therapy. PMID:2432041

  12. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst. PMID:20205727

  13. 1H-MRS in spinal cord injury: acute and chronic metabolite alterations in rat brain and lumbar spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Erschbamer, Matthias; Öberg, Johanna; Westman, Eric; Sitnikov, Rouslan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A variety of tests of sensorimotor function are used to characterize outcome after experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). These tests typically do not provide information about chemical and metabolic processes in the injured CNS. Here, we used 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to monitor long-term and short-term chemical changes in the CNS in vivo following SCI. The investigated areas were cortex, thalamus/striatum and the spinal cord distal to injury. In cortex, glutamate (Glu) decreased 1 day after SCI and slowly returned towards normal levels. The combined glutamine (Gln) and Glu signal was similarly decreased in cortex, but increased in the distal spinal cord, suggesting opposite changes of the Glu/Gln metabolites in cortex and distal spinal cord. In lumbar spinal cord, a marked increase of myo-inositol was found 3 days, 14 days and 4 months after SCI. Changes in metabolite concentrations in the spinal cord were also found for choline and N-acetylaspartate. No significant changes in metabolite concentrations were found in thalamus/striatum. Multivariate data analysis allowed separation between rats with SCI and controls for spectra acquired in cortex and spinal cord, but not in thalamus/striatum. Our findings suggest MRS could become a helpful tool to monitor spatial and temporal alterations of metabolic conditions in vivo in the brain and spinal cord after SCI. We provide evidence for dynamic temporal changes at both ends of the neuraxis, cortex cerebri and distal spinal cord, while deep brain areas appear less affected. PMID:21251091

  14. Preliminary Study of Acute Changes in Emotion Processing in Trauma Survivors with PTSD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xie, Hong; Cotton, Andrew S.; Duval, Elizabeth R.; Tamburrino, Marijo B.; Brickman, Kristopher R.; Elhai, Jon D.; Ho, S. Shaun; McLean, Samuel A.; Ferguson, Eric J.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests traumatic experience can rapidly alter brain activation associated with emotion processing. However, little is known about acute changes in emotion neurocircuits that underlie PTSD symptom development. To examine acute alterations in emotion circuit activation and structure that may be linked to PTSD symptoms, thirty-eight subjects performed a task of appraisal of emotional faces as their brains were functionally and structurally studied with MRI at both two weeks and three months after motor vehicle collision (MVC). As determined by symptoms reported in the PTSD Checklist at three months, sixteen survivors developed probable PTSD, whereas the remaining 22 did not meet criteria for PTSD diagnosis (non-PTSD). The probable PTSD group had greater activation than the non-PTSD group in dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC and vmPFC) while appraising fearful faces within two weeks after MVC and in left insular cortex (IC) three months after MVC. dmPFC activation at two weeks significantly positively correlated with PTSD symptom severity at two weeks (R = 0.462, P = 0.006) and three months (R = 0.418, p = 0.012). Changes over time in dmPFC activation and in PTSD symptom severity were also significantly positively correlated in the probable PTSD group (R = 0.641, P = 0.018). A significant time by group interaction was found for volume changes in left superior frontal gyrus (SFG, F = 6.048, p = 0.019) that partially overlapped dmPFC active region. Between two weeks and three months, left SFG volume decreased in probable PTSD survivors. These findings identify alterations in frontal cortical activity and structure during the early post-trauma period that appear to be associated with development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:27415431

  15. Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Argelio; Gurling, James; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Burns, Anthony S.; Lewis, Rachel; Soril, Lesley; Fallah, Nader; Street, John T.; Bélanger, Lise; Townson, Andrea; Liang, Liping; Atkins, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery. PMID:24023623

  16. Efficiency of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in experimental acute acoustic trauma from firearms.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, J; Aarnisalo, A A; Ylikoski, J

    2000-01-01

    In acute acoustic trauma (AAT), excessive noise exposure causes rupture of cell membranes and decreased cochlear blood flow. This leads to decreased oxygen tension in inner ear fluids and reduction of a variety of different oxygen-dependent cellular activities. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO) may help the cells suffering from hypoxia to survive. We exposed male Wistar rats to 60 impulses of 162-dB SPL from a 7.62-mm assault rifle equipped with a blank adaptor. After the exposure, 15 animals were given HBO treatment for 90 min daily for 10 consecutive days at 0.25 MPa. After a survival time of 4 weeks, auditory brainstem responses were measured and the left cochleae processed for light microscopy. The impulse noise caused permanent damage to the cochlea of all animals, with the most severe lesions in the lower middle coil, where a significantly smaller number of hair cells was missing in the HBO-treated group. The morphological damage was also reflected in function, as measured by auditory brainstem responses, which showed the greatest threshold shifts at 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kHz. PMID:10909001

  17. Potential efficacy of early treatment of acute acoustic trauma with steroids and piracetam after gunshot noise.

    PubMed

    Psillas, George; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karvelis, Ioannis; Kekes, George; Vital, Victor; Constantinidis, John

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the early effect of the treatment of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) with steroids and piracetam in a sample of 52 young soldiers who were exposed to intense gunfire noise (G3 rifle). These patients were divided into three groups: (1) group A (20 patients) in which the treatment began within the first hour after the AAT, (2) group B (17 patients) in which the treatment started more than 1 h later and less than 16 h after the AAT and (3) group C (15 patients) in which the treatment began after 24 h or more. One month after the treatment onset, 36 (69%) patients of all the groups showed hearing improvement (complete-partial recovery) in the pure tone audiometry. The greater number of patients who showed complete recovery after AAT was noted in group A (65%) compared to group B (23.5%) and C (13.3%). Moreover, in group A, in the final audiogram, the averaged hearing threshold was statistically better (P < 0.001) than that of groups B and C. In spite of the lack of control group, our data demonstrated the possible effectiveness of the immediate onset of treatment of AAT. PMID:18463885

  18. Impulse noise and acute acoustic trauma in Finnish conscripts. Number of shots fired and safe distances.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, S; Lehtomäki, K M

    1997-01-01

    This prospective study of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) from exposure to impulse noise during compulsory military service focused on three issues the number of shot or explosion impulses that the conscript was exposed to at the time of AAT, distance of injured ear from causal firearm, and the circumstances under which AAT occurred protected ears. The series includes 449 consecutive, verified cases of AAT seen at the Central Military Hospital in Helsinki, Finland, in the period 1989-1993. AAT usually occurred during combat training (87%) as a result of exposure to impulses from small arms (83%). In 41%. AAT was caused by a single shot or detonation impulse. As many as 92% of all AATs occurred within 2 m of the causal firearm. Fourteen percent were wearing hearing protectors when the accident took place, but every third had badly fitting protectors or had neglected safety regulations and used insufficient protection. Of all AATs caused by one noise impulse in protected ears. 83% were attributable to heavy arms and only 14% to small arms. The results of the study suggest that combined use of earmuffs and earplugs in association with a safe distance of over 5 m from the noise source gives adequate protection against AAT. However, for conscripts using certain heavy arms e.g. hazooka. more effective hearing protection should be developed. PMID:9187006

  19. A case of acute pancreatitis secondary to spinal cord injury. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijun; Sun, Yun; Lu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Pinjie; Yin, Lu; Li, Hui; Hua, Tianfeng; Zheng, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent and potentially life-threatening disease with high morbidity and mortality. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. Alcohol consumption and gallstones are the main etiology of AP. Hypertriglyceridemia, idiosyncratic reactions to drugs, anatomic alterations and ascaris lumbricoides can also give rise to AP. Although spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause AP, however, the case of induced by cervical spine surgery has not been reported. A 61-year-old man with quadriplegic and respiratory distress received cervical spine surgery for spinal cervical spondylosis and multi-stage longitudinal ligament. He was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after tracheotomy for progressive dyspnea, one day after the cervical spine surgery. The patient was diagnosed with AP, in the absence of any identifiable causes of pancreatitis. He was treated with intravenous fluids, no oral feeding, enteral and parenteral nutrition, antibiotic and mechanical ventilation. The patient's condition gradually improved after the treatment. This case describes a case of postoperative cervical spondylosis that led to AP. In this report, we highlight the importance of early diagnosis and subsequent appropriate treatment. We conclude that the outcome can be favorable, if the treatment is appropriate. PMID:26707037

  20. Quantifying the internal deformation of the rodent spinal cord during acute spinal cord injury - the validation of a method.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter; Kozlowski, Piotr; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of the rodent spinal cord subject to experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) has almost completely been limited to naked-eye observations, and a single measure of gross spinal cord motion due to injury. This study introduces a novel method which utilizes MRI to quantify the deformation of the rodent spinal cord due to imposed, clinically-relevant injuries - specifically, cervical contusion and dislocation mechanisms. The image registration methods were developed using the Advanced Normalization Tools package, which incorporate rigid, affine and deformable registration steps. The proposed method is validated against a fiducial-based, 'gold-standard' measure of spinal cord tissue motion. The validation analysis yielded accuracy (and precision) values of 62 μm (49 μm), 73 μm (79 μm) and 112 μm (110 μm), for the medio-lateral, dorso-ventral and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. The internal morphological change of the spinal cord has never before been quantified, experimentally. This study demonstrates the capability of this method and its potential for future application to in vivo rodent models of SCI.

  1. Safety and efficacy of corticosteroid use in neurologic trauma.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhe; Lat, Ishaq; Pollard, Sacha R

    2014-10-01

    Neurologic trauma, which consists of acute spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury, is a leading cause of death and disability. In recent years, there have been improvements in the early recognition and prompt resuscitation of patients with neurologic trauma. However, there remain few pharmacologic treatments to reduce its secondary complications. Corticosteroids have been used in patients with neurologic trauma for more than 5 decades. Traditionally, their use has been to improve motor and sensory recovery. However, recently their utility to prevent and manage trauma-related pneumonia has been investigated. Given these new investigations, the purpose of this review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the history and available scientific evidence surrounding the use of corticosteroids in neurologic trauma and caution against the use of these agents to prevent hospital-acquired pneumonia in this patient population.

  2. Incidence of deep vein thrombosis after spinal cord injury in Korean patients at acute rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Do, Jong Geol; Kim, Du Hwan; Sung, Duk Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) remain significant causes of morbidity, mortality in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Since incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean population has not been much studied, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 185 SCI patients admitted for acute rehabilitation unit to investigate the incidence of DVT. Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed to screen for the occurrence of DVT at the time of initial presentation to acute rehabilitation unit. Primary study outcome was the incidence of DVT. Possible risk factors for DVT including the epidemiologic characteristics, completeness of motor paralysis, cause of injury, spasticity, surgery, and active cancer were analyzed. The incidence of DVT after SCI was 27.6%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, absence of spasticity was a significant independent risk factor (P<0.05) for occurrence of DVT. Symptomatic pulmonary embolism was evident in 7 patients without an episode of sudden death. Therefore, it is concluded that the incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean patients is comparable with that in Western populations. This result suggests that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered in Korean patients with SCI.

  3. Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Acute Low Back Pain: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Mark J.; Maher, Christopher G.; Latimer, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is an extremely common cause of pain and disability. While many treatments for acute LBP exist, one of the most widely used, but also most controversial, is spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). This therapy includes both high-velocity manipulative techniques and low-velocity mobilization techniques. The literature regarding the use of SMT is often conflicting, which explains the difference in recommendations regarding SMT in international LBP guidelines. The lack of a clear tissue diagnosis in the majority of patients with LBP combined with the unknown mechanism of action of SMT adds to the difficulty for clinicians in providing SMT in a logical and effective manner. Despite these limitations, the existing literature does provide some assistance to clinicians on when to provide SMT and how to provide it in an optimal way. This review aims to summarize the key research literature investigating SMT in LBP in order to help clinicians make informed decisions about the use of SMT for their patients with acute LBP. PMID:19771190

  4. Clinical and functional outcomes of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome at a Major Trauma Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS) is a condition that untreated causes irreversible nerve and muscle ischemia. Treatment by decompression fasciotomy without delay prevents permanent disability. The use of intracompartmental pressure (iCP) measurement in uncertain situations aids in diagnosis of severe leg pain. As an infrequent complication of lower extremity trauma, consequences of CS include chronic pain, nerve injury, and contractures. The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with lower extremity CS after fasciotomy. Methods: Retrospective chart analysis for patients with a discharge diagnosis of CS was performed. Physical demographics, employment status, activity at time of injury, injury severity score, fracture types, pain scores, hours to fasciotomy, iCP, serum creatine kinase levels, wound treatment regimen, length of hospital stay, and discharge facility were collected. Lower extremity neurologic examination, pain scores, orthopedic complications, and employment status at 30 days and 12 months after discharge were noted. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and eight patients were assessed at 12 months. Eighty-one percent were male. Motorized vehicles caused 51% of injuries in males. Forty-one percent of injuries were tibia fractures. Acute kidney injury occurred in 2.4%. Mean peak serum creatine kinase levels were 58,600 units/ml. Gauze dressing was used in 78.9% of nonfracture patients and negative pressure wound vacuum therapy in 78.2% of fracture patients. About 21.6% of patients with CS had prior surgery. Nearly 12.9% of patients required leg amputation. Around 81.8% of amputees were male. Sixty-seven percent of amputees had associated vascular injuries. Foot numbness occurred in 20.5% of patients and drop foot palsy in 18.2%. Osteomyelitis developed in 10.2% of patients and fracture nonunion in 6.8%. About 14.7% of patients

  5. Psychobiology of PTSD in the Acute Aftermath of Trauma: Integrating Research on Coping, HPA Function and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Rao, Uma

    2012-01-01

    Research on the psychobiological sequelae of trauma has typically focused on long-term alterations in individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Far less is known about the nature and course of psychobiological risk factors for PTSD during the acute aftermath of trauma. In this review, we summarize data from prospective studies focusing on the relationships among sympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, coping strategies and PTSD symptoms during the early recovery (or non-recovery) phase. Findings from pertinent studies are integrated to inform psychobiological profiles of PTSD-risk in children and adults in the context of existing models of PTSD-onset and maintenance. Data regarding bidirectional relations between coping strategies and stress hormones is reviewed. Limitations of existing literature and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:23380312

  6. Psychobiology of PTSD in the acute aftermath of trauma: Integrating research on coping, HPA function and sympathetic nervous system activity.

    PubMed

    Morris, Matthew C; Rao, Uma

    2013-02-01

    Research on the psychobiological sequelae of trauma has typically focused on long-term alterations in individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Far less is known about the nature and course of psychobiological risk factors for PTSD during the acute aftermath of trauma. In this review, we summarize data from prospective studies focusing on the relationships among sympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, coping strategies and PTSD symptoms during the early recovery (or non-recovery) phase. Findings from pertinent studies are integrated to inform psychobiological profiles of PTSD-risk in children and adults in the context of existing models of PTSD-onset and maintenance. Data regarding bidirectional relations between coping strategies and stress hormones is reviewed. Limitations of existing literature and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  7. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  8. Thromboembolism in the Sub-Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Belci, Maurizio; Van Middendorp, Joost J; Al Halabi, Ahmed; Meagher, Tom M

    2016-01-01

    To review the evidence of thromboembolism incidence and prophylaxis in the sub-acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI) 3–6 months post injury. All observational and experimental studies with any length of follow-up and no limitations on language or publication status published up to March 2015 were included. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes studied were incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the sub-acute phase of SCI. The secondary outcome was type of thromboprophylaxis. Our search identified 4305 references and seven articles that met the inclusion criteria. Five papers reported PE events and three papers reported DVT events in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Studies were heterogeneous in populations, design and outcome reporting, therefore a meta-analysis was not performed. The included studies report a PE incidence of 0.5%–6.0% and DVT incidence of 2.0%–8.0% in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Thromboprophylaxis was poorly reported. Spinal patients continue to have a significant risk of PE and DVT after the acute period of their injury. Clinicians are advised to have a low threshold for suspecting venous thromboembolism in the sub-acute phase of SCI and to continue prophylactic anticoagulation therapy for a longer period of time. PMID:27790330

  9. Acute effects of Achilles tendon vibration on soleus and tibialis anterior spinal and cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Deroussen, François; Pérot, Chantal; Petitjean, Michel

    2012-08-01

    Prolonged vibration is known to alter muscle performance. Attenuation of Ia afferent efficacy is the main mechanism suggested. However, changes in motor cortex excitability could also be hypothesized. The purpose of the present study was therefore to analyze the acute and outlasting effects of 1 h of Achilles tendon vibration (frequency, 50 Hz) on the soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) neuromuscular excitability. Spinal excitability was investigated by means of H-reflexes and F-waves while cortical excitability was characterized by motor evoked potentials (MEPs) obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Twelve subjects performed the experimental procedures 3 times: at the beginning of the testing session (PRE), immediately after 1 h of Achilles tendon vibration (POST), and 1 h after the end of vibration (POST-1H). Prolonged vibration led to acute reduced H-reflex amplitudes for SOL only (46.9% ± 7.7% vs. 32.8% ± 7%; p = 0.006). Mainly presynaptic inhibition mechanisms were thought to be involved because of unchanged F-wave persistence and amplitude mean values, suggesting unaffected motoneuronal excitability. While no acute effects were reported for SOL and TA cortical excitability, both muscles were characterized by an outlasting increase in their MEP amplitude (0.64 ± 0.2 mV vs. 0.43 ± 0.18 mV and 2.17 ± 0.56 mV vs. 1.26 ± 0.36 mV, respectively; p < 0.05). The high modulation of Ia afferent input by vibration led to changes in motor cortex excitability that could contribute to the enhancement in muscular activation capacities reported after chronic use of tendon vibration.

  10. Docosahexaenoic Acid Pretreatment Confers Protection and Functional Improvements after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I.; Walker, Robert L.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  11. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse; Ballegaard, Martin; Krassioukov, Andrei; Hansen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Kruse, Anders; Welling, Karen-Lise; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular complications including cardiac arrest and arrhythmias remain a clinical challenge in the management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the characteristics of arrhythmias in patients with acute traumatic SCI. The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. Methods As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. Results Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) <50 b.p.m.) was present in 17–35% of the patients with cervical (C1–C8) SCI (n = 24) within the first 14 days. In the following 14 days, the occurrence was 22–32%. Bradycardia in the thoracic (Th1–Th12) SCI group (n = 6) was present in 17–33% during the observation period. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. The mean minimum HR was significantly lower in the cervical group compared with the thoracic group both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). Conclusion Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus node arrests and limited bradycardia, no arrhythmias were seen in patients with thoracic SCI. Standard 12-lead ECGs will often miss the high prevalence these arrhythmias have. PMID:24559419

  12. Enhancing the population impact of collaborative care interventions: Mixed method development and implementation of stepped care targeting posttraumatic stress disorder and related comorbidities after acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick; Jurkovich, Gregory; Russo, Joan; Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wang, Jin; Wagner, Amy; Stephens, Kari; Dunn, Chris; Uehara, Edwina; Petrie, Megan; Engel, Charles; Davydow, Dimitri; Katon, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a stepped collaborative care intervention targeting PTSD and related co-morbidities to enhance the population impact of early trauma-focused interventions. Method We describe the design and implementation of the Trauma Survivors Outcomes & Support Study (TSOS II). An interdisciplinary treatment development team was comprised of trauma surgical, clinical psychiatric and mental health services “change agents” who spanned the boundaries between front-line trauma center clinical care and acute care policy. Mixed method clinical epidemiologic and clinical ethnographic studies informed the development of PTSD screening and intervention procedures. Results Two-hundred and seven acutely injured trauma survivors with high early PTSD symptom levels were randomized into the study. The stepped collaborative care model integrated care management (i.e., posttraumatic concern elicitation and amelioration, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation) with cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy targeting PTSD. The model was feasibly implemented by front-line acute care MSW and ARNP providers. Conclusions Stepped care protocols targeting PTSD may enhance the population impact of early interventions developed for survivors of individual and mass trauma by extending the reach of collaborative care interventions to acute care medical settings and other non-specialty posttraumatic contexts. PMID:21596205

  13. Complement plays an important role in spinal cord injury and represents a therapeutic target for improving recovery following trauma.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Pannu, Ravinder; Singh, Inderjit; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Initiation of an inflammatory cascade following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is thought to cause secondary injury and to adversely impact functional recovery, although the mechanisms involved are not well defined. We report on the dynamics of complement activation and deposition in the mouse spinal cord following traumatic injury, the role of complement in the development of SCI, and the characterization of a novel targeted complement inhibitor. Following traumatic injury, mice deficient in C3 had a significantly improved locomotor score when compared with wild-type controls, and analysis of their spinal cords revealed significantly more tissue sparing, with significantly less necrosis, demyelination, and neutrophil infiltration. Wild-type mice were also treated with CR2-Crry, a novel inhibitor of complement activation that targets to sites of C3 deposition. A single intravenous injection of CR2-Crry 1 hour after traumatic injury improved functional outcome and pathology to an extent similar to that seen in C3-deficient animals. CR2-Crry specifically targeted to the injured spinal cord in a distribution pattern corresponding to that seen for deposited C3. As immunosuppression is undesirable in patients following SCI, targeted CR2-Crry may provide appropriate bioavailability to treat SCI at a dose that does not significantly affect systemic levels of serum complement activity. PMID:16936276

  14. A multidisciplinary approach to providing care to adolescents with spinal cord trauma resulting from all-terrain vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Leslie N; Weatherford, Blakely; Locke, Lindsey N; Chung, Hoi Sing; Tidwell, Chrisla; Paton, Elizabeth; Lee, Shirleatha

    2015-01-01

    All-terrain vehicle accidents that affect the spine can lead to complex injuries in adolescents. This requires that many subspecialties work together on a multidisciplinary team to improve patient outcomes. Our case presentation will examine the multidisciplinary approach to care required for an 11-year-old adolescent involved in an all-terrain vehicle accident that resulted in traumatic spinal cord injury.

  15. Acute and Chronic Deficits in the Urinary Bladder after Spinal Contusion Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juan J.; Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently alters bladder function in humans. Hematuria and cystitis occur in both human SCI as well as in rodent models of SCI. Others have reported early SCI-dependent disruption to bladder uroepithelial integrity that results in increased permeability to urine and urine-borne substances. This can result in cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, an ongoing pathological condition present throughout the chronic phase of SCI in humans. The goals of our study were twofold: (1) to begin to examine the inflammatory and molecular changes that occur within the bladder uroepithelium using a clinically-relevant spinal contusion model of injury, and (2) to assess whether these alterations continue into the chronic phase of SCI. Rats received either moderate SCI or sham surgery. Urine was collected from SCI and sham subjects over 7 days or at 7 months to assess levels of excreted proteins. Inflammation in the bladder wall was assessed via biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Bladder tight junction proteins, mediators of uroepithelial integrity, were also measured in both the acute and chronic phases of SCI. Urine protein and hemoglobin levels rapidly increase following SCI. An SCI-dependent elevation in numbers of neutrophils within the bladder wall peaked at 48 h. Bladder tight junction proteins demonstrate a rapid but transient decrease as early as 2 h post-SCI. Surprisingly, elevated levels of urine proteins and significant deficits in bladder tight junction proteins could be detected in chronic SCI, suggesting that early pathological changes to the bladder may continue throughout the chronic phase of injury. PMID:19891526

  16. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research.

  17. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research. PMID:26967029

  18. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  19. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a

  20. Daily acute intermittent hypoxia elicits functional recovery of diaphragm and inspiratory intercostal muscle activity after acute cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Opazo, A.; Vinit, S; Dougherty, B.J.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major cause of mortality after spinal cord injury is respiratory failure. In normal rats, acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces respiratory motor plasticity, expressed as diaphragm (Dia) and second external intercostal (T2 EIC) long-term facilitation (LTF). Dia (not T2 EIC) LTF is enhanced by systemic adenosine 2A (A2a) receptor inhibition in normal rats. We investigated the respective contributions of Dia and T2 EIC to daily AIH-induced functional recovery of breathing capacity with/without A2a receptor antagonist (KW6002, i.p.) following C2 hemisection (C2HS). Rats received daily AIH (dAIH: 10, 5-min episodes, 10.5% O2; 5-min normoxic intervals; 7 successive days beginning 7 days post-C2HS) or daily normoxia (dNx) with/without KW6002, followed by weekly (reminder) presentations for 8 weeks. Ventilation and EMGs from bilateral diaphragm and T2 EIC muscles were measured with room air breathing (21% O2) and maximum chemoreceptor stimulation (MCS: 7% CO2, 10.5% O2). dAIH increased tidal volume (Vt) in C2HS rats breathing room air (dAIH + vehicle: 0.47 ± 0.02, dNx + vehicle: 0.40 ± 0.01ml/100 g; p<0.05) and MCS (dAIH + vehicle: 0.83 ± 0.01, dNx + vehicle: 0.73 ± 0.01ml/100g; p<0.001); KW6002 had no significant effect. dAIH enhanced contralateral (uninjured) diaphragm EMG activity, an effect attenuated by KW6002, during room air breathing and MCS (p<0.05). Although dAIH enhanced contralateral T2 EIC EMG activity during room air breathing, KW6002 had no effect. dAIH had no statistically significant effects on diaphragm or T2 EIC EMG activity ipsilateral to injury. Thus, two weeks post-C2HS: 1) dAIH enhances breathing capacity by effects on contralateral diaphragm and T2 EIC activity; and 2) dAIH-induced recovery is A2a dependent in diaphragm, but not T2 EIC. Daily AIH may be a useful in promoting functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury, but A2a receptor antagonists (eg. caffeine) may undermine its effectiveness shortly after

  1. Proton Therapy for Spinal Ependymomas: Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Amsbaugh, Mark J.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Zhu, Ron; Wages, Cody; Crawford, Cody N.; Palmer, Matthew; De Gracia, Beth; Woo Shiao; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report acute toxicities and preliminary outcomes for pediatric patients with ependymomas of the spine treated with proton beam therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Eight pediatric patients received proton beam irradiation between October 2006 and September 2010 for spinal ependymomas. Toxicity data were collected weekly during radiation therapy and all follow-up visits. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: All patients had surgical resection of the tumor before irradiation (7 subtotal resection and 1 gross total resection). Six patients had World Health Organization Grade I ependymomas, and two had World Health Organization Grade II ependymomas. Patients had up to 3 surgical interventions before radiation therapy (range, 1-3; median, 1). Three patients received proton therapy after recurrence and five as part of their primary management. The entire vertebral body was treated in all but 2 patients. The mean radiation dose was 51.1 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45 to 54 cobalt gray equivalents). With a mean follow-up of 26 months from the radiation therapy start date (range, 7-51 months), local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were all 100%. The most common toxicities during treatment were Grade 1 or 2 erythema (75%) and Grade 1 fatigue (38%). No patients had a Grade 3 or higher adverse event. Proton therapy dramatically reduced dose to all normal tissues anterior to the vertebral bodies in comparison to photon therapy. Conclusion: Preliminary outcomes show the expected control rates with favorable acute toxicity profiles. Proton beam therapy offers a powerful treatment option in the pediatric population, where adverse events related to radiation exposure are of concern. Extended follow-up will be required to assess for late recurrences and long-term adverse effects.

  2. A Systematic Review of Non-Invasive Pharmacologic Neuroprotective Treatments for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena; Hillyer, Jessica; Mann, Cody; Baptiste, Darryl; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI) are emerging from the laboratory and seeking translation into human clinical trials. Many of these are administered as soon as possible after injury with the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing the extent of spared neurologic tissue. In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical research on such neuroprotective therapies that are administered in a non-invasive manner for acute SCI. Specifically, we review treatments that have a relatively high potential for translation due to the fact that they are already used in human clinical applications, or are available in a form that could be administered to humans. These include: erythropoietin, NSAIDs, anti-CD11d antibodies, minocycline, progesterone, estrogen, magnesium, riluzole, polyethylene glycol, atorvastatin, inosine, and pioglitazone. The literature was systematically reviewed to examine studies in which an in-vivo animal model was utilized to assess the efficacy of the therapy in a traumatic SCI paradigm. Using these criteria, 122 studies were identified and reviewed in detail. Wide variations exist in the animal species, injury models, and experimental designs reported in the pre-clinical literature on the therapies reviewed. The review highlights the extent of investigation that has occurred in these specific therapies, and points out gaps in our knowledge that would be potentially valuable prior to human translation. PMID:20146558

  3. Use of spinal manipulation in a rheumatoid patient presenting with acute thoracic pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chadwick L. R.; Mior, Silvano A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited research related to spinal manipulation of uncomplicated thoracic spine pain and even less when pain is associated with comorbid conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of trial evidence, clinical experience and appropriate selection of the type of intervention is important to informing the appropriate management of these cases. Case presentation: We present a case of a patient with long standing rheumatoid arthritis who presented with acute thoracic pain. The patient was diagnosed with costovertebral joint dysfunction and a myofascial strain of the surrounding musculature. The patient was unresponsive to treatment involving a generalized manipulative technique; however, improved following the administration of a specific applied manipulation with modified forces. The patient was deemed recovered and discharged with ergonomic and home care recommendations. Discussion: This case demonstrates a clinical situation where there is a paucity of research to guide management, thus clinicians must rely on experience and patient preferences in the selection of an appropriate and safe therapeutic intervention. The case highlights the need to contextualize the apparent contraindication of manipulation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and calls for further research. Finally the paper advances evidence based decision making that balances the available research, clinical experience, as well as patient preferences. PMID:26136606

  4. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h. PMID:24071567

  5. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  6. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after acute acoustic trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Bahk, Chan Woong; Kim, Se Hyung; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Jung, Jae Yun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-level laser radiation on rescuing hair cells of the cochlea after acute acoustic trauma and hearing loss. Nine rats were exposed to noise. Starting the following day, the left ears (NL ears) of the rats were irradiated at an energy output of 100 to 165 mW/cm2 for 60 min for 12 days in a row. The right ears (N ears) were considered as the control group. Frequency-specific hearing levels were measured before the noise exposure and also after the 1st, 3rd to 5th, 8th to 10th and 12th irradiations. After the 12th treatment, hair cells were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Compared to initial hearing levels at all frequencies, thresholds increased markedly after noise exposure. After the 12th irradiation, hearing threshold was significantly lower for the NL ears compared to the N ears. When observed using an electron microscope, the number of hair cells in the middle turn of the NL ears was significantly larger than that of the N ears. Our findings suggest that low-level laser irradiation promotes recovery of hearing thresholds after acute acoustic trauma.

