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Sample records for acute stimulatory effect

  1. Asperlicin antagonizes stimulatory effects of cholecystokinin on isolated islets

    SciTech Connect

    Zawalich, W.S.; Diaz, V.A.

    1987-03-01

    Asperlicin, a product derived from the fungus Aspergillus alliaceus, antagonized the multiple stimulatory effects of cholecystokinin (CCK-8S) on isolated islets. At a level of 10 uM, asperlicin completely inhibited insulin release in response to 25 nM CCK-8S. Increasing the level of CCK-8S to 100 nM partially restored a secretory response, while an even greater insulin stimulatory effect was noted with 500 nM CCK-8S. The inhibitory effect of asperlicin on CCK-8S-induced release was reversible. Asperlicin exposure had no effect on glucose or glyceraldehyde-induced secretion. Asperlicin reduced, in parallel with secretion, the increase in /sup 3/H efflux from (/sup 3/H) inositol prelabeled islets usually noted with CCK-8S addition. Asperlicin did not influence the small glucose-stimulated increase in /sup 3/H efflux. The results support the notion that asperlicin is a specific and potent antagonist of the multiple stimulatory effects of CCK-8S on islet tissue.

  2. Effects of Punishment Procedures on the Self-Stimulatory Behavior of an Autistic Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three punishment procedures--contingent applications of water mist, lemon juice, and vinegar--were evaluated as aversive treatment methods for a self-stimulatory behavior exhibited by a severely retarded 11-year-old male. The water mist procedure was as effective as lemon juice or vinegar, presented less physical threat to the client, and was…

  3. Brief Report: The Effects of Exercise on the Self-Stimulatory Behaviors and Positive Responding of Adolescents with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal-Malek, Andrea; Mitchell, Stella

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the self-stimulatory behaviors and academic performance of five adolescent males with autism. Results found there was a significant decrease in self-stimulatory behavior following the physical exercise. Academic performance increased after the aerobic exercise as compared to classroom…

  4. Species differences in the gut stimulatory effects of radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan; Houghton, Peter J

    2005-11-01

    This study describes the gastrointestinal (GI) prokinetic effects of the aqueous extract of radish seeds (Rs.Cr). Rs.Cr, which tested positive for terpenes, flavonoids, phenols, alkaloids and saponins, showed a spasmogenic effect in isolated rabbit jejunum and ileum, rat stomach fundus and ileum, and guinea-pig ileum and jejunum. Rs.Cr was around 10 times more potent in the guinea-pig tissues and this effect was resistant to atropine, pyrilamine or SB203186 while the spasmogenic effect in the rat and rabbit tissues was atropine sensitive. The extract exhibited atropine-sensitive GI prokinetic and laxative effects in vivo in mice. In the atropinized rabbit jejunum, Rs.Cr produced a spasmolytic effect independent of Ca(++) or K(+) channels, adrenergic or opioid receptor involvement. Activity-directed fractionation of Rs.Cr yielded four fractions, all showing effects similar to that of the parent extract. Rs.Cr and its fractions were found to be non-lethal up to 10 g kg(-1) in mice for 24 h, except for the petroleum fraction, which showed 50% mortality at high doses. Some known radish compounds (spermine, spermidine, putrescine and sinigrin) were also tested and found to be devoid of any activity. The study shows species-specific spasmogenic effects of radish in rabbit, rat and mouse via muscarinic receptors but through an uncharacterized pathway in guinea-pig tissues. Additionally, a dormant relaxant effect was also seen, while the three polyamines and one glucosinolate from radish were found to be inactive, indicating that the compound(s) responsible for the activities reported remains to be isolated. PMID:16259783

  5. Stimulatory Effect of β-glucans on Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucans are naturally occurring polysaccharides that are produced by bacteria, yeast, fungi, and many plants. Although their pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulatory, anti-infective and anti-cancer effects, have been well studied, it is still unclear how β-glucans exert their activities. However, recent studies on the β-glucan receptors shed some light on their mechanism of action. Since β-glucans have large molecular weights, they must bind surface receptors to activate immune cells. In this review, we summarize the immunopharmacological activities and the potential receptors of β-glucans in immune cells. PMID:22039366

  6. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  7. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types.

    PubMed

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a 'danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  8. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  9. Effect of Inducible Co-Stimulatory Molecule siRNA in Cerebral Infarction Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingquan; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yina; Tan, Shengyu; Xu, Yan; Li, Dan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background T cell-induced inflammatory response and related cytokine secretion at the injury site may participate in the pathogenesis of cerebral infarction. Recent studies established inducible co-stimulatory molecule (ICOS) as a novel T cell-related factor for its activation and functions. We thus investigate the role of ICOS in cerebral infarction. Material/Methods The siRNA of ICOS was first used to suppress the gene expression in cultured lymphocytes. An in vivo study was then performed by intravenous application of ICOS siRNA in cerebral infarction rats. Survival rates, neurological scores, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-17 levels were observed. Results The expression of ICOS in cultured lymphocytes was significantly suppressed by siRNA. In the in vivo study, the application of siRNA effectively lowered mortality rates of rats, in addition to the improvement of neurological behaviors and amelioration of cerebral tissue damage. Serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-17 were all significantly suppressed after siRNA injection. Conclusions ICOS siRNA can protect brain tissues from ischemia injuries after cerebral infarction, improve limb movement and coordination, lower the mortality rate of rats, and inhibit T cell-induced cytokines. These results collectively suggest the potential treatment efficacy of ICOS siRNA against cerebral infarction. PMID:26436531

  10. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  11. Stimulatory effects of combined endocrine disruptors on MA-10 Leydig cell steroid production and lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven; Boisvert, Annie; Naghi, Andrada; Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Greimel, Peter; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Culty, Martine

    2016-04-29

    Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that in-utero exposure to a mixture of the phytoestrogen Genistein (GEN), and plasticizer DEHP, induces short- and long-term alterations in testicular gene and protein expression different from individual exposures. These studies identified fetal and adult Leydig cells as sensitive targets for low dose endocrine disruptor (ED) mixtures. To further investigate the direct effects and mechanisms of toxicity of GEN and DEHP, MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells were exposed in-vitro to varying concentrations of GEN and MEHP, the principal bioactive metabolite of DEHP. Combined 10μM GEN+10μM MEHP had a stimulatory effect on basal progesterone production. Consistent with increased androgenicity, the mRNA of steroidogenic and cholesterol mediators Star, Cyp11a, Srb1 and Hsl, as well as upstream orphan nuclear receptors Nr2f2 and Sf1 were all significantly increased uniquely in the mixture treatment group. Insl3, a sensitive marker of Leydig endocrine disruption and cell function, was significantly decreased by combined GEN+MEHP. Lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer chromatography demonstrated the ability of combined 10μM combined GEN+MEHP, but not individual exposures, to increase levels of several neutral lipids and phospholipid classes, indicating a generalized deregulation of lipid homeostasis. Further investigation by qPCR analysis revealed a concomitant increase in cholesterol (Hmgcoa) and phospholipid (Srebp1c, Fasn) mediator mRNAs, suggesting the possible involvement of upstream LXRα agonism. These results suggest a deregulation of MA-10 Leydig function in response to a combination of GEN+MEHP. We propose a working model for GEN+MEHP doses relevant to human exposure involving LXR agonism and activation of other transcription factors. Taken more broadly, this research highlights the importance of assessing the impact of ED mixtures in multiple toxicological models across a range of environmentally relevant doses

  12. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia. PMID:25907369

  13. The stimulatory effect of the TLR4-mediated adjuvant glucopyranosyl lipid A is well preserved in old age.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Birgit; Joos, Clemens; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2016-02-01

    Many subunit vaccines require adjuvants to improve their limited immunogenicity. Various adjuvant candidates targeting toll-like receptors (TLRs) are currently under development including the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA). GLA has been investigated in the context of influenza vaccine, which is of particular importance for the elderly population. This study investigates the effect of GLA on antigen-presenting cells from young (median age 29 years, range 26-33 years) and older (median age 72 years, range 61-78 years) adults. Treatment with GLA efficiently increases the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as well as on ex vivo myeloid DC. Expression of co-stimulatory molecules is less pronounced on ex vivo monocytes. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12) as well as of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 is induced in monocyte-derived DC. In PBMC cultures myeloid DC and to an even greater extent monocytes produce TNF-α and IL-6 after stimulation with GLA. Production of IL-12 can also be observed in these cultures. There are no age-related differences in the capacity of GLA to induce expression of co-stimulatory molecules or production of cytokines by human antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, TLR4 agonists like GLA are particularly promising candidates as adjuvants of vaccines designed for elderly individuals. PMID:25957253

  14. Peripheral administration of a μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO suppresses the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Kolpakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possibility of modulation of the stimulatory and anxiolytic effects of caffeine by activation of μ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. Caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg (but not in a dose of 100 mg/kg) had a strong anxiolytic and psychostimulant effect. This effect was manifested in a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze, elevation of locomotor activity, and stimulation of metabolism. Administration of DAMGO to animals receiving caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg abolished the anxiolytic and psychostimulant effects of caffeine. By contrast, administration of DAMGO to rats receiving caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg had the anxiolytic effect. Activation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors is followed by the inhibition of the central μ-opioid system. We observed a decrease in the number of μ-opioid receptors in the midbrain and cerebral cortex and inhibition of β-endorphin release from nerve ending of the cingulate cortex in rats. These changes are probably followed by activation of the adenosine system in the brain. Caffeine dose should be increased to achieve the effect. Therefore, the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg are abolished under these conditions. By contrast, the anxiolytic effect of caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg (not observed under normal conditions) develops after this treatment. PMID:25573353

  15. GPER is involved in the stimulatory effects of aldosterone in breast cancer cells and breast tumor-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rigiracciolo, Damiano Cosimo; Scarpelli, Andrea; Lappano, Rosamaria; Pisano, Assunta; Santolla, Maria Francesca; Avino, Silvia; De Marco, Paola; Bussolati, Benedetta; Maggiolini, Marcello; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone induces relevant effects binding to the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), which acts as a ligand-gated transcription factor. Alternate mechanisms can mediate the action of aldosterone such as the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), MAPK/ERK, transcription factors and ion channels. The G-protein estrogen receptor (GPER) has been involved in the stimulatory effects of estrogenic signalling in breast cancer. GPER has been also shown to contribute to certain responses to aldosterone, however the role played by GPER and the molecular mechanisms implicated remain to be fully understood. Here, we evaluated the involvement of GPER in the stimulatory action exerted by aldosterone in breast cancer cells and breast tumor derived endothelial cells (B-TEC). Competition assays, gene expression and silencing studies, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence experiments, cell proliferation and migration were performed in order to provide novel insights into the role of GPER in the aldosterone-activated signalling. Our results demonstrate that aldosterone triggers the EGFR/ERK transduction pathway in a MR- and GPER-dependent manner. Aldosterone does not bind to GPER, it however induces the direct interaction between MR and GPER as well as between GPER and EGFR. Next, we ascertain that the up-regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger-1 (NHE-1) induced by aldosterone involves MR and GPER. Biologically, both MR and GPER contribute to the proliferation and migration of breast and endothelial cancer cells mediated by NHE-1 upon aldosterone exposure. Our data further extend the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms through which GPER may contribute to the stimulatory action elicited by aldosterone in breast cancer. PMID:26646587

  16. GPER is involved in the stimulatory effects of aldosterone in breast cancer cells and breast tumor-derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rigiracciolo, Damiano Cosimo; Scarpelli, Andrea; Lappano, Rosamaria; Pisano, Assunta; Santolla, Maria Francesca; Avino, Silvia; De Marco, Paola; Bussolati, Benedetta; Maggiolini, Marcello; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone induces relevant effects binding to the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), which acts as a ligand-gated transcription factor. Alternate mechanisms can mediate the action of aldosterone such as the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), MAPK/ERK, transcription factors and ion channels. The G-protein estrogen receptor (GPER) has been involved in the stimulatory effects of estrogenic signalling in breast cancer. GPER has been also shown to contribute to certain responses to aldosterone, however the role played by GPER and the molecular mechanisms implicated remain to be fully understood. Here, we evaluated the involvement of GPER in the stimulatory action exerted by aldosterone in breast cancer cells and breast tumor derived endothelial cells (B-TEC). Competition assays, gene expression and silencing studies, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence experiments, cell proliferation and migration were performed in order to provide novel insights into the role of GPER in the aldosterone-activated signalling. Our results demonstrate that aldosterone triggers the EGFR/ERK transduction pathway in a MR- and GPER-dependent manner. Aldosterone does not bind to GPER, it however induces the direct interaction between MR and GPER as well as between GPER and EGFR. Next, we ascertain that the up-regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger-1 (NHE-1) induced by aldosterone involves MR and GPER. Biologically, both MR and GPER contribute to the proliferation and migration of breast and endothelial cancer cells mediated by NHE-1 upon aldosterone exposure. Our data further extend the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms through which GPER may contribute to the stimulatory action elicited by aldosterone in breast cancer. PMID:26646587

  17. Direct Stimulatory Effects of Oxytocin in Female Rat Gonadotrophs and Somatotrophs In Vitro: Comparison With Lactotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Patrick A.; Arias-Cristancho, José A.; Cristancho-Gordo, Ruth; Helena, Cleyde V.; Bertram, Richard; Tabak, Joël

    2015-01-01

    The peptide oxytocin (OT) is secreted by hypothalamic neurons and exerts numerous actions related to reproduction. OT stimulation of prolactin secretion in female rats is important during the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and lactation. Here we report that OT also stimulates transients of intracellular Ca2+ concentration in somatotrophs and gonadotrophs as well as the release of GH and LH in a dose-dependent manner with EC50 values that closely correspond to the ligand affinity of the OT receptor (OTR). Remarkably, the hormone-releasing effect of OT in these two cell types is 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive than that in lactotrophs. The specific OTR agonist [Thr4,Gly7]-oxytocin acutely stimulated the release of LH, GH, and prolactin from female rat pituitary cells in primary culture and increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in gonadotrophs, somatotrophs, and lactotrophs. In these three cell types, the effects on hormone release and intracellular Ca2+ of both OT and [Thr4,Gly7]oxytocin were abolished by the specific OT receptor antagonist desGly-NH2-d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT but not by the highly selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist, d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Dab5]AVP. Furthermore, 10 nM arginine vasopressin stimulated LH and GH release comparably with a dose of OT that was at least 10 times lower. Finally, the presence of the OTR-like immunoreactivity could be observed in all three cell types. Taken together, these results show that OT directly stimulates gonadotrophs, somatotrophs, and lactotrophs through OT receptors and suggest that OT signaling may serve to coordinate the release of different pituitary hormones during specific physiological conditions. PMID:25406939

  18. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of green tea and caffeine on locomotor activity in SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Michna, Laura; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Wagner, George C; Conney, Allan H

    2003-08-01

    Administration of green tea or caffeine was shown previously to inhibit ultraviolet B light-induced carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice, and this effect was associated with a reduction in dermal fat. In the present study, oral administration of 0.6% green tea (6 mg tea solids/ml) or 0.04% caffeine (0.4 mg/ml; equivalent to the amount of caffeine in 0.6% green tea) as the sole source of drinking fluid to SKH-1 mice for 15 weeks increased total 24 hr locomotor activity by 47 and 24%, respectively (p<0.0001). Oral administration of 0.6% decaffeinated green tea (6 mg tea solids/ml) for 15 weeks increased locomotor activity by 9% (p<0.05). The small increase in locomotor activity observed in mice treated with decaffeinated green tea may have resulted from the small amounts of caffeine still remaining in decaffeinated green tea solutions (0.047 mg/ml). The stimulatory effects of orally administered green tea and caffeine on locomotor activity were paralleled by a 38 and 23% increase, respectively, in the dermal muscle layer thickness. In addition, treatment of the mice with 0.6% green tea or 0.04% caffeine for 15 weeks decreased the weight of the parametrial fat pad by 29 and 43%, respectively, and the thickness of the dermal fat layer was decreased by 51 and 47%, respectively. These results indicate that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice increases locomotor activity and muscle mass and decreases fat stores. The stimulatory effect of green tea and caffeine administration on locomotor activity described here may contribute to the effects of green tea and caffeine to decrease fat stores and to inhibit carcinogenesis induced by UVB in SKH-1 mice. PMID:12850499

  19. Stimulatory effect of the secretogranin-ll derived peptide secretoneurin on food intake and locomotion in female goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Mikwar, M; Navarro-Martin, L; Xing, L; Volkoff, H; Hu, W; Trudeau, V L

    2016-04-01

    Secretoneurin (SN) is a conserved peptide derived by proteolytic processing from the middle domain of the ∼600 amino acid precursor secretogranin-II (SgII). Secretoneurin is widely distributed in secretory granules of endocrine cells and neurons and has important roles in reproduction as it stimulates luteinizing hormone release from the pituitary. A potential new role of SN in goldfish feeding is the subject of this study. Firstly, we established that acute (26 h; p<0.0001) and short-term (72 h; p=0.016) fasting increased SgIIa precursor mRNA levels 1.25-fold in the telencephalon, implicating SN in the control of feeding. Secondly, we determined that intracerebroventricular injections of the type A SN (SNa; 0.2 and 1 ng/g BW) increased food intake and locomotor behavior by 60 min. Fish injected with the lower and higher doses of SNa (0.2 and 1 ng/g) respectively exhibited significant 1.77- and 2.58-fold higher food intake (p<0.0001) than the saline-injected control fish. Locomotor behavior was increased by 1.35- and 2.26-fold for 0.2 ng/g SNa (p=0.0001) and 1 ng/g SNa (p<0.0001), respectively. Injection of 1 ng/g SNa increased mRNA levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y 1.36-fold (p=0.038) and decreased hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript by 33% (p=0.01) at 2h and 5h post-injection, respectively. These data suggest interactions of SNa with stimulatory and inhibitory pathways of food intake control in fish. PMID:26860475

  20. Stimulatory effect of cytokinins and interaction with IAA on the release of lateral buds of pea plants from apical dominance.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjian; Bangerth, Fritz

    2003-09-01

    Lateral buds of pea plants can be released from apical dominance and even be transformed into dominant shoots when repeatedly treated with synthetic exogenous cytokinins (CKs). The mechanism of the effect of CKs, however, is not clear. The results in this work showed that the stimulatory effects of CKs on the growth of lateral buds and the increase in their fresh weights in pea plants depended on the structure and concentration of the CKs used. The effect of N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea (CPPU) was stronger than that of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA). Indoleacetic acid (IAA) concentration in shoot, IAA export out of the treated apex and basipetal transport in stems were markedly increased after the application of CPPU or 6-BA to the apex or the second node of pea plant. This increase was positively correlated with the increased concentration of the applied CKs. These results suggest that the increased IAA synthesis and export induced by CKs application might be responsible for the growth of lateral shoots in intact pea plants. PMID:14593807

  1. Low concentrations of dibromoacetic acid and N-nitrosodimethylamine induce several stimulatory effects in the invertebrate model Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Baberschke, Nora; Steinberg, Christian E W; Saul, Nadine

    2015-04-01

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) have natural and anthropogenic sources and are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. They are classified as toxic and carcinogenetic and various studies have addressed their effects on vertebrates. Furthermore, there is no information about the whole-organism effects at low concentrations or about their impact on invertebrates. Therefore, these compounds were studied with the model invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) at relatively low concentrations. Biological tests (life span, reproduction, body size, thermal stress resistance) as well as biochemical (pro- and antioxidative capacity and lipid peroxidation) and biomolecular assays (transcription of stress genes) were performed. None of the applied concentrations showed a toxic potential. Instead, they extended life span and increased the body length. Both xenobiotics did not cause oxidative stress or DNA damages, or acted as endocrine disruptors. The stimulatory effects on C. elegans were most likely not a result of an induced protective stress response. Instead, an 'energy saving mode', indicated by the reduced transcription of many stress response genes, could have provided additional resources for longevity and growth. Although both substances are potentially toxic at higher doses, the present study underlines the importance of testing lower concentrations and their impact on invertebrates. PMID:25556763

  2. Paternal versus maternal transmission of a stimulatory G-protein α subunit knockout produces opposite effects on energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuhua; Gavrilova, Oksana; Chen, Hui; Lee, Randy; Liu, Jie; Pacak, Karel; Parlow, A.F.; Quon, Michael J.; Reitman, Marc L.; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2000-01-01

    Heterozygous disruption of Gnas, the gene encoding the stimulatory G-protein α subunit (Gsα), leads to distinct phenotypes depending on whether the maternal (m–/+) or paternal (+/p–) allele is disrupted. Gsα is imprinted, with the maternal allele preferentially expressed in adipose tissue. Hence, expression is decreased in m–/+ mice but normal in +/p– mice. M–/+ mice become obese, with increased lipid per cell in white and brown adipose tissue, whereas +/p– mice are thin, with decreased lipid in adipose tissue. These effects are not due to abnormalities in thyroid hormone status, food intake, or leptin secretion. +/p– mice are hypermetabolic at both ambient temperature (21° C) and thermoneutrality (30° C). In contrast, m–/+ mice are hypometabolic at ambient temperature and eumetabolic at thermoneutrality M–/+ and wild-type mice have similar dose-response curves for metabolic response to a β3-adrenergic agonist, CL316243, indicating normal sensitivity of adipose tissue to sympathetic stimulation. Measurement of urinary catecholamines suggests that +/p– and m–/+ mice have increased and decreased activation of the sympathetic nervous system, respectively. This is to our knowledge the first animal model in which a single genetic defect leads to opposite effects on energy metabolism depending on parental inheritance. This probably results from deficiency of maternal- and paternal-specific Gnas gene products, respectively. PMID:10712433

  3. Stimulatory effect of cyanidin 3-glycosides on the regeneration of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru; Hirayama, Masao

    2003-06-01

    Anthocyanins have been suggested to improve visual functions. This study examined the effect of four anthocyanins in black currant fruits on the regeneration of rhodopsin using frog rod outer segment (ROS) membranes. Cyanidin 3-glycosides, glucoside and rutinoside, stimulated the regeneration, but the corresponding delphinidins showed no significant effect. The formation of a regeneration intermediate was suggested to be accelerated by cyanidin 3-rutinoside. Their effects on the cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the ROS membranes were also investigated but found to be negligible. It was concluded that the major effect of anthocyanins in rod photoreceptors is on the regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:12769524

  4. Evaluation of co-stimulatory effects of Tamarindus indica L. on MNU-induced colonic cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shivshankar, Pooja; Shyamala Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2004-08-01

    Colonic cell proliferation is the prerequisite for the genesis of cancer. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicate dietary factors to be one of the commonest predisposing factors in the development of several types of cancers including large intestine. Here we have investigated the role of the fruit pulp of Tamarindus indica L. (TI), a tropical plant-derived food material, on the proliferating colonic mucosa using Swiss albino mice. Crypt cell proliferation rate (CCPR), on histological basis and [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay were chosen to evaluate the modulating potential of TI per se and in response to a subacute dose of N-nitroso N'-methyl urea (MNU). Descending colonic segment showed greater rate of cell proliferation than the ascending colon and cecum tissues isolated from the group 2 (TI-per se) when compared with group 1 (negative controls). It also revealed a positive correlation with the incorporation studies. Significant increase in the CCPR and radiolabeled precursor incorporation (p <0.001) was observed in MNU-induced+TI fed group of animals (group 4) in all the three segments when compared with control diet fed normal (group 1) as well as MNU-induced (group 3) animals. This study therefore indicates a co-stimulatory effect of TI on MNU-induced colonic cell kinetics. PMID:15207373

  5. Blockade of adenosine receptors unmasks a stimulatory effect of ATP on cardiac contractility.

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, L.; Amerini, S.; Filippi, S.; Ledda, F.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP and beta,gamma-methylene ATP on the contractile tension of guinea-pig isolated left atria were evaluated. 2. ATP (1-100 microM) produced a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect; this response was converted to a positive inotropic effect in the presence of the antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.1 microM), and in the presence of 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM), an antagonist of A1 and A2 receptors. 3. The positive inotropic effect of ATP was antagonized by the P2 receptor antagonist, suramin (500 microM). Reactive blue 2 (30-500 microM), a putative P2y receptor antagonist, concentration-dependently reduced and finally abolished the effect of ATP. 4. In the presence of 8-phenyltheophylline, the stable analogues of ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP and beta,gamma-methylene ATP (1-30 microM), produced a concentration-dependent increase in atrial contractility of a lesser degree than that induced by ATP. 5. The results suggest that when inhibitory adenosine receptors are blocked, ATP produces a positive inotropic effect, probably mediated by P2y receptor stimulation. PMID:8401938

  6. Metabolomic assessment reveals a stimulatory effect of calcium treatment on glucosinolates contents in broccoli microgreen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preharvest calcium application has been shown to increase broccoli microgreen yield and extend shelf life. Here we investigated the effect of calcium application on its metabolome using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) tandem with mass spectrometry (HRMS). The data collected were...

  7. Stimulatory effect of procaine on the growth of several microalgae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ezure, T; Yamaguchi, T; Domen, H; Ishida, M; Schmidt, W

    2000-02-01

    Procaine has been used to stimulate plant growth and it has been noted that it also promotes growth of microorganisms. The effect of procaine hydrochloride concentration on the growth rates of several species of microalgae and cyanobacteria was studied under both photoautotropic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Procaine hydrochloride was added to cultures at concentrations over the range 0.01-1000 mg L(-1). A stimulating effect of procaine hydrochloride on photoautotrophic growth was observed for the cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica and Anabaena variabilis, and for the salt-tolerant green algae Dunaliella primolecta and Dunaliella parva. During active growth in batch culture an increase in growth rate (compared with control culture without procaine hydrochloride) of about 25% was observed at 0.1 mgL(-1) of procaine hydrochloride for A. cylindrica. However, procaine hydrochloride was toxic at concentrations of > 10 mgL(-1). Simultaneous administration of hydrolysis products of procaine, p-aminobenzoic acid and diethyl aminoethanol, in lieu of procaine hydrochloride, was as effective as procaine in stimulating growth of A. cylindrica. Heterotrophic growth of Chlorella ellipsoidea and Prototheca zopfii was not stimulated by procaine hydrochloride over the concentration range studied (0.1-10 mg L(-1)). The combined effects of procaine hydrochloride concentration and four other environmental factors (temperature, light intensity, CO2 concentration in the flushing gas and NaCl concentration) on growth rate of D. primolecta was modelled using both a neural network approach and a response surface method. These results indicate that procaine hydrochloride exerts different effects on the growth of microalgal and cyanobacterial cells as functions of dosage, species and culture conditions. PMID:10714957

  8. In vivo stimulatory effect of erythropoietin on endothelial nitric oxide synthase in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Smith, Leslie A; Nath, Karl A; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-08-01

    The discovery of tissue protective effects of erythropoietin has stimulated significant interest in erythropoietin (Epo) as a novel therapeutic approach to vascular protection. The present study was designed to determine the cerebral vascular effects of recombinant Epo in vivo. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (10(9) plaque-forming units/animal) encoding genes for human erythropoietin (AdEpo) and beta-galactosidase (AdLacZ) were injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits. After 48 h, basilar arteries were harvested for analysis of vasomotor function, Western blotting, and measurement of cGMP levels. Gene transfer of AdEpo increased the expressions of recombinant Epo and its receptor in the basilar arteries. Arteries exposed to recombinant Epo demonstrated attenuation of contractile responses to histamine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) (P < 0.05, n = 5). Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05, n = 5), whereas endothelium-independent relaxations to a nitric oxide (NO) donor 2-(N,N-diethylamino)diazenolate-2-oxide sodium salt remained unchanged in AdEpo-transduced basilar arteries. Transduction with AdEpo increased the protein expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated the S1177 form of the enzyme. Basal levels of cGMP were significantly elevated in arteries transduced with AdEpo consistent with increased NO production. Our studies suggest that in cerebral circulation, Epo enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. This effect could play an important role in the vascular protective effect of Epo. PMID:16565320

  9. Stimulatory and possible antioxidant effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) on cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Paslaru, L; Nastase, A; Stefan, L; Florea, R; Sorop, A; Ionescu, E; Popescu, I; Comorasan, S

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the electromagnetic field and the biological systems were extensively investigated, with remarkable results and advanced technologies. Nevertheless, the visible domain of the spectrum has been rather neglected, since the classic physics did not allow electronic transitions induced by visible light. Recently, the interaction of light with the matter has generated a new scientific domain known in Physics as optical manipulation, with the new concepts of optical matter and optical force. This article presents the results of our work concerning in vitro effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) irradiation on cell cultures: stimulation of cell proliferation and migration and a possible antioxidant action. PMID:25713633

  10. Stimulatory effects of starfish sapogenins (Asterias amurensis and Lethasterias nanimensis chelifera) on molluscan heart (Spisula sachalinensis).

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, B A; Kapustina, I I; Kicha, A A; Aminin, D L; Gorshkova, I A

    1998-08-01

    Sapogenins from the starfish Asterias amurensis and Lethasterias nanimensis chelifera, 5 alpha-pregn-9(11)-ene-3 beta,6 alpha-diol-20-one, 5 alpha-cholest-9(11)-ene-3 beta,6 alpha-diol-23-one, 5 alpha-cholesta-9(11),24(25)-diene-3 beta,6 alpha-diol-23-one, (20E)-5 alpha-cholesta-9(11),20(22)-diene-3 beta,6 alpha-diol-23-one and 24 zeta-methyl-5 alpha-cholesta-9(11),20(22)-diene-3 beta,6 alpha-diol-23-one, stimulated the contractile force of the heart of the mollusk Spisula sachalinensis at concentration of 5 x 10(-5) M. Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na+,K(+)-ATPase, at concentration of 5 x 10(-5) M had no effect on this physiological model. Starfish sapogenins of the cholestane series moderately inhibited rat brain cortex Na+,K(+)-ATPase and decreased Ca2+ influx into Ehrlich carcinoma cells. In contrast, pregnane asterogenin asterone did not inhibit Na+,K(+)-ATPase and increased the influx of Ca2+ into cells. These effects were not the result of cell membrane damage, because none of the compounds tested have hemolytic activity. PMID:9827037

  11. The Stimulatory Effect of Strontium Ions on Phytoestrogens Content in Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Tomasz; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szymczak, Grażyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Kocjan, Ryszard; Świeboda, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The amount of secondary metabolites in plants can be enhanced or reduced by various external factors. In this study, the effect of strontium ions on the production of phytoestrogens in soybeans was investigated. The plants were treated with Hoagland's solution, modified with Sr(2+) with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mM, and were grown for 14 days in hydroponic cultivation. After harvest, soybean plants were separated into roots and shoots, dried, and pulverized. The plant material was extracted with methanol and hydrolyzed. Phytoestrogens were quantified by HPLC. The significant increase in the concentration of the compounds of interest was observed for all tested concentrations of strontium ions when compared to control. Sr(2+) at a concentration of 2 mM was the strongest elicitor, and the amount of phytoestrogens in plant increased ca. 2.70, 1.92, 3.77 and 2.88-fold, for daidzein, coumestrol, genistein and formononetin, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 liver cell models after treatment with extracts from 2 mM Sr(2+)-stressed soybean plants when compared to extracts from non-stressed plants. Our results indicate that the addition of strontium ions to the culture media may be used to functionalize soybean plants with enhanced phytoestrogen content. PMID:26784151

  12. A stimulatory effect of Cassia occidentalis on melanoblast differentiation and migration.

    PubMed

    Babitha, Sumathy; Shin, Jeong-Hyun; Nguyen, Dung H; Park, Sang-Joo; Reyes, Gaudelia A; Caburian, Adeltrudes; Kim, Eun Ki

    2011-04-01

    In vitiligo, the active melanocytes in the epidermis are totally missing, whereas melanoblast cells in the outer root sheath of hair follicles are not affected. In an attempt to find potent repigmenting agents for vitiligo therapy, pod extracts of Cassia occidentalis was found to be effective in inducing differentiation and migration of mouse melanoblast cell line. Methanolic extract redissolved in DMSO at 12.5 μg/ml was found to cause 3.5- to 3.8-fold melanin induction in melb-a melanoblast cells after 4 days in treatment medium. In addition it induced the tyrosinase activity and altered melb-a cell morphology. Transwell migration assay showed the potential of this herbal candidate to induce direct migration of treated cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report investigating the effect of Cassia occidentalis on the differentiation and migration of melanoblast cells. The findings of present study are significant in designing preclinical and clinical studies on the efficacy of C. occidentalis as a stimulant for skin repigmentation in vitiligo. PMID:21328088

  13. S-Layer Protein Mediates the Stimulatory Effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Stuknyte, Milda; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Scabiosi, Christian; Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Junttila, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Turpeinen, Hannu; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Pesu, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The ability to positively affect host health through the modulation of the immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain. However, the identities of the bacterial cell components involved in cross talk with immune cells remain elusive. In this study, we characterized the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 and its surface-layer protein (SlpA) using in vitro and ex vivo analyses. We found that MIMLh5 and SlpA exert anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the activation of NF-κB on the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. On the contrary, MIMLh5 and SlpA act as stimulators of the innate immune system by triggering the expression of proinflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2 in the human macrophage cell line U937 via recognition through Toll-like receptor 2. In the same experiments, SlpA protein did not affect the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. A similar response was observed following stimulation of macrophages isolated from mouse bone marrow or the peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in mediating bacterial immune-stimulating activity, which could help to induce the host's defenses against and responses toward infections. This study supports the concept that the viability of bacterial cells is not always essential to exert immunomodulatory effects, thus permitting the development of safer therapies for the treatment of specific diseases according to a paraprobiotic intervention. PMID:23220964

  14. S-layer protein mediates the stimulatory effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Taverniti, Valentina; Stuknyte, Milda; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Scabiosi, Christian; Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Junttila, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Turpeinen, Hannu; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Pesu, Marko; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2013-02-01

    The ability to positively affect host health through the modulation of the immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain. However, the identities of the bacterial cell components involved in cross talk with immune cells remain elusive. In this study, we characterized the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 and its surface-layer protein (SlpA) using in vitro and ex vivo analyses. We found that MIMLh5 and SlpA exert anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the activation of NF-κB on the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. On the contrary, MIMLh5 and SlpA act as stimulators of the innate immune system by triggering the expression of proinflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2 in the human macrophage cell line U937 via recognition through Toll-like receptor 2. In the same experiments, SlpA protein did not affect the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. A similar response was observed following stimulation of macrophages isolated from mouse bone marrow or the peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in mediating bacterial immune-stimulating activity, which could help to induce the host's defenses against and responses toward infections. This study supports the concept that the viability of bacterial cells is not always essential to exert immunomodulatory effects, thus permitting the development of safer therapies for the treatment of specific diseases according to a paraprobiotic intervention. PMID:23220964

  15. Effects of Aluminum Exposure on the Bone Stimulatory Growth Factors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Luo, Weiwei; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Xue; Liu, Chao; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) is considered to be a potentially toxic metal and inhibits bone formation. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) play an important role in regulating the bone formation. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of Al on the TGF-β1 and BMP-2 in rats. In this study, Wistar rats were randomly divided into Al-treated group and control group. The Al-treated rats were provided with drinking water containing 100 mg/L AlCl3, and the control rats were given distilled water for 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. Ten rats were sacrificed in each group every 30 days. The Al-treated rats showed lower body weight and higher serum and bone levels of Al compared with the control rats. The expression levels of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 were also significantly decreased in the Al-treated rats. Serum levels of bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein (BGP), carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), and bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) were markedly lower in the Al-treated groups than in the control group. These results indicate that Al inhibits the expression of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 in bone, which inhibits the activity of osteoblasts and reduces the synthesis of BGP, B-ALP, and type I collagen, thereby inhibiting bone formation. PMID:26594034

  16. Stimulatory effects of muramyl dipeptide upon neutrophils isolated from a local bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, P. M.; Maier, K. G.; Melton, L.; Polk, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in vivo upon the local inflammatory response to a bacterial challenge. In addition to quantitative bacteriology of the tissues surrounding an infected suture, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) involved in the local inflammatory response were extracted and estimations made of their number, viability and phagocytic activity. Fewer bacteria were recovered from the muscle around the suture in MDP-treated animals compared to placebo-treated controls (P less than 0.02), although there was no difference in the number of bacteria on the suture itself. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present in greater numbers (P less than 0.01), more PMNs were viable (P less than 0.01) and more PMNs had visibly phagocytosed bacteria (P less than 0.01) in the MDP group compared to the placebo group. These data indicate that MDP enhances the local inflammatory response to infection with increased influx, viability and phagocytic activity of PMNs, resulting in improved local control of a test bacterial challenge. PMID:3318904

  17. Stimulatory Effects of Polysaccharide Fraction from Solanum nigrum on RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Faizan Naeem; Ismail, Amirah; Abidin, Nurhayati Zainal; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza

    2014-01-01

    The polysaccharide fraction from Solanum nigrum Linne has been shown to have antitumor activity by enhancing the CD4+/CD8+ ratio of the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. In this study, we analyzed a polysaccharide extract of S. nigrum to determine its modulating effects on RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells since macrophages play a key role in inducing both innate and adaptive immune responses. Crude polysaccharide was extracted from the stem of S. nigrum and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography to partially purify the extract. Five polysaccharide fractions were then subjected to a cytotoxicity assay and a nitric oxide production assay. To further analyze the ability of the fractionated polysaccharide extract to activate macrophages, the phagocytosis activity and cytokine production were also measured. The polysaccharide fractions were not cytotoxic, but all of the fractions induced nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 cells. Of the five fractions tested, SN-ppF3 was the least toxic and also induced the greatest amount of nitric oxide, which was comparable to the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression detected in the cell lysate. This fraction also significantly induced phagocytosis activity and stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Our study showed that fraction SN-ppF3 could classically activate macrophages. Macrophage induction may be the manner in which polysaccharides from S. nigrum are able to prevent tumor growth. PMID:25299340

  18. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  19. Stimulatory effects of distinct members of the bone morphogenetic protein family on ligament fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bobacz, K; Ullrich, R; Amoyo, L; Erlacher, L; Smolen, J S; Graninger, W B

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate effects of cartilage derived morphogenetic protein‐1 and ‐2 (CDMP‐1, CDMP‐2), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)‐7 and BMP‐6 on metabolism of ligament fibroblasts and their osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation potential. Methods Ligament fibroblasts were obtained from 3 month old calves, plated as monolayers or micromass cultures, and incubated with or without CDMP‐1, CDMP‐2, BMP‐7, and BMP‐6. Expression of the indicated growth factors was assessed by RT‐PCR and western immunoblotting. The presence of their respective type I and II receptors, and lineage related markers, was investigated in stimulated and unstimulated cells by RT‐PCR and northern blotting. Biosynthesis of matrix proteoglycans was assessed by [35S]sulphate incorporation in monolayers. Alcian blue and toluidine blue staining was done in micromass cultures. Results CDMP‐1, CDMP‐2, BMP‐7, and BMP‐6 were detected on mRNA and on the protein level. Type I and II receptors were endogenously expressed in unstimulated ligament fibroblasts. The growth factors significantly stimulated total proteoglycan synthesis as assessed by [35S]sulphate incorporation. Toluidine blue staining showed cartilage‐specific metachromasia in the growth factor treated micromass cultures. Transcription analysis of stimulated ligament fibroblasts demonstrated coexpression of chondrocyte markers but no up regulation of osteogenic markers. Conclusion CDMP‐1, CDMP‐2, BMP‐7, and BMP‐6 and their receptors were expressed in ligament tissue. These growth factors induced matrix synthesis in fibroblasts derived from bovine ligament. The preferential expression of cartilage markers in vitro suggests that CDMP‐1, CDMP‐2, BMP‐7, and BMP‐6 have the potential to induce differentiation towards a chondrogenic phenotype in ligament fibroblasts. Thus, fibroblasts from ligaments may serve as a source for chondrogenesis and tissue repair. PMID:15975973

  20. Stimulatory effects of a microbially dechlorinated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture on rat uterine contraction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tsuneta, Taeko; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Quensen, John F; Boyd, Stephen A; Hanna, Mona; Grindatti, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Microbially mediated reductive dechlorination has been advocated as the first part of a two-stage (anaerobic/aerobic) biotreatment process for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments, and is generally viewed as a detoxication process. However, previous studies suggest that microbial dechlorination increases the ability to stimulate uterine contractions compared with the original PCB mixtures. Here, we investigate the composition and uterotonic activity of the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1260 before and after incubation with microorganisms eluted from PCB-contaminated sediment of the Hudson River. Incubation with microorganisms resulted in a partially dechlorinated mixture (HR1260) dominated by ortho-substituted PCBs with four or fewer chlorines per biphenyl. Aroclor 1260 that had not been incubated with microorganisms had no significant effect on contraction frequency of rat uterine strips (gestation day 10) in vitro, whereas HR1260 dramatically increased contraction frequency to 718+/-134% of the basal rate at a total PCB concentration of 70 microM (p<0.05). The microbial dechlorination increased 2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl and one or more of four congeners that co-eluted during chromatography (2,3,3',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,3',4,5-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',6-pentachlorobiphenyl and 2,2',4,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl) to 24 and 8 mol%, respectively. However, the uterotonic activities of the latter congeners were modest when evaluated either solely or in a reconstituted mixture and could not fully account for the uterotonic activity of HR1260. Nonetheless, the relative abundance of congeners with three or fewer chlorines increased to 14 mol% as a group in HR1260, suggesting that these congeners collectively contribute to the uterotonic activity even though the abundance of any one congener in this group was less than 5 mol%. PMID:18359014

  1. Self-stimulatory behavior and perceptual reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Lovaas, I; Newsom, C; Hickman, C

    1987-01-01

    Self-stimulatory behavior is repetitive, stereotyped, functionally autonomous behavior seen in both normal and developmentally disabled populations, yet no satisfactory theory of its development and major characteristics has previously been offered. We present here a detailed hypothesis of the acquisition and maintenance of self-stimulatory behavior, proposing that the behaviors are operant responses whose reinforcers are automatically produced interoceptive and exteroceptive perceptual consequences. The concept of perceptual stimuli and reinforcers, the durability of self-stimulatory behaviors, the sensory extinction effect, the inverse relationship between self-stimulatory and other behaviors, the blocking effect of self-stimulatory behavior on new learning, and response substitution effects are discussed in terms of the hypothesis. Support for the hypothesis from the areas of sensory reinforcement and sensory deprivation is also reviewed. Limitations of major alternative theories are discussed, along with implications of the perceptual reinforcement hypothesis for the treatment of excessive self-stimulatory behavior and for theoretical conceptualizations of functionally related normal and pathological behaviors. PMID:3583964

  2. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M.; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways—VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT—were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full

  3. Kaolin Foliar Application Has a Stimulatory Effect on Phenylpropanoid and Flavonoid Pathways in Grape Berries.

    PubMed

    Conde, Artur; Pimentel, Diana; Neves, Andreia; Dinis, Lia-Tânia; Bernardo, Sara; Correia, Carlos M; Gerós, Hernâni; Moutinho-Pereira, José

    2016-01-01

    Drought, elevated air temperature, and high evaporative demand are increasingly frequent during summer in grape growing areas like the Mediterranean basin, limiting grapevine productivity and berry quality. The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven effective in mitigating the negative impacts of these abiotic stresses in grapevine and other fruit crops, however, little is known about its influence on the composition of the grape berry and on key molecular mechanisms and metabolic pathways notably important for grape berry quality parameters. Here, we performed a thorough molecular and biochemical analysis to assess how foliar application of kaolin influences major secondary metabolism pathways associated with berry quality-traits, leading to biosynthesis of phenolics and anthocyanins, with a focus on the phenylpropanoid, flavonoid (both flavonol- and anthocyanin-biosynthetic) and stilbenoid pathways. In grape berries from different ripening stages, targeted transcriptional analysis by qPCR revealed that several genes involved in these pathways-VvPAL1, VvC4H1, VvSTSs, VvCHS1, VvFLS1, VvDFR, and VvUFGT-were more expressed in response to the foliar kaolin treatment, particularly in the latter maturation phases. In agreement, enzymatic activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), flavonol synthase (FLS), and UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) were about two-fold higher in mature or fully mature berries from kaolin-treated plants, suggesting regulation also at a transcriptional level. The expression of the glutathione S-transferase VvGST4, and of the tonoplast anthocyanin transporters VvMATE1 and VvABCC1 were also all significantly increased at véraison and in mature berries, thus, when anthocyanins start to accumulate in the vacuole, in agreement with previously observed higher total concentrations of phenolics and anthocyanins in berries from kaolin-treated plants, especially at full maturity

  4. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  5. The stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis: Lessons from metabolic systems analysis of Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6(T.).

