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Sample records for acute stimulatory effect

  1. Stimulatory effects of propylthiouracil on pregnenolone production through upregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression in rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Chih; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Kan, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Paulus S

    2010-12-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a common and effective clinical medicine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Our previous study demonstrated that short-term treatment with PTU inhibits progesterone production in rat granulosa cells. However, our present results indicate that a 16-h treatment with PTU was able to stimulate pregnenolone production in rat granulosa cells, although progesterone production was diminished by PTU through inhibition of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Notably, we found that PTU treatment enhanced the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone, whereas the protein level of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, which is the enzyme responding to this conversion) was not affected. Interestingly, the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in both total cell lysate and the mitochondrial fraction were significantly increased by PTU treatment. Furthermore, the binding of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) to the StAR promoter region was also enhanced by PTU treatment, which suggests that PTU could upregulate StAR gene expression. In addition to SF-1 regulation, we found that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase activation is an important regulator of PTU-stimulated StAR protein expression, based on the effects of the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In conclusion, these results indicate that PTU plays opposite roles in the production of progesterone and its precursor, pregnenolone. The regulation of negative feedback on speeding the cholesterol transportation and pregnenolone conversion after a 16-h PTU treatment may be the mechanism explaining PTU's inhibition of progesterone production in rat granulosa cells.

  2. Growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masayuki; Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that resveratrol could induce death in several human cancer cell lines in culture. Here we report our observation that resveratrol can also promote the growth of certain human cancer cells when they are grown either in culture or in athymic nude mice as xenografts. At relatively low concentrations (stimulatory effect in the MDA-MB-435s human cancer cells, but this effect was not observed in several other human cell lines tested. Analysis of cell signaling molecules showed that resveratrol induced the activation of JNK, p38, Akt, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in these cells. Further analysis using pharmacological inhibitors showed that only the NF-kappaB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) abrogated the growth-stimulatory effect of resveratrol in cultured cells. In athymic nude mice, resveratrol at 16.5 mg/kg body weight enhanced the growth of MDA-MB-435s xenografts compared to the control group, while resveratrol at the 33 mg/kg body weight dose did not have a similar effect. Additional analyses confirmed that resveratrol stimulated cancer cell growth in vivo through activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Taken together, these observations suggest that resveratrol at low concentrations could stimulate the growth of certain types of human cancer cells in vivo. This cell type-specific mitogenic effect of resveratrol may also partly contribute to the procarcinogenic effect of alcohol consumption (rich in resveratrol) in the development of certain human cancers.

  3. Stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside on insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Folador, Poliane; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina M Barreto

    2009-11-01

    In vivo and in vitro treatments were carried out to investigate the effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside (1), isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), on serum glucose and insulin levels in hyperglycemic rats as well as its effect on glycogen synthesis in normal rat soleus muscle. Apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside showed an acute effect on blood glucose lowering in hyperglycemic rats and stimulated glucose-induced insulin secretion. A stimulatory effect of 1 on glycogen synthesis was observed when muscles were incubated with this flavonoid and also its effect was completely nullified by pre-treatment with insulin signal transduction inhibitors. Taking this into account, the MAPK-PP1 and PI3K-GSK3 pathways are involved in the apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside-induced increase in glycogen synthesis in muscle. This study provides evidence for dual effects of apigenin-6-C-beta-L-fucopyranoside as an antihyperglycemic (insulin secretion) as well as an insulinomimetic (glycogen synthesis) agent.

  4. Effects of Punishment Procedures on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of an Autistic Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three punishment procedures--contingent applications of water mist, lemon juice, and vinegar--were evaluated as aversive treatment methods for a self-stimulatory behavior exhibited by a severely retarded 11-year-old male. The water mist procedure was as effective as lemon juice or vinegar, presented less physical threat to the client, and was…

  5. Stimulatory effect of thymic factor(s) on steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Uzumcu, M; Akira, S; Lin, Y C

    1992-01-01

    Thymic cells from immature female rats were isolated and used for production of thymic cell culture conditioned medium (TCM). Granulosa cells were obtained from immature diethylstilbestrol (DES)-treated rats. TCM stimulated basal progesterone and estradiol secretion from the granulosa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Maximal stimulation of progesterone production occurred at 48 hours of incubation, during which period TCM caused approximately 5 times more progesterone secretion than heart cell conditioned medium (HCM) or mock extract (ME). The maximum progesterone secretion by granulosa cells occurred when they were exposed to 48% TCM causing 7 times more progesterone secretion than controls. Under the same maximum stimulatory conditions, however, TCM only approximately doubled estradiol secretion compared to concentrations secreted in the presence of HCM or ME. Thus, the effect of TCM on progesterone secretion was more prominent than its effect on estradiol secretion. The stimulatory action of TCM was not mimicked by HCM, thymosin-alpha 1 or thymulin. Furthermore, the stimulatory action of TCM on steroidogenesis did not appear to be mediated by the cAMP system. The stimulatory factor(s) in TCM were heat, acid and acetone labile, but could not be sedimented by activated charcoal. Thus, the present study demonstrates that the secretory product(s) of thymic epithelial cells can stimulate steroidogenesis in cultured rat granulosa cells. Our data imply that thymic factor(s) may have a direct effect on ovarian function.

  6. Brief Report: The Effects of Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behaviors and Positive Responding of Adolescents with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal-Malek, Andrea; Mitchell, Stella

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the self-stimulatory behaviors and academic performance of five adolescent males with autism. Results found there was a significant decrease in self-stimulatory behavior following the physical exercise. Academic performance increased after the aerobic exercise as compared to classroom…

  7. Stimulatory effect of boron and manganese salts on keratinocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Chebassier, Nathalie; Ouijja, El Houssein; Viegas, Isabelle; Dreno, Brigitte

    2004-01-01

    Keratinocyte proliferation and migration are essential for the reconstruction of the cutaneous barrier after skin injury. Interestingly, thermal waters which are rich in trace elements (e.g. boron and manganese), are known to be able to improve wound healing. In order to understand the mechanism of action of this effect, our study investigated the in vitro modulation of keratinocyte migration and proliferation by boron and manganese salts, which are present in high concentrations in a thermal water (Saint Gervais). Our in vitro study demonstrated that incubating keratinocytes for 24 h with boron salts at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 microg/ml or manganese salts at concentrations between 0.1 and 1.5 microg/ml accelerated wound closure compared with control medium (+20%). As this acceleration was not related to an increase in keratinocyte proliferation we suggest that boron and manganese act on wound healing mainly by increasing the migration of keratinocytes.

  8. Stimulatory effects of stress on gonadotropin secretion in estrogen-treated women.

    PubMed

    Puder, J J; Freda, P U; Goland, R S; Ferin, M; Wardlaw, S L

    2000-06-01

    Although stress is known to inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, recent studies in the monkey show that, under certain conditions, in the presence of estrogen, stress may actually stimulate LH release. We investigated the effects of a mild inflammatory stress (2.0-3.0 ng/kg endotoxin) on LH release in five postmenopausal women with and without transdermal estradiol (E2, 0.1 mg) replacement. In another five E2-treated women, LH release was studied when the adrenal was stimulated directly by a 3-h ACTH infusion (Cortrosyn, 50 microg/h). Mean E2 levels were less than 12 pg/mL in the unreplaced subjects and were 86 +/- 10 pg/mL and 102 +/- 18 pg/mL in the two groups of E2-replaced subjects. Blood was sampled every 15-20 min for 2 h before and for 7 h after endotoxin or ACTH injection. Mean cortisol and progesterone levels increased in all three groups over time (P < 0.001). In the women without E2 replacement, basal LH was 26.8 +/- 5.3 mIU/mL and did not change significantly, over time, after endotoxin (P = 0.58). In the same women on E2, however, a significant increase in LH occurred after endotoxin (P = 0.02), from a mean hourly baseline of 15.3 +/- 5.4 mIU/mL to a peak of 50.0 +/- 25.2 mIU/mL. During the ACTH infusion, there was a significant stimulation of LH release in the E2-replaced subjects (P < 0.001), from a mean hourly baseline of 13.3 +/- 3.0 mIU/mL to a peak of 44.1 +/- 11.7 mIU/mL. In both groups, this increase occurred 2-4 h after the initial rise in progesterone and persisted to the end. We conclude that, in the presence of sufficient estrogen, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to a stimulation of LH release. This is likely related to a rise in adrenal progesterone and its known stimulatory effect on LH release in the presence of E2. These studies provide a potential mechanism in the human by which an acute stress during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle might lead to a premature LH surge and thereby

  9. Delayed stimulatory effect of low-intensity shockwaves on human periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kam-Fai; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Kwong-Man; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the effect of shockwaves on cells explanted from normal human periosteum to study the potential mechanisms of their responses and to determine suitable treatment settings. The cells were subjected to one shockwave treatment with systematic combinations of energy intensities (range, 0.05-0.5 mJ/mm) and number of shocks (range, 500-2000) whereas control cells received no treatment. The immediate effect on cell viability and the long-lasting effect on proliferation, viable cell number at Day 18, and mineralization at Day 35 were assessed. We observed an immediate dose-dependent destructive effect of shockwaves. Energy intensity and number of shocks contributed equally to viability. Total energy dose (intensity x number of shocks) was a better reference for determining the shockwave effect. We also found a long-term stimulatory effect on proliferation, viable cell number, and calcium deposition of human periosteal cells. At the same total energy dose, low-intensity shockwaves with more shocks (0.12 mJ/mm at 1250 shocks) were more favorable for enhancing cellular activities than high-intensity waves with fewer shocks (0.5 mJ/mm at 300 shocks). These findings document some of the biochemical changes of periosteal cells during shockwave treatments.

  10. The Differential and Temporal Effects of Antecedent Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of a Child with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celiberti, David A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The effects of two levels of exercise (walking versus jogging) in suppressing the self-stimulatory behavior during academic programming of a 5-year-old boy with autism were examined. Decreased physical self-stimulation and "out of seat" behavior were found only for the jogging condition. Sharp reductions in these behaviors did not return to…

  11. AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma: evidence for direct stimulatory effect of glucocorticoid on cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W. X.; Antakly, T.

    1995-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy has been linked to increased risk of development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which has become epidemic among HIV-infected individuals. However, no experimental evidence is available to explain the role of glucocorticoid in KS biopathology. We investigated the direct effect of dexamethasone (Dex) on the growth of cultured KS cells derived from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients (AIDS-KS). Dex significantly stimulated the proliferation of AIDS-KS cells. Moreover, simultaneous exposure to Dex and oncostatin M, a KS major cytokine, produced a dramatic synergistic effect on proliferation of AIDS-KS cell. This suggests an interaction between glucocorticoid and growth factor intracellular pathways in KS cells. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor protein and mRNA in AIDS-KS cell cultures was examined by radioimmunoassay and in situ hybridization, respectively. Compared with other well studied cell lines, AIDS-KS cells contain an unusually high level of glucocorticoid receptor protein, which is further upregulated by glucocorticoid treatment. RU-486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, completely abolished the stimulatory effect of Dex and reduced the synergistic effect of Dex and oncostatin M on proliferation of AIDS-KS. These findings demonstrate that glucocorticoid stimulates directly the proliferation of AIDS-KS cells via the modulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression. Images Figure 3 PMID:7887453

  12. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  13. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro )

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  14. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  15. Stimulatory effects of arsenic-tolerant soil fungi on plant growth promotion and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16-293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20-222% and 34-760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils.

  16. Stimulatory effects of neuropeptide Y on the growth of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuge; Li, Bo; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family which is a potent orexigenic peptide known to date in mammals and teleost. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of NPY on food intake and growth of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Synthetic grouper NPY (gNPY) was given orally at the dose of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μg/g feed for 50 days, results showed that NPY treatment (1.0 and 2.0 μg/g feed) significantly increased growth rate, weight gain, feed conversion efficiency (FCE) and pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA level than the control group (p<0.05). Furthermore, high level secretion of gNPY was expressed and purified in the Pichia pastoris expression system. The bioactivity of recombinant gNPY was confirmed by its ability to up-regulate GH mRNA expression in vivo and in vitro and down-regulate preprosomatostatin I (PSSI) mRNA expression in vivo. These results demonstrate that NPY has stimulatory effects on food intake as well as growth of grouper as in other teleost fish, also indicate that recombinant gNPY from P. pastoris has the same bioactivity as synthetic gNPY and has the potential to be used as a feed additive for both research and aquatic application.

  17. Stimulatory effects of arsenic-tolerant soil fungi on plant growth promotion and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16-293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20-222% and 34-760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  18. Mechanism of action of the stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-(2''-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-L-fucopyranoside on 14C-glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Folador, Poliane; Moresco, Henrique Hunger; Brighente, Inês Maria Costa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2009-05-15

    There has been a growing interest in hypoglycemic agents from natural products, particularly those derived from plants. Flavonoids are naturally occurring phenolic compounds with a broad range of biological activities and the beneficial effects of flavonoids have been studied in relation to diabetes mellitus, either through their capacity to avoid glucose absorption or to improve glucose tolerance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of the stimulatory effect of apigenin-6-C-(2''-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)-beta-L-fucopyranoside (1), isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) leaves, on (14)C-glucose uptake. This compound (1) was found to have an acute effect on blood glucose lowering in diabetic rats and stimulated glucose-induced insulin secretion after oral treatment in hyperglycemic rats. A significant stimulatory effect of compound 1 on (14)C-glucose uptake was observed at 50 and 100 microM. The effect of compound 1 on glucose uptake was completely nullified by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), RO318220, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), PD98059, a specific inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, and colchicine, a microtubule-depolymerizing agent. Compound 1 (100 microM) and insulin (10 nM) did not show any synergistic effect on glucose uptake. These results suggest that the flavonoid may have a dual target of action, as an insulin-secretagogue and also as an insulin-mimetic agent.

  19. Stimulatory effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Li, Xiang-Hong; Xie, Jian-Guo; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H

    2002-01-01

    In an earlier study, we showed that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice for 2 weeks prior to a single application of UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in the number of p53-positive cells, p21(WAF1/CIP1)-positive cells, and apoptotic sunburn cells in the epidermis. In the present study, we found that topical application of caffeine, a major chemopreventive agent in tea, to the dorsal skin of SKH-1 mice immediately after irradiation with UVB (30 mJ/cm2) enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis as measured by the number of morphologically distinct epidermal apoptotic sunburn cells and the number of caspase 3-positive cells. Time course studies indicated that UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells were correlated with elevated levels of caspase 3, a key protease that becomes activated during an early stage of apoptosis. Topical application of caffeine immediately after UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in caspase 3 (active form)-immunoreactive-positive cells and in caspase 3 enzyme activity in the epidermis. Topical application of caffeine had only a small stimulatory effect on UVB-induced increases in the level of wild-type p53 protein and these changes were not related temporally to caffeine-induced increases in apoptotic cells. There was little or no effect of topical applications of caffeine on epidermal cell proliferation as determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA. Topical application of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to the dorsal skin of mice immediately after irradiation with UVB had a small inhibitory effect on UVB-induced increases in BrdU-positive cells in the basal layer of the epidermis, but this treatment had no effect on UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells. The results of this study indicate a proapoptotic effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

  20. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  1. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  2. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia.

  3. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia. PMID:25907369

  4. Loss of plant biodiversity eliminates stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on earthworm activity in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Arnone, John A; Zaller, Johann G; Hofer, Gabriela; Schmid, Bernhard; Körner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Earthworms are among the world's most important ecosystem engineers because of their effects on soil fertility and plant productivity. Their dependence on plants for carbon, however, means that any changes in plant community structure or function caused by rising atmospheric CO2 or loss of plant species diversity could affect earthworm activity, which may feed back on plant communities. Production of surface casts measured during three consecutive years in field experimental plots (n = 24, 1.2 m(2)) planted with local calcareous grassland species that varied in plant species richness (diversity levels: high, 31 species; medium, 12; low, 5) and were exposed to ambient (356 μl CO2 l(-1)) or elevated (600 μl CO2 l(-1)) CO2 was only consistently stimulated in high diversity plots exposed to elevated CO2 (+120 %, 31 spp: 603 ± 52 under ambient CO2 vs. 1,325 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) under elevated CO2 in 1996; +77 %, 940 ± 44 vs. 1,663 ± 204 g cast dwt. m(-2) year(-1) in 1998). Reductions in plant diversity had little effect on cast production in ecosystems maintained at ambient CO2, but the stimulatory effect of elevated CO2 on cast production disappeared when plant species diversity was decreased to 12 and 5 species. High diversity plots were also the only communities that included plant species that an earlier field study showed to be among the most responsive to elevated CO2 and to be most preferred by earthworms to deposit casts near. Further, the +87 % CO2-induced increase in cast production measured over the 3 years corresponded to a parallel increase in cumulative total nitrogen of 5.7 g N m(-2) and would help explain the large stimulation of aboveground plant biomass production observed in high-diversity communities under elevated CO2. The results of this study demonstrate how the loss of plant species from communities can alter responses of major soil heterotrophs and consequently ecosystem biogeochemistry.

  5. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic systems on behavioral stimulatory effects of low-dose alprazolam and lorazepam.

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, D; Reymann, J M; Tribut, O; Allain, H; Vasar, E; Bourin, M

    2001-02-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that alprazolam and lorazepam, administered at low doses to healthy volunteers, improve cognitive functions and psychomotor performances. Paradoxical effects of low-dose benzodiazepines have been also observed in mice, in experimental pharmacology. The aim of this work was to determine, in rat, the effect of similar low-doses of benzodiazepines on spontaneous locomotor activity and performance in the elevated zero-maze, and to investigate the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The dose-effect and the time-course of the action were studied for both compounds. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured using a photoelectric actimeter. The level of anxiety of the animals was assessed in the elevated zero-maze. Dopamine, serotonin, and their metabolites were assayed in the extracellular striatal fluid of the awake rat, obtained by microdialysis, by HPLC--EC. Spontaneous locomotor activity observed in rats given low-dose alprazolam and lorazepam evidenced a stimulatory effect only with alprazolam. The effect was maximum 90 min after administration of 0.0050 mg/kg alprazolam. An anxiogenic-like action was evidenced with the elevated zero-maze for the two compounds. We observed a statistically significant increase in striatal dopamine concentrations only with alprazolam, during the period corresponding to the behavioral stimulatory effects. We also showed a marked trend towards increased levels of serotonin with alprazolam but this modification was not significant, in spite of statistically significant variations of 5-HIAA. In the rat, behavioral stimulatory effects of low-dose benzodiazepines is evidenced with alprazolam but not lorazepam. This effect could be explained, at least in part, by increased extracellular dopamine concentrations in the striatum. Their different structures could explain the different pattern observed for the two benzodiazepines.

  6. Stimulatory effect of the secretogranin-ll derived peptide secretoneurin on food intake and locomotion in female goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Mikwar, M; Navarro-Martin, L; Xing, L; Volkoff, H; Hu, W; Trudeau, V L

    2016-04-01

    Secretoneurin (SN) is a conserved peptide derived by proteolytic processing from the middle domain of the ∼600 amino acid precursor secretogranin-II (SgII). Secretoneurin is widely distributed in secretory granules of endocrine cells and neurons and has important roles in reproduction as it stimulates luteinizing hormone release from the pituitary. A potential new role of SN in goldfish feeding is the subject of this study. Firstly, we established that acute (26 h; p<0.0001) and short-term (72 h; p=0.016) fasting increased SgIIa precursor mRNA levels 1.25-fold in the telencephalon, implicating SN in the control of feeding. Secondly, we determined that intracerebroventricular injections of the type A SN (SNa; 0.2 and 1 ng/g BW) increased food intake and locomotor behavior by 60 min. Fish injected with the lower and higher doses of SNa (0.2 and 1 ng/g) respectively exhibited significant 1.77- and 2.58-fold higher food intake (p<0.0001) than the saline-injected control fish. Locomotor behavior was increased by 1.35- and 2.26-fold for 0.2 ng/g SNa (p=0.0001) and 1 ng/g SNa (p<0.0001), respectively. Injection of 1 ng/g SNa increased mRNA levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y 1.36-fold (p=0.038) and decreased hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript by 33% (p=0.01) at 2h and 5h post-injection, respectively. These data suggest interactions of SNa with stimulatory and inhibitory pathways of food intake control in fish. PMID:26860475

  7. Stimulatory effect of cytokinins and interaction with IAA on the release of lateral buds of pea plants from apical dominance.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjian; Bangerth, Fritz

    2003-09-01

    Lateral buds of pea plants can be released from apical dominance and even be transformed into dominant shoots when repeatedly treated with synthetic exogenous cytokinins (CKs). The mechanism of the effect of CKs, however, is not clear. The results in this work showed that the stimulatory effects of CKs on the growth of lateral buds and the increase in their fresh weights in pea plants depended on the structure and concentration of the CKs used. The effect of N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea (CPPU) was stronger than that of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA). Indoleacetic acid (IAA) concentration in shoot, IAA export out of the treated apex and basipetal transport in stems were markedly increased after the application of CPPU or 6-BA to the apex or the second node of pea plant. This increase was positively correlated with the increased concentration of the applied CKs. These results suggest that the increased IAA synthesis and export induced by CKs application might be responsible for the growth of lateral shoots in intact pea plants. PMID:14593807

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  9. The stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis: Lessons from metabolic systems analysis of Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T.).

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem; Arga, Kazim Y; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD(T) is a halophilic, gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently produce levan from sucrose as carbon source via levansucrase activity. However, systems-based approaches are required to further enhance its metabolic performance for industrial application. As an important step toward this goal, the genome-scale metabolic network of Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043, which is considered a model organism for halophilic bacteria, has been reconstructed based on its genome annotation, physiological information, and biochemical information. In the present work, the genome-scale metabolic network of C. salexigens was recruited, and refined via integration of the available biochemical, physiological, and phenotypic features of H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) . The generic metabolic model, which comprises 1,393 metabolites and 1,108 reactions, was then systematically analyzed in silico using constraints-based simulations. To elucidate the relationship between levan biosynthesis and other metabolic processes, an enzyme-graph representation of the metabolic network and a graph decomposition technique were employed. Using the concept of control effective fluxes, significant links between several metabolic processes and levan biosynthesis were estimated. The major finding was the elucidation of the stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis, which was further verified experimentally via supplementation of mannitol to the fermentation medium. The optimal concentration of 30 g/L mannitol supplemented to the 50 g/L sucrose-based medium resulted in a twofold increase in levan production in parallel with increased sucrose hydrolysis rate, accumulated extracellular glucose, and decreased fructose uptake rate.

  10. Evaluation of co-stimulatory effects of Tamarindus indica L. on MNU-induced colonic cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Shyamala Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2004-08-01

    Colonic cell proliferation is the prerequisite for the genesis of cancer. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicate dietary factors to be one of the commonest predisposing factors in the development of several types of cancers including large intestine. Here we have investigated the role of the fruit pulp of Tamarindus indica L. (TI), a tropical plant-derived food material, on the proliferating colonic mucosa using Swiss albino mice. Crypt cell proliferation rate (CCPR), on histological basis and [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay were chosen to evaluate the modulating potential of TI per se and in response to a subacute dose of N-nitroso N'-methyl urea (MNU). Descending colonic segment showed greater rate of cell proliferation than the ascending colon and cecum tissues isolated from the group 2 (TI-per se) when compared with group 1 (negative controls). It also revealed a positive correlation with the incorporation studies. Significant increase in the CCPR and radiolabeled precursor incorporation (p <0.001) was observed in MNU-induced+TI fed group of animals (group 4) in all the three segments when compared with control diet fed normal (group 1) as well as MNU-induced (group 3) animals. This study therefore indicates a co-stimulatory effect of TI on MNU-induced colonic cell kinetics.

  11. Stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on visual sensitivity and electroretinography b-waves in the bullfrog eye.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Fazli; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Romana; Khan, Taous; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Hwang, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jong Seok; Chang, Su-Chan; Kim, You Young

    2013-08-01

    During the last decade, a large number of studies have focused on the development of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the vertebrate visual system. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized through photoluminescence, ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Furthermore, various electrophysiological recordings were obtained from the bullfrog eyecup preparations under various treatment conditions. Photoluminescence data showed a central peak at 386 nm while the UV-visible spectrum showed a sharp absorption band centered around 367 nm. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure, with a round to oval shape and an average particle size of > 40 nm. Electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated that zinc oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the ERG b-wave amplitude in dark-adapted bullfrog eyecups and in the presence of background illumination. Zinc oxide nanoparticles also improved the visual sensitivity by 0.7 log unit of light intensity and shortened the duration of rhodopsin regeneration. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that zinc oxide nanoparticles may be used to improve visual functions. The present study may add new dimensions to the biomedical applications of nanomaterials in eye research. PMID:23926809

  12. Darbepoietin-alfa has comparable erythropoietic stimulatory effects to recombinant erythropoietin whilst preserving the bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dewamitta, Sita R.; Russell, Megan R.; Nandurkar, Harshal; Walkley, Carl R.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis stimulating agents are widely used for the treatment of anemia. Recently, we reported erythroid expansion with impaired B lymphopoiesis and loss of trabecular bone in C57BL/6 mice following ten days of treatment with low-dose short acting recombinant human erythropoietin. We have assessed erythropoietin against longer-acting darbepoietin-alfa at a comparable erythroid stimulatory dosage regime. Darbepoietin-alfa and erythropoietin induced similar in vivo erythropoietic expansion. Both agents induced an expansion of the colony-forming unit-erythroid populations. However, unlike erythropoietin, darbepoietin-alfa did not impair bone marrow B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly the bone loss observed with erythropoietin was not apparent following darbepoietin-alfa treatment. This analysis demonstrates that whilst darbepoietin-alfa has similar in vivo erythropoietic potency to erythropoietin, it preserves the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus erythropoietin and darbepoietin-alfa manifest different action showing that erythropoiesis stimulating agents have differential non-erythroid effects dependent on their duration of action. PMID:23242598

  13. Stimulatory effect of lysophosphatidic acids on uterine smooth muscles of non-pregant rats.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, A; Fukuzawa, K; Yamada, S; Tsukatani, H

    1980-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids stimulated isolated uterine smooth muscle dose-dependently. The contractions were not reduced by pretreatment with atropine or an anti-5-hydroxytryptaminic agent. The potency depended on the nature of the acyl chain in the molecule. Of the compounds with a saturated fatty acyl group tested, the most effective were myristoyl- and lauroyl-lysophosphatidic acid. In a series of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acids, the potency increased with the number of cis double bonds in the acyl chain, and linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid was the most active. When injected intravenously, these compounds induced an immediate rise in blood pressure and intrauterine pressure, like prostaglandin F2 alpha: The order of potency of their effects on the intact uterus was consistent with that of their effects on isolated uterine smooth muscle, but not with that of their hypertensive effects in rats.

  14. Metabolomic assessment reveals a stimulatory effect of calcium treatment on glucosinolates contents in broccoli microgreen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preharvest calcium application has been shown to increase broccoli microgreen yield and extend shelf life. Here we investigated the effect of calcium application on its metabolome using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) tandem with mass spectrometry (HRMS). The data collected were...

  15. Plants Can Benefit from Herbivory: Stimulatory Effects of Sheep Saliva on Growth of Leymus chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jushan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Deli; Bonser, Stephen P.; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Yifa; Gao, Ying; Teng, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants and herbivores can evolve beneficial interactions. Growth factors found in animal saliva are probably key factors underlying plant compensatory responses to herbivory. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how animal saliva interacts with herbivory intensities and how saliva can mobilize photosynthate reserves in damaged plants. Methodology/Principal Findings The study examined compensatory responses to herbivory and sheep saliva addition for the grass species Leymus chinensis in three experiments over three years. The first two experiments were conducted in a factorial design with clipping (four levels in 2006 and five in 2007) and two saliva treatment levels. The third experiment examined the mobilization and allocation of stored carbohydrates following clipping and saliva addition treatments. Animal saliva significantly increased tiller number, number of buds, and biomass, however, there was no effect on height. Furthermore, saliva effects were dependent on herbivory intensities, associated with meristem distribution within perennial grass. Animal saliva was found to accelerate hydrolyzation of fructans and accumulation of glucose and fructose. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated a link between saliva and the mobilization of carbohydrates following herbivory, which is an important advance in our understanding of the evolution of plant responses to herbivory. Herbivory intensity dependence of the effects of saliva stresses the significance of optimal grazing management. PMID:22235277

  16. Relationship between cerebral sigma-1 receptor occupancy and attenuation of cocaine's motor stimulatory effects in mice by PD144418.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R; Miller, Dennis K; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Green, Caroline L; Watkinson, Lisa D; Carmack, Terry L; Lever, Susan Z

    2014-10-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r(2) = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine's motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418.

  17. The Stimulatory Effect of Strontium Ions on Phytoestrogens Content in Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Tomasz; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szymczak, Grażyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Kocjan, Ryszard; Świeboda, Ryszard

    2016-01-14

    The amount of secondary metabolites in plants can be enhanced or reduced by various external factors. In this study, the effect of strontium ions on the production of phytoestrogens in soybeans was investigated. The plants were treated with Hoagland's solution, modified with Sr(2+) with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mM, and were grown for 14 days in hydroponic cultivation. After harvest, soybean plants were separated into roots and shoots, dried, and pulverized. The plant material was extracted with methanol and hydrolyzed. Phytoestrogens were quantified by HPLC. The significant increase in the concentration of the compounds of interest was observed for all tested concentrations of strontium ions when compared to control. Sr(2+) at a concentration of 2 mM was the strongest elicitor, and the amount of phytoestrogens in plant increased ca. 2.70, 1.92, 3.77 and 2.88-fold, for daidzein, coumestrol, genistein and formononetin, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 liver cell models after treatment with extracts from 2 mM Sr(2+)-stressed soybean plants when compared to extracts from non-stressed plants. Our results indicate that the addition of strontium ions to the culture media may be used to functionalize soybean plants with enhanced phytoestrogen content.

  18. Stimulatory effect of ethanol on libertellenone H biosynthesis by Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chu; Xu, Ning; Gao, Yanyun; Sun, Xiaoyue; Yin, Ying; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-02-01

    Libertellenone H (1) was a promising antitumor diterpenoid isolated from Arctic fungus Eutypella sp. D-1, however, its production was very limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on cell growth and libertellenone H production. The mycelium in ethanol-feeding cultures was fragmented and dispersed, and the titer of libertellenone H was remarkably increased to 4.88 mg l(-1) in an optimal feeding manner, which was 16.4-fold higher than the control group. To provide an insight into the cell response to ethanol, genes critical to the libertellenone H biosynthesis were successfully cloned and their transcription levels were determined. The results suggested that the gene transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaric acyl coenzyme A reductase and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase were up-regulated by ethanol stimulation. The results from this study were helpful for further understanding of the ethanol function on diterpenes biosynthesis as well as developing more effective strategies for over-production of these desired secondary metabolites.

  19. A stimulatory effect of Cassia occidentalis on melanoblast differentiation and migration.

    PubMed

    Babitha, Sumathy; Shin, Jeong-Hyun; Nguyen, Dung H; Park, Sang-Joo; Reyes, Gaudelia A; Caburian, Adeltrudes; Kim, Eun Ki

    2011-04-01

    In vitiligo, the active melanocytes in the epidermis are totally missing, whereas melanoblast cells in the outer root sheath of hair follicles are not affected. In an attempt to find potent repigmenting agents for vitiligo therapy, pod extracts of Cassia occidentalis was found to be effective in inducing differentiation and migration of mouse melanoblast cell line. Methanolic extract redissolved in DMSO at 12.5 μg/ml was found to cause 3.5- to 3.8-fold melanin induction in melb-a melanoblast cells after 4 days in treatment medium. In addition it induced the tyrosinase activity and altered melb-a cell morphology. Transwell migration assay showed the potential of this herbal candidate to induce direct migration of treated cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report investigating the effect of Cassia occidentalis on the differentiation and migration of melanoblast cells. The findings of present study are significant in designing preclinical and clinical studies on the efficacy of C. occidentalis as a stimulant for skin repigmentation in vitiligo. PMID:21328088

  20. Stimulatory Effects of Acibenzolar-S-Methyl on Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Efficient N.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica is a perrenial herb that grows in tropical regions with numerous medicinal properties mostly attributed to the presence of pentacyclic triterpenoids. Interestingly, this plant also possess a significant amount of phenylpropanoid-derived chlorogenic acids (CGAs) that have recently been reported to confer neuroprotective properties. In a biotechnological attempt to increase the biosynthesis of CGA-derivatives in cultured Centella cells, acibenzolar-S-methyl was applied as a xenobiotic inducer in combination with quinic acid and shikimic acid as precursor molecules. Applying a semi-targeted metabolomics-based approach, time and concentration studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of the manipulation on cellular metabolism leading to CGA production. Phytochemical extracts were prepared using methanol and analyzed using a UHPLC-qTOF-MS platform. Data was processed and analyzed using multivariate data models. A total of four CGA-derivatives, annotated as trans-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3,5 di-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonylquinic acid (irbic acid) and 3-caffeoyl, 5-feruloylquinic acid, were found to be upregulated by the acibenzolar-S-methyl treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the induction of CGA derivatives in this species. Contrary to expectations, the effects of precursor molecules on the levels of the CGAs were insignificant. However, a total of 16 metabolites, including CGA derivatives, were up-regulated by precursor treatment. Therefore, this study shows potential to biotechnologically manipulate C. asiatica cells to increase the production of these health beneficial CGAs. PMID:27733862

  1. Evidence for a Direct Stimulatory Effect of Prostacyclin on Renin Release in Man

    PubMed Central

    Patrono, Carlo; Pugliese, Francesco; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Patrignani, Paola; Maseri, Attilio; Chierchia, Sergio; Peskar, Bernhard A.; Cinotti, Giulio A.; Simonetti, Bianca M.; Pierucci, Alessandro

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were: (a) to characterize the time and dose dependence of the effects of prostacyclin (PGI2) on renin release in healthy men; (b) to define whether PGI2-induced renin release is secondary to hemodynamic changes; (c) to determine the plasma and urine concentrations of 6-keto-PGF1α (the stable breakdown product of PGI2) associated with renin release induced by exogenous or pharmacologically enhanced endogenous PGI2. Intravenous PGI2 or 6-keto-PGF1α infusions at nominal rates of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 ng/kg per min were performed in each of six normal human subjects; in three of them, PGI2 infusion was repeated after β-adrenergic blockade and cyclooxygenase inhibition. PGI2, but not 6-keto-PGF1α, caused a time- and dose-dependent increase of plasma renin activity, which reached statistical significance at 5.0 ng/kg per min and was still significantly elevated 30 min after discontinuing the infusion. Although combined propranolol and indomethacin treatment significantly enhanced the hypotensive effects of infused PGI2, it did not modify the dose-related pattern of PGI2-induced renin release. Plasma 6-keto-PGF1α levels rose from undetectable levels (<7.5 pg/ml) in a stepwise fashion during increasingly higher infusion rates of PGI2 or 6-keto-PGF1α. The threshold concentration of plasma 6-keto-PGF1α associated with a statistically significant stimulation of renin release was ∼200 pg/ml. Upon discontinuing PGI2 or 6-keto-PGF1α infusion, the disappearance of 6-keto-PGF1α from blood showed an identical biphasic behavior, the initial phase having an apparent t½ of 3.2 min. The intravenous infusion of furosemide, which is known to stimulate renin release via a cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanism, caused a three-to fourfold increase of urinary 6-keto-PGF1α excretion rate, concomitant with the elevation of plasma renin activity levels, in six healthy women. 6-Keto-PGF1α remained undetectable in peripheral venous plasma

  2. Iridoids and Flavonoids of Four Siberian Gentians: Chemical Profile and Gastric Stimulatory Effect.

    PubMed

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I; Chirikova, Nadezhda K; Tankhaeva, Larisa M

    2015-10-21

    Some Gentiana species have been used by the nomadic people of Siberia as bitter teas or appetizers to eliminate digestive disorders (dyspepsia, heartburn, nausea, etc.). We studied the most frequently used gentians: Gentiana algida, G. decumbens, G. macrophylla and G. triflora. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the phytochemical features and gastrostimulatnt activity of these four gentian herbs. Five iridoids, seven flavones and mangiferin were detected in gentian herbs after analysis by microcolumn-RP-HPLC-UV-ESI-MS. A componential phytochemical profile of the G. decumbens herb is presented for the first time, as well as information about distinct phytochemicals found in gentian herbs. HPLC quantification of the specific compounds of gentian herbs demonstrated the high content of iridoids (24.73-73.53 mg/g) and flavonoids (12.92-78.14 mg/g). The results of biological activity evaluation of four gentian decoctions demonstrated their good ability to stimulate acid-, enzyme- and mucin-forming functions of the stomach attributed to mostly by iridoids and flavonoids. In general, it can be claimed that the gentian decoctions can be used as effective and safe appetizers and are also a good source of biologically active agents.

  3. Stimulatory effect of Coca-Cola on gastroduodenal HCO3- secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Aihara, E; Ise, F; Kita, K; Takeuchi, K

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of various carbonated beverages, especially Coca-Cola, on the HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach and duodenum. Under urethane anaesthesia, a chambered stomach or a proximal duodenal loop was perfused with saline, and HCO3- secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. The amount of CO2 contained in these beverages was about 4-7 g/mL. Coca-Cola topically applied to the mucosa for 10 min significantly increased the HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum. The HCO3- response in the duodenum was totally abolished by indomethacin and also partially inhibited by acetazolamide, an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase. Likewise, the response in the stomach was also markedly inhibited by either acetazolamide or indomethacin. The mucosal application of Coca-Cola increased the PGE2 contents in both the stomach and the duodenum. Other carbonated beverages, such as sparkling water, Fanta Grape or cider, also increased the HCO3- secretion in these tissues. These results suggest that Coca-Cola induces HCO3- secretion in both the stomach and the duodenum, and these responses may be attributable to both the intracellular supply of HCO3- generated via carbonic anhydrase, and endogenous PGs, probably related to the acidic pH of the solution.

  4. Stimulatory effects of muramyl dipeptide upon neutrophils isolated from a local bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P. M.; Maier, K. G.; Melton, L.; Polk, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in vivo upon the local inflammatory response to a bacterial challenge. In addition to quantitative bacteriology of the tissues surrounding an infected suture, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) involved in the local inflammatory response were extracted and estimations made of their number, viability and phagocytic activity. Fewer bacteria were recovered from the muscle around the suture in MDP-treated animals compared to placebo-treated controls (P less than 0.02), although there was no difference in the number of bacteria on the suture itself. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present in greater numbers (P less than 0.01), more PMNs were viable (P less than 0.01) and more PMNs had visibly phagocytosed bacteria (P less than 0.01) in the MDP group compared to the placebo group. These data indicate that MDP enhances the local inflammatory response to infection with increased influx, viability and phagocytic activity of PMNs, resulting in improved local control of a test bacterial challenge. PMID:3318904

  5. Stimulatory Effects of Polysaccharide Fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Faizan Naeem; Ismail, Amirah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth. PMID:25299340

  6. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of neuropeptide Y on growth hormone secretion in acromegaly in vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Tamura, T

    1997-02-01

    It has been reported that neuropeptide Y (NPY) affects growth hormone (GH) secretion in several animal species. With respect to the role of NPY in regulating GH release in humans, one previous study has reported that NPY inhibited GH secretion from cultured GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells in vitro. However, since it has yet to be explored whether NPY affects GH secretion in acromegaly in vivo, in this study we attempted to examine the effect of intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection of 100 microg of human NPY on plasma GH levels in 15 patients with active acromegaly, trying to find a possible correlation among GH responses to NPY, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH;500 microg, i.v.), luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH;100 microg, i.v.), and bromocriptine (Br;2.5 mg, per os). NPY significantly increased GH secretion (more than twice the basal level) in 4 (27%) patients, and all of them were responsive to LHRH and non-responsive to Br. In contrast, 3 (20%) acromegalics showed a significant decrease in GH levels (less than half the baseline) after NPY, and all these patients were responsive to both TRH and Br. From these results, we hypothesize that the NPY-induced increase in GH release may be a feature of somatotroph-like pituitary adenoma causing acromegaly, whereas the NPY-induced decrease in GH secretion may be a feature of lactotroph-like adenoma.

  7. Rapamycin has suppressive and stimulatory effects on human plasmacytoid dendritic cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P P C; Metselaar, H J; Mancham, S; van der Laan, L J W; Kwekkeboom, J

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are involved in innate immunity by interferon (IFN)-α production, and in adaptive immunity by stimulating T cells and inducing generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). In this study we studied the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition by rapamycin, a commonly used immunosuppressive and anti-cancer drug, on innate and adaptive immune functions of human PDC. A clinically relevant concentration of rapamycin inhibited Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7-induced IFN-α secretion potently (−64%) but TLR-9-induced IFN-α secretion only slightly (−20%), while the same concentration suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production by TLR-7-activated and TLR-9-activated PDC with similar efficacy. Rapamycin inhibited the ability of both TLR-7-activated and TLR-9-activated PDC to stimulate production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 by allogeneic T cells. Surprisingly, mTOR-inhibition enhanced the capacity of TLR-7-activated PDC to stimulate naive and memory T helper cell proliferation, which was caused by rapamycin-induced up-regulation of CD80 expression on PDC. Finally, rapamycin treatment of TLR-7-activated PDC enhanced their capacity to induce CD4+forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)+ regulatory T cells, but did not affect the generation of suppressive CD8+CD38+lymphocyte activation gene (LAG)-3+ Treg. In general, rapamycin inhibits innate and adaptive immune functions of TLR-stimulated human PDC, but enhances the ability of TLR-7-stimulated PDC to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation and induce CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell generation. PMID:23968562

  8. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  9. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M.; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways—VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT—were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full

  10. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  11. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries.

    PubMed

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways-VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT-were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full maturity

  12. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  13. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors.

  14. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors. PMID:3583964

  15. Suppressive effects of co-stimulatory molecule expressions on mouse splenocytes by anti-allergic agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, J; Asano, K; Tryka, E; Kanai, K; Yamamoto, S; Hisamitsu, T; Suzaki, H

    2000-01-01

    The influence of anti-allergic drugs, epinastine hydrochloride (EP) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on the co-stimulatory molecule expression was examined using in vitro cell culture technique. Spleen cells obtained from BALB/c mice 10 days after immunization with haemocyanin absorbed to aluminium hydroxide were cultured in the presence of 100.0 microg/ml haemocyanin and various concentrations of the agents. Low concentrations (<1.5 x 10(-4)M) of EP and DSCG did not influence spleen cell blastic activity induced by antigenic stimulation, whereas these agents caused significant inhibition of spleen cell activation when 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents were added to cell cultures. EP and DSCG also did not affect blastic activity of sensitized splenic T cells by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody stimulation even when these cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents. We next examined the influence of EP and DSCG on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on spleen cells in response to antigenic stimulation. Sensitized spleen cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4)M of the agents and the expression of molecules were examined by flow cytometer 24h later. EP and DSCG suppressed the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40 and CD80, but not CD86, on splenic B cells which were enhanced by antigenic stimulation in vitro. PMID:10958379

  16. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  17. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure.

  18. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  19. Stimulatory effect of nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxy flavone, on catecholamine synthesis through Ser19 and Ser40 phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Takahashi, Keita; Inagaki, Hirohide; Satoh, Noriaki; Li, Xiaoja; Goa, Xiumei; Tsutsui, Masato; Takahaishi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the dual effects of nobiletin, a compound of polymethoxy flavones found in citrus fruits, on catecholamine secretion in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Here, we report the effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis in the cells. Nobiletin increased the synthesis of (14)C-catecholamines from [(14)C]tyrosine in a time (20-30 min)- and concentration (1.0-100 μM)-dependent manner. Nobiletin (10-100 μM) also activated tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The stimulatory effect of nobiletin on (14)C-catecholamine synthesis was not observed when extracellular Ca(2+) was not present in the incubation medium. Protein kinase inhibitors including H-89, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, suppressed the stimulatory effects of nobiletin on catecholamine synthesis as well as tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Nobiletin also induced the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at Ser(19) and Ser(40). Nobiletin (1.0-100 μM) inhibited (14)C-catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine. The present findings suggest that nobiletin, by itself, stimulates catecholamine synthesis through tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation at Ser(19) and Ser(40), whereas it inhibits catecholamine synthesis induced by acetylcholine in bovine adrenal medulla.

  20. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model.