  7. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  8. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injury Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Wu, Guangyao; Zhou, Xin; Li, Jielan; Wen, Zhi; Lin, Fuchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity. Results Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores. Conclusion Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as

  9. 18F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    von Leden, Ramona E.; Selwyn, Reed G.; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M.; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel bio-marker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24 hours and 15 days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6 hours post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24 hours and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target. PMID:27084688

  10. Swim Training Initiated Acutely after Spinal Cord Injury Is Ineffective and Induces Extravasation In and Around the Epicenter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Brown, Edward H.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Whelan, Ashley; Burke, Darlene A.; Benton, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Activity-based rehabilitation is a promising strategy for improving functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). While results from both clinical and animal studies have shown that a variety of approaches can be effective, debate still exists regarding the optimal post-injury period to apply rehabilitation. We recently demonstrated that rats with moderately severe thoracic contusive SCI can be re-trained to swim when training is initiated 2 weeks after injury and that swim training had no effect on the recovery of overground locomotion. We concluded that swim training is a task-specific model of post-SCI activity-based rehabilitation. In the present study, we ask if re-training initiated acutely is more or less effective than when initiated at 2 weeks post-injury. Using the Louisville Swim Scale, an 18-point swimming assessment, supplemented by kinematic assessment of hindlimb movement during swimming, we report that acute re-training is less effective than training initiated at 2 weeks. Using the bioluminescent protein luciferase as a blood-borne macromolecular marker, we also show a significant increase in extravasation in and around the site of SCI following only 8 min of swimming at 3 days post-injury. Taken together, these results suggest that acute re-training in a rat model of SCI may compromise rehabilitation efforts via mechanisms that may involve one or more secondary injury cascades, including acute spinal microvascular dysfunction. PMID:19331515

  11. The association between spinal cord trauma-sensitive miRNAs and pain sensitivity, and their regulation by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Eric R.; Woller, Sarah A.; Hook, Michelle A.; Grau, James W.; Miranda, Rajesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a common sequela to spinal cord injury (SCI). Moreover, drugs like morphine, though critical for pain management, elicit pro-inflammatory effects that exacerbate chronic pain symptoms. Previous reports showed that SCI results in the induction and suppression of several microRNAs (miRNAs), both at the site of injury, as well as in segments of the spinal cord distal to the injury site. We hypothesized that morphine would modulate the expression of these miRNAs, and that expression of these SCI-sensitive miRNAs may predict adaptation of distal nociceptive circuitry following SCI. To determine whether morphine treatment further dysregulates SCI-sensitive miRNAs, their expression was examined by qRT-PCR in sham controls and in response to vehicle and morphine treatment following contusion in rats, at either 2 or 15 days post-SCI. Our data indicated that expression of miR1, miR124, and miR129-2 at the injury site predicted the nociceptive response mediated by spinal regions distal to the lesion site, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the interaction of SCI with adaptation of functionally intact distal sensorimotor circuitry. Moreover, the SCI-induced miRNA, miR21 was induced by subsequent morphine administration, representing an alternate, and hitherto unidentified, maladaptive response to morphine exposure. Contrary to predictions, mRNA for the pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R), an identified target of SCI-sensitive miRNAs, was also induced following SCI, indicating dissociation between miRNA and target gene expression. Moreover, IL6R mRNA expression was inversely correlated with locomotor function suggesting that inflammation is a predictor of decreased spinal cord function. Collectively, our data indicate that miR21 and other SCI-sensitive miRNAs may constitute therapeutic targets, not only for improving functional recovery following SCI, but also for attenuating the effects of SCI on pain sensitivity. PMID:24867772

  12. Chitosan produces potent neuroprotection and physiological recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngnam; Shi, Riyi; Borgens, Richard B

    2010-05-01

    Chitosan, a non-toxic biodegradable polycationic polymer with low immunogenicity, has been extensively investigated in various biomedical applications. In this work, chitosan has been demonstrated to seal compromised nerve cell membranes thus serving as a potent neuroprotector following acute spinal cord trauma. Topical application of chitosan after complete transection or compression of the guinea pig spinal cord facilitated sealing of neuronal membranes in ex vivo tests, and restored the conduction of nerve impulses through the length of spinal cords in vivo, using somatosensory evoked potential recordings. Moreover, chitosan preferentially targeted damaged tissues, served as a suppressor of reactive oxygen species (free radical) generation, and the resultant lipid peroxidation of membranes, as shown in ex vivo spinal cord samples. These findings suggest a novel medical approach to reduce the catastrophic loss of behavior after acute spinal cord and brain injury.

  13. Neurogenic motor evoked potential changes after acute experimental spinal cord i njury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Jia, Lianshun; Zhou, Xuhui

    2000-08-15

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the characte ristics of the neurogenic motor evoked potential (NMEP) before and after acute s pinal cord injury. METHODS: We recorded and characterized the spinal cord NMEP fro m 48 normal rats and from 38 rats with spinal cord hemisection lesion. Spinal co rd NMEPs were elicited by applying a range of current intensities with bipolar m icroelectrode stimuli to the C4 cord segment and recording the responses from sc iatic nerves with bipolar microelectrodes placed in the neurilemma. RESULTS: The evoked potentials consisted of three stable and re producible negative and three positive peaks. The meanplus minusSD latencies of N1 were 2.89plus minus0.22 ms on the right side and 2.89plus minus0.24 ms on th e left side. The mean conduction velocity was 47.9 m/s. The meanplus minusSD am plitudes of N1 were 3.61plus minus2.10 muV on the right side and 3.83plus minus2.3 2 muV on the left side. The amplitudes of N1 were signific antly different among the eight stimulus intensity groups (right side: F=2.22, df=7201, P=0.03; left side: F=2.11, df=7206, P=0.04). The amplitude was largest when the stimulus intensity was 1.1-2.5 mA. The latencies of N1 were not si gnificantly different among the eight stimulus intensity groups (right side: F=0.40, df=7201, P=0.9; left side: F=1.20, df=7206, P=0.3. The amplitudes and latencies of N2, N3 were not significantly different among the eight stimulus intensity groups. There were no significant changes in latency and amplitude between the left and the right side nerve responses. Thirty-eight rats underwent T9 cord right side hemisection. Among them, 20 (53%), 30 (79%), and 32 (84%) rats could not be reco rded in corresponding to N1, N2, and N3, respectively, in the right-side sciati c nerves; and 13 (79%), 18 (47%), and 21 (55%), in corresponding to N1, N2, and N3 in the left-side sciatic nerves. The latency was significantly delayed on th e both right and left sides. The amplitude N1 was significantly

  14. Diagnosis of acute dental trauma: the importance of standardized documentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Frances M; Kahler, Bill

    2015-10-01

    In 1985 Andreasen and Andreasen published a paper on the diagnosis of luxation injuries and outlined the importance of standardized clinical, radiographic, and photographic techniques. Now 30 years later, these recommendations remain current in the International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) guidelines for the management of dental trauma and describe circumstances surrounding the time of injury, the extent of trauma (e.g., type of luxation injury), healing potential (e.g., stage of root development) as well as information concerning subsequent treatment. The purpose of this review was to include findings for other types of trauma and to discuss more recent studies that augment and/or improve on the original findings from 30 years ago. The present review discusses the use of a standardized clinical registration (pulpal sensibility testing, laser Doppler flowmetry, mobility testing), radiographic survey, and photographic registration of the traumatized patient. Moreover, the value of digital radiographs and recent developments in computer tomography with respect to possible enhancement of the trauma diagnosis are discussed.

  15. Stability of trauma-related symptoms during acute substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eva; Odenwald, Michael; Proescholdt, Margit; Haubold, Anja; Bohnacker, Isabelle; Flögel, Marlene; Linde, Andreas; Müller, Sandra; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Lang, Undine; Walter, Marc; Vogel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and reports of traumatic childhood experiences decline during substance withdrawal. A convenience sample of 34 inpatients of the Psychiatric University Clinics in Basel was recruited and general psychopathological and trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Checklist, Post-Traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in the 1st and 3rd week of substance use treatment. The average age of the sample was 41.9 (SD = 9.1) years, and 26.5% were female. Hyperarousal (Mt1 = 4.51 versus Mt2 = 3.61; z = -2.38, p = .017) and avoidance symptoms (Mt1 = 6.24 versus Mt2 = 4.27; z = -2.59, p = .010) declined significantly, but re-experiencing symptoms (Mt1 = 4.00 versus Mt2 = 3.45; z = -.50, p = .617) did not. Post-traumatic stress disorder assessment, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition criteria, remained constant for 28 of 34 patients. Likewise, self-reported childhood trauma experiences decreased, yet the number of elevated subscale scores remained stable. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are not adequately treated by substance withdrawal alone. Trauma-specific diagnostics can be initiated with sufficient quality as early as the first week of withdrawal treatment. PMID:26670631

  16. Diagnosis of acute dental trauma: the importance of standardized documentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Frances M; Kahler, Bill

    2015-10-01

    In 1985 Andreasen and Andreasen published a paper on the diagnosis of luxation injuries and outlined the importance of standardized clinical, radiographic, and photographic techniques. Now 30 years later, these recommendations remain current in the International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) guidelines for the management of dental trauma and describe circumstances surrounding the time of injury, the extent of trauma (e.g., type of luxation injury), healing potential (e.g., stage of root development) as well as information concerning subsequent treatment. The purpose of this review was to include findings for other types of trauma and to discuss more recent studies that augment and/or improve on the original findings from 30 years ago. The present review discusses the use of a standardized clinical registration (pulpal sensibility testing, laser Doppler flowmetry, mobility testing), radiographic survey, and photographic registration of the traumatized patient. Moreover, the value of digital radiographs and recent developments in computer tomography with respect to possible enhancement of the trauma diagnosis are discussed. PMID:26058528

  17. Stability of trauma-related symptoms during acute substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eva; Odenwald, Michael; Proescholdt, Margit; Haubold, Anja; Bohnacker, Isabelle; Flögel, Marlene; Linde, Andreas; Müller, Sandra; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Lang, Undine; Walter, Marc; Vogel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and reports of traumatic childhood experiences decline during substance withdrawal. A convenience sample of 34 inpatients of the Psychiatric University Clinics in Basel was recruited and general psychopathological and trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Checklist, Post-Traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in the 1st and 3rd week of substance use treatment. The average age of the sample was 41.9 (SD = 9.1) years, and 26.5% were female. Hyperarousal (Mt1 = 4.51 versus Mt2 = 3.61; z = -2.38, p = .017) and avoidance symptoms (Mt1 = 6.24 versus Mt2 = 4.27; z = -2.59, p = .010) declined significantly, but re-experiencing symptoms (Mt1 = 4.00 versus Mt2 = 3.45; z = -.50, p = .617) did not. Post-traumatic stress disorder assessment, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition criteria, remained constant for 28 of 34 patients. Likewise, self-reported childhood trauma experiences decreased, yet the number of elevated subscale scores remained stable. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are not adequately treated by substance withdrawal alone. Trauma-specific diagnostics can be initiated with sufficient quality as early as the first week of withdrawal treatment.

  18. Assessment of Disability in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Given the importance of accurately and reliably assessing disability in future clinical trials, which will test therapeutic strategies in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), we sought to appraise comprehensively studies that focused on the psychometric properties (i.e., reliability, validity, and responsiveness) of all previously used outcome measures in the SCI population. The search strategy included Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Two reviewers independently assessed each study regarding eligibility, level of evidence (using Sackett's criteria), and quality. Of 363 abstracts captured in our search, 36 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eight different outcome measures were used to assess disability in the SCI population, including Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Spinal cord Injury Measure (SCIM), Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI), Quadriplegia Index of Function (QIF), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Timed Up & Go (TUG), 6-min walk test (6MWT), and 10-m walk test (10MWT). While 19 of 36 studies provided level-4 evidence, the remaining 17 articles were classified as level-2b evidence. Most of the instruments showed convergent construct validity in the SCI population, but criterion validity was not examined due to the lack a gold standard for assessment of disability. All instruments were tested in the rehabilitation and/or community setting, but only FIM was examined in the acute care setting. Based on our results of quality assessment, the SCIM has the most appropriate performance regarding the instrument's psychometric properties. Nonetheless, further investigations are required to confirm the adequate performance of the SCIM as a comprehensive measure of functional recovery in patients with SCI in rehabilitative care. The expert panel of the Spinal Cord Injury Solutions Network (SCISN) that participated in the modified Delphi process endorsed these conclusions. PMID:20367251

  19. An expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Fang; Sun, Tiansheng

    2013-01-01

    This is an expert consensus on the evaluation and treatment of thoracolumbar spinal injury, established from February 2009 to July 2010. The expert consensus consists mainly of six parts with a total of 54 recommendations including the overview (one item); pre-hospital care (one item); evaluation and diagnosis (13 items); treatment (23 items); prevention and treatment of major complications (12 items); and rehabilitation (four items). This is the first time that Chinese experts have published a consensus on spine and spinal cord injury. The expert consensus was established based on Delphi methods, literature analysis, and clinical experiences. Each recommendation is supported by and was interpreted using multi-level evidences. The level of agreement with the recommendation among the panel members was assessed as either low, moderate, or strong. Each panel member was asked to indicate his or her level of agreement on a 5-point scale, with “1” corresponding to neutrality and “5” representing maximum agreement. Scores were aggregated across the panel members and an arithmetic mean was calculated. This mean score was then translated into low, moderate, or strong. After all of the votes were collected and calculated, the results showed no low-level recommendations, 10 moderate-level recommendations, and 44 strong-level recommendations. An expert consensus was reached and was recognized by Chinese spine surgeons. Wide-scale adoption of these recommendations is urgent in the management of acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in a broader attempt to create a standard evaluation and treatment strategy for acute thoracolumbar spine and spinal cord injury in China. PMID:25206628

  20. Decorin blocks scarring and cystic cavitation in acute and induces scar dissolution in chronic spinal cord wounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Bansal, Daljeet; Tizzard, Katie; Surey, Sarina; Esmaeili, Maryam; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2014-04-01

    In the injured central nervous system (CNS), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/2-induced scarring and wound cavitation impede axon regeneration implying that a combination of both scar suppression and axogenic treatments is required to achieve functional recovery. After treating acute and chronic dorsal funicular spinal cord lesions (DFL) in adult rats with the pan-TGF-β1/2 antagonist Decorin, we report that in: (1), acute DFL, the development of all injury parameters was significantly retarded e.g., wound cavity area by 68%, encapsulation of the wound by a glia limitans accessoria (GLA) by 65%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 94%, fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 87%, 48% and 48%, respectively, and both macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 60%; and (2), chronic DFL, all the above parameters were attenuated to a lesser extent e.g., wound cavity area by 11%, GLA encapsulation by 25%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 31%, extracellular fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 58%, 22% and 29%, respectively, and macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 44%. Moreover, in acute and chronic DFL, levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were raised (by 236% and 482%, respectively), as were active-MMP-2 (by 64% and 91%, respectively) and active-MMP-9 (by 122% and 18%, respectively), while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was suppressed (by 56% and 23%, respectively) and active-TIMP-1 and active TIMP-2 were both lower but only significantly suppressed in acute DFL (by 56 and 21%, respectively). These findings demonstrate that both scar tissue mass and cavitation are attenuated in acute and chronic spinal cord wounds by Decorin treatment and suggest that the dominant effect of Decorin during acute scarring is anti-fibrogenic through suppression of inflammatory fibrosis by neutralisation of TGF-β1/2 whereas, in chronic lesions, Decorin-induction of tPA and MMP (concomitant with reduced complimentary levels of TIMP and PAI-1

  1. Pretest of the clinical application of a management model for comprehensive treatments of acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruimin; Chen, Qiulan; Xiao, Yilei; Chong, Zonglei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of a new management model of comprehensive treatments of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) on clinical application. Methods: From January 2010 to January 2011, there were 89 patients with acute SCI over the same admission period, including 32 cases divided into the management model group and the other 57 into the control group. Respectively, at the 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment, the score standardization, developed by the American Association of spinal cord injury (ASIA), was used to assess the motor and sensory function during the admission period. At the same time, a follow-up survey was made to investigate the satisfaction of patients and their families. Results: At 1 and 3 months after treatment, the motor and feeling function scores of patients in the experimental group both improved significantly compared with the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In addition, six months after treatment, the motor and sensory function scores of patients in the control group were not significantly improved any longer; while those scores in the experimental group still significantly recovered, and the difference between experimental and control groups was also statistically significant (P<0.05). According to the follow-up, patients and their families in the experimental group were of greater satisfaction than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: The management model of acute SCI treatment performed perfect clinical effects, and was worth promoting. PMID:26464687

  2. Spinal cord infarction complicating acute hydrocephalus secondary to a colloid cyst of the third ventricle. Case report.

    PubMed

    Siu, Timothy L T; Bannan, Paul; Stokes, Bryant A R

    2005-07-01

    Occipital lobe infarction secondary to tentorial herniation is a rare but well-recognized complication of posterior cerebral artery interruption during acute hydrocephalus; however, a similar event in which tonsillar herniation leads to symptomatic occlusion of the anterior spinal arteries (ASAs) has not been reported. The authors present the case of a third ventricular colloid cyst in a previously healthy 24-year-old man who presented with symptoms and signs of critically raised intracranial pressure. He subsequently survived the ictus of insults following emergency external cerebrospinal fluid drainage and definitive resection of the colloid cyst, but he sustained occipital lobe and spinal cord infarction despite the absence of systematic hypotension. The presence of watershed cervicothoracic cord infarction on magnetic resonance imaging suggested that the most likely causes were compromise of ASAs during the period of acute hydrocephalus and the accompanying downward brain herniation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to provide evidence that acute hydrocephalus may lead to ASA syndrome.

  3. Involvement of spinal cord opioid mechanisms in the acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen in mice1

    PubMed Central

    Heeman, Jacqueline H.; Zhang, Yangmiao; Shirachi, Donald Y.; Quock, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) can elicit an antinociceptive response in models of acute pain. We have demonstrated that this antinociceptive effect is centrally-mediated and is dependent on opioid receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of endogenous opioid peptides and opioid receptors specifically in the spinal cord in the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 in mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were exposed to HBO2 (100% oxygen @ 3.5 atmospheres absolute) for 11 min and their antinociceptive responsiveness was determined using the glacial acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. HBO2-induced antinociception was sensitive to antagonism by intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment with the κ- and μ-selective opioid antagonists norbinaltorphimine and β-funalrexamine, respectively, but not the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole. The antinociceptive effect of HBO2 was also significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with a rabbit antiserum against rat dynorphin1-13 but not antisera against β-endorphin or methionine-enkephalin. Based on these experimental findings, the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 appears to involve neuronal release of dynorphin and activation of κ and μ opioid receptors in the spinal cord. PMID:24113418

  4. Genome Wide Association Identifies PPFIA1 as a Candidate Gene for Acute Lung Injury Risk Following Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rui; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Bradfield, Jonathan; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christiani, David C.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Matthay, Michael; Meyer, Nuala J.; Kim, Cecilia; Li, Mingyao; Akey, Joshua; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Sevransky, Jonathan; Lanken, Paul N.; May, Addison K.; Aplenc, Richard; Maloney, James P.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2012-01-01

    Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a syndrome with high associated mortality characterized by severe hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates in patients with critical illness. We conducted the first investigation to use the genome wide association (GWA) approach to identify putative risk variants for ALI. Genome wide genotyping was performed using the Illumina Human Quad 610 BeadChip. We performed a two-stage GWA study followed by a third stage of functional characterization. In the discovery phase (Phase 1), we compared 600 European American trauma-associated ALI cases with 2266 European American population-based controls. We carried forward the top 1% of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at p<0.01 to a replication phase (Phase 2) comprised of a nested case-control design sample of 212 trauma-associated ALI cases and 283 at-risk trauma non-ALI controls from ongoing cohort studies. SNPs that replicated at the 0.05 level in Phase 2 were subject to functional validation (Phase 3) using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in stimulated B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) in family trios. 159 SNPs from the discovery phase replicated in Phase 2, including loci with prior evidence for a role in ALI pathogenesis. Functional evaluation of these replicated SNPs revealed rs471931 on 11q13.3 to exert a cis-regulatory effect on mRNA expression in the PPFIA1 gene (p = 0.0021). PPFIA1 encodes liprin alpha, a protein involved in cell adhesion, integrin expression, and cell-matrix interactions. This study supports the feasibility of future multi-center GWA investigations of ALI risk, and identifies PPFIA1 as a potential functional candidate ALI risk gene for future research. PMID:22295056

  5. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  6. Comparison of the Protective Effects of Radix Astragali, α-Lipoic Acid, and Vitamin E on Acute Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Min; Lai, Huangwen; Yang, Chuanhong; Huang, Weiyi; Wang, Jian; Fu, Xiaoyan; He, Qinglian

    2012-01-01

    Objective Oxidative damage is a critical role which involves hearing loss induced by impulse noise. That exogenous antioxidant agents reduce noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been well demonstrated in both animal studies and clinical practices. Choosing a stronger and more effective antioxidant is very important for treatment of NIHL. Vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali are the most commonly used anti-oxidants for cochlear oxidative damage from acoustic trauma. In this study, the protective effects of radix astragali, α-lipoic acid, and vitamin E on acute acoustic trauma are investigated. Methods Guinea pigs in the experimental groups were intragastrically administered vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali. Auditory thresholds were assessed by sound-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) at click and tone bursts of 8, 16 and 32 kHz, 24 hours before and 72 hours after exposure to impulse noise. Cochlear malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were detected. Hair cell damage was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results Vitamin E, α-lipoic acid, and radix astragali significantly reduced ABR deficits, reduced hair cell damage, and decreased the concentrations of MDA. α-lipoic acid and radix astragali were better than vitamin E, and there were no significant differences between α-lipoic acid and radix astragali. Conclusions α-lipoic acid or radix astragali are recommended for treatment of NIHL. PMID:24179406

  7. West Nile virus-induced acute flaccid paralysis is prevented by monoclonal antibody treatment when administered after infection of spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Morrey, John D; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Wang, Hong; Hall, Jeffery O; Skirpstunas, Ramona T; Olsen, Aaron L; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L; Koenig, Scott; Johnson, Syd; Diamond, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Acute flaccid polio-like paralysis occurs during natural West Nile virus (WNV) infection in a subset of cases in animals and humans. To evaluate the pathology and the possibility for therapeutic intervention, the authors developed a model of acute flaccid paralysis by injecting WNV directly into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of hamsters. By directly injecting selected sites of the nervous system with WNV, the authors mapped the lesions responsible for hind limb paralysis to the lumbar spinal cord. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord sections from paralyzed hamsters revealed that WNV-infected neurons localized primarily to the ventral motor horn of the gray matter, consistent with the polio-like clinical presentation. Neuronal apoptosis and diminished cell function were identified by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated BrdUTP nick end labeling) and choline acetyltransferase staining, respectively. Administration of hE16, a potently neutralizing humanized anti-WNV monoclonal antibody, 2 to 3 days after direct WNV infection of the spinal cord, significantly reduced paralysis and mortality. Additionally, a single injection of hE16 as late as 5 days after WNV inoculation of the sciatic nerve also prevented paralysis. Overall, these experiments establish that WNV-induced acute flaccid paralysis in hamsters is due to neuronal infection and injury in the lumbar spinal cord and that treatment with a therapeutic antibody prevents paralysis when administered after WNV infection of spinal cord neurons. PMID:18444087

  8. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  9. Assessment of axonal dysfunction in an in vitro model of acute compressive injury to adult rat spinal cord axons.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, M G; Nashmi, R

    1995-04-24

    An in vitro model of spinal cord injury was developed to study the pathophysiology of posttraumatic axonal dysfunction. A 25 mm length of thoracic spinal cord was removed from the adult male rat (n = 27). A dorsal column segment was isolated and pinned in a recording chamber and superfused with oxygenated (95% O2/5% CO2) Ringer. The cord was stimulated with a bipolar electrode, while two point responses were recorded extracellularly. Injury was accomplished by compression with a modified aneurysm clip which applied a 2 g force for 15 s. With injury the compound action potential (CAP) amplitude decreased to 53.7 +/- 5.4% (P < 0.001), while the latency increased to 115.6 +/- 3.1% (P < 0.0025) of control values. The absolute refractory period increased with injury from 1.7 +/- 0.1 ms to 2.1 +/- 0.1 ms (P < 0.05). The infusion of 5 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a blocker of voltage-sensitive 'fast' K channels confined to internodal regions, resulted in broadening of the CAP of injured axons to 114.9 +/- 3.1% of control (P < 0.05). Ultrastructural analysis of the injured dorsal column segments revealed marked axonal and myelin pathology, including considerable myelin disruption. In conclusion, we have developed and characterized an in vitro model of mammalian spinal cord injury which simulates many of the features of in vivo trauma. Injured axons display characteristic changes in physiological function including a shift in refractory period and high frequency conduction failure. The ultrastructural data and response of injured axons to 4-AP suggest that myelin disruption with exposure of 'fast' K+ channels contributes to posttraumatic axonal dysfunction.

  10. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  11. Acute intraparenchymal spinal cord injury in a cat due to high-rise syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz–Arámbulo, Robert; Nykamp, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female Bengal Red cat was evaluated for high-rise syndrome. The cat had paraplegia of the hind limbs, intact reflexes and pain perception, and hyperesthesia in the caudal thoracic area. Mentation, cranial nerve function, forelimb proprioceptive responses, and spinal reflexes were normal. There were no abnormalities on radiographs or computed tomography scan, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hyperintense intraparenchymal spinal cord lesion on T2-weighted and T2 fat saturation images. PMID:22942443

  12. Biocompatibility of reduced graphene oxide nanoscaffolds following acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Ali H.; Fridley, Jared S.; Mata, Javier A.; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Luerssen, Thomas G.; Perlaky, Laszlo; Kent, Thomas A.; Tour, James M.; Jea, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graphene has unique electrical, physical, and chemical properties that may have great potential as a bioscaffold for neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury. These nanoscaffolds have previously been shown to be biocompatible in vitro; in the present study, we wished to evaluate its biocompatibility in an in vivo spinal cord injury model. Methods: Graphene nanoscaffolds were prepared by the mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide. Twenty Wistar rats (19 male and 1 female) underwent hemispinal cord transection at approximately the T2 level. To bridge the lesion, graphene nanoscaffolds with a hydrogel were implanted immediately after spinal cord transection. Control animals were treated with hydrogel matrix alone. Histologic evaluation was performed 3 months after the spinal cord transection to assess in vivo biocompatibility of graphene and to measure the ingrowth of tissue elements adjacent to the graphene nanoscaffold. Results: The graphene nanoscaffolds adhered well to the spinal cord tissue. There was no area of pseudocyst around the scaffolds suggestive of cytotoxicity. Instead, histological evaluation showed an ingrowth of connective tissue elements, blood vessels, neurofilaments, and Schwann cells around the graphene nanoscaffolds. Conclusions: Graphene is a nanomaterial that is biocompatible with neurons and may have significant biomedical application. It may provide a scaffold for the ingrowth of regenerating axons after spinal cord injury. PMID:27625885

  13. Biocompatibility of reduced graphene oxide nanoscaffolds following acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Ali H.; Fridley, Jared S.; Mata, Javier A.; Samuel, Errol L. G.; Luerssen, Thomas G.; Perlaky, Laszlo; Kent, Thomas A.; Tour, James M.; Jea, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graphene has unique electrical, physical, and chemical properties that may have great potential as a bioscaffold for neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury. These nanoscaffolds have previously been shown to be biocompatible in vitro; in the present study, we wished to evaluate its biocompatibility in an in vivo spinal cord injury model. Methods: Graphene nanoscaffolds were prepared by the mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide. Twenty Wistar rats (19 male and 1 female) underwent hemispinal cord transection at approximately the T2 level. To bridge the lesion, graphene nanoscaffolds with a hydrogel were implanted immediately after spinal cord transection. Control animals were treated with hydrogel matrix alone. Histologic evaluation was performed 3 months after the spinal cord transection to assess in vivo biocompatibility of graphene and to measure the ingrowth of tissue elements adjacent to the graphene nanoscaffold. Results: The graphene nanoscaffolds adhered well to the spinal cord tissue. There was no area of pseudocyst around the scaffolds suggestive of cytotoxicity. Instead, histological evaluation showed an ingrowth of connective tissue elements, blood vessels, neurofilaments, and Schwann cells around the graphene nanoscaffolds. Conclusions: Graphene is a nanomaterial that is biocompatible with neurons and may have significant biomedical application. It may provide a scaffold for the ingrowth of regenerating axons after spinal cord injury.