    PubMed

    Ates, Ozlem; Arga, Kazim Y; Oner, Ebru Toksoy

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD(T) is a halophilic, gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently produce levan from sucrose as carbon source via levansucrase activity. However, systems-based approaches are required to further enhance its metabolic performance for industrial application. As an important step toward this goal, the genome-scale metabolic network of Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043, which is considered a model organism for halophilic bacteria, has been reconstructed based on its genome annotation, physiological information, and biochemical information. In the present work, the genome-scale metabolic network of C. salexigens was recruited, and refined via integration of the available biochemical, physiological, and phenotypic features of H. smyrnensis AAD6(T) . The generic metabolic model, which comprises 1,393 metabolites and 1,108 reactions, was then systematically analyzed in silico using constraints-based simulations. To elucidate the relationship between levan biosynthesis and other metabolic processes, an enzyme-graph representation of the metabolic network and a graph decomposition technique were employed. Using the concept of control effective fluxes, significant links between several metabolic processes and levan biosynthesis were estimated. The major finding was the elucidation of the stimulatory effect of mannitol on levan biosynthesis, which was further verified experimentally via supplementation of mannitol to the fermentation medium. The optimal concentration of 30 g/L mannitol supplemented to the 50 g/L sucrose-based medium resulted in a twofold increase in levan production in parallel with increased sucrose hydrolysis rate, accumulated extracellular glucose, and decreased fructose uptake rate. PMID:24123998

  6. A high concentration of triiodothyronine attenuates the stimulatory effect on hemin-induced erythroid differentiation of human erythroleukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Mieno; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Hirooka, Nobutaka; Obuchi, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Shoichi; Makishima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is a known stimulator of erythropoietic differentiation, severe anemia is sometimes observed in patients with hyperthyroidism and this mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of triiodothyronine (T3) on hemin-induced erythropoiesis. Human erythroleukemia K562 cells were used as an erythroid differentiation model. Cell differentiation was induced by hemin and the effect of pre-incubation with T3 (0.1 to 100 nM) was analyzed by measuring the benzidine-positive rate, hemoglobin content, CD71 expression (transferrin receptor), and mRNA expression for transcription factors related to erythropoiesis and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). Hemin, a promoter of erythroid differentiation, increased the levels of mRNAs for TRα, TRβ, and retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), as well as those for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NFE2), GATA-binding protein 1 (GATA1) and GATA-binding protein 2 (GATA2). Lower concentrations of T3 had a stimulatory effect on hemin-induced hemoglobin production (1 and 10 nM), CD71 expression (0.1 nM), and α-globin mRNA expression (1 nM), while a higher concentration of T3 (100 nM) abrogated the stimulatory effect on these parameters. T3 at 100 nM did not affect cell viability and proliferation, suggesting that the abrogation of erythropoiesis enhancement was not due to toxicity. T3 at 100 nM also significantly inhibited expression of GATA2 and RXRα mRNA, compared to 1 nM T3. We conclude that a high concentration of T3 attenuates the classical stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis exerted by a low concentration of T3 in hemin-induced K562 cells. PMID:25787723

  7. Suppressive effects of co-stimulatory molecule expressions on mouse splenocytes by anti-allergic agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, J; Asano, K; Tryka, E; Kanai, K; Yamamoto, S; Hisamitsu, T; Suzaki, H

    2000-01-01

    The influence of anti-allergic drugs, epinastine hydrochloride (EP) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on the co-stimulatory molecule expression was examined using in vitro cell culture technique. Spleen cells obtained from BALB/c mice 10 days after immunization with haemocyanin absorbed to aluminium hydroxide were cultured in the presence of 100.0 microg/ml haemocyanin and various concentrations of the agents. Low concentrations (<1.5 x 10(-4)M) of EP and DSCG did not influence spleen cell blastic activity induced by antigenic stimulation, whereas these agents caused significant inhibition of spleen cell activation when 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents were added to cell cultures. EP and DSCG also did not affect blastic activity of sensitized splenic T cells by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody stimulation even when these cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4) M of the agents. We next examined the influence of EP and DSCG on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on spleen cells in response to antigenic stimulation. Sensitized spleen cells were cultured in the presence of 2 x 10(-4)M of the agents and the expression of molecules were examined by flow cytometer 24h later. EP and DSCG suppressed the expression of costimulatory molecules, CD40 and CD80, but not CD86, on splenic B cells which were enhanced by antigenic stimulation in vitro. PMID:10958379

  8. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  9. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  10. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model. PMID:26829364

  11. Influenza Virus-Like Particles coated onto microneedles can elicit stimulatory effects on Langerhans cells in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Quan, Fu-Shi; Anstey, Alexander; Ivory, Matthew; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Compans, Richard W.; Birchall, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have a number of features that make them attractive influenza vaccine candidates. Microneedle (MN) devices are being developed for the convenient and pain-free delivery of vaccines across the skin barrier layer. Whilst MN-based vaccines have demonstrated proof-of-concept in mice, it is vital to understand how MN targeting of VLPs to the skin epidermis affects activation and migration of Langerhans cells (LCs) in the real human skin environment. MNs coated with vaccine reproducibly penetrated freshly excised human skin, depositing 80% of the coating within 60 seconds of insertion. Human skin experiments showed that H1 (A/PR/8/34) and H5 (A/Viet Nam/1203/04) VLPs, delivered via MN, stimulated LCs resulting in changes in cell morphology and a reduction in cell number in epidermal sheets. LC response was significantly more pronounced in skin treated with H1 VLPs, compared with H5 VLPs. Our data provides strong evidence that MN-facilitated delivery of influenza VLP vaccines initiates a stimulatory response in LCs in human skin. The results support and validate animal data, suggesting that dendritic cells (DCs) targeted through deposition of the vaccine in skin generate immune response. The study also demonstrates the value of using human skin alongside animal studies for preclinical testing of intradermal (ID) vaccines. PMID:20685601

  12. Interaction between Angiotensin II and Insulin/IGF-1 Exerted a Synergistic Stimulatory Effect on ERK1/2 Activation in Adrenocortical Carcinoma H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, An-li; Wang, Fen; Cui, Yun-ying; Li, Chun-yan; Li, Yu-xiu

    2016-01-01

    The cross talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin has been described mainly in cardiovascular cells, hepatocytes, adipocytes, and so forth, and to date no such cross talk was reported in adrenal. In this study, we examined the interaction between Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 in ERK and AKT signaling pathways and expression of steroidogenic enzymes in H295R cells. Compared to the control, 100 nM Ang II increased phospho-ERK1/2 approximately 3-fold. Insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) alone raised phospho-ERK1/2 1.8- and 1.5-fold, respectively, while, after pretreatment with 100 nM Ang II for 30 min, insulin (100 nM) or IGF-1 (10 nM) elevated phospho-ERK1/2 level 8- and 7-fold, respectively. The synergistic effect of Ang II and insulin/IGF-1 on ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by selective AT1 receptor blocker, PKC inhibitor, and MEK1/2 inhibitor. Ang II marginally suppressed AKT activation under the basal condition, while it had no effect on phospho-AKT induced by insulin/IGF-1. Ang II significantly stimulated mRNA expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and such stimulatory effects were enhanced when cells were cotreated with insulin/IGF-1. We are led to conclude that Ang II in combination with insulin/IGF-1 had an evident synergistic stimulatory effect on ERK1/2 activation in H295R cells and the effect may be responsible for the enhanced steroid hormone production induced by Ang II plus insulin/IGF-1. PMID:27293433

  13. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of culinary-medicinal mushrooms and their toxicity assessment using differentiating Neuro-2a and embryonic fibroblast BALB/3T3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mushrooms are not only regarded as gourmet cuisine but also as therapeutic agent to promote cognition health. However, little toxicological information is available regarding their safety. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen selected ethno-pharmacologically important mushrooms for stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth and to test for any cytotoxicity. Methods The stimulatory effect of mushrooms on neurite outgrowth was assessed in differentiating mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Neurite length was measured using Image-Pro Insight processor system. Neuritogenesis activity was further validated by fluorescence immunocytochemical staining of neurofilaments. In vitro cytotoxicity was investigated by using mouse embryonic fibroblast (BALB/3T3) and N2a cells for any embryo- and neuro-toxic effects; respectively. Results Aqueous extracts of Ganoderma lucidum, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Pleurotus giganteus and Grifola frondosa; as well as an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris significantly (p < 0.05) promoted the neurite outgrowth in N2a cells by 38.4 ± 4.2%, 38.1 ± 2.6%, 33.4 ± 4.6%, 33.7 ± 1.5%, and 35.8 ± 3.4%; respectively. The IC50 values obtained from tetrazolium (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed no toxic effects following 24 h exposure of N2a and 3T3 cells to mushroom extracts. Conclusion Our results indicate that G. lucidum, L. rhinocerotis, P. giganteus, G. frondosa and C. militaris may be developed as safe and healthy dietary supplements for brain and cognitive health. PMID:24119256

  14. Dose-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effects of luminal and serosal n-butyric acid on epithelial cell proliferation of pig distal colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Sakata, Takashi

    2005-06-01

    Large bowel bacteria convert various carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). SCFA stimulate epithelial cell proliferation of the large intestine in vivo and inhibit that of various cells in vitro. Supposing that too high concentration of SCFA on the serosal side is responsible for their inhibitory effect in vitro, we studied effects of luminal and serosal n-butyric acid (0, 0.1, 1, or 10 mmol/L, adjusted to neutral pH) on the epithelial cell proliferation rate of pig colonic mucosa in organ culture taking crypt cell production rate (CCPR) as the measure of proliferative activity. With 0 or 0.1 mmol/L n-butyric acid on the serosal side, luminal n-butyric acid increased CCPR at 1.0 mmol/L, and decreased CCPR at 10 mmol/L when compared to the luminal 0 mmol/L control. With 1.0 or 10 mmol/L serosal n-butyric acid, luminal n-butyric acid depressed CCPR dose-dependently. The above results indicated that n-butyric acid stimulated colonic epithelial cell proliferation at low concentration and inhibit it at high concentration with interaction effect to enhance the inhibitory action. The stimulatory effect of a low dose of serosal n-butyric acid may be responsible for the distant trophic effect of SCFA. PMID:16161765

  15. Stimulatory effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like substances from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum on phosphate transport in chick jejunum.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, M; Wasserman, R H

    1978-10-01

    Extracts of the calcinogenic plants Solanum malocoxylon and Cestrum diurnum stimulate phosphate absorption by the jejunum of vitamin D-deficient chicks, as determined by everted gut sac technique. Their action on cellular pathways of transepithelial phosphate transport is indistinguishable thereby from that of cholecalciferol. Increased net absorption from the lumen was due to enhanced uptake of phosphate from the luminal side, while leakage of tissue phosphate in the opposite direction was apparently unaffected. Steep serosa/mucosa concentration gradients were observed as consequence of enhanced levels of transepithelial phosphate flux in the mucosa-to-serosa direction. With respect to their stimulatory action on phosphate absorption, the calcinogenic plant factors retained their biological activity when phosphate transport was depressed by a high strontium diet. Their action in overcoming the strontium inhibition of phosphate absorption, calcium-binding protein synthesis, and alkaline phosphatase activity, was comparable to the effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. On the basis of these biological responses, the action of the plant factors from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum provides further evidence for their close resemblance to the hormonally active sterol. PMID:702209

  16. The Stimulatory Effect of Cerebral Intraventricular Injection of cNPY on Precocial Feeding Behavior in Neonatal Chicks (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guiqian; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Taofen; Jiang, Junfang; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most potent stimulants of food intake in many animals. Most of the supporting evidence for the effects of NPY has been gathered in mammalian species using porcine NPY. To investigate the effects of NPY on precocial feeding initiation in chicks, we firstly used chicken NPY (cNPY) to study its role in food intake and spontaneous activities in 3-day-old male chicks. Food intake was monitored at different times after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of cNPY (2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 μg/10 μL) and anti-cNPY antibody (anti-cNPY) (1:9000, 1:3000 or 1:1000 in dilution). cNPY given at different doses significantly increased food intake at 30 min, 60 min, 90 min and 120 min after injection. Chicks treated with 5.0 μg/10 μL of cNPY showed a maximal 4.48 fold increase in food intake comparing to the control at 30 min. There is still more than 2 fold increase in food intake at 120 min after injection of cNPY. Food intake was significantly inhibited by a single ICV injection of anti-cNPY diluted to 1:9000 (60% inhibition), 1:3000 (92% inhibition), and 1:1000 (95% inhibition) at 30 min with 1:1000 being the maximally effective concentration. The inhibitory effects of anti-cNPY (diluted to1:9000, 1:3000, 1:1000) at 120 min post ICV injection were 22%, 42% and 46%, respectively. But ICV of anti-cNPY (1:3000 in dilution) did not block the orexigenic effect of 2.5 μg/10 μL of cNPY. ICV injection of different concentrations of cNPY increases locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner while ICV anti-cNPY greatly decreased the distance moved by each chick compared to control groups. Taken together, our results demonstrated that cNPY has a promoting effect on chick food intake and locomotor activity, and that endogenous cNPY might play a positive role in regulating precocial feeding behavior in newly hatched chicks. PMID:27055273

  17. Relationship between Cerebral Sigma-1 Receptor Occupancy and Attenuation of Cocaine’s Motor Stimulatory Effects in Mice by PD144418

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Dennis K.; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A.; Green, Caroline L.; Watkinson, Lisa D.; Carmack, Terry L.; Lever, Susan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Psychostimulant effects of cocaine are mediated partly by agonist actions at sigma-1 (σ1) receptors. Selective σ1 receptor antagonists attenuate these effects and provide a potential avenue for pharmacotherapy. However, the selective and high affinity σ1 antagonist PD144418 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-1-propylpyridine) has been reported not to inhibit cocaine-induced hyperactivity. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated aspects of PD144418 binding in vitro, investigated σ1 receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy in vivo, and re-examined effects on locomotor activity. PD144418 displayed high affinity for σ1 sites (Ki 0.46 nM) and 3596-fold selectivity over σ2 sites (Ki 1654 nM) in guinea pig brain membranes. No appreciable affinity was noted for serotonin and norepinephrine transporters (Ki >100 μM), and the DAT interaction was weak (Ki 9.0 μM). In vivo, PD144418 bound to central and peripheral σ1 sites in mouse, with an ED50 of 0.22 μmol/kg in whole brain. No DAT occupancy by PD144418 (10.0 μmol/kg) or possible metabolites were observed. At doses that did not affect basal locomotor activity, PD144418 (1, 3.16, and 10 μmol/kg) attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent manner in mice. There was good correlation (r2 = 0.88) of hyperactivity reduction with increasing cerebral σ1 receptor occupancy. The behavioral ED50 of 0.79 μmol/kg corresponded to 80% occupancy. Significant σ1 receptor occupancy and the ability to mitigate cocaine’s motor stimulatory effects were observed for 16 hours after a single 10.0 μmol/kg dose of PD144418. PMID:25100754

  18. Metformin attenuates the stimulatory effect of a high-energy diet on in vivo LLC1 carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Algire, Carolyn; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Blouin, Marie-Jose; Shuai, Jian Hua; Pollak, Michael

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of metformin on the growth of lewis lung LLC1 carcinoma in C57BL/6J mice provided with either a control diet or a high-energy diet, previously reported to lead to weight gain and systemic insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia. Forty-eight male mice were randomized into four groups: control diet, control diet+metformin, high-energy diet, or high-energy diet+metformin. Following 8 weeks on the experimental diets, selected groups received metformin in their drinking water. Three weeks following the start of metformin treatment, mice were injected with 0.5x10(6) LLC1 cells and tumor growth was measured for 17 days. By day 17, tumors of mice on the high-energy diet were nearly twice the volume of those of mice on the control diet. This effect of diet on tumor growth was significantly attenuated by metformin, but metformin had no effect on tumor growth of the mice on the control diet. Metformin attenuated the increased insulin receptor activation associated with the high-energy diet and also led to increased phosphorylation of AMP kinase, two actions that would be expected to decrease neoplastic proliferation. These experimental results are consistent with prior hypothesis-generating epidemiological studies that suggest that metformin may reduce cancer risk and improve cancer prognosis. Finally, these results contribute to the rationale for evaluation of the anti-neoplastic activity of metformin in hyperinsulinemic cancer patients. PMID:18469156

  19. A comparison of the stimulatory effects of metoclopramide and cinitapride in the guinea-pig isolated ileum.

    PubMed

    Massingham, R; Bou, J; Roberts, D J

    1985-03-01

    The pharmacological effects of a new benzamide derivative cinitapride, have been compared to those of metoclopramide in guinea-pig isolated ileum and longitudinal smooth muscle-myenteric plexus preparations treated with propranolol (3 microM). Cinitapride (EC50 = 0.74 microM) was 6 times more potent than metoclopramide (EC50 = 4.69 microM) in enhancing the twitch response of co-axially stimulated preparations and 11 times more potent in eliciting contractions in non-stimulated tissues, their respective EC50 values being 0.58 microM and 6.52 microM. These contractile effects of cinitapride and metoclopramide amounted to approximately 25% of the maximum response of the tissues to acetylcholine (1 microM). Neither cinitapride nor metoclopramide, in concentrations up to 10 microM, significantly affected concentration-response curves to exogenous acetylcholine or 5-hydroxytryptamine but both drugs elicited a concentration-dependent potentiation of the ileum responses to a fixed concentration (10 microM) of the ganglion stimulant dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP). Analysis of the twitch-enhancing and contractile effects of cinitapride using a variety of drugs suggested that a common, prejunctional locus of action upon the cell bodies or axons of postganglionic, parasympathetic neurones of the myenteric plexus is involved in both of these responses. In hexamethonium (100 microM) and methysergide (0.1 microM)-treated longitudinal smooth muscle preparations desensitization or blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors using high concentrations of the same agonist (30 microM) or quipazine (10 microM) or the putative antagonists cocaine (30 microM) or tubocurarine (10 microM) produced small inhibitions (congruent to 20%) of the contractile responses to metoclopramide and cinitapride but did not affect twitch responses to these drugs. It is concluded that cinitapride is a more potent stimulant of guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle than metoclopramide in vitro although the

  20. Late administration of murine CTLA-4 blockade prolongs CD8-mediated anti-tumor effects following stimulatory cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sckisel, Gail D.; Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Tietze, Julia K.; Chen, Mingyi; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that immunostimulatory therapies such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-CD40 (αCD40) can be combined to deliver synergistic anti-tumor effects. While this strategy has shown success, efficacy varies depending on a number of factors including tumor type and severe toxicities can be seen. We sought to determine whether blockade of negative regulators such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) could simultaneously prolong CD8+ T cell responses and augment T cell anti-tumor effects. We devised a regimen in which anti-CTLA-4 was administered late so as to delay contraction and minimize toxicities. This late administration both enhanced and prolonged CD8 T cell activation without the need for additional IL-2. The quality of the T cell response was improved with increased frequency of effector/effector memory phenotype cells along with improved lytic ability and bystander expansion. This enhanced CD8 response translated to improved anti-tumor responses both at the primary and metastatic sites. Importantly, toxicities were not exacerbated with combination. This study provides a platform for rational design of immunotherapy combinations to maximize anti-tumor immunity while minimizing toxicities. PMID:26423422

  1. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  2. High dexamethasone concentration prevents stimulatory effects of TNF-alpha and LPS on IL-6 secretion from the precursors of human muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Prelovsek, Oja; Mars, Tomaz; Jevsek, Marko; Podbregar, Matej; Grubic, Zoran

    2006-12-01

    A frequent finding in patients surviving critical illness myopathy is chronic muscle dysfunction. Its pathogenesis is mostly unknown; one explanation could be that muscle regeneration, which normally follows myopathy, is insufficient in these patients because of a high glucocorticoid level in their blood. Glucocorticoids can prevent stimulatory effects of proinflammatory factors on the interleukin (IL)-6 secretion, diminishing in this way the autocrine and paracrine IL-6 actions known to stimulate proliferation at the earliest, myoblast stage of muscle formation. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of major proinflammatory agents [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] on the IL-6 secretion from the muscle precursors and then studied the influence of dexamethasone (Dex) on these effects. Mononuclear myoblasts, which still proliferate, were compared with myotubes in which this capacity is already lost. For correct interpretation of results, cultures were examined for putative apoptosis and necrosis. We found that constitutive secretion of IL-6 did not differ significantly between myoblasts and myotubes; however, the TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 release was more pronounced (P < 0.001) in myoblasts. Dex, applied at the 0.1-100 nM concentration range, prevented constitutive and TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 release at both developmental stages but only at high concentration (P < 0.01). Although there are still missing links to it, our results support the concept that high concentrations of glucocorticoids, met in critically ill patients, prevent TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 secretion. This results in reduced IL-6-mediated myoblast proliferation, leading to the reduced final mass of the regenerated muscle. PMID:16857895

  3. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  4. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  5. Stimulatory Effects of Coumestrol on Embryonic and Fetal Development Through AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Song, Gwonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Successful establishment of pregnancy is required for fetal-maternal interactions regulating implantation, embryonic development and placentation. A uterine environment with insufficient growth factors and nutrients increases the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) leading to an impaired uterine environment. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on conceptus development in the pig that is regarded as an excellent biomedical animal model for research on IUGR. Results of this study indicated that coumestrol induced migration of porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In response to coumestrol, the phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2 MAPK, and P90RSK proteins were activated in pTr cells and ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK phosphorylation was prolonged for a longer period than for the other proteins. To identify the signal transduction pathway induced by coumestrol, pharmacological inhibitors U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) were used to pretreat pTr cells. The results showed that coumestrol-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK was blocked by U0126. In addition, the increased phosphorylation in response to coumestrol was completely inhibited following pre-treatment incubation of pTr cells in the presence of LY294002 and U0126. Furthermore, these two inhibitors suppressed the ability of coumestrol to induce migration of pTr cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that coumestrol affects embryonic development through activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK cell signal transduction pathways and improvement in the uterine environment through coumestrol supplementation may provide beneficial effects of enhancing embryonic and fetal survival and development. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2733-2740, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991852

  6. Stimulatory effect of Echinacea purpurea extract on the trafficking activity of mouse dendritic cells: revealed by genomic and proteomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several Echinacea species have been used as nutraceuticals or botanical drugs for "immunostimulation", but scientific evidence supporting their therapeutic use is still controversial. In this study, a phytocompound mixture extracted from the butanol fraction (BF) of a stem and leaf (S+L) extract of E. purpurea ([BF/S+L/Ep]) containing stringently defined bioactive phytocompounds was obtained using standardized and published procedures. The transcriptomic and proteomic effects of this phytoextract on mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were analyzed using primary cultures. Results Treatment of BMDCs with [BF/S+L/Ep] did not significantly influence the phenotypic maturation activity of dendritic cells (DCs). Affymetrix DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses of genes differentially expressed in DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] for 4 or 12 h revealed that the majority of responsive genes were related to cell adhesion or motility (Cdh10, Itga6, Cdh1, Gja1 and Mmp8), or were chemokines (Cxcl2, Cxcl7) or signaling molecules (Nrxn1, Pkce and Acss1). TRANSPATH database analyses of gene expression and related signaling pathways in treated-DCs predicted the JNK, PP2C-α, AKT, ERK1/2 or MAPKAPK pathways as the putative targets of [BF/S+L/Ep]. In parallel, proteomic analysis showed that the expressions of metabolic-, cytoskeleton- or NF-κB signaling-related proteins were regulated by treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep]. In vitro flow cytometry analysis of chemotaxis-related receptors and in vivo cell trafficking assay further showed that DCs treated with [BF/S+L/Ep] were able to migrate more effectively to peripheral lymph node and spleen tissues than DCs treated as control groups. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that [BF/S+L/Ep] modulates DC mobility and related cellular physiology in the mouse immune system. Moreover, the signaling networks and molecules highlighted here are potential targets for nutritional or clinical application of Echinacea or

  7. Stimulatory Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Phytochemical Properties, Mitotic Behaviour, and Nutritional Composition of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Lay, Ma Ma; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120 Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  8. Stimulatory effects of gamma irradiation on phytochemical properties, mitotic behaviour, and nutritional composition of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.).

    PubMed

    Mohajer, Sadegh; Taha, Rosna Mat; Lay, Ma Ma; Esmaeili, Arash Khorasani; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120 Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  9. The stimulatory effect of the octadecaneuropeptide ODN on astroglial antioxidant enzyme systems is mediated through a GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Yosra; Kaddour, Hadhemi; Vaudry, David; Douiri, Salma; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Leprince, Jérôme; Castel, Hélène; Vaudry, Hubert; Amri, Mohamed; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2012-01-01

    Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense systems, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damage caused by oxidative stress on the central nervous system. Astrocytes specifically synthesize and release endozepines, a family of regulatory peptides including the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN). ODN is the ligand of both central-type benzodiazepine receptors (CBR), and an adenylyl cyclase- and phospholipase C-coupled receptor. We have recently shown that ODN is a potent protective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase activities and stimulation of cell apoptosis in astrocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the type of receptor involved in ODN-induced inhibition of SOD and catalase in cultured rat astrocytes. We found that ODN induced a rapid stimulation of SOD and catalase gene transcription in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 0.1 nM ODN blocked H2O2-evoked reduction of both mRNA levels and activities of SOD and catalase. Furthermore, the inhibitory actions of ODN on the deleterious effects of H2O2 on SOD and catalase were abrogated by the metabotropic ODN receptor antagonist cyclo1-8[Dleu5]OP, but not by the CBR antagonist flumazenil. Finally, the protective action of ODN against H2O2-evoked inhibition of endogenous antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent, but protein kinase C-independent. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that ODN, acting through its metabotropic receptor coupled to the PKA pathway, prevents oxidative stress-induced alteration of antioxidant enzyme expression and activities. The peptide ODN is thus a potential candidate for the development of specific agonists that would selectively mimic its protective activity. PMID:23181054

  10. Stimulatory effect of sulphide on thiotaurine synthesis in three hydrothermal-vent species from the East Pacific Rise.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Audrey M; Fiala-Médioni, Aline

    2003-09-01

    initial thiotaurine concentration. Moreover, the lack of any effect of sulphide in symbiont-free tissues and in gills of the methanotrophic mussel Bathymodiolus childressi reinforces the assumption that thiotaurine synthesis is a specific adaptation to the thiotrophic mode of life. While the precise function (i.e. transport and/or storage of sulphide) of hypotaurine and thiotaurine has yet to be established, our results strongly support a general role for these free amino acids in the metabolism of sulphide in hydrothermal-vent thiotrophic symbioses. PMID:12878661

  11. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  12. The Co-Stimulatory Effects of MyD88-Dependent Toll-Like Receptor Signaling on Activation of Murine γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Welte, Thomas; Saxena, Vandana; Wicker, Jason; Mann, Brian; Soong, Lynn; Barrett, Alan; Born, Willi; O'Brien, Rebecca; Wang, Tian

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells express several different toll-like receptor (TLR)s. The role of MyD88- dependent TLR signaling in TCR activation of murine γδ T cells is incompletely defined. Here, we report that Pam3CSK4 (PAM, TLR2 agonist) and CL097 (TLR7 agonist), but not lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), increased CD69 expression and Th1-type cytokine production upon anti-CD3 stimulation of γδ T cells from young adult mice (6-to 10-week-old). However, these agonists alone did not induce γδ T cell activation. Additionally, we noted that neither PAM nor CL097 synergized with anti-CD3 in inducing CD69 expression on γδ T cells of aged mice (21-to 22-month-old). Compared to young γδ T cells, PAM and CL097 increased Th-1 type cytokine production with a lower magnitude from anti-CD3- stimulated, aged γδ T cells. Vγ1+ and Vγ4+ cells are two subpopulations of splenic γδ T cells. PAM had similar effects in anti-CD3-activated control and Vγ4+ subset- depleted γδ T cells; whereas CL097 induced more IFN-γ production from Vγ4+ subset-depleted γδ T cells than from the control group. Finally, we studied the role of MyD88-dependent TLRs in γδ T cell activation during West Nile virus (WNV) infection. γδ T cell, in particular, Vγ1+ subset expansion was significantly reduced in both MyD88- and TLR7- deficient mice. Treatment with TLR7 agonist induced more Vγ1+ cell expansion in wild-type mice during WNV infection. In summary, these results suggest that MyD88-dependent TLRs provide co-stimulatory signals during TCR activation of γδ T cells and these have differential effects on distinct subsets. PMID:25232836

  13. Products for Alzheimer's self-stimulatory wanderers.

    PubMed

    Lucero, M; Pearson, R; Hutchinson, S; Leger-Krall, S; Rinalducci, E

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a variety of sensory stimulation products for the behavioral intervention of patients with Alzheimer's type dementia. Many caregivers have relied on physical and chemical restraints as the primary method of patient intervention due to the lack of appropriate dementia management products. This significantly lowers the sufferer's quality of care and life. As the age group most susceptible to Alzheimer's disease (65 and older) is the fastest growing segment of our society, an appropriate care solution must be sought. The specific aim of this study was to develop products that are sensory satisfying for the Alzheimer's patient that exhibits self-stimulatory wandering behavior. Sensory satisfying objects for product development would be determined through structured observations of self-stimulatory wanderers in an institutionalized setting. Variations of product design and mounting would be pursued in order to develop products that are not only safe and effective for patient use, but are easy for the caregiver to implement and maintain. Such products would have widespread commercial application in both the institutional and private care settings such as nursing homes, adult day care facilities, Alzheimer's care facilities, convalescent homes, mental health institutions, and assisted-living facilities. PMID:11416947

  14. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  15. Regulation of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase expression and activity in the hypophysectomized rat ovary: Interactions between the stimulatory effect of human chorionic gonadotropin and the luteolytic effect of prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, C.; Labrie, C.; Dupont, E.; Couet, J.; Trudel, C.; Rheaume, E.; Simard, J.; Luu-The, V.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1990-12-01

    The enzyme 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase (3 beta-HSD) catalyzes an obligatory step in the conversion of pregnenolone and other 5-ene-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into progesterone as well as precursors of all androgens and estrogens in the ovary. Since 3 beta-HSD is likely to be an important target for regulation by pituitary hormones, we have studied the effect of chronic treatment with LH (hCG), FSH, and PRL on ovarian 3 beta-HSD expression and activity in hypophysectomized adult female rats. Human CG (hCG) (10 IU, twice a day (bid)), ovine FSH (0.5 microgram, bid), and ovine PRL (1 mg, bid) were administered, singly or in combination, for a period of 10 days starting 15 days after hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized rats, PRL exerted a potent inhibitory effect on all the parameters studied. In fact, PRL caused a 81% decrease in ovarian 3 beta-HSD mRNA content accompanied by a similar decrease in 3 beta-HSD activity and protein levels. In addition, ovarian weight decreased by 40% whereas serum progesterone fell dramatically from 1.92 nmol/liter to undetectable levels after treatment with PRL. Whereas hCG alone had only slight stimulatory effects on 3 beta-HSD mRNA, protein content and activity levels, treatment with the gonadotropin partially or completely reversed the potent inhibitory effects of oPRL on all the parameters measured. FSH, on the other hand, had no significant effect on 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. In situ hybridization experiments using the 35S-labeled rat ovary 3 beta-HSD cDNA probe show that the inhibitory effect of PRL is exerted primarily on luteal cell 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. On the other hand, it can be seen that hCG stimulates 3 beta-HSD mRNA accumulation in interstitial cells.

  16. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on progesterone secretion and viability of cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Vazhoor, B; Yadav, V P; Gupta, M; Pathak, M C; Panda, R P; Khan, F A; Verma, M R; Maurya, V P; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the temporal (24, 48 and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, IGF-1, and EGF, respectively) production and secretion of progesterone (P4) in cultured luteal cells from different stages of estrous cycle as well as the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STARD1), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), anti-apoptotic gene PCNA, and pro-apoptotic gene BAX in luteal cells of mid-luteal phase in buffalo. Samples from early luteal phase (ELP; Day 1 to 4; n = 4), mid-luteal phase (MLP; Day 5 to 10; n = 4), and late luteal phase (LLP; Day 11 to 16; n = 4) of estrous cycle were collected. Progesterone was assayed by RIA, whereas mRNA expression was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results depicted that highest dose (100 ng/mL) of LH, IGF-1, and EGF and longer duration of time brought about a (P < 0.05) rise in P4 level and expression of steroidogenic enzymes and PCNA compared with the lower level(s) and control while, all treatments (P < 0.05) inhibited BAX expression in a time dependent-manner. Analysis of interaction between stage and treatments revealed that LH treatment (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with IGF-1 and EGF in ELP and MLP. However in LLP, treatment with IGF-1 and EGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased P4 production compared with LH treatment. Summarizing, our study explores the steroidogenic potential of LH and growth factors across different luteal stages in buffalo, which on promoting steroidogenic enzyme expression and cell viability culminated in enhanced P4 production in luteal cells. PMID:25263485

  17. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of tea, coffee or caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis of SKH-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Conney, Allan H. Zhou, Sherry; Lee Maojung; Xie Jianguo; Yang, Chung S.; Lou Yourong; Lu Yaoping

    2007-11-01

    Oral administration of green tea or a caffeine solution, but not decaffeinated green tea, inhibits UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. Oral administration of green tea, coffee or a caffeine solution for 2 weeks enhanced UVB-induced increases in apoptosis in the epidermis, but these treatments had no effect in non-UVB treated normal epidermis. Our results suggest that administration of green tea, coffee and caffeine may inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis - at least in part - by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis. Plasma levels of caffeine observed after its oral administration at cancer-preventive dose levels were within the range observed in moderate coffee drinkers. Topical applications of caffeine to mice previously treated with UVB for 20 weeks (high risk mice without tumors) inhibited the formation of tumors and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors but not in areas of the epidermis away from tumors. The selective effects of caffeine administration to stimulate UVB-induced apoptosis or apoptosis in tumors but not in normal epidermis or in areas of the epidermis away from tumors is of considerable interest, but the reasons for the selective effects of caffeine on apoptosis in DNA damaged tissues are unknown. Further studies are needed to determine mechanisms of these effects of caffeine and to determine the effects of caffeine administration on sunlight-induced actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  18. Do infrared light-emitting diodes have a stimulatory effect on wound healing? From an in-vitro trial to patient treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinck, Elke; Cagnie, B.; Cambier, D.; Cornelissen, M.

    2002-10-01

    Variable effects of different forms of light therapy on wound healing have been reported. This preliminary study covers the efficacy of infrared light emitting diodes (LED) in this domain. Cultured embryonic chicken fibroblasts were treated in a controlled, radomised manner. LED irradiation was performed three consecutive days with a wavelength of 950 nm and a power output of 160 mW, at 0,6 cm distance from the fibroblasts. Each treatment lasted 6 minutes, resulting in a surface energy denstiy of 3,2 J/cm2. The results indicated that LED treatment does not influence fibroblast proliferation at the applied energy density and irradiation frequency (p=0,474). Meanwhile the effects of LED on wound healing in vivo were studied by treating a surgical incision (6 cm) on the lateral side of the right foot in a male patient. The treatment started after 13 days, when initial stitches were being removed. The same parameters as in the in vitro study were used but the treatment was performed five times. The healing could only be evaluated clinically, the irradiated area (2,6 cm) showed a more appropriate contraction, less discoloration and a less hypertrophic scar than the control area (3,4 cm). The used parameters failed to demonstrate any biological effect of LED irradiation in vitro, although the case study on the other hand illustrated a beneficial effect.

  19. Stimulatory effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 6-38, M65 and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide 6-28 on trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sághy, É; Payrits, M; Helyes, Zs; Reglődi, D; Bánki, E; Tóth, G; Couvineau, A; Szőke, É

    2015-11-12

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) acts on G protein-coupled receptors: the specific PAC1 and VPAC1/VPAC2 receptors. PACAP6-38 was described as a potent PAC1/VPAC2 antagonist in several models, but recent studies reported its agonistic behaviors proposing novel receptorial mechanisms. Since PACAP in migraine is an important research tool, we investigated the effect of PACAP and its peptide fragments on trigeminal primary sensory neurons. Effect of the peptides was studied with ratiometric Ca-imaging technique using the fluorescent indicator fura-2 AM on primary cultures of rat and mouse trigeminal ganglia (TRGs) neurons. Specificity testing was performed on PAC1, VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor-expressing cell lines with both fluorescent and radioactive Ca-uptake methods. Slowly increasing intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca(2+)]i was detected after PACAP1-38, PACAP1-27, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and the selective PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan administration on TRG neurons, but interestingly, PACAP6-38, VIP6-28 and the PAC1 receptor antagonist M65 also caused similar activation. The VPAC2 receptor agonist BAY 55-9837 induced similar activation, while the VPAC1 receptor agonist Ala(11,22,28)VIP had no significant effect on [Ca(2+)]i. It was proven that the Ca(2+)-influx originated from intracellular stores using radioactive calcium-45 uptake experiment and Ca-free solution. On the specific receptor-expressing cell lines the antagonists inhibited the stimulating actions of the respective agonists, but had no effects by themselves. PACAP6-38, M65 and VIP6-28, which were described as antagonists in numerous studies in several model systems, act as agonists on TRG primary sensory neurons. Currently unknown receptors or splice variants linked to distinct signal transduction pathways might explain these differences. PMID:26321242

  20. Parathyroid hormone blocks the stimulatory effect of insulin-like growth factor-I on collagen synthesis in cultured 21-day fetal rat calvariae

    SciTech Connect

    Kream, B.E.; Petersen, D.N.; Raisz, L.G. )

    1990-01-01

    We examined the interaction of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on collagen synthesis in 21-day fetal rat calvariae as assessed by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)proline into collagenase-digestible protein. After 96 hours of culture, 10 nM PTH antagonized the stimulation of collagen synthesis and partially blocked the increase in dry weight produced by 10 nM IGF-I. The effect of PTH to block IGF-I stimulated collagen synthesis was observed in the central bone of calvariae and was mimicked by forskolin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, transforming growth factor-alpha or dexamethasone. Our data are consistent with the concept that the direct effect of PTH is to inhibit basal CDP labeling and fully oppose IGF-I stimulated CDP labeling. The finding that this effect of PTH is mimicked by forskolin and PMA suggests that this block in IGF-I stimulation of CDP labeling involves both cAMP and protein kinase C mediated pathways.

  1. Astragalus Root and Elderberry Fruit Extracts Enhance the IFN-β Stimulatory Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus in Murine-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frøkiær, Hanne; Henningsen, Louise; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Weiss, Gudrun; Roller, Marc; Flanagan, John; Fromentin, Emilie; Ibarra, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Many foods and food components boost the immune system, but little data are available regarding the mechanisms by which they do. Bacterial strains have disparate effects in stimulating the immune system. Indendritic cells, the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli upregulates proinflammatory cytokines, whereas gram-positive Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a robust interferon (IFN)-β response. The immune-modulating effects of astragalus root and elderberry fruit extracts were examined in bone marrow-derived murine dendritic cells that were stimulated with L. acidophilus or E. coli. IFN-β and other cytokines were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. Endocytosis of fluorescence-labeled dextran and L. acidophilus in the presence of elderberry fruit or astragalus root extract was evaluated in dendritic cells. Our results show that both extracts enhanced L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β production and slightly decreased the proinflammatory response to E. coli. The enhanced IFN-β production was associated with upregulation of toll-like receptor 3 and to a varying degree, the cytokines IL-12, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α. Both extracts increased endocytosis in immature dendritic cells, and only slightly influenced the viability of the cells. In conclusion, astragalus root and elderberry fruit extracts increase the IFN-β inducing activity of L. acidophilus in dendritic cells, suggesting that they may exert antiviral and immune-enhancing activity. PMID:23118903

  2. Stimulatory effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1A-adrenoceptor to increase glucose uptake into cultured myoblast C2C12 cell of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, I M; Tsai, C C; Lai, T Y; Cheng, J T

    2001-05-14

    In an attempt to elucidate the effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1-adrenoceptor (AR), the myoblast C2C12 cells of mice were employed to investigate the change of glucose uptake in the present study. Isoferulic acid enhanced the uptake of radioactive glucose into C2C12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which were abolished by pretreatment with prazosin. Effect of isoferulic acid on alpha1-AR was further characterized using the displacement of [3H]YM617 binding in C2C12 cells. The radioactive glucose uptake increasing action of isoferulic acid was abolished by tamsulosin or WB 4101 at concentration sufficient to block alpha1A-adrenoceptor (alpha1A-AR) but it was not modified by chlorethylclonidine (CEC) at the concentration sufficient to abolish alpha1B-AR. An activation of alpha1A-AR by isoferulic acid in C2C12 cells can thus be considered. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73312 resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of isoferulic acid-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 cells. This inhibition by U73112 was specific because the inactive congener, U73343, failed to modify the action of isoferulic acid. Also, chelerythrine and GF 109203X diminished the action of isoferulic acid at concentration sufficient to inhibit the activity of protein kinase C (PKC). The obtained data suggest that an activation of alpha1A-AR by isoferulic acid may increase the glucose uptake via PLC-PKC pathway in C2C12 cells. PMID:11474559

  3. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells: stimulatory effects on proliferation and migration of fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stessuk, Talita; Puzzi, Maria Beatriz; Chaim, Elinton Adami; Alves, Paulo César Martins; de Paula, Erich Vinicius; Forte, Andresa; Izumizawa, Juliana Massae; Oliveira, Carolina Caliári; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2016-09-01

    The clinical use of tissue engineering associated with cell therapy is considered a new alternative therapy for the repair of chronic lesions with potential application in different medical areas, mostly in orthopedic and dermatological diseases. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a rich source of growth factors and cytokines important for wound healing. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have shown potential to accelerate the resolution of ulcers, to stimulate cell proliferation, and to benefit the quality of skin repair. This study aims to determine the effect of PRP and conditioned medium (CM) from ADSC on fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. Migration and proliferation assays were performed to evaluate the growth of fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the presence of PRP, CM, and CM + PRP. Significant proliferative stimulation was observed after 48 h of culture (p < 0.05) on mean absorbance of fibroblasts cultured with 10 and 25 % PRP, 100 % CM, and 25 % PRP + 25 % CM, if compared with control. Keratinocyte proliferation was stimulated after 48 h in cultures with 25, 50, and 100 % CM, and growth was compared with controls. The migration assay detected a significant migratory stimulus in fibroblasts cultured with 10 % PRP + 10 % CM after 48 h. These in vitro results suggest that PRP and ADSC have therapeutic potential for healing and re-epithelialization of chronic wounds in vivo. PMID:27394438

  4. Rotenone exerts similar stimulatory effects on H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Luiz G B; Figueira, Tiago R; Siqueira-Santos, Edilene S; Castilho, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Chronic and systemic treatment of rodents with rotenone, a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, results in neurochemical, behavioral, and neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain mitochondria from old rats (24 months old) would be more susceptible to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and increased generation of H2O2 than mitochondria from young-adult rats (3-4 months old). Isolated brain mitochondria were incubated in the presence of different rotenone concentrations (5, 10, and 100nM), and oxygen consumption and H2O2 production were measured during respiratory states 3 (ADP-stimulated respiration) and 4 (resting respiration). Respiratory state 3 and citrate synthase activity were significantly lower in mitochondria from old rats. Mitochondria from young-adult and old rats showed similar sensitivity to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. Similarly, H2O2 production rates by both types of mitochondria were dose-dependently stimulated to the same extent by increasing concentrations of rotenone. We conclude that rotenone exerts similar effects on oxygen consumption and H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats. Therefore, aging does not increase the mitochondrial H2O2 generation in response to complex I inhibition. PMID:25596437

  5. Stimulatory effects of opioid neuropeptides on locomotory activity and conformational changes in invertebrate and human immunocytes: evidence for a subtype of delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Cadet, P; Scharrer, B

    1989-08-01

    The presence of opioid neuropeptides was shown to stimulate conformational changes and locomotory activity in immunocytes of two representatives of invertebrates as well as in human leukocytes. Cells were examined by use of phase-contrast and Nomarski optics coupled with a Zeiss Axiophot microscope, and of the Zeiss Videoplan/Vidas Image Analysis system. Immunocompetent blood cells, activated by exogenous opioids or stressful stimuli presumed to engage endogenous opioids, showed flattening, elongation, and formation of pseudopodia. In the mollusc Mytilus edulis, ameboid movements resulted in the formation of cell clusters, an activity not observed in untreated controls, or in immunocytes simultaneously exposed to opioid and naloxone. Tests with nine immunoreactive substances revealed immunocyte stimulation by delta, mu-, kappa-, and epsilon(?)-selective ligands. One of these, [D-Ala2,D-Met5]enkephalinamide (DAMA), active at a concentration of 10 pM, proved to be considerably more effective than the rest. The high pharmacological potency of DAMA, observed in both human and invertebrate immunocytes, sets this opioid apart from the closely related [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, a discrepancy not occurring in the mammalian nervous system. This suggests a specific function for [Met]enkephalin in immunoregulation, mediated perhaps by a special subtype of delta receptor. PMID:2548205

  6. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:18380545

  7. The elimination of autistic self-stimulatory behavior by overcorrection1

    PubMed Central

    Foxx, R. M.; Azrin, N. H.

    1973-01-01

    No method is in general usage and of demonstrated effectiveness in eliminating the self-stimulatory behaviors of retardates and autistics. An Overcorrection rationale was used to develop such a method. The Overcorrection procedures consisted of a period of practice in the correct mode of the behavior contingent upon self-stimulatory behavior. The procedures were applied in a behavioral day-care program to three retarded children and one autistic child who exhibited object-mouthing, hand-mouthing, head-weaving and hand-clapping. For some behaviors, comparisons were made between the Overcorrection procedure and several alternative procedures, such as physical punishment by a slap, reinforcement for nonself-stimulatory behavior, a distasteful solution painted on the hand of a hand-mouther, and free reinforcement. The Overcorrection procedures eliminated the self-stimulatory behaviors of all four children in tutorial sessions and during the entire school day and were more effective than the alternative procedures in eliminating self-stimulation. The Overcorrection procedures appear to be rapid, enduring, and effective methods of eliminating self-stimulatory behavior. PMID:16795380

  8. Paradoxical stimulatory effects of the "standard" histamine H4-receptor antagonist JNJ7777120: the H4 receptor joins the club of 7 transmembrane domain receptors exhibiting functional selectivity.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Roland; Schneider, Erich H; Dove, Stefan; Brunskole, Irena; Neumann, Detlef; Strasser, Andrea; Buschauer, Armin

    2011-04-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is expressed in several cell types of the immune system and is assumed to play an important pro-inflammatory role in various diseases, including bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, and pruritus. Accordingly, H(4)R antagonists have been suggested to provide valuable drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Over the past decade, the indole derivative 1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine (JNJ7777120) has become the "standard" H(4)R antagonist and has been extensively used to assess the pathophysiological role of the H(4)R. However, the situation has now become more complicated by recent data (p. 749 and Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol doi: 10.1007/s00210-011-0612-3) showing that JNJ7777120 can also activate β-arrestin in a supposedly G(i)-protein-independent (pertussis toxin-insensitive) manner and that at certain H(4)R species orthologs, JNJ7777120 exhibits partial agonist efficacy with respect to G(i)-protein activation (steady-state high-affinity GTPase activity). These novel findings can be explained within the concept of functional selectivity or biased signaling, assuming unique ligand-specific receptor conformations with distinct signal transduction capabilities. Thus, great caution must be exerted when interpreting in vivo effects of JNJ7777120 as H(4)R antagonism. We discuss future directions to get out of the current dilemma in which there is no "standard" H(4)R antagonist available to the scientific community. PMID:21266488

  9. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of myco synthesized AuNPs from Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. on pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Jegadeesh; Lakshmanan, Hariprasath; John, Priscilla A; Zhijian, Chan; Periasamy, Vengadesh; David, Pamela; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Background Hericium erinaceus has been reported to have a wide range of medicinal properties such as stimulation of neurite outgrowth, promotion of functional recovery of axonotmetic peroneal nerve injury, antioxidant, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In recent years, the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has attracted intense interest due to the potential use in biomedical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AuNPs from aqueous extract of H. erinaceus on neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells. Methods The formation of AuNPs was characterized by UV–visible spectrum, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), particle size distribution, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, the neurite extension study of synthesized AuNPs was evaluated by in vitro assay. Results The AuNPs exhibited maximum absorbance between 510 and 600 nm in UV–visible spectrum. FESEM and TEM images showed the existence of nanoparticles with sizes of 20–40 nm. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. The purity and the crystalline properties were confirmed by EDX diffraction analysis, which showed strong signals with energy peaks in the range of 2–2.4 keV, indicating the existence of gold atoms. The synthesized AuNPs showed significant neurite extension on PC-12 cells. Nerve growth factor 50 ng/mL was used as a positive control. Treatment with different concentrations (nanograms) of AuNPs resulted in neuronal differentiation and neuronal elongation. AuNPs induced maximum neurite outgrowth of 13% at 600 ng/mL concentration. Conclusion In this study, the AuNPs synthesis was achieved by a simple, low-cost, and rapid bioreduction approach. AuNPs were shown to have potential neuronal differentiation and

  10. The joint effects of sulfonamides and quorum sensing inhibitors on Vibrio fischeri: Differences between the acute and chronic mixed toxicity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Yuewei; Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; An, Qingqing; Yin, Chunsheng; Liu, Yin

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) are considered to be promising antibiotic alternatives and will be increasingly exposed to the environment together with antibiotics after their research and development process; it is therefore necessary to study the joint effects of QSIs and antibiotics. In this study, single and mixed toxicity of sulfonamide (SAs) and QSIs under acute and chronic conditions and their corresponding toxicity mechanisms were investigated. The results indicated that the acute joint effect was extremely complex, ranging from an antagonistic to synergistic response, while the chronic joint effect was primarily an antagonistic response. Using a molecular docking and regression model, we found that the acute joint effect could be determined by the hydrion's, ability to be oxidized, as well as the binding energy. The chronic joint effect was primarily an antagonistic response, which was due to the QSI competing against AHL for luxR generated by SAs, leading to negative effects of the QSI-luxR complexes on luxI. This phenomenon eventually weakened the stimulatory effect caused by SAs. Finally, the main differences between acute and chronic mixtures were analyzed: (1) The target protein was different between acute and chronic toxicity mixtures, and (2) effective concentration in acute and chronic toxicity mixtures was also different. These deep insights into mixed toxicity mechanisms will play an important role in the study of antibiotic resistance genes in response to antibiotic replacements. PMID:26897575

  11. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca

    PubMed Central

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A.; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8–13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30–50 and 50–100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca’s chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  12. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  13. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption. PMID:21186925

  14. [Acute tonsillopharyngitis: the effectiveness of topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Nosulya, E V; Kim, I A; Chernykh, N M; Karnoukhova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a furasol sore throat gargle solution for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis. Forty patients presenting with acute tonsillopharyngitis were allocated to two groups, 20 subjects in each, by means of independent sequential randomization. Prior to the onset of the treatment, all the patients were examined for determining the species composition of pharyngeal microflora with the use of an «AutoScan4 System» analyzer («Siemens», USA) and estimating the resistance to antibacterial preparations (by the disk diffusion method). All the participants of the study were prescribed antibacterial therapy. In the patients of group 1 (study group), the antibacterial treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis was supplemented by a furasol sore throat gargle solution whereas those of group 2 (controls) were treated without topical therapy. The quantitative evaluation of the severity of manifestations of the disease before and after the treatment was based on a 5-point visual-analog scale. It was shown that systemic antibacterial therapy resulted in the consistent decrease of the frequency of occurrence of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic microflora in the patients comprising both groups. Treatment with a furasol sore throat gargle solution did not lead to the appearance of bacterial species alien to the oropharynx, nor was it accompanied by the impairment of resistance of its mucous membrane to the colonization by microorganisms. The results of the study give evidence of the well apparent regression of the subjective signs of tonsillopharyngitis and the inflammatory changes in the mucous membrane of the pharynx in the patients given the topical treatment in the form of a furasol sore throat gargle solution in addition to antibacterial therapy. It is concluded that a furasol sore throat gargle solution can be recommended for the introduction into the combined treatment of the patients

  15. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  16. Acute effects of ethanol in the control of protein synthesis in isolated rat liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Girbes, T.; Susin, A.; Ayuso, M.S.; Parrilla, R.

    1983-10-01

    The acute effect of ethanol on hepatic protein synthesis is a rather controversial issue. In view of the conflicting reports on this subject, the effect of ethanol on protein labeling from L-(/sup 3/H)valine in isolated liver cells was studied under a variety of experimental conditions. When tracer doses of the isotope were utilized, ethanol consistently decreased the rate of protein labeling, regardless of the metabolic conditions of the cells. This inhibition was not prevented by doses of 4-methylpyrazole large enough to abolish all the characteristic metabolic effects of ethanol, and it was not related to perturbations on the rates of L-valine transport and/or proteolysis. When ethanol was tested in the presence of saturating doses of L-(/sup 3/H)valine no effect on protein labeling was observed. These observations suggest that the ethanol effect in decreasing protein labeling from tracer doses of the radioactive precursor does not reflect variations in the rate of protein synthesis but reflects changes in the specific activity of the precursor. These changes probably are secondary to variations in the dimensions of the amino acid pool utilized for protein synthesis. Even though it showed a lack of effect when tested alone, in the presence of saturating doses of the radioactive precursor ethanol inhibited the stimulatory effects on protein synthesis mediated by glucose and several gluconeogenic substrates. This effect of ethanol was not prevented by inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase, indicating that a shift of the NAD system to a more reduced state is not the mediator of its action. It is suggested that ethanol probably acted by changing the steady-state levels of some common effector(s) generated from the metabolism of all these fuels or else by preventing the inactivation of a translational repressor.