  1. The prolonged stimulatory effect of ACTH on 11 beta-hydroxylation, and its contribution to the steroidogenic potency of adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, F; Lammerant, J; Kolanowski, J

    1984-04-01

    The mechanism of the prolonged stimulatory influence of corticotropin (ACTH) on the capacity of adrenocortical cells to produce cortisol in response to ACTH and more specifically the role of 11 beta-hydroxylation, was studied on guinea-pig adrenocortical cells dispersed from control and ACTH-treated animals. As a result of the previous in vivo exposure to ACTH, the net maximal production of glucocorticoids in response to ACTH (by 10(5) cells and 2 h incubation) increased from 660 +/- 33.9 ng (control group) to 1105 +/- 117.9 ng for cells from ACTH-treated animals (P less than 0.001), whereas the apparent affinity of the steroidogenic response remained unchanged. In addition there occurred an increased conversion of exogenous pregnenolone into cortisol by cells from ACTH-treated animals, indicating a prolonged stimulatory influence of ACTH on the post-pregnenolone pathway of cortisol biosynthesis. The activity of 11 beta-hydroxylation step was therefore examined by incubating the adrenocortical cells from control and ACTH-treated animals in the presence of increasing amounts of 11-deoxycortisol. The maximal capacity of 11-deoxycortisol conversion into cortisol was increased as a result of the in vivo exposure to ACTH, averaging 3423 +/- 211 ng cortisol formed from 5 micrograms 11-deoxycortisol by 10(5) cells from ACTH-treated animals vs 2074 +/- 185 ng for cells from control guinea-pigs (P less than 0.001). However, the conversion of lower amounts of 11-deoxycortisol into cortisol, reproducing quantitatively the maximal effect of ACTH on cortisol biosynthesis, was only barely increased in cells from ACTH-treated animals (P greater than 0.05). Therefore it was concluded that ACTH increases in a lasting way not only the overall steroidogenic capacity of adrenocortical cells but also the maximal efficiency of 11 beta-hydroxylation. Since the latter effect cannot account quantitatively for the magnitude of the lasting effect of ACTH on the maximal capacity of

  2. Interaction between Angiotensin II and Insulin/IGF-1 Exerted a Synergistic Stimulatory Effect on ERK1/2 Activation in Adrenocortical Carcinoma H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, An-li; Wang, Fen; Cui, Yun-ying; Li, Chun-yan; Li, Yu-xiu

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin has been described mainly in cardiovascular cells, hepatocytes, adipocytes, and so forth, and to date no such cross talk was reported in adrenal. In this study, we examined the interaction between Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 in ERK and AKT signaling pathways and expression of steroidogenic enzymes in H295R cells. Compared to the control, 100 nM Ang II increased phospho-ERK1/2 approximately 3-fold. Insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) alone raised phospho-ERK1/2 1.8- and 1.5-fold, respectively, while, after pretreatment with 100 nM Ang II for 30 min, insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) elevated phospho-ERK1/2 level 8- and 7-fold, respectively. The synergistic effect of Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 on ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by selective AT1 receptor blocker, PKC inhibitor, and MEK1/2 inhibitor. Ang II marginally suppressed AKT activation under the basal condition, while it had no effect on phospho-AKT induced by insulin/IGF-1. Ang II significantly stimulated mRNA expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and such stimulatory effects were enhanced when cells were cotreated with insulin/IGF-1. We are led to conclude that Ang II in combination with insulin/IGF-1 had an evident synergistic stimulatory effect on ERK1/2 activation in H295R cells and the effect may be responsible for the enhanced steroid hormone production induced by Ang II plus insulin/IGF-1. PMID:27293433

  3. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of culinary-medicinal mushrooms and their toxicity assessment using differentiating Neuro-2a and embryonic fibroblast BALB/3T3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mushrooms are not only regarded as gourmet cuisine but also as therapeutic agent to promote cognition health. However, little toxicological information is available regarding their safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen selected ethno-pharmacologically important mushrooms for stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth and to test for any cytotoxicity. Methods The stimulatory effect of mushrooms on neurite outgrowth was assessed in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Neurite length was measured using Image-Pro Insight processor system. Neuritogenesis activity was further validated by fluorescence immunocytochemical staining of neurofilaments. In vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by using mouse embryonic fibroblast (BALB/3T3) and N2a cells for any embryo- and neuro-toxic effects; respectively. Results Aqueous extracts of Ganoderma lucidum, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Pleurotus giganteus and Grifola frondosa; as well as an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris significantly (p < 0.05) promoted the neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by 38.4 ± 4.2%, 38.1 ± 2.6%, 33.4 ± 4.6%, 33.7 ± 1.5%, and 35.8 ± 3.4%; respectively. The IC50 values obtained from tetrazolium (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed no toxic effects following 24 h exposure of N2a and 3T3 cells to mushroom extracts. Conclusion Our results indicate that G. lucidum, L. rhinocerotis, P. giganteus, G. frondosa and C. militaris may be developed as safe and healthy dietary supplements for brain and cognitive health. PMID:24119256

  4. Stimulatory effects of the putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3 on phosphoinositide turnover in neonatal rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, R.; Prabhu, G.; Godwin, M.; Challiss, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionate (L-AP3) on phosphoinositide turnover in neonatal rat cerebral cortex slices has been investigated. 2. At concentrations of < or = 300 microM, L-AP3 inhibited total [3H]-inositol phosphate ([3H]-InsPx) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass responses stimulated by the selective mGluR agonist, 1-amino-cyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid (1S, 3R-ACPD). Comparison with the competitive mGluR antagonist (+/-)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+/-)-MCPG) clearly demonstrated that L-AP3 caused inhibition by a mechanism that was not competitive, as L-AP3 decreased the maximal response to 1S, 3R-ACPD (by approximately 40% at 300 microM L-AP3) without significantly affecting the concentration of 1S, 3R-ACPD required to cause half-maximal stimulation of the [3H]-InsPx response. 3. In contrast, at a higher concentration L-AP3 (1 mM) caused a large increase in [3H]-InsPx accumulation which was similar in magnitude in both the absence and presence of 1S, 3R-ACPD (300 microM). D-AP3 (1 mM) had no stimulatory effect alone and did not affect the response evoked by 1S, 3R-ACPD. L-AP3 (1 mM) also caused a large increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. The magnitude of the response (4-5 fold increase over basal) approached that evoked by a maximally effective concentration of 1S, 3R-ACPD, but differed substantially in the time-course of the response. The stimulatory effects of 1S, 3R-ACPD and L-AP3 on Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation were also similarly affected by decreases in extracellular calcium concentration. 4. Detailed analysis of the inositol phospholipid labelling pattern and the inositol (poly)phosphate isomeric species generated following addition of L-AP3 was also performed. In the continued presence of myo-[3H]-inositol, L-AP3 (1 mM) stimulated a significant increase in phosphatidylinositol labelling, but not that of the polyphosphoinositides, and the inositol (poly)phosphate profile

  5. Isolation and characterization of a glucose/mannose-specific lectin with stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by macrophages from the emperor banana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, T B

    2006-02-01

    Emperor banana (Musa basjoo cv. 'Emperor Banana') is a banana cultivar that has not been studied previously. In this study, a glucose/mannose-specific lectin has been purified from the emperor banana by affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono S and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. This lectin was composed of two identical 15-kDa subunits with N-terminal amino acid sequence similarity to other lectins from other Musa species. Emperor banana lectin stimulated [3H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by mouse splenocytes and nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages. In contrast to Con A, the mitogenic activity of emperor banana lectin toward mouse splenocytes but not its stimulatory effect on nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages could be abrogated by 200 mM glucose. Emperor banana lectin also inhibited proliferation of leukemia cell (L1210) and the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. In summary, this is the first report of the macrophage-stimulating, antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibiting activities of a banana lectin.

  6. The Stimulatory Effect of Cerebral Intraventricular Injection of cNPY on Precocial Feeding Behavior in Neonatal Chicks (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guiqian; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Taofen; Jiang, Junfang; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most potent stimulants of food intake in many animals. Most of the supporting evidence for the effects of NPY has been gathered in mammalian species using porcine NPY. To investigate the effects of NPY on precocial feeding initiation in chicks, we firstly used chicken NPY (cNPY) to study its role in food intake and spontaneous activities in 3-day-old male chicks. Food intake was monitored at different times after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of cNPY (2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 μg/10 μL) and anti-cNPY antibody (anti-cNPY) (1:9000, 1:3000 or 1:1000 in dilution). cNPY given at different doses significantly increased food intake at 30 min, 60 min, 90 min and 120 min after injection. Chicks treated with 5.0 μg/10 μL of cNPY showed a maximal 4.48 fold increase in food intake comparing to the control at 30 min. There is still more than 2 fold increase in food intake at 120 min after injection of cNPY. Food intake was significantly inhibited by a single ICV injection of anti-cNPY diluted to 1:9000 (60% inhibition), 1:3000 (92% inhibition), and 1:1000 (95% inhibition) at 30 min with 1:1000 being the maximally effective concentration. The inhibitory effects of anti-cNPY (diluted to1:9000, 1:3000, 1:1000) at 120 min post ICV injection were 22%, 42% and 46%, respectively. But ICV of anti-cNPY (1:3000 in dilution) did not block the orexigenic effect of 2.5 μg/10 μL of cNPY. ICV injection of different concentrations of cNPY increases locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner while ICV anti-cNPY greatly decreased the distance moved by each chick compared to control groups. Taken together, our results demonstrated that cNPY has a promoting effect on chick food intake and locomotor activity, and that endogenous cNPY might play a positive role in regulating precocial feeding behavior in newly hatched chicks. PMID:27055273

  7. Relationship between Cerebral Sigma-1 Receptor Occupancy and Attenuation of Cocaine’s Motor Stimulatory Effects in Mice by PD144418

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Dennis K.; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A.; Green, Caroline L.; Watkinson, Lisa D.; Carmack, Terry L.; Lever, Susan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r2 = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine’s motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418. PMID:25100754

  8. Late administration of murine CTLA-4 blockade prolongs CD8-mediated anti-tumor effects following stimulatory cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sckisel, Gail D.; Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Tietze, Julia K.; Chen, Mingyi; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that immunostimulatory therapies such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-CD40 (αCD40) can be combined to deliver synergistic anti-tumor effects. While this strategy has shown success, efficacy varies depending on a number of factors including tumor type and severe toxicities can be seen. We sought to determine whether blockade of negative regulators such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) could simultaneously prolong CD8+ T cell responses and augment T cell anti-tumor effects. We devised a regimen in which anti-CTLA-4 was administered late so as to delay contraction and minimize toxicities. This late administration both enhanced and prolonged CD8 T cell activation without the need for additional IL-2. The quality of the T cell response was improved with increased frequency of effector/effector memory phenotype cells along with improved lytic ability and bystander expansion. This enhanced CD8 response translated to improved anti-tumor responses both at the primary and metastatic sites. Importantly, toxicities were not exacerbated with combination. This study provides a platform for rational design of immunotherapy combinations to maximize anti-tumor immunity while minimizing toxicities. PMID:26423422

  9. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials.

  10. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  11. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  12. Stimulatory Effects of Coumestrol on Embryonic and Fetal Development Through AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Song, Gwonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Successful establishment of pregnancy is required for fetal-maternal interactions regulating implantation, embryonic development and placentation. A uterine environment with insufficient growth factors and nutrients increases the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) leading to an impaired uterine environment. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on conceptus development in the pig that is regarded as an excellent biomedical animal model for research on IUGR. Results of this study indicated that coumestrol induced migration of porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In response to coumestrol, the phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2 MAPK, and P90RSK proteins were activated in pTr cells and ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK phosphorylation was prolonged for a longer period than for the other proteins. To identify the signal transduction pathway induced by coumestrol, pharmacological inhibitors U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) were used to pretreat pTr cells. The results showed that coumestrol-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK was blocked by U0126. In addition, the increased phosphorylation in response to coumestrol was completely inhibited following pre-treatment incubation of pTr cells in the presence of LY294002 and U0126. Furthermore, these two inhibitors suppressed the ability of coumestrol to induce migration of pTr cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that coumestrol affects embryonic development through activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK cell signal transduction pathways and improvement in the uterine environment through coumestrol supplementation may provide beneficial effects of enhancing embryonic and fetal survival and development. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2733-2740, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials.

  14. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  15. Stimulatory Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Phytochemical Properties, Mitotic Behaviour, and Nutritional Composition of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Lay, Ma Ma; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120 Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  16. Stimulatory effect of oCRH on alpha-subunit secretion during petrosal sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Vignati, F; Berselli, M E; Boccardi, E; Branca, V; Loli, P

    1992-11-01

    During bilateral and simultaneous venous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses for preoperative localization of ACTH secreting microadenomas, alpha-subunit levels, in addition to ACTH, were determined in 9 patients with Cushing's disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible occurrence of unilateral increases of alpha-subunit in basal conditions and the alpha-subunit responsiveness to oCRH. All the patients examined showed a central to peripheral and an intersinus gradient of ACTH concentrations before and/or after oCRH stimulation. Seven patients showed a central to peripheral alpha-subunit gradient in basal conditions. Lateralization of alpha-subunit concentrations was recorded in 4 patients in basal conditions (intersinus gradient > or = 1.55) and paralleled the side with the highest ACTH concentrations. After oCRH stimulation all but one patient showed a unilateral alpha-subunit increase in blood from the inferior petrosal sinus with the highest oCRH stimulated ACTH increase. The present data confirm the occurrence of an increase of alpha-subunit concentration in response to nonspecific stimulation with exogenously administered oCRH, concurrent with an ipsilateral increase of ACTH levels. The mechanism underlying this finding is still unclear, although a paracrine effect from the corticotroph tumour on adjacent pituitary tissue seems so far the most likely explanation.

  17. The stimulatory effects of caffeine with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) on light-dark behavior and open-field behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Toda, Akihisa; Imoto, Masumi; Nishimura, Satoko; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Soeda, Shinji; Shimeno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shigenori; Eyanagi, Reiko

    2010-01-22

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients taking the drug. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of oseltamivir on the behavior of mice using light-dark and open-field preference tests. Oseltamivir (75 and 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone affected neither time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test nor ambulation in the open-field test at 2h post-injection. However, a non-selective adenosine A(1)/A(2) receptor antagonist, caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test. This enhancement was not inhibited by a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, flumazenil (10-20mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Enhancement of ambulation in the open-field test was also observed when caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) was combined with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.). This enhancement was inhibited by a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.1mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, an adenosine A(2) receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (3mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased ambulation in the open-field test, while an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX (1-3mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the dopamine and adenosine systems. Our findings suggest that due to the interaction between central blockade of adenosine A(2) receptors by caffeine, and oseltamivir-induced behavioral changes, patients being treated with oseltamivir should be closely monitored.

  18. The stimulatory effect of the octadecaneuropeptide ODN on astroglial antioxidant enzyme systems is mediated through a GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Yosra; Kaddour, Hadhemi; Vaudry, David; Douiri, Salma; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Leprince, Jérôme; Castel, Hélène; Vaudry, Hubert; Amri, Mohamed; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2012-01-01

    Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense systems, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damage caused by oxidative stress on the central nervous system. Astrocytes specifically synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN). ODN is the ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine receptors (CBR), and an adenylyl cyclase- and phospholipase C-coupled receptor. We have recently shown that ODN is a potent protective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase activities and stimulation of cell apoptosis in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the type of receptor involved in ODN-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase in cultured rat astrocytes. We found that ODN induced a rapid stimulation of SOD and catalase gene transcription in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 0.1 nM ODN blocked H2O2-evoked reduction of both mRNA levels and activities of SOD and catalase. Furthermore, the inhibitory actions of ODN on the deleterious effects of H2O2 on SOD and catalase were abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1-8[Dleu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. Finally, the protective action of ODN against H2O2-evoked inhibition of endogenous antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent, but protein kinase C-independent. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that ODN, acting through its metabotropic receptor coupled to the PKA pathway, prevents oxidative stress-induced alteration of antioxidant enzyme expression and activities. The peptide ODN is thus a potential candidate for the development of specific agonists that would selectively mimic its protective activity. PMID:23181054

  19. Stimulatory effects of maitotoxin on insulin release in insulinoma HIT cells: Role of calcium uptake and phosphoinositide breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Soergel, D.G.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-12-01

    In hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells, maitotoxin (MTX) induces a time-dependent and concentration-dependent release of insulin that requires the presence of extracellular calcium. The response is nearly completely blocked by cinnarizine and cadmium, but is not inhibited by the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine or by manganese. MTX induces 45Ca+ uptake in these cells in a dose-dependent mode, and the uptake is blocked with cinnarizine, nifedipine and cadmium, and is partially inhibited by manganese. MTX induces phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells, and the response is partially blocked by cadmium, but is not affected by nifedipine, cinnarizine or manganese. High concentrations of potassium ions also induce insulin release and calcium uptake in HIT cells. Both effects of potassium are blocked partially by nifedipine, cadmium and cinnarizine. High concentrations of potassium do not induce phosphoinositide breakdown in HIT cells. The results suggest that MTX-elicited release of insulin is attained by two mechanisms: (1) a nifedipine-sensitive action, which results from MTX-induced activation of L-type calcium channels, which can be mimicked with high potassium concentrations; and (2) a nifedipine-insensitive action, which may be initiated by the activation of phosphoinositide breakdown by MTX. Such an activation of phospholipase C would result in the formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate, a release of intracellular calcium and then release of insulin to the extracellular space. Cinnarizine is proposed to block both MTX-elicited mechanisms, the first by blockade of calcium channels and the second by blocking 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate-induced release of internal calcium. Either mechanism alone appears capable of eliciting release of insulin.

  20. Stimulatory effect of sulphide on thiotaurine synthesis in three hydrothermal-vent species from the East Pacific Rise.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Audrey M; Fiala-Médioni, Aline

    2003-09-01

    initial thiotaurine concentration. Moreover, the lack of any effect of sulphide in symbiont-free tissues and in gills of the methanotrophic mussel Bathymodiolus childressi reinforces the assumption that thiotaurine synthesis is a specific adaptation to the thiotrophic mode of life. While the precise function (i.e. transport and/or storage of sulphide) of hypotaurine and thiotaurine has yet to be established, our results strongly support a general role for these free amino acids in the metabolism of sulphide in hydrothermal-vent thiotrophic symbioses.

  1. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of guanine nucleotides on arginine-vasotocin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog bladder.

    PubMed

    Mishina, T; Shimada, H; Marumo, F

    1983-11-01

    The effects of arginine-vasotocin and nucleotides on the steady-state kinetics of the adenylate cyclase activity in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) bladder were studied. Arginine-vasotocin stimulated adenylate cyclase more effectively than oxytocin or arginine-vasopressin, with respect to both the maximal hormonal activation ratio relative to basal, and the hormone concentration yielding a half-maximal response (apparent Km). Arginine-vasotocin, GTP and its analogue guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) increased the Vmax of the basal adenylate cyclase activity, but showed no effect of the apparent Km of the system for ATP. In addition, Gpp(NH)p enhanced the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, further increasing the Vmax, while GTP showed no statistically significant effect. Dual effects of GDP were apparent: it was stimulatory at 1 x 10(-5) mol/l and inhibitory at 1 x 10(-3) mol/l, on both the basal and the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate, CTP, UTP and ITP showed no apparent effect on the enzyme activity. Sodium fluoride acted in the same manner as GTP on the adenylate cyclase system, increasing only basal activity. Adenylate cyclase activities exhibited pH optima that were less distinct in the presence than in the absence of Gpp(NH)p. The Arrhenius plot of the temperature experiment showed that a high-energy step was involved for activation by Gpp(NH)p or arginine-vasotocin. When the relative activation ratios by arginine-vasotocin at different ATP concentrations were studied, a distinct activation optimum was shown at 2.5 x 10(-4) mol ATP/l, either in the absence or presence of Gpp(NH)p. The possibility that GTP, GDP nd ATP play a regulatory role in the epithelial cells of the bullfrog bladder by adjusting the responsiveness of the system to a natural hormone, arginine-vasotocin, is discussed. PMID:6606697

  2. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  3. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  4. [The "stimulatory proteodyschylia" in the amitriptylin (Laroxyl) treated rat parotid gland. Experiments on the effect of antidepressive pharmacotherapy on the parotid glands of the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chilla, R; Hoffmann, G; Arglebe, C

    1977-06-30

    The activity of total amylase and isoamylases in the rat parotid gland is reduced by treatment with Amitriptylin (Laroxyl) for 3 and 7 days while the protein content of the glands remains constant. These changes are no longer visible after treatment for 21 days and following a period without drug application. To differentiate the disturbances of protein secretion (proteodyschylia) prominent in the clinical picture of sialadenosis, the following classification is proposed. We suggest the term "stimulatory proteodyschylia" for a decrease of acinar amylolytic activity, here caused by Amitriptylin application, as opposed to the "inhibitory proteodyschylia" characterized by an acinar amylase congestion.

  5. Stimulatory effect of interleukin-1 beta on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the rat: influence of age, gender and circulating sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1994-03-01

    The bilateral communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems plays an essential role in modulating the adequate response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to the stimulatory influence of interleukins (ILs). It is thus reasonable to assume that inappropriate responses of the HPA axis to ILs might play a role in modulating the onset of pathological conditions such as infections. As part of our programme aimed at investigating the ability of ILs to release pro-opiomelanocortin-like peptides and corticosterone in rats exposed to alcohol, we observed that this stimulatory action appeared to be influenced by the gender of the animals. We therefore examined the ability of IL-1 beta, injected peripherally, to stimulate the HPA axis as a function of stage of sexual maturation and the presence or absence of circulating sex steroids. In immature (21 to 22-day-old) rats, both males and females responded to the i.p. administration of 0.5 or 2.0 micrograms IL-1 beta/kg with statistically comparable increases in plasma ACTH levels. In contrast, females released significantly (P < 0.01) more corticosterone in response to the lower dose of cytokine. Forty-day-old intact animals showed no sexual dimorphism in ACTH secretion, but the females again secreted significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) more corticosterone. Gonadectomy, performed 7-8 days prior to the assay, increased the absolute amount of corticosterone released over a 60-min period. A noticeable dimorphism of the ACTH response to IL-1 beta became apparent in 70-day-old intact rats, with females secreting more ACTH than males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  7. The stimulatory effect of rabphilin 3a on regulated exocytosis from insulin-secreting cells does not require an association-dissociation cycle with membranes mediated by Rab 3.

    PubMed

    Arribas, M; Regazzi, R; Garcia, E; Wollheim, C B; De Camilli, P

    1997-11-01

    Rabphilin 3a is a Rab 3-GTP binding protein concentrated on secretory vesicles of neurons and endocrine cells. There is evidence that rabphilin 3a undergoes cycles of association-dissociation with membranes and that recruitment of rabphilin 3a to secretory vesicles is mediated by Rab 3a, suggesting that rabphilin 3a is a downstream effector of this Rab. In this study we have investigated whether a membrane-anchored form of rabphilin 3a mimics the action of rabphilin 3a on secretion and bypasses the need for Rab 3 function. Overexpression of both wild-type rabphilin 3a and of a transmembrane anchored form of rabphilin 3a stimulated (about 2-fold) evoked secretion of coexpressed human proinsulin from clonal HIT-T15 cells. A similar transmembrane-anchored protein which lacked the Rab 3 binding region stimulated secretion even more effectively. Unexpectedly, a rabphilin 3a deletion mutant missing the Rab 3 binding domain was also stimulatory on secretion, although a further deletion of rabphilin to exclude the first of the two proline-rich regions abolished its stimulatory effect. The first of these two mutants was primarily particulate, while the second mutant was primarily soluble, suggesting that the first proline-rich region of rabphilin 3a plays a role in targeting rabphilin to its site of action. We conclude that the action of rabphilin 3a can be independent of Rab 3 if other mechanisms produce a sufficient concentration of the protein in proximity of exocytotic sites. These results provide new evidence for a fundamental similarity in the mechanisms by which Ras and Rab GTPase produce their distinct physiological effects.

  8. Self-Stimulatory Behavior and Perceptual Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovaas, Ivar; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior is offered, proposing that such behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced perceptual consequences. Related concepts are discussed, and support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is…

  9. T Helper Cells Fate Mapping by Co-stimulatory Molecules and its Functions in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, R; Najafian, N

    2014-01-01

    T cell differentiation is dictated by a combination of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with an antigen-bound major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and co-stimulatory molecules signal. The co-stimulatory signal can be positive or negative, and amplifying or diminishing the initial signal. However, the secondary co-stimulatory signal is not obligatory and its necessity is dictated, in part, by the stage of T cell development. In the field of transplantation, directing the T cell differentiation process can lead to therapeutic possibilities that promote allograft tolerance, and hinder unfavorable alloimmune responses. Therefore, understanding the details of T cell differentiation process, including the influence of co-stimulatory signals, is of paramount importance. It is important to note there is functional overlap between co-stimulatory molecules. It has been observed that some co-stimulatory signals have different effects on different T cell subsets. Hence, blockade of a co-stimulatory signal pathway, as part of a therapeutic regimen in transplantation, may have far reaching effects beyond the initial therapeutic intent and inhibit co-stimulatory signals necessary for desirable regulatory responses. In this review, co-stimulatory molecules involved in the differentiation of naïve T cells into T helper 1 (Th1), T helper 2 (Th2), T helper 17 (Th17), inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs), and T helper 9 (Th9) cells and their overlap are discussed.

  10. T Helper Cells Fate Mapping by Co-stimulatory Molecules and its Functions in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, R.; Najafian, N.

    2014-01-01

    T cell differentiation is dictated by a combination of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with an antigen-bound major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and co-stimulatory molecules signal. The co-stimulatory signal can be positive or negative, and amplifying or diminishing the initial signal. However, the secondary co-stimulatory signal is not obligatory and its necessity is dictated, in part, by the stage of T cell development. In the field of transplantation, directing the T cell differentiation process can lead to therapeutic possibilities that promote allograft tolerance, and hinder unfavorable alloimmune responses. Therefore, understanding the details of T cell differentiation process, including the influence of co-stimulatory signals, is of paramount importance. It is important to note there is functional overlap between co-stimulatory molecules. It has been observed that some co-stimulatory signals have different effects on different T cell subsets. Hence, blockade of a co-stimulatory signal pathway, as part of a therapeutic regimen in transplantation, may have far reaching effects beyond the initial therapeutic intent and inhibit co-stimulatory signals necessary for desirable regulatory responses. In this review, co-stimulatory molecules involved in the differentiation of naïve T cells into T helper 1 (Th1), T helper 2 (Th2), T helper 17 (Th17), inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs), and T helper 9 (Th9) cells and their overlap are discussed. PMID:25184030

  11. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of tea, coffee or caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis of SKH-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Conney, Allan H. Zhou, Sherry; Lee Maojung; Xie Jianguo; Yang, Chung S.; Lou Yourong; Lu Yaoping

    2007-11-01

    Oral administration of green tea or a caffeine solution, but not decaffeinated green tea, inhibits UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. Oral administration of green tea, coffee or a caffeine solution for 2 weeks enhanced UVB-induced increases in apoptosis in the epidermis, but these treatments had no effect in non-UVB treated normal epidermis. Our results suggest that administration of green tea, coffee and caffeine may inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis - at least in part - by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis. Plasma levels of caffeine observed after its oral administration at cancer-preventive dose levels were within the range observed in moderate coffee drinkers. Topical applications of caffeine to mice previously treated with UVB for 20 weeks (high risk mice without tumors) inhibited the formation of tumors and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors but not in areas of the epidermis away from tumors. The selective effects of caffeine administration to stimulate UVB-induced apoptosis or apoptosis in tumors but not in normal epidermis or in areas of the epidermis away from tumors is of considerable interest, but the reasons for the selective effects of caffeine on apoptosis in DNA damaged tissues are unknown. Further studies are needed to determine mechanisms of these effects of caffeine and to determine the effects of caffeine administration on sunlight-induced actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  12. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of tea, coffee or caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis of SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Conney, Allan H; Zhou, Sherry; Lee, Mao-Jung; Xie, Jian Guo; Yang, Chung S; Lou, You Rong; Lu, YaoPing

    2007-11-01

    Oral administration of green tea or a caffeine solution, but not decaffeinated green tea, inhibits UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. Oral administration of green tea, coffee or a caffeine solution for 2 weeks enhanced UVB-induced increases in apoptosis in the epidermis, but these treatments had no effect in non-UVB treated normal epidermis. Our results suggest that administration of green tea, coffee and caffeine may inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis--at least in part--by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis. Plasma levels of caffeine observed after its oral administration at cancer-preventive dose levels were within the range observed in moderate coffee drinkers. Topical applications of caffeine to mice previously treated with UVB for 20 weeks (high risk mice without tumors) inhibited the formation of tumors and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors but not in areas of the epidermis away from tumors. The selective effects of caffeine administration to stimulate UVB-induced apoptosis or apoptosis in tumors but not in normal epidermis or in areas of the epidermis away from tumors is of considerable interest, but the reasons for the selective effects of caffeine on apoptosis in DNA damaged tissues are unknown. Further studies are needed to determine mechanisms of these effects of caffeine and to determine the effects of caffeine administration on sunlight-induced actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  13. Nerve growth factor displays stimulatory effects on human skin and lung fibroblasts, demonstrating a direct role for this factor in tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micera, Alessandra; Vigneti, Eliana; Pickholtz, Dalia; Reich, Reuven; Pappo, Orit; Bonini, Sergio; Maquart, François Xavier; Aloe, Luigi; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2001-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide which, in addition to its effect on nerve cells, is believed to play a role in inflammatory responses and in tissue repair. Because fibroblasts represent the main target and effector cells in these processes, to investigate whether NGF is involved in lung and skin tissue repair, we studied the effect of NGF on fibroblast migration, proliferation, collagen metabolism, modulation into myofibroblasts, and contraction of collagen gel. Both skin and lung fibroblasts were found to produce NGF and to express tyrosine kinase receptor (trkA) under basal conditions, whereas the low-affinity p75 receptor was expressed only after prolonged NGF exposure. NGF significantly induced skin and lung fibroblast migration in an in vitro model of wounded fibroblast and skin migration in Boyden chambers. Nevertheless NGF did not influence either skin or lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, or metalloproteinase production or activation. In contrast, culture of both lung and skin fibroblasts with NGF modulated their phenotype into myofibroblasts. Moreover, addition of NGF to both fibroblast types embedded in collagen gel increased their contraction. Fibrotic human lung or skin tissues displayed immunoreactivity for NGF, trkA, and p75. These data show a direct pro-fibrogenic effect of NGF on skin and lung fibroblasts and therefore indicate a role for NGF in tissue repair and fibrosis.

  14. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  15. Stimulatory Effect of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Proliferation and Migration of Porcine Trophectoderm Cells and Their Regulation by the Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-AKT and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cell Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooyoung; Kim, Jinyoung; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2014-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent stimulator for angiogenesis, is likely to regulate implantation by stimulating endometrial angiogenesis and vascular permeability. In addition to known angiogenetic effects, VEGF has been suggested to participate in development of the early embryo as a mediator of fetal-maternal dialogue. Current studies have determined VEGF in terms of its role in endometrial vascular events, but VEGF-induced effects on the peri-implantation conceptus (embryo and extraembryonic membranes) remains unknown. In the present study, endometrial VEGF, VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) mRNAs increased significantly during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy as compared to the estrous cycle. Expression of VEGF, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 mRNAs was abundant in endometrial luminal and glandular epithelia, endothelial blood vessels, and scattered cells in the stroma and conceptus trophectoderm. In addition, porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells treated with VEGF exhibited increased abundance of phosphorylated (p)-AKT1, p-ERK1/2, p-p70RSK, p-RPS6, and p-4EBP1 in a time-dependent manner. The addition of U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, inhibited VEGF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but AKT1 phosphorylation was not affected. The addition of LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, decreased VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT1. Furthermore, VEGF significantly stimulated proliferation and migration of pTr cells, but these effects were blocked by SB203580, U0126, rapamycin, and LY294002, which inhibit p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, mTOR, and PI3K, respectively. These results suggest that VEGF is critical to successful growth and development of pTr during early pregnancy and that VEGF-induced stimulatory effect is coordinately regulated by multiple cell signaling pathways, including PI3K-AKT1 and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:24451985

  16. The anti-estrogen tamoxifen blocks the stimulatory effects of interleukin-6 on 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Speirs, V; Adams, E F; White, M C

    1993-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that human breast fibroblasts secrete the cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) which stimulates the ability of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells to convert estrone (E1) to the biologically more active 17 beta-estradiol (E2). This is mediated by an increase in reductive 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17-HSD) activity. In the studies described here, we have extended our observations using the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen, to demonstrate that in a steady state, endogenous intracellular concentrations of E2 have no effects on reductive 17-HSD activity (E1-->E2), but are already maximally inhibitory for the oxidative reaction (E2-->E1). Increasing intracellular concentrations of E2, however, stimulated the reductive 17-HSD in a dose-dependent manner. IL-6 stimulated the reductive pathway and was synergistic with E2. IL-6 is most likely acting through an E2-dependent mechanism, since tamoxifen completely reversed the effects of E2 and IL-6 separately and in combination. These observations suggest that tamoxifen may reduce intratissular levels of E2 by directly increasing oxidative 17-HSD activity and by blocking the actions of paracrine factors such as IL-6 which increase reductive 17-HSD activity.

  17. Nicotine and ethanol co-use in Long-Evans rats: Stimulatory effects of perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Karatayev, Olga; Lukatskaya, Olga; Moon, Sang-Ho; Guo, Wei-Ran; Chen, Dan; Algava, Diane; Abedi, Susan; Leibowitz, Sarah F

    2015-08-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate frequent co-existence of nicotine and alcohol abuse and suggest that this may result, in part, from the ready access to and intake of fat-rich diets. Whereas animal studies show that high-fat diet intake in adults can enhance the consumption of either nicotine or ethanol and that maternal consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases operant responding for nicotine in offspring, little is known about the impact of dietary fat on the co-abuse of these two drugs. The goal of this study was to test in Long-Evans rats the effects of perinatal exposure to fat on the co-use of nicotine and ethanol, using a novel paradigm that involves simultaneous intravenous (IV) self-administration of these two drugs. Fat- vs. chow-exposed offspring were characterized and compared, first in terms of their nicotine self-administration behavior, then in terms of their nicotine/ethanol self-administration behavior, and lastly in terms of their self-administration of ethanol in the absence of nicotine. The results demonstrate that maternal consumption of fat compared to low-fat chow during gestation and lactation significantly stimulates nicotine self-administration during fixed-ratio testing. It also increases nicotine/ethanol self-administration during fixed-ratio and dose-response testing, with BEC elevated to 120 mg/dL, and causes an increase in breakpoint during progressive ratio testing. Of particular note is the finding that rats perinatally exposed to fat self-administer significantly more of the nicotine/ethanol mixture as compared to nicotine alone, an effect not evident in the chow-control rats. After removal of nicotine from the nicotine/ethanol mixture, this difference between the fat- and chow-exposed rats was lost, with both groups failing to acquire the self-administration of ethanol alone. Together, these findings suggest that perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet, in addition to stimulating self-administration of nicotine, causes

  18. Nicotine and ethanol co-use in Long-Evans rats: Stimulatory effects of perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet

    PubMed Central

    Karatayev, Olga; Lukatskaya, Olga; Moon, Sang-Ho; Guo, Wei-Ran; Chen, Dan; Algava, Diane; Abedi, Susan; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate frequent co-existence of nicotine and alcohol abuse and suggest that this may result, in part, from the ready access to and intake of fat-rich diets. Whereas animal studies show that high-fat diet intake in adults can enhance the consumption of either nicotine or ethanol and that maternal consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases operant responding for nicotine in offspring, little is known about the impact of dietary fat on the co-abuse of these two drugs. The goal of this study was to test in Long-Evans rats the effects of perinatal exposure to fat on the co-use of nicotine and ethanol, using a novel paradigm that involves simultaneous intravenous (IV) self-administration of these two drugs. Fat- vs. chow-exposed offspring were characterized and compared, first in terms of their nicotine self-administration behavior, then in terms of their nicotine/ethanol self-administration behavior, and lastly in terms of their self-administration of ethanol in the absence of nicotine. The results demonstrate that maternal consumption of fat compared to low-fat chow during gestation and lactation significantly stimulates nicotine self-administration during fixed-ratio testing. It also increases nicotine/ethanol self-administration during fixed-ratio and dose-response testing, with BEC elevated to 120 mg/dL, and causes an increase in breakpoint during progressive ratio testing. Of particular note is the finding that rats perinatally exposed to fat self-administer significantly more of the nicotine/ethanol mixture as compared to nicotine alone, an effect not evident in the chow-control rats. After removal of nicotine from the nicotine/ethanol mixture, this difference between the fat- and chow-exposed rats was lost, with both groups failing to acquire the self-administration of ethanol alone. Together, these findings suggest that perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet, in addition to stimulating self-administration of nicotine, causes

  19. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  20. Stimulatory effects of Cuminum cyminum and flavonoid glycoside on Cyclosporine-A and restraint stress induced immune-suppression in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Krishan Avtar; Amina, Musarat; Bani, Sarang

    2010-04-15

    Many herbs and spices are known to modulate the immune system and have been shown to restore the immunity in immuno-compromised individuals. Spices generally used to increase the taste and flavor of food also has the history of usage as an ayurvedic medicine. Therefore to explore the health modulating effects of Cuminum cyminum and to identify the active compound, immunomodulatory properties were evaluated using flowcytometry and ELISA in normal and immune-suppressed animals. C. cyminum and compound 1 stimulated the T cells and Th1 cytokines expression in normal animals. Swiss albino mice subjected to Cyclosporine-A induced immune-suppression were dosed orally with C. cyminum (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) on consecutive days. The results showed that administration significantly increased T cells (CD4 and CD8) count and Th1 predominant immune response in a dose dependent manner thereby suggesting immunomodulatory activity through modulation of T lymphocytes expression. In restraint stress induced immune-suppressed animals, compound 1 countered the depleted T lymphocytes, decreased the elevated corticosterone levels and size of adrenal glands and increased the weight of thymus and spleen. Based on the data we may conclude that C. cyminum is a potent immunomodulator and may develop as a lead to recover the immunity of immuno-compromised individuals.

  1. Rotenone exerts similar stimulatory effects on H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Luiz G B; Figueira, Tiago R; Siqueira-Santos, Edilene S; Castilho, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Chronic and systemic treatment of rodents with rotenone, a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, results in neurochemical, behavioral, and neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain mitochondria from old rats (24 months old) would be more susceptible to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and increased generation of H2O2 than mitochondria from young-adult rats (3-4 months old). Isolated brain mitochondria were incubated in the presence of different rotenone concentrations (5, 10, and 100nM), and oxygen consumption and H2O2 production were measured during respiratory states 3 (ADP-stimulated respiration) and 4 (resting respiration). Respiratory state 3 and citrate synthase activity were significantly lower in mitochondria from old rats. Mitochondria from young-adult and old rats showed similar sensitivity to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. Similarly, H2O2 production rates by both types of mitochondria were dose-dependently stimulated to the same extent by increasing concentrations of rotenone. We conclude that rotenone exerts similar effects on oxygen consumption and H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats. Therefore, aging does not increase the mitochondrial H2O2 generation in response to complex I inhibition.

  2. Stimulatory effects of hydroxyl radical generation by Ga-Al-As laser irradiation on mineralization ability of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Ga-Al-As laser irradiation on the mineralization ability of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. HDP cells in vitro were irradiated once with a Ga-AL-As laser at 0.5 W for 500 s and at 1.0 W for 500 s in order to investigate free radicals as one mechanism for transmission of laser photochemical energy to cells. Production of the hydroxyl radical (*OH) was measured using the ESR spin-trapping method and was found to be increased by laser irradiation. The DMPO-OH was not detected in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a *OH scavenger. The formation of calcification nodule was also investigated by von Kossa staining. The number of calcified nodules was increased by 1.0 W-laser irradiation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was higher in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. Expression of mRNAs for heat shock protein 27, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and ALP were greater in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. Expression of BMPs in the conditioned medium was also higher in the 1.0 W-laser irradiation group. In particular, DMSO decreased the number of calcified nodule produced by 1.0 W-laser irradiation. These results supposed that the mineralization of HDP cells is stimulated by laser irradiation, and that *OH generated by laser irradiation is a trigger for promotion of HDP cell mineralization.

  3. CD69 is a stimulatory receptor for natural killer cell and its cytotoxic effect is blocked by CD94 inhibitory receptor

    PubMed Central

    BORREGO, F; ROBERTSON, M J; RITZ, J; PEÑA, J; SOLANA, R

    1999-01-01

    CD69 is a differentiation antigen expressed shortly after activation on T lymphocytes and other cells of haematopoietic origin, including natural killer (NK) cells. The function of CD69 on T lymphocytes acting as a costimulatory molecule in proliferation and lymphokine secretion is well established. NK cells express CD69 after activation by different stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, interferon-α (IFN-α) or anti-CD16 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, although it has been shown that CD69 triggers NK-cell-mediated cytolytic activity, its effect on other NK-cell functions has not been studied. Furthermore, the possible interaction of CD69 triggering with other C-lectin type inhibitory receptors is not known. Thus, the objective of this work is to determine whether CD69-mediated NK cytotoxicity can be regulated by CD94 inhibitory receptor and the role of CD69 on other NK-cell functions different of cytotoxicity. The results show that CD69-mediated NK cytotoxicity can be abrogated by CD94 stimulation in NK cells expressing the CD94 inhibitory form of the receptor, indicating that CD94 regulates the cytotoxic events initiated by a wide variety of NK activatory receptors. We also show that anti-CD69 mAbs, not only triggered NK cytotoxicity, but also induce NK-cell proliferation, CD25 and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, TNF-α production and Ca2+ mobilization in preactivated NK cells. These results suggest that CD69 plays a crucial role in NK-cell function contributing to sustain NK-cell activation, as it has been previously demonstrated in T cells. PMID:10447727

  4. Acute marijuana effects on social conversation.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L

    1986-01-01

    The present study assessed the acute effects of smoked marijuana on social conversation. Speech quantity was recorded continuously in seven moderate marijuana users during separate 1 h experimental sessions following the paced smoking of 0, 1.01, 1.84, and 2.84% THC marijuana cigarettes. Subjects engaged in conversation with undrugged partners who smoked placebo marijuana cigarettes. The active marijuana produced significant decreases in speech quantity, increases in heart rate, and increases in self-reports of "high" and sedation. Partners showed no effects in speech quantity or self-reports of drug effects that were systematically related to the doses administered to the subject pair members. The effects on speech quantity observed in the present study after acute dosing are similar to the effects on social conversation reported previously during chronic marijuana dosing. Marijuana appears to be an exception to the general rule that drugs of abuse increase verbal interaction.

  5. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  6. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca

    PubMed Central

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A.; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8–13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30–50 and 50–100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca’s chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  7. Immune-Stimulatory Dinucleotide at the 5′-End of Oligodeoxynucleotides Is Critical for TLR9-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a CpG or certain synthetic dinucleotides, referred to as immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, induce Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated immune responses. Chemical modifications such as 2′-O-methylribonucleotides incorporated adjacent to the immune-stimulatory dinucleotide on the 5′-side abrogate TLR9-mediated immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the location of immune-stimulatory dinucleotides in ODNs on TLR9-mediated immune responses. We designed and synthesized ODNs with two immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, one placed toward the 5′-end region and the other toward the 3′-end region, incorporated 2′-O-methylribonucleotides selectively preceding the 5′- or 3′-immune-stimulatory dinucleotide or both, and studied TLR9-mediated immune responses of these compounds in cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. These studies showed that an immune-stimulatory dinucleotide located closer to the 5′-end is critical for and dictates TLR9-mediated immune responses. These studies provide insights for the use of ODNs when employed as TLR9 agonists and antagonists or antisense agents. PMID:24900663

  8. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption. PMID:21186925

  9. The effect of some drugs on acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamadto, H H; Rashed, S M; Marii, N E; Sobhy, M M; el-Ridi, A M; el-Fakahany, A F

    1989-12-01

    The effect of some chemotherapeutics, on the course of acute toxoplasmosis in experimentally infected mice was studied. Obtained results showed that, praziquantel, levamisole had no effect on acute toxoplasmosis, while trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and clindamycin showed some prophylactic effect on acute toxoplasmosis in mice. PMID:2788673

  10. Acute effects of meals, noise and nightwork.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Miles, C

    1986-08-01

    An experimental study of the acute effects of meals, noise and nightwork showed that there was a post-meal impairment in detection of targets in a cognitive vigilance task. This was found both during the day and at night, although certain features of the results suggested that the day and night effects were not equivalent. Noise increased the number of false alarms but reduced the post-meal impairment in hit rate. Subjects with low levels of trait or state anxiety showed the greatest post-lunch impairments in performance, but this effect was reduced when the meal was eaten at night.