  14. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Beth A.; Kohl, Krista L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N=479) between the ages of 8 to 17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and one month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01), and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, re-experiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), re-experiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's rho = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery. PMID:24337685

  15. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings.

  16. Intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride improves epicenter blood flow during the acute stage of contusive spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Muradov, Johongir M; Hagg, Theo

    2013-05-15

    Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80-90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury.

  17. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  18. [Acute hearing loss in the orchestral musician : Noise trauma or idiopathic sudden deafness?].

    PubMed

    Brusis, T

    2011-07-01

    During an orchestral performance musicians are exposed to high noise levels, which may exceed the intensity which could evoke hearing impairment after many years of exposure. From experience the degree of hearing loss in musicians is in general less than would be expected from the levels of exposure. The likelihood that an orchestral musician would develop a noise-induced hearing loss is much lower than for an industrial worker in a noise-intense factory. On the other hand it has to be considered that it is imperative for musicians to have non-impaired hearing to practise their profession. In some cases a sudden onset of hearing loss is traced to the noise stress of a loud performance. In such cases, the high noise levels predominantly produced by brass instruments or drums were assumed to be the cause. This publication presents five cases of expert opinions, where previous expert opinions had assumed noise or a blast trauma as the cause for the hearing loss. By careful analysis, a noise or a blast trauma was not regarded as probable in any of the cases. Interestingly, three of the five musicians had a normal contralateral hearing. In one case normal bilateral hearing was observed without the typical c(5) notch although the musician had been subject to noise stress in an orchestra for years.

  19. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  20. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  1. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  2. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis caused by blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Treuth, Gregory M; Baibars, Motaz; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to the emergency department following an anterior chest trauma. He had significant chest pain and chest X-ray was significant for revealed multiple rib fractures and negative. CT scan of the chest ruled out pulmonary embolism or aortic dissection. However, few hours later he developed hypotension requiring admission to medical intensive care unit and intravenous vasopressors. Further workup showed ST elevation myocardial infarction involving the anterior ECG leads. Emergent coronary angiography was performed with intervention to the mid-left anterior descending occlusion. Cardiogenic shock resolved and patient was discharged few days later. One-year follow-up with echocardiogram showed stable ischaemic cardiomyopathy with improved left ventricular ejection fraction to 50%. PMID:24769662

  3. Low-Level Primary Blast Causes Acute Ocular Trauma in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kirstin; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Groth, Sylvia L; Glickman, Randolph D; Lund, Brian J; Reilly, Matthew A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether clinically significant ocular trauma can be induced by a survivable isolated primary blast using a live animal model. Both eyes of 18 Dutch Belted rabbits were exposed to various survivable low-level blast overpressures in a large-scale shock tube simulating a primary blast similar to an improvised explosive device. Eyes of the blast-exposed rabbits (as well as five control rabbits) were thoroughly examined before and after blast to detect changes. Clinically significant changes in corneal thickness arose immediately after blast and were sustained through 48 h, suggesting possible disruption of endothelial function. Retinal thickness (RT) increased with increasing specific impulse immediately after exposure. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was inversely correlated with the specific impulse of the blast wave. These findings clearly indicate that survivable primary blast causes ocular injuries with likely visual functional sequelae of clinical and military relevance.

  4. Emergency computed tomography for acute pelvic trauma: where is the bleeder?

    PubMed

    Hallinan, J T P D; Tan, C H; Pua, U

    2014-05-01

    Contrast medium extravasation at computed tomography (CT) is an accurate indicator of active haemorrhage in pelvic trauma. When this is present, potentially lifesaving surgical or endovascular treatment should be considered. Identification of the site or territory of haemorrhage is helpful for the interventional radiologist as it allows for focused angiographic evaluation and expedites haemostatic angio-embolisation. Even with thin-section arterial phase CT, tracing the bleeding vessel is not always possible and is often time consuming. We introduce a technique for predicting the bleeding vessel based on knowledge of the cross-sectional anatomical territory of the vessel as an alternative to tracing the vessel's course. Several case examples with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) correlation will be provided.

  5. Change in Neuroplasticity-Related Proteins in Response to Acute Activity-Based Therapy in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Knoblach, Susan M.; Feather, Jillenne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Activity-based therapy (ABT) focuses on regaining motor and sensory function below the level of the lesion in persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI). This is accomplished through repetitive training of specific motor tasks. Research has shown that ABT may increase neuroplasticity in the rat and human spinal cord. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine acute alterations in neuroplasticity-related proteins during ABT in persons with SCI. Methods: Volunteers were current participants in an ABT program and consisted of 12 men and 3 women (age, 31.8 ± 10.9 years) with chronic SCI (injury duration, 63.9 ± 54.4 months). A single 2-hour bout of ABT consisted of standing load bearing, body weight-supported treadmill training, whole body vibration, and functional electrical stimulation. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and immediately after completion of each modality to determine serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prolactin, and cortisol. Results: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures was used to examine differences in proteins over time. Results revealed baseline levels of BDNF (2.37 ± 1.41 ng/mL) that were lower than previous research has demonstrated in persons with SCI. No change in BDNF or cortisol was found, although prolactin was significantly reduced in response to ABT. Conclusion: Despite the length of the bout, acute changes in BDNF were not observed. Whether different intensities or modalities of ABT may promote acute increases in serum BDNF in individuals with SCI remains to be determined and further study is merited. PMID:25477737

  6. Acute inflammation induces segmental, bilateral, supraspinally mediated opioid release in the rat spinal cord, as measured by μ-opioid receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure opioid release in the spinal cord during acute and long-term inflammation using μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization. In particular, we determined whether opioid release occurs in the segments receiving the noxious signals or in the entire spinal cord, and whether it involves supraspinal signals. Internalization of neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) was measured to track the intensity of the noxious stimulus. Rats received peptidase inhibitors intrathecally to protect opioids from degradation. Acute inflammation of the hindpaw with formalin induced moderate MOR internalization in the L5 segment bilaterally, whereas NK1R internalization occurred only ipsilaterally. MOR internalization was restricted to the lumbar spinal cord, regardless of whether the peptidase inhibitors were injected in a lumbar or thoracic site. Formalin-induced MOR internalization was substantially reduced by isoflurane anesthesia. It was also markedly reduced by a lidocaine block of the cervical-thoracic spinal cord (which did not affect the evoked NK1R internalization) indicating that spinal opioid release is mediated supraspinally. In the absence of peptidase inhibitors, formalin and hindpaw clamp induced a small amount of MOR internalization, which was significantly higher than in controls. To study spinal opioid release during chronic inflammation, we injected Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw and peptidase inhibitors intrathecally. Two days later, no MOR or NK1R internalization was detected. Furthermore, CFA inflammation decreased MOR internalization induced by clamping the inflamed hindpaw. These results show that acute inflammation, but not chronic inflammation, induce segmental opioid release in the spinal cord that involves supraspinal signals. PMID:19298846

  7. The impact of unintentional pediatric trauma: a review of pain, acute stress, and posttraumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey I; Kant, Alexis J; Kim, Seok Hyeon

    2008-04-01

    This article reviews current research on acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from pediatric simple (i.e., single, unpredictable, and unintentional) physical injury and how pain may act as both a trigger and a coexisting symptom. Although several studies have explored predictors of ASD and PTSD, as well as the relationship between these conditions in adults, there is less research on ASD and PTSD in children and adolescents. This review highlights the importance of early detection of pain and acute stress symptoms resulting from pediatric unintentional physical injury in the hopes of preventing long-term negative outcomes, such as the potential development of PTSD and associated academic, social, and psychological problems.

  8. Evaluation of Early and Late Effects into the Acute Spinal Cord Injury of an Injectable Functionalized Self-Assembling Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Cigognini, Daniela; Satta, Alessandro; Colleoni, Bianca; Silva, Diego; Donegà, Matteo; Antonini, Stefania; Gelain, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The complex physiopathological events occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI) make this devastating trauma still incurable. Self-assembling peptides (SAPs) are nanomaterials displaying some appealing properties for application in regenerative medicine because they mimic the structure of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), are reabsorbable, allow biofunctionalizations and can be injected directly into the lesion. In this study we evaluated the putative neurorigenerative properties of RADA16-4G-BMHP1 SAP, proved to enhance in vitro neural stem cells survival and differentiation. This SAP (RADA16-I) has been functionalized with a bone marrow homing motif (BMHP1) and optimized via the insertion of a 4-glycine-spacer that ameliorates scaffold stability and exposure of the biomotifs. We injected the scaffold immediately after contusion in the rat spinal cord, then we evaluated the early effects by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and the late effects by histological analysis. Locomotor recovery over 8 weeks was assessed using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) test. Gene expression analysis showed that at 7 days after lesion the functionalized SAP induced a general upregulation of GAP-43, trophic factors and ECM remodelling proteins, whereas 3 days after SCI no remarkable changes were observed. Hystological analysis revealed that 8 weeks after SCI our scaffold increased cellular infiltration, basement membrane deposition and axon regeneration/sprouting within the cyst. Moreover the functionalized SAP showed to be compatible with the surrounding nervous tissue and to at least partially fill the cavities. Finally SAP injection resulted in a statistically significant improvement of both hindlimbs' motor performance and forelimbs-hindlimbs coordination. Altogether, these results indicate that RADA16-4G-BMHP1 induced favourable reparative processes, such as matrix remodelling, and provided a physical and trophic support to nervous tissue ingrowth. Thus this biomaterial, eventually

  9. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates.

  10. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  11. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  12. The axon as a physical structure in health and acute trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Collins, Jessica M

    2016-10-01

    The physical structure of neurons - dendrites converging on the soma, with an axon conveying activity to distant locations - is uniquely tied to their function. To perform their role, axons need to maintain structural precision in the soft, gelatinous environment of the central nervous system and the dynamic, flexible paths of nerves in the periphery. This requires close mechanical coupling between axons and the surrounding tissue, as well as an elastic, robust axoplasm resistant to pinching and flattening, and capable of sustaining transport despite physical distortion. These mechanical properties arise primarily from the properties of the internal cytoskeleton, coupled to the axonal membrane and the extracellular matrix. In particular, the two large constituents of the internal cytoskeleton, microtubules and neurofilaments, are braced against each other and flexibly interlinked by specialised proteins. Recent evidence suggests that the primary function of neurofilament sidearms is to structure the axoplasm into a linearly organised, elastic gel. This provides support and structure to the contents of axons in peripheral nerves subject to bending, protecting the relatively brittle microtubule bundles and maintaining them as transport conduits. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of axons are myelinated, and this thick jacket of membrane wrappings alters the form, function and internal composition of the axons to which it is applied. Together these structures determine the physical properties and integrity of neural tissue, both under conditions of normal movement, and in response to physical trauma. The effects of traumatic injury are directly dependent on the physical properties of neural tissue, especially axons, and because of axons' extreme structural specialisation, post-traumatic effects are usually characterised by particular modes of axonal damage. The physical realities of axons in neural tissue are integral to both normal function and their response to

  13. Management of the open abdomen: clinical recommendations for the trauma/acute care surgeon and general surgeon.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Luis G

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the surgical approach to managing abdominal injuries was to assess the extent of trauma, repair any damage and close the abdomen in one definitive procedure rather than leave the abdomen open. With advances in medicine, damage control surgery using temporary abdominal closure methods is being used to manage the open abdomen (OA) when closure is not possible. Although OA management is often observed in traumatic injuries, the extension of damage control surgery concepts, in conjunction with OA, for the management of the septic patient requires that the general surgeon who is faced with these challenges has a comprehensive knowledge of this complex subject. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to the acute care and general surgeon on the use of OA negative pressure therapy (OA-NPT; ABTHERA™ Open Abdomen Negative Pressure Therapy System, KCI, an ACELITY Company, San Antonio, TX) for OA management. A literature review of published evidence, clinical recommendations on managing the OA and a case study demonstrating OA management using OA-NPT have been included. PMID:27547961

  14. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed.

  15. Systematic analysis of axonal damage and inflammatory response in different white matter tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, W; Corkill, D J; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2005-12-20

    The mechanisms of white matter (WM) damage during secondary degeneration are a fundamental issue in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Our main goal was to describe the pattern of an acute inflammatory response and secondary damage to axons in different WM tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord. Adult rats were deeply anesthetized and injected with 20 nmol of NMDA into the spinal cord ventral horn on T7. Animals were perfused after survival times of 1 day, 3 days and 7 days. Ten micrometer sections were submitted to immunocytochemical analysis for activated macrophages/microglia, neutrophils and damaged axons. There were inflammatory response and progressive tissue destruction of ventral WM (VWM) with formation of microcysts in both VWM and lateral WM (LWM). In the VWM, the number of beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) end-bulbs increased from 1 day with a peak at 3 days, decreasing by 7 days following the injection. APP end-bulbs were present in the dorsal WM (DWM) at 3 days survival time but were not in the LWM. Electron microscopic analysis revealed different degrees of myelin disruption and axonal pathology in the vacuolated WM up to 14 mm along the rostrocaudal axis. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant loss of medium and large axons (P < 0.05), but not of small axons (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that bystander axonal damage and myelin vacuolation are important secondary component of the pathology of WM tracts following rat SCI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these pathological events.

  16. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Massage to Reduce Pain in People with Spinal Cord Injury during Acute Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Theresa; Jha, Amitabh; Brooks, C. A.; Allshouse, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of massage therapy for patients with new spinal cord injury (SCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation. Design A pilot single-center, randomized, single-blind, cross-over clinical trial. Setting Free-standing, not-for-profit, comprehensive rehabilitation center specializing in SCI rehabilitation Participants Forty adults ages 18 years and older undergoing acute rehabilitation following spinal cord injury reporting any type of pain. Intervention Rehabilitation nurses trained to give broad compression massage (BCM) and a control light contact touch (LCT) treatments. Participants were randomized to receive either BCM or LCT first, in six 20 minute treatment sessions over two weeks, with a one week wash-out between the two-week treatment periods. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes were changes in pain intensity and in fatigue, measured daily. Secondary outcomes included depressive symptoms measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and an assessment of pain medication usage. Results Pain intensity was higher at baseline and reduced more in the LCT-first group compared to the BCM-first group in period 1 (p=0.014); although this pattern was not found in period 2 (p=0.58). LCT and BCM groups did not significantly differ on any secondary measures except PHQ-9. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of using rehabilitation nurses to provide tactile therapy to patients with SCI and suggests a model for controlled clinical trials examining the efficacy of massage therapies. While efficacy was difficult to assess, broad compression massage was safe and well tolerated. PMID:24042991

  17. Influence of intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation on iNOS, total-NOS, and ET-1 in acute spinal cord-injured rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhenchun; Dong, Yinghai; Zhu, Jing

    2005-07-01

    Objective To research the influence of intravascular low level Laser irradiation (ILLLI) on total NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord following acute spinal cord injury (ASCI), and discuss the protective effects of ILLLI on neurons .Methods 72 rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: treatment group, injury group and control group. In treatment group and injury group, after laminectomy at the level of T-13, ASCI was performed by using Allen"s method with slight modification (6g×10cm) on rabbits. After injury, rabbits were treated immediately with He-Ne laser (power 5 mW, 1 hour per day for 10 days). At the day of 10th after treatment, total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord tissues were measured. Results The expression level of total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord in injury group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05), while after ILLLI the level of these index in treatment group decreased statistically significantly compared with those in injury group (P<0.05). Conclusion ILLLI can significantly decrease the expression level of total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 in spinal cord. It indicates that ILLLI can relieve the overexpression of total-NOS, iNOS, and ET-1 ,and thus can perform protective effects on neurons in the course of secondary spinal cord injury (SSCI) following ASCI

  18. Critical ischemia time in a model of spinal cord section. A study performed on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Martinez, David; Rosales Corral, Sergio A.; Flores Soto, Mario E.; Velarde Silva, Gustavo; Portilla de Buen, Eliseo

    2006-01-01

    Vascular changes after acute spinal cord trauma are important factors that predispose quadriplegia, in most cases irreversible. Repair of the spinal blood flow helps the spinal cord recovery. The average time to arrive and perform surgery is 3 h in most cases. It is important to determine the critical ischemia time in order to offer better functional prognosis. A spinal cord section and vascular clamping of the spinal anterior artery at C5–C6 model was used to determine critical ischemia time. The objective was to establish a critical ischemia time in a model of acute spinal cord section. Four groups of dogs were used, anterior approach and vascular clamp of spinal anterior artery with 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of ischemia and posterior hemisection of spinal cord at C5–C6 was performed. Clinical evaluation was made during 12 weeks and morphological evaluation at the end of this period. We obtained a maximal neurological coordination at 23 days average. Two cases showed sequels of right upper limb paresis at 1 and 3 ischemia hours. There was nerve conduction delay of 56% at 3 h of ischemia. Morphological examination showed 25% of damaged area. The VIII and IX Rexed’s laminae were the most affected. The critical ischemia time was 3 h. Dogs with 4 h did not exhibit any recovery. PMID:17024402

  19. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  20. Clinical course and outcome of disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by Japanese Association for Acute Medicine criteria. Comparison between sepsis and trauma.

    PubMed

    Kushimoto, Shigeki; Gando, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ogura, Hiroshi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Koseki, Kazuhide; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Iba, Toshiaki; Ueyama, Masashi; Eguchi, Yutaka; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kohji; Endo, Shigeatsu; Shimazaki, Shuji

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) study group recently announced new diagnostic criteria for DIC. These criteria have been prospectively validated and demonstrated to progress to overt DIC as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). Although an underlying condition is essential for the development of DIC, it has never been clarified if patients with different underlying disorders have a similar course. Among 329 patients with DIC diagnosed by the JAAM criteria, those with underlying sepsis (n = 98) or trauma (n = 95) were compared. The 28-day mortality rate was significantly higher in sepsis patients than trauma patients (34.7% vs. 10.5%, p < 0.0001). Within three days of fulfilling the JAAM criteria, sepsis patients had a lower platelet count, higher prothrombin time ratio, higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome score, and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score compared with trauma patients. On day 3, a significantly higher percentage of trauma patients than sepsis patients showed improvement of DIC (64.2% vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001). These differences were mainly due to patients with lower JAAM DIC scores. More than 50% of the JAAM DIC patients with sepsis who died within 28 days could not be detected by ISTH DIC criteria during the initial three days. In contrast, most trauma patients who died within 28 days had DIC simultaneously diagnosed by JAAM and ISTH criteria, except for those with brain death. These findings suggest that coagulation abnormalities, organ dysfunction, and the outcome of JAAM DIC differ between patients with sepsis and trauma.

  1. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Namas, R; Ghuma, A; Hermus, L; Zamora, R; Okonkwo, DO; Billiar, TR; Vodovotz, Y

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partially propagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP's). DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and non-human primates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS and TBI in the near future. PMID:21483522

  2. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  3. Acute Neuromuscular Adaptation at the Spinal Level Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Pin-Barre, Caroline; Laurin, Jérôme; Felix, Marie-Solenne; Pertici, Vincent; Kober, Frank; Marqueste, Tanguy; Matarazzo, Valery; Muscatelli-Bossy, Françoise; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to highlight the acute motor reflex adaptation and to deepen functional deficits following a middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO-r). Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were included in this study. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO; 120 min) was performed on 16 rats studied at 1 and 7 days, respectively (MCAO-D1 and MCAO-D7, n = 8 for each group). The other animals were divided into 3 groups: SHAM-D1 (n = 6), SHAM-D7 (n = 6) and Control (n = 8). Rats performed 4 behavioral tests (the elevated body swing test, the beam balance test, the ladder-climbing test and the forelimb grip force) before the surgery and daily after MCAO-r. H-reflex on triceps brachii was measured before and after isometric exercise. Infarction size and cerebral edema were respectively assessed by histological (Cresyl violet) and MRI measurements at the same time points than H-reflex recordings. Animals with cerebral ischemia showed persistent functional deficits during the first week post-MCAO-r. H-reflex was not decreased in response to isometric exercise one day after the cerebral ischemia contrary to the other groups. The motor reflex regulation was recovered 7 days post-MCAO-r. This result reflects an acute sensorimotor adaptation at the spinal level after MCAO-r. PMID:24587147

  4. Effects of Acute Cortisol Administration on Perceptual Priming of Trauma-Related Material

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Markus; Pfaltz, Monique; Michael, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They reflect excessive and uncontrolled retrieval of the traumatic memory. Acute elevations of cortisol are known to impair the retrieval of already stored memory information. Thus, continuous cortisol administration might help in reducing intrusive memories in PTSD. Strong perceptual priming for neutral stimuli associated with a “traumatic” context has been shown to be one important learning mechanism that leads to intrusive memories. However, the memory modulating effects of cortisol have only been shown for explicit declarative memory processes. Thus, in our double blind, placebo controlled study we aimed to investigate whether cortisol influences perceptual priming of neutral stimuli that appeared in a “traumatic” context. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 160) watched either neutral or “traumatic” picture stories on a computer screen. Neutral objects were presented in between the pictures. Memory for these neutral objects was tested after 24 hours with a perceptual priming task and an explicit memory task. Prior to memory testing half of the participants in each group received 25 mg of cortisol, the other half received placebo. In the placebo group participants in the “traumatic” stories condition showed more perceptual priming for the neutral objects than participants in the neutral stories condition, indicating a strong perceptual priming effect for neutral stimuli presented in a “traumatic” context. In the cortisol group this effect was not present: Participants in the neutral stories and participants in the “traumatic” stories condition in the cortisol group showed comparable priming effects for the neutral objects. Our findings show that cortisol inhibits perceptual priming for neutral stimuli that appeared in a “traumatic” context. These findings indicate that cortisol influences PTSD-relevant memory processes and thus further support

  5. Acute spinal cord injury and infection with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex among returning Operation Iraqi Freedom soldiers: Successful innovations in rehabilitation during isolation.

    PubMed

    Recio, Albert C; Bohart, Zachary W; Havens, Spencer R; Stiens, Steven A

    2010-04-01

    Concerns about drug-resistant infectious organisms are increasing in rehabilitation facilities. Resulting isolation protocols can potentially challenge the patients' access to medical care, psychological adaptation, mobility, and environmental interaction and therefore hinder the rehabilitation process. We report a systematic, retrospective case review of an active-duty Army sergeant who sustained a C5 American Spinal Cord Injury Association Impairment Scale A spinal cord injury while serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The patient's acute rehabilitation was complicated by an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex infection, in the blood and urine, contracted while in Iraq. Isolation protocols were designed to enable regular hands-on contact for proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, transfers, wheelchair fitting, mobility training, and environmental control. After 1 mo of comprehensive acute interdisciplinary rehabilitation, delivered in a single room on the spinal cord injury unit, the patient acquired functional skills comparable with other complete C5 tetraplegics in our unit. If a patient with spinal cord injury must be placed in isolation, it is still feasible to conduct a comprehensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation program while strictly adhering to contact isolation protocols.

  6. Acute quadriplegia due to bilateral cerebral metastases.

    PubMed

    Levine, D N; Black, P M; Kleinman, G M; Ojemann, R

    1981-03-01

    A 51-year-old man developed severe quadriparesis without sensory loss after a fall on the occiput. When he was treated with corticosteroids, the weakness worsened slightly for 2 days, but he then progressively improved and ultimately walked unassisted. Two months later, postmortem examination disclosed metastatic tumors in the superior portion of each precentral gyrus. The subjacent white matter was edematous. No spinal cord abnormalities were found. The clinical, radiologic, and neuropathologic findings suggest that the quadriplegia resulted from these bilateral cerebral lesions and not from spinal cord dysfunction. The rapid development of cerebral edema, perhaps precipitated by trauma, seemed to account for the acute onset of symptoms in this case.

  7. Development of topical BAPN delivery system for acute spinal cord injury in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chvapil, M; Weinstein, P R; Misiorowski, R L; Telles, D; Rankin, L; Stoy, V

    1984-09-01

    Topical sustained release of various medications by a subdurally implantable device at the site of spinal cord injury is considered advantageous in the treatment of early symptoms of tissue damage. A typical case is the interference with collagenous scar by beta-aminopropionitrile, inhibiting collagen polymerization. Four materials, silicone, polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and polyacrylonitrile-based hydrogel were evaluated for biocompatibility in subcutaneous implantations. The hydrogel, the least reactive, was then compared with silicone sheets as subcural implants. The histology favored the hydrogel as the most inert material, which was then used for the construction of soft, pliable pouches, releasing the drug through the hydrated wall at a rate controlled by an osmotic pump. PMID:6544776

  8. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  9. Alterations in the expression of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE/ref-1) and DNA damage in the caudal region of acute and chronic spinal cord injured rats treated by embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    DAGCI, T; ARMAGAN, G; KONYALIOGLU, S; YALCIN, A

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative mechanisms of injury-induced damage of neurons within the spinal cord are not very well understood. We used a model of T8-T9 spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat to induce neuronal degeneration. In this spinal cord injury model, unilateral avulsion of the spinal cord causes oxidative stress of neurons. We tested the hypothesis that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (or redox effector factor-1, APE/Ref-1) regulates this neuronal oxidation mechanism in the spinal cord region caudal to the lesion, and that DNA damage is an early upstream signal. The embryonic neural stem cell therapy significantly decreased DNA-damage levels in both study groups - acutely (followed up to 7 days after SCI), and chronically (followed up to 28 days after SCI) injured animals. Meanwhile, mRNA levels of APE/Ref-1 significantly increased after embryonic neural stem cell therapy in acutely and chronically injured animals when compared to acute and chronic sham groups. Our data has demonstrated that an increase of APE/Ref-1 mRNA levels in the caudal region of spinal cord strongly correlated with DNA damage after traumatic spinal cord injury. We suggest that DNA damage can be observed both in lesional and caudal regions of the acutely and chronically injured groups, but DNA damage is reduced with embryonic neural stem cell therapy.

  10. Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Visits of Veterans With Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders: Rates, Trends, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bridget M; Evans, Charlesnika T; Kurichi, Jibby E; Weaver, Frances M; Patel, Nayna; Burns, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Respiratory complications are a major cause of illness and death in persons with spinal cord injuries and dysfunction (SCI&Ds). The objectives of this study were to examine rates of outpatient visits over 5 years for acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs), including pneumonia and influenza (P&I), lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs), and upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), in veterans with SCI&Ds and to determine whether individual characteristics were associated with the number of annual visits for each type of ARI. Methods: This was a longitudinal (fiscal years 1998–2002) study of ARI visits at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) in 18,693 veterans with SCI&Ds. To examine the associations between time, patient characteristics, and annual number of ARI visits, we used random effect negative binomial models. Results: Veterans with SCI&Ds had a total of 11,113 ARI visits over the 5-year period. There was a slightly decreasing trend for LRI visits over time (P < 0.01) but no significant change for other ARIs over time. There were 30 to 35 pneumonia visits and 21 to 30 acute bronchitis visits per 1,000 SCI&D veterans per year. Older veterans were more likely than younger to have P&I visits and less likely to have URI visits (P < 0.01). Veterans with paraplegia had fewer P&I visits than subjects with tetraplegia (IRR = 0.58; CI = 0.51–0.67). Conclusions: Visit rates for ARIs are stable for veterans with SCI&Ds. Identifying risk factors associated with ARI visits is an important first step to improve prevention and treatment of ARIs and to improve the health of veterans with SCI&Ds. PMID:17853657

  11. Assessment of Impairment in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The most common primary end-point of the trial on treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is the degree of impairment. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Standards have been widely used to assess motor function and pin-prick and light-touch sensory function. In addition, pain assessment is another clinically relevant aspect of the impairment in individuals with SCI. Given this, we sought to systematically review the studies that focused on the psychometric properties of ASIA Standards and all previously used outcome measures of pain in the SCI population in the acute care setting. For the primary literature search strategy, the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were sought out. Subsequently, a secondary search strategy was carried out using the articles listed in the references of meta-analysis, systematic, and non-systematic review articles. Two reviewers (JCF and VN) independently selected the articles that fulfill the inclusion and exclusion, assessed the level of evidence of each article, and appraised the psychometric properties of each instrument. Divergences during those steps were solved by consensus between both reviewers. Of 400 abstracts captured in our primary search strategy on the ASIA Standards, 16 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. An additional 40 references were obtained from two prior systematic reviews on ASIA Standards. While 45 of 56 of the studies on ASIA Standards provided level 4 evidence, there were 11 level 2b evidence studies. Convergent construct validity (n = 34), reliability (n = 12), and responsiveness (n = 10) were the most commonly studied psychometric properties of the ASIA Standards, but two prior studies examined their content validity. Of the 267 abstracts yielded in our primary search on pain assessment, 24 articles with level 4 evidence fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was no study that examined pain assessment in the acute

  12. Technique of spinal cord compression induced by inflation of epidural balloon catheter in rabbits (Oryctologus cuniculus): efficient and easy to use model.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Antonio F B DA; Scheffer, Jussara P; Coelho, Barbara P; Aiello, Graciane; Guimarães, Arthur G; Gama, Carlos R B; Vescovini, Victor; Cabral, Paula G A; Oliveira, André L A

    2016-09-01

    The most common cause of spinal cord injury are high impact trauma, which often result in some motor impairment, sensory or autonomic a greater or lesser extent in the distal areas the level of trauma. In terms of survival and complications due to sequelae, veterinary patients have a poor prognosis unfavorable. Therefore justified the study of experimental models of spinal cord injury production that could provide more support to research potential treatments for spinal cord injuries in medicine and veterinary medicine. Preclinical studies of acute spinal cord injury require an experimental animal model easily reproducible. The most common experimental animal model is the rat, and several techniques for producing a spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of acute spinal cord injury production technique through inflation of Fogarty(r) catheter using rabbits as an experimental model because it is a species that has fewer conclusive publications and contemplating. The main requirements of a model as low cost, handling convenience, reproducibility and uniformity. The technique was adequate for performing preclinical studies in neuro-traumatology area, effectively leading to degeneration and necrosis of the nervous tissue fostering the emergence of acute paraplegia.