  17. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  18. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-12-01

    Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11°C; control) and warm (20°C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I-IV (CI-IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma metabolites, with modest additive actions limited to CII and IV state 4. Overall, our results indicate that warm acclimation came at a cost of reduced ETS efficiency and increased sensitivity to added stressors. PMID:26513222

  19. Effects of d-amphetamine, WIN 35,428, pentobarbital and morphine on schedule-controlled responding in two inbred rat strains that differ in locomotor stimulatory effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J.M.; Goldberg, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    Behavioral effects of d-amphetamine, the cocaine analog, WIN 35,428, morphine, and pentobarbital were compared in NBR/NIH and F344CR1BR rats. Either nose-poke or lever-press responding was maintained under 3-min fixed-interval schedules of food presentation. The effects of morphine, WIN 35,428 and pentobarbital depended upon the rat strain studied: morphine increased nose-poke responding in NBR but not F344 rats; significant strain x dose interactions were observed with WIN 35,428; and pentobarbital was more potent in decreasing nose-poke responding in NBR than in F344 rats. No strain differences were observed in the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine. There were also prominent differences in the effects of drugs that were related to the nature of the response requirement. In both rat strains, nose-poke responding was affected differently than lever-press responding by morphine, d-amphetamine, and WIN 35,428. Pentobarbital produced effects that were independent of the specified response topography. A global underlying difference in these rat strains cannot be identified at present to account for the diversity of findings. The behavioral effects of these drugs appear to be influenced by a host of interactive factors including the drug, strain of animal, the baseline response rate and physical dimensions of the response. PMID:11224148

  20. Differential effects of acute and chronic nicotine on dopamine output in the core and shell of the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nisell, M; Marcus, M; Nomikos, G G; Svensson, T H

    1997-01-01

    Like several drugs of abuse, nicotine increase dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAC). In the present study, the effects of acute and chronic nicotine on DA output in two subdivisions of the NAC, the core and the shell, which are largely associated with motor control and limbic functions, respectively, were examined by means of in vivo differential normal pulse voltammetry in anesthetized, pargyline-treated rats. In the first experiment, acute administration of nicotine (25, 50 and 100 micrograms/kg, cumulative doses; i.v.) was found to increase DA levels in the NACshell to 163% of baseline, whereas DA output in the NACcore was not significantly affected. In the second experiment, animals were pretreated with twelve daily injections of saline or nicotine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.); about 24 hours after the last injection, the animals were challenged with nicotine (50 micrograms/kg and 100 micrograms/kg, cumulative doses; i.v.). Under these conditions, nicotine increased DA output in the NACshell in saline-pretreated animals to 248% and in nicotine-pretreated rats to 180%. Also, nicotine increased DA output in the NACcore in saline-pretreated animals to 185%, whereas no significant effect was observed in nicotine-pretreated rats. The results of the present experiments indicate (i) that acutely administered nicotine or nicotine challenge in chronically pretreated animals with either saline or nicotine consistently increases DA release to a greater extent in the NACshell than in the NACcore, and (ii) that chronic nicotine pretreatment reduces the stimulatory-action of nicotine on DA output in either the shell or the core subdivision of the NAC. PMID:9085189

  1. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain. PMID:25894815

  2. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  3. Effect of acute airway inflammation on the pulmonary antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Deaton, Christopher M; Marlin, David J; Smith, Nicola C; Harris, Patricia A; Dagleish, Mark P; Schroter, Robert C; Kelly, Frank J

    2005-09-01

    Effects of acute airway inflammation induced by organic dust inhalation on pulmonary antioxidant status were investigated in healthy horses and horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. Exposure to organic dust induced acute airway neutrophilia, which was associated with increases in elastase and decreases in ascorbic acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. However, markers of oxidative stress were unaffected, as was hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate. Decreases in ascorbic acid correlated with increased respiratory resistance (P = .001) when both groups were combined. In conclusion, acute neutrophilic airway inflammation does not result in significant evidence of oxidative stress in horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. PMID:16203621

  4. Co-stimulatory and Co-inhibitory Pathways in Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianxia; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-05-17

    The immune system is guided by a series of checks and balances, a major component of which is a large array of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways that modulate the host response. Although co-stimulation is essential for boosting and shaping the initial response following signaling through the antigen receptor, inhibitory pathways are also critical for modulating the immune response. Excessive co-stimulation and/or insufficient co-inhibition can lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance and thus to autoimmunity. In this review, we will focus on the role of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory pathways in two systemic (systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis) and two organ-specific (multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes) emblematic autoimmune diseases. We will also discuss how mechanistic analysis of these pathways has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and initiation of clinical trials for autoimmune diseases, as well as outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:27192568

  5. Effects of Acute Exercise on Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labban, Jeffrey D.; Etnier, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of…

  6. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  7. Stimulatory Agents Simultaneously Improving the Production and Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenols from Inonotus obliquus by Submerged Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Shen, Mengwei; Quan, Lili

    2015-07-01

    Polyphenols are important secondary metabolites from the edible and medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus. Both the rarity of I. obliquus fruit body and the low efficiency of current method of submerged fermentation lead to a low yield of polyphenols. This study was aimed to determine the effect of applying stimulatory agents to liquid cultured I. obliquus on the simultaneous accumulation of exo-polyphenols (EPC) and endo-polyphenols (IPC). Linoleic acid was the most effective out of the 17 tested stimulatory agents, the majority of which increased the EPC and IPC production. The result was totally different from the stimulatory effect of Tween 80 for polysaccharide production in previous studies. The addition of 1.0 g/L linoleic acid on day 0 resulted in 7-, 14-, and 10-fold of increase (p < 0.05) in the production of EPC extracted by ethyl acetate (EA-EPC), EPC extracted by n-butyl alcohol (NB-EPC), and IPC, and significantly increased the production of ferulic acid, gallic acid, epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), phelligridin G, inoscavin B, and davallialactone. The EA-EPC, BA-EPC, and IPC from the linoleic acid-containing medium had significantly (p < 0.05) stronger scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH), which was attributed to the higher content of these bioactive polyphenols. PMID:25951778

  8. Acute effects of tea consumption on attention and mood.

    PubMed

    Einöther, Suzanne J; Martens, Vanessa E

    2013-12-01

    Tea has historically been associated with mood and performance benefits, such as relaxation and concentration. This review summarizes the research on the acute effects of tea, and its ingredients theanine and caffeine, on attention and mood. Consistent with abundant research on the benefits of caffeine, the performance benefits of tea were identified in a number of studies, with particularly consistent evidence for improved attention. Tea consumption also consistently improved self-reported alertness and arousal, whereas effects on pleasure or relaxation were less consistent. In addition to the research on caffeine in real-life performance, 2 recent studies have provided a broader perspective on tea's effects on psychological function in that they showed beneficial effects in related areas such as work performance and creativity. These studies showed the validity of laboratory findings by supporting the idea that tea consumption has acute benefits on both mood and performance in real-life situations. PMID:24172303

  9. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. PMID:24739589

  10. The effects of acute and chronic stress on diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2012-10-23

    Stress is an important contributor to pathological conditions in humans. Hormonal changes that occur during acute and chronic stress situations can affect glucose homeostasis in both healthy people and in those with diabetes. Several studies have reported a negative effect of acute stress on maintenance of blood glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The effect of stress on glycemic control in people with diabetes may be related to a direct effect of stress hormones on blood glucose levels and an indirect effect of stress on patient behaviors related to diabetes treatment and monitoring and meal and exercise plans. In contrast, there is no clear evidence that stressful life events promote the development of diabetes in children or in adults. Stress hyperglycemia, the development of hyperglycemia during acute illness, represents another interesting connection between the stress system and glucose homeostasis. A large body of evidence supports an association between stress hyperglycemia and increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Interestingly, there is some evidence supporting a beneficial effect of insulin in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units. Finally, stress can influence the development of type 2 diabetes indirectly by promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23092890

  11. Acute effects of aflatoxins on guinea pig isolated ileum.

    PubMed

    Luzi, A; Cometa, M F; Palmery, M

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies on the aflatoxins have focused mainly on their chronic toxic effects. In this study we investigated the acute gastrointestinal effects of four common aflatoxins on isolated guinea pig ileum. AFB(1) (EC(50) 4.6+/-0.4 microM) and AFB(2) (EC(50)17+/-4.4 microM) contracted isolated guinea pig ileum in a dose-dependent manner, whereas AFG(1) and AFG(2) evoked no contractions. Atropine (5.9 nM 11.8 and 23.6 nM) antagonized AFB(1)-induced contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with the nicotinic ganglionic blocker, hexamethonium (up to 55 microM), left AFB(1)-induced contractions unchanged. In contrast, tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM), blocked AFB(1) contractile activity. The two inhibitors of ACh release, morphine (0.3 microM) and clonidine (0.4 microM), antagonized EC(50) AFB(1)-induced contractions, and apamin, a drug that increases neuronal excitability, facilitated the EC(50) AFB(1)-induced contractile effect. The choline uptake blocker, hemicholinium (17.4 microM) markedly reduced AFB(1)-induced contractions. These results suggest that aflatoxins induce their contractile effect indirectly through the cholinergic system by stimulating acetylcholine release from the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve endings. The acute actions of aflatoxins on isolated guinea pig ileum could explain their acute gastrointestinal effects in humans and animals. PMID:12206819

  12. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  13. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  14. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity-induced plasticity with specific cognitive training-induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  15. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  16. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity–induced plasticity with specific cognitive training–induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  17. The Protective Effects of Buzui on Acute Alcoholism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-Chao; Gao, Shu-di; Hu, Xiao-yu; Yi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of a traditional buzui recipe in anti-inebriation treatment. Buzui consists of Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis, Fructus Chebulae, Fructus Mume, Fructus Crataegi, Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli, and Excrementum Bombycis. The buzui mixture was delivered by gavage, and ethanol was delivered subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of buzui on the righting reflex, inebriation rates, and the survival curve are depicted. Blood alcohol concentrations, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were recorded. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as malonaldehyde (MDA) levels, were also measured. Our results demonstrated that a traditional buzui recipe showed significant effects on promoting wakefulness and the prevention of acute alcohol intoxication, accelerating the metabolism of alcohol in the liver and reducing the oxidative damage caused by acute alcoholism. PMID:26884793

  18. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  19. Acute hemodialysis effects on doppler echocardiographic indices.

    PubMed

    Abid, Leila; Rekik, Hajer; Jarraya, Fayçal; Kharrat, Ilyes; Hachicha, Jamil; Kammoun, Samir

    2014-07-01

    Conventional echocardiographic (ECHO) parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricular (LV) have been shown to be load dependent. However, the impact of pre-load reduction on tissue Doppler (TD) parameters of LV function is incompletely understood. To evaluate the effect of a single hemodialysis (HD) session on LV systolic and diastolic function using pulsed Doppler echocardiography and pulsed tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), we studied 81 chronic HD patients (40 males; mean age 52.4 ± 16.4 years) with these tools. ECHO parameters were obtained 30 min before and 30 min after HD. Fluid volume removed by HD was 1640 ± 730 cm³. HD led to reduction in LV end-diastolic volume (P <0.001), end-systolic volume (P <0.001), left atrium area (P <0.001), peak early (E-wave) trans-mitral flow velocity (P <0.001), the ratio of early to late Doppler velocities of diastolic mitral inflow (P <0.001) and aortic time velocity integral (P <0.001). No significant change in peak S velocity of pulmonary vein flow after HD was noted. Early and late diastolic (E') TDI velocities and the ratio of early to late TDI diastolic velocities (E'/A') on the lateral side of the mitral annulus decreased significantly after HD (P = 0.013; P = 0.007 and P = 0.008, respectively). Velocity of flow progression (Vp) during diastole was not affected by pre-load reduction. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure and the diameter of the inferior vena cava decreased significantly (P <0.001 and P <0.001, respectively) after HD. We conclude that most of the Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function are pre-load-dependent and velocity of flow progression was minimally affected by pre-load reduction in HD patients. PMID:24969184

  20. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  1. Oligodeoxynucleotide studies in primates: antisense and immune stimulatory indications.

    PubMed

    Farman, Cindy A; Kornbrust, Doug J

    2003-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide compounds (AS ODN) are being developed as therapeutics for various disease indications. Their safety and pharmacokinetics are most commonly evaluated in rodents and nonhuman primates. Traditional AS ODN are short, single strands of DNA, and they target specific mRNA sequences. Plasma clearance of AS ODN is rapid, broad tissue distribution occurs, and elimination is by nuclease metabolism. Structural modifications to AS ODN have been made to enhance their efficacy and improve their safety. A number of class effects are observed with AS ODN that are unrelated to the specific targeted mRNA sequence. Acute effects include activation of the alternative complement pathway and inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. In monkeys, rodents, and dogs given repeated doses of AS ODN, accumulation of AS ODN and/or metabolites occurs in the form of basophilic granules in various tissues, including the kidney, lymph nodes and liver. A new potential therapeutic application of ODN is that of immune stimulation. Immunostimulatory ODN (IS ODN) are being investigated for use in treating cancer, infectious disease, and allergy. For the development of both AS and IS ODN, primates will continue to be important for safety assessment. PMID:12597439

  2. Specific effects of acute moderate exercise on cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Davranche, Karen; McMorris, Terry

    2009-04-01

    The main issue of this study was to determine whether cognitive control is affected by acute moderate exercise. Twelve participants [4 females (VO(2 max)=42 ml/kg/min) and 8 males (VO(2 max) = 48 ml/kg/min)] performed a Simon task while cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity corresponding to their individual ventilatory threshold. The distribution-analytical technique and the delta plot analysis [Ridderinkhof, K. R. (2002). Activation and suppression in conflict tasks: Empirical clarification through distributional analyses. In W. Prinz & B. Hommel (Eds.), Common mechanisms in perception and action. Attention and performance (Vol. 19, pp. 494-519). Oxford: Oxford University Press.] were used to assess the role of selective response inhibition in resolving response conflict. Results showed that cognitive processes appeared to be differently affected by acute moderate exercise. Reaction time results confirmed that performance is better (faster without change in accuracy) when the cognitive task is performed simultaneously with exercise. Between-trial adjustments (post-conflict and post-error) highlighted that cognitive control adjustments are also fully efficient during exercise. However, the effect of congruency (Simon effect) appeared to be more pronounced during exercise compared to rest which suggests that the response inhibition is deteriorated during exercise. The present findings suggest that acute moderate exercise differently affects some specific aspects of cognitive functions. PMID:19138814

  3. Immunochemical characterization and transacting properties of upstream stimulatory factor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Lefrançois-Martinez, A M; Henrion, A; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M; Martinez, A

    1996-01-19

    The ubiquitous upstream stimulatory factor (USF) transcription factors encoded by two distinct genes (USF1 and USF2) exist under the form of various dimers able to bind E-boxes. We report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of USF2 isoforms, corresponding to a 44-kDa subunit, USF2a, and a new 38-kDa subunit, USF2b, generated by differential splicing. Using specific anti-USF antibodies, we define the different binding complexes in various nuclear extracts. In vivo, the USF1/USF2a heterodimer represents over 66% of the USF binding activity whereas the USF1 and USF2a homodimers represent less than 10%, which strongly suggests an in vivo preferential association in heterodimers. In particular, an USF1/USF2b heterodimer accounted for almost 15% of the USF species in some cells. The preferential heterodimerization of USF subunits was reproduced ex vivo, while the in vitro association of cotranslated subunits, or recombinant USF proteins, appeared to be random. In transiently transfected HeLa or hepatoma cells, USF2a and USF1 homodimers transactivated a minimal promoter with similar efficiency, whereas USF2b, which lacks an internal 67-amino acid domain, was a poor transactivator. Additionally, USF2b was an efficient as USF1 and USF2a homodimers in transactivating the liver-specific pyruvate kinase gene promoter. PMID:8576131

  4. Role of upstream stimulatory factor 2 in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). About 20%–30% of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes develop DN. DN is characterized by both glomerulosclerosis with thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix expansion, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Hyperglycemia and the activation of the intra-renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in diabetes have been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of DN. However, the mechanisms are not well known. Studies from our laboratory demonstrated that the transcription factor—upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) is an important regulator of DN. Moreover, the renin gene is a downstream target of USF2. Importantly, USF2 transgenic (Tg) mice demonstrate a specific increase in renal renin expression and angiotensin II (AngII) levels in kidney and exhibit increased urinary albumin excretion and extracellular matrix deposition in glomeruli, supporting a role for USF2 in the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we summarize our findings of the mechanisms by which diabetes regulates USF2 in kidney cells and its role in regulation of renal renin-angiotensin system and the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26494984

  5. Effect and Safety of Rosuvastatin in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji Hoe; Song, Dongbeom; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Kyung-Yul; Lee, Ki-Jeong; Yoo, Joonsang; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Byung Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The benefit of statins in acute stroke remains uncertain. Statins may prevent stroke recurrence during the acute stage of stroke via pleiotropic effects. However, statins may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. We investigated the effect and safety of rosuvastatin in acute stroke patients. Methods This randomized, double-blind, multi-center trial compared rosuvastatin 20 mg and placebo in statin-naïve stroke patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 48 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was occurrence of new ischemic lesions on DWI at 5 or 14 days. Results This trial was stopped early after randomization of 316 patients due to slow enrollment. Among 289 patients with at least one follow-up imaging, the frequency of new ischemic lesions on DWI was not different between groups (rosuvastatin: 27/137, 19.7% vs. placebo: 36/152, 23.6%) (relative risk 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.53–1.30). Infarct volume growth at 5 days (log-transformed volume change, rosuvastatin: 0.2±1.0 mm3 vs. placebo: 0.3±1.3 mm3; P=0.784) was not different, either. However, hemorrhagic infarction or parenchymal/subarachnoid hemorrhage on gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging occurred less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (6/137, 4.4%) than the placebo group (22/152, 14.5%, P=0.007). Among 314 patients with at least one dose of study medication, progression or clinical recurrence of stroke tended to occur less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (1/155, 0.6% vs. 7/159, 4.4%, P=0.067). Adverse events did not differ between groups. Conclusions The efficacy of rosuvastatin in reducing recurrence in acute stroke was inconclusive. However, statin use was safe and reduced hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:26846760

  6. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  7. Acute effect of ascorbic acid on fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Bordia, A; Paliwal, D K; Jain, K; Kothari, L K

    1978-08-01

    The acute effect of 1 g oral ascorbic acid on serum fibrinolytic activity was studied in 40 adult males. In Group I (healthy adults) administration of ascorbic acid raised the serum level by about 71%, while the fibrinolytic activity increased to a peak of 137% at 6 h. In patients with CAD (Group II) an essentially similar increase in FA was observed. In Group III, simultaneous administration of ascorbic acid with 100 g fat effectively prevented a fall in fibrinolytic activity and actually raised it by 64% above the fasting level. PMID:568476

  8. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  9. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  10. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  11. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study. PMID:27031591

  12. Stimulatory current at the edge of an inactive conductor in an electric field: Role of nonlinear interfacial current-voltage relationship

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jared A.; Pollard, Andrew E.; White, Peter S.; Knisley, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac electric field stimulation is critical for the mechanism of defibrillation. The presence of certain inactive epicardial conductors in the field during defibrillation can decrease the defibrillation threshold. We hypothesized this decrease is due to stimulatory effects of current across the interface between the inactive conductor and the heart during field stimulation. To examine this current and its possible stimulatory effects, we imaged transmittance of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) conductors, tested for indium with x-ray diffraction, created a computer model containing realistic ITO interfacial properties, and optically mapped excitation of rabbit heart during electric field stimulation in the presence of an ITO conductor. Reduction of ITO to indium decreased transmittance at the edge facing the anodal shock electrode when trans-interfacial voltage exceeded standard reduction potential. The interfacial current-voltage relationship was nonlinear, producing larger conductances at higher currents. This nonlinearity concentrated the interfacial current near edges in images and in a computer model. The edge current was stimulatory, producing early postshock excitation of rabbit ventricles. Thus, darkening of ITO indicates interfacial current by indium reduction. Interfacial nonlinearity concentrates current near the edge where it can excite the heart. Stimulatory current at edges may account for the reported decrease in defibrillation threshold by inactive conductors. PMID:19605317

  13. Acute effects of cigarette smoking on microcirculation of the thumb.

    PubMed

    van Adrichem, L N; Hovius, S E; van Strik, R; van der Meulen, J C

    1992-01-01

    The acute effect of smoking on the microcirculation of the skin of the thumb was investigated in healthy volunteers. Twenty-two were smokers and 10 were non-smokers. The flow was assessed by means of laser Doppler flowmetry. The smokers inhaled 2 cigarettes. During smoking of their first and second cigarette respectively, a mean decrease in laser Doppler flow of 23.8% and 29.0% was seen (p = 0.03; p = 0.01). Ten minutes after smoking this decrease was recovered by half. This experiment confirms that one should prohibit smoking of cigarettes pre- and postoperatively for optimal wound healing conditions. PMID:1737221

  14. Acute interactive motoric effects of permethrin and xylene

    SciTech Connect

    Durnam, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The potential interactive motoric effects of permethrin (a type I pyrethroid pesticide) and xylene (an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent) were assessed in male CD-I mice following acute exposure. The hypothesis was that these two compounds would interact (the effects would be more than additive) to disrupt motor performance on inverted screen tent performance and/or locomotor activity. The data obtained from this experiment do not support this hypothesis. The results failed to show a significant interaction between the permethrin and xylene on either task, however, the combination of these compounds altered the time course of motoric effects. The peak effect on the inverted screen test occurred earlier for xylene and permethrin than for permethrin alone. The xylene probably increased the rate of absorption of xylene. On locomotor activity, permethrin and xylene when given separately increased activity, however, the highest dose combination of permethrin and xylene produced a strong decrease in activity at all time points.

  15. Acute effects of bright light exposure on cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Christopher M; Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Scheer, Frank A J L; Cajochen, Christian; Lockley, Steven W; Czeisler, Charles A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Multisynaptic neural and endocrine pathways from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus have been hypothesized to communicate circadian and photic information to the adrenal glands. In humans, light exposure has been reported to have no effect, increase, or decrease cortisol levels. These inconsistent findings in humans may be related to differences among studies including the intensity (approximately 500 to 5500 lux), duration (15 min to 4 h), and circadian phase of light exposure. The authors assessed the influence of exposure to bright light on cortisol levels in humans during the rising and descending phases of the circadian rhythm of cortisol, that is, when cortisol levels are high. Twenty healthy men and women were studied using a within-subject research design. Subjects were studied in an environment free of time cues for 9 to 10 days. Subjects received a 6.7-h exposure of bright light (approximately 10,000 lux; equivalent to ambient light intensity just after sunrise or just before sunset) or dim light (approximately 3 lux; equivalent to candle light) during the biological night and morning. Bright light exposure significantly reduced plasma cortisol levels at both circadian phases studied, whereas dim light exposure had little effect on cortisol levels. The finding of an acute suppressive effect of bright light exposure on cortisol levels supports the existence of a mechanism by which photic information can acutely influence the human adrenal glands. PMID:20484692

  16. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients. PMID:25271215

  17. Acute effect of prostaglandins and somatostatin on thymidine uptake of gastric mucosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alino, S.F.; Hilario, E. )

    1988-12-01

    This study compares the in vivo effect of exogenous administration of prostaglandin E2 (30 {mu}g/kg) and its precursor, arachidonic acid (30 {mu}g/kg), with the effect of indomethacin (5 mg/kg) on the 6-({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake of antral mucosa of mice by autoradiographical methods. Likewise, the effect of somatostatin (30 {mu}g/kg) on 6-({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake is studied. Evaluation of the number of labeled cells, in the histological sections of the gastric mucosa, showed that arachidonic acid, prostaglandin E2, and somatostatin induced an increase in the number of labeled cells (107, 44, and 45%, respectively), while indomethacin induced a decrease of 32% compared to the control group. These results suggest that prostaglandins may mediate stimulatory effects on thymidine uptake of gastric mucosa cells in the first step after drug administration.

  18. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  19. Neurobehavioral effects of acute styrene exposure in fiberglass boatbuilders

    SciTech Connect

    Letz, R.; Mahoney, F.C.; Hershman, D.L.; Woskie, S.; Smith, T.J. )

    1990-11-01

    A field investigation of the effects of acute exposure to styrene among fiberglass boatbuilders was performed. Personal samples of styrene in breathing zone air and postshift urinary mandelic acid were collected for 105 workers exposed and not exposed to styrene in 6 fiberglass boatbuilding companies in New England. Three tests from the computerized Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES) were performed by the subjects in the morning before exposure to styrene, near midday, and at the end of the work day. Duration of exposure averaged 2.9 years (SD = 4.6), 8-hour TWA styrene exposure averaged 29.9 ppm (SD = 36.2), and urinary mandelic acid averaged 347 mg/g creatinine (SD = 465). Regression analyses indicated a statistically significant relationship between postshift performance on the Symbol-Digit test and both acute styrene exposure and mandelic acid. Other analyses comparing workers exposed to less than 50 ppm and greater than 50 ppm styrene also showed a significant effect on Symbol-Digit performance. All three NES tests showed test-retest correlation coefficients above .80, and ease of use for collection of neurobehavioral data under field conditions was demonstrated.

  20. Effects of age on hemorheological responses to acute endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Moradi, Akram; Nikookheslat, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Hadi; Rahbaran, Adel; Connes, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of age on the acute responses of hemorheological variables and biochemical parameters to a single bout of sub-maximal endurance exercise. Fifteen young (20-30 years), 15 middle-aged (40-50 years) and 12 old (60-70 years) male subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed one single bout of endurance exercise encompassed 30-min cycling at 70-75% of maximal heart rate which was followed by 30-min recovery. Three blood samples were taken before, immediately after exercise and after 30-min recovery. Resting levels of hematocrit, red blood cells count, plasma albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, plasma viscosity and whole blood viscosity were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.01). Thirty minutes of cycling resulted in significant increases (P < 0.05) in all parameters; while these changes were temporary and returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Responses of all parameters to exercise and recovery were not significantly different among the three groups (P > 0.05). Fibrinogen changes during exercise and recovery were corrected for exercise- and recovery-induced changes in plasma volume. Data analysis showed effects of exercise and recovery only for raw data (P > 0.05). In addition, raw and corrected fibrinogen data in response to exercise and recovery were not age-related. Our results demonstrate that age does not affect the hemorheological responses to an acute endurance exercise in healthy men. PMID:22214687

  1. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  2. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  3. Acute off-target effects of neural circuit manipulations.

    PubMed

    Otchy, Timothy M; Wolff, Steffen B E; Rhee, Juliana Y; Pehlevan, Cengiz; Kawai, Risa; Kempf, Alexandre; Gobes, Sharon M H; Ölveczky, Bence P

    2015-12-17

    Rapid and reversible manipulations of neural activity in behaving animals are transforming our understanding of brain function. An important assumption underlying much of this work is that evoked behavioural changes reflect the function of the manipulated circuits. We show that this assumption is problematic because it disregards indirect effects on the independent functions of downstream circuits. Transient inactivations of motor cortex in rats and nucleus interface (Nif) in songbirds severely degraded task-specific movement patterns and courtship songs, respectively, which are learned skills that recover spontaneously after permanent lesions of the same areas. We resolve this discrepancy in songbirds, showing that Nif silencing acutely affects the function of HVC, a downstream song control nucleus. Paralleling song recovery, the off-target effects resolved within days of Nif lesions, a recovery consistent with homeostatic regulation of neural activity in HVC. These results have implications for interpreting transient circuit manipulations and for understanding recovery after brain lesions. PMID:26649821

  4. Diurnal Spectral Sensitivity of the Acute Alerting Effects of Light

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shadab A.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Brainard, George C.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity for the acute alerting response to nocturnal light exposure. We assessed daytime spectral sensitivity in alertness, performance, and waking electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Between-subjects (n = 8 per group). Setting: Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit. Participants: Sixteen healthy young adults (mean age ± standard deviation = 23.8 ± 2.7 y). Interventions: Equal photon density exposure (2.8 × 1013 photons/cm2/s) to monochromatic 460 nm (blue) or 555 nm (green) light for 6.5 h centered in the middle of the 16-h episode of wakefulness during the biological day. Results were compared retrospectively to 16 individuals who were administered the same light exposure during the night. Measurements and Results: Daytime and nighttime 460-nm light exposure significantly improved auditory reaction time (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and reduced attentional lapses (P < 0.05), and improved EEG correlates of alertness compared to 555-nm exposure. Whereas subjective sleepiness ratings did not differ between the two spectral conditions during the daytime (P > 0.05), 460-nm light exposure at night significantly reduced subjective sleepiness compared to 555-nm light exposure at night (P < 0.05). Moreover, nighttime 460-nm exposure improved alertness to near-daytime levels. Conclusions: The alerting effects of short-wavelength 460-nm light are mediated by counteracting both the circadian drive for sleepiness and homeostatic sleep pressure at night, but only via reducing the effects of homeostatic sleep pressure during the day. Citation: Rahman SA; Flynn-Evans EE; Aeschbach D; Brainard GC; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Diurnal spectral sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of light. SLEEP 2014;37(2):271-281. PMID:24501435

  5. Acute Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Intranasal Methamphetamine in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Carl L; Gunderson, Erik W; Perez, Audrey; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Thurmond, Andrew; Comer, Sandra D; Foltin, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal methamphetamine abuse has increased dramatically in the past decade, yet only one published study has investigated its acute effects under controlled laboratory conditions. Thus, the current study examined the effects of single-dose intranasal methamphetamine administration on a broad range of behavioral and physiological measures. Eleven nontreatment-seeking methamphetamine abusers (two females, nine males) completed this four-session, in-patient, within-participant, double-blind study. During each session, one of four intranasal methamphetamine doses (0, 12, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg) was administered and methamphetamine plasma concentrations, cardiovascular, subjective, and psychomotor/cognitive performance effects were assessed before drug administration and repeatedly thereafter. Following drug administration, methamphetamine plasma concentrations systematically increased for 4 h postdrug administration then declined. Methamphetamine dose dependently increased cardiovascular measures and ‘positive’ subjective effects, with peaks occurring approximately 5–15 min after drug administration, when plasma levels were still ascending. In addition, cognitive performance on less complicated tasks was improved by all active methamphetamine doses, whereas performance on more complicated tasks was improved only by the intermediate doses (12 and 25 mg). These results show that intranasal methamphetamine produced predictable effects on multiple behavioral and physiological measures before peak plasma levels were observed. Of interest is the dissociation between methamphetamine plasma concentrations with cardiovascular measures and positive subjective effects, which might have important implications for potential toxicity after repeated doses. PMID:17851535

  6. Investigation of acute stroke: what is the most effective strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Dunbabin, D. W.; Sandercock, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques of investigation of acute stroke syndromes have progressed rapidly in recent years, outpacing developments in effective stroke treatment. The clinician is thus faced with a variety of tests, each with different cost implications and each altering management to a greater or lesser extent. This review will concentrate on the basic tests which should be performed for all strokes (full blood count, ESR, biochemical screen, blood glucose, cholesterol, syphilis serology, chest X-ray and electrocardiogram). Additional tests may be required in selected cases: CT scan to diagnose 'non-stroke' lesions, to exclude cerebral haemorrhage if anti-haemostatic therapy is planned, and to detect strokes which may require emergency intervention (such as cerebellar stroke with hydrocephalus); echocardiography to detect cardiac sources of emboli; and in a few cases lumbar puncture and specialized haematological tests. Other tests, which are currently research tools, may be suitable for widespread use in the future including NMR, SPECT and PET scanning. PMID:2062773

  7. The effects of an acute psychosocial stressor on episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Stawski, Robert S.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Although stressors are believed to impair memory, experimental studies with humans have provided inconsistent support for this conclusion. The current study was designed to examine the effect of an acute psychosocial stressor, and subsequent reactivity, on episodic memory. One hundred participants completed a list-recall task before and after random assignment into a stressor or nonstressor condition. Participants assigned to the stressor condition exhibited both impaired delayed and immediate recall, and also exhibited increasesin the commission of intrusions and perseverations. The experience of off-task thoughts and intentional suppression of such thoughts, were associated with greater impairment of immediate recall. Changes in state anxiety, negative mood, and heart rate were unrelated to changes in memory. These data indicate that exposure to a stressor impaired the recall of previously learned information, and compromised the recall of newly acquired information. Furthermore, cognitive interference is an important factor regarding stress-related impairments of episodic memory. memory. PMID:19727439

  8. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W.; McGeary, John E.; Monti, Peter M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2013-01-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marijuana on physiological and subjective stimulation, subjective intoxication, and self-reported negative and positive affect with 114 weekly marijuana smokers. Individuals were first tested under a baseline/no smoking condition and again under experimental condition. Relative to placebo, THC significantly increased arousal and confusion/bewilderment. However, the direction of effect on anxiety varied depending on instructional set: Anxiety increased after THC for those told placebo but decreased among other participants. Furthermore, marijuana users who expected more impairment from marijuana displayed more anxiety after smoking active marijuana, whereas those who did not expect the impairment became less anxious after marijuana. Both pharmacologic and stimulus expectancy main effects significantly increased positive affect. Frequent marijuana users were less anxious after smoking as compared to less frequent smokers. These findings show that expectancy instructions and pharmacology play independent roles in effects of marijuana on negative affect. Further studies examining how other individual difference factors impact marijuana's effects on mood are needed. PMID:24319318

  9. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  10. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  11. From neurotoxic to chemosensory effects: new insights on acute solvent neurotoxicity exemplified by acute effects of 2-ethylhexanol.

    PubMed

    van Thriel, Christoph; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Schäper, Michael; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus; Juran, Stephanie; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Seeber, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    Historically, acute solvent neurotoxicity was strongly related to reversible narcotic states that could be detected by neurobehavioral tests (e.g., simple reaction time). Nowadays, the occupational exposure to chemicals is markedly reduced and the avoidance of chemosensory effects is more important for the regulation of solvents. Exemplarily, this study examines if the chemosensory perception of 2-ethylhexanol is capable to distract performance in demanding neurobehavioral tasks. In two experiments three time-weighted average concentrations of 2-ethylhexanol (C(TWA): 1.5, 10, and 20 ppm) were investigated. In experiment A (n=24) variable concentrations over time (4h) were used, experiment B (n=22) investigated constant concentrations. The experiments were conducted in a 29 m3 exposure laboratory. Cross-over designs with randomized sequences of exposures were used. Among the 46 male participants 19 subjects reported enhanced chemical sensitivity; the other 27 subjects did not show this personality feature. During the exposure periods neurobehavioral tests were presented twice (beginning; end), the intensity of chemosensory perceptions were rated thrice. The intensity of chemosensory perceptions showed a clear dose-dependency. Subjects' performance in the vigilance test was not affected by the different exposures. Moreover, the results of neurobehavioral tests measuring executive function were neither affected by the C(TWA) concentration nor by the exposure peaks. With increasing C(TWA), a subgroup of the chemically sensitive subjects showed deteriorated accuracy in a divided attention task. Especially the 20 ppm conditions were very annoying. Only during the constant 10 ppm condition the time courses of the annoyance and nasal irritation ratings indicated some adaptation. In general, with the applied neurobehavioral tests distractive effects of acute 2-ethylhexanol exposures up to 20 ppm could not be confirmed. In sensitive groups such distractive effects of

  12. Acute side effects of homologous interleukin-3 in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, F. C.; Mulder, A. H.; van den Bos, C.; Burger, H.; van Leen, R. W.; Wagemaker, G.

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin-3 treatment of juvenile rhesus monkeys elicits a dose- and time-dependent syndrome that includes urticaria, palpable lymph nodes, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, anemia, vomiting, diarrhea, intestinal bleeding, edema, and arthritis, apart from a strong stimulation of hemopoiesis. Arthritis was found to occur significantly more often in animals expressing the major histocompatibility complex alleles B9 and Dr5. Histological analysis revealed an abundance of mast cells in urticaria and, to a lesser extent, in lungs and synovia of arthritic joints. Active osteoclasts were abundant in ribs and arthritic joints. Extramedullary hemopoiesis was encountered in liver, spleen, and kidneys. The spleen showed deposits of hemosiderin, and in the liver, Kupffer cells were loaded with iron, indicating enhanced turnover of hemoglobin. Lymph nodes and bone marrow showed macrophages involved in hemophagocytosis, which probably contributed to the development of anemia and thrombopenia. Biochemical parameters in sera were indicative of parenchymal liver damage, with cholestasis and increased erythrocyte destruction. The side effects were strongly reduced in monkeys subjected to total body irradiation just before interleukin-3 treatment. Histamine antagonists were not significantly effective in preventing side effects, which is explained by the perpetual stimulation of basophilic granulocytes by exogenous interleukin-3. The nature of the side effects indicates that interleukin-3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of acute type hypersensitivity reactions and arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8256852

  13. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cocaine on the Spontaneous Behavior of Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of acute and daily cocaine on spontaneous behavior patterns of pigeons. After determining the acute effects of a range of doses, 9 pigeons were divided into three groups that received one of three doses of cocaine daily, either 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 mg/kg cocaine. Measures were taken of spontaneous…

  14. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  15. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  16. Effects of acute cooling on fish electroretinogram: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gačić, Zoran; Milošević, Milena; Mićković, Branislav; Nikčević, Miroslav; Damjanović, Ilija

    2015-06-01

    Temperature dependence of electroretinogram (ERG) was investigated in 3 fish species occupying different habitats--dogfish shark (Scyliorhinus canicula), Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio) and European eel (Anguilla anguilla). Acute cooling of the shark isolated eyecup from 23°C down to 6°C induced suppression of the electroretinographic b-wave--a complete degradation of this component was observed at 6°C. On the other hand, photoreceptor component of the ERG, the negative late receptor potential was not affected by cooling. The fact that the suppression of the dogfish shark b-wave at low temperatures was as a rule irreversible testifies about breakdown of neural retinal function at cold temperature extremes. Although in vivo experiments on immobilized Prussian carps have never resulted in complete deterioration of the b-wave at low temperatures, significant suppression of this ERG component by cooling was detected. Suppressing the effect of low temperatures on Prussian carp ERG might be due to the fact that C. gibelio, as well as other cyprinids, can be characterized as a warmwater species preferring temperatures well above cold extremes. The ERG of the eel, the third examined species, exhibited the strongest resistance to extremely low temperatures. During acute cooling of in situ eyecup preparations of migrating silver eels from 30°C down to 2°C the form of ERG became wider, but the amplitude of the b-wave only slightly decreased. High tolerance of eel b-wave to cold extremes shown in our study complies with ecological data confirming eurythermia in migrating silver eels remarkably adapted to cold-water environment as well. PMID:25759261

  17. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Chester A.; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone. PMID:23055093

  18. Antitumoral effect of Ocoxin on acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Hernández-García, Susana; Sanz, Eduardo; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy whose incidence is growing in developed countries. In the relapse setting, very limited therapeutic options are available and in most cases only palliative care can be offered to patients. The effect of a composite formulation that contains several antioxidants, Ocoxin Oral solution (OOS), was tested in this condition. When analyzed in vitro, OOS exhibited anti-AML action that was both time and dose dependent. In vivo OOS induced a ralentization of tumor growth that was due to a decrease in cell proliferation. Such effect could, at least partially, be due to an increase in the cell cycle inhibitor p27, although other cell cycle proteins seemed to be altered. Besides, OOS induced an immunomodulatory effect through the induction of IL6. When tested in combination with other therapeutic agents normally used in the treatment of AML patients, OOS demonstrated a higher antiproliferative action, suggesting that it may be used in combination with those standard of care treatments to potentiate their antiproliferative action in the AML clinic. PMID:26756220

  19. [Acute Toxic Effects of Bromate on Aquatic Organisms].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Liu, Dong-mei; Zhang, Wen-juan; Cui, Fu-yi

    2016-02-15

    Acute toxic effects of potassium bromate, sodium bromate and potassium bromide on luminescent bacteria, water flea, green alga and zebrafish were studied using standard toxic testing methods. The results showed that the pollutants had no effect on the luminous intensity of luminescent bacteria. The 96 h EC5. of potassium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 738.18 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 on Daphnia magna and Moina was 154.01 mg x L(-1) was 161.80 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 198 52 mg x L(-1), 175.68 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 931.4 mg x L(-1). The 96 h EC50 of sodium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 540.26 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 Daphnia magna and Moina was 127.90 mg x L(-1), 111.07 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 161.80 mg x L(-1), 123.47 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 1065.6 mg x L(-1). But the effects of potassium bromide on the above several kinds of aquatic organisms were far smaller than those of potassium bromate and sodium bromate. The toxic effects on test organisms were due to the impacts of bromate after the comparison of different pollutants, and the effects were more obvious with the increase of exposure time. The order of sensitivity to the toxic effects of bromate was Daphnia magna, Moina > Scenedesmus obliquus > zebrafish > Chlorella vulgaris, luminescent bacteria. PMID:27363170

  20. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  1. Aflatrem: a tremorgenic mycotoxin with acute neurotoxic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, J J; Cameron, J E; Cole, R J

    1985-01-01

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins induce neurologic symptoms ranging from mental confusion to tremors, seizures and death, and are apparently the only class of mycotoxins with significant central nervous system activity. Tremorgens have been implicated in a number of neurologic diseases of cattle collectively known as staggers syndromes, and pose significant agricultural and health problems for both cattle and humans. Although the effects of tremorgens are thought to result from transient perturbations of amino acid neurotransmitter release mechanisms, there is reason to believe that acute exposures to toxins with such synaptic effects may result in degeneration of neuronal fiber processes. To test this hypothesis, rats were given a single tremorgenic (3 mg/kg, IP) dose of aflatrem, and kinetics of amino acid neurotransmitter uptake was assessed in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals at 1 day, 1 week, and 2 weeks after injection. Results indicate a decrease in the capacity of the GABA and glutamate uptake systems, which was interpreted as a loss of nerve terminals. The affinity constants suggest a decrease in release of these transmitters as well. In addition to its transient influence on transmitter release, a single low dose of aflatrem is able to induce degeneration of neuronal processes in hippocampal neurotransmitter systems and therefore represents a long-term health threat. PMID:2867895

  2. Effects of melatonin implants in pony mares. 1. Acute effects.

    PubMed

    Peltier, M R; Robinson, G; Sharp, D C

    1998-04-15

    The effects of melatonin implant treatment over a four week period on LH, estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) secretion during the breeding season were studied in ovary-intact and ovariectomized pony mares. Mares with melatonin implants had significantly higher daytime melatonin concentrations than mares with sharm implants (P = 0.0065). In ovariectomized mares, LH secretion did not differ between mares with melatonin and sham implants. In ovary-intact mares, melatonin implants altered the pattern of LH secretion (P = 0.0023) in such a way that an increase in LH secretion was observed during the periovulatory period. Estradiol and P4 secretion were unaffected by melatonin implants. These results suggest that constant administration of melatonin may enhance the secretion of LH during the periovulatory surge but does not adversely affect E2, P4 or basal LH secretion in mares during the breeding season. PMID:10732050

  3. Acute Effect of Hookah Smoking on the Human Coronary Microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael D; Rezk-Hanna, Mary; Rader, Florian; Mason, O'Neil R; Tang, Xiu; Shidban, Sarah; Rosenberry, Ryan; Benowitz, Neal L; Tashkin, Donald P; Elashoff, Robert M; Lindner, Jonathan R; Victor, Ronald G

    2016-06-01

    Hookah (water pipe) smoking is a major new understudied epidemic affecting youth. Because burning charcoal is used to heat the tobacco product, hookah smoke delivers not only nicotine but also large amounts of charcoal combustion products, including carbon-rich nanoparticles that constitute putative coronary vasoconstrictor stimuli and carbon monoxide, a known coronary vasodilator. We used myocardial contrast echocardiography perfusion imaging with intravenous lipid shelled microbubbles in young adult hookah smokers to determine the net effect of smoking hookah on myocardial blood flow. In 9 hookah smokers (age 27 ± 5 years, mean ± SD), we measured myocardial blood flow velocity (β), myocardial blood volume (A), myocardial blood flow (A × β) as well as myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) before and immediately after 30 minutes of ad lib hookah smoking. Myocardial blood flow did not decrease with hookah smoking but rather increased acutely (88 ± 10 to 120 ± 19 a.u./s, mean ± SE, p = 0.02), matching a mild increase in MVO2 (6.5 ± 0.3 to 7.6 ± 0.4 ml·minute(-1), p <0.001). This was manifested primarily by increased myocardial blood flow velocity (0.7 ± 0.1 to 0.9 ± 0.1 second(-1), p = 0.01) with unchanged myocardial blood volume (133 ± 7 to 137 ± 7 a.u., p = ns), the same pattern of coronary microvascular response seen with a low-dose β-adrenergic agonist. Indeed, with hookah, the increased MVO2 was accompanied by decreased heart rate variability, an indirect index of adrenergic overactivity, and eliminated by β-adrenergic blockade (i.v. propranolol). In conclusion, nanoparticle-enriched hookah smoke either is not an acute coronary vasoconstrictor stimulus or its vasoconstrictor effect is too weak to overcome the physiologic dilation of coronary microvessels matching mild cardiac β-adrenergic stimulation. PMID:27067622

  4. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy. PMID:26817927

  5. Acute effects of acrolein in human volunteers during controlled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Aishwarya M.; Johanson, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Johnny C.; Palmberg, Lena; Sjögren, Bengt; Ernstgård, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde mainly formed by combustion. The critical effect is considered to be irritation of the eyes and airways; however, the scarce data available make it difficult to assess effect levels. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine thresholds for acute irritation for acrolein. Methods: Nine healthy volunteers of each sex were exposed at six occasions for 2 h at rest to: clean air, 15 ppm ethyl acetate (EA), and 0.05 ppm and 0.1 ppm acrolein with and without EA (15 ppm) to mask the potential influence of odor. Symptoms related to irritation and central nervous system effects were rated on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Results: The ratings of eye irritation were slightly but significantly increased during exposure to acrolein in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001, Friedman test) with a median rating of 8 mm (corresponding to “hardly at all”) at the 0.1 ppm condition and with no influence from EA. No significant exposure-related effects were found for pulmonary function, or nasal swelling, nor for markers of inflammation and coagulation in blood (IL-6, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and Clara cell protein) or induced sputum (cell count, differential cell count, IL-6 and IL-8). Blink frequency recorded by electromyography was increased during exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein alone but not during any of the other five exposure conditions. Conclusion: Based on subjective ratings, the present study showed minor eye irritation by exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein. PMID:26635308

  6. Effect of Acute and Chronic Calcium Administration on Plasma Renin

    PubMed Central

    Kotchen, Theodore A.; Mauli, Kimball I.; Luke, Robert; Rees, Douglas; Flamenbaum, Walter

    1974-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of Ca++ on renin release, plasma renin activity (PRA) was measured after acute and chronic Ca++ administration. 1% CaCl2 was infused into one renal artery of 10 anesthetized dogs (0.3 mg/kg/min). The excreted fraction of filtered calcium (EFca++) and EFNa+ from the infused kidney were elevated (P < 0.04) during three successive 15-min infusion periods. Serum calcium concentration was significantly elevated (P < 0.001). Creatinine clearance, systemic arterial pressure, and renal blood flow did not change (P > 0.10). Compared to control (45 ng/ml/h±5.2 SE), renal venous PRA was suppressed (P < 0.0001) after infusion of Ca++ for 15, 30, and 45 min (20 ng/ml/h±4.6, 16 ng/ml/h±4.0, and 13 ng/ml/h±2.7, respectively). 15 and 30-min after infusion, PRA did not differ from control (P > 0.20). Chronic Ca++ loading was achieved in Sprague-Dawley rats by replacing drinking water with 1% CaCl2 for 17 days. At sacrifice, serum Ca++, Na+, and K+ of controls (n = 12) did not differ (P > 0.60) from Ca++-loaded rats (n = 12). Ca++ excretion (467 μeq/24 h±51) was elevated (P < 0.001) compared to controls (85 μeq/24 h±12). PRA (8.6 ng/ml/h±1.4) and renal renin content of Ca++-loaded rats did not differ from controls (P > 0.80). However, after 8 days of sodium deprivation, both PRA and renal renin content of calcium-loaded animals were significantly lower than the respective values in pair-fed controls (P < 0.005). During the period of sodium deprivation, calcium-drinking animals were in greater negative sodium balance than controls (P < 0.005). The data are consistent with the hypothesis that acute and chronic calcium administration inhibit renin secretion. PMID:4436432

  7. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  8. The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ivaska, Kaisa K; Heliövaara, Maikki K; Ebeling, Pertti; Bucci, Marco; Huovinen, Ville; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Koistinen, Heikki A

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling in bone-forming osteoblasts stimulates bone formation and promotes the release of osteocalcin (OC) in mice. Only a few studies have assessed the direct effect of insulin on bone metabolism in humans. Here, we studied markers of bone metabolism in response to acute hyperinsulinemia in men and women. Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of infusions to determine the markers of bone formation (PINP, total OC, uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC)) and resorption (CTX, TRAcP5b). During 4 h insulin infusion (40 mU/m2 per min, low insulin), CTX level decreased by 11% (P<0.05). High insulin infusion rate (72 mU/m2 per min) for 4 h resulted in more pronounced decrease (−32%, P<0.01) whereas shorter insulin exposure (40 mU/m2 per min for 2 h) had no effect (P=0.61). Markers of osteoblast activity remained unchanged during 4 h insulin, but the ratio of uncarboxylated-to-total OC decreased in response to insulin (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for low and high insulin for 4 h respectively). During 2 h low insulin infusion, both total OC and ucOC decreased significantly (P<0.01 for both). In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC. Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin. PMID:26047829

  9. Acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Gottesdiener, K.; Jordan, J.; Chen, K.; Flattery, S.; Larson, P. J.; Candelore, M. R.; Gertz, B.; Robertson, D.; Sun, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine is used to help achieve weight control. Data on its true efficacy and mechanisms in altering energy balance in human subjects are limited. We aimed to determine the acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work and urinary catecholamines in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study. Ten healthy volunteers were given ephedrine (50 mg) or placebo thrice daily during each of two 24-h periods (ephedrine and placebo) in a whole-room indirect calorimeter, which accurately measures minute-by-minute energy expenditure and mechanical work. Measurements were taken of 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work, urinary catecholamines and binding of (+/-)ephedrine in vitro to human beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenoreceptors. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was 3.6% greater (8965+/-1301 versus 8648+/-1347 kJ, P<0.05) with ephedrine than with placebo, but mechanical work was not different between the ephedrine and placebo periods. Noradrenaline excretion was lower with ephedrine (0.032+/-0.011 microg/mg creatinine) compared with placebo (0.044+/-0.012 microg/mg creatinine) (P<0.05). (+/-)Ephedrine is a relatively weak partial agonist of human beta1- and beta2-adrenoreceptors, and had no detectable activity at human beta3-adrenoreceptors. Ephedrine (50 mg thrice daily) modestly increases energy expenditure in normal human subjects. A lack of binding of ephedrine to beta3-adrenoreceptors and the observed decrease in urinary noradrenaline during ephedrine treatment suggest that the thermogenic effect of ephedrine results from direct beta1-/beta2-adrenoreceptor agonism. An indirect beta3-adrenergic effect through the release of noradrenaline seems unlikely as urinary noradrenaline decreased significantly with ephedrine.