  11. [Acute tonsillopharyngitis: the effectiveness of topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Nosulya, E V; Kim, I A; Chernykh, N M; Karnoukhova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a furasol sore throat gargle solution for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis. Forty patients presenting with acute tonsillopharyngitis were allocated to two groups, 20 subjects in each, by means of independent sequential randomization. Prior to the onset of the treatment, all the patients were examined for determining the species composition of pharyngeal microflora with the use of an «AutoScan4 System» analyzer («Siemens», USA) and estimating the resistance to antibacterial preparations (by the disk diffusion method). All the participants of the study were prescribed antibacterial therapy. In the patients of group 1 (study group), the antibacterial treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis was supplemented by a furasol sore throat gargle solution whereas those of group 2 (controls) were treated without topical therapy. The quantitative evaluation of the severity of manifestations of the disease before and after the treatment was based on a 5-point visual-analog scale. It was shown that systemic antibacterial therapy resulted in the consistent decrease of the frequency of occurrence of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic microflora in the patients comprising both groups. Treatment with a furasol sore throat gargle solution did not lead to the appearance of bacterial species alien to the oropharynx, nor was it accompanied by the impairment of resistance of its mucous membrane to the colonization by microorganisms. The results of the study give evidence of the well apparent regression of the subjective signs of tonsillopharyngitis and the inflammatory changes in the mucous membrane of the pharynx in the patients given the topical treatment in the form of a furasol sore throat gargle solution in addition to antibacterial therapy. It is concluded that a furasol sore throat gargle solution can be recommended for the introduction into the combined treatment of the patients

  12. The Association Between Viral Infections and Co-stimulatory Gene Polymorphisms in Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ahmad; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Yaghobi, Ramin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Salehipour, Mehdi; Iravani, Mahdiyar

    2016-01-01

    Background The surveillance of kidney transplant patients depends on function of different immunologic markers like co-stimulatory molecules. These molecules may also be associated with post kidney transplant viral related outcomes. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the possible associations between co-stimulatory molecule gene polymorphisms and viral infections in kidney transplant patients. Patients and Methods In total, 172 kidney transplant patients were included in this study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in loci of co-stimulatory molecules including: PDCD.1, CD28, CTLA4 and ICOS, were analyzed in the studied patients by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Active Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were analyzed in each kidney transplant patient using the CMV antigenemia kit and HCV antibody assay, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results CMV active infection was found in 31 of 172 (18.02%) kidney transplant patients. HCV infection was only found in two of the 172 (1.16%) studied patients. Significant associations were found between TT and TC genotypes of CTLA4 -1722T/C and T allele with acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. A significant association was also found between the T allele of CD28 + 17 C/T genetic polymorphism and acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. Significantly higher frequency of AA genotype and A allele of CTLA4 + 49AG polymorphism were found in CMV infected female patients. Also a significantly higher frequency of GG genotype and G allele of PDCD-1.3A/G polymorphisms were found in CMV infected female patients. Conclusions Based on these results, CTLA4 and CD28 genetic polymorphisms, which regulate T-cell activation, can influence active CMV infection in kidney transplant patients. These results should be confirmed by further investigations. PMID:27800130

  13. Acute marijuana effects on human risk taking.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Cherek, Don R; Tcheremissine, Oleg V; Lieving, Lori M; Pietras, Cythia J

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies have established a relationship between marijuana use and risky behavior in natural settings. A limited number of laboratory investigations of marijuana effects on human risk taking have been conducted. The present study was designed to examine the acute effects of smoked marijuana on human risk taking, and to identify behavioral mechanisms that may be involved in drug-induced changes in the probability of risky behavior. Using a laboratory measure of risk taking designed to address acute drug effects, 10 adults were administered placebo cigarettes and three doses of active marijuana cigarettes (half placebo and half 1.77%; 1.77%; and 3.58% Delta9-THC) in a within-subject repeated-measures experimental design. The risk-taking task presented subjects with a choice between two response options operationally defined as risky and nonrisky. Data analyses examined cardiovascular and subjective effects, response rates, distribution of choices between the risky and nonrisky option, and first-order transition probabilities of trial-by-trial data. The 3.58% THC dose increased selection of the risky response option, and uniquely shifted response probabilities following both winning and losing outcomes following selection of the risky option. Acute marijuana administration thereby produced measurable changes in risky decision making under laboratory conditions. Consistent with previous risk-taking studies, shifts in trial-by-trial response probabilities at the highest dose suggested a change in sensitivity to both reinforced and losing risky outcomes. Altered sensitivity to consequences may be a mechanism in drug-induced changes in risk taking. Possible neurobiological sites of action related to THC are discussed.

  14. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  15. After-effects of acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    York, J L; Regan, S G

    1988-01-01

    Female, Long-Evans hooded rats (N = 10, 4 months of age) were given ethanol via intragastric intubation in doses of 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 g/kg (repeated measures design). After-effects (hypothermia, free operant activity, motor performance) were measured at six, twelve and sixteen hours, respectively, for the above doses and were compared to the effects observed after the intubation of equivolume amounts of tap water. The after-effects of ethanol on rectal temperature were varied. Both rotarod performance and free operant activity were impaired after each of the above doses of ethanol. Blood ethanol analyses revealed low blood levels of ethanol (range 6.6 +/- 1.5 to 24.6 +/- 3.4 mg/100 ml) at the time behavioral tests were performed. Thus, quantifiable behavioral impairment was observed after blood ethanol values had declined following acute intoxication episodes. These changes may be related to "hangover" symptomatology in man and may serve as a model for investigating the influence of a variety of factors related to drug dosage, rate of ethanol ingestion, type of alcoholic beverage, and prophylactic or acute intervention therapeutics.

  16. Acute toxic effects of fragrance products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Anderson, J H

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate whether fragrance products can produce acute toxic effects in mammals, we allowed groups of male Swiss-Webster mice to breathe the emissions of five commercial colognes or toilet water for 1 h. We used the ASTM-E-981 test method to evaluate sensory irritation and pulmonary irritation. We used a computerized version of this test to measure the duration of the break at the end of inspiration and the duration of the pause at the end of expiration. Decreases in expiratory flow velocity indicated airflow limitation. We subjected the mice to a functional observational battery to probe for changes in nervous system function. The emissions of these fragrance products caused various combinations of sensory irritation, pulmonary irritation, decreases in expiratory airflow velocity, as well as alterations of the functional observational battery indicative of neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity was more severe after mice were repeatedly exposed to the fragrance products. Evaluation of one of the test atmospheres with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed the presence of chemicals for which irritant and neurotoxic properties had been documented previously. In summary, some fragrance products emitted chemicals that caused a variety of acute toxicities in mice.

  17. Environmental Influences on Self-Stimulatory Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gary L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Effects of passive environmental conditions (quiet, radio, and television) and manipulable objects (no toys, toys, toys plus staff interaction) on stereotypic behaviors of four institutionalized mentally retarded adults with high rates of stereotypic behavior were evaluated. (Author)

  18. Effect of olive mill wastewaters on the oxygen consumption by activated sludge microorganisms: an acute toxicity test method.

    PubMed

    Paixão, S M; Anselmo, A M

    2002-01-01

    The test for inhibition of oxygen consumption by activated sludge (ISO 8192-1986 (E)) was evaluated as a tool for assessing, the acute toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW). According to the ISO test, information generated by this method may be helpful in estimating the effect of a test material on bacterial communities in the aquatic environment, especially in aerobic biological treatment systems. However, the lack of standardized bioassay methodology for effluents imposed that the test conditions were modified and adapted. The experiments were conducted in the presence or absence of an easily biodegradable carbon source (glucose) with different contact times (20 min and 24 h). The results obtained showed a remarkable stimulatory effect of this effluent to the activated sludge microorganisms. In fact, the oxygen uptake rate values increase with increasing effluent concentrations and contact times up to 0.98 microl O(2) h(-1) mg(-1) dry weight for a 100% OMW sample, 24 h contact time, with blanks exhibiting an oxygen uptake rate of ca. 1/10 of this value (0.07-0.10). It seems that the application of the ISO test as an acute toxicity test for effluents should be reconsidered, with convenient adaptation for its utilization as a method of estimating the effect on bacterial communities present in aerobic biological treatment systems. PMID:12015797

  19. Acute effects of ethanol in the control of protein synthesis in isolated rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Girbes, T.; Susin, A.; Ayuso, M.S.; Parrilla, R.

    1983-10-01

    The acute effect of ethanol on hepatic protein synthesis is a rather controversial issue. In view of the conflicting reports on this subject, the effect of ethanol on protein labeling from L-(/sup 3/H)valine in isolated liver cells was studied under a variety of experimental conditions. When tracer doses of the isotope were utilized, ethanol consistently decreased the rate of protein labeling, regardless of the metabolic conditions of the cells. This inhibition was not prevented by doses of 4-methylpyrazole large enough to abolish all the characteristic metabolic effects of ethanol, and it was not related to perturbations on the rates of L-valine transport and/or proteolysis. When ethanol was tested in the presence of saturating doses of L-(/sup 3/H)valine no effect on protein labeling was observed. These observations suggest that the ethanol effect in decreasing protein labeling from tracer doses of the radioactive precursor does not reflect variations in the rate of protein synthesis but reflects changes in the specific activity of the precursor. These changes probably are secondary to variations in the dimensions of the amino acid pool utilized for protein synthesis. Even though it showed a lack of effect when tested alone, in the presence of saturating doses of the radioactive precursor ethanol inhibited the stimulatory effects on protein synthesis mediated by glucose and several gluconeogenic substrates. This effect of ethanol was not prevented by inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase, indicating that a shift of the NAD system to a more reduced state is not the mediator of its action. It is suggested that ethanol probably acted by changing the steady-state levels of some common effector(s) generated from the metabolism of all these fuels or else by preventing the inactivation of a translational repressor.

  20. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  1. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-12-01

    Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11°C; control) and warm (20°C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I-IV (CI-IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma metabolites, with modest additive actions limited to CII and IV state 4. Overall, our results indicate that warm acclimation came at a cost of reduced ETS efficiency and increased sensitivity to added stressors. PMID:26513222

  2. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-12-01

    Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11°C; control) and warm (20°C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I-IV (CI-IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma metabolites, with modest additive actions limited to CII and IV state 4. Overall, our results indicate that warm acclimation came at a cost of reduced ETS efficiency and increased sensitivity to added stressors.

  3. Co-stimulatory and Co-inhibitory Pathways in Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianxia; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-05-17

    The immune system is guided by a series of checks and balances, a major component of which is a large array of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways that modulate the host response. Although co-stimulation is essential for boosting and shaping the initial response following signaling through the antigen receptor, inhibitory pathways are also critical for modulating the immune response. Excessive co-stimulation and/or insufficient co-inhibition can lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance and thus to autoimmunity. In this review, we will focus on the role of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways in two systemic (systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis) and two organ-specific (multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes) emblematic autoimmune diseases. We will also discuss how mechanistic analysis of these pathways has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and initiation of clinical trials for autoimmune diseases, as well as outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:27192568

  4. Sensory extinction: a procedure form eliminating self-stimulatory behavior in developmentally disabled children.

    PubMed

    Rincover, A

    1978-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of sensory reinforcement in the motivation of self-stimulation. If self-stimulatory behavior is maintained by its sensory consequences, such as the proprioceptive, auditory, or visual stimulation it produces, then such behavior should extinguish when those sensory consequences are not permitted. The present study introduces a new procedure, Sensory Extinction, in which certain sensory consequences are masked or removed, to examine whether self-stimulation is operant behavior maintained by sensory reinforcement. The effectiveness of Sensory Extinction was assessed by a reversal design for each of three autistic children, and the results showed the following. First, self-stimulation reliably extinguished when a certain sensory consequence was removed, then increased when that consequence was permitted. This was replicable within and across children. Second, different Sensory Extinction procedures were required for different self-stimulatory behaviors, since the sensory reinforcers supporting them were idiosyncratic across children. Finally, regarding clinical gains, the data suggest that Sensory Extinction may be a relatively convenient and rapid alternative for the treatment of self-stimulation. The present findings extend the efficacy of extinction as a behavior-modification technique to instances in which the reinforcer is purely sensory. The implications of these results for the treatment of other forms of deviant behavior are discussed.

  5. Effects of an acute seizure on associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Holley, Andrew J; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed adult 129SvEvTac mice to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1h, but not 6h, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared with controls 24h later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1h after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open-field test 2h but not 24h later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge.

  6. Co-stimulatory molecules as targets for treatment of lupus.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Joan T

    2013-09-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules help to regulate interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. Both work in murine models and some early studies in human lupus support further examination of these molecules as therapeutic targets. Complexities of lupus clinical trial variables may have hampered progress in this area but recent developments in the field may make interventional trials more feasible in the near future. To date biologics which provide direct blockade of interactions between CD40 and CD154, B7RP-1 and ICOS, and CD80 or CD86 with CD28 have been assessed in multicenter clinical trials. These data will be reviewed and critiqued.

  7. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  8. Adenosine potentiates stimulatory effects on granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro of IL-3 and SCF, but not those of G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-11.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Weiterová, L; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to ascertain if adenosine is able to co-operate with selected hematopoietic growth factors and cytokines, namely with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and interleukin-11 (IL-11), in inducing the growth of colonies from hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) from normal bone marrow cells in vitro. Adenosine was found not to produce any colonies when present in the cultures as the only potential stimulator. All the tested cytokines and growth factors were observed to induce the growth of distinct numbers of GM-CFC colonies, with the exception of IL-11. When suboptimal concentrations of the evaluated cytokines and growth factors were tested in the cultures in which various concentrations of adenosine were concomitantly present, mutually potentiating effects were found in the case of IL-3 and SCF. These results confirm the role of adenosine in regulation of granulopoiesis and predict IL-3 and SCF as candidates for further in vivo studies of their combined administration with adenosine.

  9. Effects of Acute Exercise on Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labban, Jeffrey D.; Etnier, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of…

  10. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  11. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  12. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects. PMID:26731112

  13. Acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of pain control on leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, J; Kokalj, A

    2014-03-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on leg stiffness of patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Twenty-eight eligible male athletes (aged 39.1 ± 10.3 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were treated with etoricoxib (120 mg oral once daily) during 7 days. Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), and leg stiffness were evaluated pre- and post- anti-inflammatory treatment. Results of this study showed that over the 7-day treatment period, etoricoxib provided significant relief of Achilles tendon pain (VAS) compared to that experienced at baseline: 54.5 ± 21.6 and 24.5 ± 24.8, respectively (p<0.001). Leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week NSAID therapy: LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.97 ± 0.1; (p=0.02). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated that patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy increased their leg stiffness of the affected side after oral anti-inflammatory therapy. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may contribute to improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24583548

  14. Acute effects of tea consumption on attention and mood.

    PubMed

    Einöther, Suzanne J; Martens, Vanessa E

    2013-12-01

    Tea has historically been associated with mood and performance benefits, such as relaxation and concentration. This review summarizes the research on the acute effects of tea, and its ingredients theanine and caffeine, on attention and mood. Consistent with abundant research on the benefits of caffeine, the performance benefits of tea were identified in a number of studies, with particularly consistent evidence for improved attention. Tea consumption also consistently improved self-reported alertness and arousal, whereas effects on pleasure or relaxation were less consistent. In addition to the research on caffeine in real-life performance, 2 recent studies have provided a broader perspective on tea's effects on psychological function in that they showed beneficial effects in related areas such as work performance and creativity. These studies showed the validity of laboratory findings by supporting the idea that tea consumption has acute benefits on both mood and performance in real-life situations.

  15. The effects of cold exposure on leukocytes, hormones and cytokines during acute exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dominique D; Gagnon, Sheila S; Rintamäki, Hannu; Törmäkangas, Timo; Puukka, Katri; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of exercise on total leukocyte count and subsets, as well as hormone and cytokine responses in a thermoneutral and cold environment, with and without an individualized pre-cooling protocol inducing low-intensity shivering. Nine healthy young men participated in six experimental trials wearing shorts and t-shirts. Participants exercised for 60 min on a treadmill at low (LOW: 50% of peak VO2) and moderate (MOD: 70% VO2peak) exercise intensities in a climatic chamber set at 22°C (NT), and in 0°C (COLD) with and without a pre-exercise low-intensity shivering protocol (SHIV). Core and skin temperature, heart rate and oxygen consumption were collected continuously. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of exercise to assess endocrine and immunological changes. Core temperature in NT was greater than COLD and SHIV by 0.4±0.2°C whereas skin temperature in NT was also greater than COLD and SHIV by 8.5±1.4°C and 9.3±2.5°C respectively in MOD. Total testosterone, adenocorticotropin and cortisol were greater in NT vs. COLD and SHIV in MOD. Norepinephrine was greater in NT vs. other conditions across intensities. Interleukin-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, Rantes, Eotaxin, IP-10, MIP-1β, MCP-1, VEGF, PDGF, and G-CSF were elevated in NT vs. COLD and/or SHIV. Furthermore, IFN-γ, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-10, VEGF, and PDGF demonstrate greater concentrations in SHIV vs. COLD, mainly in the MOD condition. This study demonstrated that exercising in the cold can diminish the exercise-induced systemic inflammatory response seen in a thermoneutral environment. Nonetheless, prolonged cooling inducing shivering thermogenesis prior to exercise, may induce an immuno-stimulatory response following moderate intensity exercise. Performing exercise in cold environments can be a useful strategy in partially inhibiting the acute systemic inflammatory response from exercise but oppositely, additional body cooling may reverse

  16. The effects of acute and chronic stress on diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2012-10-23

    Stress is an important contributor to pathological conditions in humans. Hormonal changes that occur during acute and chronic stress situations can affect glucose homeostasis in both healthy people and in those with diabetes. Several studies have reported a negative effect of acute stress on maintenance of blood glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The effect of stress on glycemic control in people with diabetes may be related to a direct effect of stress hormones on blood glucose levels and an indirect effect of stress on patient behaviors related to diabetes treatment and monitoring and meal and exercise plans. In contrast, there is no clear evidence that stressful life events promote the development of diabetes in children or in adults. Stress hyperglycemia, the development of hyperglycemia during acute illness, represents another interesting connection between the stress system and glucose homeostasis. A large body of evidence supports an association between stress hyperglycemia and increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Interestingly, there is some evidence supporting a beneficial effect of insulin in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units. Finally, stress can influence the development of type 2 diabetes indirectly by promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23092890

  17. Effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Seolhwa; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Insub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Roh, Changhyun

    2012-08-08

    Ionizing radiation has become an inevitable health concern emanating from natural sources like space travel and from artificial sources like medical therapies. In general, exposure to ionizing radiation such as γ-rays is one of the methods currently used to stress specific model systems. In this study, we elucidated the long-term effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on DCX-positive cells in hippocampal neurogenesis. Groups of two-month-old C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at acute dose (5 Gy) or fractional doses (1 Gy × 5 times and 0.5 Gy × 10 times). Six months after exposure to γ-irradiation, the hippocampus was analyzed. Doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry was used to measure changes of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The number of DCX-positive cells was significantly decreased in all acute and fractionally irradiation groups. The long-term changes in DCX-positive cells triggered by radiation exposure showed a very different pattern to the short-term changes which tended to return to the control level in previous studies. Furthermore, the number of DCX-positive cells was relatively lower in the acute irradiation group than the fractional irradiation groups (approximately 3.6-fold), suggesting the biological change on hippocampal neurogenesis was more susceptible to being damaged by acute than fractional irradiation. These results suggest that the exposure to γ-irradiation as a long-term effect can trigger biological responses resulting in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

  18. Acute IOP elevation with scleral suction: effects on retrobulbar haemodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A; Joos, K; Kay, M; Evans, D; Shetty, R; Sponsel, W E; Martin, B

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Mechanical and vascular factors may both contribute to glaucoma. This study investigated the relation of mechanical to vascular factors by examining how acute IOP elevation altered flow velocities in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries. METHODS: IOP was elevated from a baseline near 14 to approximately 45 mm Hg using suction ophthalmodynamometry. During recovery from scleral suction, IOP fell to near 8 mm Hg. At each IOP, peak systolic and end diastolic velocities (PSV and EDV) were measured in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries using colour Doppler imaging (Siemens Quantum 2000). Eleven healthy people served as subjects. RESULTS: Acute elevation in IOP had no effect upon PSV, EDV, or the derived resistance index in the ophthalmic artery: flow velocities in this vessel were identical at IOP of 8 mm Hg or 45 mm Hg. In contrast, in the central retinal artery, PSV and EDV fell, and the resistance index rose, in steady progression as IOP was acutely elevated (each p < 0.01). At IOP of 45 mm Hg, EDV was virtually absent and the resistance index was very nearly 1.0. CONCLUSION: Ophthalmic arterial haemodynamics are unrelated to acute fluctuations of the IOP over a wide range, suggesting that ocular hypertension itself cannot induce vascular dysfunction in this artery. In contrast, flow velocities in the central retinal artery were highly IOP dependent, implying that haemodynamic and mechanical factors are closely linked in this vascular bed. PMID:9059269

  19. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  20. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  1. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity–induced plasticity with specific cognitive training–induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  2. The Protective Effects of Buzui on Acute Alcoholism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-Chao; Gao, Shu-di; Hu, Xiao-yu; Yi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of a traditional buzui recipe in anti-inebriation treatment. Buzui consists of Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis, Fructus Chebulae, Fructus Mume, Fructus Crataegi, Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli, and Excrementum Bombycis. The buzui mixture was delivered by gavage, and ethanol was delivered subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of buzui on the righting reflex, inebriation rates, and the survival curve are depicted. Blood alcohol concentrations, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were recorded. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as malonaldehyde (MDA) levels, were also measured. Our results demonstrated that a traditional buzui recipe showed significant effects on promoting wakefulness and the prevention of acute alcohol intoxication, accelerating the metabolism of alcohol in the liver and reducing the oxidative damage caused by acute alcoholism. PMID:26884793

  3. Effects of acute exercise on long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Labban, Jeffrey D; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: exercise prior to exposure, exercise after exposure, or no-exercise. Exercise consisted of 30 min on a cycle ergometer including 20 min at moderate intensity. Only the exercise prior group recalled significantly more than the control group (p < .05). Differences among the exercise groups failed to reach significance (p = .09). Results indicated that acute exercise positively influenced recall and that exercise timing relative to memory task may have an impact on this effect.

  4. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  5. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  6. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally). Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years). The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05) increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05) lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes. PMID:25789226

  7. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  8. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  9. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  10. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  11. Effects of acute exposure to aluminum on cognition in humans.

    PubMed

    Molloy, D W; Standish, T I; Nieboer, E; Turnbull, J D; Smith, S D; Dubois, S

    2007-12-01

    There is epidemiological evidence suggesting an association between aluminum in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and between aluminum in dialysate and dialysis dementia. The exact role of aluminum in the pathogenesis of these and other dementias is not clear. This study examined the acute effects of aluminum on cognitive function in patients with AD and related dementias and in age-matched and younger volunteers with normal cognitive function. Whether individuals with AD and/or the APOE epsilon4 genotype had enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of aluminum was tested, and whether individuals with elevated blood aluminum concentrations exhibited acute cognitive effects was determined. Subjects were randomized to receive a single dose of aluminum orally (Amphojel plus citrate) for 3 d followed by a 3-wk washout, and then 3 d of matched placebo administration, or vice versa. Serum aluminum levels were measured and the daily dose of Amphojel was adjusted to a target aluminum level between 50 and 150 microg/L. Neuropsychological tests were administered at baseline and 90 min after the third dose of Amphojel or placebo. There was a large interindividual variation in aluminum serum levels in all study groups after the same initial dose of Amphojel. There were no significant differences in neuropsychological test scores after aluminum ingestion in normal volunteers or in patients with cognitive impairment. There was no association between APOE epsilon4 genotype and aluminum absorption. The results did not support the hypothesis that aluminum ingested at these doses produces acute effects on cognition or adverse effects, nor did they reveal that AD patients are more vulnerable to such outcomes. Further inquiry is required to explore any possible association between aluminum and cognition, but controlled trials may be limited by safety concerns.

  12. Acute effects of routine firefighting on lung function.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D; Distefano, S; Morse, L; Becker, C

    1986-01-01

    We undertook a study to determine the acute effects of routine firefighting on lung function and the relationship between these acute effects and nonspecific airway responsiveness. For 29 firefighters from a single fire station, we calculated the concentration of methacholine aerosol that caused a 100% increase in specific airway resistance (Pc100). Over an 8-week period we than measured FEV1 and FVC in each firefighter before and after each 24-hr workshift and after every fire. From 199 individual workshifts without fires, we calculated the mean +/- 2 SD across-workshift change in FEV1 and FVC for each firefighter. Eighteen of 76 measurements obtained within 2 hr after a fire (24%) showed a greater than 2 SD fall in FEV1 and/or FVC compared to two of 199 obtained after routine workshifts without fires (1%; p less than .001). On 13 of 18 occasions when spirometry decreased significantly, we obtained repeat spirometry (postshift) 3-18.5 hr after fires, and on four of these occasions FEV1 and/or FVC were still more than 2 SD below baseline. Decrements in spirometry occurred as often in firefighters with high Pc100s as in those with low Pc100s. In two firefighters in whom FEV1 and FVC fell by more than 10% after fires, we repeated measurements of methacholine sensitivity, and it was increased over the prestudy baseline. These findings suggest that routine firefighting is associated with a high incidence of acute decrements in lung function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients.

  14. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients. PMID:25271215

  15. Phytotoxicity and stimulatory impacts of nanosized and bulk titanium dioxide on fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill).

    PubMed

    Feizi, Hassan; Kamali, Maryam; Jafari, Leila; Rezvani Moghaddam, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the this study was to compare concentrations of nanosized TiO2 at 0, 5, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg L(-1) with bulk TiO2 for phytotoxic and stimulatory effects on fennel seed germination and early growth stage. After 14 d of seed incubation, germination percentage highly improved following exposure to 60 ppm nanosized TiO2. Similar positive effects occurred in terms of shoot dry weight and germination rate. Application of bulk TiO2 particles in 40 ppm concentration greatly decreased shoot biomass up to 50% compared to the control. Application of 40 ppm nanosized TiO2 treatment improved mean germination time by 31.8% in comparison to the untreated control. In addition, low and intermediate concentrations of nanosized TiO2 enhanced indices such as germination value, vigor index and mean daily germination. In general, there was a considerable response by fennel seed to nanosized TiO2 presenting the possibility of a new approach to overcome problems with seed germination in some plant species, particularly medicinal plants.

  16. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  17. Mustard gas toxicity: the acute and chronic pathological effects.

    PubMed

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S; Ghanei, Mostafa; Ansarin, Khalil; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2010-10-01

    Ever since it was first used in armed conflict, mustard gas (sulfur mustard, MG) has been known to cause a wide range of acute and chronic injuries to exposure victims. The earliest descriptions of these injuries were published during and in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, and a further series of accounts followed the Second World War. More recently, MG has been deployed in warfare in the Middle East and this resulted in large numbers of victims, whose conditions have been studied in detail at hospitals in the region. In this review, we bring together the older and more recent clinical studies on MG toxicity and summarize what is now known about the acute and chronic effects of the agent on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and other physiological systems. In the majority of patients, the most clinically serious long-term consequences of MG poisoning are on the respiratory system, but the effects on the skin and other systems also have a significant impact on quality of life. Aspects of the management of these patients are discussed.

  18. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  19. Seasonal pattern of the acute mortality effects of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; Lin, Hung-Mo; Stewart, Walter F; Kong, Linli; Xu, Fen; Zhou, Denjin; Zhu, Zhicao; Liang, Shengwen; Chen, Weiqing; Shah, Nirav; Stetter, Christy; He, Qingci

    2010-04-01

    Evidence of seasonal variation of acute mortality effects of air pollution is inconsistent. The seasonal patterns of associations between daily mortality and daily mean concentrations of particulate matter 10 microm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were examined using 4 yr of data (2001-2004) in Wuhan, China. Four distinct seasons occur in Wuhan, where approximately 4.5 million residents live in the city core area of 201 km2. Air pollution levels are higher and pollution ranges are wider in Wuhan than in most cities. Quasi-likelihood estimation within the context of the generalized additive models (natural spline [NS] models in R) was used to model the natural logarithm of the expected daily death counts as a function of the predictor variables. The estimates of the interaction between seasons and pollution were obtained from the main effects and pollutant season interaction models. It was found that the interactions between three pollutants and cause-specific mortality were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The strongest effects occurred consistently in winter for all-natural, cardiovascular, stroke, and respiratory mortality. Every 10-microg/m3 increase in PM10 daily concentration at lag 0-1 days was associated with an increase in all-natural mortality of 0.69% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-0.94%) for winter, 0.34% (95% CI: 0.00-0.69%) for spring, 0.45% (95% CI: -0.13 to 1.04%) for summer, and -0.21% (95% CI: -0.54 to 0.12%) for fall. The results show a clear seasonal pattern of acute mortality effects of ambient air pollution and the strongest effects occurred during winter in the study city.

  20. Involvement of sigma (sigma) receptors in the acute actions of methamphetamine: receptor binding and behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Emily C; McCracken, Kari A; Liu, Yun; Pouw, Buddy; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2005-10-01

    Methamphetamine interacts with sigma (sigma) receptors, suggesting that the drug produces some of its physiological and behavioral effects through these sites. Therefore, in the present report, receptor binding and pharmacological studies were performed to characterize the interaction between methamphetamine and sigma receptors. Of the two major sigma receptor subtypes, sigma1 and sigma2, competition binding studies showed that methamphetamine has a 22-fold preferential affinity for the sigma1 subtype. Saturation binding studies using the sigma1 selective radioligand [3H]+-pentazocine showed that in the presence of methamphetamine, there was a significant change in Kd, but not Bmax, suggesting competitive interactions. In behavioral studies, pretreatment of Swiss Webster mice with the sigma1 receptor antagonists, BD1063 or BD1047, significantly attenuated the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. Mice that were administered an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to down-regulate brain sigma1 receptors also exhibited a reduced locomotor stimulatory response to methamphetamine, as compared to control mice receiving mismatch oligonucleotides. Together, the data suggest that sigma1 receptors are involved in the acute actions of methamphetamine and that antagonism of this subtype is sufficient to prevent the locomotor stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. PMID:15939443

  1. Therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation in acute acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Vavrina, J; Müller, W

    1995-01-01

    Retrospectively 78 patients with uni- or bilateral acute acoustic trauma (AAT) were evaluated to assess the therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO). All subjects received saline or dextran (Rheomacodrex) infusions with Ginkgo extracts (Tebonin) and prednisone. Thirty six patients underwent additional hyperbaric oxygenation at a pressure of 2 atmospheres absolute for 60 minutes once daily. Both treatment groups were comparable as far as age, gender, initial hearing loss and prednisone dose are concerned. The delay of therapy onset was 15 hours in both groups and treatment was started within 72 hours in all cases. Control audiometry was performed after 6.5 days, when the HBO group had had 5 exposures to hyperbaric oxygenation. The average hearing gain in the group without HBO was 74.3 dB and in the group treated additionally with HBO 121.3 dB (P < 0.004). It is concluded, that hyperbaric oxygenation significantly improves hearing recovery after AAT. Therefore acute acoustic trauma with significant hearing threshold depression remains an otological emergency. Minimal therapy involving waiting for spontaneous recovery, which is mostly incomplete leaving a residual C5 or C6 and handicapping tinnitus, is not the treatment of choice. Randomized prospective clinical trials with a larger patient series are needed and further experimental studies are required to understand the physiological mechanisms of HBO responsible for the clinical success in AAT.

  2. Acute and chronic respiratory effects of sodium borate particulate exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Wegman, D H; Eisen, E A; Hu, X; Woskie, S R; Smith, R G; Garabrant, D H

    1994-01-01

    This study examined work-related chronic abnormality in pulmonary function and work-related acute irritant symptoms associated with exposure to borate dust in mining and processing operations. Chronic effects were examined by pulmonary function at the beginning and end of a 7-year interval. Time-specific estimates of sodium borate particulate exposures were used to estimate cumulative exposure during the study interval. Change in pulmonary function over the 7 years was found unrelated to the estimate of cumulative exposure during that interval. Exposure-response associations also were examined with respect to short-term peak exposures and incidence of five symptoms of acute respiratory irritation. Hourly measures of health outcome and continuous measures of particulate exposure were made on each subject throughout the day. Whenever a subject reported one of the irritant symptoms, a symptom intensity score was also recorded along with the approximate time of onset. The findings indicated that exposure-response relationships were present for each of the specific symptoms at several symptom intensity levels. The associations were present when exposure was estimated by both day-long and short-term (15-min) time-weighted average exposures. Associations persisted after taking account of smoking, age, and the presence of a common cold. No significant difference in response rate was found between workers exposed to different types of sodium borate dusts. PMID:7889871

  3. Effects of recombinant human GM-CSF on proliferation of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Young, D; Herrmann, F; Wiper, D; Wagner, K; Sabbath, K D

    1986-05-01

    Proliferation of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells in vitro is limited in most cases to a small subset of blasts that have several properties of stem cells. These leukemic colony-forming cells (AML-CFU) generally require addition of exogenous growth factors for proliferation in agar or methylcellulose. These factors can be supplied by media conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal leukocytes or by CSF-secreting tumor cell lines. However, the exact factor or factors required for stimulation of AML-CFU growth have not been defined. We compared the AML-CFU stimulatory activity of a human recombinant GM-CSF with that of GCT-CM, Mo-CM, and the PHA-leukocyte feeder system in 15 cases of AML. In each of the 12 cases that required exogenous growth factors for maximum AML-CFU growth, recombinant GM-CSF could replace either GM-CSF or Mo-CM, and could partially replace the PHA-leukocyte feeder system. These results indicate that this GM-CSF is a growth promoter of AML-CFU in these culture systems.

  4. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect.

    PubMed

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W; McGeary, John E; Monti, Peter M; Rohsenow, Damaris J

    2011-02-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marijuana on physiological and subjective stimulation, subjective intoxication, and self-reported negative and positive affect with 114 weekly marijuana smokers. Individuals were first tested under a baseline/no smoking condition and again under experimental condition. Relative to placebo, THC significantly increased arousal and confusion/bewilderment. However, the direction of effect on anxiety varied depending on instructional set: Anxiety increased after THC for those told placebo but decreased among other participants. Furthermore, marijuana users who expected more impairment from marijuana displayed more anxiety after smoking active marijuana, whereas those who did not expect the impairment became less anxious after marijuana. Both pharmacologic and stimulus expectancy main effects significantly increased positive affect. Frequent marijuana users were less anxious after smoking as compared to less frequent smokers. These findings show that expectancy instructions and pharmacology play independent roles in effects of marijuana on negative affect. Further studies examining how other individual difference factors impact marijuana's effects on mood are needed.

  5. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W.; McGeary, John E.; Monti, Peter M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2013-01-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marijuana on physiological and subjective stimulation, subjective intoxication, and self-reported negative and positive affect with 114 weekly marijuana smokers. Individuals were first tested under a baseline/no smoking condition and again under experimental condition. Relative to placebo, THC significantly increased arousal and confusion/bewilderment. However, the direction of effect on anxiety varied depending on instructional set: Anxiety increased after THC for those told placebo but decreased among other participants. Furthermore, marijuana users who expected more impairment from marijuana displayed more anxiety after smoking active marijuana, whereas those who did not expect the impairment became less anxious after marijuana. Both pharmacologic and stimulus expectancy main effects significantly increased positive affect. Frequent marijuana users were less anxious after smoking as compared to less frequent smokers. These findings show that expectancy instructions and pharmacology play independent roles in effects of marijuana on negative affect. Further studies examining how other individual difference factors impact marijuana's effects on mood are needed. PMID:24319318

  6. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  7. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  8. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  9. WHY DO THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OT TOLUENE IN RATS DEPEND ON THE ROUTE OF EXPOSURE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite evidence suggesting that the acute effects of organic solvents are related to their concentration in the brain, we have observed route-dependent differences in the acute behavioral effects of toluene. Whereas inhaled toluene disrupts the performance of rats on a visual si...

  10. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cocaine on the Spontaneous Behavior of Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of acute and daily cocaine on spontaneous behavior patterns of pigeons. After determining the acute effects of a range of doses, 9 pigeons were divided into three groups that received one of three doses of cocaine daily, either 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 mg/kg cocaine. Measures were taken of spontaneous…

  11. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  12. Antitumoral effect of Ocoxin on acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Hernández-García, Susana; Sanz, Eduardo; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy whose incidence is growing in developed countries. In the relapse setting, very limited therapeutic options are available and in most cases only palliative care can be offered to patients. The effect of a composite formulation that contains several antioxidants, Ocoxin Oral solution (OOS), was tested in this condition. When analyzed in vitro, OOS exhibited anti-AML action that was both time and dose dependent. In vivo OOS induced a ralentization of tumor growth that was due to a decrease in cell proliferation. Such effect could, at least partially, be due to an increase in the cell cycle inhibitor p27, although other cell cycle proteins seemed to be altered. Besides, OOS induced an immunomodulatory effect through the induction of IL6. When tested in combination with other therapeutic agents normally used in the treatment of AML patients, OOS demonstrated a higher antiproliferative action, suggesting that it may be used in combination with those standard of care treatments to potentiate their antiproliferative action in the AML clinic. PMID:26756220

  13. Antidepressant Effects of Mallotus oppositifolius in Acute Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Kukuia, Kennedy K. E.; Mante, Priscilla K.; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Adongo, Donatus W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Mallotus oppositifolius (MOE), a plant used for CNS conditions in Ghana, was investigated for acute antidepressant effects in the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). Results. In both FST and TST, MOE (10, 30, and 100 mg kg−1) significantly decreased immobility periods and frequencies. A 3-day pretreatment with 200 mg kg−1, i.p., para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, reversed the decline in immobility and the increase of swimming score induced by MOE in the modified FST. Pretreatment with reserpine alone (1 mg kg−1), α-methyldopa alone (400 mg kg−1, i.p.), or a combination of both drugs failed to reverse the decline in immobility or the increase in swimming score caused by the extract in the modified FST. The extract potentiated the frequency of head twitch responses induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine. Pretreatment with d-serine (600 mg kg−1, i.p.), glycine/NMDA agonist, abolished the behavioural effects of MOE while d-cycloserine (2.5 mg kg−1, i.p.), a glycine/NMDA partial agonist, potentiated it in both TST and modified FST. Conclusion. The extract exhibited antidepressant effects in mice which is mediated by enhancement of serotoninergic neurotransmission and inhibition of glycine/NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25045543

  14. PPARα mediates acute effects of palmitoylethanolamide on sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Xiong, Yee; Coicou, Lia G.; Piomelli, Daniele; Seybold, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The amplitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient is larger in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from tumor-bearing mice compared to that of neurons from naive mice, and the change is mimicked by co-culturing DRG neurons with the fibrosarcoma cells used to generate the tumors (Khasabova et al., 2007). The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a ligand for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα), was determined on the evoked-Ca2+ transient in the co-culture condition. The level of PEA was reduced in DRG cells from tumor-bearing mice as well as those co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. Pretreatment with PEA, a synthetic PPARα agonist (GW7647), or ARN077, an inhibitor of the enzyme that hydrolyses PEA, acutely decreased the amplitude of the evoked Ca2+ transient in small DRG neurons co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. The PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocked the effect of each. In contrast, the PPARα agonist was without effect in the control condition, but the antagonist increased the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient suggesting that PPARα receptors are saturated by endogenous ligand under basal conditions. Effects of drugs on mechanical sensitivity in vivo paralleled their effects on DRG neurons in vitro. Local injection of ARN077 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in tumor-bearing mice, and the effect was blocked by GW6471. These data support the conclusion that the activity of DRG neurons is rapidly modulated by PEA through a PPARα-dependent mechanism. Moreover, agents that increase the activity of PPARα may provide a therapeutic strategy to reduce tumor-evoked pain. PMID:22972997

  15. [Acute Toxic Effects of Bromate on Aquatic Organisms].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Liu, Dong-mei; Zhang, Wen-juan; Cui, Fu-yi

    2016-02-15

    Acute toxic effects of potassium bromate, sodium bromate and potassium bromide on luminescent bacteria, water flea, green alga and zebrafish were studied using standard toxic testing methods. The results showed that the pollutants had no effect on the luminous intensity of luminescent bacteria. The 96 h EC5. of potassium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 738.18 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 on Daphnia magna and Moina was 154.01 mg x L(-1) was 161.80 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 198 52 mg x L(-1), 175.68 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 931.4 mg x L(-1). The 96 h EC50 of sodium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 540.26 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 Daphnia magna and Moina was 127.90 mg x L(-1), 111.07 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 161.80 mg x L(-1), 123.47 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 1065.6 mg x L(-1). But the effects of potassium bromide on the above several kinds of aquatic organisms were far smaller than those of potassium bromate and sodium bromate. The toxic effects on test organisms were due to the impacts of bromate after the comparison of different pollutants, and the effects were more obvious with the increase of exposure time. The order of sensitivity to the toxic effects of bromate was Daphnia magna, Moina > Scenedesmus obliquus > zebrafish > Chlorella vulgaris, luminescent bacteria. PMID:27363170

  16. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  17. Aflatrem: a tremorgenic mycotoxin with acute neurotoxic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, J J; Cameron, J E; Cole, R J

    1985-01-01

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins induce neurologic symptoms ranging from mental confusion to tremors, seizures and death, and are apparently the only class of mycotoxins with significant central nervous system activity. Tremorgens have been implicated in a number of neurologic diseases of cattle collectively known as staggers syndromes, and pose significant agricultural and health problems for both cattle and humans. Although the effects of tremorgens are thought to result from transient perturbations of amino acid neurotransmitter release mechanisms, there is reason to believe that acute exposures to toxins with such synaptic effects may result in degeneration of neuronal fiber processes. To test this hypothesis, rats were given a single tremorgenic (3 mg/kg, IP) dose of aflatrem, and kinetics of amino acid neurotransmitter uptake was assessed in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals at 1 day, 1 week, and 2 weeks after injection. Results indicate a decrease in the capacity of the GABA and glutamate uptake systems, which was interpreted as a loss of nerve terminals. The affinity constants suggest a decrease in release of these transmitters as well. In addition to its transient influence on transmitter release, a single low dose of aflatrem is able to induce degeneration of neuronal processes in hippocampal neurotransmitter systems and therefore represents a long-term health threat. PMID:2867895

  18. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  19. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy. PMID:26817927

  20. Temporal dissociation between sodium depletion and sodium appetite appearance: Involvement of inhibitory and stimulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Margatho, L O; Porcari, C Y; Macchione, A F; da Silva Souza, G D; Caeiro, X E; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Vivas, L; Godino, A

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to analyze the participation of inhibitory and stimulatory signals in the temporal dissociation between sodium depletion (SD) induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the appearance of sodium appetite (SA), particularly 2h after PD, when the rats are hypovolemic/natremic but SA is not evident. We investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonist, methysergide, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on hypertonic NaCl and water intake 2h vs. 24h after PD. We also studied plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone (ALDO) concentration 2h vs. 24h after PD. Additionally, we combined the analysis of brain Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) with the detection of double immunoreactivity in 5HT and oxytocinergic (OT) cells 2h after PD. Bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide (4μg/200nl at each site) increased NaCl intake when tested 2h after PD compared to controls. We found a significant increase in PRA and ALDO concentration after PD but no differences between 2 and 24h after PD. We also found for the first time a significant increase 2h after PD in the number of Fos-ir neurons in the brainstem nuclei that have been shown to be involved in the inhibition of SA. In summary, the results show that 5HT-mechanisms in the LPBN modulate sodium intake during the delay of SA when the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is increased. In addition, the activation of brainstem areas previously associated with the satiety phase of SA is in part responsible for the temporal dissociation between SD and behavioral arousal. PMID:25841323

  1. Hypertensive factor: calcium stimulatory activity obtained from different tissues and animal species.

    PubMed

    Wright, G L; Huang, B S; Johnson, P J; McCumbee, W D

    1988-10-01

    It was recently shown that a peptide (hypertensive factor, HF) isolated from erythrocyte hemolysates from spontaneously hypertensive rats induced a prolonged elevation of blood pressure in normotensive rats. In addition, the peptide produced a marked stimulation of the in vitro uptake of lanthanum-resistant calcium by the aortae and enhanced the contractile response of aortic rings to constrictor agents. The present report describes findings of calcium stimulatory activity, enhancement of contractile function, or pressor activity in extracts of homogenates from several tissues of the rat and from erythrocyte hemolysates of several mammalian species. Significant stimulation of calcium uptake in aortic rings was obtained with preparations from rat brain, liver, and kidney. The activity per weight of tissue was similar for brain and kidney (approximately 2 units/g), while liver exhibited somewhat higher concentrations (4 units/g). The diffusate of cardiac tissue did not significantly alter in vitro calcium uptake by aortae. The injection of the cardiac and liver diffusates into normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats produced slight (10 Torr) (1 Torr = 133.3Pa) and moderate (25 Torr) elevations of blood pressure, respectively. Finally, a peptide purified from homogenates of rat brain by the protocol developed for the purification of HF from erythrocytes was shown to significantly enhance the contractile response of aortic rings to K+ and norepinephrine. Diffusates of erythrocytes from the rat, rabbit, dog, and guinea pig each caused a significant stimulation of calcium uptake and contained approximately the same level of activity (500 units/L of whole blood). Diffusates prepared from outdated human erythrocytes had no significant effect on calcium uptake, whereas those of freshly drawn samples exhibited high levels of activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Acute effects of acrolein in human volunteers during controlled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Aishwarya M.; Johanson, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Johnny C.; Palmberg, Lena; Sjögren, Bengt; Ernstgård, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde mainly formed by combustion. The critical effect is considered to be irritation of the eyes and airways; however, the scarce data available make it difficult to assess effect levels. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine thresholds for acute irritation for acrolein. Methods: Nine healthy volunteers of each sex were exposed at six occasions for 2 h at rest to: clean air, 15 ppm ethyl acetate (EA), and 0.05 ppm and 0.1 ppm acrolein with and without EA (15 ppm) to mask the potential influence of odor. Symptoms related to irritation and central nervous system effects were rated on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Results: The ratings of eye irritation were slightly but significantly increased during exposure to acrolein in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001, Friedman test) with a median rating of 8 mm (corresponding to “hardly at all”) at the 0.1 ppm condition and with no influence from EA. No significant exposure-related effects were found for pulmonary function, or nasal swelling, nor for markers of inflammation and coagulation in blood (IL-6, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and Clara cell protein) or induced sputum (cell count, differential cell count, IL-6 and IL-8). Blink frequency recorded by electromyography was increased during exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein alone but not during any of the other five exposure conditions. Conclusion: Based on subjective ratings, the present study showed minor eye irritation by exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein. PMID:26635308

  3. Acute effects of tianeptine on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Hernández, Gerardo; Orozco, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Simon; Baez, Scarlet

    2006-03-01

    Tianeptine is a serotonin-uptake enhancer drug whose antidepressant effectiveness is based on its ability to reduce rather than increase serotonin availability at the synaptic cleft. This paradoxical neuropharmacological mechanism has raised doubt among neuropharmacologists and psychiatrists as to the role of tianeptine as a trusty-reliable antidepressant drug. This controversial issue led us to investigate the acute effects of a single, oral dose (12.5 mg) of this drug on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters in 50 healthy subjects. The drug provoked a striking and significant reduction of plasma noradrenaline (NA) and plasma serotonin (f-5-HT) while it increased plasma dopamine (DA) and platelet serotonin (p-5-HT) concentrations within the 4-h study period. No adrenaline (Ad) changes were registered. The NA/Ad ratio and the f-5-HT/p-5-HT ratio showed significant reduction throughout the test. Finally, although diastolic blood pressure (DBP) showed significant decrease, neither systolic blood pressure (SBP) nor heart rate (HR) showed significant change. These findings are consistent with the postulation that tianeptine reduces both neural sympathetic activity and parasympathetic activity without affecting adrenal sympathetic activity, enabling us to discuss the possible mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of tianeptine. The well-known fact that major depressed patients always show raised NA plus lower than normal p-5-HT levels, both disorders which are normalized by tianeptine, gives neurochemical support to the clinical improvement triggered by the drug in these patients. Summarizing, the results presented in this study demonstrate that tianeptine triggers significant reduction of circulating noradrenaline and plasma serotonin while increasing circulating dopamine and platelet serotonin. Other possible neuropharmacological effects are also discussed.