  13. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  14. Treatment with zoledronic acid ameliorates negative geometric changes in the proximal femur following acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Smith, B; Beck, T; Ballard, P; Dapthary, M; BrintzenhofeSzoc, K; Caminis, J

    2007-05-01

    Acute spinal cord injury is associated with rapid bone loss and an increased risk of fracture. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 17 patients were followed for 1 year after administration of either 4 or 5 mg of zoledronic acid or placebo. Bone mineral density (BMD) and structural analyses of the proximal femur were performed using the hip structural analysis program at entry, 6 months, and 12 months. The 17 subjects completed 12 months of observation, nine receiving placebo and eight zoledronic acid. The placebo group showed a decrease in BMD, cross-sectional area, and section modulus and an increase in buckling ratio at each proximal femur site at 6 and 12 months. Six months after zoledronic acid, BMD, cross-sectional area, and section modulus increased at the femoral neck and intertrochanteric regions and buckling ratio decreased consistent with improved bone stability. However, at 12 months, the femoral narrow-neck values declined to baseline. In contrast to placebo, the intertrochanteric region and femur shaft were maintained at or near baseline through 12 months in the zoledronic acid-treated group. Urine N-telopeptide excretion was increased at baseline and declined in both the placebo and treatment groups during the 12 months of observation. We conclude that a single administration of zoledronic acid will ameliorate bone loss and maintain parameters of bone strength at the three proximal femur sites for 6 months and at the femur intertrochanteric and shaft sites for 12 months.

  15. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J C; Vignoli, Josiane A; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  16. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  17. Exogenous Neuritin Promotes Nerve Regeneration After Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Li, Xingyi; Xi, Shaosong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hong; Zhu, Jingling; Shan, Liya; Song, Xiaoming; Luo, Xing; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient local levels of neurotrophic factor after spinal cord injury (SCI) are the leading cause of secondary injury and limited axonal regeneration. Neuritin belongs to a family of neurotrophic factors that promote neurite outgrowth, maintain neuronal survival, and provide a favorable microenvironment for the regeneration and repair of nerve cells after injury. However, it is not known whether the exogenously applied neuritin protein has a positive effect on nerve repair after SCI. This was investigated in the present study using purified human recombinant neuritin expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris, which was tested in a rat SCI model. A recombinant neuritin concentration of 60 μg/ml induced the recovery of hind limb motor function and stimulated nerve regeneration in rats with SCI. Continuous administration of neuritin at this dose at an early stage after SCI inhibited poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) protein degradation and decreased neuronal apoptosis. In addition, during the critical postinjury period of axonal regeneration, exogenous neuritin treatment increased the expression of neurofilament 200 and growth-associated protein 43 in the damaged tissue, which was associated with the restoration of hind limb movement. These results suggest that neuritin creates an environment that promotes nerve cell survival and neurite regeneration after SCI, which contribute to nerve regeneration and the recovery of motor function. PMID:27009445

  18. Different profiles of acute stress disorder differentially predict posttraumatic stress disorder in a large sample of female victims of sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Shevlin, Mark; Hyland, Philip; Elklit, Ask

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to test the dimensional structure of acute stress disorder (ASD). Latent profile analysis was conducted on scores from the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (Bryant, Moulds, & Guthrie, 2000) using a large sample of female victims of sexual trauma. Four distinct classes were found. Two of the classes represented high and low levels of ASD, and the high ASD class was associated with a high probability of subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There were 2 intermediate classes that were differentiated by the number of arousal symptoms, and the class with high levels of arousal symptoms had a higher risk of PTSD. The results suggested that ASD is best described by qualitatively and quantitatively differing subgroups in this sample, whereas previous research has assumed ASD to be dimensional. This may explain the limited success of using ASD to predict subsequent PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Temporal and spatial patterns of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 protein and gene expression in spinal cord white matter after acute and chronic spinal cord injury in rats: implications for axonal pathophysiology after neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Fehlings, Michael G

    2004-02-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), surviving white matter axons display axonal dysfunction associated with demyelination and altered K+ channel activity. To clarify the molecular basis of posttraumatic axonal pathophysiology after SCI, we investigated the changes in expression and distribution of the axonal K+ channel subunits Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 in spinal cord white matter after in vivo SCI in the rat. Using Western blot analysis, we found an increased expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 at 2 and 6 weeks after SCI. By real-time PCR we observed an increase in Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 mRNA levels 1 day after SCI, which persisted until 6 weeks. Confocal immunohistochemistry showed a markedly dispersed labelling of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 along the injured axons, in contrast to the tight localization of these channels to the juxtaparanodes of noninjured axons. This redistribution of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 occurred as early as 1 h postinjury along some injured axons, and persisted at 6 weeks postinjury. In parallel with the redistribution of Kv1.1 and 1.2, contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is normally confined to a paranodal location, also displayed a more diffuse distribution along the injured spinal cord axons. Our results suggest that the increased expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 proteins is transcriptionally regulated. In contrast, the redistribution of the axonal K+ channel subunits occurs very early postinjury and probably reflects a disruption of the juxtaparanodal axonal region due to physical trauma, as shown by altered localization of Caspr. PMID:14984408

  20. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men.

    PubMed

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-04-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations.

  1. The burden of acute traumatic spinal cord injury among adults in the united states: an update.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Shalini; Hammond, Edward R; Haider, Adil H; Abularrage, Christopher J; Becker, Daniel; Dhiman, Nitasha; Hyder, Omar; Gupta, Deepak; Black, James H; Schneider, Eric B

    2014-02-01

    The current incidence estimate of 40 traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCI) per million population/year in the United States (U.S.) is based on data from the 1990s. We sought to update the incidence and epidemiology of TSCI in U.S adults by using the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all-payer emergency department (ED) database in the United States. Adult ED visits between 2007 and 2009 with a principal diagnosis of TSCI were identified using International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes (806.0-806.9 and 952.0-952.9). We describe TSCI cumulative incidence, mortality, discharge disposition, and hospital charges weighted to the U.S. population. The estimated 3-year cumulative incidence of TSCI was 56.4 per million adults. Cumulative incidence of TSCI in older adults increased from 79.4 per million older adults in 2007 to 87.7 by the end of 2009, but remained steady among younger adults. Overall, falls were the leading cause of TSCI (41.5%). ED charges rose by 20% over the study period, and death occurred in 5.7% of patients. Compared with younger adults, older adults demonstrated higher adjusted odds of mortality in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-16.6), mortality during hospitalization (AOR=5.9; 95% CI: 4.7-7.4), and being discharged to chronic care (AOR=3.7; 95% CI: 3.0-4.5). The incidence of TSCI is higher than previously reported with a progressive increase among older adults who also experience worse outcomes compared with younger adults. ED-related TSCI charges are also increasing. These updated national estimates support the development of customized prevention strategies based on age-specific risk factors.

  2. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome. Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test. The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  3. Acute spinal cord compression: a rare complication of dual antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Muhammad Zaid; Chong, Victor; Hutcheon, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with acute shortness of breath and exacerbation of chronic back pain. She was diagnosed with pulmonary oedema and a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction following chest X-ray, ECG and high sensitivity troponin levels. She subsequently underwent coronary angioplasty with deployment of drug-eluting stents to her circumflex and left anterior descending arteries and was started on aspirin and clopidogrel for her dual antiplatelet therapy. Unfortunately, following the procedure, she gradually lost power and sensation in both lower limbs. MRI of her spine confirmed an extradural haematoma causing thoracic cord compression. She was managed conservatively following discussions with neurosurgeons and developed further complications secondary to her immobility. PMID:26202314

  4. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  5. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  6. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  7. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  8. A descriptive study of the usage of spinal manipulative therapy techniques within a randomized clinical trial in acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Deirdre A; McDonough, Suzanne M; Baxter, G David; Dempster, Martin; Moore, Ann P

    2005-02-01

    The majority of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of spinal manipulative therapy have not adequately defined the terms 'mobilization' and 'manipulation', nor distinguished between these terms in reporting the trial interventions. The purpose of this study was to describe the spinal manipulative therapy techniques utilized within a RCT of manipulative therapy (MT; n = 80), interferential therapy (IFT; n = 80), and a combination of both (CT; n = 80) for people with acute low back pain (LBP). Spinal manipulative therapy was defined as any 'mobilization' (low velocity manual force without a thrust) or 'manipulation' (high velocity thrust) techniques of the spine described by Maitland and Cyriax. The 16 physiotherapists, all members of the Society of Orthopaedic Medicine, utilized three spinal manipulative therapy patterns in the RCT: Maitland Mobilization (40.4%, n = 59), Maitland Mobilization/Cyriax Manipulation (40.4%, n = 59) and Cyriax Manipulation (19.1%, n = 28). There was a significant difference between the MT and CT groups in their usage of spinal manipulative therapy techniques (chi2 = 9.178; df = 2; P = 0.01); subjects randomized to the CT group received three times more Cyriax Manipulation (29.2%, n = 21/72) than those randomized to the MT group (9.5%, n = 7/74; df = 1; P = 0.003). The use of mobilization techniques within the trial was comparable with their usage by the general population of physiotherapists in Britain and Ireland for LBP management. However, the usage of manipulation techniques was considerably higher than reported in physiotherapy surveys and may reflect the postgraduate training of trial therapists.

  9. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Belley-Côté, Emilie P; Fallah, Nader; Noonan, Vanessa K; Rivers, Carly S; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2016-03-01

    Previous meta-analyses of methylprednisolone (MPS) for patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs) have not addressed confidence in the quality of evidence used for pooled effect estimates, and new primary studies have been recently published. We aimed to determine whether MPS improves motor recovery and is associated with increased risks for adverse events. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library, and two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data, and evaluated risk of bias. We pooled outcomes from randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled observational studies separately and used the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to evaluate confidence. We included four RCTs and 17 observational studies. MPS was not associated with an increase in long-term motor score recovery (two RCTs: 335 participants; mean difference [MD], -1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.75 to 2.53; p = 0.55, low confidence; two observational studies: 528 participants; MD, 1.37; 95% CI, -3.08 to 5.83; p = 0.55, very low confidence) or improvement by at least one motor grade (three observational studies: 383 participants; risk ratio [RR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.53-1.33; p = 0.46, very low confidence). Evidence from two RCTs demonstrated superior short-term motor score improvement if MPS was administered within 8 h of injury (two RCTs: 250 participants; MD, 4.46; 95% CI, 0.97-7.94; p = 0.01, low confidence), but risk of bias and imprecision limit confidence in these findings. Observational studies demonstrated a significantly increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding (nine studies: 2857 participants; RR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.13-4.19; p = 0.02, very low confidence), but RCTs did not. Pooled evidence does not demonstrate a significant long-term benefit for MPS in patients with acute TSCIs and suggests it may be associated with increased gastrointestinal bleeding. These findings support current guidelines against

  10. THE EFFECT OF MONOSIALOGANGLYOSIDE (GM-1) ADMINISTRATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    BARROS, TARCÍSIO ELOY PESSOA; ARAUJO, FERNANDO FLORES DE; HIGINO, LUCAS DA PAZ; MARCON, RAPHAEL MARTUS; CRISTANTE, ALEXANDRE FOGAÇA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of monosialoganglioside (GM-1) in spinal cord trauma patients seen in our service who have not been treated with methylprednisolone. Methods: Thirty patients with acute spinal cord trauma were randomly divided into two groups. In Group 1, patients received 200 mg GM-1 in the initial assessment and thereafter received 100 mg intravenous per day for 30 days and Group 2 (control) received saline. Patients were evaluated periodically (at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year and two years), using a standardized neurological assessment of the American Spinal Injury Association / International Spinal Cord Society. Results: The comparative statistical analysis of motor indices, sensitive indices for pain and touch according to the standardization of ASIA / ISCOS showed that the assessments at 6 weeks, 6 months and 2 years, GM-Group 1 patients had higher rates than the control group regarding sensitivity to pain and touch, with no statistically significant difference from the motor index. Conclusion: The functional assessment showed improvement in the sensitive indices of patients treated with GM1 after post-traumatic spinal cord injury compared to patients who received placebo. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Case Studies Series. PMID:27217811

  11. Parent and Child Agreement for Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Psychopathology in a Prospective Study of Children and Adolescents Exposed to Single-Event Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined…

  12. Spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Spivak, J M; Balderston, R A

    1994-03-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the availability of spinal instrumentation devices, enabling surgeons to treat a variety of spinal disorders with improved results and lower morbidity. In each anatomic region new fixation systems exist. Improvement in fusion rates with supplemental plate fixation following anterior cervical diskectomies and reconstructions has been demonstrated; these devices can now be applied more safely than ever before. Posterior occipitocervical plating to the C-2 pedicle and C3-6 lateral masses can provide stable fixation despite incompetent posterior arch bony structures. Newer, more rigid anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation allows for correction of thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis along fewer levels and with better maintenance of lordosis and is also useful following anterior decompression for tumor and trauma. Segmental hook fixation of the posterior thoracolumbar spine has allowed for improved correction of deformity without increased morbidity or the need for postoperative bracing in many cases. Finally, the use of transpedicular screw fixation of the lumbosacral spine allows for excellent segmental fixation without intact posterior elements, including facet joints, and has significantly improved the fusion rate in lumbosacral fusions. PMID:8024965

  13. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  14. Coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Fahad; Tai, Javed Majid; Bokhari, Saira

    2014-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma may result in cardiac injuries ranging from simple arrhythmias to fatal cardiac rupture. Coronary artery dissection culminating in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare after blunt chest trauma. Here we report a case of a 37-year-old man who had an AMI secondary to coronary dissection resulting from blunt chest trauma after involvement in a physical fight. PMID:25246456

  15. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J; Quiros Molina, Daniel; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impaired sensory fiber transmission leads to chronic, debilitating neuropathic pain. Sensory afferents are responsive to neurotrophic factors, molecules that are known to promote survival and maintenance of neurons, and regulate sensory neuron transduction of peripheral stimuli. A subset of primary afferent fibers responds only to the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of ligands (GFLs) and is non-peptidergic. In peripheral nerve injury models, restoration of GDNF or artemin (another GFL) to pre-injury levels within the spinal cord attenuates neuropathic pain. One non-invasive approach to increase the levels of GFLs in the spinal cord is through exercise (Ex), and to date exercise training is the only ameliorative, non-pharmacological treatment for SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was 3-fold: 1) to determine whether exercise affects the onset of SCI-induced neuropathic pain; 2) to examine the temporal profile of GDNF and artemin in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn regions associated with forepaw dermatomes after SCI and Ex; and 3) to characterize GFL-responsive sensory fiber plasticity after SCI and Ex. Adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats received a moderate, unilateral spinal cord contusion at C5. A subset of rats was exercised (SCI+Ex) on automated running wheels for 20min, 5days/week starting at 5days post-injury (dpi), continuing until 9 or 37dpi. Hargreaves' and von Frey testing was performed preoperatively and weekly post-SCI. Forty-two percent of rats in the unexercised group exhibited tactile allodynia of the forepaws while the other 58% retained normal sensation. The development of SCI-induced neuropathic pain correlated with a marked decrease in the levels of GDNF and artemin in the spinal cord and DRGs. Additionally, a dramatic increase in the density and the distribution throughout the dorsal horn of GFL-responsive afferents was observed in rats with SCI

  16. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B.; Cap, Andrew P.; Rasmussen, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military–civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a “state of the science” review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. PMID:26428845

  17. Acute administration of AMPA/Kainate blocker combined with delayed transplantation of neural precursors improves lower urinary tract function in spinal injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Neuhuber, Birgit; Fischer, Itzhak

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate bladder function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in response to a combination treatment of an acutely administered AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist and delayed transplantation of neuronal precurors. Female rats received a contusion injury at T8/9. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX was directly administered into the lesion site immediately after injury. Nine days post-injury, NRP/GRP were delivered into the lesion site. Controls received NRP/GRP grafts only or no treatment (OP-Controls). Animals underwent bladder function testing during the course of the experiment and at the endpoint. Motor function was evaluated as well. After sacrifice, histological analysis of lesion site and lumbosacral spinal cord regions was performed. Rats receiving the combined treatment (NBQX&NRP/GRP) had voided volumes/micturition resembling that of normal animals and showed greater improvement of urodynamic parameters, compared to NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. Similarly, NBQX&NRP/GRP induced more spouting, regeneration or sparing of descending projections to the lumbosacral cord. The density of primary afferent projections at the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats with combined treatments was similar to that of NRP/GRP alone with decreased sprouting of primary afferents in lumbosacral cord, compared to OP-Control. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that the combined treatment reduced the size of the lesion to a greater extent than NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. NRP/GRP with and without NBQX produced significant recovery of hindlimb compared to OP-Controls. In conclusions, transplants of NRP/GRP combined with NBQX promote recovery of micturition function following spinal cord injury, likely through increased neuroprotection. PMID:21937028

  18. The penile erection efficacy of a new phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, mirodenafil (SK3530), in rabbits with acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Sang-Ki; Kim, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Seung-Ho; Park, Young-Seok; Kim, So-Jung; Choi, Changsun; Yoon, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Suk; Cho, Sung-Dae; Im, Gwang-Jin; Lee, Soo-Min; Jung, Ji-Won; Lee, Yong-Soon

    2008-11-01

    Mirodenafil (SK3530) is a new potent and selective inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that mirodenafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. Its mechanism of action is enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) induced cGMP formation resulting in significant relaxation of the corpus cavernosum (CC). The aim of this study was to investigate the oral efficacy of mirodenafil in an acute spinal cord-injured rabbit model. Mirodenafil or sildenafil citrate was given orally to male rabbits with a surgical transection of the spinal cord at the L2-L4 lumbar vertebra or ischemic-reperfusion spinal cord injury (SCI). Erections were evaluated in a time-course manner by measuring the length of the uncovered penile mucosa. In the transection SCI model, penile erections were induced at 0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg of mirodenafil but sildenafil only showed an erectile response at 3 mg/kg. The effects of 1 and 3 mg/kg of mirodenafil were significantly increased by intravenous injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide donor. In the ischemic-reperfusion injury model, 3 mg/kg of either mirodenafil or sildenafil produced a penile erection response. After injection of SNP, the lengths of immediate penile erections were significantly increased in the 1 and 3 mg/kg mirodenafil and 3 mg/kg sildenafil groups. The onset of erectile activity was faster with mirodenafil than with sildenafil citrate. These results demonstrate that mirodenafil may be useful for treating erectile dysfunction in patients with a spinal cord injury.

  19. Acupuncture's Effects in Treating the Sequelae of Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries: A Review of Allopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine Literature.

    PubMed

    Dorsher, Peter T; McIntosh, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Each year, there are an estimated 12 000 individuals who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SCI and its sequelae has over the past 50 years led to the development of medical treatments (especially urologic) that have enhanced short- and long-term survival from these injuries. The prevalence of individuals with SCI in this country is ~250 000 individuals; and beyond the incalculable personal consequences of these devastating neurologic injuries, substantial direct and indirect societal costs result from the sequelae of SCI including paralysis, sensory loss, chronic pain, decubiti and bladder and/or bowel incontinence. The purpose of this treatise is to review the allopathic and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) literature available through MEDLINE, PubMed and eCAM search engines that discuss the potential uses of acupuncture to treat acute and chronic spinal cord injuries and their sequelae, and present the neurophysiologic mechanisms for acupuncture's beneficial effects. There is evidence that use of electroacupuncture in acute SCI may significantly improve long-term neurologic recovery from these injuries both in terms of motor, sensory and bowel/bladder function with essentially no risk. Acupuncture may even improve neurourologic function in individuals with chronic SCI, and help with management with chronic pain associated with these injuries.

  20. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . ... Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and ...

  1. The Influence of Time from Injury to Surgery on Motor Recovery and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Observational Canadian Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C.; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R.; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R. John; Johnson, Michael G.; Linassi, A.G.; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24 h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72 h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24 h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24 h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24 h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS. PMID:25333195

  2. Acute Molecular Perturbation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase with an Antisense Approach Enhances Neuronal Preservation and Functional Recovery after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Dominic M.; Chatzipanteli, Katina; Masters, Neil; Patel, Samik P.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key mediator of inflammation and oxidative stress produced during pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system (CNS) injury. iNOS is responsible for the formation of high levels of nitric oxide (NO). The production of highly reactive and cytotoxic NO species, such as peroxynitrite, plays an important role in secondary tissue damage. We have previously demonstrated that acute administration of iNOS antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) 3 h after moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) potently inhibits iNOS-mediated increases in NO levels, leading to reduced blood–spinal cord barrier permeability, decreased neutrophil accumulation, and less neuronal cell death. In the current study we investigated if iNOS ASOs could also provide long-term (10-week) histological and behavioral improvements after moderate thoracic T8 contusive SCI. Adult rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=10/group): SCI alone, SCI and mixed base control oligonucleotides (MBOs), or SCI and iNOS ASOs (200 nM). Oligonucleotides were administered by spinal superfusion 3 h after injury. Behavioral analysis (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] score and subscore) was employed weekly for 10 weeks post-SCI. Although animals treated with iNOS ASOs demonstrated no significant differences in BBB scores compared to controls, subscore analysis revealed a significant improvement in foot positioning, trunk stability, and tail clearance. Histologically, while no gross improvement in preserved white and gray matter was observed, greater numbers of surviving neurons were present adjacent to the lesion site in iNOS ASO-treated animals than controls. These results support the effectiveness of targeting iNOS acutely as a therapeutic approach after SCI. PMID:22708918

  3. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  4. Acute ischemic stroke in a 19 month old following minor head trauma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Garla, Vishnu; Pino, Eduardo; Coulon, Richard; Wolfer, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Minor head trauma is a very rare cause of ischemic stroke in the pediatric population. We describe a nineteen month old patient who developed left hemiparesis and subsequently left facial palsy after a fall. MRI of the brain showed hypodensities in the basal ganglia, internal capsule and caudate nucleus consistent with stroke. Echocardiogram and MRA were normal. Hypercoaguable work up showed that the patient was a carrier for a single MTHFR gene. The patient was treated conservatively. On follow up two weeks later his facial palsy had resolved and strength in the extremities improved. Although a rare condition awareness about this is necessary as there can be considerable delay in its recognition.

  5. [Focused surgical bedside ultrasound: E-FAST (focused assessment with sonography in trauma) - abdominal aortic aneurysm - cholecystolithiasis - acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Studer, Maria; Studer, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound is an easy to learn and highly efficient diagnostic tool to complete the clinical examination and improve bedside decision-making. In the trauma room, surgeons are often required to make a quick decision as to whether or not a patient needs an emergency intervention or whether further diagnostics are required. For this reason, education of surgeons in performing focused emergency ultrasound is pivotal. The goal of ICAN is to improve and expand the education of surgeons in Switzerland. This article provides a short review of the most frequent surgical pathologies encountered in the emergency room.

  6. [Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB) managed by Japan Trauma Care and Research (JTCR)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Junichiro

    2016-02-01

    Japan Trauma Care and Research (JTCR) was founded for operating the trauma care education and research in 2005. Japan Advanced Trauma Evaluation and Care (JATEC) is an educational program of trauma care established by The Japanese Association for The Surgery of Trauma (JAST) and the Japanese Association of Acute Medicine (JAAM), managed by JTCR. The Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB) is the only database organization of Japan trauma registry that was also established by JAST and JAAM, and managed by JTCR. Registry data that is collected from the JTDB is compiled annually and disseminated in the forms of hospital benchmark reports, data quality reports, and research data sets.

  7. Local Delivery of High-Dose Chondroitinase ABC in the Sub-Acute Stage Promotes Axonal Outgrowth and Functional Recovery after Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chu-Hsun; Lin, Chi-Te; Lee, Meng-Jen; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ming-Chao; Lin, Yi-Lo; Chen, Ching-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are glial scar-associated molecules considered axonal regeneration inhibitors and can be digested by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to promote axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously demonstrated that intrathecal delivery of low-dose ChABC (1 U) in the acute stage of SCI promoted axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this study, high-dose ChABC (50 U) introduced via intrathecal delivery induced subarachnoid hemorrhage and death within 48 h. However, most SCI patients are treated in the sub-acute or chronic stages, when the dense glial scar has formed and is minimally digested by intrathecal delivery of ChABC at the injury site. The present study investigated whether intraparenchymal delivery of ChABC in the sub-acute stage of complete spinal cord transection would promote axonal outgrowth and improve functional recovery. We observed no functional recovery following the low-dose ChABC (1 U or 5 U) treatments. Furthermore, animals treated with high-dose ChABC (50 U or 100 U) showed decreased CSPGs levels. The extent and area of the lesion were also dramatically decreased after ChABC treatment. The outgrowth of the regenerating axons was significantly increased, and some partially crossed the lesion site in the ChABC-treated groups. In addition, retrograde Fluoro-Gold (FG) labeling showed that the outgrowing axons could cross the lesion site and reach several brain stem nuclei involved in sensory and motor functions. The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scores revealed that the ChABC treatment significantly improved functional recovery compared to the control group at eight weeks after treatment. Our study demonstrates that high-dose ChABC treatment in the sub-acute stage of SCI effectively improves glial scar digestion by reducing the lesion size and increasing axonal regrowth to the related functional nuclei, which promotes locomotor recovery. Thus, our results will aid in

  8. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  9. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Akpınar, Aykut; Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  10. Acute cervical spinal cord injury secondary to air bag deployment without proper use of lap or shoulder harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hart, R A; Mayberry, J C; Herzberg, A M

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with cervical central spinal cord syndrome caused by a hyperextension injury after a motor vehicle collision in which the air bag deployed in the absence of shoulder or lap belt harnesses. The potential for cervical spine and spinal cord hyperextension injuries in passengers positioned in front of air bags without proper use of shoulder or lap belt harnesses is discussed. Cervical central spinal cord quadriplegia occurred with cervical spondylosis and kyphosis that was managed by early three-level cervical corpectomy in a 58-year-old patient. Early improvement in the patient's neurological status occurred but was incomplete at the time of this report. Cervical hyperextension injuries are possible in passengers positioned in the front seat of cars with air bags when shoulder or lap belt harnesses are not used properly. Previous biomechanical studies have documented the potential for these types of injuries.

  11. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering.