  10. Mechanisms of interleukin-22's beneficial effects in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Chongmin; Kim, Daniel; Ou, Peiqi; Alfonso, Antonio; Stanek, Albert

    2016-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a disorder characterized by parenchymal injury of the pancreas controlled by immune cell-mediated inflammation. AP remains a significant challenge in the clinic due to a lack of specific and effective treatment. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms that regulate the inflammatory response in AP is needed for the development of new approaches to treatment, since immune cell-derived inflammatory cytokines have been recognized to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent studies have shown that interleukin (IL)-22, a cytokine secreted by leukocytes, when applied in the severe animal models of AP, protects against the inflammation-mediated acinar injury. In contrast, in a mild AP model, endogenous IL-22 has been found to be a predominantly anti-inflammatory mediator that inhibits inflammatory cell infiltration via the induction of Reg3 proteins in acinar cells, but does not protect against acinar injury in the early stage of AP. However, constitutively over-expressed IL-22 can prevent the initial acinar injury caused by excessive autophagy through the induction of the anti-autophagic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Thus IL-22 plays different roles in AP depending on the severity of the AP model. This review focuses on these recently reported findings for the purpose of better understanding IL-22's regulatory roles in AP which could help to develop a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26909233

  11. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  12. Antinatriuretic effect of acute morphine administration in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Walker, L A; Murphy, J C

    1984-05-01

    The renal response to the acute administration of morphine was examined in conscious, chronically catheterized, nonhydrated rats. After control clearance periods, morphine sulfate was injected i.v. at 4 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 2 mg/kg X hr. Morphine caused an increase in urine flow which was variable in magnitude and duration. The initial diuresis was not maintained despite continued morphine administration and replacement of lost fluid. Compared to vehicle treatment morphine also induced marked sodium and chloride retention which was sustained throughout the 2-hr infusion period. There were no changes in blood pressure or heart during the clearance periods, although an initial transient hypotension and bradycardia were observed with morphine injection. There were no changes in glomerular filtration rate which could account for the antinatriuresis. Naloxone pretreatment blocked all of the observed renal responses. The results indicate that morphine exerts its effects on electrolyte excretion by enhancing renal tubular sodium or chloride reabsorption rather than changes in systemic hemodynamics or glomerular filtration rate. In a separate series of experiments, urine osmolality, osmolar clearance and free water clearance were estimated. All rats receiving morphine transiently excreted a hypotonic urine (minimum 183 +/- 23 mOsmol/kg of H2O) with a reduction in osmolar clearance and a sharp increase in free water clearance. These findings are consistent with a temporary inhibition of vasopressin release by morphine. PMID:6716265

  13. Plasmapheresis in Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy: An Effective Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed Majidi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is an idiopathic disorder with an unknown cause occurring in late pregnancy. The treatment in these patients is often immediate termination of pregnancy, and plasmapheresis provides an effective treatment option. In this paper, we introduce three pregnant women treated with plasmapheresis. The first case was a 22-year-old primigravida woman treated with 22 sessions of plasmapheresis due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and ventilator-dependent respiratory failure. The second case was a 23-year-old woman in her second pregnancy treated with 4 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and hypoglycemia. The third patient was a 23-year-old primigravida woman treated with 3 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, renal failure, and coagulopathy. Plasmapheresis can be a life-saving treatment in patients with AFLP and is strongly recommended for patients with severity of their disease accompanied by other organ disorders. In addition, shortening the time interval between the termination of pregnancy and initializing plasmapheresis improves the outcome and reduces the duration of hospital stay and sessions of plasmapheresis. PMID:23424692

  14. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Lyalka, Vladimir F; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  15. Effects of oral montelukast on airway function in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cýllý, A; Kara, A; Ozdemir, T; Oğüş, C; Gülkesen, K H

    2003-05-01

    Montelukast, a specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve pulmonary function within 1 h of ingestion. This study was undertaken to compare the effects on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of oral montelukast added to intravenous steroid, intravenous steroid alone and placebo during the 24 h period following administration. Seventy asthmatic patients (FEV1 40-80% predicted and > or = 15% improvement after inhaled beta agonist) were enrolled in a single blind study to receive oral montelukast (10 mg) plus intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg), intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomised fashion. The patients received one ofthe above three groups of medication before any other treatments. This was immediately followed by the aerosol treatments of 100 mcg of terbutaline sulphate divided into three doses during 1 h as described in the consensus statement. Thereafter, patients were observed for 24 h to document the effects on PEFR, Borg dyspnoea score and need for rescue medication. The primary end point was percentage change at different time points. Secondary end points were Borg dyspnoea score and use of rescue medication. Compared with placebo, montelukast added to the prednisolone group and the prednisolone alone group had significant percentage change from baseline in PEFR in the entire 24 h period (P<0.05). The difference in PEFR between montelukast plus prednisolone group and prednisolone group favoured the montelukast plus prednisolone group but did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, montelukast plus prednisolone group required less inhaled short-acting beta agonistthan other two groups. The results of this study indicate that adding montelukast to steroid in acute asthma may have some additive improvement in lung functions. PMID:12735671

  16. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  17. Acute Effects of Ecstasy on Memory Are more Extensive than Chronic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Shariati, Mohamad Bakhtiar Hesam; Sohrabi, Maryam; Shahidi, Siamak; Nikkhah, Ali; Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Medizadeh, Mehdi; Asl, Sara Soleimani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to 3, 4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) could lead to serotonergic system toxicity in the brain. This system is responsible for learning and memory functions. Studies show that MDMA causes memory impairment dose-dependently and acutely. The present study was designed to evaluate the chronic and acute effects of MDMD on spatial memory and acquisition of passive avoidance. Methods Adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were given single or multiple injections of MDMA (10 mg/kg, IP). Using passive avoidance and Morris Water Maze (MWM) tasks, learning and spatial memory functions were assessed. The data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software and one- way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results Our results showed that there were significant differences in latency to enter the dark compartment (STL) between sham and MDMA- treated groups. Acute group significantly showed more STL in comparison with chronic group. Furthermore, MDMA groups spent more time in dark compartment (TDS) than the sham group. Administration of single dose of MDMA significantly caused an increase in TDS compared with the chronic group. In the MWM, MDMA treatment significantly increased the traveled distance and escaped latency compared to the sham group. Like to passive avoidance task, percentage of time spent in the target quadrant in MDMA- treated animals impaired in MWM compared with sham group. Discussion These data suggest that MDMA treatment impairs learning and memory functions that are more extensive in acute- treated rats. PMID:25337384

  18. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  19. Effective anaesthesia of the acutely inflamed pulp: part 1. The acutely inflamed pulp.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Seymour, D; Bhakta, S

    2015-10-23

    Achieving profound pulpal anaesthesia in a mandibular molar diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis can be argued to be the most testing of dental anaesthetic challenges. This can be attributed to the technical complexities of conventional techniques and the presence of pulp pathosis. Reasons for why the latter influences the ability to attain pulpal anaesthesia is not yet fully understood, but its frequent occurrence is well documented. In light of overcoming this it has become common practice to prescribe antibiotics, refer onto secondary care or to even commence treatment without appropriately anaesthetising the tooth. Therefore, this two part series aims to help practitioners attain clinically acceptable pulpal anaesthesia in the most testing of scenarios; the acutely inflamed mandibular molar. They should then be able to apply these same principles to other teeth presenting with similar symptoms. This section outlines the clinical presentation and pathophysiology associated with an acutely inflamed pulp, defines what it is to attain pulpal anaesthesia and critically analyses theories as to why these teeth are up to eight times more difficult to anaesthetise than their healthy counterparts. PMID:26494344

  20. Effect of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leão, Sílvia; Conde, Bebiana; Fontes, Paulo; Calvo, Teresa; Afonso, Abel; Moreira, Ilídio

    2016-04-01

    The effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on clinical outcomes after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is incompletely defined. We sought to determine the prevalence of OSA in patients with ACS and evaluate prognostic impact of OSA and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in these patients. This was a prospective longitudinal cohort study of 73 patients admitted on cardiac intensive care unit for ACS. Cardiorespiratory sleep study and/or polysomnography were performed in all patients. CPAP was recommended if Apnea-Hypopnea Index ≥5. The main study outcome was a composite of death for any cause, myocardial infarction, and myocardial revascularization. OSA was diagnosed in 46 patients (63%). Age and cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly different between groups. OSA was classified as mild (m-OSA) in 14 patients (30%) and as moderate-to-severe (s-OSA) in 32 patients (70%). After a median follow-up of 75 months (interquartile range 71 to 79), patients with s-OSA had lower event-free survival rate. After adjustment for gender, patients with s-OSA showed a significantly higher incidence of the composite end point (hazard ratio 3.58, 95% CI 1.09 to 17.73, p = 0.035). Adherence to CPAP occurred in 19 patients (41%), but compliance to CPAP therapy did not reduce the risk of composite end point (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.46, p = 0.798). In conclusion, OSA is an underdiagnosed disease with high prevalence in patients with ACS. It is urgent to establish screening protocols because those have high diagnostic yield and allow identifying a group of patients with manifestly unfavorable prognosis. PMID:26857162

  1. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  2. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  3. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıc, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  4. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic Alas1 effectively prevents and treats the induced acute attacks in acute intermittent porphyria mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Chen, Brenden; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Yu, Chunli; Phillips, John D.; New, Maria I.; Liebow, Abigail; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Querbes, William; Desnick, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Factors that induce the expression of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) result in the accumulation of the neurotoxic porphyrin precursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), which recent studies indicate are primarily responsible for the acute attacks. Current treatment of these attacks involves i.v. administration of hemin, but a faster-acting, more effective, and safer therapy is needed. Here, we describe preclinical studies of liver-directed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Alas1 (Alas1-siRNAs) in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria, the most common acute hepatic porphyria. A single i.v. dose of Alas1-siRNA prevented the phenobarbital-induced biochemical acute attacks for approximately 2 wk. Injection of Alas1-siRNA during an induced acute attack significantly decreased plasma ALA and PBG levels within 8 h, more rapidly and effectively than a single hemin infusion. Alas1-siRNA was well tolerated and a therapeutic dose did not cause hepatic heme deficiency. These studies provide proof-of-concept for the clinical development of RNA interference therapy for the prevention and treatment of the acute attacks of the acute hepatic porphyrias. PMID:24821812

  5. Acute Effects of Fine Particulate Air Pollution on ST Segment Height: A Longitudinal Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms for the relationship between particulate air pollution and cardiac disease are not fully understood. Air pollution-induced myocardial ischemia is one of the potentially important mechanisms. Methods: We investigate the acute effects and the time cours...

  6. COMPARISONS OF THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS USING A NEUROBEHAVIORAL SCREENING BATTERY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical signs of intoxication produced by cholinesterase inhibitors, many of which are used as pesticides, are considered important information for regulatory purposes. e conducted acute studies of cholinesterase inhibitors in order to compare their effects as determined by ...

  7. Stimulatory and inhibitory protein kinase C consensus sequences regulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Chappe, Valerie; Hinkson, Deborah A; Howell, L Daniel; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Liao, Jie; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2004-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation stimulates the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel and enhances its activation by protein kinase A (PKA) through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We have examined the effects of mutating consensus sequences for PKC phosphorylation and report here evidence for both stimulatory and inhibitory sites. Sequences were mutated in subsets and the mutants characterized by patch clamping. Activation of a 4CA mutant (S707A/S790A/T791A/S809A) by PKA was similar to that of wild-type CFTR and was enhanced by PKC, whereas responses of 3CA (T582A/T604A/S641A) and 2CA (T682A/S686A) channels to PKA were both drastically reduced (>90%). When each mutation in the 3CA and 2CA constructs was studied individually in a wild-type background, T582, T604, and S686 were found to be essential for PKA activation. Responses were restored when these three residues were reintroduced simultaneously into a 9CA mutant lacking all nine PKC consensus sequences (R6CA revertant); however, PKC phosphorylation was not required for this rescue. Nevertheless, two of the sites (T604 and S686) were phosphorylated in vitro, and PKC alone partially activated wild-type CFTR, the 4CA mutant, and the point mutants T582A and T604A, but not S686A channels, indicating that PKC does act at S686. The region encompassing S641 and T682 is inhibitory, because S641A enhanced activation by PKA, and T682A channels had 4-fold larger responses to PKC compared to wild-type channels. These results identify functionally important PKC consensus sequences on CFTR and will facilitate studies of its convergent regulation by PKC and PKA. PMID:14695900

  8. Stimulatory and inhibitory protein kinase C consensus sequences regulate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Chappe, Valerie; Hinkson, Deborah A.; Howell, L. Daniel; Evagelidis, Alexandra; Liao, Jie; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation stimulates the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel and enhances its activation by protein kinase A (PKA) through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We have examined the effects of mutating consensus sequences for PKC phosphorylation and report here evidence for both stimulatory and inhibitory sites. Sequences were mutated in subsets and the mutants characterized by patch clamping. Activation of a 4CA mutant (S707A/S790A/T791A/S809A) by PKA was similar to that of wild-type CFTR and was enhanced by PKC, whereas responses of 3CA (T582A/T604A/S641A) and 2CA (T682A/S686A) channels to PKA were both drastically reduced (>90%). When each mutation in the 3CA and 2CA constructs was studied individually in a wild-type background, T582, T604, and S686 were found to be essential for PKA activation. Responses were restored when these three residues were reintroduced simultaneously into a 9CA mutant lacking all nine PKC consensus sequences (R6CA revertant); however, PKC phosphorylation was not required for this rescue. Nevertheless, two of the sites (T604 and S686) were phosphorylated in vitro, and PKC alone partially activated wild-type CFTR, the 4CA mutant, and the point mutants T582A and T604A, but not S686A channels, indicating that PKC does act at S686. The region encompassing S641 and T682 is inhibitory, because S641A enhanced activation by PKA, and T682A channels had 4-fold larger responses to PKC compared to wild-type channels. These results identify functionally important PKC consensus sequences on CFTR and will facilitate studies of its convergent regulation by PKC and PKA. PMID:14695900

  9. Specific Effects of Acute Moderate Exercise on Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davranche, Karen; McMorris, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The main issue of this study was to determine whether cognitive control is affected by acute moderate exercise. Twelve participants [4 females (VO[subscript 2 max]=42 ml/kg/min) and 8 males (VO[subscript 2 max]=48 ml/kg/min)] performed a Simon task while cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity corresponding to their individual…

  10. EFFECTS OF ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE ON THERMOREGULATION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce acute neurotoxicity in mammals. According to the FQPA mandate, the USEPA is required to consider the risk of cumulative toxicity posed to humans through exposure to pyrethroid mixtures. Thermoregulatory response (TR) is being used to determine if t...

  11. The acute effects of vibration training on balance and stability amongst soccer players.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Nevill, Alan; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration training (WBVT) is a tool used amongst coaches to improve performance prior to activity. Its effects on other fitness components, such as balance and stability, along with how different populations respond are less well understood. The aim of the current research is to determine the effect of acute WBVT on balance and stability amongst elite and amateur soccer players. Forty-four healthy male soccer players (22 elite and 22 amateur) were assigned to a treatment or control group. The intervention group then performed 3 × 60 seconds static squat on vibration platform at 40 Hz (±4 mm) with Y balance test (YBT) scores and dynamic postural stability index (DPSI) measured pre and post. DPSI was significantly lower in the elite players in the acute WBVT compared to amateur players (F1, 40= 6.80; P = 0.013). YBT anterior reach distance showed a significant improvement in both amateur and elite players in the acute WBVT group (F1, 40= 32.36; P < 0.001). The improvement in DPSI amongst the elite players indicates a difference in responses to acute high frequency vibration between elite and amateur players during a landing stability task. The results indicate that acute WBVT improves anterior YBT reach distances through a possible improvement in flexibility amongst both elite and amateur players. In conclusion, acute WBVT training appears to improve stability amongst elite soccer players in comparison to amateur players, the exact reasoning behind this difference requires further investigation. PMID:25357208

  12. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  13. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nestle, F. O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J.; Wrone-Smith, T.; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  14. Acute and non-acute effects of cannabis on human memory function: a critical review of neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Allen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Smoking cannabis produces a diverse range of effects, including impairments in learning and memory. These effects are exerted through action on the endocannabinoid system, which suggests involvement of this system in human cognition. Learning and memory deficits are core symptoms of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, and may also be related to endocannabinoid dysfunction in these disorders. However, before new research can focus on potential treatments that work by manipulating the endocannabinoid system, it needs to be elucidated how this system is involved in symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Here we review neuroimaging studies that investigated acute and non-acute effects of cannabis on human learning and memory function, both in adults and in adolescents. Overall, results of these studies show that cannabis use is associated with a pattern of increased activity and a higher level of deactivation in different memory-related areas. This could reflect either increased neural effort ('neurophysiological inefficiency') or a change in strategy to maintain good task performance. However, the interpretation of these findings is significantly hampered by large differences between study populations in cannabis use in terms of frequency, age of onset, and time that subjects were abstinent from cannabis. Future neuroimaging studies should take these limitations into account, and should focus on the potential of cannabinoid compounds for treatment of cognitive symptoms in psychiatric disorders. PMID:23829369

  15. Acute cardiorespiratory effects of intracisternal injections of mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Futuro Neto, Henrique de Azevedo; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentin

    2011-06-01

    The present studies were conducted to changes arising from mercury poisoning in the central nervous system (CNS), with a focus on determining the receptors and neurotransmitters involved. Currently, little is known regarding the neurological basis of the cardiopulmonary effects of mercury poisoning. We evaluated changes in systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) following a 5 μl intracisternal (i.c) injection of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and the participation of the autonomic nervous system in these responses. 58 animals were utilized and distributed randomly into 10 groups and administered a 5 μL intracisternal injection of 0.68 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 1.2 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 2.4 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 120 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=3), saline (control) (n=7), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) plus prazosin (n=6), saline plus prazosin (n=6), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) plus metilatropina (n=4) or saline plus metilatropina (n=4)HgCl(2). Anesthesia was induced with halothane and maintained as needed with urethane (1.2 g/kg) administered intravenously (i.v.) through a cannula placed in the left femoral vein. The left femoral artery was also cannulated to record systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and heart rate (HR). A tracheotomy was performed to record respiratory rate. Animals were placed in a stereotaxic frame, and the cisterna magna was exposed. After a stabilization period, solutions (saline or HgCl(2)) were injected i.c., and cardiopulmonary responses were recorded for 50 min. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system was assessed through the i.v. injection of hexamethonium (20 mg/kg), prazosin (1 mg/kg) and methylatropine (1 mg/kg) 10 min before the i.c. injection of HgCl(2) or saline. Treatment with 0.68, 1.2, 2.4 μg/kg HgCl(2) or saline did not modify basal cardiorespiratory parameters, whereas the 120 μg/kg dose induced acute toxicity, provoking respiratory

  16. The Effects of Inhaled Steroids on Recurrent Wheeze After Acute Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Patricia; Aronoff, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute bronchiolitis infection during infancy is associated with an increased risk of asthma later in life. The objective of this study was to determine if inhaled steroids are effective in preventing the development of recurrent wheeze or asthma following acute bronchiolitis. Methods. Multiple databases and bibliographies of selected references were searched. Inclusion required (a) a randomized controlled trial of inhaled steroids and control group, (b) at least 2 weeks duration of therapy started during the acute phase of disease, and (c) identification of the rate of recurrent wheeze or asthma at least 6 months after therapy. Results. Of 1410 studies reviewed, 8 reports were included in this meta-analysis (748 patients). The overall odds ratio for developing recurrent wheeze or asthma with treatment versus without treatment was 1.02 (95% confidence interval = 0.58-1.81). Conclusions. A course of inhaled steroids after acute bronchiolitis is not effective in preventing recurrent wheeze or asthma. PMID:27335972

  17. Central nervous system effects in acute thallium poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Tai; Huang, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Wang, Hsuan-Min; Shen, Wu-Shiun; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chu, Nai-Shin

    2006-03-01

    We report the central nervous system manifestations, neuropsychological studies and brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings of two patients with acute thallium intoxication. Neurologically the patients suffered from confusion, disorientation, and hallucination in the acute stage, followed by anxiety, depression, lack of attention, and memory impairment, in addition to peripheral neuropathy. Neuropsychological tests revealed an impairment of memory function, including reversed digital span, memory registration, memory recall, memory recognition, similarity, proverb reasoning, and verbal fluency. High concentrations of thallium were found in the urine, blood, and drinking water of these two patients. Brain MRI showed lesions in the corpus striatum in one patient. During the follow-up periods, the clinical manifestations and neuropsychological studies showed a slowly progressive improvement, and a follow-up brain MRI 1.5 months later demonstrated a resolution of the lesions. We conclude that thallium intoxication might induce encephalopathy, and brain MRI studies demonstrated the acute-stage brain lesions in a severe intoxicated patient. In addition, neuropsychological tests also confirmed memory deficits, although the brain lesions in the corpus striatum might resolve. PMID:16337004

  18. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  19. Effect of Yi Gong San Decoction on Iron Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qin; Guan, Yu; Xia, Lemin; Wang, Zhicheng; Jiang, Yiling; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Guohua; Pu, Yiqiong; Xia, Jing; Luo, Meihong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Yi Gong San (YGS) decoction on iron homeostasis and the possible underlying mechanisms in a mouse model of acute inflammation in this study. Our findings suggest that YGS regulates iron homeostasis by downregulating the level of HAMP mRNA, which may depend on regulation of the IL-6/STAT3 or BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway during acute inflammation. PMID:27143982

  20. Minimal Effects of Acute Liver Injury/Acute Liver Failure on Hemostasis as Assessed by Thromboelastography

    PubMed Central

    Stravitz, R. Todd; Lisman, Ton; Luketic, Velimir A.; Sterling, Richard K.; Puri, Puneet; Fuchs, Michael; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Lee, William M.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with acute liver injury/failure (ALI/ALF) are assumed to have a bleeding diathesis on the basis of elevated INR; however, clinically significant bleeding is rare. We hypothesized that patients with ALI/ALF have normal hemostasis despite elevated INR Methods Fifty-one patients with ALI/ALF were studied prospectively using thromboelastography (TEG), which measures the dynamics and physical properties of clot formation in whole blood. ALI was defined as an INR ≥1.5 in a patient with no previous liver disease, and ALF as ALI with hepatic encephalopathy. Results Thirty-seven of 51 patients (73%) had ALF and 22 patients (43%) underwent liver transplantation or died. Despite a mean INR of 3.4±1.7 (range 1.5–9.6), mean TEG parameters were normal, and 5 individual TEG parameters were normal in 32 (63%). Low maximum amplitude, the measure of ultimate clot strength, was confined to patients with platelet counts <126 × 109/L. Maximum amplitude was higher in patients with ALF than ALI and correlated directly with venous ammonia concentrations and with increasing severity of liver injury assessed by elements of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. All patients had markedly decreased procoagulant factor V and VII levels, which were proportional to decreases in anticoagulant proteins and inversely proportional to elevated factor VIII levels. Conclusions Despite elevated INR, most patients with ALI/ALF maintain normal hemostasis by TEG, the mechanisms of which include an increase in clot strength with increasing severity of liver injury, increased factor VIII levels, and a commensurate decline in pro- and anticoagulant proteins. PMID:21703173

  1. The effects of acute stress on Pavlovian-instrumental transfer in rats.

    PubMed

    Pielock, Steffi M; Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Pavlovian stimuli invigorate ongoing instrumental action, a phenomenon termed the Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT) effect. Acute stressors can markedly enhance the release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and CRF injection into the nucleus accumbens increases the PIT effect. However, it is unknown whether acute stressors by themselves would amplify the PIT effect. Here, we examined the effects of acute stressors on PIT. Rats first received Pavlovian and instrumental training, and then the impact of the Pavlovian stimuli on instrumental responding was analyzed in the subsequent PIT test. Acute stressors were applied prior to the PIT test. Because the effects of acute stressors critically depend on stressor type and time of day, we used two acute stressors that involved one or several distinct stressors (denoted here as "single" vs. "multiple" stressors) applied either in the light or the dark period of the light:dark cycle. The results revealed that single and multiple stressors applied in the light period did not alter the PIT effect--that is, the ability of an appetitive Pavlovian stimulus to enhance leverpressing--or the basal leverpress rate. When applied in the dark period, single and multiple stressors also did not alter the PIT effect, but they did markedly reduce the basal leverpress rate. Diazepam pretreatment did not counteract the declines in basal instrumental responding in the PIT test that were induced by either a single or multiple stressors. Our findings suggest that acute stressors were unable to amplify the incentive salience of reward-predictive Pavlovian stimuli to activate instrumental responding, but, depending on the time of day of stressor exposure, they did reduce basal instrumental responding. PMID:23065681

  2. [Cardioprotective effect of GABA derivatives in acute alcohol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tiurenkov, I N; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2006-01-01

    Cardioprotective properties of GABA analogs under conditions of acute alcoholic intoxication have been studied using the following functional tests: volume loads, tests for adrenoreactivity, and maximum isometric load. The experiments showed that a 32% aqueous ethanol solution intraperitoneally injected in a dose of 8 g/kg produces a cardiotoxic action, which is manifested by a decrease in the inotropic reserve in load tests. Citrocard (50 mg/kg), phenibut (50 mg/kg), and piracetam (200 mg/kg) prevent the alcohol-induced myocardium injury, as shown by the heart contractility retained on a higher level in the test group than in the control group. PMID:16995433

  3. Effects of acute hypercapnia with and without acidosis on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, L M; Rzezinski, A; Silva, J D; Maron-Gutierrez, T; Ornellas, D S; Henriques, I; Capelozzi, V L; Teodoro, W; Morales, M M; Silva, P L; Pelosi, P; Garcia, C S N B; Rocco, P R M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of acute hypercapnic acidosis and buffered hypercapnia on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Twenty-four hours after paraquat injection, 28 Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=7/group): (1) normocapnia (NC, PaCO2=35-45 mmHg), ventilated with 0.03%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; (2) hypercapnic acidosis (HC, PaCO2=60-70 mmHg), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; and (3) buffered hypercapnic acidosis (BHC), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2 and treated with sodium bicarbonate (8.4%). The remaining seven animals were not mechanically ventilated (NV). The mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (p=0.003), IL-1β (p<0.001), and type III procollagen (PCIII) (p=0.001) in lung tissue was more reduced in the HC group in comparison with NC, with no significant differences between HC and BHC. Lung and kidney cell apoptosis was reduced in HC and BHC in comparison with NC and NV. In conclusion, in this experimental ALI model, hypercapnia, regardless of acidosis, reduced lung inflammation and lung and kidney cell apoptosis. PMID:25246186

  4. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ranieri, Federico; Lotti, Fiorenza; Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization. We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH) and unaffected hemisphere (UH) by measuring resting and active motor threshold (AMT) and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI), to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. AMT differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p = 0.004), not in females (p > 0.200), and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p = 0.033 and p = 0.042). LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery. PMID:26858590

  5. Effects of COX-2 inhibitor in temporomandibular joint acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schütz, T C B; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2007-05-01

    Since it is recognized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 mediates nociception and the sleep-wake cycle as well, and that acute inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) results in sleep disturbances, we hypothesized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor would restore the sleep pattern in this inflammatory rat model. First, sleep was monitored after the injection of Freund's adjuvant (FA group) or saline (SHAM group) into the rats' temporomandibular joint. Second, etoricoxib was co-administered in these groups. The Freund's adjuvant group showed a reduction in sleep efficiency, in rapid eye movement (REM), and in non-REM sleep, and an increase in sleep and REM sleep latency when compared with the SHAM group, while etoricoxib substantially increased sleep quality in the Freund's adjuvant group. These parameters returned progressively to those found in the SHAM group. Etoricoxib improved the sleep parameters, suggesting the involvement of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme in acute inflammation of the TMJ, specifically in REM sleep. PMID:17452571

  6. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios. PMID:27099064

  7. Possible involvement of phospholipase C and protein kinase C in stimulatory actions of L-leucine and its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, on protein synthesis in RLC-16 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki-Tsuji, Naoko; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2002-11-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in RLC-16 hepatocytes. The incorporation of [(3)H] tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an indexof protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted RLC-16 cells, L-leucineand its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipase A(2) and C canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting a possible involvement of either arachidonic acid metabolism by phospholipase A(2), cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase, or phosphatidylinositol degradation by phospholipase C in the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC.Neither indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, nor caffeic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, diminished their stimulatory actions, suggesting no involvement of arachidonic acid metabolism. Conversely, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methylglycerol, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, significantly canceled the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting an involvement of phosphatidylinositol degradation and activation of protein kinase C. These results strongly suggest that both L-leucine and KIC stimulate protein synthesis in RLC-16 cells via activation of phospholipase C and production of diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate from phosphatidylinositol, which in turn activate protein kinase C. PMID:19003115

  8. Human Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) Transcription Is Mediated by Upstream Stimulatory Factors *

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jing; Gan, Yehua; Chen, Nanyue; Wang, Jian; LeMaire, Scott A.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Wang, Xing Li

    2010-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4Hα(I)) is the rate-limiting subunit forP4Henzyme activity, which is essential for procollagen hydroxylation and secretion. In the current study, we have characterized the human P4Hα(I) promoter for transcription factors and DNA elements regulating P4Hα(I) expression. Using a progressive deletion cloning approach, we have constructed pGL3-P4Hα(I) recombinant plasmids. We have identified a positive regulatory region at the positions of bp −184 to −97 responsible for ~80% of the P4Hα(I) promoter efficiency. Three E-boxes were located within this region, and the E-box at position bp −135 explains most of the regulatory capacity. Upstream stimulatory factors (USF1/USF2) were shown to bind on the E-box using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Suppression of USF1 and/or USF2 using specific short interference RNA resulted in a significant reduction in P4Hα(I) promoter activity, and overexpressed USF1 or USF2 increased P4Hα(I) promoter activity significantly. Although transforming growth factor β1 increased the USF1/USF2-E-box binding and P4Hα(I) promoter activity, this up-regulatory effect can be largely prevented by USF1/USF2-specific short interference RNA. On the other hand, cigarette smoking extracts, which have been shown to suppress P4Hα(I) expression, inhibited the binding between the USF1/USF2 and E-box, resulting in a reduced P4Hα(I) promoter activity. Furthermore, the E-box on the P4Hα(I) promoter appeared to indiscriminately bind with either USF1 or USF2, with a similar outcome on the promoter efficiency. In conclusion, our study shows that USF1/USF2 plays a critical role in basal P4Hα(I) expression, and both positive (transforming growth factor β1) and negative (cigarette smoking extract) regulators appear to influence the USF-E-box interaction and affect P4Hα(I) expression. PMID:16488890

  9. The contribution of electrophysiology to knowledge of the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Little, H J

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the effects of ethanol on the components of neuronal transmission and the relationship of such effects to the behavioural actions of ethanol. The concentrations of ethanol with acute actions on voltage-sensitive ion channels are first described, then the actions of ethanol on ligand-gated ion channels, including those controlled by cholinergic receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, the various excitatory amino acid receptors, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Acute effects of ethanol are then described on brain areas thought to be involved in arousal and attention, the reinforcing effects of ethanol, the production of euphoria, the actions of ethanol on motor control, and the amnesic effects of ethanol; the acute effects of ethanol demonstrated by EEG studies are also discussed. Chronic effects of alcohol on neuronal transmission are described in the context of the various components of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome, withdrawal hyperexcitability, dysphoria and anhedonia, withdrawal anxiety, craving, and relapse drinking. Electrophysiological studies on the genetic influences on the effects of ethanol are discussed, particularly the acute actions of ethanol and electrophysiological differences reported in individuals predisposed to alcoholism. The conclusion notes the concentration of studies on the classical transmitters, with relative neglect of the effects of ethanol on peptides and on neuronal interactions between brain areas and integrated patterns of neuronal activity. PMID:10665833

  10. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  11. Effects of acute and chronic inhalation of paint thinner in mice: behavioral and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Fifel, Karim; Bennis, Mohamed; Ba-M'hamed, Saâdia

    2014-06-01

    Abuse of volatile inhalants has become a worldwide issue mainly among adolescents of low income social class. Acute and chronic exposure to these substances results in serious neurological and behavioral impairments. Although real exposure consists largely of simultaneous inhalation of multiple solvents, the vast majority of basic research studies have evaluated the actions of a single volatile component leaving the behavioral and neuronal effects of chemical mixture not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the acute behavioral effects of 300, 450 and 600 ppm of paint thinner inhalation on anxiety, locomotor activity and spatial memory. Additionally, the cognitive impairments related to chronic exposure of the same concentrations of thinner for 45 days were assessed. To understand the neuronal correlates of acute exposure to thinner, we used c-Fos immunohistochemistry as an endogenous marker of neuronal activation following 600 ppm of thinner. The results reveal that (i) chronically thinner exposed mice showed cognitive deficits in Morris water maze and object recognition tasks; (ii) acute inhalation of thinner induces a wide range of behavioral changes. These changes include an anxiolytic effect toward the aversive environmental bright light and a dose dependent effect on explorative locomotion. The wide range of behavioral alterations induced by acute thinner inhalation is consistent with the widespread distribution of thinner-induced c-Fos expression in multiple brain structures. PMID:24218105

  12. Acute Effects of Exposure to (56)Fe and (16)O Particles on Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Bernard M; Poulose, Shibu M; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty L; Ramirez, Francisco; Bielinski, Donna F; Heroux, Nicholas; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Although it has been shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance when tested 2-4 weeks after irradiation, it has not been determined whether exposure to HZE particles acutely affects cognitive performance, i.e., within 4-48 h after exposure. The current experiments were designed to determine the acute effects of exposure to HZE particles ((16)O and (56)Fe) on cognitive performance and whether exposure to HZE particles affected learning or memory, as well as to understand the relationship between acute changes in the levels of NOX2 (a measure of oxidative stress) and COX2 (a measure of neuroinflammation) in specific brain regions and cognitive performance. The results of these studies indicate that the acute effects of radiation exposure on cognitive performance are on memory, not learning. Further, the acute effects of exposure to HZE particles on oxidative stress and neuroinflammation and their relationship to cognitive performance indicate that, although the effects of exposure to both (56)Fe and (16)O are widespread, only changes in specific regions of the brain may be related to changes in cognitive function. PMID:26207687

  13. Recognizing acute health effects of substitute fungicides: are first-aid reports effective?

    PubMed

    Teschke, K; Hertzman, C; Wiens, M; Dimich-Ward, H; Hershler, R; Ostry, A; Kelly, S J

    1992-01-01

    Recently, many British Columbia sawmills stopped using traditional chlorophenate anti-sapstain fungicides and substituted 2-(thiocyanomethylthio) benzothiazole (TCMTB) and copper-8-quinolinolate (Copper 8). We conducted a cross-sectional study with two aims: to ascertain which acute health effects, if any, were associated with the use of the substitute fungicides; and to determine the effectiveness of first-aid records as a means of detecting acute health outcomes. Workers in five coastal sawmills were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire about symptoms considered potentially related and unrelated to fungicide exposure, and about injuries commonly reported in sawmills. In addition, we collected first-aid records from the mills, and asked senior workers to estimate the duration of exposure to fungicides for each job. Symptoms found to be consistently elevated in TCMTB mills included dry skin around the eyes, blood-stained mucus from the nose, nose bleed, peeling skin, burning or itching skin, and skin redness or rash. No symptoms were consistently elevated in the Copper 8 mills. Symptoms related to TCMTB exposure were recorded only 12 times in first-aid logs during the study period (versus 335 questionnaire self-reports). This low symptom-recording frequency may be a function of established patterns of first-aid use in which illness symptoms are reported less frequently than injuries. PMID:1585948

  14. Modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on survival of animal population: acute versus chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present paper was application of a model, which was originally developed to simulate chronic ionizing radiation effects in a generic isolated population, to the case of acute exposure, and comparison of the dynamic features of radiation effects on the population survival in cases of acute and chronic exposure. Two modes of exposure were considered: acute exposure (2-35 Gy) and chronic lifetime exposure with the same integrated dose. Calculations were made for a generic mice population; however, the model can be applied for other animals with proper selection of parameter values. In case of acute exposure, in the range 2-11 Gy, the population response was in two phases. During a first phase, there was a depletion in population survival; the second phase was a recovery period due to reparation of damage and biosynthesis of new biomass. Model predictions indicate that a generic mice population, living in ideal conditions, has the potential for recovery (within a mouse lifetime period) from acute exposure with dose up to 10-11 Gy, i.e., the population may recover from doses above an LD50 (6.2 Gy). Following acute doses above 14 Gy, however, the mice population went to extinction without recovery. In contrast, under chronic lifetime exposures (500 days), radiation had little effect on population survival up to integrated doses of 14-15 Gy, so the survival of a population subjected to chronic exposure was much better compared with that after an acute exposure with the same dose. Due to the effect of "wasted radiation", the integrated dose of chronic exposure could be about two times higher than acute dose, producing the same effect on survival. It is concluded that the developed generic population model including the repair of radiation damage can be applied both to acute and chronic modes of exposure; results of calculations for generic mice population are in qualitative agreement with published data on radiation effects in mice. PMID

  15. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  16. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  17. Effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from an acute manic episode

    PubMed Central

    Nakimuli-Mpungu, E; Mutamba, B; Nshemerirwe, S; Kiwuwa, MS; Musisi, S

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Understanding factors affecting the time to recovery from acute mania is critical in the management of manic syndromes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from acute mania. Methods We performed a retrospective study in which medical charts of individuals who were treated for acute mania were reviewed. Survival analysis with Cox regression models were used to compare time to recovery from an acute manic episode between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals and HIV-negative individuals. Results Median survival time was one week for HIV-positive individuals and more than four weeks for HIV-negative individuals (χ2 = 18.4, P value = 0.000). HIV infection was the only marginally significant independent predictor of survival probability on the acute admission ward (hazards ratio 2.87, P = 0.06). Conclusion Acute mania in HIV-infected persons responds faster to psychotropic drugs compared with that in HIV-negative persons. PMID:22096397

  18. COMPARING BEHAVIORAL DOSE-EFFECT CURVES FOR HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS ACUTELY EXPOSED TO TOLUENE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of laboratory animal data in toxicology depends upon the ability to generalize the results quantitatively to humans. To compare the acute behavioral effects of inhaled toluene in humans to those in animals, dose-effect curves were fitted by meta-analysis of published...

  19. Acute effects of exposure to 56Fe and 16O particles on learning and memory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it has been shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance when tested 2-4 weeks after irradiation, it has not been determined whether exposure to HZE particles can exert acute effects on cognitive performance; i.e., effects within 4-48 hrs after exposure. The present ...

  20. A QUANTITATIVE COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE INHALED TOLUENE IN HUMAN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acute exposure to toluene have been explored more thoroughly than other hydrocarbon solvents. These effects have been experimentally studied in humans and other species, e.g., rats, as well as in a number of in vitro preparations. The existence ofdosimetric and eff...

  1. Acute Effect of Decaffeinated Coffee on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, and Exercise Performance in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi; Kaushik, Vidya S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of decaffeinated coffee on the cardiovascular exercise performance in nine healthy volunteers was evaluated in a double-blind randomized fashion. The heart rate, blood pressure, and duration of exercise were unchanged, and no arrhythmias or ischemic changes were seen on the electrocardiogram after drinking decaffeinated coffee. It was concluded that decaffeinated coffee has no discernible, acute, adverse cardiovascular effects. PMID:3339645

  2. ASSESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF THE BEHAVIORAL EFFECT OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO TOLUENE IN HUMANS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in being able to evaluate potential benefit-cost relationships of controlling exposure to toxic substances. Behavioral effects of acute toluene exposure could be subjected to benefit-cost analysis if it's effects were quantitatively compared to tho...

  3. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  4. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  5. Acute and medium term effects of a 10-week running intervention on mood state in apprentices

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Katrin; von Haaren, Birte; Löffler, Simone; Härtel, Sascha; Jansen, Carl-Philipp; Werner, Christian; Stumpp, Jürgen; Bös, Klaus; Hey, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Exercise and physical activity have proven benefits for physical and psychological well-being. However, it is not clear if healthy young adults can enhance mood in everyday life through regular exercise. Earlier studies mainly showed positive effects of acute exercise and exercise programs on psychological well-being in children, older people and in clinical populations. Few studies controlled participants' physical activity in daily life, performed besides the exercise program, which can impact results. In addition the transition from mood enhancement induced by acute exercise to medium or long-term effects due to regular exercise is not yet determined. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the acute effects of an aerobic running training on mood and trends in medium term changes of mood in everyday life of young adults. We conducted a 10-week aerobic endurance training with frequent mood assessments and continuous activity monitoring. 23 apprentices, separated into experimental and control group, were monitored over 12 weeks. To control the effectiveness of the aerobic exercise program, participants completed a progressive treadmill test pre and post the intervention period. The three basic mood dimensions energetic arousal, valence and calmness were assessed via electronic diaries. Participants had to rate their mood state frequently on 3 days a week at five times of measurement within 12 weeks. Participants' physical activity was assessed with accelerometers. All mood dimensions increased immediately after acute endurance exercise but results were not significant. The highest acute mood change could be observed in valence (p = 0.07; η2 = 0.27). However, no medium term effects in mood states could be observed after a few weeks of endurance training. Future studies should focus on the interaction between acute and medium term effects of exercise training on mood. The decreasing compliance over the course of the study requires the development of

  6. Acute and training effects of resistance exercise on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a non-invasive method to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we discuss the effect of resistance exercise both acutely and after training on HRV in healthy individuals and in those with diseases characterized by autonomic dysfunction, such as hypertension and fibromyalgia. HR recovery after exercise is influenced by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic recovery to resting levels. Therefore, examination of HRV in response to acute exercise yields valuable insight into autonomic cardiovascular modulation and possible underlying risk for disease. Acute resistance exercise has shown to decrease cardiac parasympathetic modulation more than aerobic exercise in young healthy adults suggesting an increased risk for cardiovascular dysfunction after resistance exercise. Resistance exercise training appears to have no effect on resting HRV in healthy young adults, while it may improve parasympathetic modulation in middle-aged adults with autonomic dysfunction. Acute resistance exercise appears to decrease parasympathetic activity regardless of age. This review examines the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on HRV in young and older adults. PMID:25524332

  7. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  8. A cost effectiveness analysis of the preferred antidotes for acute paracetamol poisoning patients in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute paracetamol poisoning is a rapidly increasing problem in Sri Lanka. The antidotes are expensive and yet no health economic evaluation has been done on the therapy for acute paracetamol poisoning in the developing world. The aim of this study is to determine the cost effectiveness of using N-acetylcysteine over methionine in the management of acute paracetamol poisoning in Sri Lanka. Methods Economic analysis was applied using public healthcare system payer perspective. Costs were obtained from a series of patients admitted to the National Hospital of Sri Lanka with a history of acute paracetamol overdose. Evidence on effectiveness was obtained from a systematic review of the literature. Death due to hepatotoxicity was used as the primary outcome of interest. Analysis and development of decision tree models was done using Tree Age Pro 2008. Results An affordable treatment threshold of Sri Lankan rupees 1,537,120/death prevented was set from the expected years of productive life gained and the average contribution to GDP. A cost-minimisation analysis was appropriate for patients presenting within 10 hours and methionine was the least costly antidote. For patients presenting 10-24 hours after poisoning, n-acetylcysteine was more effective and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio of Sri Lankan rupees 316,182/life saved was well under the threshold. One-way and multi-way sensitivity analysis also supported methionine for patients treated within 10 hours and n-acetylcysteine for patients treated within 10-24 hours as preferred antidotes. Conclusions Post ingestion time is an important determinant of preferred antidotal therapy for acute paracetamol poisoning patients in Sri Lanka. Using n-acetylcysteine in all patients is not cost effective. On economic grounds, methionine should become the preferred antidote for Sri Lankan patients treated within 10 hours of the acute ingestion and n-acetylcysteine should continue to be given to patients treated

  9. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: Insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, James M.; Gilman, Jodi M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. PMID:23978384

  10. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  11. Induction of death receptor CD95 and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 by meningococcal capsular polysaccharide-loaded vaccine nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ubale, Ruhi V; Gala, Rikhav P; Zughaier, Susu M; D'Souza, Martin J

    2014-09-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and sepsis, and its capsular polysaccharides (CPS) are a major virulence factor in meningococcal infections and form the basis for serogroup designation and protective vaccines. We formulated a novel nanovaccine containing meningococcal CPS as an antigen encapsulated in albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs) that does not require chemical conjugation to a protein carrier. These nanoparticles are taken up by antigen-presenting cells and act as antigen depot by slowly releasing the antigen. In this study, we determined the ability of CPS-loaded vaccine nanoparticles to induce co-stimulatory molecules, namely CD80, CD86, and CD95 that impact effective antigen presentation. Co-stimulatory molecule gene induction and surface expression on macrophages and dendritic cells pulsed with meningococcal CPS-loaded nanoparticles were investigated using gene array and flow cytometry methods. Meningococcal CPS-loaded NP significantly induced the surface protein expression of CD80 and CD86, markers of dendritic cell maturation, in human THP-1 macrophages and in murine dendritic cells DC2.4 in a dose-dependent manner. The massive upregulation was also observed at the gene expression. However, high dose of CPS-loaded NP, but not empty NP, induced the expression of death receptor CD95 (Fas) leading to reduced TNF-α release and reduction in cell viability. The data suggest that high expression of CD95 may lead to death of antigen-presenting cells and consequently suboptimal immune responses to vaccine. The CPS-loaded NP induces the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and acts as antigen depot and can spare antigen dose, highly desirable criteria for vaccine formulations. PMID:24981893

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi Elicited-IL-10 Suppresses the Production of Inflammatory Mediators, Phagocytosis, and Expression of Co-Stimulatory Receptors by Murine Macrophages and/or Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, R. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is a tick-borne spirochete that is the causative agent for Lyme disease. Our previous studies indicate that virulent Bb can potently enhance IL-10 production by macrophages (MØs) and that blocking IL-10 production significantly enhances bacterial clearance. We hypothesize that skin-associated APC types, such as MØs and dendritic cells (DCs) are potent producers of IL-10 in response to Bb, which may act in autocrine fashion to suppress APC responses critical for efficient Bb clearance. Our goal is to delineate which APC immune functions are dysregulated by Bb-elicited IL-10 using a murine model of Lyme disease. Our in vitro studies indicated that both APCs rapidly produce IL-10 upon exposure to Bb, that these levels inversely correlate with the production of many Lyme-relevant proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and that APCs derived from IL-10-/- mice produced greater amounts of these proinflammatory mediators than wild-type APCs. Phagocytosis assays determined that Bb-elicited IL-10 levels can diminish Bb uptake and trafficking by MØs, suppresses ROS production, but does not affect NO production; Bb-elicited IL-10 had little effect on phagocytosis, ROS, and NO production by DCs. In general, Bb exposure caused little-to-no upregulation of several critical surface co-stimulatory markers by MØs and DCs, however eliminating Bb-elicited IL-10 allowed a significant upregulation in many of these co-stimulatory receptors. These data indicate that IL-10 elicited from Bb-stimulated MØs and DCs results in decreased production of proinflammatory mediators and co-stimulatory molecules, and suppress phagocytosis-associated events that are important for mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses by APCs. PMID:24367705

  13. The acute and chronic effects of "NO LOAD" resistance training.

    PubMed

    Counts, Brittany R; Buckner, Samuel L; Dankel, Scott J; Jessee, Matthew B; Mattocks, Kevin T; Mouser, J Grant; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to remove the influence of an external load and determine if muscle growth can be elicited by maximally contracting through a full range of motion. In addition, the acute physiologic and perceptual responses to each stimulus were also investigated. Thirteen participants completed 18 sessions of unilateral elbow flexion exercise. Each arm was designated to either NO LOAD or HIGH LOAD condition (70% one repetition maximum). For the NO LOAD condition, participants repeatedly contracted as hard as they could through a full range of motion without the use of an external load. Our results show that anterior muscle thickness increased similarly from Pre to Post, with no differences between conditions for the 50% [Pre: 2.7 (0.8) vs. Post: 2.9 (0.7)], 60% [Pre: 2.9 (0.7) vs. Post: 3.1 (0.7)] or 70% [Pre: 3.2 (0.7) vs. Post: 3.5 (0.7)] sites. There was a significant condition×time interaction for one repetition maximum (p=0.017), with HIGH LOAD (+2.3kg) increasing more than the NO LOAD condition (+1kg). These results extend previous studies that have observed muscle growth across a range of external loads and muscle actions and suggest that muscle growth can occur independent of an external load provided there are enough muscle fibers undergoing mechanotransduction. PMID:27329807

  14. Effect of acute cytomegalovirus infection on drug-induced SLE.

    PubMed Central

    Schattner, A.; Sthoeger, Z.; Geltner, D.