  4. Effective management of acute deep vein thrombosis: direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Roussin, A

    2015-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and accounts for most venous thromboembolic events. Although DVT is not directly life-threatening, thrombi in the proximal veins of the leg can embolize to the lungs to form a pulmonary embolism, which may prove rapidly fatal. If untreated, DVT can also lead to significant morbidity, including development of post-thrombotic syndrome. Among many risk factors, surgery, hospitalization, older age and active cancer increase the risk of VTE, and a previous event increases the risk of recurrence. Early detection and effective clot resolution are vital in managing DVT. Conventional approaches to acute treatment of VTE involve initial fast-acting parenteral heparin overlapping with and followed by vitamin K antagonist therapy. However, vitamin K antagonists have a narrow therapeutic window, require regular monitoring, and have multiple food and drug interactions. Results from phase III clinical studies involving direct Factor Xa and IIa inhibitors suggest that these agents provide an alternative therapeutic option that overcomes some of the complications associated with conventional treatment with predictable pharmacological properties and convenient dosing schedules. Analysis of data from the rivaroxaban EINSTEIN studies also suggests that these agents have the potential to improve patient-reported treatment satisfaction and reduce the length of hospital stay compared with conventional therapy. This review considers these treatment options, suitable treatment durations to prevent recurrence, and the management of DVT treatment in challenging patient groups. PMID:24927023

  5. Acute respiratory effects of summer smog in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, C E; Swaen, G M; Wesseling, G; Wouters, E F

    1994-06-01

    In 535 primary school children we studied the effects of exposure to summer smog on respiratory health. Baseline measurements were performed during low air pollution levels (max. 24-h concentrations of SO2, O3 and NO2 were 55, 49 and 58 micrograms/m3, respectively) consisting of lung function measurements using spirometry and the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, determined by a written questionnaire. During a summer smog episode, 212 randomly chosen children were re-examined, characterised by 8-h ozone levels > 120 micrograms/m3 (max. 163 micrograms/m3) and 1-h ozone levels > 160 micrograms/m3 (max. 215 micrograms/m3). Overall, small decrements were observed in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), (P < 0.05) and the forced expiratory volume between 25 and 75% of the vital capacity (FEF25-75%) (P < 0.01). On the contrary, there was a statistically significant decrease in resistance parameters. No increases were observed in the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, in this study we found small inconsistent changes in lung function and no increase of respiratory symptoms after short-time exposure to moderately high ozone levels.

  6. Acute effects of ethanol on left ventricular diastolic function.

    PubMed Central

    Kupari, M; Koskinen, P; Hynynen, M; Salmenperä, M; Ventilä, M

    1990-01-01

    Transmitral flow velocities were measured by Doppler echocardiography in nine healthy men who ingested 1 g/kg of ethanol within one hour. The measurements were made before the first drink and every hour thereafter for three hours. The peak mean (SE) blood ethanol concentration was 21.4 (1.0) mmol/l. Each man was also studied after drinking fruit juice. Ethanol increased the heart rate but did not change the peak transmitral velocities, the normalised peak filling rate, the deceleration of early flow, or the duration of relaxation as measured from the second heart sound to the peak early diastolic velocity. The ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity rose from 0.41 (0.03) to 0.44 (0.03) after ethanol but remained unchanged after juice. The difference between juice and ethanol was independent of changes in heart rate. The fluid balance was more negative in the ethanol experiment (-727 (114) ml v -107 (70) ml), suggesting a reduction in preload, and the ethanol-induced net loss of fluid correlated with the concomitant change in the velocity ratio. A moderate dose of ethanol causes a small acute increase of the ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity of mitral flow in healthy subjects. Although this change indicates altered diastolic function of the left ventricle, most of it may result from the diuretic effect of ethanol. Any major impairment of ventricular relaxation seems unlikely. PMID:2393610

  7. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  8. Acute ethanol effects on focal cerebral ischemia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Yang, G Y; Ben-Joseph, O; Ross, B D; Chenevert, T L; Domino, E F

    1998-05-01

    The effects of acute ethanol intoxication were investigated in a rat model of unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Groups of 5 to 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 hr of left middle cerebral artery occlusion. All groups were deprived of food overnight and were pretreated intraperitoneally with 5% dextrose solution (10 ml/kg), 20% ethyl alcohol in 5% dextrose solution (2 g/kg), or 30% ethyl alcohol in a 5% dextrose solution (3 g/kg) 1 hr before middle cerebral artery occlusion. Regional cerebral blood flow during ipsilateral occlusion was approximately 9.1 to 10% of baseline in all groups. The mean % brain water content in control, 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups, and 3 g/kg ethanol-treated groups were: in the ischemic core--81.6, 81.2, and 82.4; intermediate zone--80.5, 80.6, and 81.7; and outer zone--79.7, 79.7, and 80.8, respectively. Brain Na+ and K+ content in the three groups was related to water content, but much greater with ethanol pretreatment. The water content of the intermediate zones in the 3 g/kg ethanol-treated animals was significantly greater than in the control (p < 0.01 and 0.001) and the 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant dose-effect relationship in which the lower dose of ethanol tended to reduce ischemic core water content, and the larger dose increased ischemic core water, compared with the control. None of the overnight fasted groups had any significant hyperglycemia. The group given 3 g/kg i.p. ethanol 1 hr before had exacerbated edema formation with a mean whole blood level of ethanol of approximately 230 mg/dl. The neurotoxic effects of high concentrations of ethanol were unrelated to any change in plasma glucose concentrations.

  9. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  10. Acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Gottesdiener, K.; Jordan, J.; Chen, K.; Flattery, S.; Larson, P. J.; Candelore, M. R.; Gertz, B.; Robertson, D.; Sun, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine is used to help achieve weight control. Data on its true efficacy and mechanisms in altering energy balance in human subjects are limited. We aimed to determine the acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work and urinary catecholamines in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study. Ten healthy volunteers were given ephedrine (50 mg) or placebo thrice daily during each of two 24-h periods (ephedrine and placebo) in a whole-room indirect calorimeter, which accurately measures minute-by-minute energy expenditure and mechanical work. Measurements were taken of 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work, urinary catecholamines and binding of (+/-)ephedrine in vitro to human beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenoreceptors. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was 3.6% greater (8965+/-1301 versus 8648+/-1347 kJ, P<0.05) with ephedrine than with placebo, but mechanical work was not different between the ephedrine and placebo periods. Noradrenaline excretion was lower with ephedrine (0.032+/-0.011 microg/mg creatinine) compared with placebo (0.044+/-0.012 microg/mg creatinine) (P<0.05). (+/-)Ephedrine is a relatively weak partial agonist of human beta1- and beta2-adrenoreceptors, and had no detectable activity at human beta3-adrenoreceptors. Ephedrine (50 mg thrice daily) modestly increases energy expenditure in normal human subjects. A lack of binding of ephedrine to beta3-adrenoreceptors and the observed decrease in urinary noradrenaline during ephedrine treatment suggest that the thermogenic effect of ephedrine results from direct beta1-/beta2-adrenoreceptor agonism. An indirect beta3-adrenergic effect through the release of noradrenaline seems unlikely as urinary noradrenaline decreased significantly with ephedrine.

  11. The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ivaska, Kaisa K; Heliövaara, Maikki K; Ebeling, Pertti; Bucci, Marco; Huovinen, Ville; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Koistinen, Heikki A

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling in bone-forming osteoblasts stimulates bone formation and promotes the release of osteocalcin (OC) in mice. Only a few studies have assessed the direct effect of insulin on bone metabolism in humans. Here, we studied markers of bone metabolism in response to acute hyperinsulinemia in men and women. Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of infusions to determine the markers of bone formation (PINP, total OC, uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC)) and resorption (CTX, TRAcP5b). During 4 h insulin infusion (40 mU/m2 per min, low insulin), CTX level decreased by 11% (P<0.05). High insulin infusion rate (72 mU/m2 per min) for 4 h resulted in more pronounced decrease (−32%, P<0.01) whereas shorter insulin exposure (40 mU/m2 per min for 2 h) had no effect (P=0.61). Markers of osteoblast activity remained unchanged during 4 h insulin, but the ratio of uncarboxylated-to-total OC decreased in response to insulin (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for low and high insulin for 4 h respectively). During 2 h low insulin infusion, both total OC and ucOC decreased significantly (P<0.01 for both). In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC. Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin. PMID:26047829

  12. Effects of oral montelukast on airway function in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cýllý, A; Kara, A; Ozdemir, T; Oğüş, C; Gülkesen, K H

    2003-05-01

    Montelukast, a specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve pulmonary function within 1 h of ingestion. This study was undertaken to compare the effects on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of oral montelukast added to intravenous steroid, intravenous steroid alone and placebo during the 24 h period following administration. Seventy asthmatic patients (FEV1 40-80% predicted and > or = 15% improvement after inhaled beta agonist) were enrolled in a single blind study to receive oral montelukast (10 mg) plus intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg), intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomised fashion. The patients received one ofthe above three groups of medication before any other treatments. This was immediately followed by the aerosol treatments of 100 mcg of terbutaline sulphate divided into three doses during 1 h as described in the consensus statement. Thereafter, patients were observed for 24 h to document the effects on PEFR, Borg dyspnoea score and need for rescue medication. The primary end point was percentage change at different time points. Secondary end points were Borg dyspnoea score and use of rescue medication. Compared with placebo, montelukast added to the prednisolone group and the prednisolone alone group had significant percentage change from baseline in PEFR in the entire 24 h period (P<0.05). The difference in PEFR between montelukast plus prednisolone group and prednisolone group favoured the montelukast plus prednisolone group but did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, montelukast plus prednisolone group required less inhaled short-acting beta agonistthan other two groups. The results of this study indicate that adding montelukast to steroid in acute asthma may have some additive improvement in lung functions. PMID:12735671

  13. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  14. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress. PMID:27635201

  15. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  16. Effect of Dextran 40 and aprotinin on experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Crocket, K V; Reising, J R; Wirman, J A; Gau, N; Joffe, S N

    1984-03-01

    This study examines and compares the prophylactic role of aprotinin and Dextran 40 in acute pancreatitis. Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced in 70 male Wistar rats using the closed-duodenal-loop technique. The rats were randomly divided into four groups; sham operation, untreated acute pancreatitis, and therapy with aprotinin or Dextran 40. Samples of blood and urine were collected at the beginning and at the end of the 24-hr period for measurement of amylase and creatinine which allowed calculation of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR). Mortality in the aprotinin group was the same as the untreated rats (20%). Dextran 40 therapy was associated with a lower mortality rate (6.7%). Light microscopic examination confirmed that the histologic changes of acute pancreatitis were less severe in both the aprotinin- and Dextran 40-treated rats. The ACCR was elevated after Dextran 40 therapy, which was due mainly to high urinary amylase levels. These results suggest that Dextran 40 may have a prophylactic role in acute experimental pancreatitis but again emphasizes the high false-positive rate of the ACCR determination. PMID:6199589

  17. Systemic vascular effects of acute electrical baroreflex stimulation.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Steven; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Belenkie, Israel; Tyberg, John V

    2014-07-15

    We intended to determine if acute baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) increases venous capacitance and aortic conductance. BAT is effective in resistant hypertension, but its effect on the systemic vasculature is poorly understood. Left ventricular (LV) and aortic pressures and subdiaphragmatic aortic and caval flows (ultrasonic) were measured in six anesthetized dogs. Changes in abdominal blood volume (Vabdominal) were estimated as the integrated difference in abdominal aortic inflow and caval outflow. An electrode was implanted on the right carotid sinus. Data were measured during control and BAT. Next, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was infused and BAT was subsequently added. Finally, angiotensin II (ANG II) was infused, and three increased BAT currents were added. We found that BAT decreased mean aortic pressure (PAo) by 22.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased aortic conductance by 16.2 ± 4.9% (P < 0.01) and Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01). SNP decreased PAo by 17.4 ± 0.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.05). During the SNP infusion, BAT decreased PAo further, by 26.0 ± 2.1 mmHg (P < 0.001). ANG II increased PAo by 40.4 ± 3.5 mmHg (P = 0.001). When an increased BAT current was added, PAo decreased to baseline (P < 0.01) while aortic conductance increased from 62.3 ± 5.2% to 80.2 ± 3.3% (P < 0.05) of control. Vabdominal increased at a rate of 1.8 ± 0.9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01), reversing the ANG II effects. In conclusion, BAT increases arterial conductance, decreases PAo, and increases venous capacitance even in the presence of powerful vasoactive drugs. Increasing venous capacitance may be an important effect of BAT in hypertension. PMID:24816258

  18. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic Alas1 effectively prevents and treats the induced acute attacks in acute intermittent porphyria mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Chen, Brenden; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Yu, Chunli; Phillips, John D; New, Maria I; Liebow, Abigail; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Querbes, William; Desnick, Robert J

    2014-05-27

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Factors that induce the expression of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) result in the accumulation of the neurotoxic porphyrin precursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), which recent studies indicate are primarily responsible for the acute attacks. Current treatment of these attacks involves i.v. administration of hemin, but a faster-acting, more effective, and safer therapy is needed. Here, we describe preclinical studies of liver-directed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Alas1 (Alas1-siRNAs) in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria, the most common acute hepatic porphyria. A single i.v. dose of Alas1-siRNA prevented the phenobarbital-induced biochemical acute attacks for approximately 2 wk. Injection of Alas1-siRNA during an induced acute attack significantly decreased plasma ALA and PBG levels within 8 h, more rapidly and effectively than a single hemin infusion. Alas1-siRNA was well tolerated and a therapeutic dose did not cause hepatic heme deficiency. These studies provide proof-of-concept for the clinical development of RNA interference therapy for the prevention and treatment of the acute attacks of the acute hepatic porphyrias.

  19. Effect of Acute Surgical Stress on Serum Ghrelin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kontoravdis, Nikolaos; Vassilikostas, George; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Pappas, Apostolos; Seretis, Charalampos; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Chrysikos, John; Karanikas, George; Manouras, Ioannis; Legakis, Ioanis; Voros, Dionysios

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is an appetite hormone that influences the gastrointestinal function and regulates energy metabolism. Growing evidence also suggests that this hormone plays a central role in immune modulation. Each surgical operation is followed by a series of inflammatory and metabolic changes that constitute the stress response. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of stress during different types of abdominal surgery in ghrelin serum levels. Methods An overall of 25 patients were prospectively allocated in two groups based on the type of surgical operation. Group A (n = 10) patients were scheduled to undergo cholecystectomy, whereas Group B (n = 15) patients underwent colectomy. Serum ghrelin concentrations were evaluated in each patient preoperatively, after the induction of general anesthesia and tracheal intubation, one and five hours after the beginning of surgery and the morning of the first and second postoperative day. Results In both groups serum ghrelin concentrations reached their peak level at 24 hr (Group A: 8.4 ± 3.4 ng/mL; Group B: 7.4 ± 1.8 ng/mL) and these values were significantly higher than those in the preoperative period (Group A: 5.0 ±1.5 ng/mL; Group B: 4.8 ± 0.6 ng/mL) (P < 0.05). Forty eight hours after surgery the levels of ghrelin returned to their preoperative status. Patients’ gender, age, ASA score and type of surgical procedure did not influence the serum ghrelin levels. Conclusions Serum ghrelin concentration appears to elevate in response to surgical stress. Future studies are needed to improve comprehension of the mechanisms underlying responses of this hormone to acute surgical stress and to evaluate their possible clinical implications.

  20. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıc, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  1. Low dose acute alcohol effects on GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Hanchar, H. Jacob; Olsen, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and have long been implicated in mediating at least part of the acute actions of ethanol. For example, ethanol and GABAergic drugs including barbiturates and benzodiazepines share many pharmacological properties. Besides the prototypical synaptic GABAAR subtypes, nonsynaptic GABAARs have recently emerged as important regulators of neuronal excitability. While high doses (≥100 mM) of ethanol have been reported to enhance activity of most GABAAR subtypes, most abundant synaptic GABAARs are essentially insensitive to ethanol concentrations that occur during social ethanol consumption (<30 mM). However, extrasynaptic δ and β3 subunit-containing GABAARs, associated in the brain with α4or α6 subunits, are sensitive to low millimolar ethanol concentrations, as produced by drinking half a glass of wine. Additionally, we found that a mutation in the cerebellar α6 subunit (α6R100Q), initially reported in rats selectively bred for increased alcohol sensitivity, is sufficient to produce increased alcohol-induced motor impairment and further increases of alcohol sensitivity in recombinant α6β3δ receptors. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 blocks the low dose alcohol enhancement on α4/6/β3δ receptors, without reducing GABA-induced currents. In binding assays α4β3δ GABAARs bind [3H] Ro15-4513 with high affinity, and this binding is inhibited, in an apparently competitive fashion, by low ethanol concentrations, as well as analogs of Ro15-4513 that are active to antagonize ethanol or Ro15-4513’s block of ethanol. We conclude that most low to moderate dose alcohol effects are mediated by alcohol actions on alcohol/Ro15-4513 binding sites on GABAAR subtypes. PMID:16814864

  2. Acute effects of smoking on QT dispersion in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Yazdani, Shahrooz; Ghaidari, Mohamad Esmail; Asadpour-Piranfar, Mohammad; Bahrololoumi-Bafruee, Negar; Golabchi, Allahyar; Azhari, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cigarette smoking increases the risk of ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death (SCD). QT dispersion (QTD) is an important predictor of cardiac arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to assess the acute effect of smoking a single standard cigarette containing 1.7 mg nicotine on QT interval and QTD in healthy smokers and nonsmokers. METHODS The study sample population consisted of 40 healthy male hospital staff, including 20 smokers and 20 nonsmokers. They were asked to refrain from smoking at least 6 h before attending the study. A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram (ECG), recorded at paper speed of 50 mm/s, was obtained from all participants before and 10 min after smoking of a single complete cigarette. QT interval, corrected QT interval, QTD, and corrected QT dispersion (QTcD) were measured before and after smoking. RESULTS Smokers and nonsmokers did not have any significant differences in heart rate (HR) (before smoking = 67.35 ± 5.14 vs. 67.70 ± 5.07, after smoking = 76.70 ± 6.50 vs. 76.85 ± 6.50, respectively), QTD (before smoking = 37.75 ± 7.16 vs. 39.15 ± 6.55, after smoking = 44.75 ± 11.97 vs. 45.50 ± 9.58, respectively), and QTcD (before smoking = 39.85 ± 7.40 vs. 41.55 ± 6.57, after smoking = 50.70 ± 14.31 vs. 51.50 ± 11.71, respectively). However, after smoking a single cigarette, HR, mean QTD, and QTcD significantly increased (all had P value <0.001) in comparison to the measures before smoking. CONCLUSION Smoking of a single complete cigarette in both smokers and nonsmokers results in significant QTD increase, which can cause arrhythmia and SCD. PMID:25161676

  3. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  4. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  5. Predicting the acute behavioral effects in rats inhaling toluene (or up to 24 hrs: Inhaled vs. internal dose metrics.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity oftoluene, a model volatile organic compound (VOC), depends on the concentration (C) and duration (t) ofexposure, and guidelines for acute exposures have traditionally used ext relationships to extrapolate protective and/or effective concentrations across durat...

  6. Acute Effects of Fine Particulate Air Pollution on ST Segment Height: A Longitudinal Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms for the relationship between particulate air pollution and cardiac disease are not fully understood. Air pollution-induced myocardial ischemia is one of the potentially important mechanisms. Methods: We investigate the acute effects and the time cours...

  7. Behavioral effects of acute and long-term administration of catnip (Nepeta cataria) in mice.

    PubMed

    Massoco, C O; Silva, M R; Gorniak, S L; Spinosa, M S; Bernardi, M M

    1995-12-01

    Catnip or catmint (Nepeta cataria) is a plant used extensively to treat human diseases and in toys for pets. We investigated the effects of acute and long-term administration of the plant on some behaviors of mice. The plant was fed as 10% of the normal diet for 2 h/d for 1 or 7 d. Acute and long-term dosing increased both rearing and locomotion frequencies observed in an open field. Acute exposure to catnip increased stereotyped behavior and susceptibility to seizures, did not interfere with haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and decreased sleeping time after sodium pentobarbital administration. Long-term exposure induced tolerance to stereotypic behavior, catalepsy and sleeping time, and increased the susceptibility to seizures induced by picrotoxin and strychnine. An amphetamine-like effect of catnip was suggested to explain the acute effects, while dispositional and functional adaptative changes were considered involved with the long-term effects.

  8. Effects of Acute Stress on Decision Making under Ambiguous and Risky Conditions in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Cano-López, Irene; Cano-López, Beatriz; Hidalgo, Vanesa; González-Bono, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Acute stress and decision making (DM) interact in life - although little is known about the role of ambiguity and risk in this interaction. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of acute stress on DM under various conditions. Thirty-one young healthy men were randomly distributed into two groups: experimental and control. DM processes were evaluated before and after an experimental session. For the experimental group, the session consisted of an acute stress battery; and the protocol was similar for the control group but the instructions were designed to minimize acute stress. Cardiovascular variables were continuously recorded 30 minutes before the DM tasks and during the experimental session. Cortisol, glucose, mood responses, and personality factors were also assessed. Acute stress was found to enhance disadvantageous decisions under ambiguous conditions (F(1, 29) = 4.16, p = .05, η2 p = .13), and this was mainly explained by the stress induced cortisol response (26.1% of variance, F(1, 30) = 11.59, p = .002). While there were no significant effects under risky conditions, inhibition responses differed between groups (F(1, 29) = 4.21, p = .05, η2 p = .13) and these differences were explained by cardiovascular and psychological responses (39.1% of variance, F(3, 30) = 7.42, p < .001). Results suggest that DM tasks could compete with cognitive resources after acute stress and could have implications for intervention in acute stress effects on DM in contexts such as addiction or eating disorders. PMID:27644414

  9. Specific Effects of Acute Moderate Exercise on Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davranche, Karen; McMorris, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The main issue of this study was to determine whether cognitive control is affected by acute moderate exercise. Twelve participants [4 females (VO[subscript 2 max]=42 ml/kg/min) and 8 males (VO[subscript 2 max]=48 ml/kg/min)] performed a Simon task while cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity corresponding to their individual…

  10. EFFECTS OF ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE ON THERMOREGULATION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce acute neurotoxicity in mammals. According to the FQPA mandate, the USEPA is required to consider the risk of cumulative toxicity posed to humans through exposure to pyrethroid mixtures. Thermoregulatory response (TR) is being used to determine if t...

  11. The acute effects of vibration training on balance and stability amongst soccer players.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Nevill, Alan; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration training (WBVT) is a tool used amongst coaches to improve performance prior to activity. Its effects on other fitness components, such as balance and stability, along with how different populations respond are less well understood. The aim of the current research is to determine the effect of acute WBVT on balance and stability amongst elite and amateur soccer players. Forty-four healthy male soccer players (22 elite and 22 amateur) were assigned to a treatment or control group. The intervention group then performed 3 × 60 seconds static squat on vibration platform at 40 Hz (±4 mm) with Y balance test (YBT) scores and dynamic postural stability index (DPSI) measured pre and post. DPSI was significantly lower in the elite players in the acute WBVT compared to amateur players (F1, 40= 6.80; P = 0.013). YBT anterior reach distance showed a significant improvement in both amateur and elite players in the acute WBVT group (F1, 40= 32.36; P < 0.001). The improvement in DPSI amongst the elite players indicates a difference in responses to acute high frequency vibration between elite and amateur players during a landing stability task. The results indicate that acute WBVT improves anterior YBT reach distances through a possible improvement in flexibility amongst both elite and amateur players. In conclusion, acute WBVT training appears to improve stability amongst elite soccer players in comparison to amateur players, the exact reasoning behind this difference requires further investigation.

  12. Effects of the Neurac® technique in patients with acute-phase subacromial impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of the Neurac technique on shoulder pain, function, and range of motion in patients with acute-phase subacromial impingement syndrome. [Subjects] Thirteen patients (seven females and six males) with acute-phase subacromial impingement syndrome participated in this study. [Methods] Shoulder pain, function, and range of motion were assessed before and after the application of the Neurac technique. [Results] Pain and function scores were significantly lower after than before the Neurac intervention. Shoulder range of motion was significantly greater after Neurac intervention than before it. [Conclusion] The Neurac technique is a useful intervention for patients with acute-phase subacromial impingement syndrome. PMID:26157230

  13. Acute and non-acute effects of cannabis on human memory function: a critical review of neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Allen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Smoking cannabis produces a diverse range of effects, including impairments in learning and memory. These effects are exerted through action on the endocannabinoid system, which suggests involvement of this system in human cognition. Learning and memory deficits are core symptoms of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, and may also be related to endocannabinoid dysfunction in these disorders. However, before new research can focus on potential treatments that work by manipulating the endocannabinoid system, it needs to be elucidated how this system is involved in symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Here we review neuroimaging studies that investigated acute and non-acute effects of cannabis on human learning and memory function, both in adults and in adolescents. Overall, results of these studies show that cannabis use is associated with a pattern of increased activity and a higher level of deactivation in different memory-related areas. This could reflect either increased neural effort ('neurophysiological inefficiency') or a change in strategy to maintain good task performance. However, the interpretation of these findings is significantly hampered by large differences between study populations in cannabis use in terms of frequency, age of onset, and time that subjects were abstinent from cannabis. Future neuroimaging studies should take these limitations into account, and should focus on the potential of cannabinoid compounds for treatment of cognitive symptoms in psychiatric disorders.

  14. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  15. The effect of acute discontinuation of total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wagman, L D; Newsome, H H; Miller, K B; Thomas, R B; Weir, G C

    1986-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute discontinuation (AD) of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on serum glucose, insulin, and glucagon levels and on the generation of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Fifty studies were performed in 48 patients. In none of the 30 studies of 1 hour duration nor in the 20 studies of 8 hours duration was there a single episode of symptomatic hypoglycemia. One patient had a glucose below normal (60 mg/dl) during the first hour after AD. Glucose and insulin concentrations were elevated at the start of TPN discontinuation but returned to normal values within 60 minutes and remained there during the successive 7 hours of study. Although glucagon levels were slightly elevated at zero time, no significant decrease occurred. There was no evidence for counter-regulation based on the patterns of glucose and hormone levels. With some restrictions, acute discontinuation is a safe, rapid method of ending a prolonged TPN infusion. PMID:3094465

  16. Effects of Acute Low Back Pain on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Lee, Sang Sook

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the changes in static and dynamic postural control after the development of acute low back pain. Methods Thirty healthy right-handed volunteers were divided into three groups; the right back pain group, the left back pain group, and the control group. 0.5 mL of 5% hypertonic saline was injected into L4-5 paraspinal muscle for 5 seconds to cause muscle pain. The movement of the center of gravity (COG) during their static and dynamic postural control was measured with their eyes open and with their eyes closed before and 2 minutes after the injection. Results The COGs for the healthy adults shifted to the right quadrant and the posterior quadrant during their static and dynamic postural control test (p<0.05). The static and dynamic instability index while they had their eyes closed was significantly increased than when they had their eyes open with and without acute back pain. After pain induction, their overall and anterior/posterior instability was increased in both the right back pain group and the left back pain group during the static postural control test (p<0.05). A right deviation and a posterior deviation of the COG still remained, and the posterior deviation was greater in the right back pain group (p<0.05). Conclusion The static instability, particularly the anterior/posterior instability was increased in the presence of acute low back pain, regardless of the visual information and the location of pain. PMID:23526750

  17. Acute effect upon pulmonary function of low level exposure to phenol-formaldehyde-resin-coated wood.

    PubMed

    Imbus, H R; Tochilin, S J

    1988-09-01

    In order to determine whether phenol-formaldehyde-resin-coated wood particles would cause an acute decline in pulmonary function, 176 workers in 2 oriented strandboard production plants were given respiratory questionnaires and pulmonary function tests before and during their work shifts. Measurements of dust and adsorbed formaldehyde were made on the same day as the pulmonary function tests. Measured formaldehyde levels were low, and measured dust levels were low to moderate. There was no evidence of an acute effect upon pulmonary function.

  18. Effect of Yi Gong San Decoction on Iron Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qin; Guan, Yu; Xia, Lemin; Wang, Zhicheng; Jiang, Yiling; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Guohua; Pu, Yiqiong; Xia, Jing; Luo, Meihong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Yi Gong San (YGS) decoction on iron homeostasis and the possible underlying mechanisms in a mouse model of acute inflammation in this study. Our findings suggest that YGS regulates iron homeostasis by downregulating the level of HAMP mRNA, which may depend on regulation of the IL-6/STAT3 or BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway during acute inflammation. PMID:27143982

  19. Mechanisms of the acute effects of inhaled ozone in humans.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Philip A

    2016-12-01

    Ambient air ozone (O3) is generated photochemically from oxides of nitrogen and volatile hydrocarbons. Inhaled O3 causes remarkably reversible acute lung function changes and inflammation. Approximately 80% of inhaled O3 is deposited on the airways. O3 reacts rapidly with CC double bonds in hydrophobic airway and alveolar surfactant-associated phospholipids and cholesterol. Resultant primary ozonides further react to generate bioactive hydrophilic products that also initiate lipid peroxidation leading to eicosanoids and isoprostanes of varying electrophilicity. Airway surface liquid ascorbate and urate also scavenge O3. Thus, inhaled O3 may not interact directly with epithelial cells. Acute O3-induced lung function changes are dominated by involuntary inhibition of inspiration (rather than bronchoconstriction), mediated by stimulation of intraepithelial nociceptive vagal C-fibers via activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 cation channels by electrophile (e.g., 4-oxo-nonenal) adduction of TRPA1 thiolates enhanced by PGE2-stimulated sensitization. Acute O3-induced neutrophilic airways inflammation develops more slowly than the lung function changes. Surface macrophages and epithelial cells are involved in the activation of epithelial NFkB and generation of proinflammatory mediators such as IL-6, IL-8, TNFa, IL-1b, ICAM-1, E-selectin and PGE2. O3-induced partial depolymerization of hyaluronic acid and the release of peroxiredoxin-1 activate macrophage TLR4 while oxidative epithelial cell release of EGFR ligands such as TGFa or EGFR transactivation by activated Src may also be involved. The ability of lipid ozonation to generate potent electrophiles also provides pathways for Nrf2 activation and inhibition of canonical NFkB activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. PMID:27451958

  20. Antipsychotic effect of milieu in the acute treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Khan, A

    1990-07-01

    We studied 35 patients meeting DSM-III criteria for schizophrenia, paranoid or undifferentiated type, chronic with acute exacerbation. All were treated in hospital, 13 on a psychiatric intensive care unit, and 22 on an open ward. The former unit is a more structured and less stimulating one. We found those patients treated on that ward to show greater improvement in BPRS ratings during the first 2 days of hospitalization compared to the open-ward group, despite similar doses of medication being utilized. Additionally, this improvement was noted to occur among BPRS items comprising a psychotic subscale.

  1. Acute pulmonary effects of ultrafine particles in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdörster, G; Finkelstein, J N; Johnston, C; Gelein, R; Cox, C; Baggs, R; Elder, A C

    2000-08-01

    important difference from the behavior of larger particles. Furthermore, the pulmonary toxicity of the ultrafine Teflon fumes could be prevented by adapting the animals with short 5-minute exposures on 3 days prior to a 15-minute exposure. This shows the importance of preexposure history in susceptibility to acute effects of ultrafine particles. Aging of the fresh Teflon fumes for 3.5 minutes led to a predicted coagulation resulting in particles greater than 100 nm that no longer caused toxicity in exposed animals. This result is consistent with greater toxicity of ultrafine particles compared with accumulation-mode particles. When establishing dose-response relationships for intratracheally instilled titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of the size of the urban ultrafine particles (20 nm) and of the urban accumulation-mode particles (250 nm), we observed significantly greater pulmonary inflammatory response to ultrafine TiO2 in rats and mice. The greater toxicity of the ultrafine TiO2 particles correlated well with their greater surface area per mass. Ultrafine particles of carbon, platinum, iron, iron oxide, vanadium, and vanadium oxide were generated by electric spark discharge and characterized to obtain particles of environmental relevance for study. The CMD of the ultrafine carbon particles was approximately 26 nm, and that of the metal particles was 15 to 20 nm, with geometric standard deviations (GSDs) of 1.4 to 1.7. For ultrafine carbon particles, approximately 100 micrograms/m3 is equivalent to 12 x 10(6) particles/cm3. Homogeneous coagulation of these ultrafine particles in an animal exposure chamber occurred rapidly at 1 x 10(7) particles/cm3, so that particles quickly grew to sizes greater than 100 nm. Thus, controlled aging of ultrafine carbon particles allowed the generation of accumulation-mode carbon particles (due to coagulation growth) for use in comparative toxicity studies. We also developed a technique to generate ultrafine particles consisting of the

  2. Filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase association within the membrane of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Real-Hohn, Antonio; Zancan, Patricia; Da Silva, Daniel; Martins, Eliane R; Salgado, Leonardo T; Mermelstein, Claudia S; Gomes, Andre M O; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Glycolytic enzymes reversibly associate with the human erythrocyte membrane (EM) as part of their regulatory mechanism. The site for this association has been described as the amino terminus of band 3, a transmembrane anion transporter. Binding of glycolytic enzymes to this site is recognized to inhibit glycolysis, since binding inhibits the catalytic activity of these enzymes, including the rate-limiting enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). However, the existence of a putative stimulatory site for glycolytic enzymes within the EM has been proposed. PFK has been described as able to reversibly associate with other proteins, such as microtubules, which inhibit the enzyme, and filamentous actin, which activates the enzyme. Here, it is demonstrated that PFK also binds to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins in the protein meshwork that forms the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Through fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments using either confocal microscopy or fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that, within the EM, PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins are located close enough to propose binding between them. Moreover, specifically blocking PFK binding to band 3 results in an association of the enzyme with the EM that increases the enzyme's catalytic activity. Conversely, disruption of the association between PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins potentiates the inhibitory action of the EM on the enzyme. Furthermore, it is shown that insulin signaling increases the association of PFK to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins, revealing that this event may play a role on the stimulatory effects of insulin on erythrocyte glycolysis. In summary, the present work presents evidence that filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for PFK within the EM.

  3. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Lotti, Fiorenza; Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization. We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH) and unaffected hemisphere (UH) by measuring resting and active motor threshold (AMT) and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI), to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. AMT differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p = 0.004), not in females (p > 0.200), and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p = 0.033 and p = 0.042). LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery. PMID:26858590

  4. The effects of time following acute growth hormone administration on metabolic and power output measures during acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Irving, Brian A; Patrie, James T; Anderson, Stacey M; Watson-Winfield, Deidre D; Frick, Kirsten I; Evans, William S; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Weltman, Arthur

    2004-09-01

    We examined the effects of GH infusion on metabolism and performance measures during acute exercise. Nine males [(X+/-SEM): age 23.7+/-1.9 yr, height 182.6+/-1.6 cm, weight 77.3+/- 2.6 kg, percent fat 17.7+/-1.9%, peak oxygen consumption 37.9 +/- 2.9 ml/kg.min] completed six 30-min randomly assigned bicycle ergometer exercise trials at a power output midway between the lactate threshold and peak oxygen consumption. In five of the six trials, the subjects received a recombinant humanGHinfusion (10 microg/kg, 6-min square wave pulse) at 0800 h, followed by a 30-min exercise trial initiated at one of the following times: 0845, 0930, 1015, 1100, or 1145 h. During one of the six trials, the subject received a saline infusion followed by a 30-min exercise trial initiated at 0845 h. Mixed-effect, repeated-measures ANOVA analyses corrected for multiple comparisons revealed that there were no significant condition effects for total work, caloric expenditure, heart rate response, the blood lactate response, or ratings of perceived exertion response. However, acute GH administration resulted in a lower exercise oxygen consumption without a drop-off in power output. We conclude that the time of exercise initiation after GH infusion does not affect total work, caloric expenditure, heart rate response, blood lactate response, or ratings of perceived exertion but reduces oxygen consumption in response to 30 min of constant load exercise at an intensity above the lactate threshold. The last outcome may suggest that GH administration can improve exercise economy.

  5. The contribution of electrophysiology to knowledge of the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Little, H J

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the effects of ethanol on the components of neuronal transmission and the relationship of such effects to the behavioural actions of ethanol. The concentrations of ethanol with acute actions on voltage-sensitive ion channels are first described, then the actions of ethanol on ligand-gated ion channels, including those controlled by cholinergic receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, the various excitatory amino acid receptors, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Acute effects of ethanol are then described on brain areas thought to be involved in arousal and attention, the reinforcing effects of ethanol, the production of euphoria, the actions of ethanol on motor control, and the amnesic effects of ethanol; the acute effects of ethanol demonstrated by EEG studies are also discussed. Chronic effects of alcohol on neuronal transmission are described in the context of the various components of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome, withdrawal hyperexcitability, dysphoria and anhedonia, withdrawal anxiety, craving, and relapse drinking. Electrophysiological studies on the genetic influences on the effects of ethanol are discussed, particularly the acute actions of ethanol and electrophysiological differences reported in individuals predisposed to alcoholism. The conclusion notes the concentration of studies on the classical transmitters, with relative neglect of the effects of ethanol on peptides and on neuronal interactions between brain areas and integrated patterns of neuronal activity. PMID:10665833

  6. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  7. Effects of acute and chronic inhalation of paint thinner in mice: behavioral and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Fifel, Karim; Bennis, Mohamed; Ba-M'hamed, Saâdia

    2014-06-01

    Abuse of volatile inhalants has become a worldwide issue mainly among adolescents of low income social class. Acute and chronic exposure to these substances results in serious neurological and behavioral impairments. Although real exposure consists largely of simultaneous inhalation of multiple solvents, the vast majority of basic research studies have evaluated the actions of a single volatile component leaving the behavioral and neuronal effects of chemical mixture not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the acute behavioral effects of 300, 450 and 600 ppm of paint thinner inhalation on anxiety, locomotor activity and spatial memory. Additionally, the cognitive impairments related to chronic exposure of the same concentrations of thinner for 45 days were assessed. To understand the neuronal correlates of acute exposure to thinner, we used c-Fos immunohistochemistry as an endogenous marker of neuronal activation following 600 ppm of thinner. The results reveal that (i) chronically thinner exposed mice showed cognitive deficits in Morris water maze and object recognition tasks; (ii) acute inhalation of thinner induces a wide range of behavioral changes. These changes include an anxiolytic effect toward the aversive environmental bright light and a dose dependent effect on explorative locomotion. The wide range of behavioral alterations induced by acute thinner inhalation is consistent with the widespread distribution of thinner-induced c-Fos expression in multiple brain structures.

  8. Effects of acute and chronic inhalation of paint thinner in mice: behavioral and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Fifel, Karim; Bennis, Mohamed; Ba-M'hamed, Saâdia

    2014-06-01

    Abuse of volatile inhalants has become a worldwide issue mainly among adolescents of low income social class. Acute and chronic exposure to these substances results in serious neurological and behavioral impairments. Although real exposure consists largely of simultaneous inhalation of multiple solvents, the vast majority of basic research studies have evaluated the actions of a single volatile component leaving the behavioral and neuronal effects of chemical mixture not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the acute behavioral effects of 300, 450 and 600 ppm of paint thinner inhalation on anxiety, locomotor activity and spatial memory. Additionally, the cognitive impairments related to chronic exposure of the same concentrations of thinner for 45 days were assessed. To understand the neuronal correlates of acute exposure to thinner, we used c-Fos immunohistochemistry as an endogenous marker of neuronal activation following 600 ppm of thinner. The results reveal that (i) chronically thinner exposed mice showed cognitive deficits in Morris water maze and object recognition tasks; (ii) acute inhalation of thinner induces a wide range of behavioral changes. These changes include an anxiolytic effect toward the aversive environmental bright light and a dose dependent effect on explorative locomotion. The wide range of behavioral alterations induced by acute thinner inhalation is consistent with the widespread distribution of thinner-induced c-Fos expression in multiple brain structures. PMID:24218105

  9. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    PubMed

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction.

  10. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  11. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  12. Central effect of histamine in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hamzeh-Gooshchi, Nasrin; Seiednejhad-Yamchi, Sona

    2008-01-01

    In conscious rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (icv) cannula, effect of icv injections of histamine, chlorpheniramine (H(1)-receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (H(2)-receptor blocker) was investigated in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain. Acute trigeminal pain was induced by putting a drop of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface of the eye and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. Histamine (20, 40 microg) and chlorpheniramine (80 microg) significantly decreased the numbers of eye wipes. Ranitidine alone had no effect. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not change the histamine-induced analgesia, whereas the histamine effect on pain was inhibited with ranitidine pretreatment. These results indicate that the brain histamine, through central H(2) receptors, may be involved in the modulation of the acute trigeminal pain in rats.

  13. Acute effects of exposure to 56Fe and 16O particles on learning and memory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it has been shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance when tested 2-4 weeks after irradiation, it has not been determined whether exposure to HZE particles can exert acute effects on cognitive performance; i.e., effects within 4-48 hrs after exposure. The present ...

  14. Acute Effect of Decaffeinated Coffee on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, and Exercise Performance in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi; Kaushik, Vidya S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of decaffeinated coffee on the cardiovascular exercise performance in nine healthy volunteers was evaluated in a double-blind randomized fashion. The heart rate, blood pressure, and duration of exercise were unchanged, and no arrhythmias or ischemic changes were seen on the electrocardiogram after drinking decaffeinated coffee. It was concluded that decaffeinated coffee has no discernible, acute, adverse cardiovascular effects. PMID:3339645

  15. COMPARING BEHAVIORAL DOSE-EFFECT CURVES FOR HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS ACUTELY EXPOSED TO TOLUENE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of laboratory animal data in toxicology depends upon the ability to generalize the results quantitatively to humans. To compare the acute behavioral effects of inhaled toluene in humans to those in animals, dose-effect curves were fitted by meta-analysis of published...

  16. ASSESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF THE BEHAVIORAL EFFECT OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TOLUENE IN HUMANS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in being able to evaluate potential benefit-cost relationships of controlling exposure to toxic substances. Behavioral effects of acute toluene exposure could be subjected to benefit-cost analysis if it's effects were quantitatively compared to tho...

  17. A QUANTITATIVE COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE INHALED TOLUENE IN HUMAN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acute exposure to toluene have been explored more thoroughly than other hydrocarbon solvents. These effects have been experimentally studied in humans and other species, e.g., rats, as well as in a number of in vitro preparations. The existence ofdosimetric and eff...