  12. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  13. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  14. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  15. A novel adaptation of a parent–child observational assessment tool for appraisals and coping in children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Background Millions of children worldwide are exposed to acute potentially traumatic events (PTEs) annually. Many children and their families experience significant emotional distress and/or functional impairment following PTEs. While current research has begun to highlight a role for early appraisals and coping in promoting or preventing full recovery from PTEs, the exact nature of the relationships among appraisals, coping, and traumatic stress reactions as well as how appraisals and coping behaviors are influenced by the child's environment (e.g., parents) remains unclear; assessment tools that reach beyond self-report are needed to improve this understanding. Objective The objective of the current study is to describe the newly created Trauma Ambiguous Situations Tool (TAST; i.e., an observational child–parent interview and discussion task that allows assessment of appraisals, coping, and parent–child processes) and to report on initial feasibility and validation of TAST implemented with child–parent dyads in which children were exposed to a PTE. Method As part of a larger study on the role of biopsychosocial factors in posttraumatic stress reactions, children (aged 8–13) and parents (n=25 child–parent dyads) completed the TAST during the child's hospitalization for injury. Results Children and parents engaged well with the TAST. The time to administer the TAST was feasible, even in a peri-trauma context. The TAST solicited a wide array of appraisals (threat and neutral) and coping solutions (proactive and avoidant). Forced-choice and open-ended appraisal assessments provided unique information. The parent–child discussion portion of the TAST allowed for direct observation of parent–child processes and demonstrated parental influence on children's appraisals and coping solutions. Conclusions The TAST is a promising new research tool, which may help to explicate how parents influence their child's developing appraisals and coping solutions

  16. A clinical prediction model for long-term functional outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury based on acute clinical and imaging factors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jefferson R; Grossman, Robert G; Frankowski, Ralph F; Kiss, Alexander; Davis, Aileen M; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Tator, Charles H; Dvorak, Marcel; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Harkema, Susan; Guest, James D; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    To improve clinicians' ability to predict outcome after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to help classify patients within clinical trials, we have created a novel prediction model relating acute clinical and imaging information to functional outcome at 1 year. Data were obtained from two large prospective SCI datasets. Functional independence measure (FIM) motor score at 1 year follow-up was the primary outcome, and functional independence (score ≥ 6 for each FIM motor item) was the secondary outcome. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to clinical and imaging predictors obtained within 3 days of injury. A logistic model was then created using the dichotomized secondary outcome and the same predictor variables. Model validation was performed using a bootstrap resampling procedure. Of 729 patients, 376 met the inclusion criteria. The mean FIM motor score at 1 year was 62.9 (±28.6). Better functional status was predicted by less severe initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale grade, and by an ASIA motor score >50 at admission. In contrast, older age and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal characteristics consistent with spinal cord edema or hemorrhage predicted worse functional outcome. The linear model predicting FIM motor score demonstrated an R-square of 0.52 in the original dataset, and 0.52 (95% CI 0.52,0.53) across the 200 bootstraps. Functional independence was achieved by 148 patients (39.4%). For the logistic model, the area under the curve was 0.93 in the original dataset, and 0.92 (95% CI 0.92,0.93) across the bootstraps, indicating excellent predictive discrimination. These models will have important clinical impact to guide decision making and to counsel patients and families.

  17. A Clinical Prediction Model for Long-Term Functional Outcome after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical and Imaging Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jefferson R.; Grossman, Robert G.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Kiss, Alexander; Davis, Aileen M.; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Harrop, James S.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Tator, Charles H.; Dvorak, Marcel; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Harkema, Susan; Guest, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To improve clinicians' ability to predict outcome after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to help classify patients within clinical trials, we have created a novel prediction model relating acute clinical and imaging information to functional outcome at 1 year. Data were obtained from two large prospective SCI datasets. Functional independence measure (FIM) motor score at 1 year follow-up was the primary outcome, and functional independence (score ≥6 for each FIM motor item) was the secondary outcome. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to clinical and imaging predictors obtained within 3 days of injury. A logistic model was then created using the dichotomized secondary outcome and the same predictor variables. Model validation was performed using a bootstrap resampling procedure. Of 729 patients, 376 met the inclusion criteria. The mean FIM motor score at 1 year was 62.9 (±28.6). Better functional status was predicted by less severe initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale grade, and by an ASIA motor score >50 at admission. In contrast, older age and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal characteristics consistent with spinal cord edema or hemorrhage predicted worse functional outcome. The linear model predicting FIM motor score demonstrated an R-square of 0.52 in the original dataset, and 0.52 (95% CI 0.52,0.53) across the 200 bootstraps. Functional independence was achieved by 148 patients (39.4%). For the logistic model, the area under the curve was 0.93 in the original dataset, and 0.92 (95% CI 0.92,0.93) across the bootstraps, indicating excellent predictive discrimination. These models will have important clinical impact to guide decision making and to counsel patients and families. PMID:22709268

  18. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  19. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Chung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jang Woon; Ha, Kee Yong

    2016-09-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  20. Can acute low back pain result from segmental spinal buckling during sub-maximal activities? A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Richard; Fung, Joyce

    2005-02-01

    This paper provides a review of the current literature supporting the hypothesis that segmental spine buckling resulting in tissue damage may be a primary cause of sudden onset low back pain, even during activities that are sub-maximal with respect to loading and muscle activation. While a temporal link exists, it is supported primarily by anecdotal and clinical reports. More pertinent to this review is the biological plausibility of segmental spine buckling as a mechanism of acute injury, supported by modelling studies as well as current knowledge of tissue mechanics and neurophysiology. One antithesis, however, is the low incidence of low back injuries reported during sub-maximal tasks. In order to account for this discrepancy, several predisposing factors are addressed, both constant and situation-dependent, which may contribute to the occurrence of segmental spinal buckling during sub-maximal activities. PMID:15681264

  1. Systematic, theoretically-grounded development and feasibility testing of an innovative, preventive web-based game for children exposed to acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Winston, Flaura K.; Hildenbrand, Aimee K.; Kohser, Kristen L.; March, Sonja; Kenardy, Justin; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of children are affected by acute medical events annually, creating need for resources to promote recovery. While web-based interventions promise wide reach and low cost for users, development can be time- and cost-intensive. A systematic approach to intervention development can help to minimize costs and increase likelihood of effectiveness. Using a systematic approach, our team integrated evidence on the etiology of traumatic stress, an explicit program theory, and a user-centered design process to intervention development. Objective To describe evidence and the program theory model applied to the Coping Coach intervention and present pilot data evaluating intervention feasibility and acceptability. Method Informed by empirical evidence on traumatic stress prevention, an overarching program theory model was articulated to delineate pathways from a) specific intervention content to b) program targets and proximal outcomes to c) key longer-term health outcomes. Systematic user-testing with children ages 8–12 (N = 42) exposed to an acute medical event and their parents was conducted throughout intervention development. Results Functionality challenges in early prototypes necessitated revisions. Child engagement was positive throughout revisions to the Coping Coach intervention. Final pilot-testing demonstrated promising feasibility and high user-engagement and satisfaction. Conclusion Applying a systematic approach to the development of Coping Coach led to the creation of a functional intervention that is accepted by children and parents. Development of new e-health interventions may benefit from a similar approach. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of Coping Coach in achieving targeted outcomes of reduced trauma symptoms and improved health-related quality of life. PMID:25844276

  2. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during “Target” sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory “oddball” attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  3. [Immunonutrition after trauma].

    PubMed

    Felbinger, T W; Sachs, M; Richter, H P

    2011-11-01

    Immunonutrition may be superior to standard clinical nutrition in specific clinical situations. After severe trauma, an enteral immuno-enhancing diet, enriched with arginine, omega-3 fatty acids, and nucleotides, decreases infectious complications. During acute respiratory distress syndrome, a continuous enteral diet with high-dose omega-3 fatty acids, gamma-linolenic acid, and antioxidants improved clinical outcome. Glutamine should be administered enterally or parenterally whenever total parenteral nutrition is indicated.

  4. Imaging of laryngeal trauma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed.

  5. Imaging of laryngeal trauma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed. PMID:24238937

  6. A Systematic Review of Experimental Strategies Aimed at Improving Motor Function after Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Cortes, Mar; Guest, James; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-03-01

    While various approaches have been proposed in clinical trials aimed at improving motor function after spinal cord injury in humans, there is still limited information regarding the scope, methodological quality, and evidence associated with single-intervention and multi-intervention approaches. A systematic review performed using the PubMed search engine and the key words "spinal cord injury motor recovery" identified 1973 records, of which 39 were selected (18 from the search records and 21 from reference list inspection). Study phase ( clinicaltrials.org criteria) and methodological quality (Cochrane criteria) were assessed. Studies included proposed a broad range of single-intervention (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) and multi-intervention approaches (that combined more than one strategy). The highest evidence level was for Phase III studies supporting the role of multi-intervention approaches that contained a rehabilitation component. Quality appraisal revealed that the percentage of selected studies classified with high risk of bias by Cochrane criteria was as follows: random sequence generation = 64%; allocation concealment = 77%; blinding of participants and personnel = 69%; blinding of outcome assessment = 64%; attrition = 44%; selective reporting = 44%. The current literature contains a high proportion of studies with a limited ability to measure efficacy in a valid manner because of low methodological strength in all items of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment. Recommendations to decrease bias are discussed and include increased methodological rigor in the study design and recruitment of study participants, and the use of electrophysiological and imaging measures that can assess functional integrity of the spinal cord (and may be sufficiently sensitive to detect changes that occur in response to therapeutic

  7. Effects of acute dorsal spinal hemisection on motoneuron discharge in the medial gastrocnemius of the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Powers, R K; Rymer, W Z

    1988-05-01

    1. The discharge of single alpha-motoneuron axons was recorded from small cut filaments of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle nerve in the decerebrated cat preparation before and after a dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord. The remainder of the MG muscle nerve was left intact, and muscle force and multiunit electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded along with alpha-motoneuron discharge, while motor output was varied by manual stimulation of the contralateral hindlimb. 2. We recorded activity in 32 motoneurons before and after the spinal lesion, and pre- and postlesion recruitment forces and minimum firing rates were determined for 30 of these. Postlesion decreases in minimum firing rates were observed in 25/30 motoneurons, and decreases in recruitment force were seen in 21/30 motoneurons. The remaining motoneurons, which generally had low presection recruitment forces and minimum rates, exhibited postlesion increases in both parameters (see below). 3. The effects of the spinal lesion on the recruitment force and minimum firing rate of a motoneuron were related to the prelesion values of these parameters; the largest postlesion decreases were seen in motoneurons with the highest prelesion rates and recruitment forces. Spinal lesions thus acted to shift and compress the range of recruitment forces and minimum firing rates, so that after the lesion all motoneurons tended to exhibit discharge behavior typical of that seen only in the lowest threshold motoneurons before the lesion. In addition, motoneurons with low prelesion recruitment forces (less than 1.0 N of active force) generally showed an increase in recruitment force after the lesion, indicating that the lesion may have led to changes in the prelesion recruitment order. Direct evidence of recruitment reversals was obtained in 4/14 experiments where two or more motoneurons were followed pre- and postlesion. 4. The lesion-induced changes in motoneuron discharge characteristics were associated

  8. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  9. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  10. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  11. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  12. Early applied electric field stimulation attenuates secondary apoptotic responses and exerts neuroprotective effects in acute spinal cord injury of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhang, G; Rong, W; Wang, A; Wu, C; Huo, X

    2015-04-16

    Injury potential, which refers to a direct current voltage between intact and injured nerve ends, is mainly caused by injury-induced Ca2+ influx. Our previous studies revealed that injury potential increased with the onset and severity of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an application of applied electric field stimulation (EFS) with the cathode distal to the lesion could delay and attenuate injury potential formation. As Ca2+ influx is also considered as a major trigger for secondary injury after SCI, we hypothesize that EFS would protect an injured spinal cord from secondary injury and consequently improve functional and pathological outcomes. In this study, rats were divided into three groups: (1) sham group, laminectomy only; (2) control group, subjected to SCI only; and (3) EFS group, received EFS immediately post-injury with the injury potential modulated to 0±0.5 mV by EFS. Functional recovery of the hind limbs was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale. Results revealed that EFS-treated rats exhibited significantly better locomotor function recovery. Luxol fast blue staining was performed to assess the spared myelin area. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the number of myelinated nerve fibers. Ultrastructural analysis was performed to evaluate the size of myelinated nerve fibers. Findings showed that the EFS group rats exhibited significantly less myelin loss and had larger and more myelinated nerve fibers than the control group rats in dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST) 8 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, we found that EFS inhibited the activation of calpain and caspase-3, as well as the expression of Bax, as detected by Western blot analysis. Moreover, EFS decreased cellular apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL, within 4 weeks post-injury. Results suggest that early EFS could significantly reduce spinal cord degeneration and improve functional and historical recovery. Furthermore, these neuroprotective effects may be related to

  13. The influence of time in captivity, food intake and acute trauma on blood analytes of juvenile Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John P.; Tuomi, Pam A.; Mellish, Jo-Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    The Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus, has experienced regionally divergent population trends over recent decades. One potential mechanism for this disparity is that local factors cause reduced health and, therefore, reduced survival of individuals. The use of blood parameters to assess sea lion health may help to identify whether malnutrition, disease and stress are important drivers of current trends, but such assessments require species-specific knowledge of how parameters respond to various health challenges. We used principal components analysis to identify which key blood parameters (principal analytes) best described changes in health for temporarily captive juvenile Steller sea lions in known conditions. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the changes in principal analytes with food intake, time in captivity and acute trauma associated with hot-iron branding and transmitter implant surgery. Of the 17 blood parameters examined, physiological changes for juvenile sea lions were best described using the following six principal analytes: red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, globulin, platelets, glucose and total bilirubin. The white blood cell counts and total bilirubin declined over time in captivity, whereas globulin increased. Elevated red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts and total bilirubin and reduced globulin values were associated with lower food intake. After branding, white blood cell counts were elevated for the first 30 days, while globulin and platelets were elevated for the first 15 days only. After implant surgery, red blood cell counts and globulin remained elevated for 30 days, while white blood cell counts remained elevated during the first 15 days only. Glucose was unassociated with the factors we studied. These results were used to provide expected ranges for principal analytes at different levels of food intake and in response to the physical challenges of branding and implant surgery

  14. Simulated Activity But Real Trauma: A Systematic Review on Nintendo Wii Injuries Based on a Case Report of an Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian A.; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for “Wii (trauma or injury or fracture).” Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations. PMID:25816033

  15. Simulated activity but real trauma: a systematic review on Nintendo Wii injuries based on a case report of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian A; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for "Wii (trauma or injury or fracture)." Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations.

  16. The influence of time in captivity, food intake and acute trauma on blood analytes of juvenile Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, John P; Tuomi, Pam A; Mellish, Jo-Ann E

    2015-01-01

    The Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus, has experienced regionally divergent population trends over recent decades. One potential mechanism for this disparity is that local factors cause reduced health and, therefore, reduced survival of individuals. The use of blood parameters to assess sea lion health may help to identify whether malnutrition, disease and stress are important drivers of current trends, but such assessments require species-specific knowledge of how parameters respond to various health challenges. We used principal components analysis to identify which key blood parameters (principal analytes) best described changes in health for temporarily captive juvenile Steller sea lions in known conditions. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the changes in principal analytes with food intake, time in captivity and acute trauma associated with hot-iron branding and transmitter implant surgery. Of the 17 blood parameters examined, physiological changes for juvenile sea lions were best described using the following six principal analytes: red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, globulin, platelets, glucose and total bilirubin. The white blood cell counts and total bilirubin declined over time in captivity, whereas globulin increased. Elevated red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts and total bilirubin and reduced globulin values were associated with lower food intake. After branding, white blood cell counts were elevated for the first 30 days, while globulin and platelets were elevated for the first 15 days only. After implant surgery, red blood cell counts and globulin remained elevated for 30 days, while white blood cell counts remained elevated during the first 15 days only. Glucose was unassociated with the factors we studied. These results were used to provide expected ranges for principal analytes at different levels of food intake and in response to the physical challenges of branding and implant surgery

  17. Simulated activity but real trauma: a systematic review on Nintendo Wii injuries based on a case report of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian A; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for "Wii (trauma or injury or fracture)." Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations. PMID:25816033

  18. Transfusion practices in trauma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-09-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  19. Transfusion practices in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  20. Trauma induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lolay, Georges A; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed K

    2016-01-15

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction.

  1. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Sperl, André; Heller, Raban; Kunzmann, Kevin; Graeser, Viola; Akbar, Michael; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury. PMID:27447486

  2. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Arash; Sperl, André; Heller, Raban; Kunzmann, Kevin; Graeser, Viola; Akbar, Michael; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury. PMID:27447486

  3. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A CERVICAL SPINAL FRACTURE IN A BENNETT'S WALLABY (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS).

    PubMed

    Kragness, Brandy J; Graham, Jennifer E; Bedenice, Daniela; Restifo, Melissa M; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2016-03-01

    Macropods are susceptible to trauma, and fractures of the cervical vertebrae due to collisions are relatively common. A 4-yr-old, intact male Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) was presented acutely nonambulatory and tetraparetic but with motor function present in all limbs. Cervical radiographs revealed a C4 vertebral fracture. Surgical stabilization was obtained through a ventral midline approach whereby the vertebral bodies were distracted and then secured with screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Postoperative radiographs revealed restoration of the spinal canal and appropriate implant placement. The patient was discharged 4 days postoperatively and gradually recovered full neurologic function per the owner over the ensuing 10 wk. Subsequent radiographs obtained 10.5 mo postoperatively revealed a healed fracture with stable implants. The ventral spinal distraction and stabilization technique using screws and PMMA, as are used in the domestic dog, was successful in this wallaby despite its smaller vertebral size and comparable lack of soft-tissue support. PMID:27010308

  4. A Grading System To Evaluate Objectively the Strength of Pre-Clinical Data of Acute Neuroprotective Therapies for Clinical Translation in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena B.; Tsai, Eve; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Magnuson, David K.; Reier, Paul J.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Blight, Andrew R.; Oudega, Martin; Guest, James D.; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The past three decades have seen an explosion of research interest in spinal cord injury (SCI) and the development of hundreds of potential therapies that have demonstrated some promise in pre-clinical experimental animal models. A growing number of these treatments are seeking to be translated into human clinical trials. Conducting such a clinical trial, however, is extremely costly, not only for the time and money required to execute it, but also for the limited resources that will then no longer be available to evaluate other promising therapies. The decision about what therapies have sufficient pre-clinical evidence of efficacy to justify testing in humans is therefore of utmost importance. Here, we have developed a scoring system for objectively grading the body of pre-clinical literature on neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. The components of the system include an evaluation of a number of factors that are thought to be important in considering the “robustness” of a therapy's efficacy, including the animal species and injury models that have been used to test it, the time window of efficacy, the types of functional improvements effected by it, and whether efficacy has been independently replicated. The selection of these factors was based on the results of a questionnaire that was performed within the SCI research community. A modified Delphi consensus-building exercise was then conducted with experts in pre-clinical SCI research to refine the criteria and decide upon how to score them. Finally, the grading system was applied to a series of potential neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. This represents a systematic approach to developing an objective method of evaluating the extent to which the pre-clinical literature supports the translation of a particular experimental treatment into human trials. PMID:20507235

  5. Survival, Differentiation, and Migration of High-Purity Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Progenitor Motor Neurons in Fibrin Scaffolds after Sub-Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    McCreedy, D A; Wilems, T S; Xu, H; Butts, J C; Brown, C R; Smith, A W; Sakiyama-Elbert, S E

    2014-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can be differentiated into many neural cell types that hold great potential as cell replacement therapies following spinal cord injury (SCI). Coupling stem cell transplantation with biomaterial scaffolds can produce a unified combination therapy with several potential advantages including enhanced cell survival, greater transplant retention, reduced scarring, and improved integration at the transplant/host interface. Undesired cell types, however, are commonly present in ES-cell derived cultures due to the limited efficiency of most ES cell induction protocols. Heterogeneous cell populations can confound the interaction between the biomaterial and specific neural populations leading to undesired outcomes. In particular, biomaterials scaffolds may enhance tumor formation by promoting survival and proliferation of undifferentiated ES cells that can persist after induction. Methods for purification of specific ES cell-derived neural populations are necessary to recognize the full potential of combination therapies involving biomaterials and ES cell-derived neural populations. We previously developed a method for enriching ES cell-derived progenitor motor neurons (pMNs) induced from mouse ES cells via antibiotic selection and showed that the enriched cell populations are depleted of pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we demonstrate the survival and differentiation of enriched pMNs within three dimensional (3D) fibrin scaffolds in vitro and when transplanted into a sub-acute dorsal hemisection model of SCI into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. PMID:25346848

  6. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  7. The multilevel organization of vicarious pain responses: effects of pain cues and empathy traits on spinal nociception and acute pain.

    PubMed

    Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Martel, Marc O; Roy, Mathieu; Caron, Etienne; Jackson, Philip L; Rainville, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The shared-representation model of empathy suggests that vicarious pain processes rely partly on the activation of brain systems underlying self-pain in the observer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that self-pain may be facilitated by the vicarious priming of neural systems underlying pain perception. Pictures illustrating painful agents applied to the hand or the foot (sensory information), or painful facial expressions (emotional information) were shown to 43 participants to test the effects of vicarious pain on the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) of the lower limb and pain intensity and unpleasantness produced by transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied over the sural nerve. Results confirmed the expected priming effects of vicarious pain on spinal and perceptual processes. However, for comparable pain intensity and arousal evoked by the pain pictures, the facilitation of the NFR and the self-pain unpleasantness measurements was more robust in response to pictures depicting pain sensory compared to emotional information. Furthermore, the facilitation of the NFR by pain pictures was positively correlated with the empathy trait of the observer. In contrast, the change in perceived shock-pain intensity was negatively correlated with empathic traits. This dissociation implies that low-level vicarious priming processes underlying pain facilitation may be downregulated at higher pain-processing stages in individuals reporting higher levels of empathy. We speculate that this process contributes to reducing self-other assimilation and is necessary to adopt higher-order empathic responses and altruistic behaviors.

  8. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  9. Systemic Bisperoxovanadium Activates Akt/mTOR, Reduces Autophagy, and Enhances Recovery following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Walker, Melissa J.; Liu, Nai-Kui; Risberg, Emelie C.; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jinhui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Secondary damage following primary spinal cord injury extends pathology beyond the site of initial trauma, and effective management is imperative for maximizing anatomical and functional recovery. Bisperoxovanadium compounds have proven neuroprotective effects in several central nervous system injury/disease models, however, no mechanism has been linked to such neuroprotection from bisperoxovanadium treatment following spinal trauma. The goal of this study was to assess acute bisperoxovanadium treatment effects on neuroprotection and functional recovery following cervical unilateral contusive spinal cord injury, and investigate a potential mechanism of the compound's action. Two experimental groups of rats were established to 1) assess twice-daily 7 day treatment of the compound, potassium bisperoxo (picolinato) vanadium, on long-term recovery of skilled forelimb activity using a novel food manipulation test, and neuroprotection 6 weeks following injury and 2) elucidate an acute mechanistic link for the action of the drug post-injury. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting were performed to assess cellular signaling 1 day following SCI, and histochemistry and forelimb functional analysis were utilized to assess neuroprotection and recovery 6 weeks after injury. Bisperoxovanadium promoted significant neuroprotection through reduced motorneuron death, increased tissue sparing, and minimized cavity formation in rats. Enhanced forelimb functional ability during a treat-eating assessment was also observed. Additionally, bisperoxovanadium significantly enhanced downstream Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and reduced autophagic activity, suggesting inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten as a potential mechanism of bisperoxovanadium action following traumatic spinal cord injury. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of a clinically applicable pharmacological therapy for rapid initiation of neuroprotection post-spinal

  10. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: The classical clinical presentation, neuroradiographic features, and conservative vs. surgical management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord (CSS) injury remain controversial. Methods: CSS injuries, occurring in approximately 9.2% of all cord injuries, are usually attributed to significant hyperextension trauma combined with congenital/acquired cervical stenosis/spondylosis. Patients typically present with greater motor deficits in the upper vs. lower extremities accompanied by patchy sensory loss. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) scans usually show hyperintense T2 intramedullary signals reflecting acute edema along with ligamentous injury, while noncontrast computed tomography (CT) studies typically show no attendant bony pathology (e.g. no fracture, dislocation). Results: CSS constitute only a small percentage of all traumatic spinal cord injuries. Aarabi et al. found CSS patients averaged 58.3 years of age, 83% were male and 52.4% involved accidents/falls in patients with narrowed spinal canals (average 5.6 mm); their average American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score was 63.8, and most pathology was at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (71%). Surgery was performed within 24 h (9 patients), 24–48 h (10 patients), or after 48 h (23 patients). In the Brodell et al. study of 16,134 patients with CSS, 39.7% had surgery. In the Gu et al. series, those with CSS and stenosis/ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) exhibited better outcomes following laminoplasty. Conclusions: Recognizing the unique features of CSS is critical, as the clinical, neuroradiological, and management strategies (e.g. conservative vs. surgical management: early vs. late) differ from those utilized for other spinal cord trauma. Increased T2-weighted MR images best document CSS, while CT studies confirm the absence of fracture/dislocation. PMID:26005576

  11. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-08-01

    Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was principally

  12. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  13. Intestinal Epithelial TLR-4 Activation Is Required for the Development of Acute Lung Injury after Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock via the Release of HMGB1 from the Gut.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Chhinder P; Jia, Hongpeng; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte; Ozolek, John; Zhu, Xiaorong; Billiar, Timothy R; Hackam, David J

    2015-05-15

    The mechanisms that lead to the development of remote lung injury after trauma remain unknown, although a central role for the gut in the induction of lung injury has been postulated. We hypothesized that the development of remote lung injury after trauma/hemorrhagic shock requires activation of TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, and we sought to determine the mechanisms involved. We show that trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused lung injury in wild-type mice, but not in mice that lack TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, confirming the importance of intestinal TLR4 activation in the process. Activation of intestinal TLR4 after trauma led to increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, enterocyte apoptosis, and the release of circulating HMGB1, whereas inhibition of ER stress attenuated apoptosis, reduced circulating HMGB1, and decreased lung injury severity. Neutralization of circulating HMGB1 led to reduced severity of lung injury after trauma, and mice that lack HMGB1 in the intestinal epithelium were protected from the development of lung injury, confirming the importance of the intestine as the source of HMGB1, whose release of HMGB1 induced a rapid protein kinase C ζ-mediated internalization of surface tight junctions in the pulmonary epithelium. Strikingly, the use of a novel small-molecule TLR4 inhibitor reduced intestinal ER stress, decreased circulating HMGB1, and preserved lung architecture after trauma. Thus, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation leads to HMGB1 release from the gut and the development of lung injury, whereas strategies that block upstream TLR4 signaling may offer pulmonary protective strategies after trauma.

  14. Use of intraoperative ultrasound in decision making during spinal operations.

    PubMed

    Theodotou, B C; Powers, S K

    1986-08-01

    The use of intraoperative spinal ultrasonography in 14 cases and its effect on decision making during laminectomy procedures is discussed. The advantages of the technique in operations for syringomyelia, trauma, spondylosis, intramedullary tumors, and neuroablative procedures of the spinal cord are elaborated. PMID:3528907

  15. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  16. A comparison of spinal manipulation methods and usual medical care for acute and sub-acute low back pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Mitchell; Glick, Ronald; Stevans, Joel; Landsittel, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Randomized-controlled trial with follow-up to 6 months. Objective This was a comparative effectiveness trial of: manual-thrust manipulation (MTM) versus mechanical-assisted manipulation (MAM); and manipulation versus usual medical care (UMC). Summary of Background Data Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions seen in primary care and physical medicine practice. MTM is a common treatment for LBP. Claims that MAM is an effective alternative to MTM have yet to be substantiated. There is also question about the effectiveness of manipulation in acute and sub-acute LBP, as compared to UMC. Methods 107 adults with onset of LBP within the past 12 weeks were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: MTM; MAM; or UMC. Outcome measures included the Oswestry LBP disability index (0 to 100 scale) and numeric pain rating (0 to 10 scale). Participants in the manipulation groups were treated twice weekly over 4 weeks; subjects in UMC were seen for 3 visits during this time. Outcome measures were captured at baseline, 4 weeks, 3 months and 6 months. Results Linear regression showed a statistically significant advantage of MTM at 4 weeks compared to MAM (disability = −8.1, p = .009; pain = −1.4, p = .002) and UMC (disability = −6.5, p = .032; pain = −1.7, p < .001). Responder analysis, defined as 30% and 50% reductions in Oswestry scores revealed a significantly greater proportion of responders at 4 weeks in MTM (76%; 50%) compared to MAM (50%; 16%) and UMC (48%; 39%).Similar between-group results were found for pain: MTM (94%; 76%); MAM (69%; 47%); and UMC (56%; 41%). No statistically significant group differences were found between MAM and UMC, and for any comparison at 3 or 6 months. Conclusions MTM provides greater short-term reductions in self-reported disability and pain scores compared to UMC or MAM. PMID:25423308

  17. Spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  18. What is the best treatment to decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine release in acute skeletal muscle injury induced by trauma in rats: low-level laser therapy, diclofenac, or cryotherapy?

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Frigo, Lucio; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Vanin, Adriane Aver; Santos, Larissa Aline; Albuquerque-Pontes, Gianna Móes; De Marchi, Thiago; Tairova, Olga; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto

    2014-03-01

    Currently, treatment of muscle injuries represents a challenge in clinical practice. In acute phase, the most employed therapies are cryotherapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In the last years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has becoming a promising therapeutic agent; however, its effects are not fully known. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of sodium diclofenac (topical application), cryotherapy, and LLLT on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels after a controlled model of muscle injury. For such, we performed a single trauma in tibialis anterior muscle of rats. After 1 h, animals were treated with sodium diclofenac (11.6 mg/g of solution), cryotherapy (20 min), or LLLT (904 nm; superpulsed; 700 Hz; 60 mW mean output power; 1.67 W/cm(2); 1, 3, 6 or 9 J; 17, 50, 100 or 150 s). Assessment of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-1β and IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels was performed at 6 h after trauma employing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. LLLT with 1 J dose significantly decreased (p < 0.05) IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels compared to non-treated injured group as well as diclofenac and cryotherapy groups. On the other hand, treatment with diclofenac and cryotherapy does not decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine levels compared to the non-treated injured group. Therefore, we can conclude that 904 nm LLLT with 1 J dose has better effects than topical application of diclofenac or cryotherapy in acute inflammatory phase after muscle trauma.