    1994-01-01

    A 58 year old woman developed systemic symptoms, interstitial lung disease, splenomegaly, leukopenia and anti-histone and anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), while treated with hydralazine for hypertension. Five months after presentation she was admitted with high fever, skin rash and atypical lymphocytosis due to acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Worsening leukopenia and increased ANA were found, and high titres of anti-DNA antibodies, anti-cardiolipin antibodies and rheumatoid factors appeared. Hydralazine was stopped and the patient gradually became asymptomatic. All autoantibodies spontaneously disappeared (over 16 weeks), and the white cell count and spleen size became normal. The patient was found to be a slow acetylator and to have both HLA-DR4 and selective IgA deficiency. Thus, a multifactorial genetic susceptibility to develop drug-induced lupus was brought out in stages first by hydralazine and then by CMV, yet all manifestations and autoantibodies resolved spontaneously, demonstrating the complex interplay of varied environmental factors with a genetic predisposition in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:7831173

  15. Opposite effects of the acute promyelocytic leukemia PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins on retinoic acid signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, M; Testa, U; Nervi, C; Ferrucci, P F; Grignani, F; Puccetti, E; Grignani, F; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the PML or PLZF nuclear protein are the genetic markers of acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs). APLs with the PML-RAR alpha or the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein are phenotypically indistinguishable except that they differ in their sensitivity to retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation: PML-RAR alpha blasts are sensitive to RA and patients enter disease remission after RA treatment, while patients with PLZF-RAR alpha do not. We here report that (i) like PML-RAR alpha expression, PLZF-RAR alpha expression blocks terminal differentiation of hematopoietic precursor cell lines (U937 and HL-60) in response to different stimuli (vitamin D3, transforming growth factor beta1, and dimethyl sulfoxide); (ii) PML-RAR alpha, but not PLZF-RAR alpha, increases RA sensitivity of hematopoietic precursor cells and restores RA sensitivity of RA-resistant hematopoietic cells; (iii) PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar RA binding affinities; and (iv) PML-RAR alpha enhances the RA response of RA target genes (those for RAR beta, RAR gamma, and transglutaminase type II [TGase]) in vivo, while PLZF-RAR alpha expression has either no effect (RAR beta) or an inhibitory activity (RAR gamma and type II TGase). These data demonstrate that PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar (inhibitory) effects on RA-independent differentiation and opposite (stimulatory or inhibitory) effects on RA-dependent differentiation and that they behave in vivo as RA-dependent enhancers or inhibitors of RA-responsive genes, respectively. Their different activities on the RA signalling pathway might underlie the different responses of PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha APLs to RA treatment. The PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein contains an approximately 120-amino-acid N-terminal motif (called the POZ domain), which is also found in a variety of zinc finger proteins and a group of poxvirus proteins and which mediates protein

  16. Cognitive and physiological effects of an acute physical activity intervention in elementary school children

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Katja; Schmidt, Mirko; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute physical activity intervention that included cognitive engagement on executive functions and on cortisol level in young elementary school children. Half of the 104 participating children (6–8 years old) attended a 20-min sport sequence, which included cognitively engaging and playful forms of physical activity. The other half was assigned to a resting control condition. Individual differences in children's updating, inhibition, and shifting performance as well as salivary cortisol were assessed before (pre-test), immediately after (post-test), and 40 min after (follow-up) the intervention or control condition, respectively. Results revealed a significantly stronger improvement in inhibition in the experimental group compared to the control group, while it appeared that acute physical activity had no specific effect on updating and shifting. The intervention effect on inhibition leveled out 40 min after physical activity. Salivary cortisol increased significantly more in the experimental compared to the control group between post-test and follow-up and results support partly the assumed inverted U-shaped relationship between cortisol level and cognitive performance. In conclusion, results indicate that acute physical activity that includes cognitive engagement may have immediate positive effects on inhibition, but not necessarily on updating and shifting in elementary school children. This positive effect may partly be explained through cortisol elevation after acute physical activity. PMID:25566148

  17. Nutritional support for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pisters, P W; Ranson, J H

    1992-09-01

    The current review has summarized current data relevant to the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis. Selection of the most appropriate form of nutritional support for patients with acute pancreatitis is intimately linked to a thorough understanding of the effects of various forms of enteral and parenteral nutrition on physiologic exocrine secretory mechanisms. Two basic concepts have emerged from the multiple studies that have addressed these issues to date: 1, enteral feeds should have low fat composition and be delivered distal to the ligament of Treitz to minimize exocrine pancreatic secretion and 2, parenteral substrate infusions, alone or in combinations similar to those administered during TPN, do not stimulate exocrine pancreatic secretion. From a practical standpoint, most patients with acute pancreatitis are diagnosed by nonoperative means and will manifest some degree of paralytic ileus during the early phase of the disease. Therefore, jejunal feeds are usually not a therapeutic option early in the course of this disease. On the basis of the clinical studies reviewed herein we propose general guidelines for the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis: 1, most patients with mild uncomplicated pancreatitis (one to two prognostic signs) do not benefit from nutritional support; 2, nutritional support should begin early in the course of patients with moderate to severe disease (as soon as hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory stability permit); 3, initial nutritional support should be through the parenteral route and include fat emulsion in amounts sufficient to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency (no objective data exist to recommend specific amino acid formulations); 4, patients requiring operation for diagnosis or complications of the disease should have a feeding jejunostomy placed at the time of operation for subsequent enteral nutrition using a low fat formula, such as Precision HN (Sandoz, 1.3 percent calories as fat

  18. Effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on isolated islets' insulin release

    PubMed Central

    Zardooz, Homeira; Zahediasl, Saleh; Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Farrokhi, Babak; Nasiraei, Shiva; Kazeminezhad, Behrang; Gholampour, Roohollah

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated pancreatic islets. Male Wistar rats were divided into two control and stressed groups; each further was allocated into fed and fasted groups. Stress was induced by communication box for one (acute), fifteen and thirty (chronic) days. After islet isolation, their number, size and insulin output were assessed. Plasma corticosterone level was determined. In fasted animals, acute stress increased basal and post stress plasma corticosterone level, while 30 days stress decreased it compared to day 1. In fed rats, acute stress increased only post stress plasma corticosterone concentration, however, after 15 days stress, it was decreased compared to day 1. Acute stress did not change insulin output; however, the insulin output was higher in the fed acutely stressed rats at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose than fasted ones. Chronic stress increased insulin output on day 15 in the fasted animals but decreased it on day 30 in the fed animals at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose. In the fasted control rats insulin output was lower than fed ones. In the chronic stressed rats insulin output at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose was higher in the fasted than fed rats. The number of islets increased in the fasted rats following 15 days stress. This study indicated that the response of the isolated islets from acute and chronically stressed rats are different and depends on the feeding status.

  19. Acclimation and acute temperature effects on population differences in oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Baris, Tara Z; Crawford, Douglas L; Oleksiak, Marjorie F

    2016-01-15

    Temperature changes affect metabolism on acute, acclamatory, and evolutionary time scales. To better understand temperature's affect on metabolism at these different time scales, we quantified cardiac oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in three Fundulus taxa acclimated to 12 and 28°C and measured at three acute temperatures (12, 20, and 28°C). The Fundulus taxa (northern Maine and southern Georgia F. heteroclitus, and a sister taxa, F. grandis) were used to identify evolved changes in OxPhos. Cardiac OxPhos metabolism was quantified by measuring six traits: state 3 (ADP and substrate-dependent mitochondrial respiration); E state (uncoupled mitochondrial activity); complex I, II, and IV activities; and LEAK ratio. Acute temperature affected all OxPhos traits. Acclimation only significantly affected state 3 and LEAK ratio. Populations were significantly different for state 3. In addition to direct effects, there were significant interactions between acclimation and population for complex I and between population and acute temperature for state 3. Further analyses suggest that acclimation alters the acute temperature response for state 3, E state, and complexes I and II: at the low acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at low assay temperatures, and at the high acclimation temperature, the acute response was dampened at high assay temperatures. Closer examination of the data also suggests that differences in state 3 respiration and complex I activity between populations were greatest between fish acclimated to low temperatures when assayed at high temperatures, suggesting that differences between the populations become more apparent at the edges of their thermal range. PMID:26582639

  20. Chronic hyperleptinemia induces resistance to acute natriuretic and NO-mimetic effects of leptin.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Wojtak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Apart from controlling energy balance, leptin, secreted by adipose tissue, is also involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Previous studies have demonstrated that acutely administered leptin stimulates natriuresis and vascular nitric oxide (NO) production and that these effects are impaired in obese animals. However, the mechanism of resistance to leptin is not clear. Because obesity is associated with chronically elevated leptin, we examined if long-term hyperleptinemia impairs acute effects of leptin on sodium excretion and NO production in the absence of obesity. Hyperleptinemia was induced in lean rats by administration of exogenous leptin at a dose of 0.5mg/kg/day for 7 days, and then acute effect of leptin (1mg/kg i.v.) was studied under general anesthesia. Leptin increased fractional sodium excretion and decreased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the renal medulla. In addition, leptin increased the level of NO metabolites and cyclic GMP in plasma and aortic wall. These acute effects of leptin were impaired in hyperleptinemic animals. In both control and hyperleptinemic groups the effect of leptin on Na(+) excretion and renal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was abolished by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, but not by protein kinase B/Akt inhibitor, triciribine,. In contrast, acute effect of leptin on NO metabolites and cGMP was abolished by triciribine but not by wortmannin. Leptin stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473) in aortic tissue but not in the kidney, and this effect was comparable in control and hyperleptinemic groups. These results suggest that hyperleptinemia may mediate "renal" and "vascular" leptin resistance observed in obesity. PMID:19854228

  1. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this. PMID:26576033

  2. Self-regulation strategies may enhance the acute effect of exercise on smoking delay.

    PubMed

    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis; Pappa, Vassiliki; Tsiami, Anastasia; Tzatzaki, Theodora; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zourbanos, Nikos; Goudas, Marios; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined the acute effect of a moderate intensity aerobic exercise session combined with self-regulation on smoking delay in physically inactive smokers. Participants were 11 adults (5 males and 6 females) that completed three experimental conditions: control, exercise, and exercise using self-regulation strategies (SR). Following the experimental treatment smoking for the two exercise conditions delayed significantly more than for the control condition; in addition exercise SR delayed smoking marginally more that the plain exercise condition. Findings supported previous research that acute exercise reduces cravings to smoke, and suggests that the use of self-regulation strategies may strengthen exercise for smoking cessation interventions. PMID:26851493

  3. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  4. Antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and acute toxicity effects of Salvia leriifolia Benth seed extract in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Haddadkhodaparast, Mohammad H; Arash, Ali R

    2003-04-01

    The antinociceptive and antiinflammatory effects as well as the acute toxicity of Salvia leriifolia aqueous seed extract were studied in mice and rats. Antinociceptive activity was assessed using the hot-plate and tail flick tests. The effect on acute inflammation was studied using vascular permeability increased by acetic acid and xylene-induced ear oedema in mice. The activity against chronic inflammation was assessed using the cotton pellet test in rats. The LD(50) of the extract was found to be 19.5 g/kg (i.p.) in mice. The aqueous seed extract showed significant and dose-dependent (1.25-10 g/kg) antinociceptive activity over 7 h, and was inhibited by naloxone pretreatment. Significant and dose-dependent (2.5-10 g/kg) activity was observed against acute inflammation induced by acetic acid and in the xylene ear oedema test. In the chronic inflammation test the extract (2.5-5 g/kg) showed significant and dose-dependent antiinflammatory activity. The aqueous seed extract of S. leriifolia may therefore have supraspinal antinociceptive effects which may be mediated by opioid receptors, and showed considerable effects against acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:12722156

  5. The effect of acute haemorrhage in the dog and man on plasma-renin concentration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Davies, D. L.; Lever, A. F.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Verniory, A.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of acute haemorrhage on the plasma renin concentration was studied in the dog and man. 2. Plasma-renin concentration was regularly increased after the larger bleeds; after the smaller haemorrhages plasma-renin concentration remained unchanged. 3. The results are discussed in relation to current hypotheses concerning the control of renin and aldosterone secretion. PMID:4287431

  6. Acute bilateral glaucoma and panuveitis as a side effect of topiramate for weight loss treatment.

    PubMed

    Pikkel, Yoav Yechezkel

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with acute angle-closure glaucoma and panuveitis in both eyes after being treated with topiramate for binge eating and obesity. This case report emphasises the hazardous side effects of treatment with topiramate with unusual indication and the precaution a caretaker must take when treating a patient. PMID:24744070

  7. Time Scale Effects in Acute Association between Air-Pollution and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used wavelet analysis and generalized additive models (GAM) to study timescale effects in the acute association between mortality and air-pollution. Daily averages of measured NO2 concentrations in the metropolitan Paris area are used as indicators of human exposure...

  8. The Chronic and Acute Effects of Exercise Upon Selected Blood Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roitman, J. L.; Brewer, J. P.

    This study investigated the effects of chronic and acute exercise upon selected blood measures and indices. Nine male cross-country runners were studied. Red blood count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured using standard laboratory techniques; mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin…

  9. State/Trait Anxiety and Anxiolytic Effects of Acute Physical Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guszkowska, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine anxiolytic effects of acute physical exertions in relation to the initial anxiety state and trait in women. Material and methods: A group of 163 women aged 16-56 years, attending fitness clubs in Warsaw, participated in the study. They selected a single exercise to perform--strength, aerobic or mixed, lasting 30 to over 60…

  10. NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lots of information is available surrounding the acute toxicity of anticholinesterase pesticides, but these have been very few detailed studies on the chronic effects of these pesticides. Humans are exposed on a chronic basis and some humans believe that have been affected advers...

  11. EFFECT OF ACUTE MATERNAL TOXICITY ON FETAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acute alterations in maternal health status upon fetal development were assessed following exposure of pregnant CD-1 mice on day 8 of gestation to one of ten chemicals at a dose calculated to be the maternal LD10 or LD40. The dams were killed on day 18 of gestation...

  12. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  13. Neurobehavorial effects of acute exposure to four solvents: meta-abalyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Meta-and re-analyses of the available data for the neurobehavioral effects of acute inhalation exposure to toluene were reported by Benignus et al. (2007). The present study was designed to test the generality of the toluene results in as many other solvents as possible by furthe...

  14. COMPARISON OF ACUTE NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute neurobehavioral and cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting effects of N-methyl carbamate insecticides have not been systematically compared. We evaluated five carbamates - carbaryl (CB), propoxur (PP), oxamyl (OM), methomyl (MM), and methiocarb (MC). Adult male Long-Evans ra...

  15. Acute Alcohol Effects on Repetition Priming and Word Recognition Memory with Equivalent Memory Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Suchismita; Bates, Marsha E.

    2006-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication effects on memory were examined using a recollection-based word recognition memory task and a repetition priming task of memory for the same information without explicit reference to the study context. Memory cues were equivalent across tasks; encoding was manipulated by varying the frequency of occurrence (FOC) of words…

  16. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  17. TOWARD COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in being able to express the consequences of exposure to potentially toxic compounds in monetary terms in order to evaluate potential cost-benefit relationships of controlling exposure. Behavioral effects of acute toluene exposure could be subjected ...

  18. Acute effects of all-trans-retinoic acid in ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a vitamin A derivative that is important in neuronal patterning, survival, and neurite outgrowth. We investigated the relatively acute effects of ATRA (100 nM and 1 µM) on cell swelling in ischemic injury and on key features hypothesized to contribute to cell swelli...

  19. Chinese Head Trauma Data Bank: Effect of Hyperthermia on the Outcome of Acute Head Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hyperthermia may accentuate the detrimental consequences of brain injury and worsen the outcome of patients with acute head trauma, especially severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We explored the effect of different magnitudes and durations of hyperthermia in the first 3 days after injury on the outcome of 7145 patients with acute head trauma, including 1626 with severe TBI. The differences in mortality and unfavorable outcome between the normothermia group, mild fever group, moderate fever group, and high fever group were statistically significant (p<0.001). The mortality and unfavorable outcome of severe TBI patients in the groups also differed significantly (p<0.001). The mortality and unfavorable outcome of patients with 1 day, 2 days, and 3 days of high fever were significantly increased (p<0.01). Our data strongly indicate that both degree and duration of early post-trauma hyperthermia are closely correlated with the outcome of acute TBI patients, especially severely injured ones, which indicates that hyperthermia may play a detrimental role in the delayed mechanisms of damage after acute TBI. Prevention of early hyperthermia after acute head trauma is therefore essential to the management of TBI patients. PMID:22026424

  20. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  1. The effect of obesity on inflammatory cytokine and leptin production following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Caslin, H L; Franco, R L; Crabb, E B; Huang, C J; Bowen, M K; Acevedo, E O

    2016-02-01

    Obesity may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by eliciting chronic systemic inflammation and impairing the immune response to additional stressors. There has been little assessment of the effect of obesity on psychological stress, an independent risk factor for CVD. Therefore, it was of interest to examine interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and leptin following an acute mental stress task in nonobese and obese males. Twenty college-aged males (21.3 ± 0.56 years) volunteered to participate in a 20-min Stroop color-word and mirror-tracing task. Subjects were recruited for obese (body mass index: BMI > 30) and nonobese (BMI < 25) groups, and blood samples were collected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The acute mental stress task elicited an increase in heart rate, catecholamines, and IL-1β in all subjects. Additionally, acute mental stress increased cortisol concentrations in the nonobese group. There was a significant reduction in leptin in obese subjects 30 min posttask compared with a decrease in nonobese subjects 120 min posttask. Interestingly, the relationship between the percent change in leptin and IL-1Ra at 120 min posttask in response to an acute mental stress task was only observed in nonobese individuals. This is the first study to suggest that adiposity in males may impact leptin and inflammatory signaling mechanisms following acute mental stress. PMID:26511907

  2. The effect of chronic vs. acute injection of vasopressin on animal learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Hamburger-Bar, R; Klein, A; Belmaker, R H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of chronic and acute treatment with DDAVP, a vasopressin analog, was studied in 2 month old male rats, using an active avoidance test in a shuttle box. The experiment lasted 6 weeks: an acquisition period of 4 weeks and an extinction period of 2 weeks. Rats were treated one hour before behavioral testing 3 times a week for 6 weeks with either DDAVP 20 micrograms/rat/day for the whole period (chronic group) or with DDAVP for the first week and again once only on the first day of the extinction period (acute group) or with saline. Chronic treatment with DDAVP resulted in better acquisition and in a marked retardation of extinction compared with the acute treatment group. These results were obtained both in normal rats and in rats pretreated at age 5 days of life with intracisternal 6-OH dopamine. PMID:3991361

  3. Effect of acute exercise and cardiovascular fitness on cognitive function: an event-related cortical desynchronization study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Chu, Chien-Heng; Wang, Chun-Chih; Song, Tai-Fen; Wei, Gao-Xia

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effects of acute exercise and cardiovascular fitness on cognitive function using the Stroop test and event-related desynchronization (ERD) in an aged population. Old adults (63.10 ± 2.89 years) were first assigned to either a high-fitness or a low-fitness group, and they were then subjected to an acute exercise treatment and a reading control treatment in a counterbalanced order. Alpha ERD was recorded during the Stroop test, which was administered after both treatments. Acute exercise improved cognitive performance regardless of the level of cognition, and old adults with higher fitness levels received greater benefits from acute exercise. Additionally, acute exercise, rather than overall fitness, elicited greater lower and upper alpha ERDs relative to the control condition. These findings indirectly suggest that the beneficial effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance may result from exercise-induced attentional control observed during frontal neural excitation. PMID:25308605

  4. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  5. Influence of various treatments including povidone-iodine and healing stimulatory reagents in a rabbit ear wound model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Maeda, Tatsuo; Okura, Takaaki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-10-01

    Selecting an appropriate treatment for a given case of skin wound is crucial for inducing optimal healing. We used an animal model developed from normal rabbit ears in order to assess the efficacy of treatments for skin wounds with or without a wet dressing, anti microbial reagent or topical wound-stimulatory reagents. The degree of healing in each group was evaluated and compared using four histological parameters: (i) degree of reepithelialisation, (ii) amount of granulation tissue formation, and (iii) the number of capillary lumens and (iv) fibroblasts in the granulation tissue. Treatment using wet dressings resulted in an increase in capillary number compared with the open dry wound. Although the retention of povidone-iodine (PI) in wound tissue after application significantly inhibited reepithelialisation (P < 0.05), rinsing PI off with saline was comparable in effect to using only a wet dressing. The three topical reagents, namely, basic fibroblast growth factor, prostaglandin E1 and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate, significantly improved reepithelialisation (P < 0.05). In conclusion, wounds should be kept hydrated by applying topical reagents. If there are any signs of bacterial infection, PI can be applied and rinsed later with saline in order to minimise its cytotoxic effects. PMID:22776519

  6. The effect of sodium tetraborate and alum in the management of acute childhood diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Aung, M M; U, P P

    1986-03-01

    The effect of oral rehydration (OR) has been well established in the management of dehydration in acute childhood diarrhoea. Many authors have been trying to find additives of all types which would be effective in retaining oral fluids and promoting their active absorption into the circulation. Any agent which will effectively reduce oral rehydration requirements should be considered for prospective studies. Amongst the traditional medicines, it was noticed that sodium tetraborate (borax) and alum reduced appreciably the fluid requirement in many cases of acute childhood diarrhoea. This traditional usage of these chemicals without any noticeable side effects has been described for centuries. During preliminary observations on 26 of our children given these salts no side effects were detected. PMID:2428288

  7. Control of the reproductive axis: Balancing act between stimulatory and inhibitory inputs.

    PubMed

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2015-04-01

    As for most vertebrates, reproduction in poultry is controlled by an integrated axis [the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis]. External and internal cues are integrated at the level of the hypothalamus to initiate gonadal recruitment and control the subsequent reproductive cycle. Until recently, it was believed that the HPG was exclusively under stimulatory control from hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). However in 2000, the discovery of gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), an inhibitory peptide, changed this dogma. Since then, evidence accumulated to confirm that in fact the HPG is under a dual control system with a stimulatory and an inhibitory branch. In this paper, we review the organization of this dual control system, the mechanisms controlling the synthesis and release of GnRH and GnIH, and the possible integration and interactions between the two branches to regulate pituitary gonadotropes' function. Furthermore, as light perception and photoperiod are the primary cues utilized by the poultry industry in controlled environments, special consideration was given to potential practical applications. PMID:25638470

  8. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  9. [Effect of shengmaisan on serum lipid peroxidation in acute viral myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, M H; Rong, Y Z; Lu, B J

    1996-03-01

    The effect of Shengmaisan (SMS) on 62 acute viral myocarditis patients and its peroxidation damage was studied. The results revealed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in blood were decreased and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma was increased in acute viral myocarditis patients in comparison with the healthy controls (P < 0.001). 62 acute viral myocarditis patients were divided into two groups: SMS group and placebo group. After treatment, both SOD and GSH-Px activities were increased and the level of MDA decreased (P < 0.001) in SMS group, while those in placebo group were not changed (P < 0.05). The results suggested that the myocardial damage of viral myocarditis is closely related with lipid peroxidation SMS acts as an effective free radical scavenger and anti-lipid peroxidation drug. SMS could prevent the damage of myocardia and might be taken as one of the effective therapeutic methods in treatment of acute viral myocarditis. PMID:9208534

  10. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  11. The Effect of Vigorous Intensity Acute Exercise on Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David Spencer

    2012-01-01

    The effect of physical activity (PA) and consequent influence on cognition within adult seniors has been widely published. However, there is a paucity of causal research relating PA and cognition to schoolchildren within an authentic setting. Also, little is known about the required intensity and dosage of PA to effect executive function (EF)…

  12. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Ribeiro, Diogo Farias; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently. Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood. Method A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models. Results Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01). Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01) or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01) elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02), though aerobic training did not. The cumulative

  13. Protective effects of intravenous immunoglobulin and antimicrobial agents on acute pneumonia in leukopenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaru; Katoh, Hideya; Hamaoka, Saeko; Kinoshita, Mao; Akiyama, Koichi; Naito, Yoshifumi; Sawa, Teiji

    2016-04-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes the type of acute lung injury that is strongly associated with bacteremia, sepsis, and mortality, especially under immunocompromised conditions. Although administration of immunoglobulin solution is an applicable immunotherapy in immunocompromised patients, efficacy of immunoglobulin administration against multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa pneumonia has not been well evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of prophylactic administration of immunoglobulin solution (IVIG) in comparison with that of other types of antimicrobial agents, such as anti-PcrV IgG, piperacillin/tazobactam, or colistin in an immunocompromised mouse model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Colistin was the most effective agent for preventing acute lung injury, bacteremia, cytokinemia, and sepsis. Among the four tested antimicrobial agents, after colistin, anti-PcrV IgG and IVIG were the most effective at protecting mice from mortality. Piperacillin/tazobactam did not prevent acute lung injury or bacteremia; rather, it worsened lung histology. The data suggest that using an agent for which a positive result in an in vitro susceptibility test has been obtained may not always prevent acute lung injury in a leukopenic host infected with P. aeruginosa. Clinicians should consider the possibility of discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo tests because the absence of in vitro bactericidal activity in an antimicrobial agent is not always a reliable predictor of its lack of ability to eradicate bacteria in vivo, even in immunocompromised hosts. Based on our findings, the potential protective effects of IVIG against the acute lung injury induced by P. aeruginosa should be reevaluated. PMID:26867796

  14. Effects of copper on the acute cortisol response and associated physiology in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of chronic waterborne copper (Cu) exposure on the acute stress-induced cortisol response and associated physiological consequences in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout were exposed to 30 μg Cu/L in moderately hard water (120 mg/L as CaCO(3)) for 40 days, following which time the acute cortisol response was examined with a series of stressors. At 40 days, a 65% increase in Cu was observed in the gill, but no accumulation was observed in the liver, brain or head kidney. Stressors such as air exposure or confinement did not elicit an increase in circulating cortisol levels for Cu-exposed fish, in contrast to controls. However, this inhibitory effect on the acute cortisol response appeared to have few implications on the ability of Cu-exposed fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. For example, plasma Na(+), Ca(2+) and glucose levels as well as hepatic glycogen levels were the same post-stress in control and Cu-exposed fish. Trout were also challenged with exposure to 50% seawater for 48 h, where Cu-exposed trout maintained plasma Na(+), glucose and hepatic glycogen levels. However, Cu-exposed fish experienced decreased plasma K(+) levels throughout the Cu exposure and stress tests. In conclusion, chronic Cu exposure resulted in the abolition of an acute cortisol response post-stress. There was no Cu accumulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) suggesting this was not a direct toxic effect of Cu on the cortisol regulatory pathway. However, the lack of an acute cortisol response in Cu-exposed fish did not impair the ability of the fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. This effect on cortisol may be a strategy to reduce costs during the chronic stress of Cu exposure, and not endocrine disruption as a result of toxic injury. PMID:21964321

  15. Effect of Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Shock on 5-Hydroxytrypamine 6 Receptor Immunoreactivity in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Seungwoo; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Seungkeun; Lee, Hyung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) induces not only an antidepressant effect but also adverse effects such as amnesia. One potential mechanism underlying both the antidepressant and amnesia effect of ECS may involve the regulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) 6 (5-HT6) receptor, but less is known about the effects of acute ECS on the changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression in the hippocampus. In addition, as regulation of 5-HT receptor expression is influenced by the number of ECS treatment and by interval between ECS treatment and sacrifice, it is probable that magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression could be influenced by repeated ECS exposure. To explore this possibility, we observed and compared the changes of 5-HT6 receptor immunoreactivity (5-HT6 IR) in rat hippocampus at 1, 8, 24, or 72 h after the treatment with either a single ECS (acute ECS) or daily ECS for 10 days (chronic ECS). We found that acute ECS increased 5-HT6 IR in the CA1, CA3, and granule cell layer of hippocampus, reaching peak levels at 8 h and returning to basal levels 72 h later. The magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR observed after acute ECS were not affected by chronic ECS. These results demonstrate that both acute and chronic ECS transiently increase the 5-HT6 IR in rat hippocampus, and suggest that the magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR in the hippocampus appear not to be influenced by repeated ECS treatment. PMID:25258570

  16. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability. Research report, Sep 85-Jul 88

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability in the normal and ischemic heart of anesthetized and conscious dogs. Exposure (90 to 120 minutes) to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, was without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability in laboratory dogs. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. Using a model involving partial coronary artery stenosis, no changes were found in either the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Also examined were the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state in order to take into consideration possible adverse consequences mediated by the central nervous system. The study found no adverse effects on the cardiac-excitable properties in response to either a 2-hour- or 24-hour-exposure paradigm.

  17. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.

    1991-02-01

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m{sup 3} for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m{sup 3} (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  18. Acute and subacute effects of the ultrasonic blade and electrosurgery on nerve physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chaoyang; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Cavanaugh, John M.; Broughton, Duan; Clymer, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasonic blades have been shown to cause less acute electrophysiological damage when applied near nerves than monopolar electrosurgery (ES). This study was performed to determine whether the acute nerve damage observed for ES, as well as the relative lack of damage observed for ultrasonic dissection, extends through a subacute timeframe. Muscle incisions were made in rat with the Harmonic® Blade (HB) and ES at a distance of 2 mm from the sciatic nerve. Sham surgery was also performed which consisted of similar exposure of the sciatic nerve without use of an energized device. Electrophysiological function was assessed acutely over a 3-h period, and subacutely after a 7-day survival, by monitoring the sciatic nerve compound action potential (CAP), conduction velocity (CV), von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation force, leukocyte infiltration, and impaired axonal transport via β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry. During the acute period, ES produced significantly lower CAP and CV, and higher levels of leukocytes and β-APP than sham, whereas the ultrasonic blade was not significantly different from sham, and had significantly lower VFH force than ES. After the subacute survival, ES continued to display significantly lower CAP and CV, and higher levels of leukocytes and β-APP than sham, whereas ultrasonic blade had higher CAP and CV than sham, and lower VFH than ES. This study confirms that incisions made with an ultrasonic blade cause less acute nerve damage than monopolar ES, and are comparable to sham surgery at a distance of 2 mm from the sciatic nerve. The negative effects of electrosurgery extend through at least a 7-day survival period, whereas subacute recovery after application of the ultrasonic blade was comparable to that of sham surgery. For surgical procedures in the vicinity of vital nerves, use of the ultrasonic blade represents a lower risk than ES for both acute and subacute neural trauma. PMID:25812024

  19. Effects of central opiate and serotoninergic structures on heart rhythm during acute myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Prokop'eva, E V; Pivovarov, Y I

    2001-12-01

    Electrostimulation of the central gray matter in the sylvian aqueduct and nucleus raphe magnus produced an antiarrhythmic effect during acute myocardial ischemia. Stimulation and blockade of opiate receptors in the central amygdaloid nucleus and lateral hypothalamus with dalargin and naloxone induced the same effect. Destruction of the central gray matter in the sylvian aqueduct and nucleus raphe magnus decreased electrical stability of ischemic myocardium. PMID:12152875

  20. Upstream stimulatory factors stimulate transcription through E-box motifs in the PF4 gene in megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Eri; Tozuka, Zenzaburo; Nagai, Ryohei; Watanabe, Ayako; Matsumoto, Kayoko; Yasui, Kazuta; Jackman, Robert W; Nakano, Toru; Doi, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is expressed during megakaryocytic differentiation. We previously demonstrated that the homeodomain proteins (myeloid ecotropic integration site 1 [MEIS1], Pbx-regulating protein 1 [PREP1], and pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factors [PBXs]) bind to the novel regulatory element tandem repeat of MEIS1 binding element [TME] and transactivate the rat PF4 promoter. In the present study, we investigated and identified other TME binding proteins in megakaryocytic HEL cells using mass spectrometry. Among identified proteins, we focused on upstream stimulatory factor (USF1) and USF2 and investigated their effects on the PF4 promoter. USF1 and 2 bound to the E-box motif in the TME and strongly transactivated the PF4 promoter. Furthermore, physiologic bindings of USF1 and 2 to the TME in rat megakaryocytes were demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Interestingly, the E-box motif in the TME was conserved in TME-like sequences of both the human and mouse PF4 promoters. USF1 and 2 also bound to the human TME-like sequence and transactivated the human PF4 promoter. Expressions of USF1 and 2 were detected by reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human megakaryocytes derived from CD34+ cells. Thus, these studies demonstrate that the novel TME binding transcription factors, USF1 and 2, transactivate rat and human PF4 promoters and may play an important role in megakaryocytic gene expression. PMID:15187018

  1. Metformin Suppresses MHC-Restricted Antigen Presentation by Inhibiting Co-Stimulatory Factors and MHC Molecules in APCs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seulmee; Hyun, Bobae; Lee, Aeri; Kong, Hyunseok; Han, Shinha; Lee, Chong-Kil; Ha, Nam-Joo; Kim, Kyungjae

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is widely used for T2D therapy but its cellular mechanism of action is undefined. Recent studies on the mechanism of metformin in T2D have demonstrated involvement of the immune system. Current immunotherapies focus on the potential of immunomodulatory strategies for the treatment of T2D. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on the antigen-presenting function of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Metformin decreased both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA and suppressed the expression of both MHC molecules and co-stimulatory factors such as CD54, CD80, and CD86 in DCs, but did not affect the phagocytic activity toward exogenous OVA. The class II-restricted OVA presentation-regulating activity of metformin was also confirmed using mice that had been injected with metformin followed by soluble OVA. These results provide an understanding of the mechanisms of the T cell response-regulating activity of metformin through the inhibition of MHC-restricted antigen presentation in relation to its actions on APCs. PMID:24009856

  2. Cross-shift study of acute respiratory effects in cement production workers.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Omid; Aslani, Maryam; Sadeghniiat Haghighi, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Cement dust exposure is associated with increased respiratory impairment. As the major occupational hazard in the cement production industry is cement particles, our aim was to more thoroughly examine the acute effects of occupational exposure to cement dust on the respiratory system. A cross-shift study was conducted in a cement factory in Iran. 100 high exposed workers from production and packing sections and 100 low exposed from office workers were included. Environmental total dust was measured in each section. Assessment of lung function was done by pre and post shift spirometry. At the end of the day shift, acute respiratory symptoms were recorded. The means of total dust among high and low exposed workers were 16.55 mg/m3 and 0.9 mg/m3, respectively. The most common acute respiratory symptoms in high exposed workers were stuffy nose (52%) and shortness of breath (49%). A statistically significant post shift reduction in PEF, FEV1, FEF 25-75, FVC and FEV1/ FVC was demonstrated in high exposed group. Multivariate linear regression showed a significant relationship between the percentage of the cross-shift decrease in spirometric indices and exposure to cement dust. We detected significant relationship between exposure to cement dust and acute respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function indices. Effective dust-control measures and preparing a suitable strategy for respiratory protection are highly recommended. PMID:24659073

  3. Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wollen, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization. Nutritional and botanical therapies included are huperzine A, polyphenols, Ginkgo, Panax ginseng, Withania somnifera, phosphatidylserine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, acetyl L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, various vitamins and minerals, and melatonin. Stimulatory therapies discussed are physical exercise, cognitive training, music, and socialization. Finally, treatment strategies are discussed in light of the benefits and drawbacks of different therapeutic approaches. It is concluded that potential risks of both approved and non-approved therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits and certain consequences of disease progression. Approaches that target several dysfunctions simultaneously and that emphasize nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies may offer the most benefit at this time. PMID:21155625

  4. Comparison between the effects of quercetin on seizure threshold in acute and chronic seizure models.

    PubMed

    Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Hajiali, Farid; Taghiloo, Mina; Abbasi, Esmail; Mohseni, Fatemeh; Yousefi, Farbod

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids are important constituents of food and beverages, and several studies have shown that they have neuroactive properties. Many of these compounds are ligands for γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the anticonvulsant effects of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), which is a flavonoid found in plants, in rats treated with pentylenetetrazole in acute and chronic seizure models. Single intraperitoneal administration of quercetin did not show anticonvulsive effects against acute seizure. Similarly, multiple oral pretreatment with quercetin did not have protective effects against acute seizure. However, multiple intraperitoneal administration of quercetin (25 and 50 mg/kg) significantly increased time to death compared with the control (p < 0.001). However, quercetin pretreatment had no significant effects on the pattern of convulsion development during all periods of kindling. But on the test day, quercetin (100 mg/kg) could significantly increase generalized tonic-clonic seizure onset (GTCS) and decrease GTCS duration compared with the control (p < 0.01, p < 0.05). We conclude that quercetin has a narrow therapeutic dose range for anticonvulsant activities in vivo, and it has different effects on the seizure threshold. The different effects of quercetin on seizure threshold may occur through several mechanisms. PMID:24442347

  5. Effects of Ozonated Olive Oil on Acute Radiation Proctitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Fatma Ayça; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Sümer, Demet; Köktürk, Füruzan; Bektaş, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute radiation proctitis is a common complication of pelvic radiation and management of acute radiation proctitis is under evaluation. The beneficial effects of ozonated olive oil (OzOO) have already been shown in the treatment of chronic wounds. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical OzOO on acute radiation proctitis. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical OzOO on acute radiation proctitis. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Rats were divided into three groups: control; irradiation+saline (1 mL); and irradiation +OzOO (1 mL). A single fraction of 17.5 Gy was delivered to each rat. The OzOO was administered rectally each day after irradiation. Each rat was observed daily for signs of proctitis. Irradiated rats were euthanised on days 5 and 10. The mucosal changes were evaluated macroscopically and pathologically. Results: According to the clinical findings, five rats in the irradiation+saline group showed Grade 4 symptoms on the 10th day. Macroscopic finding scores on the 10th day in the irradiation+saline and irradiation+OzOO groups were statistically significantly different. On pathological examination, radiation-induced mucosal damage was the most prominent 10 days after irradiation in saline-treated rats. On the 10th day, the irradiation+OzOO group showed mild inflammation and slight crypt change, which corresponded to Grade 1 pathological findings. Conclusion: OzOO attenuates macroscopic and pathological findings of acute radiation proctitis in rats. PMID:25207143

  6. The effect of chronic and acute exercise on immunity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Jan, M S; Chen, H I

    1993-02-01

    The effects of exercise training and acute exercise on the immune system were investigated in rats. For chronic exercise training, the rats ran on a drum exerciser at the intensity of about 60-70% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) for 30 min and then extended up to 60 min per day, 5 days per week for 10 weeks. The rats were at rest for 3 days before sacrifice. The mitogenic activity of spleen lymphocytes to concanavalin A (Con A) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) decreased as compared to the sedentary control, while proliferative response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) production in the training group was reduced. The immunomodulatory effect after acute exercise has also been investigated and it showed profound enhancement of cell proliferation to Con A, SEB and LPS in mild (50% VO2max for 10 min) and moderate (70% VO2max for 10 min) exercise groups. The enhancing activity was less prominent after severe exercise (> 75%) VO2max until exhaustion). The IL2 production increased in all of these acute exercise groups. Nevertheless, there was no significant variation between exercise and control groups in the cell number per spleen and the percentages of various lymphocyte populations, i.e., total T, CD4+, CD8+ and IL-2R+ T cells as well as B cells. In summary, this study indicates that chronic exercise training may cause the reduction of T cell activity while acute exercise manifests an enhancing effect. However, B cell proliferation was elevated in both chronic and acute exercise groups. PMID:8463030

  7. Acute effects of corticosterone injection on paternal behavior in California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) fathers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Breanna N; Perea-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Saltzman, Wendy

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids are thought to mediate the disruption of parental behavior in response to acute and chronic stress. Previous research supports their role in chronic stress; however, no study has experimentally tested the effects of acute glucocorticoid elevation on paternal behavior. We tested the prediction that acute corticosterone (CORT) increases would decrease paternal behavior in California mouse fathers and would lead to longer-term effects on reproductive success, as even short-term increases in CORT have been shown to produce lasting effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. First-time fathers were injected with 30 mg/kg CORT, 60 mg/kg CORT or vehicle, or left unmanipulated. Interactions between the male and its pup(s) were recorded 1.5-2h after injection and scored for paternal and non-paternal behavior. Treatment groups were combined into control (unmanipulated + vehicle, n = 15) and CORT (30 mg/kg + 60 mg/kg, n = 16) for analysis based on resulting plasma CORT concentrations. CORT treatment did not alter paternal or non-paternal behaviors or any long-term measures (male body mass or temperature, pup growth rate, pup survival, interbirth interval, number or mass of pups born in the second litter). Fathers showed a significant rise in body mass at day 30 postpartum, followed by a decrease in body mass after the birth of the second litter; however, this pattern did not differ between the CORT and control groups. In summary, acute elevation of plasma CORT did not alter direct paternal behavior, body mass, or reproductive outcomes, suggesting that acute CORT elevation alone does not overtly disrupt paternal care in this biparental mammal. PMID:21939660

  8. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry. PMID:11468403

  9. The effect of food on the acute toxicity of silver nitrate to four freshwater test species and acute-to-chronic ratios.

    PubMed

    Naddy, Rami B; McNerney, Gina R; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Bell, Russell A; Kramer, James R; Wu, Kuen B; Paquin, Paul R

    2011-11-01

    Acute silver toxicity studies were conducted with and without food for four common freshwater test species: Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow-FHM), and Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout-RBT) in order to generate acute-to-chronic ratios (ACR). The studies were conducted similarly (i.e., static-renewal or flow-through) to chronic/early-life stage studies that were previously performed in this laboratory. The acute toxicity (EC/LC50 values) of silver without food ranged from 0.57 μg dissolved Ag/l for C.dubia to 9.15 μg dissolved Ag/l for RBT. The presence of food resulted in an increase in EC/LC50 values from 1.25× for RBT to 22.4× for C. dubia. Invertebrate food type was also shown to effect acute silver toxicity. Food did not affect EC/LC50s or ACRs as greatly in fish studies as in invertebrate studies. ACRs for both invertebrate species were <1.0 when using acute studies without food but were 1.22 and 1.33 when using acute studies with food. ACRs for FHMs ranged from 4.06 to 7.19, while RBT ACRs ranged from 28.6 to 35.8 depending on whether food was present in acute studies. The data generated from this research program should be useful in re-determining a final ACR for silver in freshwater as well as in risk assessments. PMID:21779820

  10. Acute Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter on Blood Pressure: Differential Effects across Urban Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dvonch, J. Timothy; Kannan, Srimathi; Schulz, Amy J.; Keeler, Gerald J.; Mentz, Graciela; House, James; Benjamin, Alison; Max, Paul; Bard, Robert L.; Brook, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between exposure to ambient particulate matter <2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5) and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of differing community-level exposure to PM2.5 on daily measures of blood pressure (BP) among an adult population. During the period May 2002 through April 2003, BP was examined at two time points for 347 adults residing in three distinct communities of Detroit, MI. Exposure to PM2.5 was assessed in each community during this period, along with multivariate associations between PM2.5 and BP. In models combining all three communities, PM2.5 was significantly associated with systolic pressure (SP); a 10 μg/m3 increase in daily PM2.5 was associated with a 3.2 mm Hg increase in SP (p=0.05). However, in models that added a location interaction, larger effects were observed for SP within the community with highest PM2.5 levels; a 10 μg/m3 increase in daily PM2.5 was associated with a 8.6 mm Hg increase in SP (p=0.01). We also found young age (<55 years) and not taking BP medications to be significant predictors of increased BP effects. Among those taking BP medications, the PM2.5 effect on BP appeared to be mitigated, partially explaining the age effect, as those participants less than 55 years were less likely to take BP medications. Short-term increases in exposure to ambient PM2.5 are associated with acute increases in BP in adults, especially within communities with elevated levels of exposure. PMID:19273743

  11. Effective treatment of migraine. Terminating acute attacks, reducing their frequency.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Edmeads, John

    2004-04-01

    Migraine is the headache most commonly encountered in primary care practice. In one US population survey, 17.6% of women and 6% of men reported migraine. Specific, effective treatment options for migraine are increasingly available, helping to reinforce how important it is that this common and sometimes disabling condition be recognized by primary care physicians. PMID:15095534

  12. THE UNIVERSITY OF AKRON STUDY ON AIR POLLUTION AND HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS II. EFFECTS ON ACUTE RESPIRATORY ILLNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of air pollution on acute respiratory illness (ARI). Levels of air pollutants were monitored on a daily 24-hour basis at two schools in Akron, Ohio. The children at each school completed daily diaries which served as a screen...