  18. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  19. Influence of various treatments including povidone-iodine and healing stimulatory reagents in a rabbit ear wound model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Maeda, Tatsuo; Okura, Takaaki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-10-01

    Selecting an appropriate treatment for a given case of skin wound is crucial for inducing optimal healing. We used an animal model developed from normal rabbit ears in order to assess the efficacy of treatments for skin wounds with or without a wet dressing, anti microbial reagent or topical wound-stimulatory reagents. The degree of healing in each group was evaluated and compared using four histological parameters: (i) degree of reepithelialisation, (ii) amount of granulation tissue formation, and (iii) the number of capillary lumens and (iv) fibroblasts in the granulation tissue. Treatment using wet dressings resulted in an increase in capillary number compared with the open dry wound. Although the retention of povidone-iodine (PI) in wound tissue after application significantly inhibited reepithelialisation (P < 0.05), rinsing PI off with saline was comparable in effect to using only a wet dressing. The three topical reagents, namely, basic fibroblast growth factor, prostaglandin E1 and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate, significantly improved reepithelialisation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, wounds should be kept hydrated by applying topical reagents. If there are any signs of bacterial infection, PI can be applied and rinsed later with saline in order to minimise its cytotoxic effects.

  20. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  1. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  2. Prolonged Effects of Acute Stress on Decision-Making under Risk: A Human Psychophysiological Study.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Kaori; Ohira, Hideki; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the prolonged effects of physiological responses induced by acute stress on risk-taking in decision-making. Participants were divided into a Stress group (N = 14) and a Control group (N = 12). The Trier Social Stress Test was administered as an acute stressor, and reading was administered as a control task; thereafter, participants performed a decision-making task in which they needed to choose a sure option or a gamble option in Gain and Loss frame trials 2 h after (non-) exposure to the stressor. Increased cortisol, adrenaline, heart rate (HR), and subjective stress levels validated acute stress manipulation. Stressed participants made fewer risky choices only in the Gain domain, whereas no effect of stress was shown in the Loss domain. Deceleration of HR reflecting attention was greater for Gains compared with Losses only in the Stress group. Risk avoidance was determined by increased levels of cortisol caused by acute stress. These results suggest that processes regarding glucocorticoid might be involved in the prolonged effects of acute stress on the evaluation of risks and the monitoring of outcomes in decision-making. PMID:27679566

  3. Prolonged Effects of Acute Stress on Decision-Making under Risk: A Human Psychophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Kaori; Ohira, Hideki; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the prolonged effects of physiological responses induced by acute stress on risk-taking in decision-making. Participants were divided into a Stress group (N = 14) and a Control group (N = 12). The Trier Social Stress Test was administered as an acute stressor, and reading was administered as a control task; thereafter, participants performed a decision-making task in which they needed to choose a sure option or a gamble option in Gain and Loss frame trials 2 h after (non-) exposure to the stressor. Increased cortisol, adrenaline, heart rate (HR), and subjective stress levels validated acute stress manipulation. Stressed participants made fewer risky choices only in the Gain domain, whereas no effect of stress was shown in the Loss domain. Deceleration of HR reflecting attention was greater for Gains compared with Losses only in the Stress group. Risk avoidance was determined by increased levels of cortisol caused by acute stress. These results suggest that processes regarding glucocorticoid might be involved in the prolonged effects of acute stress on the evaluation of risks and the monitoring of outcomes in decision-making. PMID:27679566

  4. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  5. Prolonged Effects of Acute Stress on Decision-Making under Risk: A Human Psychophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Kaori; Ohira, Hideki; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the prolonged effects of physiological responses induced by acute stress on risk-taking in decision-making. Participants were divided into a Stress group (N = 14) and a Control group (N = 12). The Trier Social Stress Test was administered as an acute stressor, and reading was administered as a control task; thereafter, participants performed a decision-making task in which they needed to choose a sure option or a gamble option in Gain and Loss frame trials 2 h after (non-) exposure to the stressor. Increased cortisol, adrenaline, heart rate (HR), and subjective stress levels validated acute stress manipulation. Stressed participants made fewer risky choices only in the Gain domain, whereas no effect of stress was shown in the Loss domain. Deceleration of HR reflecting attention was greater for Gains compared with Losses only in the Stress group. Risk avoidance was determined by increased levels of cortisol caused by acute stress. These results suggest that processes regarding glucocorticoid might be involved in the prolonged effects of acute stress on the evaluation of risks and the monitoring of outcomes in decision-making.

  6. Acute and training effects of resistance exercise on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a non-invasive method to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we discuss the effect of resistance exercise both acutely and after training on HRV in healthy individuals and in those with diseases characterized by autonomic dysfunction, such as hypertension and fibromyalgia. HR recovery after exercise is influenced by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic recovery to resting levels. Therefore, examination of HRV in response to acute exercise yields valuable insight into autonomic cardiovascular modulation and possible underlying risk for disease. Acute resistance exercise has shown to decrease cardiac parasympathetic modulation more than aerobic exercise in young healthy adults suggesting an increased risk for cardiovascular dysfunction after resistance exercise. Resistance exercise training appears to have no effect on resting HRV in healthy young adults, while it may improve parasympathetic modulation in middle-aged adults with autonomic dysfunction. Acute resistance exercise appears to decrease parasympathetic activity regardless of age. This review examines the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on HRV in young and older adults.

  7. Effects of acute aspartame and acute alcohol ingestion upon the cognitive performance of pilots.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A F; Belger, A; Banich, M T; Taylor, H

    1991-07-01

    Anecdotal evidence has associated the artificial sweetener aspartame with a number of symptoms of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. There are, however, little scientific data concerning the effect of aspartame upon complex mental operations such as those necessary for flying an aircraft. Thirteen pilots were tested in a double-blind study using the SPARTANS cognitive test battery of aviation-relevant information-processing tasks. These tasks relate to perceptual-motor abilities, spatial abilities, working memory, attentional performance, risk taking, processing flexibility, planning and sequencing ability. Subjects were tested over five sessions consisting of pretest and posttest controls and three randomly ordered treatment sessions. The treatment conditions involved an aspartame dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, a placebo condition, and an ethyl alcohol (0.1% BAL) condition as the positive control. No detectable performance decrements were associated with the aspartame condition, although decrements in psychomotor and spatial abilities were detected in the ethanol condition. Results were found to be consistent with prior flight-simulator studies of alcohol, but do not appear to support the concerns expressed in anecdotal testimony regarding the deleterious effects of aspartame upon cognitive performance.

  8. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bjork, James M; Gilman, Jodi M

    2014-09-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  9. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  10. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Robin; Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  11. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form.

  12. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-08-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12-16 Hz), and beta (16-25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children.

  13. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12–16 Hz), and beta (16–25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children. PMID:27656629

  14. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12–16 Hz), and beta (16–25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children.

  15. Acute effects of aerobic stretching, health and happiness improving movement exercise on cortical activity of children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungsoo; Park, Sangjun; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin; Lee, Kwanghee; Rhyu, Hyun-Seung

    2016-08-01

    Acute high-intensity physical exercise is known to improve cognitive performance of children, including those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this work, we investigated the acute effect of an aerobic stretching and moderate-intensity, health and happiness improving movement (HHIM) exercise on the cortical activity of children with and without ADHD using electroencephalography (EEG). Children aged 12 to 14 yr with combined-type ADHD and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study, performing two individual movements (n=79, 35 controls) and a single exercise bout (n=45, 18 controls). electroencephalographic signals were recorded before and immediately after each movement, and before and after acute exercise under resting conditions, to obtain absolute and relative power estimates for the theta (3.5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), sensory motor rhythm (12-16 Hz), and beta (16-25 Hz) bands. After acute HHIM exercise, all children showed significant changes in their relative EEG, mainly in the theta and alpha bands. Individual movements were found to influence relative theta, alpha and beta, and theta-to-beta ratios. He presents aerobic stretching HHIM exercise has demonstrated acute effect on the cortical activity of children. PMID:27656629

  16. Phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) during synaptic activation results from the release of a stimulatory and in inhibitory agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    PI has been implicated in the process of synaptic transmission and is increased by agonists. It has been suggested that PI is involved in cellular Ca/sup + +/ mobilization and the process represents a series of hydrolytic reactions with inositol as the final product. Hence, the rate of release of /sup 3/H-inositol (/sup 3/H-Ins) from prelabelled inositol phospholipids can be used as an index of PI. In the /sup 3/H-inositol prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglia, they studied the effect of synaptic activity on PI. PI did not change during orthodromic stimulation (20 Hz, 5 min). However, upon cessation of the stimulation, PI increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 30 min. This increase in PI was reduced by suffusing the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine. In the presence of atropine (5 ..mu..M), orthodromic stimulation increased PI. They hypothesized that synaptic activation releases a long-lasting stimulatory agonist and a short-lived inhibitory (Ach/adenosine) agonist(s) affecting PI. To test this idea, 2 sympathetic ganglia were used. One was prelabelled with /sup 3/H-inositol and the other was not. The two ganglia were placed together in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringers solution containing atropine. Orthodromic stimuli were applied to the non-labelled ganglion and elicited release of /sup 3/H-Ins from the non-stimulated ganglion.

  17. Opposite effects of the acute promyelocytic leukemia PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins on retinoic acid signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, M; Testa, U; Nervi, C; Ferrucci, P F; Grignani, F; Puccetti, E; Grignani, F; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the PML or PLZF nuclear protein are the genetic markers of acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs). APLs with the PML-RAR alpha or the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein are phenotypically indistinguishable except that they differ in their sensitivity to retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation: PML-RAR alpha blasts are sensitive to RA and patients enter disease remission after RA treatment, while patients with PLZF-RAR alpha do not. We here report that (i) like PML-RAR alpha expression, PLZF-RAR alpha expression blocks terminal differentiation of hematopoietic precursor cell lines (U937 and HL-60) in response to different stimuli (vitamin D3, transforming growth factor beta1, and dimethyl sulfoxide); (ii) PML-RAR alpha, but not PLZF-RAR alpha, increases RA sensitivity of hematopoietic precursor cells and restores RA sensitivity of RA-resistant hematopoietic cells; (iii) PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar RA binding affinities; and (iv) PML-RAR alpha enhances the RA response of RA target genes (those for RAR beta, RAR gamma, and transglutaminase type II [TGase]) in vivo, while PLZF-RAR alpha expression has either no effect (RAR beta) or an inhibitory activity (RAR gamma and type II TGase). These data demonstrate that PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar (inhibitory) effects on RA-independent differentiation and opposite (stimulatory or inhibitory) effects on RA-dependent differentiation and that they behave in vivo as RA-dependent enhancers or inhibitors of RA-responsive genes, respectively. Their different activities on the RA signalling pathway might underlie the different responses of PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha APLs to RA treatment. The PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein contains an approximately 120-amino-acid N-terminal motif (called the POZ domain), which is also found in a variety of zinc finger proteins and a group of poxvirus proteins and which mediates protein

  18. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  19. Different effects of tianeptine pretreatment in rats exposed to acute stress and repeated severe stress.

    PubMed

    Kasar, M; Mengi, M; Yildirim, E A; Yurdakos, E

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aim to discuss the relationship between stress and learning and emotionality in an experimental model using two different stress conditions: acute stress (single restraint stress for 20 min) and repeated severe stress (6-h daily restraint for 21 days). We studied the effects of tianeptine, which has been suggested to have anxiolytic and cognition-enhancing effects under stressful conditions. After acute stress, the increase in the duration of immobility (F = 5.753 and 3.664) in the open field and holeboard tests and the decrease in rearing (F = 3.891) in the holeboard test were significant when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Results for repeated severe stress showed that in both the open field and holeboard tests the decrease in rearing (F = 4.494 and 4.530, respectively), increase in the duration of immobility (F = 6.069 and 4.742, respectively) and decrease in head dips (F = 4.938) in the holeboard test were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The group pretreated with tianeptine showed no significant difference from controls for either acute or repeated severe stress conditions. In the Morris water maze test, acute stress led to a prolongation of average escape latency, which indicated a spatial learning deficit. Treatment with tianeptine prior to acute stress prevented this spatial deficit. Repeated severe stress also led to spatial learning deficits in rats, but this deficit was not prevented by treatment with tianeptine. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment with tianeptine had different effects on stress-induced spatial learning deficits under acute and repeated stress conditions, while the effects on emotionality and anxiety-like behavior were similar. The mechanisms implicated in stress-induced emotional and memory deficits will be discussed.

  20. Effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide on treatment of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer Cakir, Ozlem; Esen, Hasan; Toker, Aysun; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali; Polat, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research continues to develop novel therapeutic modalities that particularly focus on the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to assess the effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide, alone or in combination, on pancreatic enzymes, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas cells, using a model of experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Objectives: We aimed to demonstrate effects of diclofenac sodium, octreotide and their combined use on pancreatic enzymes, activity of pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas on treatment of caerulin-induced experimental acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Caerulin-induced acute pancreatitis model was created using a total of 58 male BALB-C mice of 25 gr in seven groups. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity were examined as well as apoptotic values in pancreatic acinar cells through TUNNEL method. Histopathology of pancreas was evaluated for presence of edema, hemorrhage, parenchymal necrosis, fat necrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and fibrosis. Results: In the diclofenac sodium group, apoptotic values in the pancreatic acinar cells were found to be statistically lower than in the acute pancreatitis group in terms of parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage scores (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, and P = 0.052, respectively). No statistically significant differences were found in serum level of amylase, lipase, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and the other histopathological scores (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Diclofenac sodium, a cost-effective agent with a favorable side-effect profile, may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Findings of this study suggest a better efficacy for diclofenac sodium monotherapy as compared to octreotide alone or octreotide/diclofenac combination. PMID:26770346

  1. Cognitive and physiological effects of an acute physical activity intervention in elementary school children

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Katja; Schmidt, Mirko; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute physical activity intervention that included cognitive engagement on executive functions and on cortisol level in young elementary school children. Half of the 104 participating children (6–8 years old) attended a 20-min sport sequence, which included cognitively engaging and playful forms of physical activity. The other half was assigned to a resting control condition. Individual differences in children's updating, inhibition, and shifting performance as well as salivary cortisol were assessed before (pre-test), immediately after (post-test), and 40 min after (follow-up) the intervention or control condition, respectively. Results revealed a significantly stronger improvement in inhibition in the experimental group compared to the control group, while it appeared that acute physical activity had no specific effect on updating and shifting. The intervention effect on inhibition leveled out 40 min after physical activity. Salivary cortisol increased significantly more in the experimental compared to the control group between post-test and follow-up and results support partly the assumed inverted U-shaped relationship between cortisol level and cognitive performance. In conclusion, results indicate that acute physical activity that includes cognitive engagement may have immediate positive effects on inhibition, but not necessarily on updating and shifting in elementary school children. This positive effect may partly be explained through cortisol elevation after acute physical activity. PMID:25566148

  2. Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wollen, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization. Nutritional and botanical therapies included are huperzine A, polyphenols, Ginkgo, Panax ginseng, Withania somnifera, phosphatidylserine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, acetyl L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, various vitamins and minerals, and melatonin. Stimulatory therapies discussed are physical exercise, cognitive training, music, and socialization. Finally, treatment strategies are discussed in light of the benefits and drawbacks of different therapeutic approaches. It is concluded that potential risks of both approved and non-approved therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits and certain consequences of disease progression. Approaches that target several dysfunctions simultaneously and that emphasize nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies may offer the most benefit at this time.

  3. PD-1 Co-inhibitory and OX40 Co-stimulatory Crosstalk Regulates Helper T Cell Differentiation and Anti-Plasmodium Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zander, Ryan A; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Guthmiller, Jenna J; Kulu, Divine I; Li, Jun; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D; Butler, Noah S

    2015-05-13

    The differentiation and protective capacity of Plasmodium-specific T cells are regulated by both positive and negative signals during malaria, but the molecular and cellular details remain poorly defined. Here we show that malaria patients and Plasmodium-infected rodents exhibit atypical expression of the co-stimulatory receptor OX40 on CD4 T cells and that therapeutic enhancement of OX40 signaling enhances helper CD4 T cell activity, humoral immunity, and parasite clearance in rodents. However, these beneficial effects of OX40 signaling are abrogated following coordinate blockade of PD-1 co-inhibitory pathways, which are also upregulated during malaria and associated with elevated parasitemia. Co-administration of biologics blocking PD-1 and promoting OX40 signaling induces excessive interferon-gamma that directly limits helper T cell-mediated support of humoral immunity and decreases parasite control. Our results show that targeting OX40 can enhance Plasmodium control and that crosstalk between co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory pathways in pathogen-specific CD4 T cells can impact pathogen clearance. PMID:25891357

  4. Acclimation and acute temperature effects on population differences in oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Baris, Tara Z; Crawford, Douglas L; Oleksiak, Marjorie F

    2016-01-15

    Temperature changes affect metabolism on acute, acclamatory, and evolutionary time scales. To better understand temperature's affect on metabolism at these different time scales, we quantified cardiac oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in three Fundulus taxa acclimated to 12 and 28°C and measured at three acute temperatures (12, 20, and 28°C). The Fundulus taxa (northern Maine and southern Georgia F. heteroclitus, and a sister taxa, F. grandis) were used to identify evolved changes in OxPhos. Cardiac OxPhos metabolism was quantified by measuring six traits: state 3 (ADP and substrate-dependent mitochondrial respiration); E state (uncoupled mitochondrial activity); complex I, II, and IV activities; and LEAK ratio. Acute temperature affected all OxPhos traits. Acclimation only significantly affected state 3 and LEAK ratio. Populations were significantly different for state 3. In addition to direct effects, there were significant interactions between acclimation and population for complex I and between population and acute temperature for state 3. Further analyses suggest that acclimation alters the acute temperature response for state 3, E state, and complexes I and II: at the low acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at low assay temperatures, and at the high acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at high assay temperatures. Closer examination of the data also suggests that differences in state 3 respiration and complex I activity between populations were greatest between fish acclimated to low temperatures when assayed at high temperatures, suggesting that differences between the populations become more apparent at the edges of their thermal range. PMID:26582639

  5. Chronic hyperleptinemia induces resistance to acute natriuretic and NO-mimetic effects of leptin.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Wojtak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Apart from controlling energy balance, leptin, secreted by adipose tissue, is also involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Previous studies have demonstrated that acutely administered leptin stimulates natriuresis and vascular nitric oxide (NO) production and that these effects are impaired in obese animals. However, the mechanism of resistance to leptin is not clear. Because obesity is associated with chronically elevated leptin, we examined if long-term hyperleptinemia impairs acute effects of leptin on sodium excretion and NO production in the absence of obesity. Hyperleptinemia was induced in lean rats by administration of exogenous leptin at a dose of 0.5mg/kg/day for 7 days, and then acute effect of leptin (1mg/kg i.v.) was studied under general anesthesia. Leptin increased fractional sodium excretion and decreased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the renal medulla. In addition, leptin increased the level of NO metabolites and cyclic GMP in plasma and aortic wall. These acute effects of leptin were impaired in hyperleptinemic animals. In both control and hyperleptinemic groups the effect of leptin on Na(+) excretion and renal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was abolished by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, but not by protein kinase B/Akt inhibitor, triciribine,. In contrast, acute effect of leptin on NO metabolites and cGMP was abolished by triciribine but not by wortmannin. Leptin stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473) in aortic tissue but not in the kidney, and this effect was comparable in control and hyperleptinemic groups. These results suggest that hyperleptinemia may mediate "renal" and "vascular" leptin resistance observed in obesity.

  6. The Effect of Exertion on Heart Rate and Rating of Perceived Exertion in Acutely Concussed Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Andrea; Leddy, John; Freitas, Michael; Czuczman, Natalie; Willer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research suggests that one physiological effect of concussion is a disruption in regulation of autonomic nervous system control that affects the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic output. While changes in heart rate after concussion have been observed, the nature of the heart rate change during progressive exercise has not been well evaluated in acutely symptomatic patients. Additionally, little is known about the relationship between HR and RPE in this population. Methods We compared changes in heart rate and perceived effort during graded treadmill exertion in recently concussed patients to elucidate the effect of brain injury on cardiovascular response to exercise. Resting HR, HR on exercise initiation, and changes in HR and RPE during the Buffalo Concussion Treadmill Test (BCTT) were compared on two test visits: When patients were symptomatic (acute) and after recovery. Results were compared with the test-retest results obtained from a control group consisting of healthy, non-concussed individuals. Results Patients had a significantly lower HR at onset of exercise when acutely concussed as compared to when recovered and reported greater perceived exertion at every exercise intensity level when symptomatic, despite exercising at lower workloads, than when recovered. Sympathetic response to increased exertion was not affected by concussion - HR increased in response to exercise at a comparable rate in both tests. These differences observed in response to exercise between the first BCTT and follow-up evaluation in initially concussed patients were not present in non-concussed individuals. Conclusion Our results suggest that during the acute phase after concussion, acutely concussed patients demonstrated an impaired ability to shift from parasympathetic to sympathetic control over heart rate at the onset of exercise. Changes in the autonomic nervous system after concussion may be more complex than previously reported. Continued evaluation of

  7. Acute effects of sulfur mustard injury--Munich experiences.

    PubMed

    Kehe, K; Thiermann, H; Balszuweit, F; Eyer, F; Steinritz, D; Zilker, T

    2009-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a strong vesicant agent which has been used in several military conflicts. Large stockpiles still exist to the present day. SM is believed to be a major threat to civilian populations because of the persistent asymmetric threat by non-state actors, such as terrorist groups, its easy synthesis and handling and the risk of theft from stockpiles. Following an asymptomatic interval of several hours, acute SM exposure produces subepidermal skin blisters, respiratory tract damage, eye lesions and bone marrow depression. Iranian victims of SM exposure during the Iran-Iraq (1984-1988) war were treated at intensive care units of 3 Munich hospitals. All 12 patients were injured following aerial attacks with SM filled bombs, which exploded in a distance between 5 and 30m. All patients soon noted an offensive smell of garlic, addle eggs or oil roasted vegetables. No individual protective equipment was used. Eye itching and skin blistering started 2h after SM exposure. Some patients complained of nausea, dizziness and hoarseness. 4h after exposure, most patients started vomiting. Eye symptoms worsened and most patients suffered from temporary blindness due to blepharospasm and lid oedema. Additionally, pulmonary symptoms such as productive cough occurred. Patients were transferred to Munich 4-17 days after SM exposure. On admission all patients showed significant skin blistering and pigmentation. Conjunctivitis and photophobia were the major eye symptoms. Pulmonary symptoms, including productive cough were persistent. Bronchoscopy revealed massive inflammation of the trachea with signs of necrosis. 3 patients needed tracheotomy. Chest X-ray did not yield abnormal observations. This presentation summarizes the experience of treating SM victims in Munich and discusses therapeutic implications. PMID:19482056

  8. Effect of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amine, El Mekkaoui; Kaoutar, Saâda; Ihssane, Mellouki; Adil, Ibrahimi; Dafr-Allah, Benajah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prolonged fasting may precipitate or exacerbate gastrointestinal complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between Ramadan fasting and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB), and to assess characteristics of those occurred in the holly month. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients, who underwent endoscopy for AUGIB in Ramadan (R) and the month before Ramadan (BR). Epidemiological, clinical and etiological characteristics and outcome of patients having AUGIB were compared between the two periods from 2001 to 2010. Results: Two hundred and ninety-one patients had endoscopy for AUGIB during the two periods study. There was an increasing trend in the overall number of patients in Ramadan period (n = 132, 45.4% versus n = 159, 54.6%), especially with duodenal ulcer (n = 48, 37.2% versus n = 81, 62.8%). The most frequent etiology was peptic ulcer but it was more observed in group R than in group BR (46.2% versus 57.9%, P = 0.04), especially duodenal ulcer (36.4% versus 50.3%, P = 0.01); this finding persisted in multivariable modeling (adjusted odds ratio: 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.69, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was a decreasing trend in rate of variceal bleeding from BR period (26.5%) to R period (18.9%; P = 0.11). Regarding the outcome, there were no significant differences between the two periods of the study: Recurrent bleeding (10.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.36) and mortality rate (5.3% versus 4.4%, P = 0.7). Conclusion: The most frequent etiology of AUGIB was peptic ulcer during Ramadan. However, Ramadan fasting did not influence the outcome of the patients. Prophylactic measures should be taken for people with risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:23930121

  9. Hyperhydrating effect of acute administration of angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Fregly, M J; Wilson, K M; Rowland, N E; Cade, J R

    1992-01-01

    Water intake, urine output, and fluid exchange (water intake less urine output) were measured in rats at hourly intervals for 7 hours and at 24 hours following acute administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 micrograms/kg SC). AII induced the expected abrupt increase in water intake and a more gradual increase in urine output. The change in fluid exchange (fluid exchange of the AII-treated group less fluid exchange of controls) became positive within the first hour after treatment with AII, decreased linearly with time, and reached 0 at approximately 10 to 12 hours after treatment with AII. When AII was administered intracerebroventricularly (50 ng), similar results were observed. In this case, the change in fluid exchange (delta F) reached 0 in about 6 hours. Imposition of a water load (1% of body weight, IP) on the group receiving AII SC failed to affect the time required for delta F to reach 0 if the water load was disregarded. However, inclusion of the load as a part of intake extended the time the rats remained in positive fluid balance beyond that of the nonloaded, AII-treated control group. In the case of the larger water load (3% of body weight, IP), delta F returned to that of controls in about 4 to 5 hours if the water load was disregarded. However, inclusion of the load as part of intake extended the period of hyperhydration well beyond that of both the nonloaded, AII-treated group and the AII-treated group given the 1% load.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this.

  11. NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lots of information is available surrounding the acute toxicity of anticholinesterase pesticides, but these have been very few detailed studies on the chronic effects of these pesticides. Humans are exposed on a chronic basis and some humans believe that have been affected advers...

  12. Acute Alcohol Effects on Repetition Priming and Word Recognition Memory with Equivalent Memory Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Suchismita; Bates, Marsha E.

    2006-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication effects on memory were examined using a recollection-based word recognition memory task and a repetition priming task of memory for the same information without explicit reference to the study context. Memory cues were equivalent across tasks; encoding was manipulated by varying the frequency of occurrence (FOC) of words…

  13. Neurobehavorial effects of acute exposure to four solvents: meta-abalyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Meta-and re-analyses of the available data for the neurobehavioral effects of acute inhalation exposure to toluene were reported by Benignus et al. (2007). The present study was designed to test the generality of the toluene results in as many other solvents as possible by furthe...

  14. State/Trait Anxiety and Anxiolytic Effects of Acute Physical Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guszkowska, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine anxiolytic effects of acute physical exertions in relation to the initial anxiety state and trait in women. Material and methods: A group of 163 women aged 16-56 years, attending fitness clubs in Warsaw, participated in the study. They selected a single exercise to perform--strength, aerobic or mixed, lasting 30 to over 60…

  15. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  16. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  17. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  18. The Chronic and Acute Effects of Exercise Upon Selected Blood Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roitman, J. L.; Brewer, J. P.

    This study investigated the effects of chronic and acute exercise upon selected blood measures and indices. Nine male cross-country runners were studied. Red blood count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured using standard laboratory techniques; mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin…

  19. TOWARD COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in being able to express the consequences of exposure to potentially toxic compounds in monetary terms in order to evaluate potential cost-benefit relationships of controlling exposure. Behavioral effects of acute toluene exposure could be subjected ...

  20. Time Scale Effects in Acute Association between Air-Pollution and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used wavelet analysis and generalized additive models (GAM) to study timescale effects in the acute association between mortality and air-pollution. Daily averages of measured NO2 concentrations in the metropolitan Paris area are used as indicators of human exposure...

  1. COMPARISON OF ACUTE NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute neurobehavioral and cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting effects of N-methyl carbamate insecticides have not been systematically compared. We evaluated five carbamates - carbaryl (CB), propoxur (PP), oxamyl (OM), methomyl (MM), and methiocarb (MC). Adult male Long-Evans ra...

  2. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. PMID:27503811

  3. The effect of obesity on inflammatory cytokine and leptin production following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Caslin, H L; Franco, R L; Crabb, E B; Huang, C J; Bowen, M K; Acevedo, E O

    2016-02-01

    Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by eliciting chronic systemic inflammation and impairing the immune response to additional stressors. There has been little assessment of the effect of obesity on psychological stress, an independent risk factor for CVD. Therefore, it was of interest to examine interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and leptin following an acute mental stress task in nonobese and obese males. Twenty college-aged males (21.3 ± 0.56 years) volunteered to participate in a 20-min Stroop color-word and mirror-tracing task. Subjects were recruited for obese (body mass index: BMI > 30) and nonobese (BMI < 25) groups, and blood samples were collected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The acute mental stress task elicited an increase in heart rate, catecholamines, and IL-1β in all subjects. Additionally, acute mental stress increased cortisol concentrations in the nonobese group. There was a significant reduction in leptin in obese subjects 30 min posttask compared with a decrease in nonobese subjects 120 min posttask. Interestingly, the relationship between the percent change in leptin and IL-1Ra at 120 min posttask in response to an acute mental stress task was only observed in nonobese individuals. This is the first study to suggest that adiposity in males may impact leptin and inflammatory signaling mechanisms following acute mental stress.

  4. The effect of obesity on inflammatory cytokine and leptin production following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Caslin, H L; Franco, R L; Crabb, E B; Huang, C J; Bowen, M K; Acevedo, E O

    2016-02-01

    Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by eliciting chronic systemic inflammation and impairing the immune response to additional stressors. There has been little assessment of the effect of obesity on psychological stress, an independent risk factor for CVD. Therefore, it was of interest to examine interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and leptin following an acute mental stress task in nonobese and obese males. Twenty college-aged males (21.3 ± 0.56 years) volunteered to participate in a 20-min Stroop color-word and mirror-tracing task. Subjects were recruited for obese (body mass index: BMI > 30) and nonobese (BMI < 25) groups, and blood samples were collected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The acute mental stress task elicited an increase in heart rate, catecholamines, and IL-1β in all subjects. Additionally, acute mental stress increased cortisol concentrations in the nonobese group. There was a significant reduction in leptin in obese subjects 30 min posttask compared with a decrease in nonobese subjects 120 min posttask. Interestingly, the relationship between the percent change in leptin and IL-1Ra at 120 min posttask in response to an acute mental stress task was only observed in nonobese individuals. This is the first study to suggest that adiposity in males may impact leptin and inflammatory signaling mechanisms following acute mental stress. PMID:26511907

  5. Clinical Effects of Hypertension on the Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Goo; Ahn, Yongkeun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Rhew, Jay Young; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Bae, Jang Ho; Rha, Seung Woon; Kim, Chong Jin; Jang, Yang Soo; Yoon, Junghan; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of ischemic heart disease has been increased rapidly in Korea. However, the clinical effects of antecedent hypertension on acute myocardial infarction have not been identified. We assessed the relationship between antecedent hypertension and clinical outcomes in 7,784 patients with acute myocardial infarction in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry during one-year follow-up. Diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cerebrovascular disease, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease were more prevalent in hypertensives (n=3,775) than nonhypertensives (n=4,009). During hospitalization, hypertensive patients suffered from acute renal failure, shock, and cerebrovascular event more frequently than in nonhypertensives. During follow-up of one-year, the incidence of major adverse cardiac events was higher in hypertensives. In multi-variate adjustment, old age, Killip class ≥III, left ventricular ejection fraction <45%, systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg on admission, post procedural TIMI flow grade ≤2, female sex, and history of hypertension were independent predictors for in-hospital mortality. However antecedent hypertension was not significantly associated with one-year mortality. Hypertension at the time of acute myocardial infarction is associated with an increased rate of in-hospital mortality. PMID:19794974

  6. Seasonal effects on the reported incidence of acute diarrhoeal disease in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pinfold, J V; Horan, N J; Mara, D D

    1991-09-01

    This paper examines the seasonal variation in the reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for selected areas in the northeast of Thailand. Charts are presented which show rainfall, temperature and reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for the period 1982 to 1987. Incidence of diarrhoea appears to be inversely related to a sharp decrease in temperature around January each year. Although rainfall does not appear to have a direct effect on the relative incidence of acute diarrhoea, there is always a consistent reduction during July or August, after the rains have begun. Seasonal changes in climate may be indirectly related to other factors which have an important bearing on diarrhoeal disease. Rainwater collection is an important water source in this region and the affect this has on water use is discussed in relation to faeco-oral disease transmission.

  7. Inhibitory effects of pretreatment with radon on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Teruaki; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibits carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in mice. In addition, it has been reported that reactive oxygen species contribute to alcohol-induced hepatopathy. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effects of radon inhalation on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of 50% alcohol (5 g/kg bodyweight) after inhaling approximately 4000 Bq/m(3) radon for 24 h. Alcohol administration significantly increased the activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) in serum, and the levels of triglyceride and lipid peroxide in the liver, suggesting acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy. Radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver. Furthermore, pretreatment with radon inhibited the depression of hepatic functions and antioxidative functions. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibited acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

  8. Effect of acute exercise and cardiovascular fitness on cognitive function: an event-related cortical desynchronization study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Chu, Chien-Heng; Wang, Chun-Chih; Song, Tai-Fen; Wei, Gao-Xia

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effects of acute exercise and cardiovascular fitness on cognitive function using the Stroop test and event-related desynchronization (ERD) in an aged population. Old adults (63.10 ± 2.89 years) were first assigned to either a high-fitness or a low-fitness group, and they were then subjected to an acute exercise treatment and a reading control treatment in a counterbalanced order. Alpha ERD was recorded during the Stroop test, which was administered after both treatments. Acute exercise improved cognitive performance regardless of the level of cognition, and old adults with higher fitness levels received greater benefits from acute exercise. Additionally, acute exercise, rather than overall fitness, elicited greater lower and upper alpha ERDs relative to the control condition. These findings indirectly suggest that the beneficial effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance may result from exercise-induced attentional control observed during frontal neural excitation. PMID:25308605

  9. Effects of acute stressors on nociception, adrenocortical responses and behavior of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Herskin, Mette S; Munksgaard, Lene; Ladewig, Jan

    2004-12-15

    Effects of acute stressors on behavioral, adrenocortical and nociceptive responses were examined in 24 dairy cows kept in tie stalls, using 15 min of social isolation in novel surroundings (ISOL), fixation by the head in the home stall (FIX) and the provision of novel neighbors/stall (NEIGH) as acute stressors as well as a control treatment (CON). Each cow was exposed to one treatment daily in a balanced order. All stressors led to signs of hypoalgesia as indicated by slower (P=0.01) and reduced responses (P<0.10) toward nociceptive laser stimulation after exposure to the acute stressors. ISOL, however, had stronger effects than FIX or NEIGH. ISOL or FIX led to increased plasma concentration of cortisol (P<0.001), whereas NEIGH or CON did not. The behavioral responses were affected by treatments as well, as shown by decreased rumination for all stressors (P<0.001) and a gradual increase in active avoidance from CON to NEIGH to FIX (P<0.001). Furthermore, exposure to NEIGH led to increased exploration (P<0.001), aggression (P<0.10) and self-grooming behavior (P<0.10) compared with the CON treatment. The results suggest that nociceptive changes are part of responses toward acute stress in dairy cows. The nociceptive changes, however, were not direct reflections of the adrenocortical or behavioral responses toward the acute stressors. Therefore, quantification of nociceptive changes, in combination with behavioral and physiological registrations, can be one way to broaden the range of biological systems, considered for the study of animals under stress, and thereby extend the understanding of responses toward acute stress in dairy cows. PMID:15581663

  10. The effect of sodium tetraborate and alum in the management of acute childhood diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Aung, M M; U, P P

    1986-03-01

    The effect of oral rehydration (OR) has been well established in the management of dehydration in acute childhood diarrhoea. Many authors have been trying to find additives of all types which would be effective in retaining oral fluids and promoting their active absorption into the circulation. Any agent which will effectively reduce oral rehydration requirements should be considered for prospective studies. Amongst the traditional medicines, it was noticed that sodium tetraborate (borax) and alum reduced appreciably the fluid requirement in many cases of acute childhood diarrhoea. This traditional usage of these chemicals without any noticeable side effects has been described for centuries. During preliminary observations on 26 of our children given these salts no side effects were detected.

  11. Effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on platelet aggregation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, Fumikazu; Kitamura, Nobuo; Satoh, Eiki

    2014-03-01

    Although psychological stress has long been known to alter cardiovascular function, there have been few studies on the effect of psychological stress on platelets, which play a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on the aggregation of platelets and platelet cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Mice were subjected to both transportation stress (exposure to novel environment, psychological stress) and restraint stress (psychological stress) for 2 h (acute stress) or 3 weeks (2 h/day) (chronic stress). In addition, adrenalectomized mice were subjected to similar chronic stress (both transportation and restraint stress for 3 weeks). The aggregation of platelets from mice and [Ca(2+)]i was determined by light transmission assay and fura-2 fluorescence assay, respectively. Although acute stress had no effect on agonist-induced platelet aggregation, chronic stress enhanced the ability of the platelet agonists thrombin and ADP to stimulate platelet aggregation. However, chronic stress failed to enhance agonist-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i. Adrenalectomy blocked chronic stress-induced enhancement of platelet aggregation. These results suggest that chronic, but not acute, psychological stress enhances agonist-stimulated platelet aggregation independently of [Ca(2+)]i increase, and the enhancement may be mediated by stress hormones secreted from the adrenal glands.

  12. Acute effects of hexabromocyclododecane on Leydig cell cyclic nucleotide signaling and steroidogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Dakic, Vanja; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Hrubik, Jelena; Andric, Nebojsa; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2013-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), an additive brominated flame retardant routinely added to various consumer products, was reported to have toxic effects upon biota, including endocrine disruption. In this study, the potential toxicity of HBCDD was tested in peripubertal rat Leydig cells in vitro during 6 h exposure. HBCDD inhibited human chorionic gonadotropin- and forskolin-supported cAMP accumulation and steroidogenesis. It also inhibited basal cAMP production, but elevated basal steroidogenesis. The expression of several cAMP-dependent genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, was also inhibited by HBCDD treatment. Nevertheless, this was not accompanied by a decrease in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, as documented by western blot analysis, and activity of steroidogenic enzymes, as documented by unaffected steroidogenesis in the presence of permeable 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol. However, HBCDD caused significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in untreated and human chorionic gonadotropin-treated cells. This indicates that HBCDD acute toxicity in Leydig cells reflects changes in mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent cAMP production and basal and cAMP-regulated cholesterol transport. This in turn facilitates basal but inhibits cAMP-dependent steroidogenesis. Acute effects of HBCDD treatment on transcription are also indicative of its sustained effects on Leydig cell function. PMID:23347875

  13. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Ribeiro, Diogo Farias; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently. Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood. Method A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models. Results Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01). Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01) or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01) elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02), though aerobic training did not. The cumulative

  14. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  15. The Effect of Vigorous Intensity Acute Exercise on Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David Spencer

    2012-01-01

    The effect of physical activity (PA) and consequent influence on cognition within adult seniors has been widely published. However, there is a paucity of causal research relating PA and cognition to schoolchildren within an authentic setting. Also, little is known about the required intensity and dosage of PA to effect executive function (EF)…

  16. Thyroid receptor β involvement in the effects of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Connor, David A; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite adverse health effects. Nicotine's effects on learning may contribute to addiction by enhancing drug-context associations. Effects of nicotine on learning could be direct or could occur by altering systems that modulate cognition. Because thyroid signaling can alter cognition and nicotine/smoking may change thyroid function, nicotine could affect learning through changes in thyroid signaling. These studies investigate the functional contributions of thyroid receptor (TR) subtypes β and α1 to nicotine-enhanced learning and characterize the effects of acute nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels. We conducted a high throughput screen of transcription factor activity to identify novel targets that may contribute to the effects of nicotine on learning. Based on these results, which showed that combined nicotine and learning uniquely acted to increase TR activation, we identified TRs as potential targets of nicotine. Further analyses were conducted to determine the individual and combined effects of nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels, but no changes were seen. Next, to determine the role of TRβ and TRα1 in the effects of nicotine on learning, mice lacking the TRβ or TRα1 gene and wildtype littermates were administered acute nicotine prior to fear conditioning. Nicotine enhanced contextual fear conditioning in TRα1 knockout mice and wildtypes from both lines but TRβ knockout mice did not show nicotine-enhanced learning. This finding supports involvement of TRβ signaling in the effect of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory. Acute nicotine enhances learning and these effects may involve processes regulated by the transcription factor TRβ. PMID:25666034

  17. Thyroid Receptor β Involvement in the Effects of Acute Nicotine on Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Prescott T.; Kenney, Justin W.; Connor, David; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite adverse health effects. Nicotine’s effects on learning may contribute to addiction by enhancing drug-context associations. Effects of nicotine on learning could be direct or could occur by altering systems that modulate cognition. Because thyroid signaling can alter cognition and nicotine/smoking may change thyroid function, nicotine could affect learning through changes in thyroid signaling. These studies investigate the functional contributions of thyroid receptor (TR) subtypes β and α1 to nicotine-enhanced learning and characterize the effects of acute nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels. We conducted a high throughput screen of transcription factor activity to identify novel targets that may contribute to the effects of nicotine on learning. Based on these results, which showed that combined nicotine and learning uniquely acted to increase TR activation, we identified TRs as potential targets of nicotine. Further analyses were conducted to determine the individual and combined effects of nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels, but no changes were seen. Next, to determine the role of TRβ and TRα1 in the effects of nicotine on learning, mice lacking the TRβ or TRα1 gene and wildtype littermates were administered acute nicotine prior to fear conditioning. Nicotine enhanced contextual fear conditioning in TRα1 knockout mice and wildtypes from both lines but TRβ knockout mice did not show nicotine-enhanced learning. This finding supports involvement of TRβ signaling in the effect of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory. Acute nicotine enhances learning and these effects may involve processes regulated by the transcription factor TRβ. PMID:25666034

  18. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640247

  19. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability. Research report, Sep 85-Jul 88

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability in the normal and ischemic heart of anesthetized and conscious dogs. Exposure (90 to 120 minutes) to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, was without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability in laboratory dogs. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. Using a model involving partial coronary artery stenosis, no changes were found in either the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Also examined were the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state in order to take into consideration possible adverse consequences mediated by the central nervous system. The study found no adverse effects on the cardiac-excitable properties in response to either a 2-hour- or 24-hour-exposure paradigm.

  20. Effect of Vaporub on the restlessness of children with acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Berger, H; Madreiter, H; Jarosch, E

    1978-01-01

    In this study pneumographs of children with acute bronchitis treated with Vicks Vaporub or Petrolatum were used. Movement artifacts were used as a measure of the so-called "restlessness" of the children. The experimental schedule consisted of a 10-minute phase of recording before a 3-minute treatment with Vaporub or Petrolatum, followed by a 70-minute observation period, during which time pneumograms were also recorded. Thirty-four Vaporub-treated children showed an increase in periods without movement artifacts of up to 213.8%, the Petrolatum controls, twenty-six children, up to 62.4% as compared to the corresponding pre-treatment values. It is concluded that Vaporub is effective in decreasing restlessness in children suffering from acute bronchitis. This effect is quite marked and cannot be due solely to psychological effects of the rub therapy, or to effects of petrolatum without aromatics.

  1. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.

    1991-02-01

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m{sup 3} for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m{sup 3} (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. Acute and subacute effects of the ultrasonic blade and electrosurgery on nerve physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chaoyang; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Cavanaugh, John M.; Broughton, Duan; Clymer, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasonic blades have been shown to cause less acute electrophysiological damage when applied near nerves than monopolar electrosurgery (ES). This study was performed to determine whether the acute nerve damage observed for ES, as well as the relative lack of damage observed for ultrasonic dissection, extends through a subacute timeframe. Muscle incisions were made in rat with the Harmonic® Blade (HB) and ES at a distance of 2 mm from the sciatic nerve. Sham surgery was also performed which consisted of similar exposure of the sciatic nerve without use of an energized device. Electrophysiological function was assessed acutely over a 3-h period, and subacutely after a 7-day survival, by monitoring the sciatic nerve compound action potential (CAP), conduction velocity (CV), von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation force, leukocyte infiltration, and impaired axonal transport via β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry. During the acute period, ES produced significantly lower CAP and CV, and higher levels of leukocytes and β-APP than sham, whereas the ultrasonic blade was not significantly different from sham, and had significantly lower VFH force than ES. After the subacute survival, ES continued to display significantly lower CAP and CV, and higher levels of leukocytes and β-APP than sham, whereas ultrasonic blade had higher CAP and CV than sham, and lower VFH than ES. This study confirms that incisions made with an ultrasonic blade cause less acute nerve damage than monopolar ES, and are comparable to sham surgery at a distance of 2 mm from the sciatic nerve. The negative effects of electrosurgery extend through at least a 7-day survival period, whereas subacute recovery after application of the ultrasonic blade was comparable to that of sham surgery. For surgical procedures in the vicinity of vital nerves, use of the ultrasonic blade represents a lower risk than ES for both acute and subacute neural trauma. PMID:25812024

  3. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zummo, S.M.; Karol, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.