  19. Early Decompression (< 8 h) after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Improves Functional Outcome as Assessed by Spinal Cord Independence Measure after One Year.

    PubMed

    Grassner, Lukas; Wutte, Christof; Klein, Barbara; Mach, Orpheus; Riesner, Silvie; Panzer, Stephanie; Vogel, Matthias; Bühren, Volker; Strowitzki, Martin; Vastmans, Jan; Maier, Doris

    2016-09-15

    There is an ongoing controversy about the optimal timing for surgical decompression after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). For this reason, we performed a retrospective study of patients who were operated on after traumatic cervical SCI at the Trauma Center Murnau, Germany, and who met inclusion as well as exclusion criteria (n = 70 patients). Follow-up data were collected prospectively according to the European Multicenter Study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) protocol over a period of 1 year. Early decompression was defined as within the first 8 h after the insult (n = 35 patients). Primary outcome was the difference in the SCIM (Spinal Cord Independence Measure) 1 year after the trauma. After the follow-up period, patients who were decompressed earlier had a significantly higher SCIM difference (45.8 vs. 27.1, p < 0.005). A regression analysis showed that timing of decompression, age, as well as basal AIS (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale) and basal SCIM scores were independent predictors for a better functional outcome (SCIM). Further, patients from the early decompression group had better AIS grades (p < 0.006) and a higher AIS conversion rate (p < 0.029). Additionally, this cohort also had a better total motor performance as well as upper extremity motor function after 1 year (p < 0.025 and p < 0.002). The motor and neurological levels of patients who were operated on within 8 h were significantly more caudal (p < 0.003 and p < 0.014) after 1 year. The present study suggests that early decompression after traumatic cervical SCI might have a positive impact on the functional and neurological outcome of affected individuals.

  20. Suspension trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Caroline; Porter, Keith M

    2007-01-01

    Suspension trauma (also known as “harness‐induced pathology” or “orthostatic shock while suspended”) is the development of presyncopal symptoms and loss of consciousness if the human body is held motionless in a vertical position for a period of time. It has been described in experiments of personal fall protection, and has been implicated in causes of death in mountaineering accidents, but it seems neither to be widely known about nor to have been presented to the medical profession. This article highlights the potential existence of suspension trauma and suggests that more robust medical research using modern harnesses and healthy volunteers would be beneficial to assess whether this is purely a theoretical risk. PMID:17384373

  1. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Odrick R; Torrado, Aranza I; Santiago, Jose M; Rodriguez, Ana E; Salgado, Iris K; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-12-15

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  2. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Odrick R.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Ana E.; Salgado, Iris K.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  3. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  4. Spinal Plasticity following Intermittent Hypoxia: Implications for Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dale-Nagle, Erica A.; Hoffman, Michael S.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Vinit, Stéphane; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity is a fundamental property of the neural system controlling breathing. One frequently studied model of respiratory plasticity is long-term facilitation of phrenic motor output (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF arises from spinal plasticity, increasing respiratory motor output through a mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in or near phrenic motor neurons. Since intermittent hypoxia induces spinal plasticity, we are exploring the potential to harness repetitive AIH as a means of inducing functional recovery in conditions causing respiratory insufficiency, such as cervical spinal injury. Since repetitive AIH induces phenotypic plasticity in respiratory and motor neurons, it may restore respiratory motor function in patients with incomplete spinal injury. PMID:20536940

  5. Ventilatory strategies in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shubhangi; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Lung injury in trauma patients can occur because of direct injury to lung or due to secondary effects of injury elsewhere for example fat embolism from a long bone fracture, or due to response to a systemic insult such as; acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to sepsis or transfusion related lung injury. There are certain special situations like head injury where the primary culprit is not the lung, but the brain and the ventilator strategy is aimed at preserving the brain tissue and the respiratory system takes a second place. The present article aims to delineate the strategies addressing practical problems and challenges faced by intensivists dealing with trauma patients with or without healthy lungs. The lung protective strategies along with newer trends in ventilation are discussed. Ventilatory management for specific organ system trauma are highlighted and their physiological base is presented. PMID:24550626

  6. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis. PMID:24966260

  7. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  8. Age of Trauma Onset and HPA Axis Dysregulation Among Trauma-Exposed Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, Kate Ryan; Vargas, Ivan; Geiss, Elisa G; Lopez-Duran, Nestor L

    2015-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) is a pathway through which childhood trauma may increase risk for negative health outcomes. The HPA axis is sensitive to stress throughout development; however, few studies have examined whether timing of exposure to childhood trauma is related to differences in later HPA axis functioning. Therefore, we examined the association between age of first trauma and HPA axis functioning among adolescents, and whether these associations varied by sex. Parents of 97 youth (aged 9-16 years) completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI), and youth completed the Socially-Evaluated Cold-Pressor Task (SECPT). We measured salivary cortisol response to the SECPT, the cortisol awakening response, and diurnal regulation at home across 2 consecutive weekdays. Exposure to trauma during infancy related to delayed cortisol recovery from peak responses to acute stress, d = 0.23 to 0.42. Timing of trauma exposure related to diverging patterns of diurnal cortisol regulation for males, d = 0.55, and females, d = 0.57. Therefore, the HPA axis may be susceptible to developing acute stress dysregulation when exposed to trauma during infancy, whereas the consequences within circadian cortisol regulation may occur in the context of later trauma exposure and vary by sex. Further investigations are warranted to characterize HPA axis sensitivity to exposure to childhood trauma across child development.

  9. Paraplegia due to Spinal Epidermoid Cyst Rupture at Asthma Attack

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kweon Young; Kang, Jung Hun; Choi, Dae Woo; Lee, Min Hong

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidermoid cyst is less than 1% of the entire spinal cord tumor and a rare tumor. It is a slowly proliferating benign tumor and can be a result of either congenital or acquired factors. In particular, reports of acute paraplegia due to spinal epidermoid cyst rupture are very rare. Since authors experienced paraplegia resulting from congenital spinal epidermoid cyst rupture during an asthma attack, it is reported with a review of literature. PMID:23705125

  10. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  11. Nanomedicine for Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds. PMID:23945984

  12. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  13. Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms but not generalized anxiety symptoms are associated with severity of exposure to war trauma: A study of civilians under fire

    PubMed Central

    Helpman, Liat; Besser, Avi; Neria, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and generalized anxiety symptoms (GAS) may ensue following trauma. While they are now thought to represent different psychopathological entities, it is not clear whether both GAS and PTSS show a dose–response to trauma exposure. The current study aimed to address this gap in knowledge and to investigate the moderating role of subjects’ demographics in the exposure-outcome associations. The sample included 249 civilian adults, assessed during the 2014 Israel–Gaza military conflict. The survey probed demographic information, trauma exposure, and symptoms. PTSS but not GAS was associated with exposure severity. Women were at higher risk for both PTSS and GAS than men. In addition, several demographic variables were only associated with PTSS levels. PTSS dose-response effect was moderated by education. These findings are in line with emerging neurobiological and cognitive research, suggesting that although PTSS and GAS have shared risk factors they represent two different psychopathological entities. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:26343559

  14. Chronic Spinal Compression Model in Minipigs: A Systematic Behavioral, Qualitative, and Quantitative Neuropathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Roman; Juhas, Stefan; Keshavarzi, Sassan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Johe, Karl; Marsala, Silvia; Scadeng, Miriam; Lazar, Peter; Tomori, Zoltan; Schulteis, Gery; Beattie, Michael; Ciacci, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The goal of the present study was to develop a porcine spinal cord injury (SCI) model, and to describe the neurological outcome and characterize the corresponding quantitative and qualitative histological changes at 4–9 months after injury. Adult Gottingen-Minnesota minipigs were anesthetized and placed in a spine immobilization frame. The exposed T12 spinal segment was compressed in a dorso-ventral direction using a 5-mm-diameter circular bar with a progressively increasing peak force (1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 kg) at a velocity of 3 cm/sec. During recovery, motor and sensory function were periodically monitored. After survival, the animals were perfusion fixed and the extent of local SCI was analyzed by (1) post-mortem MRI analysis of dissected spinal cords, (2) qualitative and quantitative analysis of axonal survival at the epicenter of injury, and (3) defining the presence of local inflammatory changes, astrocytosis, and schwannosis. Following 2.5-kg spinal cord compression the animals demonstrated a near complete loss of motor and sensory function with no recovery over the next 4–9 months. Those that underwent spinal cord compression with 2 kg force developed an incomplete injury with progressive partial neurological recovery characterized by a restricted ability to stand and walk. Animals injured with a spinal compression force of 1.5 kg showed near normal ambulation 10 days after injury. In fully paralyzed animals (2.5 kg), MRI analysis demonstrated a loss of spinal white matter integrity and extensive septal cavitations. A significant correlation between the magnitude of loss of small and medium-sized myelinated axons in the ventral funiculus and neurological deficits was identified. These data, demonstrating stable neurological deficits in severely injured animals, similarities of spinal pathology to humans, and relatively good post-injury tolerance of this strain of minipigs to spinal trauma, suggest that this model can successfully be used

  15. Racial disparities in outcomes after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lad, Shivanand P; Umeano, Odera A; Karikari, Isaac O; Somasundaram, Aravind; Bagley, Carlos A; Gottfried, Oren N; Isaacs, Robert E; Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Patil, Chirag G; Huang, Kevin; Boakye, Maxwell

    2013-03-15

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is an acute trauma to the neural elements resulting in temporary or permanent sensory and motor deficit. Studies have indicated that although 66% of SCI occur in Caucasians, there are a growing number of other racial groups affected by SCI. Furthermore, there has been a lack of research concerning racial disparities in outcomes following SCI. As such, a retrospective analysis using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2000 to 2009 was performed. African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans were included in the study. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (OR) to examine the relationship between racial backgrounds and mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, length of hospital stay, in-hospital complications, and patient disposition. Our results showed that significant differences were found in length of hospital stay, with African American and Hispanic populations having longer hospital stays than Caucasian and Asians. For all type complications, African Americans (OR 1.228, confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.356) and Native Americans (OR 1.618, CI 1.083-2.419) were more likely than Caucasian and Hispanic patients to have in-hospital complications. For disposition status, African Americans (OR 0.844, CI 0.730-0.976) and Asians (OR 0.475, CI 0.297-0.760) were much less likely than Caucasians or Hispanic populations to be discharged to an acute rehabilitation program. The results from this large-scale study (n=18,671) demonstrate a number of racial disparities following SCI at the national level, including rate of complications, length of stay, and disposition to acute rehabilitation centers. This should raise awareness to cultural differences but also serve as an opportunity to reduce gaps in care across ethnicities for this universally life-altering condition.

  16. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  17. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally

  18. The spectrum of agricultural trauma.

    PubMed

    Cogbill, T H; Busch, H M

    1985-01-01

    During the past 6 years, 375 patients were hospitalized with injuries resulting from farm accidents. The mechanism of injury was farm animal in 135 patients (36%), tractor in 89 (24%), corn picker or auger in 57 (15%), power take-off in 29 (8%), other farm machinery in 50 (13%), and miscellaneous in 15 (4%). Injury severity score (ISS) of 25 or greater was calculated for 29 individuals (8%). Eleven groups of surgical subspecialists performed 539 procedures. Eight patients (2.1%) died as a result of their injuries. All eight deaths occurred after tractor accidents secondary to pelvic fractures, head and spinal cord injury, or blunt chest trauma. Thirty-nine patients (10%) were left with serious permanent disability. Unnecessary morbidity and mortality in many cases were attributed to excessive prehospital care times within a largely rural area. Better prevention by farmer education and the initiation of mandatory safety devices on agricultural equipment may lower the incidence of farm accidents. Major agricultural trauma is frequent and diverse and is optimally managed in a regional trauma center. PMID:4093573

  19. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  20. [Central necrosis of the lumbo-sacral segment of the spinal cord associated with multiple cholesterin emboli, clinically presenting as acute paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, M; Uchigata, M; Shimizu, S; Sakamoto, T; Murayama, S

    2000-10-01

    A seventy-six-year-old man suddenly suffered from paraplegia and pain in both legs. He had been maintained on hemodialysis and committed a suicide attempt by cutting the shunt at the paraplegic attack. He was brought to the emergency ward for the treatment of hemorrhagic preshock. Neurological examination demonstrated flaccid paraplegia, loss of tendon reflex in the lower extremities, dissociated sensory loss below the fourth lumbar level; and incontinence in defecation. MRI showed T2 shortening in the ventral spinal cord caudal below the level of the eleventh thoracic cord. Postmortem examination confirmed ischemic infarct in the central area of the spinal cord, associated with disseminated cholesterin emboli in the small arteries. This case was the first MRI demonstration of central necrosis caused by cholesterin emboli, and may emphasize the significance of cholesterin emboli in the spinal arterial disorders in the aged.

  1. Imaging of trauma of the spine.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Flanders, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of imaging in spine trauma is to gauge the extent of bony, vascular, and neurologic compromise. Neurologic and mechanical stability are key pieces of information that must be efficiently communicated to the referring clinician. From immobilization and steroid therapy, to vascular repair and emergent surgical intervention, clinical outcomes of spine-injured patients depend on timely and well-chosen imaging studies. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) has essentially replaced radiography in clearance of the spine and is the gold standard in evaluation of the bony spinal column. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is typically reserved for patients with neurologic deficits or for obtunded/impaired patients in whom the neurologic exam is not reliable, even in the absence of osseous injury on CT. MRI is the only available imaging modality that is able to clearly depict the internal architecture of the spinal cord, and, as such, has a central role in depicting parenchymal changes resulting from injury. Intramedullary edema and hemorrhage have been shown to correlate with the degree of neurologic deficit and prognosis. Moreover, advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion and diffusion tensor imaging, have shifted the focus to determining structural and functional integrity of neural structures. Here, we review the role of imaging in spine trauma, as well as the key radiologic features of injury to the spinal column and spinal cord. PMID:27430440

  2. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  3. The beneficial effects of a thromboxane receptor antagonist on spinal cord perfusion following experimental cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tempel, G E; Martin, H F

    1992-06-01

    The eicosanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin have opposing actions causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. The ratio of these two eicosanoids is thus an important determinant of circulatory homeostasis. An increase in this ratio occurs in certain inflammatory conditions with dramatic consequences in organ perfusion. In spinal cord trauma, in addition to direct physical perturbation of the spinal cord, it is likely that further structural and functional loss occurs as a result of decreased tissue perfusion precipitated by an increase in the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio. This study evaluated hemodynamics and organ perfusion, 3 h following 24 g-cm spinal cord trauma in the rat. The role of thromboxane was investigated with an inhibitor of thromboxane synthesis (Dazoxiben) and with a receptor antagonist (13-APT). Cardiac output and blood pressure were unaffected by Dazoxiben, 13-APT, or spinal cord trauma. Injury effected approximately a 40% decrease in spinal cord perfusion from 0.41 to 0.25 ml/min/g which was not improved by the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Dazoxiben. 13-ATP completely abrogated the decline in spinal cord blood flow flowing injury. Perfusion of other selected organs demonstrated little change as a result of the spinal trauma. Brain flow remained constant at 0.78 ml/min/g brain. Coronary blood flow, however, declined from 3.2 to 2.0 ml/min/g heart tissue. The data suggest consideration of the importance of thromboxane in therapeutic attempts to reduce secondary injury arising in spinal cord trauma. PMID:1386102

  4. The development of insomnia or the plasticity of good sleep? A preliminary study of acute changes in sleep and insomnia resulting from an analogue trauma.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Cele; Gradisar, Michael; Pulford, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The present preliminary study aimed to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the development of insomnia. An analogue stressor (i.e., trauma video) was used to prevent presleep cognitive de-arousal. Subsequent changes in nocturnal sleep and sleep-related attentional processing were examined. Thirty-four participants were randomly assigned to either a cognitive arousal (trauma video; age: M = 22.9, SD = 4.3, 6 male, 11 female) or control (pleasant video; age: M = 23.8, SD = 5.8, 7 male, 10 female) condition. Although no significant differences were found for presleep cognitive de-arousal (p = .39), the cognitive arousal group experienced a significant worsening in sleep latency (p = .048, partial η(2) = .12) and an increase in sleep-related attentional bias (p = .032, d = 0.51) following the manipulation. However, changes in sleep and attentional bias were not maintained. Vulnerability to stress did not significantly account for any change in attentional bias, arousal, or sleep. These findings challenge current conceptualizations of the development of insomnia, yet also supporting the notion that good sleep is a default state that protects individuals from sleep disturbance.

  5. An efficient device to experimentally model compression injury of mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Zeng, Xiang; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Han, InBo; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Teng, Yang D

    2015-09-01

    We report an efficient and effective device to reproducibly model clinically relevant spinal cord injury (SCI) via controlled mechanical compression. In the present study, following skin incision, dorsal laminectomy was performed to expose T10 spinal cord of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-250 g). The vertebral column was suspended and stabilized by Allis clamps at T8 and 12 spinous processes. A metal impounder was then gently loaded onto T10 dura (20, 35 or 50 g × 5 min; n=7/group), resulting in acute mild, moderate, or severe standing weight compression, respectively. Neurobehavioral outcomes were evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale and inclined plane test for coordinated hindlimb function, and a battery of spinal reflex tests for sensorimotor functions, at 1 day following SCI and weekly thereafter for 7 weeks. Quantitative histopathology was used to assess injury-triggered loss of white matter, gray matter and ventral horn motor neurons. Immunocytochemical levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the cervical and lumbar regions were measured to determine the distal segment impact of T10 compression. The data demonstrates that the standardized protocol generates weight-dependent hindlimb motosensory deficits and neurodegeneration primarily at and near the lesion epicenter. Importantly, there are significantly increased GFAP and APP expressions in spinal cord segments involved in eliciting post-SCI allodynia. Therefore, the described system reliably produces compression trauma in manners partially emulating clinical quasi-static insults to the spinal cord, providing a pragmatic model to investigate pathophysiological events and potential therapeutics for compression SCI. PMID:26210871

  6. Infiltrating spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Yen, Han-Lin; Tsai, Shih-Chung; Liu, Shian-Min

    2008-10-01

    Infiltrating angiolipomas are rarely encountered in the spine. We present a case involving a 71-year-old man with a dorsal epidural angiolipoma at the T5-T7 level. The tumor involved the T5-T6 vertebral bodies and left pedicle. The patient presented with acute paraparesis and MRI showed a homogeneously hyphointense lesion on T1-weighted images. The epidural component of the tumor was removed via laminectomy to achieve adequate cord decompression. The patient was symptom-free at a 2-year follow-up. This report emphasizes the unusual clinical presentation and MRI features of an infiltrating spinal angiolipoma and discusses therapeutic management options.

  7. HDAC6 Regulates the Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy to Prevent Oxidative Damage in Injured Neurons after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Yarong; Teng, Xiaomei; Yang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia- (HI-) induced oxidative stress plays a role in secondary pathocellular processes of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) due to HI from many kinds of mechanical trauma. Increasing evidence suggests that the histone deacetylase-6 (HDAC6) plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both physiological and abnormal, stressful, pathological conditions. This paper found that inhibition of HDAC6 accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in response to the HI. Deficiency of HDAC6 hindered the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) activity to resistance of HI-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, this study provided the experimental evidence for the potential role of HDAC6 in the regulation of CMA by affecting HSP90 acetylation. Therefore, HDAC6 plays an important role in the function of CMA pathway under the HI stress induced by SCI and it may be a potential therapeutic target in acute SCI model. PMID:26649145

  8. Spinal cord injury--scientific challenges for the unknown future.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Leif; Aldskogius, Håkan; Holtz, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The history of spinal cord injuries starts with the ancient Egyptian medical papyrus known as the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. The papyrus written about 2500 B.C.by the physician and architect of the Sakkara pyramids Imhotep, describes "crushed vertebra in his neck" as well as symptoms of neurological deterioration. An ailment not to be treated was the massage to the patients at that time. This fatalistic attitude remained until the end of World War II when the first rehabilitation centre focused on the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients was opened. Our knowledge of the pathophysiological processes, both the primary as well as the secondary, has increased tremendously. However, all this knowledge has only led to improved medical care but not to any therapeutic method to restore, even partially, the neurological function. Neuroprotection is defined as measures to counteract secondary injury mechanisms and/or limit the extent of damage caused by self-destructive cellular and tissue processes. The co-existence of several distinctly different injury mechanisms after trauma has provided opportunities to explore a large number of potentially neuroprotective agents in animal experiments such as methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results of this research have been very discouraging and pharmacological neuroprotection for patients with spinal cord injury has fallen short of the expectations created by the extensive research and promising observations in animal experiments. The focus of research has now, instead, been transformed to the field of neural regeneration. This field includes the discovery of regenerating obstacles in the nerve cell and/or environmental factors but also various regeneration strategies such as bridging the gap at the site of injury as well as transplantation of foetal tissue and stem cells. The purpose of this review is to highlight selected experimental and clinical studies that form the basis for undertaking future challenges in

  9. Spinal cord injury--scientific challenges for the unknown future.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Leif; Aldskogius, Håkan; Holtz, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The history of spinal cord injuries starts with the ancient Egyptian medical papyrus known as the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus. The papyrus written about 2500 B.C.by the physician and architect of the Sakkara pyramids Imhotep, describes "crushed vertebra in his neck" as well as symptoms of neurological deterioration. An ailment not to be treated was the massage to the patients at that time. This fatalistic attitude remained until the end of World War II when the first rehabilitation centre focused on the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients was opened. Our knowledge of the pathophysiological processes, both the primary as well as the secondary, has increased tremendously. However, all this knowledge has only led to improved medical care but not to any therapeutic method to restore, even partially, the neurological function. Neuroprotection is defined as measures to counteract secondary injury mechanisms and/or limit the extent of damage caused by self-destructive cellular and tissue processes. The co-existence of several distinctly different injury mechanisms after trauma has provided opportunities to explore a large number of potentially neuroprotective agents in animal experiments such as methylprednisolone sodium succinate. The results of this research have been very discouraging and pharmacological neuroprotection for patients with spinal cord injury has fallen short of the expectations created by the extensive research and promising observations in animal experiments. The focus of research has now, instead, been transformed to the field of neural regeneration. This field includes the discovery of regenerating obstacles in the nerve cell and/or environmental factors but also various regeneration strategies such as bridging the gap at the site of injury as well as transplantation of foetal tissue and stem cells. The purpose of this review is to highlight selected experimental and clinical studies that form the basis for undertaking future challenges in

  10. The trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of psychological trauma: intrusive memories and beyond.

    PubMed

    James, Ella L; Lau-Zhu, Alex; Clark, Ian A; Visser, Renée M; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Holmes, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of psychological trauma is fundamental to clinical psychology. Following traumatic event(s), a clinically significant number of people develop symptoms, including those of Acute Stress Disorder and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The trauma film paradigm offers an experimental psychopathology model to study both exposure and reactions to psychological trauma, including the hallmark symptom of intrusive memories. We reviewed 74 articles that have used this paradigm since the earliest review (Holmes & Bourne, 2008) until July 2014. Highlighting the different stages of trauma processing, i.e. pre-, peri- and post-trauma, the studies are divided according to manipulations before, during and after film viewing, for experimental as well as correlational designs. While the majority of studies focussed on the frequency of intrusive memories, other reactions to trauma were also modelled. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the trauma film paradigm as an experimental psychopathology model of trauma, consider ethical issues, and suggest future directions. By understanding the basic mechanisms underlying trauma symptom development, we can begin to translate findings from the laboratory to the clinic, test innovative science-driven interventions, and in the future reduce the debilitating effects of psychopathology following stressful and/or traumatic events.

  11. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  12. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration.

  13. Trauma-Sensitive Schools: An Evidence-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Jacqui L.; Bush, Kelly A.; Kersevich, Sonia E.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a common and pervasive problem. There is a positive correlation between ACEs and difficulties across the lifespan. Unlike healthy forms of stress, ACEs have a detrimental impact on the developing brain. There are three types of trauma: acute, chronic, and complex. Most ACEs are considered complex trauma,…

  14. The Sanctuary Model of Trauma-Informed Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Sandra L.; Sreedhar, Sarah Yanosy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Sanctuary Model[R], a trauma-informed method for creating or changing an organizational culture. Although the model is based on trauma theory, its tenets have application in working with children and adults across a wide diagnostic spectrum. Originally developed in a short-term, acute inpatient psychiatric setting for…

  15. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  16. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  17. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  18. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance.

  19. ‘Pseudofailure’ of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this ‘Pseudofailure’, as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  20. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  1. Computed tomography of pancreatic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Crass, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    In a review of over 300 CT scans of abdominal trauma, we encountered 13 patients with surgically proved pancreatic injuries. CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fractures, contusions, or posttraumatic pseudocysts in 11 of these patients. There were two false positive and two false negative diagnoses. The CT diagnosis of pancreatic trauma may be difficult in selected patients who are scanned soon after injury. Acutely, the actual plane of a pancreatic fracture may be difficult to identify with CT, and the peripancreatic soft-tissue changes of traumatic pancreatitis are often subtle. Eight of 11 correctly diagnosed pancreatic injuries showed thickening of the left anterior renal fascia on CT scans. This sign should prompt a critical evaluation of the pancreas of the traumatized patient.

  2. [Long-term survival after severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W; Mutschler, M; Graw, M; Lefering, R

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival after severe trauma is rarely addressed in German trauma journals although knowledge of life expectancy and identification of factors contributing to increased mortality are important for lifetime care management, development of service models, and targeting health promotion and prevention interventions. As reliable data in Germany are lacking, we compiled data mainly from the USA and Australia to describe life expectancy, risk factors, and predictors of outcome in patients experiencing traumatic spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and polytrauma. Two years after trauma, life expectancy in all three categories was significantly lower than that of the general population. It depends strongly on severity of disability, age, and gender and is quantifiable. Whereas improvements in medical care have led to a marked decline in short-term mortality, surprisingly long-term survival in severe trauma has not changed over the past 30 years. Therefore, there is need to intensify long-term trauma patient care and to find new strategies to limit primary damage. PMID:27342106

  3. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kasım Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients. Overview of Literature Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability. Methods Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia. Results There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need

  4. Preceding trauma in childhood hematogenous bone and joint infections.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Kallio, Markku J T; Lankinen, Petteri; Peltola, Heikki; Kallio, Pentti E

    2014-03-01

    Preceding trauma may play a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of hematogenous bone and joint infections. Among 345 children with an acute hematogenous bone and/or joint infection, 20% reported trauma during a 2-week period leading to infection. Blunt impact, bruises, or excoriations were commonly reported. The rate was similar to that in the general pediatric population obtained from the literature. In the study group, patients with and without trauma were similar in age, serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, length of hospitalization, and late sequelae. Preceding minor trauma did not prove to be significant as an etiological or as a prognostic factor.

  5. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  6. Trauma Facts for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers facts which can help educators deal with children undergoing trauma. These include: (1) One out of every 4 children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior; (2) Trauma can impact school performance; (3) Trauma can impair learning; (4) Traumatized children may experience…

  7. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  8. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  9. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  10. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  11. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  13. Spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, Spyros

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade there have been significant improvements in all the fields of management of patients with spinal dysraphism, which have increased dramatically the quality of life of these children. Prevention of spina bifida with food fortification is becoming increasingly practiced worldwide. As result, in many parts of the world the frequency of myelomeningocele has decreased. Intrauterine closure of myelomeningocele has been attempted in many institutions with variable results. While it is still at the sphere of experimental therapy, it is reasonable to anticipate progress in this field in the next decade. Antenatal MR imaging is already providing very high level of detail even before the child is born. This creates new ethical dilemmas and requires additional care, but has improved significantly the overall management of patients and their families. Further improvements are anticipated in this field. Management of neuropathic bladder has improved significantly in the last decade and is anticipated to play an increasing role in the long term follow up. Surgery for spinal cord tethering in all its forms has improved in the last decade, with far more chances of complete untethering now in comparison to 10-15 years ago, with the use of micro-neurosurgical techniques and intraoperative monitoring. It is reasonable to expect that in the next decade, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spinal cord surgery will become mandatory. In the 2013 Annual Special Issue we have assembled a team of authors distinguished in their fields, who bring us up to date with all the latest developments. PMID:24013314

  14. Ester Hydrolysis Differentially Reduces Aconitine-Induced Anti-hypersensitivity and Acute Neurotoxicity: Involvement of Spinal Microglial Dynorphin Expression and Implications for Aconitum Processing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aconitines, including bulleyaconitine A, probably the most bioactive and abundant alkaloids in Aconitum plant, are a group of diester C19-diterpenoid alkaloids with one acetylester group attached to C8 of the diterpenoid skeleton and one benzoylester group to C14. Hydrolysis of both groups is involved in the processing of Aconitum, a traditional Chinese medicinal approach. We recently demonstrated that bulleyaconitine A produced anti-hypersensitivity, which was mediated by stimulation of spinal microglial dynorphin A expression. This study aimed to elucidate whether the acetylester and benzoylester groups are involved in aconitine-induced dynorphin A expression, anti-hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity in neuropathic rats. Intrathecal administration of aconitine and benzoylaconine (but not aconine) attenuated mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, with normalized ED50 values of 35 pmol and 3.6 nmol, respectively. Aconitine and benzoylaconine anti-allodynia was completely blocked by the microglial inhibitor, dynorphin A antiserum, and κ-opioid receptor antagonist. Aconitine and benzoylaconine, but not aconine, stimulated dynorphin A expression in cultured primary spinal microglia, with EC50 values of 32 nM and 3 μM, respectively. Intrathecal aconitine, benzoylaconine and aconine induced flaccid paralysis and death, with normalized TD50 values of 0.5 nmol, 0.2 μmol, and 1.6 μmol, respectively. The TD50/ED50 ratios of aconitine and benzolyaconine were 14:1 and 56:1. Our results suggest that both the C8-acetyl and C14-benzoyl groups are essential for aconitine to stimulate spinal microglial dynorphin A expression and subsequent anti-hypersensitivity, which can be separated from neurotoxicity, because both benzoylaconine and aconine differentially produced anti-hypersensitivity and neurotoxicity due to their different stimulatory ability on dynorphin A expression. Our results support the scientific rationale for Aconitum processing, but caution should be taken to

  15. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided.