  13. The effect of music on pain and acute confusion in older adults undergoing hip and knee surgery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Locsin, Rozzano

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music listening in older adults following hip or knee surgery. Acute confusion and pain after surgery can increase length of stay and reduce function. Study results demonstrate a reduction in acute confusion and pain and improved ambulation and higher satisfaction scores in older adults who listened to music. PMID:16974175

  14. Acute analgesic effects of nicotine and tobacco in humans: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ditre, Joseph W; Heckman, Bryan W; Zale, Emily L; Kosiba, Jesse D; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-07-01

    Although animal models have consistently demonstrated acute pain inhibitory effects of nicotine and tobacco, human experimental studies have yielded mixed results. The main goal of this meta-analysis was to quantify the effects of nicotine/tobacco administration on human experimental pain threshold and tolerance ratings. A search of PubMed and PsycINFO online databases identified 13 eligible articles, including k = 21 tests of pain tolerance (N = 393) and k = 15 tests of pain threshold (N = 339). Meta-analytic integration for both threshold and tolerance outcomes revealed that nicotine administered through tobacco smoke and other delivery systems (eg, patch, nasal spray) produced acute analgesic effects that may be characterized as small to medium in magnitude (Hedges g = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.21-0.50). Publication bias-corrected estimates remained significant and indicated that these effects may be closer to small. Sex composition was observed to be a significant moderator, such that pain threshold effects were more robust among samples that included more men than women. These results help to clarify a mixed literature and may ultimately help to inform the treatment of both pain and nicotine dependence. Pain and tobacco smoking are both highly prevalent and comorbid conditions. Current smoking has been associated with more severe chronic pain and physical impairment. Acute nicotine-induced analgesia could make smoking more rewarding and harder to give up. Future research should use dynamic measures of experimental pain reactivity and further explore biopsychosocial mechanisms of action. PMID:27023418

  15. Acute and developmental behavioral effects of flame retardants and related chemicals in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jarema, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deborah L.; Shaffer, Rachel M.; Behl, Mamta; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers are phased out, numerous compounds are emerging as potential replacement flame retardants for use in consumer and electronic products. Little is known, however, about the neurobehavioral toxicity of these replacements. This study evaluated the neurobehavioral effects of acute or developmental exposure to t-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP), 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDP), isodecyl diphenyl phosphate (IDDP), isopropylated phenyl phosphate (IPP), tricresyl phosphate (TMPP; also abbreviated TCP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP; also abbreviated TPP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP; also abbreviated TDCPP), tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), and 2,2-,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Larvae (n ≈ 24 per dose per compound) were exposed to test compounds (0.4–120 µM) at sub-teratogenic concentrations either developmentally or acutely, and locomotor activity was assessed at 6 days post fertilization. When given developmentally, all chemicals except BPDP, IDDP and TBBPA produced behavioral effects. When given acutely, all chemicals produced behavioral effects, with TPHP, TBBPA, EHDP, IPP, and BPDP eliciting the most effects at the most concentrations. The results indicate that these replacement flame retardants may have developmental or pharmacological effects on the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:26348672

  16. CONTRASTING BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE AND CHRONIC SMOKING IN DETOXIFIED ALCOHOLICS

    PubMed Central

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Gilbertson, Rebecca; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2011-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that acute nicotine administration provides a compensatory mechanism by which alcoholics might alleviate attentional deficits. In contrast, chronic smoking is increasingly recognized as negatively affecting neurobehavioral integrity. These opposing effects have not been simultaneously examined. Thus, we sought to a) extend previous work by exploring the effects of acute nicotine effects on vigilance components of attention and replicate previous findings suggesting that treatment-seeking alcoholics experience benefit to a greater extent than do other groups; and b) to examine the impact of chronic smoking on these tasks and across subgroups. Methods Substance abusing participants (N=86) were recruited and subgrouped on the basis of dependency criteria as either alcoholics, alcoholics with co-morbid stimulant dependence, or stimulant dependent individuals. Groups of cigarette-smoking (N=17) and non-smoking (N=22) community controls were recruited as comparison groups. Smoking subjects were assigned a placebo, low, or high dose nicotine patch in a double-blind placebo controlled fashion. Non-smoking controls were administered either a placebo or low dose. Testing occurred after dose stabilization. Results General linear models indicated greater sensitivity to acute nicotine administration among alcoholics than other groups when controlling for the effect of intensity of smoking history, as reflected by pack-years. Pack-years correlated negatively with performance measures in alcoholics but not stimulant abusing subgroups or smoking controls. Finally, regression analyses demonstrated that pack-years predicted poorer performance only for the alcoholic subgroup. Conclusions These results support previous work finding a compensatory effect of acute nicotine administration on attentional performance in alcoholics and reinforce the consideration of recent nicotine use as a confound in neurocognitive studies of alcoholics. Of

  17. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects. PMID:10837840

  18. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly reduced peripheral leucocyte numbers. The counter-irritant activity of levan was compared with that of a known counter-irritant, dextran. The ability of levan to reduce pleural polymorph numbers and exudate volume could not be accounted for totally by counter-irritation. Studies using an in-vitro leucocyte adhesion assay system indicate that levan affects leucocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium. PMID:6201184

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Helicteres gardneriana Ethanol Extract on Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Juliana Oliveira; de Arruda, Laura Lícia Milani; Baroni, Silmara; Truiti, Maria da Conceição Torrado; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of an ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana (Nees) Castiglioni was assayed in experimental models of pleurisy and microcirculation in situ. Treatment of animals with 500 mg/kg body weight reduced the exudate volume (35% reduction) induced by intrapleural injection of carrageenan and the migration of polymorphonuclear cells into the inflamed pleural cavity of rats (40%). Additionally, rolling and adhesion of leukocytes and the number of leukocytes that migrated toward the perivascular space in response to the carrageenan injection were decreased by the extract (500 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of the ethanol extract of Helicteres gardneriana and imply that inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial interactions is important in the extract's mechanism of action. PMID:22028731

  20. The acute effect of music on interictal epileptiform discharges.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert P

    2004-10-01

    This study was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled, pilot clinical trial investigating the effect of Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos (K448) on the frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) from the EEGs of children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, or "rolandic" epilepsy. The goal was to demonstrate decreased frequency of IEDs with exposure to K448. Four subjects were recruited and 4-hour awake EEG recordings performed. IED frequency per minute was averaged over each of three epochs per hour. Mean IED count per epoch, standard deviations, and variance were calculated. Only complete waking epochs were analyzed. Two subjects demonstrated sufficient waking IEDs for statistical analysis, consisting of three epochs of K448-related effects. Significant decreases in IEDs per minute (33.7, 50.6, and 33.9%) were demonstrated comparing baseline with exposure to K448, but not to control music (Beethoven's Für Elise). PMID:15380117

  1. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  2. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-01-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  3. Effects of Acute Laboratory Stress on Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Starcke, Katrin; Wiesen, Carina; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that stress can affect executive functioning. However, previous results are mixed with respect to the direction and size of effects, especially when considering different subcomponents of executive functions. The current study systematically investigates the effects of stress on the five components of executive functions proposed by Smith and Jonides (1999): attention and inhibition; task management; planning; monitoring; and coding. Healthy participants (N = 40) were either exposed to the computerized version of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test as a stressor (N = 20), or to a rest condition (N = 20). Stress reactions were assessed with heart rate and subjective measures. After the experimental manipulation, all participants performed tasks that measure the different executive functions. The manipulation check indicates that stress induction was successful (i.e., the stress group showed a higher heart rate and higher subjective responses than the control group). The main results demonstrate that stressed participants show a poorer performance compared with unstressed participants in all executive subcomponents, with the exception of monitoring. Effect sizes for the tasks that reveal differences between stressed and unstressed participants are high. We conclude that the laboratory stressor used here overall reduced executive functioning. PMID:27065926

  4. The acute effect of different frequencies of whole-body vibration on countermovement jump performance.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anthony P; Sanderson, Mark F; Attwood, Lynda A

    2011-06-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to elicit acute and chronic improvements in neuromuscular function; however, there is little conclusive evidence regarding an optimum protocol for acute WBV. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute exposure to different frequencies of WBV on countermovement jump (CMJ) height. Twelve recreationally trained men (age, 31 ± 8 years; height, 177 ± 12 cm; weight, 83.0 ± 6.9 kg) completed maximal CMJs pre- and post-WBV in a half-squat position for 30 seconds. In a blinded design with randomized testing order, participants were exposed on different days to frequencies of 0, 30, 35, and 40 Hz. Significant main effects were found for time (pre-to-post WBV, p < 0.01) and frequency * time interaction (p < 0.01), with post hoc analysis highlighting that there was a significant mean improvement of 6% in CMJ as a result of WBV at 40 Hz but no significant change at other frequencies. This study demonstrates that for recreationally trained men, an acute 30-second bout of vertical WBV at 40 Hz and 8-mm peak-to-peak displacement significantly enhances explosive jumping performance in comparison to other frequencies. Acute vertical WBV for 30 seconds at 40 Hz may be incorporated into strength and conditioning training to enhance explosive power; however, the exact mechanisms for improvements remain to be elucidated and further well-controlled investigations on chronic WBV training and using well-trained athletes are recommended. PMID:21358422

  5. Acute and Chronic Alcohol Administration: Effects on Performance of Zebrafish in a Latent Learning Task

    PubMed Central

    Luchiari, Ana C; Salajan, Diana C; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major medical problem. Zebrafish have been proposed to model alcohol related human disorders. Alcohol impairs learning and memory. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on performance of zebrafish in a recently developed latent learning paradigm. We employ a 2 × 3 × 2 experimental design (chronic × acute alcohol treatment × path blocked). The latent learning task had two phases: one, 30 min long exploration trials (16 days, 1 trial/day) with left or right path of a complex maze blocked, and two, a subsequent probe trial with all paths open leading to a goal box that now contained stimulus fish. During the 16 days each fish received one of two chronic treatments: freshwater or 0.50% (vol/vol%) alcohol. Subsequently, fish were immersed for 1h in one of the following solutions: 0.00 (freshwater), 0.50 or 1.00% alcohol, the acute challange. Behavior of fish was recorded during the probe trial that commenced immediately after the acute treatment. Path choices, latency to leave the start box and to enter the goal box, time spent in the goal box, distance travelled, and duration of freezing were quantified. We found that acute exposure to 1.00% alcohol after chronic freshwater disrupted learning performance, so did exposure to freshwater after chronic alcohol treatment (withdrawal). We also found exposure to chronic alcohol to diminish the effect of subsequent acute alcohol suggesting development of tolerance. Our results demonstrate that analysis of learning performance of zebrafish allows detection of alcohol-induced functional changes. The simplicity and scalability of the employed task also imply the utility of the zebrafish in high throughput drug screens. PMID:25557800

  6. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    PubMed Central

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  7. A preliminary study on the effects of acellular tissue graft augmentation in acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K

    2008-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture injuries present surgical challenges because of the mechanical forces placed on this tendon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an acellular human dermal tissue matrix, GraftJacket Matrix (Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN), as an augmentation material in acute Achilles tendon repair. Eleven consecutive patients with acute tendon ruptures were evaluated and followed up (20-31 months). Primary repair was followed by augmentation with the graft sutured circumferentially around the tendon. Patients were placed in an early functional rehabilitation program with postoperative evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome scores were calculated based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scoring system. At 20-month postoperative follow-up, there have been no cases of rerupture or recurrent pain. The average return-to-activity time was 11.8 +/- 0.75 weeks. These retrospective clinical results suggest that with an acellular human dermal tissue matrix to augment acute Achilles tendon, primary repair offers a desirable return-to-activity time without any rerupture or complications. ACFAS Level of Clinical Evidence: 2c. PMID:18156058

  8. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  9. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  10. Effect of acute paraquat poisoning on CYP450 isoforms activity in rats by cocktail method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuanghu; Wang, Zhiyi; Chen, Dongxin; Chen, Mengchun; Lin, Yingying; Liu, Zezheng; Zhang, Lijing; Wen, Congcong; Wang, Xianqin; Ma, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is a highly effective contact herbicide that is marketed worldwide as a fantastical, non-selective compound for broadleaf weed control. As compared to most pesticides, paraquat is extremely toxic to humans and the lack of strategies to manage paraquat poisoning has resulted in high fatality rates. The rats were randomly divided into acute paraquat poisoning group and control group. The paraquat group rats were given 36 mg/kg paraquat by intragastric administration. The influence of acute paraquat poisoning on the activities of CYP450 isoforms CYP2B6, CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 were evaluated by cocktail method, they were responded by the changes of pharmacokinetic parameters of bupropion, phenacetin, tolbutamide, metoprolol, midazolam and omeprazole. The six probe drugs were given to rats through intragastric administration, and the plasma concentrations were determined by UPLC-MS/MS. In the results of paraquat group compared to control group, there was statistical pharmacokinetic difference for bupropion, tolbutamide, metoprolol, midazolam and omeprazole. Acute paraquat poisoning may induce the activities of CYP2C19, and inhibit of CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 in rats. This may give advising for reasonable drug use after acute paraquat poisoning. PMID:26770539

  11. Effect of acute paraquat poisoning on CYP450 isoforms activity in rats by cocktail method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuanghu; Wang, Zhiyi; Chen, Dongxin; Chen, Mengchun; Lin, Yingying; Liu, Zezheng; Zhang, Lijing; Wen, Congcong; Wang, Xianqin; Ma, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is a highly effective contact herbicide that is marketed worldwide as a fantastical, non-selective compound for broadleaf weed control. As compared to most pesticides, paraquat is extremely toxic to humans and the lack of strategies to manage paraquat poisoning has resulted in high fatality rates. The rats were randomly divided into acute paraquat poisoning group and control group. The paraquat group rats were given 36 mg/kg paraquat by intragastric administration. The influence of acute paraquat poisoning on the activities of CYP450 isoforms CYP2B6, CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 were evaluated by cocktail method, they were responded by the changes of pharmacokinetic parameters of bupropion, phenacetin, tolbutamide, metoprolol, midazolam and omeprazole. The six probe drugs were given to rats through intragastric administration, and the plasma concentrations were determined by UPLC-MS/MS. In the results of paraquat group compared to control group, there was statistical pharmacokinetic difference for bupropion, tolbutamide, metoprolol, midazolam and omeprazole. Acute paraquat poisoning may induce the activities of CYP2C19, and inhibit of CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 in rats. This may give advising for reasonable drug use after acute paraquat poisoning. PMID:26770539

  12. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  13. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  14. Chronic and acute effects of stress on energy balance: are there appropriate animal models?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stress activates multiple neural and endocrine systems to allow an animal to respond to and survive in a threatening environment. The corticotropin-releasing factor system is a primary initiator of this integrated response, which includes activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The energetic response to acute stress is determined by the nature and severity of the stressor, but a typical response to an acute stressor is inhibition of food intake, increased heat production, and increased activity with sustained changes in body weight, behavior, and HPA reactivity. The effect of chronic psychological stress is more variable. In humans, chronic stress may cause weight gain in restrained eaters who show increased HPA reactivity to acute stress. This phenotype is difficult to replicate in rodent models where chronic psychological stress is more likely to cause weight loss than weight gain. An exception may be hamsters subjected to repeated bouts of social defeat or foot shock, but the data are limited. Recent reports on the food intake and body composition of subordinate members of group-housed female monkeys indicate that these animals have a similar phenotype to human stress-induced eaters, but there are a limited number of investigators with access to the model. Few stress experiments focus on energy balance, but more information on the phenotype of both humans and animal models during and after exposure to acute or chronic stress may provide novel insight into mechanisms that normally control body weight. PMID:25519732

  15. Oncogenic potential of guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor alpha subunit in thyroid glands of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, F M; Caillou, B; Talbot, M; Dessarps-Freichey, F; Maunoury, M T; Schlumberger, M; Mercken, L; Monier, R; Feunteun, J

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice have been used to address the issue of the oncogenic potential of mutant guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs) alpha subunit in the thyroid gland. The expression of the mutant Arg-201-->His Gs alpha subunit transgene has been directed to murine thyroid epithelial cells by bovine thyroglobulin promoter. The transgenic animals develop hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas with increased intracellular cAMP levels and high uptake of [125I]iodine and produced elevated levels of circulating triiodothyronine and thyroxine. These animals demonstrate that the mutant form of Gs alpha subunit carries an oncogenic activity, thus supporting the model that deregulation of cAMP level alters growth control in thyroid epithelium. These animals represent models for humans with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules. Images PMID:7937980

  16. Acute cognitive effects of high doses of dextromethorphan relative to triazolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Reissig, Chad J.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although concerns surrounding high-dose dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have recently increased, few studies have examined the acute cognitive effects of high doses of DXM. The aim of this study was to compare the cognitive effects of DXM with those of triazolam and placebo. METHODS Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg /70 kg), and placebo were administered p.o. to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Effects on cognitive performance were examined at baseline and after drug administration for up to 6 hours. RESULTS Both triazolam and DXM produced acute impairments in attention, working memory, episodic memory, and metacognition. Impairments observed following doses of 100-300 mg/70 kg DXM were generally smaller in magnitude than those observed after 0.5 mg/70 kg triazolam. Doses of DXM that impaired performance to the same extent as triazolam were in excess of 10-30 times the therapeutic dose of DXM. CONCLUSION The magnitude of the doses required for these effects and the absence of effects on some tasks within the 100-300 mg/70 kg dose range of DXM, speak to the relatively broad therapeutic window of over-the-counter DXM preparations when used appropriately. However, the administration of supratherapeutic doses of DXM resulted in acute cognitive impairments on all tasks that were examined. These findings are likely relevant to cases of high-dose DXM abuse. PMID:22989498

  17. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainic, Josipa; Samardzic, Janko; Erhardt, Julija; Krsnik, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration. Methods DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes. Results DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results failed to demonstrate significant effects of single- and long-term DHEAS treatment on the convulsive susceptibility in both adult and aged mice of both sexes. However, small but significant changes regarding sex differences in the susceptibility to seizures were observed following DHEAS administration to mice. Conclusion Although our findings suggest that DHEAS treatment might be safe for various potential therapeutic applications in adult as well as in old age, they also support subtle interaction of DHEAS with male and female hormonal status

  18. Electrophysiologic and behavioral effects of perinatal and acute exposure of rats to lead and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David O; Hussain, Rifat J; Berger, David F; Lombardo, John P; Park, Hye-Youn

    2002-01-01

    Lead and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) both cause a reduction of intelligence quotient and behavioral abnormalities in exposed children that have features in common with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We have used rats as a model to study the effects of both perinatal and acute exposure to lead or PCBs in an effort to compare and understand the mechanisms of these nervous system decrements. Long-term potentiation (LTP) is an electrophysiologic measurement that correlates well with cognitive ability. We have determined the effects of chronic perinatal exposure to lead or PCB 153 as well as acute application of these substances to isolated brain slices, with recordings in two areas of the hippocampus, CA1 and CA3. Both substances, whether chronically or acutely applied, significantly reduced LTP in CA1 in animals at age 30 and 60 days. In CA3, they reduced LTP in 30-day animals but potentiated it in 60-day animals. Although neither lead nor PCB 153 alters baseline synaptic transmission at low stimulus strengths, at higher levels they induce changes in the same direction as those of LTP. These results show surprisingly similar actions of these quite different chemicals, and the similarity of effects on chronic and acute application indicates that effects are both pharmacologic and developmental. Behavioral studies of rats exposed to PCBs from contaminated fish show hyperactivity, impulsiveness, and increased frustration relative to unexposed controls. These results demonstrate that lead and PCBs have similar effects on synaptic plasticity and behavior and suggest that the compounds may act through a common mechanism. PMID:12060832

  19. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  20. Overcoming the effects of acute stress through good teamwork practices

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, D.K. ); Gaddy, C.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Two recent industry studies have taken a look at operators in stressful situations. In the context of severe-accident management, Mumaw et al. discussed four approaches to training operators for severe accidents: (1) training for knowledge or procedural skills; (2) training decision makers about goals and plans; (3) training to avoid cognitive biases; and (4) training within a realistic setting. These four approaches address directly the cognitive skills important for decision making. These types of training can also address indirectly the effects of stress on performance. First, effects of stress on decision making, such as reduced working memory, can be addressed by training cognitive skills. Second, exposure to realistically stressful situations can reduce the novelty and uncertainty, which is a primary cause of stress reactions. In a second study reported by Desaulniers, the stress of requalification exams was the focus. Desaulniers concluded that repeated changes in the exam process, inconsistency in interpretation of examiner guidelines, and some content and grading practices resulted in undue stress for the operators. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff actions to remedy these sources of undue stress were described.

  1. Acute hematologic and hemorheologic effects of sulfur dioxide inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Baskurt, O.K.

    1988-09-01

    Fifty male rats were exposed to 0.87 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 24 hr. Hematologic and hemorheologic parameters measured in this group were compared with the results of a control group of 51 male rats. Hematocrit values were found to be higher (p less than .005) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (43.55 +/- 0.41%, mean +/- standard error), when compared to the control group value (41.97 +/- 0.35%). Sulfhemoglobin values were also higher (p less than .0001) in the SO/sub 2/-treated group (0.60 +/- 0.08%) than the control group (0.08 +/- 0.02%). Osmotic hemolysis ratio was slightly increased (p less than .05) in the 0.55% sodium chloride solution. However, whole blood and packed cell viscosities were lower in the SO/sub 2/-treated animals, while there was no significant difference in the plasma viscosities. The mechanism of these effects could not be clarified completely, but structural and functional effects of SO2 inhalation on peripheral erythrocytes were discussed.

  2. Genetic NMDA receptor deficiency disrupts acute and chronic effects of cocaine but not amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Amy J; Laakso, Aki; Cyr, Michel; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Salahpour, Ali; Medvedev, Ivan O; Dykstra, Linda A; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G

    2008-10-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission is required for several forms of neuronal plasticity. Its role in the neuronal responses to addictive drugs is an ongoing subject of investigation. We report here that the acute locomotor-stimulating effect of cocaine is absent in NMDA receptor-deficient mice (NR1-KD). In contrast, their acute responses to amphetamine and to direct dopamine receptor agonists are not significantly altered. The striking attenuation of cocaine's acute effects is not likely explained by alterations in the dopaminergic system of NR1-KD mice, since most parameters of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function are unchanged. Consistent with the behavioral findings, cocaine induces less c-Fos expression in the striatum of these mice, while amphetamine-induced c-Fos expression is intact. Furthermore, chronic cocaine-induced sensitization and conditioned place preference are attenuated and develop more slowly in mutant animals, but amphetamine's effects are not altered significantly. Our results highlight the importance of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission specifically in cocaine actions, and support a hypothesis that cocaine and amphetamine elicit their effects through differential actions on signaling pathways. PMID:18185498

  3. Protective Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM8610 against Acute Cadmium Toxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qixiao; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM8610, a selected probiotic with good cadmium binding capacity, against acute cadmium toxicity in mice. Ninety mice were divided into prevention and therapy groups. In the prevention groups, CCFM8610 was administered at 109 CFU once daily for 7 days, followed by a single oral dose of cadmium chloride at 1.8 mg cadmium for each mouse. In the therapy groups, the same dose of CCFM8610 was administered for 2 days after an identical single dose of cadmium exposure. Mice that received neither cadmium nor culture or that received cadmium alone served as negative and positive controls, respectively. The effects of both living and dead CCFM8610 on cadmium ion concentrations in feces, liver, and kidney were determined. Moreover, the alterations in reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and histopathology in the liver and kidney were investigated. The results showed that compared to the mice that received cadmium only, CCFM8610 treatment can effectively decrease intestinal cadmium absorption, reduce tissue cadmium accumulation, alleviate renal and hepatic oxidative stress, and ameliorate hepatic histopathological changes. Living CCFM8610 administered after cadmium exposure offered the most significant protection. Our results suggested that CCFM8610 is more effective against acute cadmium toxicity than a simple antioxidant treatment due to its special physiological functions and that it can be considered a new dietary therapeutic strategy against acute cadmium toxicity. PMID:23263961

  4. [Alteration of the acute toxicity and various pharmacologic effects of streptomycin sulfate by calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Korablev, M V; Kopelevich, V M

    1983-10-01

    The effect of calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP) on acute toxicity of streptomycin and the decrease by the antibiotic of the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex, body temperature and oxygen intake was studied on 258 albino mice weighing 22-26 g. Medical calcium pantothenate (CPA) was used for control purposes. CPP is an antagonist of streptomycin sulfate. In a dose of 1/10 or 1/5 of the LD50 injected intraperitoneally CPP lowered acute toxicity of streptomycin and prevented its effect in a dose of 0.11--1.1 g/kg injected subcutaneously on the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex and body temperature. The spectrum index of the CPP antitoxic effect was equal to 22.5. By its acute toxicity CPP (LD50 1.18 +/- 0.07 g/kg) did not differ from CPA (LD50 1.25 +/- 0.08 g/kg). The efficacy of CPP, by its antitoxic spectrum, was 1.8 times higher than that of CPA. CPA lowered the streptomycin effect on the "holes" reflex and body temperature, while CPP prevented it. Both the drugs did not influence the decrease in the oxygen consumption induced by streptomycin. PMID:6651265

  5. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  6. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  7. Acute effects of whole-body vibration. Stabilography and electrogastrography.

    PubMed

    Kjellberg, A; Wikström, B O

    1987-06-01

    The influence of whole-body vibration on postural control and stomach motility was investigated. Fifteen subjects were exposed to two vibration signals (3 and 6 Hz random) while sitting for 1 h on a vibration simulator. A control situation, ie, sitting for 1 h without vibration, was also included. Stabilographic recordings before and 1 and 15 min after the sitting showed that exposure to these frequencies had no effect on postural control. Electrogastrographic (EGG) measurements before and during the sitting showed that, for 3 Hz, there was an initial increase in activity which decreased towards normal values. For 6 Hz there was a significant increase in activity for EGG frequencies of 0.05 and 0.13 Hz. The results imply that stomach motility can be affected by whole-body vibration in certain frequency ranges. PMID:3616553

  8. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide Upon Cognitive Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Ryder, V. E.; Lam, C. W.; Statish, U.; Basner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) originate from human metabolism and typically, within spacecraft, remain about 10-fold higher in concentration than at the earth's surface. There have been recurring complaints by crew members of episodes of "mental viscosity" adversely affecting their performance, and there is evidence from the International Space Station (ISS) that associates CO2 levels with reports of headaches by crewmembers. Additionally, there is concern that CO2 may contribute to vision impairment and intracranial pressure that has been observed in some crewmembers. Consequently, flight rules have been employed to control the level of CO2 below 4 mm Hg, which is well below the existing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) of 10 mm Hg for 24-hour exposures, and 5.3 mm Hg for exposures of 7 to 180 days. However, the flight rule imposed limit, which places additional demands upon resources and current technology, still exceeds the lower bound of the threshold range for reportable headaches (2 - 5 mm Hg). Headaches, while sometime debilitating themselves, are also symptoms that can provide evidence that physiological defense mechanisms have been breached. The causes of the headaches may elicit other subtle adverse effects that occur at CO2 levels well below that for headaches. The concern that CO2 may have effects at levels below the threshold for headaches appears to be substantiated in unexpected findings that CO2 at concentrations below 2 mm Hg substantially reduced some cognitive functions that are associated with the ability to make complex decisions in conditions that are characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity, and delayed feedback. These are conditions that could be encountered by crews in off-nominal situations or during the first missions beyond low earth orbit. If findings of the earlier study are confirmed in crew-like subjects, our findings would provide additional evidence that CO2 may need to be

  9. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  10. Comparison of Acute Health Effects From Exposures to Diesel and Biodiesel Fuel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Mehus, Aaron A.; Reed, Rustin J.; Lee, Vivien S. T.; Littau, Sally R.; Hu, Chengcheng; Lutz, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the comparative acute health effects associated with exposures to diesel and 75% biodiesel/25% diesel (B75) blend fuel emissions. Methods: We analyzed multiple health endpoints in 48 healthy adults before and after exposures to diesel and B75 emissions in an underground mine setting—lung function, lung and systemic inflammation, novel biomarkers of exposure, and oxidative stress were assessed. Results: B75 reduced respirable diesel particulate matter by 20%. Lung function declined significantly more after exposure to diesel emissions. Lung inflammatory cells along with sputum and plasma inflammatory mediators increased significantly to similar levels with both exposures. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress, was not significantly changed after either exposure. Conclusions: Use of B75 lowered respirable diesel particulate matter exposure and some associated acute health effects, although lung and systemic inflammation were not reduced compared with diesel use. PMID:26147538

  11. The neurocircuitry of illicit psychostimulant addiction: acute and chronic effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sara B; Lewis, Candace R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Illicit psychostimulant addiction remains a significant problem worldwide, despite decades of research into the neural underpinnings and various treatment approaches. The purpose of this review is to provide a succinct overview of the neurocircuitry involved in drug addiction, as well as the acute and chronic effects of cocaine and amphetamines within this circuitry in humans. Investigational pharmacological treatments for illicit psychostimulant addiction are also reviewed. Our current knowledge base clearly demonstrates that illicit psychostimulants produce lasting adaptive neural and behavioral changes that contribute to the progression and maintenance of addiction. However, attempts at generating pharmacological treatments for psychostimulant addiction have historically focused on intervening at the level of the acute effects of these drugs. The lack of approved pharmacological treatments for psychostimulant addiction highlights the need for new treatment strategies, especially those that prevent or ameliorate the adaptive neural, cognitive, and behavioral changes caused by chronic use of this class of illicit drugs. PMID:24648786

  12. The effect of differing intensities of acute cycling on preadolescent academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael; Johnson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of differing intensity levels of acute exercise on preadolescent academic ability. In a repeated measures design, 18 preadolescent participants (mean age±S.D.= 9.8±1.4 years: 9 male and 9 female) completed the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT 4) following 20 minutes of rest, 20-minutes on a cycling ergometer at 50% maximal heart rate reserve (HRR), and 20-minutes on a cycling ergometer at 75% HRR on separate days. Exercise was found to improve spelling irrespective of intensity level. Moderate levels of exercise improved reading although the effect of high levels of intensity is less clear. Both intensity levels impaired arithmetic, whilst sentence comprehension was unaffected. These findings further support the past research that indicates acute bouts of exercise can selectively improve cognition in preadolescent children. However, the present study finds no support for the notion that increasing the intensity of exercise accentuates benefits. PMID:23724796

  13. The effect of acute stress on memory depends on word valence.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Tom; Jelicic, Marko; Merckelbach, Harald

    2006-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of acute stress on working memory and memory for neutral, emotionally negative, and emotionally positive words in healthy undergraduates. Participants (N=60) were exposed to either the Trier Social Stress Test (stress group) or a non-stressful task (control group). Analyses of salivary cortisol samples taken throughout the study showed elevated glucocorticoid levels after the experimental manipulation in the stress group, but not in the control group. Recall performance was impaired in the stress group, but only so for neutral words. No differences between the stress and control group were found on working memory measures. For the stress group, digit span forward and digit span total scores were associated with correct recall of neutral words. All in all, this study lends further support to the notion that the memory effects of exposure to acute stress depend on the valence of the memory material. PMID:16388863

  14. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2016-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  15. Effects of acute physical exercise on executive functions: a comparison between aerobic and strength exercise.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Rodrigues; Gualano, Bruno; Takao, Pollyana Pereira; Avakian, Paula; Fernandes, Rafael Mistura; Morine, Diego; Takito, Monica Yuri

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute aerobic and strength exercises on selected executive functions. A counterbalanced, crossover, randomized trial was performed. Forty-two healthy women were randomly submitted to three different conditions: (1) aerobic exercise, (2) strength exercise, and (3) control condition. Before and after each condition, executive functions were measured by the Stroop Test and the Trail Making Test. Following the aerobic and strength sessions, the time to complete the Stroop "non-color word" and "color word" condition was lower when compared with that of the control session. The performance in the Trail Making Test was unchanged. In conclusion, both acute aerobic and strength exercises improve the executive functions. Nevertheless, this positive effect seems to be task and executive function dependent. PMID:22889693

  16. Preventive Effect of Cichorium Intybus L. Two Extracts on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Ali-Reza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Abed, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of pancreas with sudden onset, high mortality rate and multiple organ failure characteristics. It has been shown that oxygen free radicals have an important role in development of pancreatitis and its complications. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxicity and gastroprotective properties of Cichorium intybus L. suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulean (50 μg/ kg at 1 h intervals) in mice resulted in acute pancreatitis, which was characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, as well as increases in the serum levels of amylase and lipase in comparison to normal mice. Different doses of C. intybus root (CRE) and aerial parts hydroalcoholic extract (CAPE) orally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and intraperitoneally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were administrated 1.0 and 0.5 h respectively before pancreatitis induction on separate groups of male mice (n=6). Control groups treated with normal saline (5 ml/ kg) similarly. Results: Both extracts in greater test doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) were effective to decrease amylase (23-36%) and lipase (27-35%) levels. In oral route, the dose of 200 mg/ kg showed a significant decrease in levels of amylase (16%) and lipase (24%) activity while the greatest dose (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was only effective to diminish inflammatory features like edema and leukocyte infiltration in pancreatitis tissue (P<0.01). Vacuolization was not significantly reduced in extracts treated groups. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. intybus hydroalcoholic extracts were effective to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis and the efficacy was partly dependent to the dose and was more significant after parenteral administration. PMID:22708031

  17. Acute effects of intense interval training on running mechanics.

    PubMed

    Collins, M H; Pearsall, D J; Zavorsky, G S; Bateni, H; Turcotte, R A; Montgomery, D L

    2000-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if there are significant kinematic changes in running pattern after intense interval workouts, whether duration of recovery affects running kinematics, and whether changes in running economy are related to changes in running kinematics. Seven highly trained male endurance runners (VO2max = 72.3+/-3.3 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); mean +/- s) performed three interval running workouts of 10 x 400 m at a speed of 5.94+/-0.19 m x s(-1) (356+/-11.2 m x min(-1)) with a minimum of 4 days recovery between runs. Recovery of 60, 120 or 180 s between each 400 m repetition was assigned at random. Before and after each workout, running economy and several kinematic variables were measured at speeds of 3.33 and 4.47 m x s(-1) (200 and 268 m x min(-1)). Speed was found to have a significant effect on shank angle, knee velocity and stride length (P < 0.05). Correlations between changes pre- and post-test for VO2 (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and several kinematic variables were not significant (P > 0.05) at both speeds. In general, duration of recovery was not found to adversely affect running economy or the kinematic variables assessed, possibly because of intra-individual adaptations to fatigue. PMID:10718563

  18. Acute and chronic environmental effects of clandestine methamphetamine waste.

    PubMed

    Kates, Lisa N; Knapp, Charles W; Keenan, Helen E

    2014-09-15

    The illicit manufacture of methamphetamine (MAP) produces substantial amounts of hazardous waste that is dumped illegally. This study presents the first environmental evaluation of waste produced from illicit MAP manufacture. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) was measured to assess immediate oxygen depletion effects. A mixture of five waste components (10mg/L/chemical) was found to have a COD (130 mg/L) higher than the European Union wastewater discharge regulations (125 mg/L). Two environmental partition coefficients, K(OW) and K(OC), were measured for several chemicals identified in MAP waste. Experimental values were input into a computer fugacity model (EPI Suite™) to estimate environmental fate. Experimental log K(OW) values ranged from -0.98 to 4.91, which were in accordance with computer estimated values. Experimental K(OC) values ranged from 11 to 72, which were much lower than the default computer values. The experimental fugacity model for discharge to water estimates that waste components will remain in the water compartment for 15 to 37 days. Using a combination of laboratory experimentation and computer modelling, the environmental fate of MAP waste products was estimated. While fugacity models using experimental and computational values were very similar, default computer models should not take the place of laboratory experimentation. PMID:25000573

  19. Marijuana’s Acute Effects on Cognitive Bias for Affective and Marijuana Cues

    PubMed Central

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; McGeary, John E.; Knopik, Valerie S.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana’s ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7–3.0 % delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On two separate days, regular marijuana users (N=89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and two experimental tasks: Pleasantness Rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and Emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the Pleasantness Rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively-valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the Emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources towards marijuana-specific and negatively-valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively-valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  20. Age- and Sex-Associated Effects on Acute-Phase Proteins in Göttingen Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Christoffersen, Berit Ø; Jensen, Søren J; Ludvigsen, Trine P; Nilsson, Sara K; Grossi, Anette B; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2015-01-01

    Göttingen minipigs are a useful model for diseases having an inflammatory component, and the associated use of acute-phase proteins (APP) as biomarkers of inflammation warrants establishment of their reference ranges. The objective of this study was to establish reference values for selected APP in Göttingen minipigs and to investigate the effects of age, sex, and various stimuli on these ranges. Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, pig major acute-phase protein (PMAP), albumin, and porcine α-1 acid glycoprotein (PAGP) were evaluated in 4 age groups (6, 16, 24 and 40–48 wk) of male and female Göttingen minipigs. In addition, minipigs were tested under 2 housing conditions, after acute LPS challenge, and after diet-induced obesity with and without mild diabetes. Changing the pigs to a new environment induced significant increases in CRP, PMAP, haptoglobin and PAGP and a decrease in albumin. An acute LPS stimulus increased CRP, PMAP, haptoglobin, and SAA; PAGP was unchanged and albumin decreased. Obese pigs with and without diabetes showed increases in CRP and PAGP, albumin decreased, and haptoglobin and SAA were unchanged. PMAP was increased only in obese pigs without diabetes. In conclusion, reference values for CRP, PMAP, haptoglobin, SAA, PAGP and albumin were established for male and female Göttingen minipigs of different ages. These APP were influenced by age and sex, underlining the importance of considering these factors when designing and interpreting studies including aspects of inflammation. In addition, an APP response was verified after both acute and chronic stimuli. PMID:26310463

  1. A Study of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Effect of Oral Antioxidant Supplementation in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ghone, Rahul A.; Suryakar, Adinath N.; Kulhalli, P. M.; Bhagat, Sonali S.; Padalkar, Ramchandra K.; Karnik, Aarti C.; Hundekar, Prakash S.; Sangle, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition represents one of the most severe health problems in India. Free radicals play an important role in immunological response, which induces the oxidative surplus in severe acute malnutrition. Severe dietary deficiency of nutrients leads to increased oxidative stress in cellular compartments. Aim: The goal of this study was to inspect impact of oxidative stress in the form of serum malondialdehyde as product of lipid peroxidation, vitamin E, zinc and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase in patients with severe acute malnutrition. Material and Methods: Sixty severe acute malnutrition patients were studied before and after supplementation of antioxidants for one month, and their status were compared with those of 60 age and sex matched healthy controls. The level of serum MDA was analyzed by the Kei Satoh method, serum vitamin E concentration was measured by Baker and Frank Method, serum zinc was measured by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase was measured by Kajari Das Method. Results: Significantly increased levels of serum malondialdehyde (p<0.001) were found in the patients as compared to those in controls, and significant depletions were found in the levels of serum vitamin E, zinc and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase in patients with severe acute malnutrition as compared to those in controls. After supplementation of antioxidants for one month, the levels of malondialdehyde were found to be decreased significantly (p<0.001) and zinc and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase capacity levels were increased significantly (p<0.05). Also, there was a non–significant (p>0.05) increase in vitamin E levels as compared to those before supplementation results. Conclusion: Harsh deficiency of various nutrients in severe acute malnutrition leads to generation of heavy oxidative stress. These effects may be minimized with supplementation of antioxidants. PMID:24298460

  2. Marijuana's acute effects on cognitive bias for affective and marijuana cues.

    PubMed

    Metrik, Jane; Aston, Elizabeth R; Kahler, Christopher W; Rohsenow, Damaris J; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S

    2015-10-01

    Marijuana produces acute increases in positive subjective effects and decreased reactivity to negative affective stimuli, though may also acutely induce anxiety. Implicit attentional and evaluative processes may explicate marijuana's ability to acutely increase positive and negative emotions. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed attentional processing of rewarding and negative affective stimuli as well as marijuana-specific stimuli. On 2 separate days, regular marijuana users (N = 89) smoked placebo or active THC cigarette and completed subjective ratings of mood, intoxication, urge to smoke marijuana, and 2 experimental tasks: pleasantness rating (response latency and perceived pleasantness of affective and marijuana-related stimuli) and emotional Stroop (attentional bias to affective stimuli). On the pleasantness rating task, active marijuana increased response latency to negatively valenced and marijuana-related (vs. neutral) visual stimuli, beyond a general slowing of response. Active marijuana also increased pleasantness ratings of marijuana images, although to a lesser extent than placebo due to reduced marijuana urge after smoking. Overall, active marijuana did not acutely change processing of positive emotional stimuli. There was no evidence of attentional bias to affective word stimuli on the emotional Stroop task with the exception of attentional bias to positive word stimuli in the subgroup of marijuana users with cannabis dependence. Marijuana may increase allocation of attentional resources toward marijuana-specific and negatively valenced visual stimuli without altering processing of positively valenced stimuli. Marijuana-specific cues may be more attractive with higher levels of marijuana craving and less wanted with low craving levels. PMID:26167716

  3. Acute circulatory effects of military low-altitude flight noise.

    PubMed

    Michalak, R; Ising, H; Rebentisch, E

    1990-01-01

    Volunteers aged 70 to 89 years living in a senior citizen's home in Haifa were exposed to flight noise via earphones while watching video films. Their blood pressure and heart rates were measured simultaneously. A high-quality recording and reproduction technique was employed. They were exposed to the noise of two to three overflights with Lmax = 99-114 dB(A) and slow sound pressure level increase (aircraft take off) or with Lmax = 95-112 dB(A) and a fast sound pressure level increase (low-altitude flight at high subsonic speed) at intervals of 10 to 15 min. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure was raised at Lmax = 112 dB(A) and high speed level increase at the average of 23 and 13 mmHg, respectively with individual maximal values of about 40 mm Hg (systolic). In order to prevent risks to the subjects' health, the noise exposure was not raised to levels above 112 dB(A) and fast level increase, although Lmax = 125 dB(A) has been measured in 75 m-low-altitude flight areas. The blood pressure response to a repeated single exposure increased in proportion to the preceding noise exposure. At high intensities and fast level increase an up to fourfold reaction intensification was detected in the majority of subjects. This change in reactivity is regarded as the result of sensitization toward the special type of noise and the implications of these observations for the long-term effects of chronic exposure to low-altitude flight noise are considered. On the basis of these results, proposals are made for limiting values for Lmax and for the speed of sound pressure level increase, the implementation of which would lead to a marked reduction in health risks from low-altitude flight noise. PMID:2228256

  4. Yogurt: effect on leukocytes and blood coagulation in an acute liver injury model.

    PubMed

    Haro, Cecilia; Lazarte, Sandra; Zelaya, Hortensia; Alvarez, Susana; Agüero, Graciela

    2009-08-01

    This study determined whether cow or goat yogurt administration has a preventive effect on the hepatic damage undergone during an acute liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of d-galactosamine. Groups of mice were fed with cow or goat yogurt for 2 days or 7 days before the d-galactosamine injection. Blood and liver samples were obtained 12 hours after d-galactosamine inoculation. d-Galactosamine induced an increase in serum amino-transaminases, a reduction in the number of blood leukocytes, an enhancement in neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, a recruitment of leukocytes toward the liver, an increase in cell death, and an alteration in prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogen levels. Treatment with cow or goat yogurt was effective at increasing leukocyte number and decrease myeloperoxidase activity. We also observed a decrease in leukocyte accumulation in the liver and a reduction in cell death. Activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen were normalized, but prothrombin time only showed an improvement without reaching normal values. Cow or goat yogurts were effective at protecting against an experimental acute liver injury, especially when administered for 7 days. PMID:19735179

  5. Acute effects of polychlorinated biphenyl-containing and -free transformer fluids on rat testicular steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Andric, S A; Kostic, T S; Dragisic, S M; Andric, N L; Stojilkovic, S S; Kovacevic, R Z

    2000-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-based transformer fluids belong to a class of environmentally persistent mixtures with known toxic effects. Here, we studied the acute effects of Askarel (which contains Aroclor 1260) and two substitute transformer fluids (the silicone oil-based DC561 and the mineral oil-based ENOL C) on rat testicular steroidogenesis. Single intraperitoneal (ip; 10 mg/kg body weight) or bilateral intratesticular (itt; 25 microg/testis) injections of Askarel markedly decreased serum androgen levels 24 hr after administration. In acute testicular cultures from these animals, chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated progesterone and androgen productions were severely attenuated. When itt was injected or added in vitro, Askarel inhibited 3ss-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3ssHSD), stimulated 17[alpha]-hydroxylase/lyase (P450c17), and did not affect 17ss-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in testicular postmitochondrial fractions. The ip-injected Askarel did not affect 3ssHSD, but inhibited P450c17, suggesting that a more intensive metabolism of peripherally injected Askarel reduces the circulating levels of active ingredients below the threshold needed for inhibition of 3ssHSD and generates a derivative that inhibits P450c17. In contrast to Askarel, itt-injection (25 microg/testis) of DC561 and ENOL C did not affect in vivo and in vitro steroidogenesis. These findings show the acute effects of Askarel, but not silicone and mineral oils, on testicular steroidogenesis. PMID:11049815

  6. Protective effect of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., on acute and chronic inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Lokesh; Dey, Amitabha; Sakthivel, G.; Bhattamishra, Subrat Kumar; Dutta, Amitsankar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extracts and its aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp. leaves. Materials and Methods: In this present study, all the test samples were evaluated on in-vivo inflammatory model such as carrageenan and histamine-induced acute-inflammation and cotton pellet induced granuloma formation in albino male rats. Test samples were also employed in in-vitro assays like DPPH* free radical scavenging activity and COX inhibition assay. Results: The test samples at the dose of 200mg/kg/p.o. were found to cause significant inhibition of carrageenan and histamine-induced inflammation and cotton pallet-induced granuloma formation on acute and chronic inflammation in rats. The test samples, except n-butanol fraction, exhibited inhibitory effect for both COX-1 and COX-2, in in-vitro assay but their percentage of inhibition values differs from each other. The test samples (aqueous extracts, aqueous, n-butanol, ethyl-acetate, and chloroform fractions) at 100 μg concentration exhibits 54.37%, 33.88%, 62.85%, 56.28%, and 57.48% DPPH* radical-scavenging effect respectively in in-vitro antioxidant study. Conclusion: These observations established the anti-inflammatory effect of C. colebrookianum leaves in acute and chronic stages of inflammation by free radical scavenging and inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. PMID:24014914

  7. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage. PMID:23363576

  8. Acute Effect of High-Intensity Eccentric Exercise on Vascular Endothelial Function in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Ra, Song-Gyu; Shiraki, Hitoshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    Choi, Y, Akazawa, N, Zempo-Miyaki, A, Ra, S-G, Shiraki, H, Ajisaka, R, and Maeda, S. Acute effect of high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function in young men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2279-2285, 2016-Increased central arterial stiffness is as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence regarding the effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness is conflicting. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness. We evaluated the acute changes in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and arterial stiffness after high-intensity eccentric exercise. Seven healthy, sedentary men (age, 24 ± 1 year) performed maximal eccentric elbow flexor exercise using their nondominant arm. Before and 45 minutes after eccentric exercise, carotid arterial compliance and brachial artery FMD and L-FMC in the nonexercised arm were measured. Carotid arterial compliance was significantly decreased, and β-stiffness index significantly increased after eccentric exercise. Brachial FMD was significantly reduced after eccentric exercise, whereas there was no significant difference in brachial L-FMC before and after eccentric exercise. A positive correlation was detected between change in arterial compliance and change in FMD (r = 0.779; p ≤ 0.05), and a negative correlation was detected between change in β-stiffness index and change in FMD (r = -0.891; p < 0.01) with eccentric exercise. In this study, acute high-intensity eccentric exercise increased central arterial stiffness; this increase was accompanied by a decrease in endothelial function caused by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation but not by a change in endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction. PMID:24832967

  9. Effects of an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial lipemia and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ariel M; Kurti, Stephanie P; Smith, Joshua R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Harms, Craig A

    2016-03-01

    A high-fat meal (HFM) induces an increase in blood lipids (postprandial lipemia; PPL), systemic inflammation, and acute airway inflammation. While acute exercise has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and lipid-lowering effects, it is unknown whether exercise prior to an HFM will translate to reduced airway inflammation post-HFM. Our purpose was to determine the effects of an acute bout of exercise on airway inflammation post-HFM and to identify whether any protective effect of exercise on airway inflammation was associated with a reduction in PPL or systemic inflammation. In a randomized cross-over study, 12 healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men (age, 23.0 ± 3.2 years; height, 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; weight, 78.5 ± 11.7 kg) consumed an HFM (1 g fat/1 kg body weight) 12 h following exercise (EX; 60 min at 60% maximal oxygen uptake) or without exercise (CON). Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO; measure of airway inflammation), triglycerides (TG), and inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor-necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6) were measured while fasted at 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. FENO increased over time (2 h: CON, p = 0.001; EX, p = 0.002, but not by condition (p = 0.991). TG significantly increased 2 and 4 h post-HFM (p < 0.001), but was not significant between conditions (p = 0.256). Inflammatory markers did not significantly increase by time or condition (p > 0.05). There were no relationships between FENO and TG or systemic inflammatory markers for any time point or condition (p > 0.05). In summary, an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise performed 12 h prior to an HFM did not change postprandial airway inflammation or lipemia in healthy, 18- to 29-year-old men. PMID:26872295

  10. Immune stimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides reduces Salmonella enterica subsp. Arizonae organ colonization and mortality in young turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) mimic bacterial DNA and are stimulatory to the innate immune system of most vertebrate species. The immunostimulatory activities of CpG ODN have been studied extensively and are well characterized in human and murine immun...

  11. [Advance in studies on effect of traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines in prevention and treatment of acute altitude sickness].

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Liu, Zhen; Xing, Yan-Wei; Gao, Ao; Zhu, Huo-Ming; Wang, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Acute altitude reaction is a stress response of organism to special altitude environmental factors such as hypoxia, low pressure, cold, dry and strong ultraviolet. As it is the most incident disease in high altitude areas, its prevention remains a problem to be solved. In China, the traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines have been recognized as an effective means of preventing and treating acute altitude sicknesses. Some single-recipe or compound traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines have been proved to be effective for acute altitude sicknesses. In this article, we will describe traditional Chinese (Tibetan) medicines of different types with efficacy in prevention and treatment of altitude sicknesses. PMID:24066576

  12. Acute toxicological effects on the earthworm Eisenia fetida of 18 common pharmaceuticals in artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Val, Jonatan; Mainar, Ana Ma; Zuriaga, Estefanía; Español, Cecilia; Langa, Elisa

    2015-06-15

    Following soil applications of recycled water and biosolids, pharmaceutical residues can eventually enter the terrestrial environment. In vitro and in vivo assays have largely focused on the acute ecotoxicity of these compounds in aquatic systems. However, studies on the ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceuticals in soil biota are especially scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute toxicity of 18 pharmaceuticals (4 NSAIDs, 5 blood lipid-lowering agents, 6 β-blockers and 3 antibiotics) that are usually found in the environment by using an Eisenia fetida bioassay. In addition, the presence of these pharmaceuticals in artificial soil was verified at the end of the test. Our results indicate that seven of the studied drugs cause acute adverse effects in E. fetida, in particular, the NSAIDs and the blood lipid-lowering agents. Ibuprofen (LC50=64.80 mg/kg) caused the highest acute toxicity for all tested compounds, followed by diclofenac (LC50=90.49 mg/kg) and simvastatin (LC50=92.70 mg/kg). Other tested pharmaceuticals from NSAIDs and blood lipid-lowering families have toxicity effects, from a LC50=140.87 mg/kg for gemfibrozil to 795.07 mg/kg for lovastatin. Atorvastatin, bezafibrate, β-blockers and antibiotics showed no detectable lethality in E. fetida. The four NSAIDs showed evidence of modification of their original chemical structure after 14 days so the detected toxicity may be due to the original product as well as their degradation products. The three blood lipid-lowering agents seem to be more stable in soil. From an environmental perspective, the lethal concentrations of the tested drugs are much greater than those reported in wastewater and biosolids, therefore acute toxic effects may be improbable. However, little is known about the accumulation of these substances in soils after regular applications, so accumulative and chronic effects cannot be excluded. Moreover, more studies are needed to determine the role of the degradation

  13. EFFECTS OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ON ACUTE MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment on acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection were studied to explore the potential usefulness of MCMV as a means of detecting immune dysfunction and to identify host defense mechanisms important for protection against MCMV.

  14. The role of gaseous neurotransmitters in the antinociceptive effects of morphine during acute thermal pain.

    PubMed

    Gou, Gemma; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2014-08-15

    Treatment with a carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer, CORM-2) or a classical inducible heme oxygenase (HO-1) inducer (cobalt protoporphyrin IX, CoPP) enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine during chronic pain but the role played by these compounds in acute thermal nociception was not evaluated. The effects of CORM-2 and CoPP treatments on the local antinociceptive actions of morphine and their interactions with nitric oxide during acute pain were evaluated by using wild type (WT), neuronal (nNOS-KO) or inducible (iNOS-KO) nitric oxide synthase knockout mice and assessing their thermal nociception to a hot stimulus with the hot plate test. Our results showed that the absence of nNOS or iNOS genes did not alter licking and jumping responses nor the antinociceptive effects produced by morphine indicating that the local thermal inhibitory effects produced by this drug in the absence of inflammation or injury are not mediated by the nitric oxide pathway triggered by nNOS or iNOS enzymes. Moreover, while the systemic administration of CORM-2 or CoPP inhibited licking and jumping latencies in all genotypes, these treatments only enhanced the local inhibition of jumping latencies produced by morphine in WT and nNOS-KO mice which effects were reversed by the peripheral administration of an HO-1 inhibitor. These data indicate that the co-administration of morphine with CORM-2 or CoPP produced remarkable local antinociceptive effects in WT and nNOS-KO mice and reveal that a significant interaction between carbon monoxide and nitric oxide systems occurs on the local antinociceptive effects produced by morphine during acute thermal nociception. PMID:24846012

  15. Effects of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Executive Function in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Roseann; Darby, Lynn A.; Fullenkamp, Adam; Morgan, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise may increase cognitive processing speed among tasks demanding a substantial degree of executive function. Few studies have investigated executive function after acute exercise in older adults across various exercise intensities. Healthy females 60-75 years of age (n = 11) who were not on medications completed 20-min exercise sessions at a moderate (50%VO2max) exercise intensity and a vigorous (75%VO2max) exercise intensity. Modified flanker tasks (reaction times) and d2 tests of sustained and selective attention (components of executive function) were completed before, immediately after, and 30-min post-exercise. Results indicated that older adult females had improved scores on the modified flanker task reaction times (RTT, RTI, RTC) and d2 tests immediately after both moderate and vigorous intensity aerobic exercise. Some of these effects were maintained 30 min post-exercise. These findings suggest that an acute bout of exercise, regardless of intensity, can improve performance on tests of executive function in older women. Key points Few studies have investigated the effects of the intensity of exercise on executive function in older women Executive function improved after 20-min of aerobic exercise regardless of exercise intensity in older women Findings from the study were not confounded by prescribed medications; all participants who were older women were not taking any medications PMID:26336345

  16. The effect of acute treadmill walking on cognitive control and academic achievement in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Hillman, C H; Pontifex, M B; Raine, L B; Castelli, D M; Hall, E E; Kramer, A F

    2009-03-31

    The effect of an acute bout of moderate treadmill walking on behavioral and neuroelectric indexes of the cognitive control of attention and applied aspects of cognition involved in school-based academic performance were assessed. A within-subjects design included 20 preadolescent participants (age=9.5+/-0.5 years; eight female) to assess exercise-induced changes in performance during a modified flanker task and the Wide Range Achievement Test 3. The resting session consisted of cognitive testing followed by a cardiorespiratory fitness assessment to determine aerobic fitness. The exercise session consisted of 20 min of walking on a motor-driven treadmill at 60% of estimated maximum heart rate followed by cognitive testing once heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-exercise levels. Results indicated an improvement in response accuracy, larger P3 amplitude, and better performance on the academic achievement test following aerobic exercise relative to the resting session. Collectively, these findings indicate that single, acute bouts of moderately-intense aerobic exercise (i.e. walking) may improve the cognitive control of attention in preadolescent children, and further support the use of moderate acute exercise as a contributing factor for increasing attention and academic performance. These data suggest that single bouts of exercise affect specific underlying processes that support cognitive health and may be necessary for effective functioning across the lifespan. PMID:19356688

  17. Effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Tortoledo, F.E.; Batty, J.W.; Raizner, A.E.

    1985-05-01

    The effects of coronary artery recanalization by intracoronary administration of streptokinase on left ventricular function during acute myocardial infarction have received increasing attention in recent years. Although myocardial dysfunction is often more pronounced in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction, the effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular dysfunction has not been previously addressed. Accordingly, in this investigation, 54 patients who participated in a prospective, controlled, randomized trial of recanalization during acute myocardial infarction were studied. Among 30 patients with inferior wall infarction, 19 had right ventricular dysfunction on admission; 11 of these 19 had positive uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the right ventricle, indicative of right ventricular infarction. Patients with successful recanalization exhibited improved right ventricular ejection fraction from admission to day 10. However, control patients and patients who did not undergo recanalization also exhibited improvement. These data indicate that the right ventricular dysfunction commonly associated with inferior wall infarction is often transient, and improvement is the rule, irrespective of early recanalization of the infarct vessel.