  4. Effects of acute corticosterone treatment on partner preferences in male and female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    LaPlante, Kimberly A; Huremovic, Enida; Tomaszycki, Michelle L

    2014-04-01

    Stress alters physiology and behavior across species. Most research on the effects of stress on behavior uses chronic stressors, and most are correlational. The effects of acute stressors on physiology and behavior have been mixed. Here, we use zebra finches, a highly gregarious species that forms long-term pair bonds, to test the effects of an acute corticosterone (CORT) on opposite-sex partner preferences over a same-sex individual or a group (the latter is a highly appealing option). We had two competing hypotheses. First, we predicted that acute CORT would alter preferences for the opposite sex bird in both conditions in both sexes. However, since there is a sex difference in the effects of CORT on partner preferences in voles, these effects may be more pronounced in males than in females. To test our hypotheses, we administered 2 doses of CORT (10μg and 20μg) or vehicle (control) using a repeated measures design. In the male vs. female test, there was a significant Sex by Treatment interaction, such that in males, 10μg CORT increased preferences for a female over the male compared to when these same males were treated with saline at baseline. There were no effects of treatment in females. In the opposite-sex vs. group condition, there was an overall effect of Treatment, such that the 10μg dose increased preference for the opposite-sex individual over both saline treatments, regardless of sex. These findings further our understanding of the effects of an acute stressor on sexual partner preferences.

  5. Acute and chronic effect of ethanol on hepatic albumin synthesis in rat liver in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, H.; Kato, S.; Murawaki, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Wakushima, T.; Hirayama, C.

    1986-08-01

    To study the effects of ethanol and its metabolite on albumin metabolism, we examined the hepatic albumin synthesis and secretion in male Wistar rats in vitro, following acute and chronic ethanol administration. After acute ethanol administration, proalbumin synthesis in rat liver in vitro, declined to 47% of the control level at 4 hrs, the lowest level, and increased thereafter to slightly higher than the control level at 16 hrs. On the other hand, chronic ethanol administration for 4 weeks, increased proalbumin synthesis to 1.5 times that of the control level. In the acute ethanol group, a significant negative correlation was observed between proalbumin radioactivity and the concentration of hepatic ethanol and acetaldehyde. The variation between proalbumin radioactivity and hepatic ethanol concentration was wider than the variation between proalbumin and hepatic acetaldehyde. In the chronic ethanol group, ethanol was not detected in the liver. No significant differences from the proalbumin/albumin ratio were seen at any time point after acute or chronic ethanol administration. These findings suggest that the effects of ethanol on hepatic albumin synthesis differ with the method of ethanol administration, and acetaldehyde and/or ethanol is involved in the reduction in albumin synthesis, however, proalbumin-albumin conversion is not disturbed.

  6. Effects of Acute Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Anaerobic Performance in Trained Female Cyclists.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jordan M; Smith, Keyona; Moyen, Nicole E; Binns, Ashley; Gray, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal beta-alanine (BA) supplementation can improve exercise performance in males through increases in carnosine; however, females experience greater relative increases in carnosine compared to males. This potentially allows females to benefit from acute BA doses; however, effects of an acute BA dose on performance in females remain unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate how an acute dose of 1.6 g BA affects anaerobic performance in female cyclists. Twelve females (age=26.6±1.3 y) volunteered to participate in this randomized, double-blind study. All participants completed two supplement trials: 1) Placebo=34 g dextrose and 2) BA=1.6 g BA + 34 g dextrose. Thirty-minutes after supplementation, participants performed three repeated Wingate cycling tests with 2 min of active rest after each. Fatigue index, mean power, and peak power were measured during each Wingate. Lactate, heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at rest, immediately after each Wingate, and after each active rest period. RPE significantly decreased (p<0.001) immediately following Wingates 1 and 2 and after each 2-min rest period for the BA trials; however, no differences were observed immediately after Wingate 3 (p>0.05). No significant supplementation effect was observed for any performance or physiological variable (p>0.05 for all variables). Findings suggest that an acute dose of BA (1.6 g) decreases RPE during anaerobic power activities in trained female cyclists.

  7. Lack of behavioural effects after acute tyrosine depletion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lythe, K E; Anderson, I M; Deakin, J F W; Elliott, R; Strickland, P L

    2005-01-01

    Acute dietary tyrosine depletion has previously been shown to reduce dopamine neurotransmission in both animals and humans. In this study, we investigated the effects of brain dopamine depletion, through acute tyrosine and phenylalanine depletion, on plasma prolactin, mood and neuropsychological function in 12 normal subjects. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, subjects received two amino-acid drinks separated by a week, a nutritionally balanced mixture (Bal) and on the other occasion a tyrosine and phenylalanine deficient mixture (TP-). The plasma ratio of tyrosine and phenylalanine to the other large neutral amino acids decreased significantly on the TP- occasion (-78.7%, p < 0.0001) and there was an increase in plasma prolactin concentration relative to the balanced drink in the seven subjects for whom results were available for both occasions (p < 0.02). Acute tyrosine depletion did not alter mood as measured by visual analogue scale ratings, and measures of memory, attention and behavioural inhibition were also unaffected. Our results are consistent with acute dietary tyrosine depletion causing a reduction in brain dopamine neurotransmission but raise questions about how robust or consistent the effects are on psychological function. PMID:15671123

  8. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment⋆

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J.; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met Po2/Fio2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and Po2/Fio2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity. PMID:19041527

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure with pressure support ventilation is effective in treating acute-onset bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yiuka; Fikry, Karim; Shah, Bhavika; Madapu, Manokanth; Gaz, Randall D; Leffert, Lisa R; Jiang, Yandong

    2015-06-01

    Acute bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve injury leading to acute vocal cord paralysis (VCP) is a serious complication of head and neck surgery, often requiring emergent surgical intervention. Although well documented, its presentation may be sudden and unexpected, occurring despite lack of obvious intraoperative nerve injury. There is limited literature on airway management strategies for patients with acute bilateral VCP before attaining a secure airway. We report a case of acute VCP that was successfully treated with continuous positive airway pressure via facemask ventilation. This effective temporizing strategy allowed clinicians to plan and prepare for tracheostomy, minimizing potential complications.

  10. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  11. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  12. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jarema, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deborah L.; Shaffer, Rachel M.; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n ≈ 24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4–120 µM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:26348672

  13. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jarema, Kimberly A; Hunter, Deborah L; Shaffer, Rachel M; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n≈24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4-120 μM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system.

  14. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jarema, Kimberly A; Hunter, Deborah L; Shaffer, Rachel M; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n≈24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4-120 μM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:26348672

  15. Effects of pinacidil on reentrant arrhythmias generated during acute regional ischemia: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Trénor, Beatriz; Ferrero, José M; Rodríguez, Blanca; Montilla, Fulgencio

    2005-07-01

    Many experimental studies have pointed out the controversy involving the arrhythmogenic effects of potassium channel openers (KCOs) in ischemia. KCOs activate the ATP-sensitive potassium current [IK(ATP)], resulting in action potential duration (APD) shortening, especially under pathological conditions such as ischemia. Acute myocardial ischemia leads to electrophysiological inhomogeneities in APD, conduction velocity, and refractoriness, which provide the substrate for reentry initiation and maintenance and may lead to malignant arrhythmias. The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the KCO pinacidil on vulnerability to reentry during acute regional ischemia using computer simulations. We use a two-dimensional virtual heart tissue with implementation of acute regional ischemia conditions. Membrane kinetics are represented by a modified version of Luo-Rudy (phase II) action potential model that incorporates the effect of pinacidil on IK(ATP). The vulnerable window (VW) for reentry is quantified for different doses of pinacidil. Our results show that for doses below 3 micromol/l the VW widens with increasing pinacidil concentration, whereas for higher doses of pinacidil the VW decreases, becoming zero for concentrations above 10 micromol/l. The ionic mechanisms involved in this behavior are explored. This study demonstrates that the effect of pinacidil on arrhythmogenesis is strongly dose-dependent, and that high doses of pinacidil exert a strong antiarrhythmic effect.

  16. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects.

  17. Acute effects of ethanol on sex hormones in non-alcoholic men and women.

    PubMed

    Ellingboe, J

    1987-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption has long been known to interfere with reproductive function and sexual behavior, but specific effects of acute alcohol ingestion on sex hormones have been studied only recently. An attempt is made in this review to summarize and explain conflicting results from studies of the acute effects of alcohol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, with healthy non-alcoholic men and women as subjects. In men, moderate to high doses of ethanol have been reported to suppress plasma testosterone. Although some clinical studies have not supported this observation, considerable evidence documents direct alcohol inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis in the testis. After alcohol ingestion, plasma LH remains unchanged or increases, probably because of reduced androgen negative feedback. In analogous studies with women during the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, alcohol does not decrease plasma estradiol or alter LH levels. Furthermore, it has been reported that plasma levels of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone increase during alcohol treatment in the midluteal phase, while gonadotropins tend to decrease. Alcohol has no effect on LH secretion in post-menopausal women. Because reports on the acute effects of alcohol in men have not been consistent, it remains to be determined if acute alcohol effects in men and women are really different. In men, provocative tests of gonadotropin response to LHRH stimulation were normal during periods of intoxication and hangover, indicating that ethanol has no significant direct effect on LH secretion at the pituitary level. It seems more likely that alcohol changes plasma levels of sex steroids by altering hepatic, gonadal, and possibly adrenal metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects. PMID:10837840

  19. Acute effects of aspartame on aggression and neurochemistry of rats.

    PubMed

    Goerss, A L; Wagner, G C; Hill, W L

    2000-08-01

    The inverse relationship between serotonin and aggression was investigated in rats treated with aspartame, a sweetener thought to interfere with the synthesis of this neurotransmitter. Eleven adult, male Long-Evans rats received either aspartame (200-800 mg/kg, IP) or the vehicle prior to testing in a standard resident-intruder paradigm. Contrary to our hypothesis, aspartame significantly decreased aggression as shown by increased latencies to the first attack and decreased number of bites per session. Corresponding with the effects on aggression, aspartame significantly increased striatal levels of serotonin. It was concluded that high doses of aspartame reduced aggressive attack via a serotonergic mechanism while the lower dose was without effect on either variable.

  20. Acute and chronic alcohol administration: effects on performance of zebrafish in a latent learning task.

    PubMed

    Luchiari, Ana C; Salajan, Diana C; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major medical problem. Zebrafish have been proposed to model alcohol related human disorders. Alcohol impairs learning and memory. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on performance of zebrafish in a recently developed latent learning paradigm. We employ a 2×3×2 experimental design (chronic×acute alcohol treatment×path blocked). The latent learning task had two phases: one, 30min long exploration trials (16 days, 1 trial/day) with left or right path of a complex maze blocked, and two, a subsequent probe trial with all paths open leading to a goal box that now contained stimulus fish. During the 16 days each fish received one of two chronic treatments: freshwater or 0.50% (v/v%) alcohol. Subsequently, fish were immersed for 1h in one of the following solutions: 0.00 (freshwater), 0.50% or 1.00% alcohol, the acute challenge. Behavior of fish was recorded during the probe trial that commenced immediately after the acute treatment. Path choices, latency to leave the start box and to enter the goal box, time spent in the goal box, distance traveled, and duration of freezing were quantified. We found that acute exposure to 1.00% alcohol after chronic freshwater disrupted learning performance, so did exposure to freshwater after chronic alcohol treatment (withdrawal). We also found exposure to chronic alcohol to diminish the effect of subsequent acute alcohol suggesting development of tolerance. Our results demonstrate that analysis of learning performance of zebrafish allows detection of alcohol-induced functional changes. The simplicity and scalability of the employed task also imply the utility of the zebrafish in high throughput drug screens. PMID:25557800

  1. Acute and Chronic Alcohol Administration: Effects on Performance of Zebrafish in a Latent Learning Task

    PubMed Central

    Luchiari, Ana C; Salajan, Diana C; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major medical problem. Zebrafish have been proposed to model alcohol related human disorders. Alcohol impairs learning and memory. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on performance of zebrafish in a recently developed latent learning paradigm. We employ a 2 × 3 × 2 experimental design (chronic × acute alcohol treatment × path blocked). The latent learning task had two phases: one, 30 min long exploration trials (16 days, 1 trial/day) with left or right path of a complex maze blocked, and two, a subsequent probe trial with all paths open leading to a goal box that now contained stimulus fish. During the 16 days each fish received one of two chronic treatments: freshwater or 0.50% (vol/vol%) alcohol. Subsequently, fish were immersed for 1h in one of the following solutions: 0.00 (freshwater), 0.50 or 1.00% alcohol, the acute challange. Behavior of fish was recorded during the probe trial that commenced immediately after the acute treatment. Path choices, latency to leave the start box and to enter the goal box, time spent in the goal box, distance travelled, and duration of freezing were quantified. We found that acute exposure to 1.00% alcohol after chronic freshwater disrupted learning performance, so did exposure to freshwater after chronic alcohol treatment (withdrawal). We also found exposure to chronic alcohol to diminish the effect of subsequent acute alcohol suggesting development of tolerance. Our results demonstrate that analysis of learning performance of zebrafish allows detection of alcohol-induced functional changes. The simplicity and scalability of the employed task also imply the utility of the zebrafish in high throughput drug screens. PMID:25557800

  2. Effect of neonatal handling on adult rat spatial learning and memory following acute stress.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, A; Pondiki, S; Kitraki, E; Diamantopoulou, A; Panagiotaropoulos, T; Raftogianni, A; Stylianopoulou, F

    2008-03-01

    Brief neonatal handling permanently alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function resulting in increased ability to cope with stress. Since stress is known to affect cognitive abilities, in the present study we investigated the effect of brief (15 min) handling on learning and memory in the Morris water maze, following exposure to an acute restraint stress either before training or recall. Exposure of non-handled rats to the acute stress prior to training resulted in quicker learning of the task, than in the absence of the stressor. When acute stress preceded acquisition, male handled rats showed an overall better learning performance, and both sexes of handled animals were less impaired in the subsequent memory trial, compared to the respective non-handled. In addition, the number of neurons immunoreactive for GR was higher in all areas of Ammon's horn of the handled rats during the recall. In contrast, the number of neurons immunoreactive for MR was higher in the CA1 and CA2 areas of the non-handled males. When the acute restraint stress was applied prior to the memory test, neonatal handling was not effective in preventing mnemonic impairment, as all animal groups showed a similar deficit in recall. In this case, no difference between handled and non-handled rats was observed in the number of GR positive neurons in the CA2 and CA3 hippocampal areas during the memory test. These results indicate that early experience interacts with sex and acute stress exposure in adulthood to affect performance in the water maze. Hippocampal corticosterone receptors may play a role in determining the final outcome.

  3. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  4. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism.

  5. Effects of Acute Laboratory Stress on Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Starcke, Katrin; Wiesen, Carina; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that stress can affect executive functioning. However, previous results are mixed with respect to the direction and size of effects, especially when considering different subcomponents of executive functions. The current study systematically investigates the effects of stress on the five components of executive functions proposed by Smith and Jonides (1999): attention and inhibition; task management; planning; monitoring; and coding. Healthy participants (N = 40) were either exposed to the computerized version of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test as a stressor (N = 20), or to a rest condition (N = 20). Stress reactions were assessed with heart rate and subjective measures. After the experimental manipulation, all participants performed tasks that measure the different executive functions. The manipulation check indicates that stress induction was successful (i.e., the stress group showed a higher heart rate and higher subjective responses than the control group). The main results demonstrate that stressed participants show a poorer performance compared with unstressed participants in all executive subcomponents, with the exception of monitoring. Effect sizes for the tasks that reveal differences between stressed and unstressed participants are high. We conclude that the laboratory stressor used here overall reduced executive functioning. PMID:27065926

  6. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-01-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  7. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  8. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  9. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  10. Effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress on rat Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marić, D; Kostić, T; Kovacević, R

    1996-06-01

    In rats, acute immobilization (IMO) stress (2 h) induced a fall in the serum androgen concentrations (T+DHT) without detectable changes in serum luteinizing hormone (LH) values. In vitro studies, using a suspension of Leydig cells from adult rat testis, demonstrated that acute stress inhibited conversion of progesterone (P) or 17hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) to T while conversion of androstendione (delta 4 A) was not affected. Acute IMO reduced activity of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and decreased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production. Chronic IMO stress (2 h daily for 10 days) induced a decrease in serum androgen level with decline in serum LH values. In vitro, hCG-stimulated progesterone and androgen production by suspension of Leydig cells, as well as conversion of P and 17OHP to T were not significantly altered. Our data demonstrates that acute IMO stress impaired testicular steroidogenesis primarily at the testicular level (decreasing the activity of certain enzymes), while chronic IMO stress exerts the effect mainly on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis; reduced serum LH levels elicit a decrease in serum androgen levels.

  11. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  12. Effect of acute alcohol use on the lethality of suicide attempts in patients with mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo; Oquendo, Maria A; Richardson-Vejlgaard, Randall; Makhija, Nita M; Posner, Kelly; Mann, J John; Stanley, Barbara H

    2009-07-01

    Acute alcohol use is an important risk factor for attempted and completed suicide. We evaluated the effect of acute alcohol intake on the lethality of suicide attempts to test the hypothesis that acute alcohol intoxication is associated with more lethal suicide attempts. This retrospective study included 317 suicide attempters enrolled in mood disorders protocols. Demographic and clinical parameters were assessed. The use of alcohol at the time of the most lethal suicide attempt was determined. On the basis of their responses participants were classified into three groups: participants who reported "Enough alcohol intake to impair judgment, reality testing and diminish responsibility" or "Intentional intake of alcohol in order to facilitate implementation of attempt" were included in the group "Alcohol" (A); participants who reported "Some alcohol intake prior to but not related to attempt, reportedly not enough to impair judgment, reality testing" were included in the group "Some Alcohol" (SA); and participants who reported "No alcohol intake immediately prior to attempt" were included in the group "No Alcohol" (NA). Lethality of the most lethal suicide attempts was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. Prevalence of patients with alcohol use disorders was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. SA participants reported more reasons for living and lower suicide intent scores at the time of their most lethal suicide attempt compared to the A and NA groups. Acute alcohol use increases the lethality of suicide attempts in individuals with mood disorders.

  13. Chronic and acute effects of stress on energy balance: are there appropriate animal models?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stress activates multiple neural and endocrine systems to allow an animal to respond to and survive in a threatening environment. The corticotropin-releasing factor system is a primary initiator of this integrated response, which includes activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The energetic response to acute stress is determined by the nature and severity of the stressor, but a typical response to an acute stressor is inhibition of food intake, increased heat production, and increased activity with sustained changes in body weight, behavior, and HPA reactivity. The effect of chronic psychological stress is more variable. In humans, chronic stress may cause weight gain in restrained eaters who show increased HPA reactivity to acute stress. This phenotype is difficult to replicate in rodent models where chronic psychological stress is more likely to cause weight loss than weight gain. An exception may be hamsters subjected to repeated bouts of social defeat or foot shock, but the data are limited. Recent reports on the food intake and body composition of subordinate members of group-housed female monkeys indicate that these animals have a similar phenotype to human stress-induced eaters, but there are a limited number of investigators with access to the model. Few stress experiments focus on energy balance, but more information on the phenotype of both humans and animal models during and after exposure to acute or chronic stress may provide novel insight into mechanisms that normally control body weight. PMID:25519732

  14. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children.

    PubMed

    Hoek, G; Brunekreef, B

    1993-01-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  15. Effect of precipitating factors of acute heart failure on readmission and long‐term mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Sadoune, Malha; Feliot, Elodie; Teixeira, Antonio; Laribi, Said; Plaisance, Patrick; Nouira, Semir; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Gayat, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the leading causes of unscheduled hospitalization and is associated with frequent readmissions and substantial mortality. Precipitating factors of AHF influence short‐term mortality, but their effect on outcome after hospital discharge is unknown. The present study assessed the effect of precipitating factors on readmission and long‐term survival in the overall population and in patients aged 75 years or younger. Methods and results Patients admitted with AHF (n = 755) included in the multicentre cohort ‘Biomarcoeurs’ were included in the study. Precipitating factors of AHF were classified in four main groups: acute coronary syndrome, atrial fibrillation, acute pulmonary disease and other causes. Hospital readmission during 90 days after discharge and survival at 1 year were analysed. Precipitating factors influenced readmissions and survival. Acute pulmonary disease was associated with fewer readmissions (HR 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.99, P = 0.049), especially in patients aged 75 years or younger (HR 0.20, 95% CI 0.06–0.63, P = 0.006), whereas atrial fibrillation (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.29–3.85, P = 0.004) and acute coronary syndrome (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.02–4.86, P = 0.044) were associated with more readmissions. Patients with acute pulmonary disease at admission showed higher mortality (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.04–2.43, P = 0.034), especially in subjects aged 75 years or younger (HR 2.52, 95% CI 1.17–5.41, P = 0.018). Conclusions Precipitating factors of AHF substantially influenced outcome after hospitalization. In particular, patients with AHF precipitated by acute pulmonary disease showed fewer readmissions and higher 1 year mortality, especially in patients aged 75 years or younger.

  16. Is honey an effective treatment for acute cough in children?

    PubMed

    Nitsche, María Pía; Carreño, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cough represents one of the most common reasons for pediatrician consultations. There are many available treatments for symptomatic relief, including honey. Despite its wide availability, there is little knowledge about its benefits. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including three randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of honey probably decreases the severity and frequency of cough, improves the quality of parent's and patient's sleep, and does not have side effects. PMID:27280298

  17. Is honey an effective treatment for acute cough in children?

    PubMed

    Nitsche, María Pía; Carreño, Mónica

    2016-05-30

    Cough represents one of the most common reasons for pediatrician consultations. There are many available treatments for symptomatic relief, including honey. Despite its wide availability, there is little knowledge about its benefits. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including three randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of honey probably decreases the severity and frequency of cough, improves the quality of parent's and patient's sleep, and does not have side effects.

  18. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26730585

  20. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  1. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainic, Josipa; Samardzic, Janko; Erhardt, Julija; Krsnik, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration. Methods DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes. Results DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results failed to demonstrate significant effects of single- and long-term DHEAS treatment on the convulsive susceptibility in both adult and aged mice of both sexes. However, small but significant changes regarding sex differences in the susceptibility to seizures were observed following DHEAS administration to mice. Conclusion Although our findings suggest that DHEAS treatment might be safe for various potential therapeutic applications in adult as well as in old age, they also support subtle interaction of DHEAS with male and female hormonal status

  2. Acute cognitive effects of high doses of dextromethorphan relative to triazolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Reissig, Chad J.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although concerns surrounding high-dose dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have recently increased, few studies have examined the acute cognitive effects of high doses of DXM. The aim of this study was to compare the cognitive effects of DXM with those of triazolam and placebo. METHODS Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg /70 kg), and placebo were administered p.o. to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Effects on cognitive performance were examined at baseline and after drug administration for up to 6 hours. RESULTS Both triazolam and DXM produced acute impairments in attention, working memory, episodic memory, and metacognition. Impairments observed following doses of 100-300 mg/70 kg DXM were generally smaller in magnitude than those observed after 0.5 mg/70 kg triazolam. Doses of DXM that impaired performance to the same extent as triazolam were in excess of 10-30 times the therapeutic dose of DXM. CONCLUSION The magnitude of the doses required for these effects and the absence of effects on some tasks within the 100-300 mg/70 kg dose range of DXM, speak to the relatively broad therapeutic window of over-the-counter DXM preparations when used appropriately. However, the administration of supratherapeutic doses of DXM resulted in acute cognitive impairments on all tasks that were examined. These findings are likely relevant to cases of high-dose DXM abuse. PMID:22989498

  3. Identification of stimulatory and inhibitory inputs to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during hypoglycaemia or transport in ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; French, N P; Saphier, P W; Lowry, P J; Veldhuis, J D; Dobson, H

    2003-06-01

    This study used the novel approach of statistical modelling to investigate the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and quantify temporal relationships between hormones. Two experimental paradigms were chosen, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and 2 h transport, to assess differences in control between noncognitive and cognitive stimuli. Vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were measured in hypophysial portal plasma, and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in jugular plasma of conscious sheep, and deconvolution analysis was used to calculate secretory rates, before modelling. During hypoglycaemia, the relationship between plasma glucose and vasopressin or CRH was best described by log10 transforming variables (i.e. a positive power-curve relationship). A negative-feedback relationship with log10 cortisol concentration 2 h previously was detected. Analysis of the "transport" stimulus suggested that the strength of the perceived stimulus decreased over time after accounting for cortisol facilitation and negative-feedback. The time course of vasopressin and CRH responses to each stimulus were different However, at the pituitary level, the data suggested that log10 ACTH secretion rate was related to log10 vasopressin and CRH concentrations with very similar regression coefficients and an identical ratio of actions (2.3 : 1) for both stimuli. Similar magnitude negative-feedback effects of log10 cortisol at -110 min (hypoglycaemia) or -40 min (transport) were detected, and both models contained a stimulatory relationship with cortisol at 0 min (facilitation). At adrenal gland level, cortisol secretory rates were related to simultaneously measured untransformed ACTH concentration but the regression coefficient for the hypoglycaemia model was 2.5-fold greater than for transport. No individual sustained maximum cortisol secretion for longer than 20 min during hypoglycaemia and 40 min during transport. These unique models demonstrate

  4. Acute hematologic and hemorheologic effects of sulfur dioxide inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.

    1988-09-01

    Fifty male rats were exposed to 0.87 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 24 hr. Hematologic and hemorheologic parameters measured in this group were compared with the results of a control group of 51 male rats. Hematocrit values were found to be higher (p less than .005) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (43.55 +/- 0.41%, mean +/- standard error), when compared to the control group value (41.97 +/- 0.35%). Sulfhemoglobin values were also higher (p less than .0001) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (0.60 +/- 0.08%) than the control group (0.08 +/- 0.02%). Osmotic hemolysis ratio was slightly increased (p less than .05) in the 0.55% sodium chloride solution. However, whole blood and packed cell viscosities were lower in the SO/sub 2/-treated animals, while there was no significant difference in the plasma viscosities. The mechanism of these effects could not be clarified completely, but structural and functional effects of SO2 inhalation on peripheral erythrocytes were discussed.

  5. Involvement of spinal cord opioid mechanisms in the acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen in mice.

    PubMed

    Heeman, Jacqueline H; Zhang, Yangmiao; Shirachi, Donald Y; Quock, Raymond M

    2013-12-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) can elicit an antinociceptive response in models of acute pain. We have demonstrated that this antinociceptive effect is centrally-mediated and is dependent on opioid receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of endogenous opioid peptides and opioid receptors specifically in the spinal cord in the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 in mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were exposed to HBO2 (100% oxygen at 3.5atm absolute) for 11min and their antinociceptive responsiveness was determined using the glacial acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. HBO2-induced antinociception was sensitive to antagonism by intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment with the κ- and μ-selective opioid antagonists norbinaltorphimine and β-funaltrexamine, respectively, but not the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole. The antinociceptive effect of HBO2 was also significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with a rabbit antiserum against rat dynorphin1-13 but not antisera against β-endorphin or methionine-enkephalin. Based on these experimental findings, the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 appears to involve neuronal release of dynorphin and activation of κ- and μ-opioid receptors in the spinal cord. PMID:24113418

  6. [Alteration of the acute toxicity and various pharmacologic effects of streptomycin sulfate by calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Korablev, M V; Kopelevich, V M

    1983-10-01

    The effect of calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP) on acute toxicity of streptomycin and the decrease by the antibiotic of the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex, body temperature and oxygen intake was studied on 258 albino mice weighing 22-26 g. Medical calcium pantothenate (CPA) was used for control purposes. CPP is an antagonist of streptomycin sulfate. In a dose of 1/10 or 1/5 of the LD50 injected intraperitoneally CPP lowered acute toxicity of streptomycin and prevented its effect in a dose of 0.11--1.1 g/kg injected subcutaneously on the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex and body temperature. The spectrum index of the CPP antitoxic effect was equal to 22.5. By its acute toxicity CPP (LD50 1.18 +/- 0.07 g/kg) did not differ from CPA (LD50 1.25 +/- 0.08 g/kg). The efficacy of CPP, by its antitoxic spectrum, was 1.8 times higher than that of CPA. CPA lowered the streptomycin effect on the "holes" reflex and body temperature, while CPP prevented it. Both the drugs did not influence the decrease in the oxygen consumption induced by streptomycin. PMID:6651265

  7. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  8. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  9. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide Upon Cognitive Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Ryder, V. E.; Lam, C. W.; Statish, U.; Basner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) originate from human metabolism and typically, within spacecraft, remain about 10-fold higher in concentration than at the earth's surface. There have been recurring complaints by crew members of episodes of "mental viscosity" adversely affecting their performance, and there is evidence from the International Space Station (ISS) that associates CO2 levels with reports of headaches by crewmembers. Additionally, there is concern that CO2 may contribute to vision impairment and intracranial pressure that has been observed in some crewmembers. Consequently, flight rules have been employed to control the level of CO2 below 4 mm Hg, which is well below the existing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) of 10 mm Hg for 24-hour exposures, and 5.3 mm Hg for exposures of 7 to 180 days. However, the flight rule imposed limit, which places additional demands upon resources and current technology, still exceeds the lower bound of the threshold range for reportable headaches (2 - 5 mm Hg). Headaches, while sometime debilitating themselves, are also symptoms that can provide evidence that physiological defense mechanisms have been breached. The causes of the headaches may elicit other subtle adverse effects that occur at CO2 levels well below that for headaches. The concern that CO2 may have effects at levels below the threshold for headaches appears to be substantiated in unexpected findings that CO2 at concentrations below 2 mm Hg substantially reduced some cognitive functions that are associated with the ability to make complex decisions in conditions that are characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity, and delayed feedback. These are conditions that could be encountered by crews in off-nominal situations or during the first missions beyond low earth orbit. If findings of the earlier study are confirmed in crew-like subjects, our findings would provide additional evidence that CO2 may need to be

  10. Acute effects of muscle vibration on sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Tindel, Jérémy

    2015-02-01

    Projections from the somesthetic cortex are believed to be involved in the modulation of motor cortical excitability by muscle vibration. The aim of the present pilot study was to analyse the effects of a vibration intervention on short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI), and afferent facilitation (AF), three intracortical mechanisms reflecting sensorimotor integration. Abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SAI, AF and LAI were investigated on 10 subjects by conditioning test transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses with median nerve electrical stimulation at inter-stimuli intervals in the range 15-25 ms, 25-60 ms, and 100-200 ms, respectively. Test motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were compared to unconditioned MEPs. Measurements were performed before and just after 15 min of vibration applied to the muscle belly of APB at a frequency of 80 Hz. SAI and LAI responses were significantly reduced compared to unconditioned test MEPs (P=0.039 and P<0.001, respectively). AF MEP amplitude was greater than SAI and LAI one (P=0.009 and P=0.004, respectively), but not different from test MEP (P=0.511). There was no significant main effect of vibration (P=0.905). However, 4 subjects were clearly identified as responders. Their mean vibration-induced increase was 324 ± 195% in APB SAI MEP amplitude, and 158 ± 53% and 319 ± 80% in AF and LAI, respectively. Significant differences in SAI, AF and LAI vibration-induced changes were found for responders when compared to non-responders (P=0.019, P=0.038, and P=0.01, respectively). A single session of APB vibration may increase sensorimotor integration, via decreased inhibition and increased facilitation. However, such results were not observed for all subjects, suggesting that other factors (such as attention to the sensory inputs) may have played a role.

  11. The effect of acute stretching on agility performance.

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Leonard H; Bartz, Shari D

    2011-11-01

    Static stretching (SS) has shown decreases in many areas including strength, anaerobic power, and sprinting time. Dynamic stretching (DS) has shown increases in anaerobic power and decreases in sprinting time. Research on the effects of stretching on agility performance is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of SS and DS on performance time of a sport agility test. Sixty male subjects consisting of collegiate (n = 18) and recreational (n = 42) basketball athletes volunteered for the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 intervention groups: SS, DS, or no stretching (NS). All groups completed a 10-minute warm-up jog followed by a 3-minute rest. The SS and DS groups then completed an 8.5-minute stretching intervention. Next, all subjects completed 3 trials of the 505 agility test with 2-5 minutes of rest between trials. A 2-way repeated-measure analysis of variance (Stretch group, athlete category, group × athlete interaction) was used to determine statistical significance (p < 0.05). A Tukey post hoc test was performed to determine differences between groups. For all athletes, the DS group produced significantly faster times on the agility test (2.22 ± 0.12 seconds, mean ± SD) in comparison to both the SS group (2.33 ± 0.15 seconds, p = 0.013) and NS group (2.32 ± 0.12 seconds, p = 0.026). Differences between the SS and NS groups revealed no significance (p = 0.962). There was a significant difference in mean times for the type of athlete (p = 0.002); however, interaction between the type of athlete and stretching group was not significant (p = 0.520). These results indicate that in comparison to SS or NS, DS significantly improves performance on closed agility skills involving a 180° change of direction.

  12. Effects of acute physical exercise on executive functions: a comparison between aerobic and strength exercise.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Rodrigues; Gualano, Bruno; Takao, Pollyana Pereira; Avakian, Paula; Fernandes, Rafael Mistura; Morine, Diego; Takito, Monica Yuri

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute aerobic and strength exercises on selected executive functions. A counterbalanced, crossover, randomized trial was performed. Forty-two healthy women were randomly submitted to three different conditions: (1) aerobic exercise, (2) strength exercise, and (3) control condition. Before and after each condition, executive functions were measured by the Stroop Test and the Trail Making Test. Following the aerobic and strength sessions, the time to complete the Stroop "non-color word" and "color word" condition was lower when compared with that of the control session. The performance in the Trail Making Test was unchanged. In conclusion, both acute aerobic and strength exercises improve the executive functions. Nevertheless, this positive effect seems to be task and executive function dependent. PMID:22889693

  13. Effective treatment of experimental acute otitis media by application of volatile fluids into the ear canal.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Karl G; Magnusdottir, Anna B; Petersen, Hannes; Hermansson, Ann

    2005-06-01

    Essential oils are volatile and can have good antimicrobial activity. We compared the effects of oil of basil (Ocimum basilicum) and essential oil components (thymol, carvacrol, and salicylaldehyde) to those of a placebo when placed in the ear canal of rats with experimental acute otitis media caused by pneumococci or Haemophilus influenzae. Progress was monitored by otomicroscopic examination and middle ear cultures. The treatment with oil of basil or essential oil components cured or healed 56%-81% of rats infected with H. influenzae and 6%-75% of rats infected with pneumococci, compared with 5.6%-6% of rats in the placebo group. Essential oils or their components placed in the ear canal can provide effective treatment of acute otitis media. PMID:15871121

  14. Effects of acute electromagnetic fields exposure on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity during resting state.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bin; Shao, Qing; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of acute radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. We designed a controllable LTE-related EMF exposure environment at 2.573 GHz and performed the 30 min real/sham exposure experiments on human brain under the safety limits. The resting state fMRI signals were collected before and after EMF exposure. Then voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity method was utilized to evaluate the acute effects of LTE EMF exposure on the homotopic functional connectivity between two human hemispheres. Based on our previous research, we further demonstrated that the 30 min short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity in resting state around the medial frontal gyrus and the paracentral lobule during the real exposure.

  15. The effect of differing intensities of acute cycling on preadolescent academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael; Johnson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of differing intensity levels of acute exercise on preadolescent academic ability. In a repeated measures design, 18 preadolescent participants (mean age±S.D.= 9.8±1.4 years: 9 male and 9 female) completed the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT 4) following 20 minutes of rest, 20-minutes on a cycling ergometer at 50% maximal heart rate reserve (HRR), and 20-minutes on a cycling ergometer at 75% HRR on separate days. Exercise was found to improve spelling irrespective of intensity level. Moderate levels of exercise improved reading although the effect of high levels of intensity is less clear. Both intensity levels impaired arithmetic, whilst sentence comprehension was unaffected. These findings further support the past research that indicates acute bouts of exercise can selectively improve cognition in preadolescent children. However, the present study finds no support for the notion that increasing the intensity of exercise accentuates benefits. PMID:23724796

  16. Acute marijuana effects on response-reinforcer relations under multiple variable-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Lane, S D; Cherek, D R; Pietras, C J; Tcheremissine, O V

    2004-07-01

    Acute marijuana administration may alter response-reinforcer relationships via a change in reinforcer efficacy, but may also impair coordination and motor function. One approach to evaluating drug effects on both motor function and reinforcer efficacy involves fitting the matching law equation to data obtained under multiple variable interval (VI) schedules. The present report describes an experiment that examined the effects of acute marijuana on response properties using this approach. Six human subjects responded under a multiple VI schedule for monetary reinforcers after smoking placebo and two active doses of marijuana. The low marijuana dose produced unsystematic changes in responding. As measured by the matching law equation parameters (k and rB), at the high dose five subjects showed a decrease-motor-related properties of response rate and four subjects' responding indicated a decrease in reinforcer efficacy. These data raise the possibility that, at high doses, marijuana administration alters both motor function and reinforcer efficacy.

  17. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  18. Comparison of Acute Health Effects From Exposures to Diesel and Biodiesel Fuel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Mehus, Aaron A.; Reed, Rustin J.; Lee, Vivien S. T.; Littau, Sally R.; Hu, Chengcheng; Lutz, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the comparative acute health effects associated with exposures to diesel and 75% biodiesel/25% diesel (B75) blend fuel emissions. Methods: We analyzed multiple health endpoints in 48 healthy adults before and after exposures to diesel and B75 emissions in an underground mine setting—lung function, lung and systemic inflammation, novel biomarkers of exposure, and oxidative stress were assessed. Results: B75 reduced respirable diesel particulate matter by 20%. Lung function declined significantly more after exposure to diesel emissions. Lung inflammatory cells along with sputum and plasma inflammatory mediators increased significantly to similar levels with both exposures. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress, was not significantly changed after either exposure. Conclusions: Use of B75 lowered respirable diesel particulate matter exposure and some associated acute health effects, although lung and systemic inflammation were not reduced compared with diesel use. PMID:26147538

  19. Alternative substance paradigm: effectiveness of beverage blinding and effects on acute alcohol responses.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Megan; McNamara, Patrick; King, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    A fundamental goal of double-blind alcohol challenge studies is to reduce alcohol expectancies, though there is little research on the effectiveness of blinding procedures and their relationship to acute alcohol responses. This study examined social drinkers' perception of beverage content and related alcohol response during 3 separate double-blind experimental sessions with placebo, low-dose alcohol (0.4 g/kg), and high-dose alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Using the alternative substance paradigm, participants (N = 182) were informed that the beverage they consumed might contain alcohol, a stimulant, a sedative, or a placebo. At several time points, subjective and objective measures were obtained, and participants were asked to identify which substance they received. During both placebo and low-dose alcohol sessions, 33% and 50% of participants, respectively, did not correctly identify the beverage content; during the high-dose alcohol session, 20% did not correctly identify the beverage. Although correct and incorrect identifiers at any dose level did not differ on major background variables, drinking characteristics, or psychomotor performance during these sessions, they did differ on self-reported subjective responses, with greater sedation reported by incorrect identifiers in the placebo and high-dose conditions. In summary, results suggest that the alternative substance paradigm may be a viable option for alcohol laboratory studies, particularly for repeated sessions in within-subject designs and in cases in which the experimenter wants to reduce expectancy by not revealing a priori that alcohol is being administered.

  20. Preventive Effect of Cichorium Intybus L. Two Extracts on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Ali-Reza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Abed, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of pancreas with sudden onset, high mortality rate and multiple organ failure characteristics. It has been shown that oxygen free radicals have an important role in development of pancreatitis and its complications. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxicity and gastroprotective properties of Cichorium intybus L. suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulean (50 μg/ kg at 1 h intervals) in mice resulted in acute pancreatitis, which was characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, as well as increases in the serum levels of amylase and lipase in comparison to normal mice. Different doses of C. intybus root (CRE) and aerial parts hydroalcoholic extract (CAPE) orally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and intraperitoneally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were administrated 1.0 and 0.5 h respectively before pancreatitis induction on separate groups of male mice (n=6). Control groups treated with normal saline (5 ml/ kg) similarly. Results: Both extracts in greater test doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) were effective to decrease amylase (23-36%) and lipase (27-35%) levels. In oral route, the dose of 200 mg/ kg showed a significant decrease in levels of amylase (16%) and lipase (24%) activity while the greatest dose (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was only effective to diminish inflammatory features like edema and leukocyte infiltration in pancreatitis tissue (P<0.01). Vacuolization was not significantly reduced in extracts treated groups. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. intybus hydroalcoholic extracts were effective to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis and the efficacy was partly dependent to the dose and was more significant after parenteral administration. PMID:22708031

  1. The effect of sand storms on acute asthma in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.; Riaz, Muhammad; Mahjoub, Mohamed Osman; Malhis, Nidal; Al-Tamimi, Saleh; Al-Modaihsh, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Major sand storms are frequent in the Middle East. This study aims to investigate the role of air particulate matter (PM) level in acute asthma in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: An aerosol spectrometer was used to evaluate PM < 10μm in diameter (PM10) and PM < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) concentrations in the air every 30 minutes throughout February and March 2012 in Riyadh. Data on children 2-12 years of age presenting to the emergency department of a major children's hospital with acute asthma during the same period were collected including their acute asthma severity score. RESULTS: The median with interquartile range (IQR) levels of PM10 and PM2.5 were 454 μg/m3 (309,864) and 108 μg/m3 (72,192) respectively. There was no correlation between the average daily PM10 levels and the average number of children presenting with acute asthma per day (r = -0.14, P = 0.45), their daily asthma score (r = 0.014, P = 0.94), or admission rate ( r= -0.08, P = 0.65). This was also true for average daily PM2.5 levels. In addition, there was no difference in these variables between days with PM10 >1000 μg/m3, representing major sand storms, plus the following 5 days and other days with PM10< 1000 μg/m3. CONCLUSION: Sand storms, even major ones, had no significant impact on acute asthma exacerbations in children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The very high levels of PM, however, deserve further studying especially of their long-term effects. PMID:25593604

  2. Marijuana's acute effects on cognitive bias for affective and marijuana cues.

    PubMed

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R; Kahler, Christopher W; Rohsenow, Damaris J; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S

    2015-10-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana's ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On 2 separate days, regular marijuana users (N = 89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and 2 experimental tasks: pleasantness rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the pleasantness rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources toward marijuana-specific and negatively valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels.

  3. Marijuana’s Acute Effects on Cognitive Bias for Affective and Marijuana Cues

    PubMed Central

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; McGeary, John E.; Knopik, Valerie S.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana’s ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On two separate days, regular marijuana users (N=89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and two experimental tasks: Pleasantness Rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and Emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the Pleasantness Rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively-valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the Emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources towards marijuana-specific and negatively-valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively-valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  4. Marijuana's acute effects on cognitive bias for affective and marijuana cues.

    PubMed

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R; Kahler, Christopher W; Rohsenow, Damaris J; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S

    2015-10-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana's ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On 2 separate days, regular marijuana users (N = 89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and 2 experimental tasks: pleasantness rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the pleasantness rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources toward marijuana-specific and negatively valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  5. The effects of acute normovolaemic haemodilution on peri-operative coagulation in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Na, H S; Do, S H

    2015-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty results in substantial blood loss in the peri-operative period. We evaluated the effects of acute normovolaemic haemodilution on blood coagulation and platelet function in 11 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. We performed acute normovolaemic haemodilution and haematological tests, rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®) ) and whole-blood impedance aggregometry. Blood samples were obtained at three time points: (i) before the initiation of acute normovolaemic haemodilution; (ii) 20 min after completion of acute normovolaemic haemodilution; and (iii) 20 min after retransfusion. After acute normovolaemic haemodilution, ROTEM parameters demonstrated hypocoagulability. Clot formation time of INTEM was increased by 31.6% (p = 0.016), whereas the α-angle and maximum clot formation of INTEM decreased by 8.1% (p = 0.032) and 3.0% (p = 0.013) respectively, compared with baseline values. Clotting time and clot formation time of EXTEM were increased by 40.8% (p = 0.042) and 31.3% (p = 0.016), respectively, whereas the α-angle and maximum clot formation of EXTEM were decreased by 11.9% (p = 0.020) and 9.5% (p = 0.013), respectively. The maximum clot formation of FIBTEM decreased by 35.1% compared with the baseline value (p = 0.007). Following retransfusion, ROTEM values returned to baseline; clot formation time decreased and the α-angle and maximum clot formation increased. There were no significant changes in platelet aggregation during the study. At 20 min after the end of acute normovolaemic haemodilution, the international normalised ratio of prothrombin time was increased compared with the baseline value (p = 0.003). We conclude that acute normovolaemic haemodilution resulted in a hypocoagulable state compared with baseline values and that coagulation parameters returned to normal after retransfusion.