  16. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided. PMID:21735271

  17. Acute Putrescine Supplementation with Schwann Cell Implantation Improves Sensory and Serotonergic Axon Growth and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Iorgulescu, J Bryan; Patel, Samik P; Louro, Jack; Andrade, Christian M; Sanchez, Andre R; Pearse, Damien D

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation exhibits significant potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair and its use as a therapeutic modality has now progressed to clinical trials for subacute and chronic human SCI. Although SC implants provide a receptive environment for axonal regrowth and support functional recovery in a number of experimental SCI models, axonal regeneration is largely limited to local systems and the behavioral improvements are modest without additional combinatory approaches. In the current study we investigated whether the concurrent delivery of the polyamine putrescine, started either 30 min or 1 week after SCI, could enhance the efficacy of SCs when implanted subacutely (1 week after injury) into the contused rat spinal cord. Polyamines are ubiquitous organic cations that play an important role in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell division, cytoskeletal organization, and cell differentiation. We show that the combination of putrescine with SCs provides a significant increase in implant size, an enhancement in axonal (sensory and serotonergic) sparing and/or growth, and improved open field locomotion after SCI, as compared to SC implantation alone. These findings demonstrate that polyamine supplementation can augment the effectiveness of SCs when used as a therapeutic approach for subacute SCI repair. PMID:26550496

  18. Riluzole for the treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury: rationale for and design of the NACTN Phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Michael G; Wilson, Jefferson R; Frankowski, Ralph F; Toups, Elizabeth G; Aarabi, Bizhan; Harrop, James S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Harkema, Susan J; Guest, James D; Tator, Charles H; Burau, Keith D; Johnson, Michele W; Grossman, Robert G

    2012-09-01

    In the immediate period after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) a variety of secondary injury mechanisms combine to gradually expand the initial lesion size, potentially leading to diminished neurological outcomes at long-term follow-up. Riluzole, a benzothiazole drug, which has neuroprotective properties based on sodium channel blockade and mitigation of glutamatergic toxicity, is currently an approved drug that attenuates the extent of neuronal degeneration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, several preclinical SCI studies have associated riluzole administration with improved functional outcomes and increased neural tissue preservation. Based on these findings, riluzole has attracted considerable interest as a potential neuroprotective drug for the treatment of SCI. Currently, a Phase I trial evaluating the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of riluzole in human SCI patients is being conducted by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury. The current review summarizes the existing preclinical and clinical literature on riluzole, provides a detailed description of the Phase I trial, and suggests potential opportunities for future investigation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00876889.

  19. Acute Putrescine Supplementation with Schwann Cell Implantation Improves Sensory and Serotonergic Axon Growth and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iorgulescu, J. Bryan; Patel, Samik P.; Louro, Jack; Andrade, Christian M.; Sanchez, Andre R.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation exhibits significant potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair and its use as a therapeutic modality has now progressed to clinical trials for subacute and chronic human SCI. Although SC implants provide a receptive environment for axonal regrowth and support functional recovery in a number of experimental SCI models, axonal regeneration is largely limited to local systems and the behavioral improvements are modest without additional combinatory approaches. In the current study we investigated whether the concurrent delivery of the polyamine putrescine, started either 30 min or 1 week after SCI, could enhance the efficacy of SCs when implanted subacutely (1 week after injury) into the contused rat spinal cord. Polyamines are ubiquitous organic cations that play an important role in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell division, cytoskeletal organization, and cell differentiation. We show that the combination of putrescine with SCs provides a significant increase in implant size, an enhancement in axonal (sensory and serotonergic) sparing and/or growth, and improved open field locomotion after SCI, as compared to SC implantation alone. These findings demonstrate that polyamine supplementation can augment the effectiveness of SCs when used as a therapeutic approach for subacute SCI repair. PMID:26550496

  20. Riluzole for the treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury: rationale for and design of the NACTN Phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Michael G; Wilson, Jefferson R; Frankowski, Ralph F; Toups, Elizabeth G; Aarabi, Bizhan; Harrop, James S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Harkema, Susan J; Guest, James D; Tator, Charles H; Burau, Keith D; Johnson, Michele W; Grossman, Robert G

    2012-09-01

    In the immediate period after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) a variety of secondary injury mechanisms combine to gradually expand the initial lesion size, potentially leading to diminished neurological outcomes at long-term follow-up. Riluzole, a benzothiazole drug, which has neuroprotective properties based on sodium channel blockade and mitigation of glutamatergic toxicity, is currently an approved drug that attenuates the extent of neuronal degeneration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, several preclinical SCI studies have associated riluzole administration with improved functional outcomes and increased neural tissue preservation. Based on these findings, riluzole has attracted considerable interest as a potential neuroprotective drug for the treatment of SCI. Currently, a Phase I trial evaluating the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of riluzole in human SCI patients is being conducted by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury. The current review summarizes the existing preclinical and clinical literature on riluzole, provides a detailed description of the Phase I trial, and suggests potential opportunities for future investigation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00876889. PMID:22985381

  1. Radionuclide evaluation of lung trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Lull, R.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Sugerman, H.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Boll, D.A.; Kaplan, K.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging procedures can play a significant role in evaluating the pulmonary complications that are seen in trauma patients. A quantitative method for measuring increased pulmonary capillary permeability that uses Tc-99m HSA allows early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and accurately differentiates this condition from pneumonia or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. This technique may be of great value in following the response to therapy. The use of 133Xe to diagnose inhalation injury remains an important diagnostic tool, particularly at hospitals with specialized burn units. Regional decreases in ventilation-perfusion images reliably localize aspirated foreign bodies. Radionuclide techniques that are used to demonstrate gastropulmonary aspiration remain controversial and require further clinical evaluation. Pulmonary perfusion imaging, although nonspecific, may provide the earliest clue for correct diagnosis of fat embolism, air embolism, contusion, or laceration. Furthermore, the possibility of perfusion abnormality due to these uncommon conditions must be remembered whenever trauma patients are evaluated for pulmonary thromboembolism with scintigraphy. Occasionally, liver or spleen scintigraphy may be the most appropriate procedure when penetrating chest trauma also involves these subdiaphragmatic organs.

  2. Demystifying damage control in musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Bates, P; Parker, P; McFadyen, I; Pallister, I

    2016-05-01

    Trauma care has evolved rapidly over the past decade. The benefits of operative fracture management in major trauma patients are well recognised. Concerns over early total care arose when applied broadly. The burden of additional surgical trauma could constitute a second hit, fuelling the inflammatory response and precipitating a decline into acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Temporary external fixation aimed to deliver the benefits of fracture stabilisation without the risk of major surgery. This damage control orthopaedics approach was advocated for those in extremis and a poorly defined borderline group. An increasing understanding of the physiological response to major trauma means there is now a need to refine our treatment options. A number of large scale retrospective reviews indicate that early definitive fracture fixation is beneficial in the majority of major trauma patients. It is recommended that patients are selected appropriately on the basis of their response to resuscitation. The hope is that this approach (dubbed 'safe definitive fracture surgery' or 'early appropriate care') will herald an era when care is individualised for each patient and their circumstances. The novel Damage Control in Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery course at The Royal College of Surgeons of England aims to equip senior surgeons with the insights and mindset necessary to contribute to this key decision making process as well as also the technical skills to provide damage control interventions when needed, relying on the improved techniques of damage control resuscitation and advances in the understanding of early appropriate care. PMID:27023640

  3. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  4. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  5. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Esenciales: hojas informativas de fácil lectura) Other Information Back Pain Order a NIAMS publication to be mailed Health ... as effective as conventional, nonoperative treatments for acute back pain. Acupuncture. This treatment involves stimulating certain places on ...

  6. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  7. [Non-invasive transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation facilitates locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal cats].

    PubMed

    Musienko, P E; Bogacheva, I N; Savochin, A A; Kilimnik, V A; Gorskiĭ, O V; Nikitin, O A; Gerasimenko, Ia P

    2013-08-01

    It is known that spinal neuronal networks activated by epidural electrical stimulation (EES) can produce the stepping EMG pattern and control the locomotor behavior. At present study we showed that non-invasive transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tESCS) applied to the lumbar-sacral enlargement can facilitate the locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal animals. The comparison of the motor responses evoked by EES vs tESCS showed that both methods produce the locomotor patterns with close properties and similar reflex mechanisms. The data obtained suggest that tESCS is an efficient approach for investigation of the locomotor control in acute and chronic experiments as well as facilitates of the locomotor abilities after spinal cord injury. Taking to account the non-invasivity and easement of tESCS, this approach could be further implemented in clinical practice for rehabilitation of the patient with spinal cord injury.

  8. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    PubMed

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions.

  9. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    PubMed

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions. PMID:10884118

  10. Plasma arginine correlations in trauma and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chiarla, C; Giovannini, I; Siegel, J H

    2006-02-01

    , transferrin, cholesterol and many AA clearances. These data show that changes in ARG in trauma and sepsis are correlated with changes in other AA and, within these correlations, reconfirm a tendency to lower ARG in trauma compared to sepsis. The strong correlation with lysine warrants a deeper assessment of the practical implications of interdependency between these two AA. The data also suggest that changes in plasma ORN in trauma and sepsis may reflect adequacy of AA substrate to support acute-phase and other synthetic processes.

  11. Ventilation in chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Torsten; Ragaller, Maximilian

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is one important factor for total morbidity and mortality in traumatized emergency patients. The complexity of injury in trauma patients makes it challenging to provide an optimal oxygenation while protecting the lung from further ventilator-induced injury to it. On the other hand, lung trauma needs to be treated on an individual basis, depending on the magnitude, location and type of lung or chest injury. Several aspects of ventilatory management in emergency patients are summarized herein and may give the clinician an overview of the treatment possibilities for chest trauma victims. PMID:21769213

  12. Acute treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and chronic environmental enrichment confer neurobehavioral benefit after experimental brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anthony E; Wagner, Amy K; Westergom, Brian P; Malena, Rebecca R; Zafonte, Ross D; Olsen, Adam S; Sozda, Christopher N; Luthra, Pallavi; Panda, Monisha; Cheng, Jeffery P; Aslam, Haris A

    2007-02-27

    Acute treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or chronic environmental enrichment (EE) hasten behavioral recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine if combining these interventions would confer additional benefit. Anesthetized adult male rats received either a cortical impact or sham injury followed 15min later by a single intraperitoneal injection of 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) or saline vehicle (1.0mL/kg) and then randomly assigned to either enriched or standard (STD) housing. Behavioral assessments were conducted utilizing established motor and cognitive tests on post-injury days 1-5 and 14-18, respectively. Hippocampal CA(1)/CA(3) neurons were quantified at 3 weeks. Both 8-OH-DPAT and EE attenuated CA(3) cell loss. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced spatial learning in a Morris water maze (MWM) as revealed by differences between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD and TBI+VEHICLE+STD groups (P=0.0014). EE improved motor function as demonstrated by reduced time to traverse an elevated narrow beam in both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups versus the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P=0.0007 and 0.0016, respectively). EE also facilitated MWM learning as evidenced by both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups locating the escape platform quicker than the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P's<0.0001). MWM differences were also observed between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD groups (P=0.0004) suggesting that EE enhanced the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. However, there was no difference between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups. These data replicate previous results from our laboratory showing that both a single systemic administration of 8-OH-DPAT and EE improve recovery after TBI and extend those findings by elucidating that the combination of treatments in this particular paradigm did not confer additional benefit. One explanation for the lack of an additive effect is that EE

  13. Acute treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and chronic environmental enrichment confer neurobehavioral benefit after experimental brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Anthony E.; Wagner, Amy K.; Westergom, Brian P.; Malena, Rebecca R.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Olsen, Adam S.; Sozda, Christopher N.; Luthra, Pallavi; Panda, Monisha; Cheng, Jeffery P.; Aslam, Haris A.

    2007-01-01

    Acute treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or chronic environmental enrichment (EE) hasten behavioral recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine if combining these interventions would confer additional benefit. Anesthetized adult male rats received either a cortical impact or sham injury followed 15 min later by a single intraperitoneal injection of 8-OH-DPAT (0.5 mg/kg) or saline vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) and then randomly assigned to either enriched or standard (STD) housing. Behavioral assessments were conducted utilizing established motor and cognitive tests on post-injury days 1-5 and 14-18, respectively. Hippocampal CA1/CA3 neurons were quantified at 3 weeks. Both 8-OH-DPAT and EE attenuated CA3 cell loss. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced spatial learning in a Morris water maze (MWM) as revealed by differences between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD and TBI+VEHICLE+STD groups (P=0.0014). EE improved motor function as demonstrated by reduced time to traverse an elevated narrow beam in both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups vs. the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P=0.0007 and P=0.0016, respectively). EE also facilitated MWM learning as evidenced by both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups locating the escape platform quicker than the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P's<0.0001). MWM differences were also observed between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD groups (P=0.0004) suggesting that EE enhanced the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. However, there was no difference between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups. These data replicate previous results from our laboratory showing that both a single systemic administration of 8-OH-DPAT and EE improve recovery after TBI and extend those findings by elucidating that the combination of treatments in this particular paradigm did not confer additional benefit. One explanation for the lack of an additive effect is that EE is a

  14. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  15. The stress regulator FKBP51 drives chronic pain by modulating spinal glucocorticoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Maiarù, Maria; Tochiki, Keri K.; Cox, Marc B.; Annan, Leonette V.; Bell, Christopher G.; Feng, Xixi; Hausch, Felix; Géranton, Sandrine M.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in FKBP51 are associated with stress-related psychiatric disorders and influence the severity of pain symptoms experienced after trauma. Here, we report that FKBP51 (FK506 binding protein 51) is crucial for the full development and maintenance of long-term pain states and that this is independent from its effect on mood. Indeed, FKBP51 knock out mice but also mice with silencing of FKBP51 restricted to the spinal cord showed reduced hypersensitivity in a number of persistent pain models. FKBP51 deletion did not compromise the detection of acute painful stimuli, a critical protective mechanism. Moreover, the specific FKBP51 inhibitor SAFit2 intrathecally administered reduced the severity of an established pain state, confirming the crucial role of spinal FKBP51 in nociceptive processing. Finally, glucocorticoid signaling, which is known to modulate persistent pain states in rodents, was impaired in FKBP51 knock out mice. This suggested that FKBP51 regulates chronic pain by modulation of glucocorticoid signaling. In conclusion, FKBP51 is a central mediator of chronic pain, likely in humans as well as rodents, and is a new pharmacologically tractable target for the treatment of long term pain states. PMID:26865567

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  18. Proteomic Analysis of the Spatio-temporal Based Molecular Kinetics of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Identifies a Time- and Segment-specific Window for Effective Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Stephanie; Cizkova, Dasa; Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Nataf, Serge; Pays, Laurent; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Maass, Peter; Kobarg, Jan H; Kobeissy, Firas; Mériaux, Céline; Wisztorski, Maxence; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Cigankova, Viera; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a major debilitating health issue with a direct socioeconomic burden on the public and private sectors worldwide. Although several studies have been conducted to identify the molecular progression of injury sequel due from the lesion site, still the exact underlying mechanisms and pathways of injury development have not been fully elucidated. In this work, based on OMICs, 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, cytokines arrays, confocal imaging we established for the first time that molecular and cellular processes occurring after SCI are altered between the lesion proximity, i.e. rostral and caudal segments nearby the lesion (R1-C1) whereas segments distant from R1-C1, i.e. R2-C2 and R3-C3 levels coexpressed factors implicated in neurogenesis. Delay in T regulators recruitment between R1 and C1 favor discrepancies between the two segments. This is also reinforced by presence of neurites outgrowth inhibitors in C1, absent in R1. Moreover, the presence of immunoglobulins (IgGs) in neurons at the lesion site at 3 days, validated by mass spectrometry, may present additional factor that contributes to limited regeneration. Treatment in vivo with anti-CD20 one hour after SCI did not improve locomotor function and decrease IgG expression. These results open the door of a novel view of the SCI treatment by considering the C1 as the therapeutic target. PMID:27250205

  19. Treating childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Terr, Lenore C

    2013-01-01

    This review begins with the question "What is childhood trauma?" Diagnosis is discussed next, and then the article focuses on treatment, using 3 basic principles-abreaction, context, and correction. Treatment modalities and complications are discussed, with case vignettes presented throughout to illustrate. Suggestions are provided for the psychiatrist to manage countertransference as trauma therapy proceeds.

  20. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, S; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC]) and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches. PMID:25593358

  1. Pain management in trauma: A review study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Heidari Zadie, Zahra; Euasobhon, Pramote; Ketumarn, Penkae; Karbasfrushan, Ali; Amini-Saman, Javad; Mohammadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Pain in trauma has a role similar to the double-edged sword. On the one hand, pain is a good indicator to determine the severity and type of injury. On the other hand, pain can induce sever complications and it may lead to further deterioration of the patient. Therefore, knowing how to manage pain in trauma patients is an important part of systemic approach in trauma. The aim of this manuscript is to provide information about pain management in trauma in the Emergency Room settings. Methods: In this review we searched among electronic and manual documents covering a 15-yr period between 2000 and 2016. Our electronic search included Pub Med, Google scholar, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. We looked for articles in English and in peer-reviewed journals using the following keywords: acute pain management, trauma, emergency room and injury. Results: More than 3200 documents were identified. After screening based on the study inclusion criteria, 560 studies that had direct linkage to the study aim were considered for evaluation based World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder chart. Conclusions: To provide adequate pain management in trauma patients require: adequate assessment of age-specific pharmacologic pain management; identification of adequate analgesic to relieve moderate to severe pain; cognizance of serious adverse effects of pain medications and weighting medications against their benefits, and regularly reassessing patients and reevaluating their pain management regimen. Patient-centered trauma care will also require having knowledge of barriers to pain management and discussing them with the patient and his/her family to identify solutions. PMID:27414816

  2. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after lumbar trauma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Birk, Harjus; Robinson, Caitlin K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are common injuries, accounting for approximately 90% of all spinal trauma. Lumbar spine trauma in the elderly is a growing public health problem with relatively little evidence to guide clinical management. The authors sought to characterize the complications, morbidity, and mortality associated with surgical and nonsurgical management in elderly patients with traumatic fractures of the lumbar spine. METHODS Using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients ≥ 55 years of age who had traumatic fracture to the lumbar spine. This group was divided into middle-aged (55-69 years) and elderly (≥ 70 years) cohorts. Cohorts were subdivided into nonoperative, vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, noninstrumented surgery, and instrumented surgery. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to characterize and identify predictors of medical and surgical complications, mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, number of days on ventilator, and hospital discharge in each subgroup. Adjusted odds ratios, mean differences, and associated 95% CIs were reported. Statistical significance was assessed at p < 0.05, and the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied for each outcome analysis. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2012, 22,835 people met the inclusion criteria, which represents 94,103 incidents nationally. Analyses revealed a similar medical and surgical complication profile between age groups. The most prevalent medical complications were pneumonia (7.0%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (3.6%), and deep venous thrombosis (3%). Surgical site infections occurred in 6.3% of cases. Instrumented surgery was associated with the highest odds of each complication (p < 0.001). The inpatient mortality rate was 6.8% for all subjects. Multivariable analyses demonstrated that age ≥ 70 years was an independent predictor of

  3. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of which can be serious (eg, dependency, misuse and overdose). Methods and analysis OPAL is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded trial that will investigate the judicious use of an opioid analgesic in 346 participants with acute low back pain and/or neck pain who are slow to recover. Participants will be recruited from general practice and randomised to receive the opioid analgesic (controlled release oxycodone plus naloxone up to 20 mg per day) or placebo in addition to guideline-based care (eg, reassurance and advice of staying active) for up to 6 weeks. Participants will be followed-up for 3 months for effectiveness outcomes. The primary outcome will be pain severity. Secondary outcomes will include physical functioning and time to recovery. Medication-related adverse events will be assessed and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. We will additionally assess long-term use and risk of misuse of opioid analgesics for up to 12 months. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Trial results will be disseminated by publications and conference presentations, and via the media. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000775516: Pre-results. PMID:27558901

  4. A Clinical Perspective and Definition of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be complete or incomplete. The level of injury in SCI is defined as the most caudal segment with motor function rated at greater than or equal to 3/5, with pain and temperature preserved. The standard neurological classification of SCI provided by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) assigns grades from ASIA A (complete SCI) through ASIA E (normal sensory/motor), with B, C, and D representing varying degrees of injury between these extremes. The most common causes of SCI include trauma (motor vehicle accidents, sports, violence, falls), degenerative spinal disease, vascular injury (anterior spinal artery syndrome, epidural hematoma), tumor, infection (epidural abscess), and demyelinating processes (). (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B91)(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  5. Mitigation of sensory and motor deficits by acrolein scavenger phenelzine in a rat model of spinal cord contusive injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Park, Jonghyuck; Butler, Breanne; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Zheng, Lingxing; Tang, Jonathan; McCain, Robyn; Zhang, Wenpeng; Ouyang, Zheng; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are no effective therapies available for the excruciating neuropathic pain that develops after spinal cord injuries (SCI). As such, a great deal of effort is being put into the investigation of novel therapeutic targets that can alleviate this pain. One such target is acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde produced as a byproduct of oxidative stress and inflammation that is capable of activating the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel, known to be involved in the transmission and propagation of chronic neuropathic pain. One anti-acrolein agent, hydralazine, has already been shown to reduce neuropathic pain behaviors and offer neuroprotection after SCI. This study investigates another acrolein scavenger, phenelzine, for its possible role of alleviating sensory hypersensitivity through acrolein suppression. The results show that phenelzine is indeed capable of attenuating neuropathic pain behaviors in acute, delayed, and chronic administration schedules after injury in a rat model of SCI. In addition, upon the comparison of hydralazine to phenelzine, both acrolein scavengers displayed a dose-dependent response in the reduction of acrolein in vivo. Finally, phenelzine proved capable of providing locomotor function recovery and neuroprotection of spinal cord tissue when administered immediately after injury for 2 weeks. These results indicate that phenelzine may be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain after SCI and likely a viable alternative to hydralazine. We have shown that phenelzine can attenuate neuropathic pain behavior in acute, delayed, and chronic administration in post-SCI rats. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction in an acrolein metabolite in urine and an acrolein adduct in spinal cord tissue, and the suppression of TRPA1 over-expression in central and peripheral locations post-trauma. Acrolein scavenging might be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce post-SCI neuropathic pain.

  6. Mitigation of sensory and motor deficits by acrolein scavenger phenelzine in a rat model of spinal cord contusive injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Park, Jonghyuck; Butler, Breanne; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Zheng, Lingxing; Tang, Jonathan; McCain, Robyn; Zhang, Wenpeng; Ouyang, Zheng; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are no effective therapies available for the excruciating neuropathic pain that develops after spinal cord injuries (SCI). As such, a great deal of effort is being put into the investigation of novel therapeutic targets that can alleviate this pain. One such target is acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde produced as a byproduct of oxidative stress and inflammation that is capable of activating the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel, known to be involved in the transmission and propagation of chronic neuropathic pain. One anti-acrolein agent, hydralazine, has already been shown to reduce neuropathic pain behaviors and offer neuroprotection after SCI. This study investigates another acrolein scavenger, phenelzine, for its possible role of alleviating sensory hypersensitivity through acrolein suppression. The results show that phenelzine is indeed capable of attenuating neuropathic pain behaviors in acute, delayed, and chronic administration schedules after injury in a rat model of SCI. In addition, upon the comparison of hydralazine to phenelzine, both acrolein scavengers displayed a dose-dependent response in the reduction of acrolein in vivo. Finally, phenelzine proved capable of providing locomotor function recovery and neuroprotection of spinal cord tissue when administered immediately after injury for 2 weeks. These results indicate that phenelzine may be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain after SCI and likely a viable alternative to hydralazine. We have shown that phenelzine can attenuate neuropathic pain behavior in acute, delayed, and chronic administration in post-SCI rats. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction in an acrolein metabolite in urine and an acrolein adduct in spinal cord tissue, and the suppression of TRPA1 over-expression in central and peripheral locations post-trauma. Acrolein scavenging might be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce post-SCI neuropathic pain. PMID:27060873

  7. Transplantation of specific human astrocytes promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen J A; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Noble, Mark; Mayer-Proschel, Margot; Davies, Jeannette E; Proschel, Christoph

    2011-03-02

    Repairing trauma to the central nervous system by replacement of glial support cells is an increasingly attractive therapeutic strategy. We have focused on the less-studied replacement of astrocytes, the major support cell in the central nervous system, by generating astrocytes from embryonic human glial precursor cells using two different astrocyte differentiation inducing factors. The resulting astrocytes differed in expression of multiple proteins thought to either promote or inhibit central nervous system homeostasis and regeneration. When transplanted into acute transection injuries of the adult rat spinal cord, astrocytes generated by exposing human glial precursor cells to bone morphogenetic protein promoted significant recovery of volitional foot placement, axonal growth and notably robust increases in neuronal survival in multiple spinal cord laminae. In marked contrast, human glial precursor cells and astrocytes generated from these cells by exposure to ciliary neurotrophic factor both failed to promote significant behavioral recovery or similarly robust neuronal survival and support of axon growth at sites of injury. Our studies thus demonstrate functional differences between human astrocyte populations and suggest that pre-differentiation of precursor cells into a specific astrocyte subtype is required to optimize astrocyte replacement therapies. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show functional differences in ability to promote repair of the injured adult central nervous system between two distinct subtypes of human astrocytes derived from a common fetal glial precursor population. These findings are consistent with our previous studies of transplanting specific subtypes of rodent glial precursor derived astrocytes into sites of spinal cord injury, and indicate a remarkable conservation from rat to human of functional differences between astrocyte subtypes. In addition, our studies provide a specific population of human astrocytes that

  8. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  9. Spinal epidural angiolipoma complicated by an intratumoral abscess. Case report.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Gianpaolo; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Lauriola, Libero; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2005-08-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare, benign lesions representing 0.14 to 1.2% of all spinal axis tumors. They most commonly involve the midthoracic spine and are located in the posterior epidural space. Up to now, six pediatric cases have been reported in the literature; two of them involved an acute clinical onset that was related to a venous infarction of a tumor. The authors report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a midthoracic epidural angiolipoma who was admitted with a clinical history of an acute paraparesis. In contrast to previous descriptions, the acute onset in this case was related to a spontaneous intratumoral abscess within the tumor.

  10. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  11. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  13. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed.

  14. Programmed management of acute cervical cord trauma.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Bryk, J P; Yashon, D; Albin, M S; Demian, Y K

    Results in ten patients admitted with the diagnosis of complete traumatic quadriplegia and with fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on aggressive emergency surgical treatment of these lesions such as tracheostomy, laminectomy and cord cooling, incorporated into a detailed protocol of overall management.

  15. [Noise level evaluation in acute ear trauma].

    PubMed

    Bobodzhanov, U B

    2003-01-01

    Subjective noise in the ears can be defined as a pathological acoustic sensation arising in the ear in different pathology of the acoustic analyzer. To make the treatment of the injury more effective, topical diagnosis of the acoustic analyzer affection is desirable.

  16. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  17. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  18. Trauma-Informed Schools.

    PubMed

    Wiest-Stevenson, Courtney; Lee, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Violence has impacted every aspect of daily life. These tragedies have shocked the world. This has resulted in school communities being fractured. Additionally, The National Survey of Children Exposed to Violence found that 60% of the children surveyed have been exposed to some form of trauma, either in or out of school. Traumatology research has shown most people respond to a wide range of traumatic events in similar ways. The common responses include traumatic responses, posttraumatic stress responses, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article the authors outline the impact of trauma on children within school systems; discuss the mental health services schools are providing; present a trauma-informed school model; identifies tools which can be utilized in schools; and provide resources needed for a trauma-informed school, along with additional tools and resources. The authors discuss future recommendations for the community and schools as traumatic events continue to grow and impact a large number of children.