  18. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  19. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  20. Hepatoprotective effects of polymethoxyflavones against acute and chronic carbon tetrachloride intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Choi, Bong-Keun; Kang, Hwan-Kyu; Jung, Ju-Young; Lim, Seol-Wa; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we explore the protective effects of Citrus aurantium L. extract (CAE) against acute and chronic CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. The quantitative analysis of CAE was performed using HPLC-UV to determine the nobiletin content was approximately 27%. For the acute model, the male ICR mice were orally treated with water, silymarin (positive control, 200 mg/kg) and CAE (50 and 200 mg/kg) for 3 days prior to CCl4 (1 mL/kg, 50% v/v in olive oil) IP injection. For the chronic model (n = 6/group), the mice were treated with each treatment for 28 consecutive days and CCl4 (1 mL/kg, 20%) was injected twice a week. In both the acute and chronic models, the CCl4 alone treated group showed histopathologic alterations with a significantly increase in serum hepatic enzyme levels together with a disrupted anti-oxidative status. In contrast, the CAE treatments restored pathologic alterations and recovered the oxidative status by enhancing antioxidant enzymes and reducing lipid peroxidation levels. Furthermore, CAE enhanced nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its related cytoprotective signals, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that CAE exerts a protective effect against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity with its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic activity. PMID:26980244

  1. Effects of Schizolobium parahyba Extract on Experimental Bothrops Venom-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martines, Monique Silva; Mendes, Mirian M.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; de Castro, Isac; Filho, Sebastião R. Ferreira; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP) extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV)-induced AKI. Methodology Groups of 8 to 10 rats received infusions of 0.9% saline (control, C), SP 2 mg/kg, BV 0.25 mg/kg and BV immediately followed by SP (treatment, T) in the doses already described. After the respective infusions, animals were assessed for their glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance), renal blood flow (RBF, Doppler), blood pressure (BP, intra-arterial transducer), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary osmolality (UO, freezing point), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, kinetic method), hematocrit (Hct, microhematocrit), fibrinogen (Fi, Klauss modified) and blinded renal histology (acute tubular necrosis score). Principal Findings BV caused significant decreases in GFR, RBF, UO, HcT and Fi; significant increases in RVR, NGAL and LDH; and acute tubular necrosis. SP did not prevent these changes; instead, it caused a significant decrease in GFR when used alone. Conclusion SP administered simultaneously with BV, in an approximate 10∶1 concentration, did not prevent BV-induced AKI, hemolysis and fibrinogen consumption. SP used alone caused a decrease in GFR. PMID:24551041

  2. Acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of a cellulosic exopolysaccharide obtained from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; De-Oliveira, Ana Cecília A X; De-Carvalho, Rosangela R; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Coelho, Deise R; Lima, Salvador Vilar C; Paumgartten, Francisco José R; Aguiar, José Lamartine A

    2016-02-10

    The acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of BC were studied. Cytotoxicity of BC was evaluated in cultured C3A hepatoma cells (HepG2/C3A) using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. Acute toxicity was tested in adults Wistar rats treated with a single dose of BC. The genotoxicity of BC was evaluated in vivo by the micronucleus assay. BC (0.33-170 μg/mL) added to C3A cell culture medium caused no elevation in LDH release over the background level recorded in untreated cell wells. The treatment with the BC in a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg body weight) caused no deaths or signs of toxicity. BC attenuated CP-induced and inhibition the incidence of MNPCE (female: 46.94%; male: 22.7%) and increased the ratio of PCE/NCE (female: 46.10%; male: 35.25%). There was no alteration in the LDH release in the wells where C3A cells were treated with increasing concentrations of BC compared to the wells where the cells received the cell culture medium only (background of approximately 20% cell death), indicated that in the dose range tested BC was not cytotoxic. BC was not cytotoxic, genotoxic or acutely toxic. BC attenuated CP-induced genotoxic and myelotoxic effects. PMID:26686163

  3. Effect of the acute crowding stress on the rat brown adipose tissue metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Cvijic, Gordana; Petrovic, Natasa; Davidovic, Vukosava

    2005-12-01

    Our previous results have shown that metabolic and thermal stressors influence interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) metabolic activity by increasing oxygen consumption and, consequently, altering the toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidative system activity. Since there is not enough evidence about the effect of psychosocial stressors on these processes, we studied the effect of acute crowding stress on the IBAT and hypothalamic monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity as well as IBAT antioxidative enzymes, manganese (MnSOD), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase (CAT), as the relevant indicators of IBAT metabolic alternations under the stress exposure and the returning of animals to control conditions. The results indicated that acute crowding stress did not change the hypothalamic and IBAT MAO activities, the generation of ROS and, consequently, the IBAT CuZnSOD and CAT activities. However, all three antioxidative enzymes were affected only after the recovery period. It seems that peripheral overheating of rats during acute crowding changes the stress nature, by becoming more thermal than psychosocial and by suppression the hypothalamic efferent pathways involved in the IBAT thermogenesis regulation. However, it seems that returning of the animals to the control conditions after the stress termination causes the reactivation of IBAT thermogenesis with tendency to normalise the body temperature. PMID:16309937

  4. THE EFFECT OF ACUTE TREADMILL WALKING ON COGNITIVE CONTROL AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN PREADOLESCENT CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Charles H.; Pontifex, Matthew B.; Raine, Lauren B.; Castelli, Darla M.; Hall, Eric E.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of moderate treadmill walking on behavioral and neuroelectric indices of the cognitive control of attention and applied aspects of cognition involved in school-based academic performance were assessed. A within-subjects design included twenty preadolescent participants (Age = 9.5 ± 0.5 years; 8 female) to assess exercise-induced changes in performance during a modified flanker task and the Wide Range Achievement Test 3. The resting session consisted of cognitive testing followed by a cardiorespiratory fitness assessment to determine aerobic fitness. The exercise session consisted of 20 minutes of walking on a motor-driven treadmill at 60% of estimated maximum heart rate followed by cognitive testing once heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-exercise levels. Results indicated an improvement in response accuracy, larger P3 amplitude, and better performance on the academic achievement test following aerobic exercise relative to the resting session. Collectively, these findings indicate that single, acute bouts of moderately-intense aerobic exercise (i.e., walking) may improve the cognitive control of attention in preadolescent children, and further supports the use of moderate acute exercise as a contributing factor for increasing attention and academic performance. These data suggest that single bouts of exercise affect specific underlying processes that support cognitive health and may be necessary for effective functioning across the lifespan. PMID:19356688

  5. Effect of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and neutrophil functions in active and inactive subjects.

    PubMed

    Benoni, G; Bellavite, P; Adami, A; Chirumbolo, S; Lippi, G; Brocco, G; Cuzzolin, L

    1995-01-01

    In this work we studied the possible effects of acute exercise on some haematological parameters and on some functions of neutrophils in seven active and six inactive subjects. Physical exercise (10 min on a cycle ergometer at a heart rate of 150 beats.min-1) induced a significant increase in total leucocyte, lymphocyte and neutrophil concentrations in active subjects; serum iron and ferritin concentrations were lower in active compared to inactive subjects. Cellular adhesion, bactericidal activity and superoxide anion production did not change after exercise, while we also observed some differences between active and inactive subjects before exercise. In particular, the neutrophils from active subjects showed a significantly higher percentage of adhesion, higher bactericidal activity and lower superoxide anion production. In conclusion, the training induced changes in some neutrophil functions, while acute exercise influenced, overall, leucocyte concentrations. PMID:7768243

  6. Venous Congestion, Endothelial and Neurohormonal Activation in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Cause or Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Paolo C.; Doran, Amanda C.; Onat, Duygu; Wong, Ka Yuk; Ahmad, Myra; Sabbah, Hani N.; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Venous congestion and endothelial and neurohormonal activation are known to occur in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), yet the temporal role of these processes in the pathophysiology of decompensation is not fully understood. Conventional wisdom presumes congestion to be a consequence of worsening cardiovascular function; however, the biomechanically driven effects of venous congestion are biologically plausible contributors to ADHF that remain largely unexplored in vivo. Recent experimental evidence from human models suggests that fluid accumulation and venous congestion are not simply consequences of poor cardiovascular function, but rather are fundamental pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory, and hemodynamic stimuli that contribute to acute decompensation. The latest advances in the monitoring of volume status using implantable devices allow for the detection of venous congestion before symptoms arise. This may ultimately lead to improved treatment strategies including not only diuretics, but also specific, adjuvant interventions to counteract endothelial and neurohormonal activation during early preclinical decompensation. PMID:25740404

  7. Effect of Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmandi, Mohammad; Neiseh, Fatemeh; SadeghiShermeh, Mehdi; Ebadi, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep is one of the basic human needs and sleep deprivation causes nu-merous adverse effects on the human body and mind. Due to reduced sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, this study was carried out to determine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Methods: In this two-group controlled clinical trial, sixty patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran in 2010 were selected by purposeful sampling method and randomly allocated to two groups of case and control. In the case group, in the second night stay, the intervention of eye mask was done per night and by using the Petersburg's sleep quality index; sleep quality was evaluated during and at the end of hospitalization. Then data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient and SPSS software version 19. Results: Total sleep quality score of the case group was significantly decreased after intervention (4.86 ± 1.88) from before intervention (10.46 ± 4.09) (p < 0.000). In addi-tion, total score of sleep quality after intervention in the case group (4.86 ± 1.88) was significant different from the control group (8.43 ± 1.97) (p < 0.005). Conclusion: Using eye mask, as an economical and uncomplicated method, can improve sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units and can be used as an alternative method of treatment instead of drug therapy. PMID:25276688

  8. The effects of acute oral antioxidants on diving-induced alterations in human cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Obad, Ante; Palada, Ivan; Valic, Zoran; Ivančev, Vladimir; Baković, Darija; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujić, Željko

    2007-01-01

    Diving-induced acute alterations in cardiovascular function such as arterial endothelial dysfunction, increased pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and reduced heart function have been recently reported. We tested the effects of acute antioxidants on arterial endothelial function, PAP and heart function before and after a field dive. Vitamins C (2 g) and E (400 IU) were given to subjects 2 h before a second dive (protocol 1) and in a placebo-controlled crossover study design (protocol 2). Seven experienced divers performed open sea dives to 30 msw with standard decompression in a non-randomized protocol, and six of them participated in a randomized trial. Before and after the dives ventricular volumes and function and pulmonary and brachial artery function were assessed by ultrasound. The control dive resulted in a significant reduction in flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and heart function with increased mean PAP. Twenty-four hours after the control dive FMD was still reduced 37% below baseline (8.1 versus 5.1%, P = 0.005), while right ventricle ejection fraction (RV-EF), left ventricle EF and endocardial fractional shortening were reduced much less (∼2–3%). At the same time RV end-systolic volume was increased by 9% and mean PAP by 5%. Acute antioxidants significantly attenuated only the reduction in FMD post-dive (P < 0.001), while changes in pulmonary artery and heart function were unaffected by antioxidant ingestion. These findings were confirmed by repeating the experiments in a randomized study design. FMD returned to baseline values 72 h after the dive with pre-dive placebo, whereas for most cardiovascular parameters this occurred earlier (24–48 h). Right ventricular dysfunction and increased PAP lasted longer. Acute antioxidants attenuated arterial endothelial dysfunction after diving, while reduction in heart and pulmonary artery function were unchanged. Cardiovascular changes after diving are not fully reversed up to 3 days after a dive, suggesting

  9. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity. PMID:24642543

  10. Effects of everolimus on a rat model of cerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Özkardeş, Alper Bilal; Bozkurt, Birkan; Dumlu, Ersin Gürkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Yazgan, Aylin Kılıç; Ergin, Merve; Erel, Özcan; Kılıç, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the biochemical and histopathological effects of everolimus in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of everolimus on blood biochemical parameters and tissue histopathology in an experimental rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods: In 30 Wistar albino rats (male; 240–260 g), acute pancreatitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) administered twice in 2 h. They were equally divided into the following three groups: 0.9% isotonic solution (Group 1; control), everolimus once (Group 2), and everolimus twice (Group 3) by oral gavage after cerulein injection. Thirty hours after the induction of pancreatitis, blood samples were collected by direct intracardiac puncture, rats were sacrificed, and pancreatic tissue samples were obtained. Results: Biochemical analyses of the blood samples showed statistically significant difference in red blood cell count as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, urea, and alanine transaminase levels among the study groups (p<0.05 in all). Everolimus proved to significantly increase red blood cell count in a dose-independent manner. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly increased only after treatment with one dose of everolimus. Urea level was significantly different between the Groups 2 and 3; however, no change was observed in both groups when compared with the control. Alanine transaminase level significantly decreased only after treatment with two doses of everolimus. Histopathological analyses revealed that everolimus significantly decreased inflammation and perivascular infiltrate in a dose-dependent manner (35% in Group 2, 75% in Group 3; p=0.048). Conclusion: Treatment with two doses of everolimus improved some biochemical and histopathological parameters of experimental rat models of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and implied the specific inhibition of

  11. Interacting Effects of Trait Anger and Acute Anger Arousal on Pain: The Role of Endogenous Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Burns, John W.; Chung, Ok Yung; Chont, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Objective Elevated trait anger (TRANG; heightened propensity to experience anger) is associated with greater pain responsiveness, possibly via associations with deficient endogenous opioid analgesia. This study tested whether acute anger arousal moderates the impact of TRANG on endogenous opioid analgesia. Methods 94 chronic low back pain participants (LBP) and 85 healthy controls received opioid blockade (8mg naloxone) or placebo in randomized, counterbalanced order in separate sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to undergo either a 5-minute anger recall interview (ARI) or neutral control interview (NCI) across both drug conditions. Immediately following the assigned interview, participants engaged sequentially in finger pressure and ischemic forearm pain tasks. Opioid blockade effects were derived (blockade minus placebo condition pain ratings) to index opioid antinociceptive function. Results Placebo condition TRANG × Interview interactions (p’s<.05) indicated that TRANG was hyperalgesic only in the context of acute anger arousal (ARI condition; p’s<.05). Blockade effect analyses suggested these hyperalgesic effects were related to deficient opioid analgesia. Significant TRANG × Interview interactions (p’s<.05) for both pain tasks indicated that elevated TRANG was associated with smaller blockade effects (less endogenous opioid analgesia) only in the ARI condition (p’s<.05). Results for ischemic task VAS intensity blockade effects suggested that associations between TRANG and impaired opioid function were most evident in LBP participants when experiencing anger (Type × Interview × TRANG Interaction; p<.05). Conclusions Results indicate that hyperalgesic effects of TRANG are most prominent when acute anger is aroused, and suggest that endogenous opioid mechanisms contribute. PMID:21862829

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Thrombolysis within 4.5 Hours of Acute Ischemic Stroke in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingquan; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Du, Wanliang; Liu, Gaifen; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous economic studies conducted in developed countries showed intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is cost-effective for acute ischemic stroke. The present study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of tPA treatment in China, the largest developing country. Methods A combination of decision tree and Markov model was developed to determine the cost-effectiveness of tPA treatment versus non-tPA treatment within 4.5 hours after stroke onset. Outcomes and costs data were derived from the database of Thrombolysis Implementation and Monitor of acute ischemic Stroke in China (TIMS-China) study. Efficacy data were derived from a pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials. Costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared in both short term (2 years) and long term (30 years). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Comparing to non-tPA treatment, tPA treatment within 4.5 hours led to a short-term gain of 0.101 QALYs at an additional cost of CNY 9,520 (US$ 1,460), yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CNY 94,300 (US$ 14,500) per QALY gained in 2 years; and to a long-term gain of 0.422 QALYs at an additional cost of CNY 6,530 (US$ 1,000), yielding an ICER of CNY 15,500 (US$ 2,380) per QALY gained in 30 years. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that tPA treatment is cost-effective in 98.7% of the simulations at a willingness-to-pay threshold of CNY 105,000 (US$ 16,200) per QALY. Conclusions Intravenous tPA treatment within 4.5 hours is highly cost-effective for acute ischemic strokes in China. PMID:25329637

  13. Effect of harmless acute pancreatitis score, red cell distribution width and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio on the mortality of patients with nontraumatic acute pancreatitis at the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Gülen, Bedia; Sonmez, Ertan; Yaylaci, Serpil; Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Dur, Ali; Turkdogan, Figen Tunali; Söğüt, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Harmless acute pancreatitis score (HAPS), neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) are used to determine the early prognosis of patients diagnosed with nontraumatic acute pancreatitis in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: Patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis (K 85.9) in the ED according to the ICD10 coding during one year were included in the study. Patients with chronic pancreatitis and those who had missing data in their files were excluded from the study. Patients who did not have computed tomography (CT) in the ED were not included in the study. RESULTS: Ultimately, 322 patients were included in the study. The median age of the patients was 53.1 (IQR=36–64). Of the patients, 68.1% (n=226) had etiological causes of the biliary tract. The mortality rate of these patients within the first 48 hours was 4.3% (n=14). In the logistic regression analysis performed by using Balthazar classification, HAPS score, RDW, neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio, age, diabetes mellitus and systolic blood pressure, the only independent variable in determining mortality was assigned as Balthazar classification (OR: 15; 95% CI: 3.5 to 64.4). CONCLUSIONS: HAPS, neutrophile/lymphocyte ratio and RDW were not effective in determining the mortality of nontraumatic acute pancreatitis cases within the first 48 hours. The only independent variable for determining the mortality was Balthazar classification. PMID:25802563

  14. Effects of Acute and Chronic Morphine on Delay Discounting in Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Eppolito, Amy K.; France, Charles P.; Gerak, Lisa R.

    2015-01-01

    When reinforcers of different magnitudes are concurrently available, choice is greater for a large reinforcer; that choice can be reduced by delaying its delivery, a phenomenon called delay discounting and represented graphically by a delay curve in which choice is plotted as a function of delay to the large reinforcer. Morphine, administered acutely, can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers. In this study, the impact of morphine tolerance, dependence and withdrawal on choice of delayed reinforcers was examined in 6 pigeons responding to receive a small amount of food delivered immediately or a larger amount delivered immediately or after delays that increased within sessions. Acutely, morphine decreased responding for the large reinforcer, and the effect was greater when morphine was administered immediately, rather than 6 hr, before sessions. During 8 weeks of daily administration, morphine produced differential effects across pigeons, shifting the delay curve downward in some and upward in others. In all pigeons, tolerance developed to the response rate-decreasing effects of morphine but not to its effects on delay discounting. When chronic morphine treatment was discontinued, rate of responding decreased in 4 pigeons, indicating the emergence of withdrawal; choice of the large reinforcer increased, regardless of delay, in all pigeons, an effect that persisted for weeks. These data suggest that chronic morphine administration has long-lasting effects on choice behavior, which might impact vulnerability to relapse in opioid abusers. PMID:23553726

  15. Identification of the control region for tissue-specific imprinting of the stimulatory G protein α-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Chen, Min; Deng, Chuxia; Bourc'his, Déborah; Nealon, Julie G.; Erlichman, Beth; Bestor, Timothy H.; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2005-01-01

    Gnas is a complex gene with multiple imprinted promoters. The upstream Nesp and Nespas/Gnasxl promoters are paternally and maternally methylated, respectively. The downstream promoter for the stimulatory G protein α-subunit (Gsα) is unmethylated, although in some tissues (e.g., renal proximal tubules), Gsα is poorly expressed from the paternal allele. Just upstream of the Gsα promoter is a primary imprint mark (1A region) where maternal-specific methylation is established during oogenesis. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B, a disorder of renal parathyroid hormone resistance, is associated with loss of 1A methylation. Analysis of embryos of Dnmt3L–/– mothers (which cannot methylate maternal imprint marks) showed that Nesp, Nespas/Gnasxl, and 1A imprinting depend on one or more maternal primary imprint marks. We generated mice with deletion of the 1A differentially methylated region. These mice had normal Nesp-Nespas/Gnasxl imprinting, indicating that the Gnas locus contains two independent imprinting domains (Nespas-Nespas/Gnasxl and 1A-Gsα) controlled by distinct maternal primary imprint marks. Paternal, but not maternal, 1A deletion resulted in Gsα overexpression in proximal tubules and evidence for increased parathyroid hormone sensitivity but had no effect on Gsα expression in other tissues where Gsα is normally not imprinted. The 1A region is a maternal imprint mark that contains one or more methylation-sensitive cis-acting elements that suppress Gsα expression from the paternal allele in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:15811946

  16. Identification of stimulatory and inhibitory inputs to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during hypoglycaemia or transport in ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; French, N P; Saphier, P W; Lowry, P J; Veldhuis, J D; Dobson, H

    2003-06-01

    This study used the novel approach of statistical modelling to investigate the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and quantify temporal relationships between hormones. Two experimental paradigms were chosen, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and 2 h transport, to assess differences in control between noncognitive and cognitive stimuli. Vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were measured in hypophysial portal plasma, and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in jugular plasma of conscious sheep, and deconvolution analysis was used to calculate secretory rates, before modelling. During hypoglycaemia, the relationship between plasma glucose and vasopressin or CRH was best described by log10 transforming variables (i.e. a positive power-curve relationship). A negative-feedback relationship with log10 cortisol concentration 2 h previously was detected. Analysis of the "transport" stimulus suggested that the strength of the perceived stimulus decreased over time after accounting for cortisol facilitation and negative-feedback. The time course of vasopressin and CRH responses to each stimulus were different However, at the pituitary level, the data suggested that log10 ACTH secretion rate was related to log10 vasopressin and CRH concentrations with very similar regression coefficients and an identical ratio of actions (2.3 : 1) for both stimuli. Similar magnitude negative-feedback effects of log10 cortisol at -110 min (hypoglycaemia) or -40 min (transport) were detected, and both models contained a stimulatory relationship with cortisol at 0 min (facilitation). At adrenal gland level, cortisol secretory rates were related to simultaneously measured untransformed ACTH concentration but the regression coefficient for the hypoglycaemia model was 2.5-fold greater than for transport. No individual sustained maximum cortisol secretion for longer than 20 min during hypoglycaemia and 40 min during transport. These unique models demonstrate

  17. Acute and long-term in vitro effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Annangi, Balasubramanyam; Rubio, Laura; Alaraby, Mohamed; Bach, Jordi; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2016-09-01

    Since most of the toxic studies of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) focused on acute and high-dose exposure conditions, the aim of the present study was to fill the existing knowledge gap of long-term effects of ZnO NPs at sub-toxic doses. To overcome this point, we have evaluated the toxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic effects of ZnO NPs under long-term treatments (12 weeks), using a sub-toxic dose (1 µg/mL) according to acute 48-h exposure. Preliminarily, oxidative stress and genotoxic/oxidative DNA damage were determined under acute exposure and high-dose conditions. To determine the role of oxidative DNA damage, a wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF Ogg1 (+/+)) and its isogenic 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout partner (MEF Ogg1 (-/-)) cell lines were used. Although short-term exposure (24-h) experiments demonstrated that ZnO NPs were able to induce ROS, genotoxicity, and oxidative DNA damage in both cell lines, no effects were obtained under long-term exposure scenario. Thus, 1 µg/mL exposure over 12 weeks was unable to induce genotoxicity as well as cellular transformation in both cell types, as indicated by the lack of observed morphological cell changes, variations in the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, and anchorage-independent cell growth ability, regarded as cancer-like phenotypic hallmarks. Our results indicate that short-term effects of ZnO NP exposure are not replicated under long-term and sub-toxic dose conditions. All together, the lack of genotoxic/carcinogenic effects after chronic treatments seem to indicate a reduced risk associated with ZnO NP exposure. PMID:26449478

  18. Effect of Acute Exercise on Clinically Measured Reaction Time in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shailesh; Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We have developed a reliable and valid clinical test of reaction time (RTclin) that is sensitive to the acute effects of concussion. If RTclin is to be used as a sideline concussion assessment tool then the acute effects of exercise on RTclin may need to be controlled for. The purpose of this study is therefore to determine the effect of exercise on RTclin. Methods A gender balanced group of 42 collegiate athletes were assigned to an exercise (n=28) and a control (n=14) group using 2:1 block randomization. The exercise group completed a graded 4-stage exercise protocol on a stationary bicycle (100W × 5min; 150W × 5min; 200W × 5min; sprint × 2min) while the control group was tested at identical time periods without exercising. Mean RTclin was calculated over 8 trials as the fall time of a vertically-suspended rigid shaft after its release by the examiner before being caught by the athlete; RTclin was measured at baseline and after each of the 4 stages. Results As both heart rate and rate of perceived exertion significantly increased over the 4 stages in the exercise group (p<.001), mean RTclin showed a significant overall decline during repeated test administration (p<.008). However, there were no significant group (exercise vs. control, p=0.822) or group-by-stage interaction (p=0.169) effects on RTclin as assessed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Conclusion Exercise did not appear to affect RTclin performance in this study. This suggests that RTclin measured during a sideline concussion assessment does not need to be adjusted to account for the acute effects of exercise. PMID:24002343

  19. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  20. The acute extracellular flux (XF) assay to assess compound effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruolan; Novick, Steven J; Mangum, James B; Queen, Kennedy; Ferrick, David A; Rogers, George W; Stimmel, Julie B

    2015-03-01

    Numerous investigations have linked mitochondrial dysfunction to adverse health outcomes and drug-induced toxicity. The pharmaceutical industry is challenged with identifying mitochondrial liabilities earlier in drug development and thereby reducing late-stage attrition. Consequently, there is a demand for reliable, higher-throughput screening methods for assessing the impact of drug candidates on mitochondrial function. The extracellular flux (XF) assay described here is a plate-based method in which galactose-conditioned HepG2 cells were acutely exposed to test compounds, then real-time changes in the oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate were simultaneously measured using a Seahorse Bioscience XF-96 analyzer. The acute XF assay was validated using marketed drugs known to modulate mitochondrial function, and data analysis was automated using a spline curve fitting model developed at GlaxoSmithKline. We demonstrate that the acute XF assay is a robust, sensitive screening platform for evaluating drug-induced effects on mitochondrial activity in whole cells. PMID:25381255

  1. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Ömer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Öztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  2. Effects of Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Hsin; Chen, Shao-Yuan; Wang, Vinchi; Chen, Chao-Ching; Wang, Kaw-Chen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chien; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Yip, Ping-Keung; Ma, Wen-Ya; Liu, Chuan-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This prospective study assessed the efficacy and safety of HBOT as adjuvant treatment on 46 acute ischemic stroke in patients who did not receive thrombolytic therapy. The HBOT group (n = 16) received conventional medical treatment with 10 sessions of adjunctive HBOT within 3–5 days after stroke onset, while the control group (n = 30) received the same treatment but without HBOT. Early (around two weeks after onset) and late (one month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. The baseline clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group showed significant difference (P ≤ 0.001). In the control group, there was only significant difference in early outcome (P = 0.004). For early efficacy, there was no difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores between the two groups (P = 0.140) but there was statistically significant difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores at one month (P ≤ 0.001). The HBOT used in this study may be effective for patients with acute ischemic stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:22919348

  3. The Acute Exposure Effects of Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles on Murine Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liberda, Eric N; Cuevas, Azita K; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung Chi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may help to explain observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled nickel nanoparticle exposures such as increases in vascular inflammation, generate reactive oxygen species, alter vasomotor tone, and potentiated atherosclerosis in murine species. Methods Following an acute whole body inhalation exposure to 500μg/m3 of nickel nanoparticles for 5 hrs, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation, and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the exposure. Results and Conclusions Acute exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation (CEPCs). CECs were significantly elevated indicating that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. These results coincided with a decrease in the mRNA of receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing. This data provides new insight into how an acute nickel nanoparticle exposure to half of the current Occupational Safety & Health Administration permissible exposure limit may adversely affect EPCs. PMID:25144474

  4. Therapeutic effects of topical netrin-4 in a corneal acute inflammatory model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Shao, Yi; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Sang-Ming; Li, Wei; Liu, Zu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the therapeutic effect of netrin-4 on the early acute phase of inflammation in the alkali-burned eye. METHODS Eye drops containing netrin-4 or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were administered to a alkali-burn-induced corneal acute inflammatory model four times daily. The clinical evaluations, including fluorescein staining and inflammatory index, were performed on day 1, 4 and 7 using slit lamp microscopy. Global specimens were collected on day 7 and processed for immunofluorescent staining. The levels of inflammatory mediators in the corneas were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS Exogenous netrin-4 administered on rat ocular surfaces showed more improvements in decreasing fluorescein staining on day 4 and 7, and resolved alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation index on day 7 (P<0.01). The levels of IL-1β, IL-6, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1) in corneas were decreased in netrin-4-treated groups (P<0.05). In addition, netrin-4 significantly reduced the expression of leukocyte common antigen 45 (CD45) in the alkali-burn cornea (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Topical netrin-4 accelerated wound healing and reduced the inflammation on alkali-burn rat model, suggesting a potential as an anti-inflammatory agent in the clinical to treat the acute inflammation. PMID:25938032

  5. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Acute and Chronic Effects of Methylprednisolone on Hepatic Urea Cycle Genes in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Snyder, Grayson H.; Jusko, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) regulate many enzymes at both mRNA and protein levels. This study used microarrays to broadly assess regulation of various genes related to the greater urea cycle and employs pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling to quantitatively analyze and compare the temporal profiles of these genes during acute and chronic exposure to methylprednisolone (MPL). One group of adrenalectomized male Wistar rats received an intravenous bolus dose (50 mg/kg) of MPL, whereas a second group received MPL by a subcutaneous infusion (Alzet osmotic pumps) at a rate of 0.3 mg/kg/hr for seven days. The rats were sacrificed at various time points over 72 hours (acute) or 168 hours (chronic) and livers were harvested. Total RNA was extracted and Affymetrix® gene chips (RG_U34A for acute and RAE 230A for chronic) were used to identify genes regulated by CS. Besides five primary urea cycle enzymes, many other genes related to the urea cycle showed substantial changes in mRNA expression. Some genes that were simply up- or down-regulated after acute MPL showed complex biphasic patterns upon chronic infusion indicating involvement of secondary regulation. For the simplest patterns, indirect response models were used to describe the nuclear steroid-bound receptor mediated increase or decrease in gene transcription (e.g. tyrosine aminotransferase, glucocorticoid receptor). For the biphasic profiles, involvement of a secondary biosignal was assumed (e.g. ornithine decarboxylase, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and more complex models were derived. Microarrays were used successfully to explore CS effects on various urea cycle enzyme genes. PD models presented in this report describe testable hypotheses regarding molecular mechanisms and quantitatively characterize the direct or indirect regulation of various genes by CS. PMID:19787073

  6. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  7. Acute exposure to silica nanoparticles aggravate airway inflammation: different effects according to surface characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Sohn, Jung-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Ju; Park, Yoon Hee; Han, Heejae; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Kangtaek; Choi, Hoon; Um, Kiju; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Jung-Won; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in many scientific and industrial fields despite the lack of proper evaluation of their potential toxicity. This study examined the effects of acute exposure to SNPs, either alone or in conjunction with ovalbumin (OVA), by studying the respiratory systems in exposed mouse models. Three types of SNPs were used: spherical SNPs (S-SNPs), mesoporous SNPs (M-SNPs), and PEGylated SNPs (P-SNPs). In the acute SNP exposure model performed, 6-week-old BALB/c female mice were intranasally inoculated with SNPs for 3 consecutive days. In the OVA/SNPs asthma model, the mice were sensitized two times via the peritoneal route with OVA. Additionally, the mice endured OVA with or without SNP challenges intranasally. Acute SNP exposure induced significant airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, particularly in the S-SNP group. In OVA/SNPs asthma models, OVA with SNP-treated group showed significant airway inflammation, more than those treated with only OVA and without SNPs. In these models, the P-SNP group induced lower levels of inflammation on airways than both the S-SNP or M-SNP groups. Interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-1β and interferon-γ levels correlated with airway inflammation in the tested models, without statistical significance. In the mouse models studied, increased airway inflammation was associated with acute SNPs exposure, whether exposed solely to SNPs or SNPs in conjunction with OVA. P-SNPs appear to be relatively safer for clinical use than S-SNPs and M-SNPs, as determined by lower observed toxicity and airway system inflammation. PMID:26183169

  8. Effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Raven, Peter B; Rebuffat, Thomas; Denise, Pierre; Lericollais, Romain; Sugawara, Jun; Normand, Hervé

    2015-10-15

    Systemic blood distribution is an important factor involved in regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, the effect of an acute change in central blood volume (CBV) on CBF regulation remains unclear. To address our question, we sought to examine the CBF and systemic hemodynamic responses to microgravity during parabolic flight. Twelve healthy subjects were seated upright and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. During the brief periods of microgravity, mean arterial pressure was decreased (-26 ± 1%, P < 0.001), despite an increase in cardiac output (+21 ± 6%, P < 0.001). During microgravity, central arterial pulse pressure and estimated carotid sinus pressure increased rapidly. In addition, this increase in central arterial pulse pressure was associated with an arterial baroreflex-mediated decrease in heart rate (r = -0.888, P < 0.0001) and an increase in total vascular conductance (r = 0.711, P < 0.001). The middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) remained unchanged throughout parabolic flight (P = 0.30). During microgravity the contribution of cardiac output to MCA Vmean was gradually reduced (P < 0.05), and its contribution was negatively correlated with an increase in total vascular conductance (r = -0.683, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the acute loading of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors by increases in CBV during microgravity results in acute and marked systemic vasodilation. Furthermore, we conclude that this marked systemic vasodilation decreases the contribution of cardiac output to CBF. These findings suggest that the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex-mediated peripheral vasodilation along with dynamic cerebral autoregulation counteracts a cerebral overperfusion, which otherwise would occur during acute increases in CBV. PMID:26310936

  9. The anti-fatty liver effects of garlic oil on acute ethanol-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Guo, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Cui-Li; Zhao, Sheng; Dou, Dan-Dan; Gao, Xu-Cong; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-11-25

    The protective effects of single dose of garlic oil (GO) on acute ethanol-induced fatty liver were investigated. Mice were treated with ethanol (4.8 g/kg bw) to induce acute fatty liver. The liver index, the serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) levels and the histological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were determined for the antioxidant capacity assay. Acute ethanol exposure resulted in the enlargement of the liver index and the increase of the serum and hepatic TG levels (P<0.01), which were dramatically attenuated by GO pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). GO treatment (simultaneously with ethanol exposure) exhibited similar effects to those of pretreatment, while no obviously protective effects were displayed when it was used at 2h after ethanol intake. Histological changes were paralleled to these indices. Beside this, GO dramatically prolonged the drunken time and shortened the waking time, and these effects were superior to those of silymarin and tea polyphenol. In addition, GO dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of MDA levels, restored the GSH levels and enhanced the SOD, GR and GST activities. Compared with the ethanol group, the MDA levels decreased by 14.2% (P<0.05), 29.9% and 32.8% (P<0.01) in GO groups 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively. The GST activity increased by 9.97%, 19.94% (P<0.05) and 42.12% (P<0.01) of the ethanol group in GO groups 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively, while the GR activity increased by 28.57% (P<0.05), 37.97% (P<0.01), 50.45% (P<0.01) of the ethanol group in GO groups 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively. These data indicated that single dose of GO possessed ability to prevent acute ethanol-induced fatty liver, but may lose its capacity when used after ethanol exposure. The protective effects

  10. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance. PMID:26849997

  11. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  12. Acute effects of Yakson and Gentle Human Touch on the behavioral state of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyesang; Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin C

    2009-09-01

    Two weeks of touch intervention, either Yakson or Gentle Human Touch (GHT) have been shown to reduce the levels of stress hormones. This study evaluated the acute impact of both interventions on state during and immediately after touch. Forty preterm infants with a gestational age of < or =34 weeks received either Yakson or GHT for 15 days. A significantly greater sleeping state was identified in both groups after touch. This effect was significantly stronger with Yakson than GHT. During touch, about half the Yakson infants showed an arousal effect while the GHT infants showed little change. Both interventions left the babies calmer after touch. This calming effect is consistent with the previously observed effect on stress hormones and should be beneficial in terms of growth and development. Yakson had an arousing effect on a subset of the infants during touch, which possibly could be beneficial in terms of social development. PMID:19713405

  13. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  14. The protective effect of Esculentoside A on experimental acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Xingtong; Qiu, Xiaochen; Wang, Junjie; Fang, He; Wang, Zhihong; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory response and oxidative stress are considered to play an important role in the development of acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Esculentoside A (EsA), isolated from the Chinese herb phytolacca esculenta, has the effect of modulating immune response, cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as anti-inflammatory effects. The present study is to evaluate the protective effect of EsA on CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury. In vitro, CCK-8 assays showed that EsA had no cytotoxicity, while it significantly reduced levels of TNF-α and cell death rate challenged by CCl4. Moreover, EsA treatment up-regulated PPAR-γ expression of LO2 cells and reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenged by CCl4. In vivo, EsA prevented mice from CCl4-induced liver histopathological damage. In addition, levels of AST and ALT were significantly decreased by EsA treatment. Furthermore, the mice treated with EsA had a lower level of TNF-α, Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in mRNA expression. EsA prevented MDA release and increased GSH-Px activity in liver tissues. Immunohistochemical staining showed that over-expression of F4/80 and CD11b were markedly inhibited by EsA. The western bolt results showed that EsA significantly inhibited CCl4-induced phosphonated IkBalpha (P-IκB) and ERK. Furthermore, EsA treatment also alleviated GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury on liver enzyme and histopathological damage. Unfortunately, our results exhibited that EsA had no effects on CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis which were showed by TUNEL staining and Bax, Caspase-3 and cleaved Caspase-3 expression. Our results proved that EsA treatment attenuated CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and its protective effects might be involved in inhibiting inflammatory response and oxidative stress, but not apoptosis with its underlying mechanism associated with PPAR-γ, NF-κB and ERK signal

  15. Natural Killer Cell Immunomodulation: Targeting Activating, Inhibitory, and Co-stimulatory Receptor Signaling for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Cariad; Fritsch, Katherine; Kohrt, Holbrook E.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in the recognition and eradication of tumors. Efforts at using NK cells as antitumor agents began over two decades ago, but recent advances in elucidating NK cell biology have accelerated the development of NK cell-targeting therapeutics. NK cell activation and the triggering of effector functions is governed by a complex set of activating and inhibitory receptors. In the early phases of cancer immune surveillance, NK cells directly identify and lyse cancer cells. Nascent transformed cells elicit NK cell activation and are eliminated. However, as tumors progress, cancerous cells develop immunosuppressive mechanisms that circumvent NK cell-mediated killing, allowing for tumor escape and proliferation. Therapeutic intervention aims to reverse tumor-induced NK cell suppression and sustain NK cells’ tumorlytic capacities. Here, we review tumor–NK cell interactions, discuss the mechanisms by which NK cells generate an antitumor immune response, and discuss NK cell-based therapeutic strategies targeting activating, inhibitory, and co-stimulatory receptors. PMID:26697006

  16. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J.; Fagan, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of osthole against acute ischemic stroke on middle cerebral ischemia occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Tao; Liu, Wenbo; Dong, Wenpeng; Qu, Yan; Jiang, Xiaofan; Ji, Xituan; Zhen, Haining; Fei, Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, has taken considerable attention because of its diverse pharmacological functions. It has been reported to be useful in the treatment of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and neuronal damage. In the present study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of osthole and its potential mechanisms against acute ischemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. The rats were pretreated with osthole 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg 30 min before MCAO. The neuroprotective effect of osthole against acute ischemic stroke was evaluated by neurological deficit score (NDS), dry-wet weight and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH), activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the level of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 after 2h of MCAO in rats were detected to investigate its anti-oxidative action and anti-inflammatory property. Pretreatment with osthole significantly increased in GSH, and decreased the volume of infarction, NDS, edema, MDA, MPO, IL-1β and IL-8 compared with rats in the MCAO group at 24h after MCAO. The study suggests the neuroprotective effect of osthole in the MCAO model of rats. The anti-oxidative action and anti-inflammatory property of osthole may contribute to a beneficial effect against stroke. PMID:20869955

  18. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1994-11-01

    We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair.

  19. Acute kidney injury: short-term and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Doyle, James F; Forni, Lui G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most common cause of organ dysfunction in critically ill adults, with a single episode of AKI, regardless of stage, carrying a significant morbidity and mortality risk. Since the consensus on AKI nomenclature has been reached, data reflecting outcomes have become more apparent allowing investigation of both short- and long-term outcomes.Classically the short-term effects of AKI can be thought of as those reflecting an acute deterioration in renal function per se. However, the effects of AKI, especially with regard to distant organ function ("organ cross-talk"), are being elucidated as is the increased susceptibility to other conditions. With regards to the long-term effects, the consideration that outcome is a simple binary endpoint of dialysis or not, or survival or not, is overly simplistic, with the reality being much more complex.Also discussed are currently available treatment strategies to mitigate these adverse effects, as they have the potential to improve patient outcome and provide considerable economic health savings. Moving forward, an agreement for defining renal recovery is warranted if we are to assess and extrapolate the efficacy of novel therapies. Future research should focus on targeted therapies assessed by measure of long-term outcomes. PMID:27373891

  20. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  1. Acute effects of physical exercise in type 2 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Ricardo Yukio; Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Browne, Rodrigo Alberto Vieira; Moraes, José Fernando Vila Nova; Coelho Júnior, Hélio José; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The literature has shown the efficiency of exercise in the control of type 2 diabetes (T2D), being suggested as one of the best kinds of non-pharmacological treatments for its population. Thus, the scientific production related to this phenomenon has growing exponentially. However, despite its advances, still there is a lack of studies that have carried out a review on the acute effects of physical exercise on metabolic and hemodynamic markers and possible control mechanisms of these indicators in individuals with T2D, not to mention that in a related way, these themes have been very little studied today. Therefore, the aim of this study was to organize and analyze the current scientific production about the acute effects of physical exercise on metabolic and hemodynamic markers and possible control mechanisms of these indicators in T2D individuals. For such, a research with the following keywords was performed: -exercise; diabetes and post-exercise hypotension; diabetes and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption; diabetes and acute effects in PUBMED, SCIELO and HIGHWIRE databases. From the analyzed studies, it is possible to conclude that, a single exercise session can promote an increase in the bioavailability of nitric oxide and elicit decreases in postexercise blood pressure. Furthermore, the metabolic stress from physical exercise can increase the oxidation of carbohydrate during the exercise and keep it, in high levels, the post exercise consumption of O², this phenomenon increases the rate of fat oxidation during recovery periods after exercise, improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and reduces glycemia between 2-72 h, which seems to be dependent on the exercise intensity and duration of the effort. PMID:25317243

  2. Agricultural adjuvants: acute mortality and effects on population growth rate of Daphnia pulex after chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Walthall, William K

    2003-12-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity of eight agricultural adjuvants (Bond, Kinetic, Plyac, R-11, Silwet L-77, Sylgard 309, X-77, and WaterMaxx) to Daphnia pulex were evaluated with 48-h acute lethal concentration estimates (LC50) and a 10-d population growth-rate measurement, the instantaneous rate of increase (r1). Based on LC50, the order of toxicity was R-11 > X-77 = Sylgard 309 = Silwet L-77 > Kinetic > Bond > Plyac > WaterMaxx; all LC50 estimates were higher than the expected environmental concentration (EEC) of 0.79 mg/L, indicating that none of these adjuvants should cause high levels of mortality in wild D. pulex populations. Extinction, defined as negative population growth rate, occurred after exposure to 0.9 mg/L R-11, 13 mg/L X-77, 25 mg/L Kinetic, 28 mg/L Silwet, 18 mg/L Sylgard, 450 mg/L Bond, 610 mg/L Plyac, and 1,600 mg/L WaterMaxx. Concentrations that caused extinction were substantially below the acute LC50 for R-11, Kinetic, Plyac, X-77, and Bond. The no-observable-effects concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observable-effects concentration (LOEC) for the number of offspring per surviving female after exposure to R-11 were 0.5 and 0.75 mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for population size after exposure to R-11 were (1.25 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. Both of these values were lower than the EEC, indicating that R-11 does have the potential to cause damage to D. pulex populations after application at recommended field rates. The wide range of concentrations causing extinction makes it difficult to generalize about the potential impacts that agricultural adjuvants might have on aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, additional studies that examine effects on other nontarget organisms and determine residues in aquatic ecosystems may be warranted. PMID:14713050

  3. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Antunes, S C; Correia, A T; Nunes, B

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  4. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  5. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia. PMID:26751937

  6. The effect of pravastatin on acute rejection after kidney transplantation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, S; Wilkinson, A H; Kobashigawa, J A; Wang, X M; Chia, D; Ozawa, M; Zhong, H P; Hirata, M; Cohen, A H; Teraski, P I

    1996-05-27

    Hyperlipidemia is an important complication of kidney transplantation affecting up to 74% of recipients. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are reported to provide safe and effective treatment for this problem. A recent study suggests that pravastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, also decreases the incidence of both clinically severe acute rejection episodes and natural killer cell cytotoxicity after orthotopic heart transplantation. We have performed a prospective randomized pilot study of the effect of pravastatin on these same parameters after cadaveric kidney transplantation. Graft recipients were randomized to receive pravastatin after transplantation or no pravastatin (24 patients in each group) in addition to routine cyclosporine and prednisone immunosuppression. Lipid levels, acute rejection episodes and serial natural killer cell cytotoxicities were followed for 4 months after the transplant. At the end of the study period, pravastatin had successfully controlled mean total cholesterol levels (202.6 +/- 9.3 vs. 236.5 +/- 11.9 mg/dl, P < 0.02), LDL levels (107.9 +/- 6.6 vs.149.6 +/- 10.7 mg/dl, P < 0.002), and triglyceride levels (118.8 +/- 14.2 vs. 157.2 +/- 13.8 mg/dl, P < 0.05). In addition, the pravastatin-treated group experienced a reduction in the incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (25% vs. 58%, P = 0.01), the incidence of multiple rejections episodes (P < 0.05), and the use of both pulse methylprednisolone (P = 0.01) and OKT3 (P = 0.02). Mean natural killer cell cytotoxicity was similarly reduced (11.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 20.0 +/- 2.0% lysis of K562 target cells, P < 0.002). These data suggest that pravastatin exerts an additional immunosuppressive effect in kidney transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. PMID:8633373

  7. Differential effects of acute and chronic fructose administration on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to distinguish between the acute and chronic effects of fructose administration. In vivo, liver lipogenesis, as measured by {sup 3}H{sub 2}O incorporation, was greater in rats fed 60% fructose than in their glucose fed controls. Both fructose feeding, and fructose feeding plus intraperitoneal fructose injection increased the activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Liver PDH activity was increased by fructose feeding, and was increased even more by fructose feeding and injection of fructose, but this was not associated with any changes in hepatic ATP concentrations.