  6. Acute effects of intense interval training on running mechanics.

    PubMed

    Collins, M H; Pearsall, D J; Zavorsky, G S; Bateni, H; Turcotte, R A; Montgomery, D L

    2000-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if there are significant kinematic changes in running pattern after intense interval workouts, whether duration of recovery affects running kinematics, and whether changes in running economy are related to changes in running kinematics. Seven highly trained male endurance runners (VO2max = 72.3+/-3.3 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); mean +/- s) performed three interval running workouts of 10 x 400 m at a speed of 5.94+/-0.19 m x s(-1) (356+/-11.2 m x min(-1)) with a minimum of 4 days recovery between runs. Recovery of 60, 120 or 180 s between each 400 m repetition was assigned at random. Before and after each workout, running economy and several kinematic variables were measured at speeds of 3.33 and 4.47 m x s(-1) (200 and 268 m x min(-1)). Speed was found to have a significant effect on shank angle, knee velocity and stride length (P < 0.05). Correlations between changes pre- and post-test for VO2 (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and several kinematic variables were not significant (P > 0.05) at both speeds. In general, duration of recovery was not found to adversely affect running economy or the kinematic variables assessed, possibly because of intra-individual adaptations to fatigue.

  7. Stimulatory activities of a T cell proteoglycan fraction (T-PGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D.; Olmstead, L.

    1986-03-01

    The authors had demonstrated previously that T lymphocytes synthesize and secrete chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (PG). To analyze whether this PG possessed immunoregulatory activity, mouse T cell hybridomas were created and screened for secretion of /sup 35/S-PG. The PG secreted by high producer lines was purified primarily by anion exchange chromatography. Analysis of isolated material indicated the presence of uronic acid, a major sugar in glycosaminoglycans. SDS-PAGE of radio-iodinated T-PGF revealed two bands at 70 kd and 50 kd, which was confirmed by silver staining. The T-PGF stimulated mouse splenic B cell fractions to proliferate and differentiate into plaque-forming cells; no induction or costimulation (with Con A) of T cells fraction or thymocyte proliferation was detected. The T-PGF stimulated activated (Percoll low density, increased forward light scattering) B cells better than resting populations; induction of resting cells could be enhanced by simultaneous addition of low concentrations of a protein mitogen, STM. Biochemically and functionally, T-PGF co-migrates with PG in the void volume of Sephacryl S-200 columns. The precise nature of the relationship between B cell stimulatory activity and PG is unknown; however, the recent production of monoclonal antibodies against T-PGF should help clarify these questions.

  8. Engineering artificial antigen-presenting cells to express a diverse array of co-stimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, Megan M; Golovina, Tatiana N; Aqui, Nicole A; Tai, Victoria C; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Milone, Michael C; Carroll, Richard G; Riley, James L; June, Carl H

    2007-05-01

    To facilitate the therapeutic application of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we have developed a cell-based artificial APC (aAPC) system by engineering K562 cells with lentiviruses to direct the stable expression and secretion of a variety of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. Here we report the use of a combinatorial lentiviral gene transfer approach to achieve long-term stable expression of at least seven genes in the K562 parental cell line. Expression of various combinations of genes on the aAPC enables the precise determination of human T-cell activation requirements, such that aAPCs can be tailored for the optimal propagation of T-cell subsets with specific growth requirements and distinct functions. The aAPCs support ex vivo growth and long-term expansion of functional human CD8 T cells without requiring the addition of exogenous cytokines, in contrast to the use of natural APCs. Distinct populations of T cells can be expanded with aAPCs expressing CD137L (4-1BBL) and/or CD80. Finally, the aAPCs provide an efficient platform to expand genetically modified T cells and to maintain CD28 expression on CD8 T cells. Therefore, K562-based aAPCs have therapeutic potential for adoptive immunotherapies and vaccinations. PMID:17375070

  9. Retractile processes in T lymphocyte orientation on a stimulatory substrate: morphology and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Sergey N.; Maly, Ivan V.

    2008-03-01

    T cells of the immune system target infected and tumor cells in crowded tissues with high precision by coming into direct contact with the intended target and orienting the intracellular Golgi apparatus and the associated organelles to the area of the cell-cell contact. The mechanism of this orientation remains largely unknown. To further elucidate it we used three-dimensional microscopy of living T cells presented with an artificial substrate mimicking the target cell surface. The data indicate that long, finger-like processes emanate from the T cell surface next to the intracellular Golgi apparatus. These processes come in contact with the substrate and retract. The retraction accompanies the reorientation of the T cell body which brings the Golgi apparatus closer to the stimulatory substrate. Numerical modeling indicates that considering the forces involved the retraction of a process attached with one end to the cell body near the Golgi apparatus and with the other end to the substrate can bring the Golgi apparatus to the substrate by moving the entire cell body. The dynamic scenarios that are predicted by the quantitative model explain features of the reorientation movements that we measured but could not explain previously. We propose that retraction of the surface processes is a force-generating mechanism contributing to the functional orientation of T lymphocytes.

  10. Acute potentiating effect of depth jumps on sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Paul J; Kenny, John; O' Rourke, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the addition of 3 depth jumps to a dynamic warm-up (DYNDJ) protocol would significantly improve 20-m sprint performance when compared with a cardiovascular (C) warm-up protocol or a dynamic (DYN) stretching protocol alone. The first part of the study identified optimal drop height for all subjects using the maximum jump height method. The identified optimal drop heights were later used during the DYNDJ protocol. The second part compared the 3 warm-up protocols above to determine their effect on 20-m sprint performance. Twenty-nine subjects (age, 20.8 ± 4.4 years; weight, 82.6 ± 9.9 kg; height, 180.3 ± 6.2 cm) performed 3 protocols of a C protocol, a DYN protocol, and a DYNDJ protocol in a randomized order. A 20-m sprint was performed 1 minute after the completion of each of the 3 protocols. Results displayed significant differences between each of the 3 protocols. A significant improvement (p = 0.001) of 2.2% was obtained in sprint time between the C protocol (3.300 ± 0.105 seconds) and the DYN protocol (3.227 ± 0.116 seconds), a further significant improvement of 5.01% was attained between the C and the DYNDJ protocols (3.300 ± 0.10 vs. 3.132 ± 0.120 seconds; p = 0.001). In addition, a significant improvement (p = 0.001) of 2.93% was observed between the DYN protocol (3.227 ± 0.116 seconds) and the DYNDJ protocol (3.132 ± 0.116 seconds). The data from this study advocate the use of DYNDJ protocol as a means of significantly improving 20-m sprint performance 1 minute after the DYNDJ protocol. PMID:23799423

  11. The acute effects of different stretching exercises on jump performance.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Laura; Balius, Ramon; Aliste, Luisa; Pujol, Montse; Pedret, Carles

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the short-term effects of different stretching exercises during the warm-up period on the lower limbs. A controlled, crossover clinical study involving 49 volunteers (14 women and 35 men; mean age: 20.4 years) enrolled in a "physical and sporting activities monitor" program. The explosive force was assessed using the Bosco test. The protocol was as follows: The test involved a (pre) jump test, general warm-up, intervention and (post) jump test. Each volunteer was subjected to each of the 5 interventions (no stretching [NS] and stretching: static passive stretching [P]; proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation [PNF] techniques; static active stretching in passive tension [PT]; static active stretching in active tension [AT]) in a random order. The jump test was used to assess the squat jump, countermovement jump (CMJ), elasticity index (EI), and drop jump. An intragroup statistical analysis was performed before and after each intervention to compare the differences between the different stretching exercises. An intergroup analysis was also performed. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between all variables for the interventions "P," "PNF," and "TA" in the intragroup analysis, with each value being higher in the postjump test. Only the "P" intervention showed a significant difference (p = 0.046) for "EI," with the postvalue being lower. Likewise, significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed for the "CMJ" measurements during the intergroup analysis, especially between "NS" and the interventions "P," "PNF," "AT," and "PT," with each value, particularly that for "AT," being higher after stretching. The results of this study suggest that static active stretching in AT can be recommended during the warm-up for explosive force disciplines. PMID:21993032

  12. Acute effects of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on affective withdrawal symptoms and cravings among women smokers.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Dunsiger, Shira; Whiteley, Jessica A; Ussher, Michael H; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Jennings, Ernestine G

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of laboratory studies have shown that acute bouts of aerobic exercise favorably impact affect and cravings among smokers. However, randomized trials have generally shown exercise to have no favorable effect on smoking cessation or withdrawal symptoms during quit attempts. The purpose of the present study was to explore this apparent contradiction by assessing acute changes in affect and cravings immediately prior to and following each exercise and contact control session during an eight-week smoking cessation trial. Sixty previously low-active, healthy, female smokers were randomized to an eight-week program consisting of brief baseline smoking cessation counseling and the nicotine patch plus either three sessions/week of moderate intensity aerobic exercise or contact control. Findings revealed a favorable impact of exercise on acute changes in positive activated affect (i.e., energy), negative deactivated affect (i.e., tiredness), and cigarette cravings relative to contact control. However, effects dissipated from session to session. Results suggest that aerobic exercise has potential as a smoking cessation treatment, but that it must be engaged in frequently and consistently over time in order to derive benefits. Thus, it is not surprising that previous randomized controlled trials-in which adherence to exercise programs has generally been poor-have been unsuccessful in showing effects of aerobic exercise on smoking cessation outcomes.

  13. Protective effect of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., on acute and chronic inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Lokesh; Dey, Amitabha; Sakthivel, G.; Bhattamishra, Subrat Kumar; Dutta, Amitsankar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extracts and its aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp. leaves. Materials and Methods: In this present study, all the test samples were evaluated on in-vivo inflammatory model such as carrageenan and histamine-induced acute-inflammation and cotton pellet induced granuloma formation in albino male rats. Test samples were also employed in in-vitro assays like DPPH* free radical scavenging activity and COX inhibition assay. Results: The test samples at the dose of 200mg/kg/p.o. were found to cause significant inhibition of carrageenan and histamine-induced inflammation and cotton pallet-induced granuloma formation on acute and chronic inflammation in rats. The test samples, except n-butanol fraction, exhibited inhibitory effect for both COX-1 and COX-2, in in-vitro assay but their percentage of inhibition values differs from each other. The test samples (aqueous extracts, aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions) at 100 μg concentration exhibits 54.37%, 33.88%, 62.85%, 56.28%, and 57.48% DPPH* radical-scavenging effect respectively in in-vitro antioxidant study. Conclusion: These observations established the anti-inflammatory effect of C. colebrookianum leaves in acute and chronic stages of inflammation by free radical scavenging and inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. PMID:24014914

  14. Acute and long-term effects of cannabis use: a review.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Roux, Perrine; Rolland, Benjamin; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Lançon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis remains the most commonly used and trafficked illicit drug in the world. Its use is largely concentrated among young people (15- to 34-year-olds). There is a variety of cannabis use patterns, ranging from experimental use to dependent use. Men are more likely than women to report both early initiation and frequent use of cannabis. Due to the high prevalence of cannabis use, the impact of cannabis on public health may be significant. A range of acute and chronic health problems associated with cannabis use has been identified. Cannabis can frequently have negative effects in its users, which may be amplified by certain demographic and/or psychosocial factors. Acute adverse effects include hyperemesis syndrome, impaired coordination and performance, anxiety, suicidal ideations/tendencies, and psychotic symptoms. Acute cannabis consumption is also associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, especially fatal collisions. Evidence indicates that frequent and prolonged use of cannabis can be detrimental to both mental and physical health. Chronic effects of cannabis use include mood disorders, exacerbation of psychotic disorders in vulnerable people, cannabis use disorders, withdrawal syndrome, neurocognitive impairments, cardiovascular and respiratory and other diseases.

  15. Evaluation of acute sensory--motor effects and test sensitivity using termiticide workers exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Dick, R B; Steenland, K; Krieg, E F; Hines, C J

    2001-01-01

    Sensory and motor testing was performed on a group of termiticide workers primarily using chlorpyrifos-containing products to evaluate both the acute effects from current exposure and sensitivity of the measures to detect effects. The study group comprised 106 applicators and 52 nonexposed participants. Current exposure was measured by urinary concentrations of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) collected the morning of testing. The mean TCP value for the 106 applicators was 200 microg/g creatinine. Participants received 4--5 h of testing and were evaluated using a sensory--motor test battery recommended by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-sponsored advisory panel to be appropriate for testing effects from pesticide exposures. Measurements testing olfactory dysfunction, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color vision, vibrotactile sensitivity, tremor, manual dexterity, eye--hand coordination, and postural stability were analyzed. Study results indicated limited acute effects from exposure to chlorpyrifos using urinary TCP as a measure of current exposure. The effects occurred primarily on measures of postural sway in the eyes closed and soft-surface conditions, which suggests a possible subclinical effect involving the proprioceptive and vestibular systems. Several other tests of motor and sensory functions did not show any evidence of acute exposure effects, although statistically significant effects of urinary TCP on the Lanthony color vision test scores and one contrast sensitivity test score were found. The visual measures, however, were not significant when a step-down Bonferroni correction was applied. Information also is presented on the sensitivity of the measures to detect effects in an occupationally exposed population using standard error of the parameter estimates. PMID:11485841

  16. Gamma-amino butyric acid inhibits the nicotine-imposed stimulatory challenge in xenograft models of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, H A N; Al-Wadei, M H; Ullah, M F; Schuller, H M

    2012-02-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer; smoking is a documented risk factor. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated intracellular signaling in response to nicotine has recently been implicated in the growth regulation of NSCLC. In the current study nude mice carrying xenografts of the human lung NSCLC cell lines NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 were used as animal models. Nicotine administration and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment lasted for 30 days. Catecholamines, cortisol, GABA, and cAMP were analyzed in blood and tumor tissues by immunoassays. Expression of nicotinic receptors and effector proteins in the xenografts was assessed by Western blotting. Our data indicate that nicotine stimulated the growth of NSCLC xenografts via modulation of nAChR upregulation and activation of cAMP signaling. The nicotine-treated group showed an enhanced level of stress neurotransmitters and second messenger cAMP in serum, blood cellular fraction, and xenograft tissues. Activation of critical proteins in the oncogenic pathway, including CREB, ERK, Akt, and Src, and upregulation of α-4 and α-7 subunits of nAChR provided mechanistic insight for the observed stimulatory effect of nicotine. Interestingly, GABA, being an antagonist to cAMP signaling, showed a promising intervention by reversing the stimulatory effect of nicotine on cancer growth and all signaling pathways. GABA has potential to lower the risk of NSCLC among smokers and could be used to enhance the clinical outcome of standard cancer intervention strategies.

  17. [Piretanide in chronic and acute decompensated heart failure. Effect on hemodynamics and vasoactive hormones].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Hopf, R; Vens-Cappell, F; Kirsten, R; Nelson, K; Pooth, R; Kaltenbach, M

    1989-06-15

    Eight patients with chronic heart failure classified as NYHA class II to III (group 1) and nine patients with acute decompensated heart failure classified as NYHA class IV (group 2) were treated with piretanide at a dosage of 12 mg administered intravenously. In both groups the level of prostaglandine PGE2 as well as plasma renine activity significantly increased prior to the onset of diuresis. The percentage increase was more pronounced in group 1 which had lower baseline values. With a time-lag, the norepinephrine plasma level also increased significantly. During the first 30 minutes there was only little effect on blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (group 1). Only after 60 minutes there was a significant decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 39 +/- 17 to 33 +/- 18 mm Hg; p less than 0.05). In patients with acute decompensated heart failure (group 2) piretanide led to a significant reduction in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 42 +/- 13 to 37 +/- 12 mm Hg; p less than 0.05) within 15 minutes after administration, i.e. even prior to the onset of diuresis. Thus, the administration of piretanide had a positive effect on hemodynamics in patients with chronic as well as in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Significant improvement prior to diuresis onset, however, was only found in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These effects may be explained by a stimulation of prostaglandines which promote vasodilation. They are increased by the diuresis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage.

  19. Effects of budesonide and N-acetylcysteine on acute lung hyperinflation, inflammation and injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Anne-Helene; Eriksson, Christina; Wang, Xiangdong

    2005-08-01

    Leukocyte activation and production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species are important in the pathogenesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. The present study investigated acute lung hyperinflation, edema, and lung inflammation 4 h after an intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 microg/ml/kg). Effects of budesonide, an inhaled anti-inflammatory corticosteroids, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, were evaluated in Wistar rats receiving either low (2.5 microg/ml/kg) or high (50 microg/ml/kg) concentrations of LPS. This study demonstrates that LPS in a concentration-dependent pattern induces acute lung hyperinflation measured by excised lung gas volume (25-45% above control), lung injury indicated by increased lung weight (10-60%), and lung inflammation characterized by the infiltration of leukocytes (40-14000%) and neutrophils (80-17000%) and the production of cytokines (up to 2700%) and chemokines (up to 350%) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pretreatment with NAC partially prevented tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) production induced by the low concentration of LPS, while pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the increased production of TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractive protein (MCP)-1 after LPS challenge at both low and high concentrations. Budesonide failed to prevent BALF levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (GRO/CINC-1) as well as lung hyperinflation induced by both low and high concentrations of LPS. Pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the formation of lung edema at the low concentration of LPS and had partial effects on acute lung injury and leukocyte influx at the high concentrations. Thus, our data indicate that therapeutic effects of budesonide and NAC are dependent upon the severity of the disease.

  20. Acute hypertension reveals depressor and vasodilator effects of cannabinoids in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Gardiner, Sheila M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids can be influenced by anaesthesia and can differ in chronic hypertension, but the extent to which they are influenced by acute hypertension in conscious animals has not been determined. Experimental approach We examined cardiovascular responses to intravenous administration of anandamide and the synthetic cannabinoid, (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone (WIN55212-2), in conscious male Wistar rats made acutely hypertensive by infusion of angiotensin II (AII) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). Rats were chronically instrumented for measurement of arterial blood pressure and vascular conductances in the renal, mesenteric and hindquarters beds. Key results Anandamide dose-dependently decreased the mean arterial blood pressure of rats made hypertensive by AII-AVP infusion, but not normotensive rats. Interestingly, acute hypertension also revealed a hypotensive response to WIN55212-2, which caused hypertension in normotensive animals. The enhanced depressor effects of the cannabinoids in acute hypertension were associated with increased vasodilatation in hindquarters, renal and mesenteric vascular beds. Treatment with URB597, which inhibits anandamide degradation by fatty acid amide hydrolase, potentiated the depressor and mesenteric vasodilator responses to anandamide. Furthermore, haemodynamic responses to WIN55212-2, but not to anandamide, were attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophen yl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide]. Conclusions and implications These results broadly support the literature showing that the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids can be exaggerated in hypertension, but highlight the involvement of non-CB1 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the actions of anandamide. PMID:19133994

  1. Effects of an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial lipemia and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ariel M; Kurti, Stephanie P; Smith, Joshua R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Harms, Craig A

    2016-03-01

    A high-fat meal (HFM) induces an increase in blood lipids (postprandial lipemia; PPL), systemic inflammation, and acute airway inflammation. While acute exercise has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and lipid-lowering effects, it is unknown whether exercise prior to an HFM will translate to reduced airway inflammation post-HFM. Our purpose was to determine the effects of an acute bout of exercise on airway inflammation post-HFM and to identify whether any protective effect of exercise on airway inflammation was associated with a reduction in PPL or systemic inflammation. In a randomized cross-over study, 12 healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men (age, 23.0 ± 3.2 years; height, 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; weight, 78.5 ± 11.7 kg) consumed an HFM (1 g fat/1 kg body weight) 12 h following exercise (EX; 60 min at 60% maximal oxygen uptake) or without exercise (CON). Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO; measure of airway inflammation), triglycerides (TG), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor-necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6) were measured while fasted at 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. FENO increased over time (2 h: CON, p = 0.001; EX, p = 0.002, but not by condition (p = 0.991). TG significantly increased 2 and 4 h post-HFM (p < 0.001), but was not significant between conditions (p = 0.256). Inflammatory markers did not significantly increase by time or condition (p > 0.05). There were no relationships between FENO and TG or systemic inflammatory markers for any time point or condition (p > 0.05). In summary, an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise performed 12 h prior to an HFM did not change postprandial airway inflammation or lipemia in healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men. PMID:26872295

  2. Purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) anthocyanins: preventive effect on acute and subacute alcoholic liver damage and dealcoholic effect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongnan; Mu, Taihua; Liu, Xingli; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jingwang

    2014-03-19

    This study aimed to investigate the dealcoholic effect and preventive effect of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (PSPAs) on acute and subacute alcoholic liver damage (ALD). Seven-week-old male inbred mice were grouped into five groups: control group (without PSPAs and ethanol treatments), model group (with ethanol treatment only), low-dose group (50 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), middle-dose group (125 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), and high-dose group (375 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), and the mice in all groups were administered intragastrically. Biochemical parameters of serum and liver were determined, and the histopathological changes of liver tissue were also analyzed. Results showed that all tested parameters were ameliorated after consumption of PSPAs. Therefore, PSPAs have preventive effect on acute and subacute ALD. It is suggested that PSPAs could be used as a supplementary reagent during prophylactic and curative managements of ALD.

  3. [Advance in studies on effect of traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines in prevention and treatment of acute altitude sickness].

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Liu, Zhen; Xing, Yan-Wei; Gao, Ao; Zhu, Huo-Ming; Wang, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Acute altitude reaction is a stress response of organism to special altitude environmental factors such as hypoxia, low pressure, cold, dry and strong ultraviolet. As it is the most incident disease in high altitude areas, its prevention remains a problem to be solved. In China, the traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines have been recognized as an effective means of preventing and treating acute altitude sicknesses. Some single-recipe or compound traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines have been proved to be effective for acute altitude sicknesses. In this article, we will describe traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines of different types with efficacy in prevention and treatment of altitude sicknesses. PMID:24066576

  4. Acute toxicological effects on the earthworm Eisenia fetida of 18 common pharmaceuticals in artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Val, Jonatan; Mainar, Ana Ma; Zuriaga, Estefanía; Español, Cecilia; Langa, Elisa

    2015-06-15

    Following soil applications of recycled water and biosolids, pharmaceutical residues can eventually enter the terrestrial environment. In vitro and in vivo assays have largely focused on the acute ecotoxicity of these compounds in aquatic systems. However, studies on the ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceuticals in soil biota are especially scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute toxicity of 18 pharmaceuticals (4 NSAIDs, 5 blood lipid-lowering agents, 6 β-blockers and 3 antibiotics) that are usually found in the environment by using an Eisenia fetida bioassay. In addition, the presence of these pharmaceuticals in artificial soil was verified at the end of the test. Our results indicate that seven of the studied drugs cause acute adverse effects in E. fetida, in particular, the NSAIDs and the blood lipid-lowering agents. Ibuprofen (LC50=64.80 mg/kg) caused the highest acute toxicity for all tested compounds, followed by diclofenac (LC50=90.49 mg/kg) and simvastatin (LC50=92.70 mg/kg). Other tested pharmaceuticals from NSAIDs and blood lipid-lowering families have toxicity effects, from a LC50=140.87 mg/kg for gemfibrozil to 795.07 mg/kg for lovastatin. Atorvastatin, bezafibrate, β-blockers and antibiotics showed no detectable lethality in E. fetida. The four NSAIDs showed evidence of modification of their original chemical structure after 14 days so the detected toxicity may be due to the original product as well as their degradation products. The three blood lipid-lowering agents seem to be more stable in soil. From an environmental perspective, the lethal concentrations of the tested drugs are much greater than those reported in wastewater and biosolids, therefore acute toxic effects may be improbable. However, little is known about the accumulation of these substances in soils after regular applications, so accumulative and chronic effects cannot be excluded. Moreover, more studies are needed to determine the role of the degradation

  5. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  6. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death.

  7. Acute versus subchronic pyridostigmine administration: Effects on the anticholinergic properties of atropine

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, C.B.; Glenn, J.F.; Bowers, W.D.

    1993-05-13

    Acute, subchronic and chronic exposures to cholinergic compounds may result in differing effects. The efficacy of pyridostigmine bromide (PY) prophylaxis against organophosphorus poisoning depends on post exposure atropine (AT) administration. AT induces a dose-dependent increase in rate of rise of core temperature in heat exposed humans and rats. To determine whether AT's anticholinergic potency is altered following PY administration, we examined AT's effects following acute or subchronic (2 weeks) PY administration in the sedentary heat-stressed rat. Unrestrained rats were used in the following 8 groups of 12: acute (a,2 injections via tail vein) aSAL+SAL, aSAL+AT, aPY+SAL, aPY+AT; subchronic (c, osmotic pump + tail vein) cSAL+SAL, cSAL+AT, cPY+SAL, cPY+AT (SAL- saline, AT- 200 ug/kg, aPY- 100 ug/kg, cPY- 20 ug/hr.) Fifteen minutes following the final injection, rats were subjected to an ambient temperature of 41.5 deg C until a core temperature of 42.6 deg C was attained.

  8. Effects of Schizolobium parahyba Extract on Experimental Bothrops Venom-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martines, Monique Silva; Mendes, Mirian M.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; de Castro, Isac; Filho, Sebastião R. Ferreira; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP) extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV)-induced AKI. Methodology Groups of 8 to 10 rats received infusions of 0.9% saline (control, C), SP 2 mg/kg, BV 0.25 mg/kg and BV immediately followed by SP (treatment, T) in the doses already described. After the respective infusions, animals were assessed for their glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance), renal blood flow (RBF, Doppler), blood pressure (BP, intra-arterial transducer), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary osmolality (UO, freezing point), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, kinetic method), hematocrit (Hct, microhematocrit), fibrinogen (Fi, Klauss modified) and blinded renal histology (acute tubular necrosis score). Principal Findings BV caused significant decreases in GFR, RBF, UO, HcT and Fi; significant increases in RVR, NGAL and LDH; and acute tubular necrosis. SP did not prevent these changes; instead, it caused a significant decrease in GFR when used alone. Conclusion SP administered simultaneously with BV, in an approximate 10∶1 concentration, did not prevent BV-induced AKI, hemolysis and fibrinogen consumption. SP used alone caused a decrease in GFR. PMID:24551041

  9. THE EFFECT OF ACUTE TREADMILL WALKING ON COGNITIVE CONTROL AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN PREADOLESCENT CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Charles H.; Pontifex, Matthew B.; Raine, Lauren B.; Castelli, Darla M.; Hall, Eric E.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of moderate treadmill walking on behavioral and neuroelectric indices of the cognitive control of attention and applied aspects of cognition involved in school-based academic performance were assessed. A within-subjects design included twenty preadolescent participants (Age = 9.5 ± 0.5 years; 8 female) to assess exercise-induced changes in performance during a modified flanker task and the Wide Range Achievement Test 3. The resting session consisted of cognitive testing followed by a cardiorespiratory fitness assessment to determine aerobic fitness. The exercise session consisted of 20 minutes of walking on a motor-driven treadmill at 60% of estimated maximum heart rate followed by cognitive testing once heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-exercise levels. Results indicated an improvement in response accuracy, larger P3 amplitude, and better performance on the academic achievement test following aerobic exercise relative to the resting session. Collectively, these findings indicate that single, acute bouts of moderately-intense aerobic exercise (i.e., walking) may improve the cognitive control of attention in preadolescent children, and further supports the use of moderate acute exercise as a contributing factor for increasing attention and academic performance. These data suggest that single bouts of exercise affect specific underlying processes that support cognitive health and may be necessary for effective functioning across the lifespan. PMID:19356688

  10. Pronounced effects of acute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Catoire, Milène; Mensink, Marco; Boekschoten, Mark V; Hangelbroek, Roland; Müller, Michael; Schrauwen, Patrick; Kersten, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated the effects of an acute endurance exercise bouts on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human muscle. To that end, 12 male subjects aged 44-56 performed one hour of one-legged cycling at 50% W(max). Muscle biopsies were taken from the exercising and non-exercising leg before and immediately after exercise and analyzed by microarray. One-legged cycling raised plasma lactate, free fatty acids, cortisol, noradrenalin, and adrenalin levels. Surprisingly, acute endurance exercise not only caused pronounced gene expression changes in exercising muscle but also in non-exercising muscle. In the exercising leg the three most highly induced genes were all part of the NR4A family. Remarkably, many genes induced in non-exercising muscle were PPAR targets or related to PPAR signalling, including PDK4, ANGPTL4 and SLC22A5. Pathway analysis confirmed this finding. In conclusion, our data indicate that acute endurance exercise elicits pronounced changes in gene expression in non-exercising muscle, which are likely mediated by changes in circulating factors such as free fatty acids. The study points to a major influence of exercise beyond the contracting muscle.

  11. Effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Tortoledo, F.E.; Batty, J.W.; Raizner, A.E.

    1985-05-01

    The effects of coronary artery recanalization by intracoronary administration of streptokinase on left ventricular function during acute myocardial infarction have received increasing attention in recent years. Although myocardial dysfunction is often more pronounced in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction, the effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular dysfunction has not been previously addressed. Accordingly, in this investigation, 54 patients who participated in a prospective, controlled, randomized trial of recanalization during acute myocardial infarction were studied. Among 30 patients with inferior wall infarction, 19 had right ventricular dysfunction on admission; 11 of these 19 had positive uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the right ventricle, indicative of right ventricular infarction. Patients with successful recanalization exhibited improved right ventricular ejection fraction from admission to day 10. However, control patients and patients who did not undergo recanalization also exhibited improvement. These data indicate that the right ventricular dysfunction commonly associated with inferior wall infarction is often transient, and improvement is the rule, irrespective of early recanalization of the infarct vessel.

  12. Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Executive Function in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Roseann; Darby, Lynn A; Fullenkamp, Adam; Morgan, Amy L

    2015-09-01

    Acute aerobic exercise may increase cognitive processing speed among tasks demanding a substantial degree of executive function. Few studies have investigated executive function after acute exercise in older adults across various exercise intensities. Healthy females 60-75 years of age (n = 11) who were not on medications completed 20-min exercise sessions at a moderate (50%VO2max) exercise intensity and a vigorous (75%VO2max) exercise intensity. Modified flanker tasks (reaction times) and d2 tests of sustained and selective attention (components of executive function) were completed before, immediately after, and 30-min post-exercise. Results indicated that older adult females had improved scores on the modified flanker task reaction times (RTT, RTI, RTC) and d2 tests immediately after both moderate and vigorous intensity aerobic exercise. Some of these effects were maintained 30 min post-exercise. These findings suggest that an acute bout of exercise, regardless of intensity, can improve performance on tests of executive function in older women. Key pointsFew studies have investigated the effects of the intensity of exercise on executive function in older womenExecutive function improved after 20-min of aerobic exercise regardless of exercise intensity in older womenFindings from the study were not confounded by prescribed medications; all participants who were older women were not taking any medications.

  13. Effects of Acute Exposure to Sublethal Waterborne Cadmium on Energy Homeostasis in Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix).

    PubMed

    Pi, Jie; Li, Xuelin; Zhang, Ting; Li, Deliang

    2016-10-01

    Effects of acute exposure to sublethal waterborne cadmium (Cd) on energy homeostasis in filter-feeding fishes have rarely been studied. The response patterns of energy substances were investigated in juvenile silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) exposed to sublethal waterborne Cd for 96 h. The results showed the 96hLC50 of Cd on juvenile silver carp was 1.723 mg/L. Sublethal acute exposure of Cd significantly affected the energy homeostasis of juvenile silver carp, including increase in plasma glucose and lactate, and decrease in plasma triglyceride, muscle glycogen and triglyceride and liver glycogen. The results indicated that glycogen and triglyceride prior to protein were mobilized to meet the increased demands for detoxication and repair mechanism to sublethal waterborne Cd exposure, and glycogen level depleted faster and restored slower in the liver than in the white muscle in juvenile silver carp. PMID:27488982

  14. Venous Congestion, Endothelial and Neurohormonal Activation in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Cause or Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Paolo C.; Doran, Amanda C.; Onat, Duygu; Wong, Ka Yuk; Ahmad, Myra; Sabbah, Hani N.; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Venous congestion and endothelial and neurohormonal activation are known to occur in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), yet the temporal role of these processes in the pathophysiology of decompensation is not fully understood. Conventional wisdom presumes congestion to be a consequence of worsening cardiovascular function; however, the biomechanically driven effects of venous congestion are biologically plausible contributors to ADHF that remain largely unexplored in vivo. Recent experimental evidence from human models suggests that fluid accumulation and venous congestion are not simply consequences of poor cardiovascular function, but rather are fundamental pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory, and hemodynamic stimuli that contribute to acute decompensation. The latest advances in the monitoring of volume status using implantable devices allow for the detection of venous congestion before symptoms arise. This may ultimately lead to improved treatment strategies including not only diuretics, but also specific, adjuvant interventions to counteract endothelial and neurohormonal activation during early preclinical decompensation. PMID:25740404

  15. Effect of the degree of hill slope on acute downhill running velocity and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Davies, Joseph A; Clewien, Rustin W

    2008-05-01

    This study analyzes the effects of hill slope on acute overspeed running. This study considers both acceleration and supramaximal velocity. Forty-four athletes ran 40-yard sprints, on 5 different hill slopes, ranging from 2.1 degrees to 6.9 degrees . Forty-yard sprint times and 10-yard split times were recorded using the Brower Timing System Speedtrap II. Analysis reveals that 40-yard and 10-yard sprints performed on hill slopes of approximately 5.8 degrees were optimal compared to flatland running and the other slopes assessed. Sprinting on a 5.8 degrees slope increased the subjects' maximal speed by 7.09% +/- 3.66% and increased the subjects' acceleration by 6.54% +/- 1.56%. Strength and conditioning professionals who train athletes for speed should develop and use overspeed hills or platforms with slopes of approximately 5.8 degrees in order to maximize acute sprinting velocity and acceleration.

  16. Acute tolerance to rate-decreasing effects of single doses of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Martinez, Gerardo; Friesenhahn, Gregory; Javors, Martin; Lamb, R J

    2008-06-01

    Acute tolerance occurs when behavioral impairment is greater at a given blood ethanol concentration (BAC) on the ascending versus descending limb of the BAC-time curve following administration of a single dose of ethanol, however studies utilizing learned behaviors have not been widely reported. We assessed acute tolerance to single doses of ethanol in five Lewis rats responding under a fixed-ratio (FR8) schedule of food presentation. Response rates for food during 1-min components (ending 2, 4, 11, 18, 33, and 57 min after ethanol administration) were determined, and BAC was measured immediately after each component using a rat breathalyzer. Ethanol (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg, i.p.) produced dose-related decreases in responding for food that tended to recover over time for all but the highest dose tested. Similarly, dose-related increases in BAC were also observed. Using either an analysis that expressed impairment per unit BAC on the ascending limb versus the descending limb (by assessing the area under the curve (AUC) for behavior and BAC on each limb), the slope of the function that relates the behavioral effect to BAC (each expressed as percent maximum effect), or a variant of the Mellanby method (hysteresis), acute tolerance was observed following a dose of 0.4 g/kg ethanol. Though behavior appeared to recover on the descending limb following higher doses (especially 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg), acute tolerance to these doses was not present. PMID:18328511

  17. Stimulatory action of protein kinase Cɛ isoform on the slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Toda, H; Ding, W-G; Yasuda, Y; Toyoda, F; Ito, M; Matsuura, H; Horie, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Protein kinase C (PKC) comprises at least twelve isoforms and has an isoform-specific action on cardiac electrical activity. The slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current (I Ks) is one of the major repolarizing currents in the hearts of many species and is also potentiated by PKC activation. Little is known, however, about PKC isoform(s) functionally involved in the potentiation of I Ks in native cardiac myocytes. Experimental approach: I Ks was recorded from guinea-pig atrial myocytes, using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp method. Key results: Bath application of phenylephrine enhanced I Ks concentration-dependently with EC50 of 5.4 μM and the maximal response (97.1±11.9% increase, n=16) was obtained at 30 μM. Prazosin (1 μM) almost totally abolished the potentiation of I Ks by phenylephrine, supporting the involvement of α1-adrenoceptors. The stimulatory action of phenylephrine was significantly, if not entirely, inhibited by the general PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I but was little affected by Gö-6976, Gö-6983 and rottlerin. Furthermore, this stimulatory effect was significantly reduced by dialyzing atrial myocytes with PKCɛ-selective inhibitory peptide ɛV1-2 but was not significantly affected by conventional PKC isoform-selective inhibitory peptide βC2-4. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) at 100 nM substantially increased I Ks by 64.2±1.3% (n=6), which was also significantly attenuated by an internal dialysis with ɛV1-2 but not with βC2-4. Conclusions and implications: The present study provides experimental evidence to suggest that, in native guinea-pig cardiac myocytes, activation of PKC contributes to α1-adrenoceptor-mediated potentiation of I Ks and that ɛ is the isoform predominantly involved in this PKC action. PMID:17339832

  18. Cost effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for patients with acute, undifferentiated chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, S; Calvert, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Patients presenting to hospital with acute, undifferentiated chest pain have a low, but important, risk of significant myocardial ischaemia. Potential diagnostic strategies for patients with acute, undifferentiated chest pain vary from low cost, poor effectiveness (discharging all home) to high cost, high effectiveness (admission and intensive investigation). This paper aimed to estimate the relative cost effectiveness of these strategies. Methods: Decision analysis modelling was used to measure the incremental cost per quality adjusted year of life (QALY) gained for five potential strategies to diagnose acute undifferentiated chest pain, compared with the next most effective strategy, or a baseline strategy of discharging all patients home without further testing. Results: Cardiac enzyme testing alone costs £17 432/QALY compared with discharge without testing. Adding two to six hours of observation and repeat enzyme testing costs an additional £18 567/QALY. Adding exercise testing to this strategy costs £28 553/QALY. A strategy of overnight admission, enzyme, and exercise testing has an incremental cost of £120 369/QALY, while a strategy consisting of overnight admission without exercise testing is subject to extended dominance. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the results are sensitive to variations in the direct costs of running each strategy and to variation in assumptions regarding the effect of diagnostic testing upon quality of life of those with non-cardiac disease. Conclusion: Observation based strategies incur similar costs per QALY to presently funded interventions for coronary heart disease, while strategies requiring hospital admission may be prohibitively poor value for money. Validation of the true costs and effects of observation based strategies is essential before widespread implementation. PMID:12954681

  19. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  20. Effect of the acute and chronic estrogen on anxiety in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Kalandakanond-Thongsong, Sarinee; Daendee, Suwaporn; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan

    2012-01-18

    Despite the extensive studies on the influences of estrogen (E(2)) on anxiety-like behaviors, there is still conflicting evidence regarding the specific effects of E(2) on anxiety. These discrepancies may be a result of different replacement regimens. The goals of this study were to evaluate anxiety-like behavior in ovariectomized rats (Ovx) using the elevated T-maze (ETM) test for the following variables: (1) the effects of acute versus chronic E(2) dosing, (2) the effects of chronic E(2) at different doses and, (3) the effects of Tamoxifen (Tam) co-administered with E(2). Rats in the acute E(2) dosing group (aE(2)) showed reduced inhibitory avoidance responses with prolong escape latencies compared to Ovx; while rats in the chronic E(2) dosing group (cE(2)) showed reduced inhibitory avoidance responses only. These results suggest that E(2) contains anxiolytic effects when given once or repeatedly. Moreover, when various doses of E(2) (1-100 μg/kg) were chronically given to the Ovx rats, all doses produced impaired inhibitory avoidance responses compared to Ovx, suggesting that chronic replacement of E(2) had no dose-dependent effect on anxiety-like behavior. Interestingly, in the 3-week delay replacement regimen, the low dose E(2) (1 μg/kg, s.c.) group displayed no anxiolytic effects as their inhibitory avoidance responses in the ETM were not different from their Ovx counterparts. On the contrary, the Ovx group that received Tam+E(2) (Tam 1 mg/kg, PO and E(2) 1 μg/kg, s.c.) had reduced inhibitory avoidance responses compared to other groups. These findings indicate that when Tam is co-administered with chronic low dose estrogen, it can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and result in anti-anxiety effects. Therefore, it is likely that the anxiolytic-like behavior relative to generalized anxiety disorder can be conserved when estrogen is given acutely or chronically; while the anxiolytic-like behavior relative to panic disorder can be conserved only when

  1. The Stimulatory Effects of Topical Application of Radioactive Lantern Mantle Powder on Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, SMJ; Rahmani, MR; Rahnama, A; Saeed-Pour, A; Nouri, E; Hosseini, N; Aghaiee, MM

    2009-01-01

    Some people in different parts of Iran use burned mantles as a wound healing medicine. To perform surface area measurement, twenty rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The 1st group received topical burned radioactive lantern mantle powder at 1st-3rd day after making excision wounds. The 2nd group received non-radioactive lantern mantle powder. For histological study, 36 male rats randomly divided into two groups of 18 animals each. Full thickness excision wound (314±31.4 mm2) was made on the dorsal neck in all animals after inducing general anesthesia. For the first 3 days, cases received topical application of the radioactive lantern mantle powder. Finally, to measure the tensile strength, an incision was made on the dorsal neck of the rats. Surface area measurement of the wounds showed a progressive surface reduction in both groups. Histological study showed a significant statistically difference between cases and controls with respect to fibrinoid necrosis and neutrophilic exudate at the days 3 and 14. Considering the existence of granulation tissue, a significant difference was observed between case and control groups at days 3 and 7. Tensile strength study showed no significant difference between the cases and controls until 30 days after excision. PMID:19543481

  2. Differential effects of stimulatory factors on natural killer cell activities of young and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Nogusa, Shoko; Murasko, Donna M; Gardner, Elizabeth M

    2012-09-01

    Age-associated influences on natural killer (NK) cell functions following cytokine stimulation were examined in splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice. NK cells of both young and aged mice exhibited significantly increased: interferon-γ production after interleukin (IL)-12 or IL-15 alone or any combination of IL-12, IL-18, and IL-2; cytotoxicity after IL-2 or IL-15; and granzyme B expression after IL-15. The only significant age-associated differences were observed in interferon-γ production after IL-15 or IL-12 + 18 + 2 and in granzyme B expression following IL-2 or IL-15. Perforin expression did not increase following stimulation; however, NK cells from aged mice expressed significantly higher levels than young mice. These results underscore the complexity of the cytokine-induced functional activities of NK cells and illustrate the differential response of NK cells from young and aged mice to cytokine stimulation.

  3. The stimulatory effects of topical application of radioactive lantern mantle powder on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Rahmani, M R; Rahnama, A; Saeed-Pour, A; Nouri, E; Hosseini, N; Aghaiee, M M

    2009-01-01

    Some people in different parts of Iran use burned mantles as a wound healing medicine. To perform surface area measurement, twenty rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The 1st group received topical burned radioactive lantern mantle powder at 1st-3rd day after making excision wounds. The 2nd group received non-radioactive lantern mantle powder. For histological study, 36 male rats randomly divided into two groups of 18 animals each. Full thickness excision wound (314+/-31.4 mm(2)) was made on the dorsal neck in all animals after inducing general anesthesia. For the first 3 days, cases received topical application of the radioactive lantern mantle powder. Finally, to measure the tensile strength, an incision was made on the dorsal neck of the rats. Surface area measurement of the wounds showed a progressive surface reduction in both groups. Histological study showed a significant statistically difference between cases and controls with respect to fibrinoid necrosis and neutrophilic exudate at the days 3 and 14. Considering the existence of granulation tissue, a significant difference was observed between case and control groups at days 3 and 7. Tensile strength study showed no significant difference between the cases and controls until 30 days after excision.

  4. Stimulatory effect of Brazilian propolis on hair growth through proliferation of keratinocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shota; Oda, Yozo; Matsuo, Chika; Kumura, Haruto; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-12-10

    Propolis is a natural honeybee hive product with the potential for use in the treatment of dermatological conditions, such as cutaneous abrasions, burns, and acne. In this study, we investigated whether propolis stimulates hair growth in mice. Ethanol-extracted propolis, which contains various physiologically active substances such as caffeic acid and kaempferol, stimulated anagen induction in shaved back skin. Anagen induction occurred without any detectable abnormalities in the shape of the hair follicles (HFs), hair stem cells in the bulge, proliferating hair matrix keratinocytes in the hair bulb, or localization of versican in the dermal papilla. Propolis treatment also stimulated migration of hair matrix keratinocytes into the hair shaft in HFs during late anagen in the depilated back skin. Organotypic culture of skin containing anagen stage HFs revealed significant stimulation of hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation by propolis. Furthermore, propolis facilitated the proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. These results indicate that propolis stimulates hair growth by inducing hair keratinocyte proliferation.