  19. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  20. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts.

  1. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research.

  2. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  3. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  4. Spinal cord contusion models.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2002-01-01

    Most human spinal cord injuries involve contusions of the spinal cord. Many investigators have long used weight-drop contusion animal models to study the pathophysiology and genetic responses of spinal cord injury. All spinal cord injury therapies tested to date in clinical trial were validated in such models. In recent years, the trend has been towards use of rats for spinal cord injury studies. The MASCIS Impactor is a well-standardized rat spinal cord contusion model that produces very consistent graded spinal cord damage that linearly predicts 24-h lesion volumes, 6-week white matter sparing, and locomotor recovery in rats. All aspects of the model, including anesthesia for male and female rats, age rather than body weight criteria, and arterial blood gases were empirically selected to enhance the consistency of injury. PMID:12440371

  5. The use of massive transfusion protocol for trauma and non-trauma patients in a civilian setting: what can be done better?

    PubMed Central

    Wijaya, Ramesh; Cheng, Hui Min Gloria; Chong, Chee Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Massive transfusion protocol (MTP) is increasingly used in civilian trauma cases to achieve better haemostatic resuscitation in patients requiring massive blood transfusions (MTs), with improved survival outcomes. However, in non-trauma patients, evidence for MTP is lacking. This study aims to assess the outcomes of a newly established MTP in a civilian setting, for both trauma and non-trauma patients, in an acute surgical care unit. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis was performed on 46 patients for whom MTP was activated in Changi General Hospital, Singapore. The patients were categorised into trauma and non-trauma groups. Assessment of Blood Consumption (ABC) score was used to identify MTP trauma patients and analyse over-activation rates. RESULTS Only 39.1% of all cases with MTP activation eventually received MTs; 39.8% of the MTs were for non-trauma patients. Mean fresh frozen plasma to packed red blood cells (pRBC) ratio achieved with MTP was 0.741, while mean platelet to pRBC ratio was 0.213. The 24-hour mortality rate for all patients who received an MT upon MTP activation was 33.3% (trauma vs. non-trauma group: 45.5% vs. 14.3%). The ABC scoring system used for trauma patients had a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 41.2%, respectively. CONCLUSION MTP may be used for both trauma and non-trauma patients in acute care surgery. Scoring systems to predict the need for an MT, improved compliance to predefined transfusion ratios and regular reviews of the MTP are necessary to optimise MTPs and to improve the outcomes of patients receiving MTs. PMID:27211577

  6. Trauma systems and the costs of trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, M G; Bazzoli, G J; Coffey, R M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the cost of providing trauma services in trauma centers organized by publicly administered trauma systems, compared to hospitals not part of a formal trauma system. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Secondary administrative discharge abstracts for a national sample of severely injured trauma patients in 44 trauma centers and 60 matched control hospitals for the year 1987 were used. STUDY DESIGN. Retrospective univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the impact of formal trauma systems and trauma center designation on the costs of treating trauma patients. Key dependent variables included length of stay, charge per day per patient, and charge per hospital stay. Key impact variables were type of trauma system and level of trauma designation. Control variables included patient, hospital, and community characteristics. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data were selected for hospitals based on (1) a large national hospital discharge database, the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project, 1980-1987 (HCUP-2) and (2) a special survey of trauma systems and trauma designation undertaken by the Hospital Research and Educational Trust of the American Hospital Association. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The results show that publicly designated Level I trauma centers, which are the focal point of most trauma systems, have the highest charge per case, the highest average charge per day, and similar or longer average lengths of stay than other hospitals. These findings persist after controlling for patient injury and health status, and for demographic characteristics and hospital and community characteristics. CONCLUSIONS. Prior research shows that severely injured trauma patients have greater chances of survival when treated in specialized trauma centers. However, findings here should be of concern to the many states developing trauma systems since the high costs of Level I centers support limiting the number of centers designated at this

  7. Isolated spinal artery aneurysm: a rare culprit of subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tony H T; Leung, Warren K W; Lai, Bill M H; Khoo, Jennifer L S

    2015-04-01

    Isolated spinal artery aneurysm is a rare lesion which could be accountable for spontaneous spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with sudden onset of chest pain radiating to the neck and back, with subsequent headache and confusion. Initial computed tomography aortogram revealed incidental finding of subtle acute spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A set of computed tomography scans of the brain showed further acute intracranial subarachnoid haemorrhage with posterior predominance, small amount of intraventricular haemorrhage, and absence of intracranial vascular lesions. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a thrombosed intradural spinal aneurysm with surrounding sentinel clot, which was trapped and excised during surgical exploration. High level of clinical alertness is required in order not to miss this rare but detrimental entity. Its relevant aetiopathological features and implications for clinical management are discussed.

  8. Level-I Trauma Center Effects on Return-to-Work Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Sergio I.; Salkever, David; MacKenzie, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Injury is the leading cause of death for persons aged 1-44 years in the United States. Injuries have a substantial economic cost. For that reason, regional systems of trauma care in which the more acutely injured patients are transported to Level-I (L-I) trauma centers (TCs) has been widely advocated. However, the cost of TC care is…

  9. Systemic inflammation after trauma.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Andreas; Franklin, Glen A; Cheadle, William G

    2007-12-01

    Trauma is still one of the main reasons for death among the population worldwide. Mortality occurring early after injury is due to "first hits", including severe organ injury, hypoxia, hypovolaemia or head trauma. Massive injury leads to activation of the immune system and the early inflammatory immune response after trauma has been defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). "Second hits" such as infections, ischaemia/reperfusion or operations can further augment the pro-inflammatory immune response and have been correlated with the high morbidity and mortality in the latter times after trauma. SIRS can lead to tissue destruction in organs not originally affected by the initial trauma with subsequent development of multi-organ dysfunction (MOD). The initial pro-inflammatory response is followed by an anti-inflammatory response and can result in immune suppression with high risk of infection and sepsis. Trauma causes activation of nearly all components of the immune system. It activates the neuroendocrine system and local tissue destruction and accumulation of toxic byproducts of metabolic respiration leads to release of mediators. Extensive tissue injury may result in spillover of these mediators into the peripheral bloodstream to further maintain and augment the pro-inflammatory response. Hormones like ACTH, corticosteroids and catecholamines as well as cytokines, chemokines and alarmins play important roles in the initiation and persistence of the pro-inflammatory response after severe injury. The purpose of this review is therefore to describe the immunological events after trauma and to introduce important mediators and pathways of the inflammatory immune response.

  10. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Sim, Sook Young

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  11. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  12. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome as a result of spontaneous bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Jarrahnejad, Payam; Balakrishnan, Anila; Huettner, William C

    2008-01-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity following trauma. A rare occurence of spontaneous bleeding into the carpal tunnel, presenting as acute carpal tunnel syndrome, is presented. PMID:19721797

  13. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions.

  14. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. PMID:25241267

  15. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  16. Cycling Exercise Affects the Expression of Apoptosis-Associated microRNAs after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Keeler, Benjamin E.; Zhukareva, Victoria; Houlé, John D.

    2010-01-01

    There are two major aspects to a spinal cord injury (SCI): an acute, primary mechanical trauma and a progressive phase of secondary tissue damage provoked by inflammation, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and demyelination. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, ~22 nucleotide, non-protein-coding RNAs that function at the post-transcriptional level to regulate gene expression. They have important roles in homeostatic processes such as cell proliferation and programmed cell death. In the injured rat spinal cord we performed an expression analysis of miRs and their downstream targets involved in apoptotic pathways and used post-injury cycling exercise to test for activity dependent plasticity of miR expression. We show that SCI results in increased expression of miR Let-7a and miR16 while exercise leads to elevated levels of miR21 and decreased levels of miR15b. These changes in miR expression are correlated with changes in expression of their target genes: pro-apoptotic (decreased PTEN, PDCD4 and RAS mRNA) and anti-apoptotic (increased Bcl-2 mRNA) target genes. This is accompanied by a down regulation of mRNA for caspase-7 and caspase-9 and reduced levels of caspase-7 protein. These results indicates possible beneficial effects of exercise through action on multiple miRs and their targets that contribute to the functional regulation of apoptosis after SCI. PMID:20816819

  17. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  18. Acrolein contributes to TRPA1 up-regulation in peripheral and central sensory hypersensitivity following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Chen, Zhe; Muratori, Breanne; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2015-12-01

    Acrolein, an endogenous aldehyde, has been shown to be involved in sensory hypersensitivity after rat spinal cord injury (SCI), for which the pathogenesis is unclear. Acrolein can directly activate a pro-algesic transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel that exists in sensory neurons. Both acrolein and TRPA1 mRNA are elevated post SCI, which contributes to the activation of TRPA1 by acrolein and consequently, neuropathic pain. In the current study, we further showed that, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA exists not only in dorsal root ganglias but also in both peripheral (paw skin) and central endings of primary afferent nerves (dorsal horn of spinal cord). This is the first indication that pain signaling can be over-amplified in the peripheral skin by elevated expressions of TRPA1 following SCI, in addition over-amplification previously seen in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Furthermore, we show that acrolein alone, in the absence of physical trauma, could lead to the elevation of TRPA1 mRNA at various locations when injected to the spinal cord. In addition, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA could be mitigated using acrolein scavengers. Both of these attributes support the critical role of acrolein in elevating TRPA1 expression through gene regulation. Taken together, these data indicate that acrolein is likely a critical causal factor in heightening pain sensation post-SCI, through both the direct binding of TRPA1 receptor, and also by boosting the expression of TRPA1. Finally, our data also further support the notion that acrolein scavenging may be an effective therapeutic approach to alleviate neuropathic pain after SCI. We propose that the trauma-mediated elevation of acrolein causes neuropathic pain through at least two mechanisms: acrolein stimulates the production of transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in both central and peripheral locations, and it activates TRPA1 channels directly. Therefore, acrolein appears to be a critical

  19. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  20. Tageted bipolar radiofrequency decompression with vertebroplasty for intractable radicular pain due to spinal metastasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seong Jin; Lee, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal tumors are usually quite difficult to treat. In patients with metastatic spinal tumors, conventional radiotherapy fails to relieve pain in 20–30% of cases and open surgery often causes considerable trauma and complications, which delays treatment of the primary disease. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is considered to be useful in achieving rapid pain control and preventing further vertebral collapse due to spinal metastasis. However, symptoms of intraspinal neural compression can be contraindications to PVP. To overcome this problem, we performed PVP following targeted bipolar radiofrequency decompression, and examined the effect of the combined treatment in relieving severe radicular pain related to spinal cord compression caused by malignant metastatic tumors. PMID:27482319

  1. A Direct Comparison of Three Clinically Relevant Treatments in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hosier, Hillary; Peterson, David; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Smith, Bradley R.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent preclinical studies have identified three treatments that are especially promising for reducing acute lesion expansion following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): riluzole, systemic hypothermia, and glibenclamide. Each has demonstrated efficacy in multiple studies with independent replication, but there is no way to compare them in terms of efficacy or safety, since different models were used, different laboratories were involved, and different outcomes were evaluated. Here, using a model of lower cervical hemicord contusion, we compared safety and efficacy for the three treatments, administered beginning 4 h after trauma. Treatment-associated mortality was 30% (3/10), 30% (3/10), 12.5% (1/8), and 0% (0/7) in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively. For survivors, all three treatments showed overall favorable efficacy, compared with controls. On open-field locomotor scores (modified Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores), hypothermia- and glibenclamide-treated animals were largely indistinguishable throughout the study, whereas riluzole-treated rats underperformed for the first two weeks; during the last four weeks, scores for the three treatments were similar, and significantly different from controls. On beam balance, hypothermia and glibenclamide treatments showed significant advantages over riluzole. After trauma, rats in the glibenclamide group rapidly regained a normal pattern of weight gain that differed markedly and significantly from that in all other groups. Lesion volumes at six weeks were: 4.8±0.7, 3.5±0.4, 3.1±0.3 and 2.5±0.3 mm3 in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively; measurements of spared spinal cord tissue confirmed these results. Overall, in terms of safety and efficacy, systemic hypothermia and glibenclamide were superior to riluzole. PMID:26192071

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vilaas S; Reis, Martin N; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Broder, Joshua; Choudhri, Asim F; Kendi, A Tuba; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Prall, J Adair; Raksin, Patricia B; Roth, Christopher J; Sharma, Aseem; West, O Clark; Wintermark, Max; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Neuroimaging plays an important role in the management of head trauma. Several guidelines have been published for identifying which patients can avoid neuroimaging. Noncontrast head CT is the most appropriate initial examination in patients with minor or mild acute closed head injury who require neuroimaging as well as patients with moderate to severe acute closed head injury. In short-term follow-up neuroimaging of acute traumatic brain injury, CT and MRI may have complementary roles. In subacute to chronic traumatic brain injury, MRI is the most appropriate initial examination, though CT may have a complementary role in select circumstances. Advanced neuroimaging techniques are areas of active research but are not considered routine clinical practice at this time. In suspected intracranial vascular injury, CT angiography or venography or MR angiography or venography is the most appropriate imaging study. In suspected posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, high-resolution noncontrast skull base CT is the most appropriate initial imaging study to identify the source, with cisternography reserved for problem solving. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27262056

  3. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  4. Trauma Boot Camp: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moftakhar, Yasmin; Dobbins IV, Arthur L; Khan, Ramisha; Dasgupta, Rahul; Blanda, Rachel; Marchand, Tiffany; Ahmed, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interns are often unprepared to effectively communicate in the acute trauma setting. Despite the many strengths of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program, the main shortcoming within the course is the deficiency of teamwork and leadership training. In this study, we describe the creation of an interdisciplinary boot camp in which interns' basic trauma knowledge, level of confidence, and teamwork skills are assessed. Methods: We designed a one-day, boot camp curriculum for interns of various specialties with the purpose of improving communication and teamwork skills for effective management of acute trauma patients. Our curriculum consisted of a one-day, twelve-hour experience, which included trauma patient simulations, content expert lectures, group discussion of video demonstrations, and skill development workstations. Baseline and acquired knowledge were assessed through the use of confidence surveys, cognitive questionnaires, and a validated evaluation tool of teamwork and leadership skills for trauma Results: Fifteen interns entered the boot camp with an overall confidence score of 3.2 (1-5 scale) in the management of trauma cases. At the culmination of the study, there was a significant increase in the overall confidence level of interns in role delegation, leadership, Crisis Resource Management (CRM) principles, and in the performance of primary and secondary surveys. No significant changes were seen in determining and effectively using the Glasgow Coma Scale, Orthopedic splinting/reduction skills, and effective use of closed-loop communication. Conclusion: An intensive one-day trauma boot camp demonstrated significant improvement in self-reported confidence of CRM concepts, role delegation, leadership, and performance of primary and secondary surveys. Despite the intensive curriculum, there was no significant improvement in overall teamwork and leadership performance during simulated cases. Our boot camp curriculum offers educators a

  5. Thermoelectric device for treatment of radiculitis and spinal massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Kobylyansky, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Results of development of a thermoelectric device that enables controlled cyclic temperature impact on the damaged area of human organism are presented. Unlike the existing medical devices employing direct supply current for thermoelectric module, the present device controls supply current according to time dependence of temperature change assigned by doctor. It is established that such a device is an efficient means of therapy at herniation of intervertebral disks with marked radiculitis and tunicary syndromes, at meningitis, other spinal diseases and back traumas.

  6. Sonography of scrotal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rao, Meka Srinivasa; Arjun, Kalyanpur

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance. PMID:23833421

  7. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  8. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  9. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  10. The case of the missing testicle: blunt scrotal trauma in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Megan H; Bradin, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    Serious blunt scrotal trauma in the pediatric population is rare and can pose significant danger to the viability of the testes. The following case describes an adolescent boy who presented with a single testis in his scrotum after low-impact perineal trauma, consistent with testicular dislocation. The literature regarding scrotal trauma includes few cases of testicular dislocation from low-impact perineal trauma. Included is a brief review of the most recent data including epidemiology, differential diagnosis, acute management, and complications pertinent to the pediatric emergency clinician.

  11. Spinal fractures in recreational bobsledders: an unexpected mechanism of injury

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Sofianos, Dmitri A.; Powell, Amy; Daubs, Michael; Patel, Rakesh; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective case series and literature review. Objective: To report and discuss spinal fractures occurring in recreational bobsledders. Summary of background data: Spinal fractures have been commonly described following traumatic injury during a number of recreational sports. Reports have focused on younger patients and typically involved high-impact sports or significant injuries. With an aging population and a wider array of recreational sports, spinal injuries may be seen after seemingly benign activities and without a high-impact injury. Methods: A retrospective review of two patients and review of the literature was performed. Results: Two patients with spinal fractures after recreational bobsledding were identified. Both patients, aged 57 and 54 years, noticed a simultaneous onset of severe back pain during a routine turn on a bobsled track. Neither was involved in a high-impact injury during the event. Both patients were treated conservatively with resolution of symptoms. An analysis of the bobsled track revealed that potential forces imparted to the rider may be greater than the yield strength of vertebral bone. Conclusions: Older athletes may be at greater risk for spinal fracture associated with routine recreational activities. Bobsledding imparts large amounts of force during routine events and may result in spinal trauma. Older patients, notably those with osteoporosis or metabolic bone disease, should be educated about the risks associated with seemingly benign recreational sports. PMID:23230417

  12. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma.

  13. Pediatric Secondary Overtriage in a Statewide Trauma System.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander; Bonasso, Patrick; Lynch, Kevin; Long, Dustin; Vaughan, Richard; Wilson, Alison; Con, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Secondary overtriage is a term that describes patients who are discharged home shortly after being transferred, an indication that transfer and hospitalization were unnecessary. The study goal was to identify factors associated with secondary triage. A statewide trauma registry was used to identify trauma patients aged less than 18 years during a 6-year period (2007-2012) who were discharged within 48 hours from arrival and did not undergo a surgical procedure. We compared those that were treated at initial facility and those transferred to a second facility using clinical indices including patterns of injury pattern using multivariate logistic regression. Of the 4441 patients who fit our inclusion criteria, 801 (18%) were transferred. Younger age groups were more likely to be transferred. Factors associated with being transferred included head, spinal, and facial injuries, and patient arrival during the nighttime work shifts. In conclusion, young patients who have signs of possible neurological or spinal injuries and those who arrive during nondaytime shifts during the workday are more likely to be transferred to another trauma center. These may reflect the comfort level and resources of the local facility.

  14. Sexual and Reproductive Function in Spinal Cord Injury and Spinal Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Theodore H.; Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J. Mason; Palumbo, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data. PMID:26605025

  15. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  16. Minimizing Promotion Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, LuAnn W.; McGrath, Loraine

    1983-01-01

    Nursing administrators can minimize promotion trauma and its unnecessary cost by building awareness of the transition process, clarifying roles and expectations, and attending to the promoted employee's needs. This article will help nursing administrators develop a concept of manager care combined with programs for orientation of new managers,…

  17. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  18. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes.

  19. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes. PMID:23192074

  20. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques. PMID:26449103

  1. Orbital Emphysema Following Ocular Trauma and Sneezing.

    PubMed

    Gauguet, Jean-Marc; Lindquist, Patricia A; Shaffer, Kitt

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is typically a benign condition that occurs following forceful injection of air into the orbital soft tissue spaces. In many cases there is a history of trauma and fracture of an orbital bone, which permits air entry. However, other mechanisms of orbital emphysema have been reported including infection, pulmonary barotrauma, injury from compressed-air hoses, and complications from surgery including dental procedures. Here, we describe a report of a teenager who suffered an isolated medial orbital wall fracture while playing basketball, and several hours later developed orbital emphysema acutely after sneezing. We will review the radiological evaluation of orbital fractures and emphysema.

  2. Penetrating spinal injuries and their management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A.; Pandey, P. N.; Ghani, A.; Jaiswal, G.

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating spinal trauma due to missile/gunshot injuries has been well reported in the literature and has remained the domain of military warfare more often. Civic society's recent upsurge in gunshot injuries has created a dilemma for the treating neurosurgeon in many ways as their management has always involved certain debatable and controversial issues. Both conservative and surgical management of penetrating spinal injuries (PSI) have been practiced widely. The chief neurosurgical concern in these types of firearm injuries is the degree of damage sustained during the bullet traversing through the neural tissue and the after-effects of the same in long term. We had an interesting case of a penetrating bullet injury to cervical spine at C2 vertebral level. He was operated and the bullets were removed from posterior midline approach. Usually, the management of such cases differs from region to region depending on the preference of the surgeon but still certain common principles are followed world over. Thus, we realized the need to review the literature regarding spinal injuries with special emphasis on PSI and to study the recent guidelines for their treatment in light of our case. PMID:23125489

  3. Epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1977-01-01

    Accidents are the cause of some 50 deaths per 100 000 population each year in the US; some 3% of these are from traumatic spinal cord injury alone. Traumatic spinal cord injury in socioeconomically advanced countries, has a probably annual incidence rate of 3 per 100 000 population. Males are affected five times as often as females, and in the US, Negroes have twice the rates of whites. Half the cases are due to motor vehicle accidents, 1/4 to falls, and 1/10 to sports injuries. Maximal ages at risk are 15 to 34; only for cord damage due to falls do this risk differ, and here elderly are the more prone. Associated injuries are common in traumatic cord injury, and head injury and pulmonary dysfunction are frequent causes of the acute deaths in traumatic SCI which is why complete quadriplegia has a high early case-fatality ratio. Late deaths in SCI are principally the direct or indirect result of the neurogenic bladder. With treatment in comprehensive spinal cord injury centers, more than 4 of 5 traumatic SCI patients will survive ten years with an average of almost 18 years. Median survival may be almost 14 years for complete quadriplegia, 17 for complete paraplegia, 19 for incomplete quadriplegia, 20 for incomplete paraplegia and 28 for cauda equina lesions. Prevalence is likely to be some 50 per 100 000 population with about 20 per 100 000 completely paralyzed (3 quadriplegic and 19 paraplegic). Some 4 out of 5 survivors of traumatic SCI should be able to live at home and perform gainful work after such treatment. PMID:616527

  4. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:27414143

  5. Combination therapy that targets secondary pulmonary changes after abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Davis, K A; Fabian, T C; Ragsdale, D N; Trenthem, L L; Croce, M A; Proctor, K G

    2001-06-01

    After abdominal trauma, the lung is susceptible to secondary injury caused by acute neutrophil (PMN) sequestration and alveolar capillary membrane disruption. Adenosine is an endogenous anti-inflammatory metabolite that decreases PMN activation. AICAR ([5-amino-1-[beta-D-ribofuranosyl]imidazole-4-carboxamide]riboside) is the prototype of a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs that increase endogenous adenosine. After trauma, AICAR administration has been shown to decrease secondary lung injury in models of hemorrhagic shock with delayed lipopolysaccharide challenge and pulmonary contusion. However, early suppression of PMN activation could worsen outcomes after penetrating abdominal trauma. We hypothesized that, after penetrating abdominal trauma, the ideal resuscitation strategy would involve early, short-lived suppression of PMN activation to minimize secondary lung injury, followed by later enhancement of PMN chemotaxis and phagocytosis [using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)] to lessen late septic complications. G-CSF has not been shown to potentiate PMN mediated pulmonary reperfusion injury. Swine were subjected to cecal ligation/incision and hemorrhagic shock (trauma), followed by resuscitation with shed blood, crystalloid, and either G-CSF, a combination of G-CSF and AICAR, or 0.9% normal saline. At 72 h, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocyte counts and protein concentration were determined, and lung tissue analysed for myeloperoxidase (MPO, a measure of PMN infiltration) and microscopic pathology. Analysis of BALs revealed a significant increase protein concentrations and in white blood cell and PMN infiltration (P< 0.05) following trauma. These acute changes were not exacerbated by G-CSF, but were reversed by combined AICAR + G-CSF, which implicates a physiologic role for adenosine. This suggests that combination therapy may have beneficial effects on the lung after trauma.

  6. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Taype Zamboni, Danilo E. R.; Carabelli, Guido S.; Barla, Jorge D.; Sancineto, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is extremely rare when compared to compartment syndrome in other anatomical regions, such as the forearm or the lower leg. It usually occurs in drug users following prolonged immobilization due to loss of consciousness. Another possible cause is trauma, which is rare and has only few reports in the literature. Physical examination may show tense and swollen buttocks and severe pain caused by passive range of motion. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who developed GCS after prolonged anterior-posterior pelvis compression. The physical examination revealed swelling, scrotal hematoma, and left ankle extension weakness. An unstable pelvic ring injury was diagnosed and the patient was taken to surgery. Measurement of the intracompartmental pressure was measured in the operating room, thereby confirming the diagnosis. Emergent fasciotomy was performed to decompress the three affected compartments. Trauma surgeons must be aware of the possibility of gluteal compartment syndrome in patients who have an acute pelvic trauma with buttock swelling and excessive pain of the gluteal region. Any delay in diagnosis or treatment can be devastating, causing permanent disability, irreversible loss of gluteal muscles, sciatic nerve palsy, kidney failure, or even death. PMID:27579205

  7. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Diaz Dilernia, Fernando; Zaidenberg, Ezequiel E; Gamsie, Sebastian; Taype Zamboni, Danilo E R; Carabelli, Guido S; Barla, Jorge D; Sancineto, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is extremely rare when compared to compartment syndrome in other anatomical regions, such as the forearm or the lower leg. It usually occurs in drug users following prolonged immobilization due to loss of consciousness. Another possible cause is trauma, which is rare and has only few reports in the literature. Physical examination may show tense and swollen buttocks and severe pain caused by passive range of motion. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who developed GCS after prolonged anterior-posterior pelvis compression. The physical examination revealed swelling, scrotal hematoma, and left ankle extension weakness. An unstable pelvic ring injury was diagnosed and the patient was taken to surgery. Measurement of the intracompartmental pressure was measured in the operating room, thereby confirming the diagnosis. Emergent fasciotomy was performed to decompress the three affected compartments. Trauma surgeons must be aware of the possibility of gluteal compartment syndrome in patients who have an acute pelvic trauma with buttock swelling and excessive pain of the gluteal region. Any delay in diagnosis or treatment can be devastating, causing permanent disability, irreversible loss of gluteal muscles, sciatic nerve palsy, kidney failure, or even death. PMID:27579205

  8. Selective nonoperative management of high grade splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Branco, Bernardino C; Tang, Andrew L; Rhee, Peter; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Rizoli, Sandro; O'Keeffe, Terence

    2013-01-01

    The "Evidence-based Telemedicine - Trauma & Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) Journal Club performed a critical review of the literature and selected three up-to-date articles on the management of splenic trauma. Our focus was on high-grade splenic injuries, defined as AAST injury grade III-V. The first paper was an update of the 2003 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) practice management guidelines for nonoperative management of injury to the spleen. The second paper was an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) 2012 plenary paper evaluating the predictive role of contrast blush on CT scan in AAST grade IV and V splenic injuries. Our last article was from Europe and investigates the effects of angioembolization of splenic artery on splenic function after high-grade splenic trauma (AAST grade III-V). The EBT-TACS Journal Club elaborated conclusions and recommendations for the management of high-grade splenic trauma. PMID:23912375

  9. Training in Trauma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Patrick M.; Schwab, C William; Haut, Elliott R.; Gracias, Vicente H.; Dabrowski, G Paul; Gupta, Rajan; Pryor, John P.; Kauder, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe outcomes from a clinical trauma surgical education program that places the board-eligible/board-certified fellow in the role of the attending surgeon (fellow-in-exception [FIE]) during the latter half of a 2-year trauma/surgical critical care fellowship. Summary Background Data: National discussions have begun to explore the question of optimal methods for postresidency training in surgery. Few objective studies are available to evaluate current training models. Methods: We analyzed provider-specific data from both our trauma registry and performance improvement (PI) databases. In addition, we performed TRISS analysis when all data were available. Registry and PI data were analyzed as 2 groups (faculty trauma surgeons and FIEs) to determine experience, safety, and trends in errors. We also surveyed graduate fellows using a questionnaire that evaluated perceptions of training and experience on a 6-point Likert scale. Results: During a 4-year period 7,769 trauma patients were evaluated, of which 46.3% met criteria to be submitted to the PA Trauma Outcome Study (PTOS, ie, more severe injury). The faculty group saw 5,885 patients (2,720 PTOS); the FIE group saw 1,884 patients (879 PTOS). The groups were similar in respect to mechanism of injury (74% blunt; 26% penetrating both groups) and injury severity (mean ISS faculty 10.0; FIEs 9.5). When indexed to patient contacts, FIEs did more operations than the faculty group (28.4% versus 25.6%; P < 0.05). Death rates were similar between groups (faculty 10.5%; FIEs 10.0%). Analysis of deaths using PI and TRISS data failed to demonstrate differences between the groups. Analysis of provider-specific errors demonstrated a slightly higher rate for FIEs when compared with faculty when indexed to PTOS cases (4.1% versus 2.1%; P < 0.01). For both groups, errors in management were more common than errors in technique. Twenty-one (91%) of twenty-three surveys were returned. Fellows’ feelings of preparedness

  10. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  11. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link be