  5. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  6. Stimulatory effect of Brazilian propolis on hair growth through proliferation of keratinocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shota; Oda, Yozo; Matsuo, Chika; Kumura, Haruto; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-12-10

    Propolis is a natural honeybee hive product with the potential for use in the treatment of dermatological conditions, such as cutaneous abrasions, burns, and acne. In this study, we investigated whether propolis stimulates hair growth in mice. Ethanol-extracted propolis, which contains various physiologically active substances such as caffeic acid and kaempferol, stimulated anagen induction in shaved back skin. Anagen induction occurred without any detectable abnormalities in the shape of the hair follicles (HFs), hair stem cells in the bulge, proliferating hair matrix keratinocytes in the hair bulb, or localization of versican in the dermal papilla. Propolis treatment also stimulated migration of hair matrix keratinocytes into the hair shaft in HFs during late anagen in the depilated back skin. Organotypic culture of skin containing anagen stage HFs revealed significant stimulation of hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation by propolis. Furthermore, propolis facilitated the proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. These results indicate that propolis stimulates hair growth by inducing hair keratinocyte proliferation. PMID:25418897

  7. Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high

  8. The effect of repeated acute hypoxaemia on fetal cardiovascular development in the sheep.

    PubMed

    Steyn, C; Hanson, M A

    1998-10-01

    1. Hypoxaemia during intrauterine life may be important in the development of cardiovascular diseases in later life. Thus it was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of repeated acute hypoxia on the cardiovascular development and growth of the fetus. 2. Fourteen fetal sheep (105-109 days gestational age) were instrumented with amniotic and vascular catheters, an electrocardiogram (ECG) electrode and a flow probe around the femoral artery. Seven animals were given repeated acute isocapnic hypoxaemia (Pa,O2 reduced to ca. 13 mmHg) for 1 h every day for 14 days and they were compared to seven animals which remained normoxic throughout with respect to fetal mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), fetal heart rate (FHR), and fetal baro- and chemoreflexes. 3. No differences were found between the two groups of fetuses in FHR, MAP, baro- or chemoreflexes, femoral blood flow, femoral vascular resistance or fetal growth. 4. Repeated acute hypoxaemia of a moderate degree over a period of 2 weeks in late gestation does not affect cardiovascular development or growth in the fetal sheep.

  9. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  10. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE.

  11. Dispersant and salinity effects on weathering and acute toxicity of South Louisiana crude oil.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Adam J; Nyman, J Andrew; Kaller, Michael D; Green, Christopher C

    2013-11-01

    Chemical dispersants are an important technology in the remediation of oil spills in the aquatic environment, facilitating degradation of crude oil and salinity is an important factor in dispersant effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of salinity on the degradation chemistry of crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and acute toxicity of the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of the dispersant COREXIT 9500A and chemically dispersed crude oil on a common estuarine fish. Laboratory microcosms were designed at salinities of 4 parts per thousand (ppt), 12 ppt, or 18 ppt and spiked with crude oil, COREXIT 9500A, or a combined exposure to crude oil and COREXIT and allowed to biodegrade for 1 wk, 4 wk, and 16 wk. The WAF was harvested for analytical PAH analysis and acute toxicity testing in juvenile Fundulus grandis. Compared with undispersed oil, COREXIT exponentially increased the PAH concentrations in the WAF for up to 16 wk; hopane-normalized concentrations indicated that biodegradation was slowed for the first 4 wk. Dispersed crude oil and COREXIT were acutely toxic following 1 wk of biodegradation with no correlation between PAH concentrations and crude oil WAF mortality. Both dispersant and dispersant oil mixtures remained toxic for at least 4 wk at the lowest salinity tested, suggesting increased sensitivity or reduced biodegradation of toxic components in low-saline environments. At the lowest salinity, oil dispersed with COREXIT was more toxic than either the COREXIT alone or oil alone, even after 16 wk of biodegradation. PMID:24377102

  12. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE. PMID:27239681

  13. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  14. Behavioral economic analysis of stress effects on acute motivation for alcohol.

    PubMed

    Owens, Max M; Ray, Lara A; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    Due to issues of definition and measurement, the heavy emphasis on subjective craving in the measurement of acute motivation for alcohol and other drugs remains controversial. Behavioral economic approaches have increasingly been applied to better understand acute drug motivation, particularly using demand curve modeling via purchase tasks to characterize the perceived reinforcing value of the drug. This approach has focused on using putatively more objective indices of motivation, such as units of consumption, monetary expenditure, and price sensitivity. To extend this line of research, the current study used an alcohol purchase task to determine if, compared to a neutral induction, a personalized stress induction would increase alcohol demand in a sample of heavy drinkers. The stress induction significantly increased multiple measures of the reinforcing value of alcohol to the individual, including consumption at zero price (intensity), the maximum total amount of money spent on alcohol (Omax), the first price where consumption was reduced to zero (breakpoint), and the general responsiveness of consumption to increases in price (elasticity). These measures correlated only modestly with craving and mood. Self-reported income was largely unrelated to demand but moderated the influence of stress on Omax. Moderation based on CRH-BP genotype (rs10055255) was present for Omax, with T allele homozygotes exhibiting more pronounced increases in response to stress. These results provide further support for a behavioral economic approach to measuring acute drug motivation. The findings also highlight the potential relevance of income and genetic factors in understanding state effects on the perceived reinforcing value of alcohol.

  15. Effect of drugs on the pulmonary changes in experimental acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Taylor, T V

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory complications of acute pancreatitis are well recognised and are closely related to a poor prognosis. Using an experimental model in the rat, a decrease in lung compliance and an increase in lung weight were produced in acute pancreatitis. The effects of dexamethasone, heparin, and aspirin on these changes were studied. The mean specific lung compliance was reduced by 16% in the pancreatitis group compared with the control group (p less than 0.05) and this change was abolished by dexamethasone (p less than 0.02), heparin (p less than 0.01), and aspirin (p less than 0.001). Percentage lung weight (as percentage of total body weight) was raised by 22% in the pancreatitis group compared with the sham operation group (p less than 0.01) and this change was abolished by heparin (p less than 0.01) and aspirin (p less than 0.05), but not affected by dexamethasone (p less than 0.5). The results indicate that 'stiff' and heavy lungs occur in experimental acute pancreatitis. The fact that these changes are abolished by heparin and improved by aspirin suggests that intrapulmonary fibrin deposition is a factor in the pathogenesis of the important respiratory complications of this condition. PMID:7076022

  16. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  17. Effect of acute renal failure on neurotoxicity of enoxacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, J; Ohashi, K; Yamamoto, K; Sawada, Y; Iga, T

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effect of acute renal failure on the neurotoxicity of enoxacin (ENX) in rats. Experimental acute renal failure was produced by bilateral ureteral ligation. ENX was intravenously infused to ureter ligated (UL) and control rats, and its concentration in plasma, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was compared. Plasma concentration of ENX increased rapidly in UL rats as compared with control rats. Brain/plasma concentration ratio (Kp)-time profile of ENX was similar in UL and control rats. Brain concentration of ENX at the occurrence of convulsion did not depend on the infusion rate, suggesting that in the brain tissue it equilibrates rapidly with the site of action for clonic convulsion. Brain concentration of ENX in UL rats at the occurrence of clonic convulsion was lower than that in control rats. A similar tendency was also observed with CSF concentration. In conclusion, the potentiation of neurotoxicity of ENX with acute renal failure may be caused by not only decreased capability for renal elimination of ENX but also increased sensitivity to convulsant activity of ENX in the central nervous system.

  18. The acute extracellular flux (XF) assay to assess compound effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruolan; Novick, Steven J; Mangum, James B; Queen, Kennedy; Ferrick, David A; Rogers, George W; Stimmel, Julie B

    2015-03-01

    Numerous investigations have linked mitochondrial dysfunction to adverse health outcomes and drug-induced toxicity. The pharmaceutical industry is challenged with identifying mitochondrial liabilities earlier in drug development and thereby reducing late-stage attrition. Consequently, there is a demand for reliable, higher-throughput screening methods for assessing the impact of drug candidates on mitochondrial function. The extracellular flux (XF) assay described here is a plate-based method in which galactose-conditioned HepG2 cells were acutely exposed to test compounds, then real-time changes in the oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate were simultaneously measured using a Seahorse Bioscience XF-96 analyzer. The acute XF assay was validated using marketed drugs known to modulate mitochondrial function, and data analysis was automated using a spline curve fitting model developed at GlaxoSmithKline. We demonstrate that the acute XF assay is a robust, sensitive screening platform for evaluating drug-induced effects on mitochondrial activity in whole cells.

  19. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Ömer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Öztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  20. Dispersant and salinity effects on weathering and acute toxicity of South Louisiana crude oil.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Adam J; Nyman, J Andrew; Kaller, Michael D; Green, Christopher C

    2013-11-01

    Chemical dispersants are an important technology in the remediation of oil spills in the aquatic environment, facilitating degradation of crude oil and salinity is an important factor in dispersant effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of salinity on the degradation chemistry of crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and acute toxicity of the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of the dispersant COREXIT 9500A and chemically dispersed crude oil on a common estuarine fish. Laboratory microcosms were designed at salinities of 4 parts per thousand (ppt), 12 ppt, or 18 ppt and spiked with crude oil, COREXIT 9500A, or a combined exposure to crude oil and COREXIT and allowed to biodegrade for 1 wk, 4 wk, and 16 wk. The WAF was harvested for analytical PAH analysis and acute toxicity testing in juvenile Fundulus grandis. Compared with undispersed oil, COREXIT exponentially increased the PAH concentrations in the WAF for up to 16 wk; hopane-normalized concentrations indicated that biodegradation was slowed for the first 4 wk. Dispersed crude oil and COREXIT were acutely toxic following 1 wk of biodegradation with no correlation between PAH concentrations and crude oil WAF mortality. Both dispersant and dispersant oil mixtures remained toxic for at least 4 wk at the lowest salinity tested, suggesting increased sensitivity or reduced biodegradation of toxic components in low-saline environments. At the lowest salinity, oil dispersed with COREXIT was more toxic than either the COREXIT alone or oil alone, even after 16 wk of biodegradation.

  1. Acute effects of summer air pollution on respiratory health of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Gielen, M H; van der Zee, S C; van Wijnen, J H; van Steen, C J; Brunekreef, B

    1997-06-01

    In the early summer of 1995, the acute respiratory effects of ambient air pollution were studied in a panel of 61 children, ages 7 to 13 yr, of whom 77% were taking asthma medication. Peak flow was measured twice daily with MiniWright meters at home and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms and medication use was registered daily by the parents in a diary. Exposure to air pollution was characterized by the ambient concentrations of ozone, PM10, and black smoke. During the study period, maximal 1-h ozone concentrations never exceeded 130 microg/m3, and 24-h black smoke and PM10 concentrations were never higher than 41 and 60 microg/m3 respectively. Associations of air pollution and health outcomes were evaluated using time series analysis. After adjusting for pollen, time trend, and day of the week, black smoke in particular was associated with acute respiratory symptoms and with medication use. Less strong associations were found for PM10 and ozone. These results suggest that in this panel of children, most of whom had asthma, relatively low levels of particulate matter and ozone in ambient air are able to increase symptoms and medication use.

  2. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

  3. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction. PMID:26688111

  4. Effect of platelet-activating factor antagonists (BN-52021, WEB-2170, and BB-882) on bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    de Souza, L J; Sampietre, S N; Assis, R S; Knowles, C H; Leite, K R; Jancar, S; Monteiro Cunha, J E; Machado, M C

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is an important source of pancreas infection in acute pancreatitis. The effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has been proved in various studies. The aim of this study was to determine whether potent PAF antagonists influence bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in 62 Wistar rats by injection of 2.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. The rats treated with PAF factor antagonists received intravenous injection of WEB-2170 (10 mg/kg), lexipafant (5 mg/kg), and BN-52021 (5 mg/kg) 30 minutes before induction of acute pancreatitis. Six hours after induction of acute pancreatitis, bacteriologic cultures and histologic scoring of tissues were performed. There was a statistically significant reduction in bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and liver but not to the pancreas of the rats treated with PAF antagonists. No significant increase in the intestinal bacterial population of any group was found. There were no statistical differences between the pancreatic histologic scores of the groups. PAF antagonists reduced bacterial translocation to distant sites other than the pancreas, preventing the bacterial dissemination that occurs in the early phase of acute pancreatitis and may have beneficial effects on the evolution of this disease.

  5. Effects of dark chocolate consumption on the prothrombotic response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men.

    PubMed

    von Känel, R; Meister, R E; Stutz, M; Kummer, P; Arpagaus, A; Huber, S; Ehlert, U; Wirtz, P H

    2014-12-01

    Flavanoid-rich dark chocolate consumption benefits cardiovascular health, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the acute effect of dark chocolate on the reactivity of prothrombotic measures to psychosocial stress. Healthy men aged 20-50 years (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 8.8) were assigned to a single serving of either 50 g of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50 g of optically identical flavonoid-free placebo chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate consumption, both groups underwent an acute standardised psychosocial stress task combining public speaking and mental arithmetic. We determined plasma levels of four stress-responsive prothrombotic measures (i. e., fibrinogen, clotting factor VIII activity, von Willebrand Factor antigen, fibrin D-dimer) prior to chocolate consumption, immediately before and after stress, and at 10 minutes and 20 minutes after stress cessation. We also measured the flavonoid epicatechin, and the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine in plasma. The dark chocolate group showed a significantly attenuated stress reactivity of the hypercoagulability marker D-dimer (F=3.87, p=0.017) relative to the placebo chocolate group. Moreover, the blunted D-dimer stress reactivity related to higher plasma levels of the flavonoid epicatechin assessed before stress (F=3.32, p = 0.031) but not to stress-induced changes in catecholamines (p's=0.35). There were no significant group differences in the other coagulation measures (p's≥0.87). Adjustments for covariates did not alter these findings. In conclusion, our findings indicate that a single consumption of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate blunted the acute prothrombotic response to psychosocial stress, thereby perhaps mitigating the risk of acute coronary syndromes triggered by emotional stress.

  6. Effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Raven, Peter B; Rebuffat, Thomas; Denise, Pierre; Lericollais, Romain; Sugawara, Jun; Normand, Hervé

    2015-10-15

    Systemic blood distribution is an important factor involved in regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, the effect of an acute change in central blood volume (CBV) on CBF regulation remains unclear. To address our question, we sought to examine the CBF and systemic hemodynamic responses to microgravity during parabolic flight. Twelve healthy subjects were seated upright and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. During the brief periods of microgravity, mean arterial pressure was decreased (-26 ± 1%, P < 0.001), despite an increase in cardiac output (+21 ± 6%, P < 0.001). During microgravity, central arterial pulse pressure and estimated carotid sinus pressure increased rapidly. In addition, this increase in central arterial pulse pressure was associated with an arterial baroreflex-mediated decrease in heart rate (r = -0.888, P < 0.0001) and an increase in total vascular conductance (r = 0.711, P < 0.001). The middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) remained unchanged throughout parabolic flight (P = 0.30). During microgravity the contribution of cardiac output to MCA Vmean was gradually reduced (P < 0.05), and its contribution was negatively correlated with an increase in total vascular conductance (r = -0.683, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the acute loading of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors by increases in CBV during microgravity results in acute and marked systemic vasodilation. Furthermore, we conclude that this marked systemic vasodilation decreases the contribution of cardiac output to CBF. These findings suggest that the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex-mediated peripheral vasodilation along with dynamic cerebral autoregulation counteracts a cerebral overperfusion, which otherwise would occur during acute increases in CBV. PMID:26310936

  7. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  8. Determination of an acute no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for copper in water.

    PubMed

    Araya, M; McGoldrick, M C; Klevay, L M; Strain, J J; Robson, P; Nielsen, F; Olivares, M; Pizarro, F; Johnson, L A; Poirier, K A

    2001-10-01

    A prospective, double-blind controlled study was designed to determine the acute no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of nausea in an apparently healthy population of 179 individuals who drank copper-containing water as the sulfate salt. Subjects were recruited at three different international sites and given a blind, randomly selected dose (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 mg Cu/L) in a bolus of 200 ml (final total copper dose was equivalent to 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mg) once weekly over a consecutive 5-week period. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea were screened for a period of up to 24 h. Nausea was the most frequently reported effect and was reported within the first 15 min of ingestion. For the combined trisite population (n=179), 8, 9, 14, 25, and 44 subjects responded positively to one or more GI symptoms at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg Cu/L, respectively. Analysis of the data demonstrated a clear dose response to the combined positive GI effects and to nausea alone. Statistically significant greater reporting of effects occurred at 6 and 8 mg Cu/L. Therefore, an acute NOAEL and lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of 4 and 6 mg Cu/L (0.8 and 1.2 mg Cu), respectively, were determined in drinking water for a combined international human population.

  9. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  10. Differential Effects of Acute Alcohol on EEG and Sedative Responses in Adolescent and Adult Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pian, Jerry P.; Criado, Jose R.; Walker, Brendan M.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related developmental differences in sensitivity to the acute effects of alcohol may play an important role in the development of alcoholism. The present study was designed to evaluate the acute effects of alcohol on cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) in adolescent (P36) and adult (P78) Wistar rats. Five minutes of EEG was recorded after administration of 0, 0.75 or 1.5 g/kg alcohol. The righting reflex was performed to measure the sedative effects of alcohol (3.5 g/kg) and total sleeping time for each rat. Our results showed that alcohol (1.5 g/kg) increased power in the 1–2 Hz band and decreased the power in the 32–50 Hz band in the parietal cortical region of adolescent rats. Alcohol (1.5 g/kg) also increased stability of the EEG power in the slow-wave frequency bands (2–4 Hz, 4–6 Hz, and 6–8 Hz) of adolescent rats. In the frontal cortex of adult rats, but not in adolescent rats, alcohol (1.5 or 0.75 g/kg) decreased the power in the 16–32 Hz frequency band. Alcohol (1.5 g/kg) differentially increased power in a multiple of slow-wave frequency bands (2–4 Hz and 4–6 Hz) in the parietal cortex of adult rats as compared to adolescent rats. Adolescent rats were shown significantly shorter sleeping time and higher blood alcohol levels after regaining reflex than adult rats. Our results provide additional evidence of age-related differences in the effects of acute alcohol on cortical EEG, sedation and tolerance. PMID:18191821

  11. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance. PMID:26849997

  12. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance.

  13. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  14. Acute, subacute and chronic effects of central neuropeptide Y on energy balance in rats.

    PubMed

    Székely, M; Pétervári, E; Pákai, E; Hummel, Z; Szelényi, Z

    2005-04-01

    Central neuropeptide Y (NPY) injection has been reported to cause hyperphagia and in some cases also hypometabolism or hypothermia. Chronic central administration induced a moderate rise of short duration in body weight, without consistent metabolic/thermal changes. In the present studies the acute and subsequent subacute ingestive and metabolic/thermal changes were studied following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NPY in cold-adapted and non-adapted rats, or the corresponding chronic changes following i.c.v. NPY infusion. Besides confirming basic earlier data, we demonstrated novel findings: a temporal relationship for the orexigenic and metabolic/thermal effects, and differences of coordination in acute/subacute/chronic phases or states. The acute phase (30-60 min after injection) was anabolic: coordinated hyperphagia and hypometabolism/hypothermia. NPY evoked a hypothermia by suppressing any (hyper)metabolism in excess of basal metabolic rate, without enhancing heat loss. Thus, acute hypothermia was observed in sub-thermoneutral but not thermoneutral environments. The subsequent subacute catabolic phase exhibited opposite effects: slight increase in metabolic rate, rise in body temperature, reaching a plateau within 3-4 h after injection -- this was maintained for at least 24 h; meanwhile the food intake decreased and the normal daily weight gain stopped. This rebound is only indirectly related to NPY. Chronic (7-day long) i.c.v. NPY infusion induced an anabolic phase for 2-3 days, followed by a catabolic phase and fever, despite continued infusion. In cold-adaptation environment the primary metabolic effect of the infusion induced a moderate hypothermia with lower daytime nadirs and nocturnal peaks of the circadian temperature rhythm, while at near-thermoneutral environments in non-adapted rats the infusion attenuated only the nocturnal temperature rise by suppressing night-time hypermetabolism. Further finding is that in cold-adapted animals

  15. The protective effect of Esculentoside A on experimental acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Xingtong; Qiu, Xiaochen; Wang, Junjie; Fang, He; Wang, Zhihong; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory response and oxidative stress are considered to play an important role in the development of acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Esculentoside A (EsA), isolated from the Chinese herb phytolacca esculenta, has the effect of modulating immune response, cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as anti-inflammatory effects. The present study is to evaluate the protective effect of EsA on CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury. In vitro, CCK-8 assays showed that EsA had no cytotoxicity, while it significantly reduced levels of TNF-α and cell death rate challenged by CCl4. Moreover, EsA treatment up-regulated PPAR-γ expression of LO2 cells and reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenged by CCl4. In vivo, EsA prevented mice from CCl4-induced liver histopathological damage. In addition, levels of AST and ALT were significantly decreased by EsA treatment. Furthermore, the mice treated with EsA had a lower level of TNF-α, Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in mRNA expression. EsA prevented MDA release and increased GSH-Px activity in liver tissues. Immunohistochemical staining showed that over-expression of F4/80 and CD11b were markedly inhibited by EsA. The western bolt results showed that EsA significantly inhibited CCl4-induced phosphonated IkBalpha (P-IκB) and ERK. Furthermore, EsA treatment also alleviated GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury on liver enzyme and histopathological damage. Unfortunately, our results exhibited that EsA had no effects on CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis which were showed by TUNEL staining and Bax, Caspase-3 and cleaved Caspase-3 expression. Our results proved that EsA treatment attenuated CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and its protective effects might be involved in inhibiting inflammatory response and oxidative stress, but not apoptosis with its underlying mechanism associated with PPAR-γ, NF-κB and ERK signal

  16. The effects of acute alcohol on motor impairments in adolescent, adult, and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Laura C; Novier, Adelle; Van Skike, Candice E; Diaz-Granados, Jaime L; Matthews, Douglas B

    2015-03-01

    Acute alcohol exposure has been shown to produce differential motor impairments between aged and adult rats and between adolescent and adult rats. However, the effects of acute alcohol exposure among adolescent, adult, and aged rats have yet to be systematically investigated within the same project using a dose-dependent analysis. We sought to determine the age- and dose-dependent effects of acute alcohol exposure on gross and coordinated motor performance across the rodent lifespan. Adolescent (PD 30), adult (PD 70), and aged (approximately 18 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats were tested on 3 separate motor tasks: aerial righting reflex (ARR), accelerating rotarod (RR), and loss of righting reflex (LORR). In a separate group of animals, blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) were determined at multiple time points following a 3.0 g/kg ethanol injection. Behavioral tests were conducted with a Latin square repeated-measures design in which all animals received the following doses: 1.0 g/kg or 2.0 g/kg alcohol or saline over 3 separate sessions via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. During testing, motor impairments were assessed on the RR 10 min post-injection and on ARR 20 min post-injection. Aged animals spent significantly less time on the RR when administered 1.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adult rats. In addition, motor performance impairments significantly increased with age after 2.0 g/kg alcohol administration. On the ARR test, aged rats were more sensitive to the effects of 1.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg alcohol compared to adolescents and adults. Seven days after the last testing session, animals were given 3.0 g/kg alcohol and LORR was examined. During LORR, aged animals slept longer compared to adult and adolescent rats. This effect cannot be explained solely by BEC levels in aged rats. The present study suggests that acute alcohol exposure produces greater motor impairments in older rats when compared to adolescent and adult rats and begins to establish a

  17. Comparison the effectiveness of aripiprazole and risperidone for the treatment of acute bipolar mania

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Amir Akhavan; Hebrani, Paria; Behdani, Fatemeh; Salaran, Mohamad; Marvast, Majid Nabizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Second-generation antipsychotics, approved for the treatment of mania, are associated with adverse effects such as weight gain and metabolic disorders. Aripiprazole, a recently introduced second-generation antipsychotic, are thought to account for its low propensity for weight gain, metabolic disturbances and sedation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of risperidone versus aripiprazole in the treatment of acute mania. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with acute episodes of mania were enrolled in this study, and they were randomly assigned into a risperidone group of 24 cases and an aripiprazole group of 26 cases. In group A, aripiprazole with a dose of 5-30 mg/day and in group B, risperidone with a dose of 2-8 mg/day was given to patients. The average dose of aripiprazole was 27 mg/day, and the average dose of risperidone was 6 mg/day. The effects of each drug for the treatment of acute mania were assessed on the 1st day of admission and on days 2, 4, 6, 8 and at weeks 2, 4 and 6 after therapy using the young mania rating scale (YMRS) and at the baseline and on weeks 3 and 6 after admission using the clinical global impression (CGI) scale. Results: The mean age of the group of risperidone was 34 ± 8.6 years and in a group of aripiprazole it was 34 ± 9.1 years (P = 0.83). Comparison of YMRS scores over the period of 6 weeks revealed a statistically significant difference in both groups (P < 0.0001). There was also a statistically significant difference in YMRS scores between risperidone and aripiprazole at day 8 (P = 0.026) and weeks 2 (P = 0.035) and 4 (P = 0.042). There was also a statistically significant difference in CGI-Severity scale score at weeks 3 (P = 0.003) and 6 (P = 0.000) and in CGI-Improvement scale score at weeks 3 (P = 0.005) and 6 (P = 0.002). The most common side-effect observed in both groups was headache (0%15/4 in aripiprazole vs. %16/7 in risperidone) Conclusion: Aripiprazole that is readily available

  18. Acute kidney injury: short-term and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Doyle, James F; Forni, Lui G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most common cause of organ dysfunction in critically ill adults, with a single episode of AKI, regardless of stage, carrying a significant morbidity and mortality risk. Since the consensus on AKI nomenclature has been reached, data reflecting outcomes have become more apparent allowing investigation of both short- and long-term outcomes.Classically the short-term effects of AKI can be thought of as those reflecting an acute deterioration in renal function per se. However, the effects of AKI, especially with regard to distant organ function ("organ cross-talk"), are being elucidated as is the increased susceptibility to other conditions. With regards to the long-term effects, the consideration that outcome is a simple binary endpoint of dialysis or not, or survival or not, is overly simplistic, with the reality being much more complex.Also discussed are currently available treatment strategies to mitigate these adverse effects, as they have the potential to improve patient outcome and provide considerable economic health savings. Moving forward, an agreement for defining renal recovery is warranted if we are to assess and extrapolate the efficacy of novel therapies. Future research should focus on targeted therapies assessed by measure of long-term outcomes. PMID:27373891

  19. Differential acute effects of selenomethionine and sodium selenite on the severity of colitis.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Franziska; Oldorff, Lisa; Besselt, Karolin; Kipp, Anna Patricia

    2015-04-01

    The European population is only suboptimally supplied with the essential trace element selenium. Such a selenium status is supposed to worsen colitis while colitis-suppressive effects were observed with adequate or supplemented amounts of both organic selenomethionine (SeMet) and inorganic sodium selenite. In order to better understand the effect of these selenocompounds on colitis development we examined colonic phenotypes of mice fed supplemented diets before the onset of colitis or during the acute phase. Colitis was induced by treating mice with 1% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for seven days. The selenium-enriched diets were either provided directly after weaning (long-term) or were given to mice with a suboptimal selenium status after DSS withdrawal (short-term). While long-term selenium supplementation had no effect on colitis development, short-term selenite supplementation, however, resulted in a more severe colitis. Colonic selenoprotein expression was maximized in all selenium-supplemented groups independent of the selenocompound or intervention time. This indicates that the short-term selenite effect appears to be independent from colonic selenoprotein expression. In conclusion, a selenite supplementation during acute colitis has no health benefits but may even aggravate the course of disease. PMID:25867950

  20. Effects of acute fluoxetine, paroxetine and desipramine on rats tested on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Drapier, Dominique; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Laviolle, Bruno; Millet, Bruno; Allain, Hervé; Bourin, Michel; Reymann, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-25

    Antidepressants are usually prescribed for the treatment of depression but more recently have also been recommended for the treatment of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiogenic- or anxiolytic-like effects of an acute administration of antidepressants (serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds) in male Wistar rats submitted to the elevated plus-maze. Fluoxetine (2.5, 5, 10, 15mg/kg), paroxetine (0.1, 0.5, 3, 12mg/kg) and desipramine (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg) or their vehicles were administered intraperitoneally 30min prior to testing. Diazepam (0.5, 1.5, 2.5mg/kg) was used as a positive comparator for anxiolytic effect. In comparison with control animals, the percentage of time the rats treated with fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (3 and 12mg/kg) spent in the open arms decreased. The percent of inactive time spent in the open arms also decreased in rats given fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (12mg/kg). Desipramine was inactive on all these parameters. In conclusion, acute treatment with fluoxetine and paroxetine, but not with desipramine, produced a pattern of anxiety behavior. Thus, the pharmacological mechanism appears to be due more to serotonergic than adrenergic neurotransmission. The elevated plus-maze exhibits good sensitivity for detecting anxiogenic effects of antidepressant drugs and the conventional parameters are sufficient and reliable for detecting such effects.

  1. Effect of acute exposure to low environmental calcium on respiration and locomotion in Lymnaea stagnalis (L.).

    PubMed

    Dalesman, Sarah; Lukowiak, Ken

    2010-05-01

    Environmental calcium is a major factor affecting the distribution of freshwater gastropods. Whilst the effects on growth and morphology are fairly well understood, little is known about how calcium availability affects other aspects of gastropod biology. Lymnaea stagnalis (L.) is considered a calciphile and exhibits reduced growth and survival in environments containing less than 20 mg l(-1) Ca(2+). Many freshwater systems exhibit fluctuations in calcium concentration over time: where calcium levels are normally high there may be periods of low [Ca(2+)], for example following periods of flooding. Here we examined the effects of acute periods of low (20 mg l(-1)) environmental calcium on the physiology and behaviour of L. stagnalis, specifically measuring how locomotion and respiration differ between high calcium (80 mg l(-1)) and low calcium (20 mg l(-1)) environments. We found that in a low calcium environment crawling speed is reduced, and that this coincides with an increase in cutaneous respiration, indicating that the increased metabolic demands of calcium acquisition at low [Ca(2+)] reduce the energy available for locomotion. Conversely we found a decrease in aerial respiration in hypoxic conditions in the low calcium relative to the high calcium environment. In conclusion, we found that acute exposure to low environmental calcium has a highly significant effect on locomotion and respiration, which may have consequences for snail fitness when no morphological effects are apparent.

  2. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J.; Fagan, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Protective effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Antonio; Alfieri, Alessio; Mazzella, Marialuisa; Mazzella, Antonio; Scognamiglio, Mattia; Scognamiglio, Gianluigi; Mascolo, Nicola; Cicala, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an organic compound widely used as solvent in biological studies and as vehicle for drug administration. DMSO has been shown to possess several biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive effects, and it has been proposed to be therapeutic in several disorders, such as gastrointestinal diseases, rheumatologic diseases, and for the treatment of several manifestations of amyloidosis. To better define the biological profile of DMSO, we investigated its effect on an in vivo model of acute myocardial infarction in rats, caused by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Our results show that pretreatment of rats with intraperitoneal (ip) DMSO (500 microL/Kg) for 3 consecutive days before left anterior descending coronary artery ligation significantly (P < 0.05) reduced cardiac damage from 18.75 +/- 4.88% (n = 12) to 4.46 +/- 2.01% (n = 8); serum levels of troponin I from 29.35 +/- 12.32 ng/mL (n = 8) to 2.95 +/- 1.32 ng/mL (n = 4); and serum levels of myoglobin from 46.86 +/- 10.35 ng/mL (n = 7) to 13.75 +/- 0.85 ng/mL (n = 4). Our data demonstrate that DMSO has a protective effect in a model of acute myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:19904216

  4. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Castro, J.R. |

    1994-11-01

    We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair.

  5. The effect of pravastatin on acute rejection after kidney transplantation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, S; Wilkinson, A H; Kobashigawa, J A; Wang, X M; Chia, D; Ozawa, M; Zhong, H P; Hirata, M; Cohen, A H; Teraski, P I

    1996-05-27

    Hyperlipidemia is an important complication of kidney transplantation affecting up to 74% of recipients. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are reported to provide safe and effective treatment for this problem. A recent study suggests that pravastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, also decreases the incidence of both clinically severe acute rejection episodes and natural killer cell cytotoxicity after orthotopic heart transplantation. We have performed a prospective randomized pilot study of the effect of pravastatin on these same parameters after cadaveric kidney transplantation. Graft recipients were randomized to receive pravastatin after transplantation or no pravastatin (24 patients in each group) in addition to routine cyclosporine and prednisone immunosuppression. Lipid levels, acute rejection episodes and serial natural killer cell cytotoxicities were followed for 4 months after the transplant. At the end of the study period, pravastatin had successfully controlled mean total cholesterol levels (202.6 +/- 9.3 vs. 236.5 +/- 11.9 mg/dl, P < 0.02), LDL levels (107.9 +/- 6.6 vs.149.6 +/- 10.7 mg/dl, P < 0.002), and triglyceride levels (118.8 +/- 14.2 vs. 157.2 +/- 13.8 mg/dl, P < 0.05). In addition, the pravastatin-treated group experienced a reduction in the incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (25% vs. 58%, P = 0.01), the incidence of multiple rejections episodes (P < 0.05), and the use of both pulse methylprednisolone (P = 0.01) and OKT3 (P = 0.02). Mean natural killer cell cytotoxicity was similarly reduced (11.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 20.0 +/- 2.0% lysis of K562 target cells, P < 0.002). These data suggest that pravastatin exerts an additional immunosuppressive effect in kidney transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. PMID:8633373

  6. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia. PMID:26751937

  7. Acute effect of two aerobic exercise modes on maximum strength and strength endurance.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Eduardo Oliveira; Tricoli, Valmor; Franchini, Emerson; Paulo, Anderson Caetano; Regazzini, Marcelo; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 modes of aerobic exercise (continuous or intermittent) on maximum strength (1 repetition maximum, 1RM) and strength endurance (maximum repetitions at 80% of 1RM) for lower- and upper-body exercises to test the acute hypothesis in concurrent training (CT) interference. Eight physically active men (age: 26.9 +/- 4.2 years; body mass: 82.1 +/- 7.5 kg; height: 178.9 +/- 6.0 cm) were submitted to: (a) a graded exercise test to determine V(.-)O2max (39.26 +/- 6.95 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and anaerobic threshold velocity (3.5 mmol x L(-1)) (9.3 +/- 1.27 km x h(-1)); (b) strength tests in a rested state (control); and (c) 4 experimental sessions, at least 7 days apart. The experimental sessions consisted of a 5-kilometer run on a treadmill continuously (90% of the anaerobic threshold velocity) or intermittently (1:1 minute at V(.-)O2max). Ten minutes after the aerobic exercise, either a maximum strength or a strength endurance test was performed (leg press and bench press exercises). The order of aerobic and strength exercises followed a William's square distribution to avoid carryover effects. Results showed that only the intermittent aerobic exercise produced an acute interference effect on leg strength endurance, decreasing significantly (p < 0.05) the number of repetitions from 10.8 +/- 2.5 to 8.1 +/- 2.2. Maximum strength was not affected by the aerobic exercise mode. In conclusion, the acute interference hypothesis in concurrent training seems to occur when both aerobic and strength exercises produce significant peripheral fatigue in the same muscle group.

  8. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia.

  9. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  10. Agricultural adjuvants: acute mortality and effects on population growth rate of Daphnia pulex after chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Walthall, William K

    2003-12-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity of eight agricultural adjuvants (Bond, Kinetic, Plyac, R-11, Silwet L-77, Sylgard 309, X-77, and WaterMaxx) to Daphnia pulex were evaluated with 48-h acute lethal concentration estimates (LC50) and a 10-d population growth-rate measurement, the instantaneous rate of increase (r1). Based on LC50, the order of toxicity was R-11 > X-77 = Sylgard 309 = Silwet L-77 > Kinetic > Bond > Plyac > WaterMaxx; all LC50 estimates were higher than the expected environmental concentration (EEC) of 0.79 mg/L, indicating that none of these adjuvants should cause high levels of mortality in wild D. pulex populations. Extinction, defined as negative population growth rate, occurred after exposure to 0.9 mg/L R-11, 13 mg/L X-77, 25 mg/L Kinetic, 28 mg/L Silwet, 18 mg/L Sylgard, 450 mg/L Bond, 610 mg/L Plyac, and 1,600 mg/L WaterMaxx. Concentrations that caused extinction were substantially below the acute LC50 for R-11, Kinetic, Plyac, X-77, and Bond. The no-observable-effects concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observable-effects concentration (LOEC) for the number of offspring per surviving female after exposure to R-11 were 0.5 and 0.75 mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for population size after exposure to R-11 were (1.25 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. Both of these values were lower than the EEC, indicating that R-11 does have the potential to cause damage to D. pulex populations after application at recommended field rates. The wide range of concentrations causing extinction makes it difficult to generalize about the potential impacts that agricultural adjuvants might have on aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, additional studies that examine effects on other nontarget organisms and determine residues in aquatic ecosystems may be warranted.

  11. How closely do acute lethal concentration estimates predict effects of toxicants on populations?

    PubMed

    Stark, John D

    2005-04-01

    Acute lethal dose/concentration estimates are the most widely used measure of toxicity and these data often are used in ecological risk assessment. However, the value of the lethal concentration (LC50) as a toxicological endpoint for use in ecological risk assessment recently has been criticized. A question that has been asked frequently is how accurate is the LC50 for prediction of longer-term effects of toxicants on populations of organisms? To answer this question, Daphnia pulex populations were exposed to nominal concentrations equal to the 48-h acute LC50 of 6 insecticides, Actara, Aphistar diazinon, pymetrozine, Neemix, and Spinosad; and 8 agricultural adjuvants, Bond, Kinetic, Plyac, R-11, Silwet, Sylgard 309, Water Maxx, and X-77; for 10 d. None of the D. pulex populations exposed to the acute LC50 of these insecticides were 50% lower than the control populations at the end of the study; exposure to diazinon resulted in populations that were higher than expected (91% of the control). Exposure to Actara and Aphistar resulted in populations that were < 1 and 29% of the control, respectively. Exposure to Fulfill, Neemix, and Spinosad resulted in extinction. Extinction occurred after exposure to all of the adjuvants, except Silwet L-77 where the population was 31% of the control. These results corroborate other studies that indicate that the LC50 is not a good predictor of effects on population growth. Although lethal concentration estimates have their place in toxicology, namely to compare intrinsic toxicity of chemicals among species or susceptibility of a species to different chemicals over short time periods, population growth and growth-rate studies are necessary to predict toxicant effects on populations.

  12. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Morphine on Some Blood Biochemical Parameters in an Inflammatory Condition in Gonadectomized Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chahkandi, Mohadeseh; Askari, Nayerreh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background Opiates affect blood factors as well as pain and inflammation in a gender-dependent manner. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of morphine on serum glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea in gonadectomized and inflammation conditions. Methods Animals were divided as follows: control group, carrageenan and chronic morphine recipients, acute morphine recipients, chronic morphine recipients, carrageenan recipients, acute morphine and carrageenan recipients, gonadectomized group, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan, gonadectomized recipients of morphine, gonadectomized recipients of chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan and chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of acute morphine and carrageenan. Findings Our results have shown that acute and chronic morphine elevates blood glucose level in the acute and chronic morphine group. Cholesterol level has shown to be increasing in the morphine and carrageenan recipient group compared with a group which merely received morphine. Triglyceride has shown to be decreasing in acute and chronic morphine recipient group compared with control group. A significant increase in serum urea was observed in acute and chronic morphine recipients compared with the carrageenan recipient group. Conclusion Morphine alters the serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, and urea in the normal and inflammatory conditions differently, hence, this finding should be considered in the patients who use morphine as a relief of pain, especially in an inflammatory condition. PMID:26885349

  13. Chronic vs. short-term acute O3 exposure effects on nocturnal transpiration in two Californian oaks.

    PubMed

    Grulke, N E; Paoletti, E; Heath, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    We tested the effect of daytime chronic moderate ozone (O3) exposure, short-term acute exposure, and both chronic and acute O3 exposure combined on nocturnal transpiration in California black oak and blue oak seedlings. Chronic O3 exposure (70 ppb for 8 h/day) was implemented in open-top chambers for either 1 month (California black oak) or 2 months (blue oak). Acute O3 exposure (approximately 1 h in duration during the day, 120-220 ppb) was implemented in a novel gas exchange system that supplied and maintained known O3 concentrations to a leaf cuvette. When exposed to chronic daytime O3 exposure, both oaks exhibited increased nocturnal transpiration (without concurrent O3 exposure) relative to unexposed control leaves (1.8x and 1.6x, black and blue oak, respectively). Short-term acute and chronic O3 exposure did not further increase nocturnal transpiration in either species. In blue oak previously unexposed to O3, short-term acute O3 exposure significantly enhanced nocturnal transpiration (2.0x) relative to leaves unexposed to O3. California black oak was unresponsive to (only) short-term acute O3 exposure. Daytime chronic and/or acute O3 exposures can increase foliar water loss at night in deciduous oak seedlings.

  14. Acute effect of mercury toxicity on some enzymes in liver of teleost Sarotherodon mossambicus

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, K.A.; Naidu, K.A.; Ramamurthi, R.

    1984-06-01

    The effects of 1.5 ppm of mercuric chloride (LC50/48 hr) on some enzymes and organic substances of liver tissue of Sarotherodon mossambicus were studied. Significant decreases in the activities of succinate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and acid phosphatase and in the levels of organic substances like total anthrone-positive substances, glycogen, and total ninhydrin-positive substances were observed. The results indicate impaired oxidative and transphosphorylative activities and utilization of carbohydrates during acute mercury toxicosis in fish.

  15. Differential effects of acute and chronic fructose administration on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to distinguish between the acute and chronic effects of fructose administration. In vivo, liver lipogenesis, as measured by {sup 3}H{sub 2}O incorporation, was greater in rats fed 60% fructose than in their glucose fed controls. Both fructose feeding, and fructose feeding plus intraperitoneal fructose injection increased the activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Liver PDH activity was increased by fructose feeding, and was increased even more by fructose feeding and injection of fructose, but this was not associated with any changes in hepatic ATP concentrations.

  16. Self-Reported Acute Health Effects and Exposure to Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    Krueger, W S; Hilborn, E D; Dufour, A P; Sams, E A; Wade, T J

    2016-06-01

    To understand the etiological burden of disease associated with acute health symptoms [e.g. gastrointestinal (GI), respiratory, dermatological], it is important to understand how common exposures influence these symptoms. Exposures to familiar and unfamiliar animals can result in a variety of health symptoms related to infection, irritation and allergy; however, few studies have examined this association in a large-scale cohort setting. Cross-sectional data collected from 50 507 participants in the United States enrolled from 2003 to 2009 were used to examine associations between animal contact and acute health symptoms during a 10-12 day period. Fixed-effects multivariable logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confident intervals (CI) for associations between animal exposures and outcomes of GI illness, respiratory illness and skin/eye symptoms. Two-thirds of the study population (63.2%) reported direct contact with animals, of which 7.7% had contact with at least one unfamiliar animal. Participants exposed to unfamiliar animals had significantly higher odds of self-reporting all three acute health symptoms, when compared to non-animal-exposed participants (GI: AOR = 1.4, CI = 1.2-1.7; respiratory: AOR = 1.5, CI = 1.2-1.8; and skin/eye: AOR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.3), as well as when compared to participants who only had contact with familiar animals. Specific contact with dogs, cats or pet birds was also significantly associated with at least one acute health symptom; AORs ranged from 1.1 to 1.5, when compared to participants not exposed to each animal. These results indicate that contact with animals, especially unfamiliar animals, was significantly associated with GI, respiratory and skin/eye symptoms. Such associations could be attributable to zoonotic infections and allergic reactions. Etiological models for acute health symptoms should consider contact with companion animals, particularly exposure to unfamiliar animals

  17. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  18. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  19. Effects of acute administration of brotizolam in subjects with disturbed sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, T.; Zorick, F.; Koshorek, G. L.; Wittig, R.; Roth, T.

    1983-01-01

    1 Effects of ingestion of brotizolam (0.25 and 0.50 mg) over 1-3 days on polysomnographic measures of sleep were assessed in patients complaining of insomnia. 2 Brotizolam reduced latency to sleep, number of awakenings and wake during sleep, and increased total sleep time. It also increased stage 2 sleep and decreased slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. 3 Increasing the dose from 0.25 to 0.50 mg increased hypnotic efficacy, and there was a more consistent and reliable effect. 4 Discontinuation of brotizolam had minimal effects on sleep compared with placebo over the 3 nights after acute administration. 5 No side-effects or disruption of daytime function was found using questionnaires and objective tests of performance. PMID:6661383

  20. Effects of imidazoline I2 receptor ligands on acute nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Cristal; Zhang, Yanan; Del Bello, Fabio; Li, Jun-Xu

    2012-01-25

    This study examined the antinociceptive effects of seven imidazoline I2 receptor ligands in a rat warm water tail withdrawal procedure (46 and 50 °C). Agmatine, 2-BFI, phenyzoline, and diphenyzoline produced a significant antinociceptive activity at 46 °C. BU224, S22687, and idazoxan had no effect at 46 °C up to doses that altered the locomotor activity. None of the drugs showed antinociceptive activity at 50 °C. It is suggested that I2 receptor agonists have antinociceptive activity for acute phasic pain under weak noxious stimulus, and the effects are efficacy-dependent. These data explain the findings that I2 receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of opioids and support developing higher-efficacy I2 receptor agonists for the treatment of pain.

  1. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  2. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.