  8. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Morphine on Some Blood Biochemical Parameters in an Inflammatory Condition in Gonadectomized Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chahkandi, Mohadeseh; Askari, Nayerreh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background Opiates affect blood factors as well as pain and inflammation in a gender-dependent manner. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of morphine on serum glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and urea in gonadectomized and inflammation conditions. Methods Animals were divided as follows: control group, carrageenan and chronic morphine recipients, acute morphine recipients, chronic morphine recipients, carrageenan recipients, acute morphine and carrageenan recipients, gonadectomized group, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan, gonadectomized recipients of morphine, gonadectomized recipients of chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of carrageenan and chronic morphine, gonadectomized recipients of acute morphine and carrageenan. Findings Our results have shown that acute and chronic morphine elevates blood glucose level in the acute and chronic morphine group. Cholesterol level has shown to be increasing in the morphine and carrageenan recipient group compared with a group which merely received morphine. Triglyceride has shown to be decreasing in acute and chronic morphine recipient group compared with control group. A significant increase in serum urea was observed in acute and chronic morphine recipients compared with the carrageenan recipient group. Conclusion Morphine alters the serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, and urea in the normal and inflammatory conditions differently, hence, this finding should be considered in the patients who use morphine as a relief of pain, especially in an inflammatory condition. PMID:26885349

  9. Self-Reported Acute Health Effects and Exposure to Companion Animals.

    PubMed

    Krueger, W S; Hilborn, E D; Dufour, A P; Sams, E A; Wade, T J

    2016-06-01

    To understand the etiological burden of disease associated with acute health symptoms [e.g. gastrointestinal (GI), respiratory, dermatological], it is important to understand how common exposures influence these symptoms. Exposures to familiar and unfamiliar animals can result in a variety of health symptoms related to infection, irritation and allergy; however, few studies have examined this association in a large-scale cohort setting. Cross-sectional data collected from 50 507 participants in the United States enrolled from 2003 to 2009 were used to examine associations between animal contact and acute health symptoms during a 10-12 day period. Fixed-effects multivariable logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confident intervals (CI) for associations between animal exposures and outcomes of GI illness, respiratory illness and skin/eye symptoms. Two-thirds of the study population (63.2%) reported direct contact with animals, of which 7.7% had contact with at least one unfamiliar animal. Participants exposed to unfamiliar animals had significantly higher odds of self-reporting all three acute health symptoms, when compared to non-animal-exposed participants (GI: AOR = 1.4, CI = 1.2-1.7; respiratory: AOR = 1.5, CI = 1.2-1.8; and skin/eye: AOR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.3), as well as when compared to participants who only had contact with familiar animals. Specific contact with dogs, cats or pet birds was also significantly associated with at least one acute health symptom; AORs ranged from 1.1 to 1.5, when compared to participants not exposed to each animal. These results indicate that contact with animals, especially unfamiliar animals, was significantly associated with GI, respiratory and skin/eye symptoms. Such associations could be attributable to zoonotic infections and allergic reactions. Etiological models for acute health symptoms should consider contact with companion animals, particularly exposure to unfamiliar animals

  10. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  11. The therapeutic effects of tuberostemonine against cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Beak, Hyunjung; Park, Soojin; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Jaehoon; Park, Sangwon; Kim, Jinju; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is mainly caused by cigarette smoking and is characterized by the destruction of lung parenchyma, structural alterations of the small airways, and systemic inflammation. Tuberostemonine (TS) is an alkaloid-type phytochemical from Stemona tuberosa. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of TS in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mouse model of acute lung inflammation. The mice were whole-body exposed to CS or fresh air for 7 days. TS was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 1h before exposure to CS. To test the effects of TS, the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were counted. Furthermore, we measured the levels of several chemokines, such as GCP-2, MIP-3α, MCP-1 and KC, in the lung tissue. The cellular profiles and histopathological analysis demonstrated that the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells significantly decreased in the TS-treated groups compared with the CS-exposure group. The TS treatment significantly ameliorated the airway epithelial thickness induced by CS exposure and caused a significant decrement in the production of chemokines in the lung. These results suggest that TS has anti-inflammatory effects against CS-induced acute lung inflammation. PMID:26849941

  12. Hepatoprotective effect of methylsulfonylmethane against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Rehab; El Morsy, Engy M

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄)-induced acute liver injury in rats. A single injection of CCl₄ (2 ml/kg, i.p.) increased serum aminotransferases (ALT and AST) activities. In addition, CCl₄ treatment led to elevation of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content as well as decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Furthermore, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) content was suppressed while proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels increased in liver tissue after CCl4 administration. We showed that acute CCl₄-induced damage was accompanied by a rise in Bax/Bcl₂ ratio indicating apoptosis. Pre-treatment with MSM (400 mg/kg) inhibited the increases of serum ALT and AST activities, decreased hepatic MDA, TNF-α, IL-6 and Bax/Bcl₂ ratio compared to CCl₄ treated group. On the other hand, MSM raised SOD and CAT activities as well as CYP2E1 level in liver tissues. The present study shows that MSM possesses a hepatoprotective effect against CCl₄-induced liver injury in rats. This protective effect might be through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties. PMID:23591777

  13. Effects of an acute bout of exercise on memory in 6th grade children.

    PubMed

    Etnier, Jennifer; Labban, Jeffrey D; Piepmeier, Aaron; Davis, Matthew E; Henning, David A

    2014-08-01

    Research supports the positive effects of exercise on cognitive performance by children. However, a limited number of studies have explored the effects specifically on memory. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an acute bout of exercise on learning, short-term memory, and long-term memory in a sample of children. Children were randomly assigned to an exercise condition or to a no-treatment control condition and then performed repeated trials on an auditory verbal learning task. In the exercise condition, participants performed the PACER task, an aerobic fitness assessment, in their physical education class before performing the memory task. In the control condition, participants performed the memory task at the beginning of their physical education class. Results showed that participants in the exercise condition demonstrated significantly better learning of the word lists and significantly better recall of the words after a brief delay. There were not significant differences in recognition of the words after an approximately 24-hr delay. These results provide evidence in a school setting that an acute bout of exercise provides benefits for verbal learning and long-term memory. Future research should be designed to identify the extent to which these findings translate to academic measures. PMID:25050827

  14. Effects of acute and chronic flunitrazepam on delay discounting in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Eppolito, Amy K; France, Charles P; Gerak, Lisa R

    2011-03-01

    Delay to delivery of a reinforcer can decrease responding for that reinforcer and increase responding for smaller reinforcers that are available concurrently and delivered without delay; acute administration of drugs can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers, although the impact of chronic treatment on delay discounting is not well understood. In this experiment, the effects of repeated administration of the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam were studied in 6 pigeons responding on one key to receive food that was delivered immediately and on a second key to receive a larger amount of food that was delivered following delays which increased across a single session. Pigeons responded predominantly for the large reinforcer when there were no delays and when delays were short; however, as delays increased, responding for the large reinforcer decreased. Acutely, flunitrazepam (0.32, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased responding for the large reinforcer, shifting the discounting curve rightward and upward. Repeated administration of flunitrazepam (0.32, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/kg, each for six sessions, separated by one session during which vehicle was administered) did not markedly alter its effects on responding for the large reinforcer, indicating that the development of tolerance to this effect of flunitrazepam is modest under these conditions. PMID:21541119

  15. Effect of Oral Ondansetron on Decreasing the Vomiting Associated with Acute Gastroenteritis in Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    Golshekan, Kioomars; Badeli, Hamidreza; Rezaieian, Saman; Mohammadpour, Haniyeh; Hassanzadehrad, Afagh

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral ondansetron in decreasing the vomiting due to acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods In a single center, randomized, double blind, controlled trial, the effect of oral ondansetron was compared with placebo on 176 patients between 1 and 10 years old with acute gastroenteritis. 30 minutes after drug administration, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was initiated. Severity of vomiting was evaluated during emergency department (ED) stay and 48 hours follow up. Data were collected and analyzed by SPSS16. Findings Fifty two of children (58.5%) were males with the mean age of 3.12 (±2.30) years. Ten patients in ondansetron and 14 in placebo group had persistent vomiting during ED stay. After analyzing, there was no significant relation between vomiting in 4 and 48 hours and need for intra venous fluid therapy between the two groups although ondansetron generally decreased ORT failure (P=0.03). Conclusion Although administrayion of oral ondansetron in gastroenteritis could decrease failure of ORT, it seems that further well-conducted clinical studies are needed to determine effects of oral ondansetron precisely. PMID:24800017

  16. Detrimental effect of hypothermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution in anaesthetized cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, A.; Fahim, Mohammad

    Haemodynamic responses to hypothermia were studied at normal haematocrit and following the induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution. Experiments were performed on 20 cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane in two groups. In one group (n=10) the effects of hypothermia on various haemodynamic variables were studied at normal haematocrit (41.0+/-1.7%) and in the second group of cats (n=10) the effects of hypothermia on various haemodynamic variables were studied after the induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (14.0+/-1.0%). The haemodynamic variables left ventricular pressure, left ventricular contractility, arterial blood pressure, heart rate and right atrial pressure were recorded on a polygraph. Cardiac output was measured using a cardiac output computer. In both groups hypothermia was induced by surface cooling with the help of ice. Cardiovascular variables were recorded at each 1° C fall in body temperature. Hypothermia produced a significant (P<0.05) drop in heart rate, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure and left ventricular contractility in both groups. However, the percentage decrease in these variables in response to hypothermia was significantly (P<0.05) higher in cats with low haematocrit than in those with normal haematocrit. The severity of hypothermia - induced cardiovascular effects is evident from the drastic decrease in heart rate, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure and myocardial contractility in cats with low haematocrit, indicating a higher risk of circulatory failure under anaemic conditions at low temperatures.

  17. Effects of Parasternal Block on Acute and Chronic Pain in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doğan Bakı, Elif; Kavrut Ozturk, Nilgün; Ayoğlu, Rauf Umut; Emmiler, Mustafa; Karslı, Bilge; Uzel, Hanife

    2016-09-01

    Background Sternotomy causes considerable postoperative pain and postoperative pain management encompasses different analgesic regimens. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of peroperative parasternal block with levobupivacaine on acute and chronic pain after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 81 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery were included in this study. Patients were randomly allocated by opening an envelope to receive either parasternal block with pharmacologic analgesia (group P; before sternal wire placement: sternotomy and mediastinal tube sites were infiltrated with local anesthetics) or pharmacologic analgesia alone (group C) for postoperative pain relief. All patients received intravenous tramadol with patient-controlled analgesia at the end of the surgery. Demographic characteristics, vital signs, tramadol consumption, analgesic intake, and intensity of pain with a visual analogue scale were recorded for each patient. Six months after surgery, the patients' type of chronic pain was evaluated using the Leeds Assessment Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale questionnaire. Results Patients who received parasternal block experienced less pain and needed less opioid analgesic (125.75 ± 28.9 mg in group P vs 213.17 ± 61.25 mg in group C) for 24 hours postoperatively (P < .001). There was no significant difference in nociceptive and neuropathic pain between the groups. Conclusion Parasternal block had a benefical effect on the management of postoperative acute pain and decreased opioid consumption after surgery but had no significant effect in chronic post surgical pain. PMID:25900900

  18. Long distance running and acute effects on plantar foot sensitivity and plantar foot loading.

    PubMed

    Alfuth, Martin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-09-26

    The plantar surface of the foot senses local pressures during stance and locomotion. These foot loading characteristics may be affected by long distance running. Little is known about the physiological effects of sports-related loading on plantar sensitivity and their relationship with plantar foot loading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of long distance running on plantar sensitivity to touch and their relationship with foot loading characteristics. It was hypothesized that plantar sensation would decrease after long distance running and may be related to foot loading characteristics. In 15 middle-aged runners, sensory detection thresholds to light touch and plantar pressures were measured before and after a 10 km run. After the run, no significant changes in sensory perception thresholds were observed so that correlations between foot sensitivity and foot loading could not be calculated. A significant decrease of force-time integrals and maximum forces was demonstrated in the whole foot (-6.2%, p=0.003; -3.9%, p=0.001) and the heel (-10.5%, p=0.003; -8.5%, p=0.002). Furthermore, maximum force was significantly reduced in the lateral midfoot (-6.4%, p=0.002). In conclusion, a sub-maximal 10 km running exercise appears to have no significant acute effects on plantar sensitivity, plantar pressure distribution and peak forces. PMID:21871535

  19. Acute and Chronic Effects of Ethanol on Learning-Related Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol’s acute and long-term pharmacological consequences. PMID:24447472

  20. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  1. [Acute toxicological effects of heavy metal pollution in soils on earthworms].

    PubMed

    Song, Yufang; Zhou, Qixing; Xu, Huaxia; Ren, Liping; Sun, Tieheng; Gong, Ping

    2002-02-01

    Acute and sub-acute lethal effects of single and combined Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd on earthworm was determined using meadow brown soil. Results indicated that the mortality of earthworm was significantly related with the concentrations of Cu and Zn in the soil (alpha = 0.05, RCu = 0.86, RPb = 0.87), and the inhibition rate of earthworm growth was significantly related with the concentration of Cu in the soil (alpha = 0.05, RCu = 0.84). There was no significant relation between the concentrations of other heavy metals tested and the death rate and the growth-inhibition rate. The degree of individual earthworm enduring the toxicity of heavy metals varied greatly. The threshold concentration of toxicity defined by statistical method, the level to conduce the death of individual earthworm was 300 mg.kg-1 for Cu, 1300 mg.kg-1 for Zn, 1700 mg.kg-1 for Pb, 300 mg.kg-1 for Cd. LC50 was 400-450 mg.kg-1 for Cu, 1500-1900 mg.kg-1 for Zn, 2350-2400 mg.kg-1 for Pb and 900 mg.kg-1 for Cd. Combined effects of single Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd to conduce more than 10% of the death rate of earthworm could result in 100% of the death rate of earthworm, thus showing the strong synergistic joint effect of the heavy metals. PMID:11993124

  2. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  3. Acute effects of concentric and eccentric exercise on glucose metabolism and interleukin-6 concentration in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Krüsmann, PJ; Mersa, L; Eder, EM; Gatterer, H; Melmer, A; Ebenbichler, C; Burtscher, M

    2016-01-01

    Acute muscle-damaging eccentric exercise (EE) negatively affects glucose metabolism. On the other hand, long-term eccentric endurance exercise seems to result in equal or superior positive effects on glucose metabolism compared to concentric endurance exercise. However, it is not known if acute non-muscle-damaging EE will have the same positive effects on glucose metabolism as acute concentric exercise (CE). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) released from the exercising muscles may be involved in the acute adaptations of glucose metabolism after CE and non-muscle-damaging EE. The aim of this study was to assess acute effects of uphill walking (CE) and non-muscle-damaging downhill walking (EE) on glucose metabolism and IL-6 secretion. Seven sedentary non-smoking, healthy males participated in a crossover trial consisting of a 1 h uphill (CE) and a 1 h downhill (EE) walking block on a treadmill. Venous blood samples were drawn before (pre), directly after (acute) and 24 h after (post) exercise. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and 24 h after exercise. Glucose tolerance after 1 and 2 hours significantly improved 24 hours after CE (-10.12±3.22%: P=0.039; -13.40±8.24%: P=0.028). After EE only the 1-hour value was improved (-5.03±5.48%: P=0.043). Acute IL-6 concentration rose significantly after CE but not after EE. We conclude that both a single bout of CE and a single bout of non-muscle-damaging EE elicit positive changes in glucose tolerance even in young, healthy subjects. Our experiment indicates that the overall metabolic cost is a major trigger for acute adaptations of glucose tolerance after exercise, but only the IL-6 production during EE was closely related to changes in glycaemic control. PMID:27274108

  4. Acute effects of concentric and eccentric exercise on glucose metabolism and interleukin-6 concentration in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Philippe, M; Krüsmann, P J; Mersa, L; Eder, E M; Gatterer, H; Melmer, A; Ebenbichler, C; Burtscher, M

    2016-06-01

    Acute muscle-damaging eccentric exercise (EE) negatively affects glucose metabolism. On the other hand, long-term eccentric endurance exercise seems to result in equal or superior positive effects on glucose metabolism compared to concentric endurance exercise. However, it is not known if acute non-muscle-damaging EE will have the same positive effects on glucose metabolism as acute concentric exercise (CE). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) released from the exercising muscles may be involved in the acute adaptations of glucose metabolism after CE and non-muscle-damaging EE. The aim of this study was to assess acute effects of uphill walking (CE) and non-muscle-damaging downhill walking (EE) on glucose metabolism and IL-6 secretion. Seven sedentary non-smoking, healthy males participated in a crossover trial consisting of a 1 h uphill (CE) and a 1 h downhill (EE) walking block on a treadmill. Venous blood samples were drawn before (pre), directly after (acute) and 24 h after (post) exercise. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and 24 h after exercise. Glucose tolerance after 1 and 2 hours significantly improved 24 hours after CE (-10.12±3.22%: P=0.039; -13.40±8.24%: P=0.028). After EE only the 1-hour value was improved (-5.03±5.48%: P=0.043). Acute IL-6 concentration rose significantly after CE but not after EE. We conclude that both a single bout of CE and a single bout of non-muscle-damaging EE elicit positive changes in glucose tolerance even in young, healthy subjects. Our experiment indicates that the overall metabolic cost is a major trigger for acute adaptations of glucose tolerance after exercise, but only the IL-6 production during EE was closely related to changes in glycaemic control. PMID:27274108

  5. Gastroprotective Effects of Astragaloside IV against Acute Gastric Lesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shuai; Yang, Guang; Li, Winny; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Hailong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Minzhou

    2016-01-01

    Background Protection of the gastric mucosa from acute lesions induced by various irritants is a pertinent issue in the field of critical care medicine. In this study, we investigated the gastroprotective effects of astragaloside IV on acute gastric lesions in rats under stressful conditions. Methods Rats were randomized into six groups. Group 1 and 2 received 10% Tween 80 (vehicle). Group 3 received 20 mg/kg of omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received astragaloside IV at concentration of 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. As a means to induce gastric lesions, Groups 2–6 were subjected to water immersion and restraint stress for 12 hours after treatment. Results Our present studies show that compared to rats in group 2, treatment with 1 to 50 mg/kg astragaloside IV significantly decreased the size of gastric lesions, MDA, TNFα and MCP1 levels, in addition to normalizing gastric pH, gastric mucus and SOD levels (P<0.05). Histomorphological examination confirmed that treatment with astragaloside IV elicited a dosage-dependent protective effect on the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, pretreatment with astragaloside IV resulted in significant elevations in HSP70 and reduction in Bax, along with over-expression of PLCγ response level, which was further confirmed via immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusions The acute gastric lesions induced are attenuated by pretreatment with astragaloside IV which is possibly due to the enhancing of the expression of HSP70 with concomitant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic capacity. PMID:26845156

  6. Long term outcome and cost-effectiveness of stenting versus balloon angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Suryapranata, H; Ottervanger, J; Nibbering, E; van't, H; Hoorntje, J; de Boer, M J; Al, M; Zijlstra, F

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the long term clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of stenting compared with balloon angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
METHODS—Patients with acute myocardial infarction were randomly allocated to primary stenting (112) or balloon angioplasty (115). The primary end point was the cumulative first event rate of death, non-fatal reinfarction, or target vessel revascularisation. Secondary end points were restenosis at six months and the cost-effectiveness at follow up.
RESULTS—After 24 months, the combined clinical end point of death/reinfarction was 4% after stenting and 11% after balloon angioplasty (p = 0.04). Subsequent target vessel revascularisation was necessary in 15 patients (13%) after stenting and in 39 (34%) after balloon angioplasty (p < 0.001). The cumulative cardiac event-free survival rate was also higher after stenting (84% v 62%, p < 0.001). The angiographic restenosis rate after stenting was less than after balloon angioplasty (12% v 34%, p < 0.001). Despite the higher initial costs of stenting (Dfl 21 484 v Dfl 18 625, p < 0.001), the cumulative costs at 24 months were comparable with those of balloon angioplasty (Dfl 31 423 v Dfl 32 933, p = 0.83).
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with balloon angioplasty, primary stenting for acute myocardial infarction results in a better long term clinical outcome without increased cost.


Keywords: stenting; angioplasty; myocardial infarction; cost-benefit analysis PMID:11359749

  7. Effectiveness of Acute Phase Hybrid Assistive Limb Rehabilitation in Stroke Patients Classified by Paralysis Severity

    PubMed Central

    FUKUDA, Hiroyuki; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; HAMADA, Omi; SAITA, Kazuya; OGATA, Toshiyasu; SHIOTA, Etsuji; SANKAI, Yoshiyuki; INOUE, Tooru

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of acute phase hybrid assistive limb (HAL) rehabilitation training for patients after stroke by measuring the difference in the severity of paralysis. Fifty-three acute stroke patients were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. HAL training was administered about twice per week, and the mean number of sessions was 3.9 ± 2.7. The walking training was performed on a treadmill with individually adjustable body weight support and speed and there was a 10-m walk test (10MWT) before and after each session. Assessment at baseline and at endpoint consisted of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Revised Hasegawa’s Dementia Scale (HDS-R), Brunnstrom stage (Brs), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Barthel index (BI), and 10MWT. We measured these assessments at the first walking training session and at the end of the final training session without the HAL. To evaluate the feasibility of training with the HAL, the outcome measures of BI, FIM, and speed and number of steps of 10MWT were compared before and after training using a paired Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test in different Brs. Except for Brs IV, the Brs III or higher subgroups displayed significant amelioration in BI, and the Brs III subgroup displayed significant amelioration in FIM. The Brs V and VI subgroups displayed significant amelioration in 10-m walking speed and steps. In acute phase rehabilitation after stroke, it is thought that the HAL is more effective for patients with less lower-limb paralysis, such as Brs III or higher. PMID:26041627

  8. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system.

    PubMed

    Judge, Sarah J; Savy, Claire Y; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G; Morris, Christopher M; Gartside, Sarah E

    2016-02-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  9. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P < .015; 95% confidence intervals 0.25-0.77). There was also an increase in the HOMA-IR index; on visit 1, the median HOMA-IR (interquartile range) was 5.2 (3.9) versus 6.9 (6.8) on visit 3 (P < .015). Other indices of glucose metabolism did not change. These observations document that GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans. PMID:23230283

  10. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  11. Acute effects of head-down tilt and hypoxia on modulators of fluid homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Cintron, N. M.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Scotto, P.; Loeppky, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to understand the interaction between acute postural fluid shifts and hypoxia on hormonal regulation of fluid homeostasis, the authors measured the responses to head-down tilt with and without acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), plasma aldosterone (ALD), and plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured in six healthy male volunteers who were exposed to a head-down tilt protocol during normoxia and hypoxia. The tilt protocol consisted of a 17 degrees head-up phase (30 minutes), a 28 degrees head-down phase (1 hour), and a 17 degrees head-up recovery period (2 hours, with the last hour normoxic in both experiments). Altitude equivalent to 14,828 ft was simulated by having the subjects breathe an inspired gas mixture with 13.9% oxygen. The results indicate that the postural fluid redistribution associated with a 60-minute head-down tilt induces the release of ANP and cGMP during both hypoxia and normoxia. Hypoxia increased cGMP, cAMP, ALD, and PRA throughout the protocol and significantly potentiated the increase in cGMP during head-down tilt. Hypoxia had no overall effect on the release of ANP, but appeared to attenuate the increase with head-down tilt. This study describes the acute effects of hypoxia on the endocrine response during fluid redistribution and suggests that the magnitude, but not the direction, of these changes with posture is affected by hypoxia.

  12. The Effect of Oxandrolone on the Endocrinologic, Inflammatory, and Hypermetabolic Responses During the Acute Phase Postburn

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Suman, Oscar E.; Kulp, Gabriela; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Herndon, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data: Postburn long-term oxandrolone treatment improves hypermetabolism and body composition. The effects of oxandrolone on clinical outcome, body composition, endocrine system, and inflammation during the acute phase postburn in a large prospective randomized single-center trial have not been studied. Methods: Burned children (n = 235) with >40% total body surface area burn were randomized (block randomization 4:1) to receive standard burn care (control, n = 190) or standard burn care plus oxandrolone for at least 7 days (oxandrolone 0.1 mg/kg body weight q.12 hours p.o, n = 45). Clinical parameters, body composition, serum hormones, and cytokine expression profiles were measured throughout acute hospitalization. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test, or ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction with significance accepted at P < 0.05. Results: Demographics and clinical data were similar in both groups. Length of intensive care unit stay was significantly decreased in oxandrolone-treated patients (0.48 ± 0.02 days/% burn) compared with controls (0.56 ± 0.02 days/% burn), (P < 0.05). Control patients lost 8 ± 1% of their lean body mass (LBM), whereas oxandrolone-treated patients had preserved LBM (+9 ± 4%), P < 0.05. Oxandrolone significantly increased serum prealbumin, total protein, testosterone, and AST/ALT, whereas it significantly decreased α2-macroglobulin and complement C3, P < 0.05. Oxandrolone did not adversely affect the endocrine and inflammatory response as we found no significant differences in the hormone panels and cytokine expression profiles. Conclusions: In this large prospective, double-blinded, randomized single-center study, oxandrolone shortened length of acute hospital stay, maintained LBM, improved body composition and hepatic protein synthesis while having no adverse effects on the endocrine axis postburn, but was associated with an increase in AST and ALT. PMID:17717439

  13. Effect of upper airway obstruction in acute stroke on functional outcome at 6 months

    PubMed Central

    Turkington, P; Allgar, V; Bamford, J; Wanklyn, P; Elliott, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether upper airway obstruction occurring within the first 24 hours of stroke onset has an effect on outcome following stroke at 6 months. Traditional definitions used for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are arbitrary and may not apply in the acute stroke setting, so a further aim of the study was to redefine respiratory events and to assess their impact on outcome. Methods: 120 patients with acute stroke underwent a sleep study within 24 hours of onset to determine the severity of upper airway obstruction (respiratory disturbance index, RDI-total study). Stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, SSS) and disability (Barthel score) were also recorded. Each patient was subsequently followed up at 6 months to determine morbidity and mortality. Results: Death was independently associated with SSS (OR (95% CI) 0.92 (0.88 to 0.95), p<0.00001) and RDI-total study (OR (95% CI) 1.07 (1.03 to 1.12), p<0.01). The Barthel index was independently predicted by SSS (p = 0.0001; r = 0.259; 95% CI 0.191 to 0.327) and minimum oxygen saturation during the night (p = 0.037; r = 0.16; 95% CI 0.006 to 0.184). The mean length of the respiratory event most significantly associated with death at 6 months was 15 seconds (sensitivity 0.625, specificity 0.525) using ROC curve analysis. Conclusion: The severity of upper airway obstruction appears to be associated with a worse functional outcome following stroke, increasing the likelihood of death and dependency. Longer respiratory events appear to have a greater effect. These data suggest that long term outcome might be improved by reducing upper airway obstruction in acute stroke. PMID:15115859

  14. Effects of acetorphan, an enkephalinase inhibitor, on experimental and acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Baumer, P; Danquechin Dorval, E; Bertrand, J; Vetel, J M; Schwartz, J C; Lecomte, J M

    1992-01-01

    Acetorphan is an orally active inhibitor of enkephalinase (EC 3.4.24.11) with antidiarrhoeal activity in rodents apparently through protection of endogenous enkephalins and a purely antisecretory mechanism. Its antidiarrhoeal activity in man was assessed in an experimental model of cathartic induced secretory diarrhoea as well as in acute diarrhoea of presumed infectious origin. In six healthy volunteers receiving castor oil and pretreated with acetorphan or placebo in a crossover controlled trial, the drug significantly decreased the number and weight of stools passed during 24 hours. About 200 outpatients with severe acute diarrhoea (more than five stools per day) were included in a randomised double blind study of acetorphan against placebo. The significant antidiarrhoeal activity of acetorphan was established using a variety of criteria: (i) the duration of both diarrhoea and treatment were diminished; (ii) no acetorphan treated patient withdrew from the study whereas five dropped out because of worsening in the placebo group; (iii) the frequency of symptoms associated with diarrhoea--for example, abdominal pain or distension, nausea and anorexia--remaining after two weeks was nearly halved; (iv) using visual analogue scales acetorphan treatment was found more effective than placebo by both investigators and patients. There was statistically no significant difference between acetorphan and placebo in respect of side effects, particularly constipation, which often accompanies the antidiarrhoeal activity of mu opioid receptor agonists this difference is attributable to the lack of antipropulsive activity of acetorphan in man. The efficacy and tolerance of acetorphan suggest that enkephalinase inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the symptomatic management of acute secretory diarrhoea without impairing intestinal transit. PMID:1624154

  15. [Protective effect of rupatadine against oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Li; Lu, Jing; Yu, Shu-Qin; He, Jian-Lin; Zhou, Min; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2007-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) makes up a spectrum of disease that is commonly defined as "acute non-cardiogenic edematous lung injury". It may contribute to morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patient in the intensive care unit. ALI was induced by oleic acid in rabbits. During the experiment, blood samples were taken from cervical artery and subjected to blood-gas analysis at different time points after oleic acid injection. Shortly after the rabbits were killed at 3 hour after iv OA injection, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was colleted, and the concentrations of protein, platelet-activating factor (PAF), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin 8 (IL-8) in BALF were then measured by ELISA. The ratio of wet to dry weight (W/D) of left lung was calculated to assess alveolar edema. Lung tissue was fixed in formaldehyde and stained with HE, and examined under a light microscope. The OA-induced elevation of arterial blood oxygen pressure was inhibited, as well as PAF, ICAM-1, IL-8 in BALF in rupatadine group. Furthermore, rupatadine also decreased the concentration of protein in BALF and inhibited the increase of the W/D weight ratio significantly. Light microscopic findings showed that the damage in rupatadine groups was far less severe than that in OA model group. Pretreatment with rupatadine has a beneficial effect on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rabbits. The ultimate reduction of inflammatory factors was involved, at least in part, in the mechanism of action of rupatadine effects. PMID:17520822

  16. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  17. Acute Effects of Normobaric Hypoxia on Hand-Temperature Responses During and After Local Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Keramidas, Michail E, Roger Kölegård, Igor B. Mekjavic, and Ola Eiken. Acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. High Alt Med Biol. 15:183–191, 2014.—The purpose was to investigate acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after a cold-water hand immersion test. Fifteen males performed two right-hand immersion tests in 8°C water, during which they were inspiring either room air (Fio2: 0.21; AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (Fio2: 0.14; HYPO). The tests were conducted in a counterbalanced order and separated by a 1-hour interval. Throughout the 30-min cold-water immersion (CWI) and the 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) phases, finger-skin temperatures were measured continuously with thermocouple probes; infrared thermography was also employed during the RW phase to map all segments of the hand. During the CWI phase, the average skin temperature (Tavg) of the fingers did not differ between the conditions (AIR: 10.2±0.5°C, HYPO: 10.0±0.5°C; p=0.67). However, Tavg was lower in the HYPO than the AIR RW phase (AIR: 24.5±3.4°C; HYPO: 22.0±3.8°C; p=0.002); a response that was alike in all regions of the immersed hand. Accordingly, present findings suggest that acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia does not aggravate the cold-induced drop in hand temperature of normothermic males. Still, hypoxia markedly impairs the rewarming responses of the hand. PMID:24666109

  18. Impairment of inhibitory control processing related to acute psychotomimetic effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Atakan, Z; Martin-Santos, R; Crippa, J A; Kambeitz, J; Malhi, S; Giampietro, V; Williams, S; Brammer, M; Rubia, K; Collier, D A; McGuire, P K

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use can induce acute psychotic symptoms and increase the risk of schizophrenia. Impairments in inhibitory control and processing are known to occur both under the influence of cannabis and in schizophrenia. Whether cannabis-induced impairment in inhibitory processing is related to the acute induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence is unclear. We investigated the effects of acute oral administration of 10mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, on inhibitory control and regional brain activation during inhibitory processing in humans and examined whether these effects are related to the induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence using a repeated-measures, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subject design. We studied thirty-six healthy, English-speaking, right-handed men with minimal previous exposure to cannabis and other illicit drugs twice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed a response inhibition (Go/No-Go) task. Relative to placebo, delta-9-THC caused transient psychotic symptoms, anxiety, intoxication and sedation, inhibition errors and impaired inhibition efficiency. Severity of psychotic symptoms was directly correlated with inhibition error frequency and inversely with inhibition efficiency under the influence of delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC attenuated left inferior frontal activation which was inversely correlated with the frequency of inhibition errors and severity of psychotic symptoms and positively with inhibition efficiency under its influence. These results provide experimental evidence that impairments in cognitive processes involved in the inhibitory control of thoughts and actions and inferior frontal function under the influence of cannabis may have a role in the emergence of transient psychotic symptoms under its influence. PMID:25532865

  19. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  20. The effects of acute versus chronic health challenges on the behavior of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Szyszka, O; Tolkamp, B J; Edwards, S A; Kyriazakis, I

    2012-12-01

    The changes in behavior associated with a (subclinical) acute and a chronic health challenge were investigated to assess their potential value for the development of an early disease detection system in beef cattle. The hypothesis was that acute challenges would lead to acute but transient changes in behavior, whereas the converse would be the case during chronic challenges, with changes taking longer to develop, but being more persistent. For this purpose, Holstein-Friesian beef bulls were challenged either with a repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenous bolus given at 3 increasing doses over the course of 5 d, or with a single dose of the abomasal parasite Ostertagia ostertagi, acting as models of acute and chronic challenge respectively. A third unchallenged group acted as controls. Fecal and blood samples were taken regularly and analyzed for fecal egg counts (FEC), pepsinogen concentration and LPS antibodies. A sensor was fitted to the front leg of each bull to record activity and posture. Video recordings were taken to monitor drinking and feeding behavior. Antibodies to LPS were detected only after the third LPS challenge. Fecal egg counts were detected 3 wk post infection, and pepsinogen increased roughly at the same time in parasitized bulls. Body weight of parasitized animals was reduced relative to controls after 17 d post infection (P < 0.001), whereas there was no difference in performance between the LPS and control animals (P > 0.05). Effects of LPS on behavior lasted only for a few hours, presenting themselves as reduction in activity approximately 10 h after the first challenge (P = 0.057). The clearest behavioral changes due to parasitism were on posture. Parasitized animals had less frequent (P = 0.003), but longer lying episodes (P = 0.038) than controls. Once established, these changes persisted for 30 d post infection. However, there was no treatment effect on overall activity, measured by the number of steps taken or on total lying time

  1. The Effect of IQ Level on the Degree of Cognitive Deterioration Experienced during Acute Hypoglycemia in Normal Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ann E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Whether IQ level exerts a differential effect on the impairment of cognitive performance induced during acute hypoglycemia was studied for 24 nondiabetic adults. At various levels of hypoglycemia, no overall effect of IQ on deterioration was noted. Higher IQ did not apparently protect against adverse effects. (SLD)

  2. Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Management of Acute Toxicity and Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although several chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) were recently classified as Schedule I substances, rates of use and cases of serious toxic effects remain high. While case reports and media bring attention to severe SC toxicity, daily SC use resulting in dependence and withdrawal is a significant concern that is often overlooked when discussing the risks of these drugs. There is a rich literature on evidence-based approaches to treating substance use disorders associated with most abused drugs, yet little has been published regarding how to best treat symptoms related to SC dependence given its recency as an emerging clinically significant issue. This review provides a background of the pharmacology of SCs, recent findings of adverse effects associated with both acute intoxication and withdrawal as a consequence of daily use, and treatment approaches that have been implemented to address these issues, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapies for managing detoxification. In order to determine prevalence of use in cannabis smokers, a population at high risk for SC use, we obtained data on demographics of SC users, frequency of use, and adverse effects over a 3.5-year period (2012–2015) in the New York City metropolitan area, a region with a recent history of high SC use. While controlled studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of SCs are lacking, it is clear that risks associated with using these drugs pertain not only to the unpredictable and severe nature of acute intoxication but also to the effects of long-term, chronic use. Recent reports in the literature parallel findings from our survey, indicating that there is a subset of people who use SCs daily. Although withdrawal has not been systematically characterized and effective treatments have yet to be elucidated, some symptom relief has been reported with benzodiazepines and the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Given the continued use and abuse of SCs, empirical studies

  3. Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Management of Acute Toxicity and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D

    2016-05-01

    Although several chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) were recently classified as Schedule I substances, rates of use and cases of serious toxic effects remain high. While case reports and media bring attention to severe SC toxicity, daily SC use resulting in dependence and withdrawal is a significant concern that is often overlooked when discussing the risks of these drugs. There is a rich literature on evidence-based approaches to treating substance use disorders associated with most abused drugs, yet little has been published regarding how to best treat symptoms related to SC dependence given its recency as an emerging clinically significant issue. This review provides a background of the pharmacology of SCs, recent findings of adverse effects associated with both acute intoxication and withdrawal as a consequence of daily use, and treatment approaches that have been implemented to address these issues, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapies for managing detoxification. In order to determine prevalence of use in cannabis smokers, a population at high risk for SC use, we obtained data on demographics of SC users, frequency of use, and adverse effects over a 3.5-year period (2012-2015) in the New York City metropolitan area, a region with a recent history of high SC use. While controlled studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of SCs are lacking, it is clear that risks associated with using these drugs pertain not only to the unpredictable and severe nature of acute intoxication but also to the effects of long-term, chronic use. Recent reports in the literature parallel findings from our survey, indicating that there is a subset of people who use SCs daily. Although withdrawal has not been systematically characterized and effective treatments have yet to be elucidated, some symptom relief has been reported with benzodiazepines and the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Given the continued use and abuse of SCs, empirical studies

  4. Acute and chronic pretreatment with essential oil of peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., Lamiaceae) influences drug effects.

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Božin, Biljana

    2012-06-01

    The appearance of common and self-initiative usage of various herbal preparations in everyday practice and life imposes the question of possible interactions with drugs. This survey examined the influence of acute and chronic peppermint oil (PO--Mentha × piperita L., Lamiaceae; prepared as emulsion for oral use) on pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time, analgesic effect of codeine and impairment of motor coordination caused by midazolam in mice. The chemical profile of essential oil was determined by GC-MS. Applied doses of PO were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/kg. Chronic PO intake (in both doses) led to significant decrease of analgesic effect of codeine, while acute intake of PO did not change this effect. Acute PO pretreatment in higher dose caused significant prolongation of pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time, while it was significantly shortened by chronic PO pretreatment at the same dose. Midazolam effect was enhanced and prolonged significantly by chronic PO intake at higher dose, while acute intake of PO did not change this effect. Gut motility was increased only by acute intake of higher PO dose. Regarding the fact that PO produces changes in tested drug effects, the interaction between drugs and phytopreparations containing PO should be additionally followed/confirmed in humans. PMID:22076909

  5. Cost-effectiveness of zinc as adjunct therapy for acute childhood diarrhoea in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Robberstad, Bjarne; Strand, Tor; Black, Robert E.; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the incremental costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of zinc used as adjunct therapy to standard treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea, including dysentery, and to reassess the cost-effectiveness of standard case management with oral rehydration salt (ORS). METHODS: A decision tree was used to model expected clinical outcomes and expected costs under four alternative treatment strategies. The best available epidemiological, clinical and economic evidence was used in the calculations, and the United Republic of Tanzania was the reference setting. Probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Monte-Carlo simulation technique and the potential impacts of uncertainty in single parameters were explored in one-way sensitivity analyses. FINDINGS: ORS was found to be less cost-effective than previously thought. The use of zinc as adjunct therapy significantly improved the cost-effectiveness of standard management of diarrhoea for dysenteric as well as non-dysenteric illness. The results were particularly sensitive to mortality rates in non-dysenteric diarrhoea, but the alternative interventions can be defined as highly cost-effective even in pessimistic scenarios. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to recommend the inclusion of zinc into standard case management of both dysenteric and non-dysenteric acute diarrhoea.A direct transfer of our findings from the United Republic of Tanzania to other settings is not justified, but there are no indications of large geographical differences in the efficacy of zinc. It is therefore plausible that our findings are also applicable to other developing countries. PMID:15500284

  6. Differential effects of naltrexone on cardiac, subjective and behavioural reactions to acute ethanol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jordan B.; Conrod, Patricia; Vassileva, Jasmin; Gianoulakis, Christina; Pihl, Robert O.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Alcohol may have psychomotor stimulant properties during the rising limb of the blood alcohol curve at commonly self-administered doses. Increased heart rate (HR) immediately after alcohol consumption may serve as an indicator or marker of such properties, which appear to be potentially opiate-mediated and dopamine-dependent. Naltrexone, an opiate antagonist, has been used successfully in the treatment of alcoholism and may produce its therapeutic effects through its effects on alcohol metabolism or by blocking alcohol's rewarding effects. We hypothesized that, if naltrexone blocks the psychomotor stimulant properties of ethanol, then it would decrease or eliminate the HR increase associated with acute alcohol intoxication and that this would be independent of any effect on alcohol metabolism. Methods Twenty male subjects were administered placebo and alcohol (1.0 mL 95% USP ethanol/kg body weight) in a laboratory setting on one day and naltrexone (50 mg) and alcohol on another (counterbalanced). We assessed all subjects for a change in HR and for a subjective and behavioural response from 35 to 170 minutes after drug or alcohol administration. Results The placebo and alcohol mix produced a significant mean HR increase from baseline (F1,95 = 46.01, p < 0.0001, Cohen's d = 0.62), while naltrexone and alcohol did not (nonsignificant). The significant effects of naltrexone on blood alcohol level did not account for the effect of naltrexone on alcohol-induced HR change but did account for alterations in subjective and behavioural response to alcohol. Conclusions Naltrexone appears to substantially reduce the HR increase that is characteristic of alcohol intoxication. This finding appears to lend moderate support to the notions that, first, naltrexone has differential effects on alcohol reactions and, second, that it specifically blocks the acute psychomotor stimulant properties of alcohol. PMID:17136216

  7. Predicting the neurobehavioral side effects of dexamethasone in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Warris, Lidewij T; van den Akker, Erica L T; Aarsen, Femke K; Bierings, Marc B; van den Bos, Cor; Tissing, Wim J E; Sassen, Sebastiaan D T; Veening, Margreet A; Zwaan, Christian M; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2016-10-01

    Although dexamethasone is an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can induce a variety of serious neurobehavioral side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity at the tissue level. We therefore prospectively studied whether we could predict the occurrence of these side effects using the very low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST) or by measuring trough levels of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3-16 years of age) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were initially included during the maintenance phase (with dexamethasone) of the Dutch ALL treatment protocol. As a marker of glucocorticoid sensitivity, the salivary very low-dose DST was used. A post-dexamethasone cortisol level <2.0nmol/L was considered a hypersensitive response. The neurobehavioral endpoints consisted of questionnaires regarding psychosocial and sleeping problems administered before and during the course of dexamethasone (6mg/m(2)), and dexamethasone trough levels were measured during dexamethasone treatment. Patients with a hypersensitive response to dexamethasone had more behavioral problems (N=11), sleeping problems, and/or somnolence (N=12) (P<0.05 for all three endpoints). The positive predictive values of the DST for psychosocial problems and sleeping problems were 50% and 30%, respectively. Dexamethasone levels were not associated with neurobehavioral side effects. We conclude that neither the very low-dose DST nor measuring dexamethasone trough levels can accurately predict dexamethasone-induced neurobehavioral side effects. However, patients with glucocorticoid hypersensitivity experienced significantly more symptoms associated with dexamethasone-induced depression. Future studies should elucidate further the mechanisms by which neurobehavioral side effects are influenced by glucocorticoid sensitivity. PMID:27448086

  8. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  9. Acute toxic effects of sustained-release verapamil in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pritza, D R; Bierman, M H; Hammeke, M D

    1991-10-01

    Four hypertensive patients with chronic renal insufficiency or end-stage renal disease who were treated with sustained-release verapamil hydrochloride subsequently developed acute toxic effects. All four patients developed varying degrees of atrioventricular heart block, hypotension, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, and hepatic dysfunction. Supportive treatment consisted of intravenous catecholamines, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, and dialysis, and all patients recovered completely without any residual hepatic or cardiac disease. Patients with renal impairment who are treated with sustained-release verapamil may accumulate verapamil or its metabolites and develop toxic side effects. We conclude that sustained-release verapamil should be used with caution in this patient population and that patients should be closely monitored for adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and hepatic side effects. PMID:1843183

  10. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  11. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  12. Effects of prostaglandins and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors on acutely obstructed kidneys in the dog.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, U; Zwergel, T; Ziegler, M

    1991-01-01

    An intact canine model was developed to study the effects of prostaglandins (PG) and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors on acutely obstructed kidneys. Totally implanted nephrostomy tubes were placed to measure renal pelvic pressure. Complete ureteral obstruction was obtained with a Fogarty balloon catheter inflated in the distal ureter; by this method renal pelvic pressure reached 40-50 mm Hg. Renal pelvic pressure was reduced after intravenous indomethacin and dipyrone administration, whereas blood pressure showed no major changes. Exogenous prostaglandins had both immediate and contrary effects: PGE2 caused a significant decrease, whereas PGF2 alpha caused a significant increase in renal pelvic and blood pressure. The reduced rise in renal pelvic pressure appears to be the main reason for the analgesic effects of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors. The efficiency of these drugs in the treatment of renal colic is supported by this study, that of prostaglandins cannot be proved. PMID:1792708

  13. Acute effects of air pollution changes in schoolchildren: the Gardanne coal basin study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpin, D.; Kleisbauer, J. P.; Fondarai, A.; Francheterre, A.; Fondarai, J.; Graland, B.; Viala, A.

    1988-12-01

    In the literature, studies devoted to shortterm effects of air pollution episodes in children have provided controversial results. To evaluate if acute air pollution changes in the Gardanne coal basin (France) could have deleterious effects on children's pulmonary function, we studied 160 children on two different days. Each in-school examination consisted of a short questionnaire and a spirometric assessment. The area included districts of high and low pollution levels. In the former, the two examinations took place at different air pollution levels whereas, in the latter, the air pollution levels were comparable. We obtained higher spirometric values during the second examination, regardless of air pollution changes and suggesting a learning effect, which vanished when we used FEV1/FVC ratio. The difference in FEV1/FVC between days of low and high pollution was significant but merely equal to 2%. There was no change of clinical symptom score.

  14. The effect of acute stress and long-term corticosteroid administration on plasma metabolites in an urban and desert songbird.

    PubMed

    Davies, Scott; Rodriguez, Natalie S; Sweazea, Karen L; Deviche, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In response to stressful stimuli, animals activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which can result in transition to the "emergency life history stage." A key adaptive characteristic of this life history stage is the mobilization of energy stores. However, few data are available on the metabolic response to acute stress in wild-caught, free-ranging birds. We quantified the effect of acute capture and restraint stress on plasma glucose, free fatty acid, and uric acid in free-ranging Abert's towhees Melozone aberti. Furthermore, birds were caught from urban and desert localities of Phoenix, Arizona, to investigate potential effects of urban versus desert habitats on the corticosterone (CORT) and metabolic response to acute stress. Complementing work on free-ranging birds, captive towhees received CORT-filled Silastic capsules to investigate the response of urban and desert conspecifics to long-term CORT administration. We quantified the effect of CORT administration on baseline plasma glucose and uric acid, liver and pectoralis muscle glycogen stores, kidney phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C, a key gluconeogenic enzyme), and body mass. Acute stress increased plasma CORT and glucose and decreased plasma uric acid but had no effect on plasma free fatty acid. There was no difference between urban and desert localities in body mass, fat scores, and the response to acute stress. CORT administration decreased body mass but had no effect on glucose and uric acid, pectoral muscle glycogen, or kidney PEPCK-C. However, liver glycogen of CORT-treated urban birds increased compared with corresponding controls, whereas glycogen decreased in CORT-treated desert birds. This study suggests that Abert's towhees principally mobilize glucose during acute stress but urban and desert towhees do not differ in their CORT and metabolic response to acute stress or long-term CORT administration. PMID:23303320

  15. Clinical effects of anticoagulant therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction: systematic overview of randomised trials.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R.; MacMahon, S.; Flather, M.; Baigent, C.; Remvig, L.; Mortensen, S.; Appleby, P.; Godwin, J.; Yusuf, S.; Peto, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Most randomised trials of anticoagulant therapy for suspected acute myocardial infarction have been small and, in some, aspirin and fibrinolytic therapy were not used routinely. A systematic overview (meta-analysis) of their results is needed, in particular to assess the clinical effects of adding heparin to aspirin. DESIGN: Computer aided searches, scrutiny of reference lists, and inquiry of investigators and companies were used to identify potentially eligible studies. On central review, 26 studies were found to involve unconfounded randomised comparisons of anticoagulant therapy versus control in suspected acute myocardial infarction. Additional information on study design and outcome was sought by correspondence with study investigators. SUBJECTS: Patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. INTERVENTIONS: No routine aspirin was used among about 5000 patients in 21 trials (including half of one small trial) that assessed heparin alone or heparin plus oral anticoagulants, and aspirin was used routinely among 68,000 patients in six trials (including the other half of one small trial) that assessed the addition of intravenous or high dose subcutaneous heparin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Death, reinfarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, and major bleeds (average follow up of about 10 days). RESULTS: In the absence of aspirin, anticoagulant therapy reduced mortality by 25% (SD 8%; 95% confidence interval 10% to 38%; 2P = 0.002), representing 35 (11) fewer deaths per 1000. There were also 10 (4) fewer strokes per 1000 (2P = 0.01), 19 (5) fewer pulmonary emboli per 1000 (2P < 0.001), and non-significantly fewer reinfarctions, with about 13 (5) extra major bleeds per 1000 (2P = 0.01). Similar sized effects were seen with the different anticoagulant regimens studied. In the presence of aspirin, however, heparin reduced mortality by only 6% (SD 3%; 0% to 10%; 2P = 0.03), representing just 5 (2) fewer deaths per 1000. There were 3 (1.3) fewer

  16. Acute and chronic effects of atmospheric oxygen on the feeding behavior of Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Manoush; Albert, Todd; Pierce, Nicholas; VandenBrooks, John M; Dodge, Tahnee; Harrison, Jon F

    2014-09-01

    All insects studied to date show reduced growth rates in hypoxia. Drosophila melanogaster reared in moderate hypoxia (10 kPa PO2) grow more slowly and form smaller adults, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear, as metabolic rates are not oxygen-limited. It has been shown that individual fruit flies do not grow larger in hyperoxia (40 kPa PO2), but populations of flies evolve larger size. Here we studied the effect of acute and chronic variation in atmospheric PO2 (10, 21, 40 kPa) on feeding behavior of third instar larvae of D.melanogaster to assess whether oxygen effects on growth rate can be explained by effects on feeding behavior. Hypoxic-reared larvae grew and developed more slowly, and hyperoxic-rearing did not affect growth rate, maximal larval mass or developmental time. The effect of acute exposure to varying PO2 on larval bite rates matched the pattern observed for growth rates, with a 22% reduction in 10 kPa PO2 and no effect of 40 kPa PO2. Chronic rearing in hypoxia had few effects on the responses of feeding rates to oxygen, but chronic rearing in hyperoxia caused feeding rates to be strongly oxygen-dependent. Hypoxia produced similar reductions in bite rate and in the volume of tunnels excavated by larvae, supporting bite rate as an index of feeding behavior. Overall, our data show that reductions in feeding rate can explain reduced growth rates in moderate hypoxia for Drosophila, contributing to reduced body size, and that larvae cannot successfully compensate for this level of hypoxia with developmental plasticity. PMID:25008193

  17. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  18. Effects of acute and chronic cocaine administration on titrating-delay matching-to-sample performance.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Branch, Marc N

    2012-03-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the primary dependent measure. After establishing stable performance in pigeons, several behaviorally-effective doses of cocaine were administered acutely. Dose-related within-session decreases in titrated delay values were observed. Following acute determinations, the dose of cocaine that produced the most rapid decline without eliminating performance was administered prior to each daily session. Chronic administration resulted in performance trending toward control levels. A redetermination of the dose-response function following chronic exposure revealed reduced potency (i.e., tolerance) under cocaine on titrated delay matching-to-sample performance. Supplemental analyses suggest that cocaine may serve as a disruptor of the stimulus conditions in which the performance was established. PMID:22389523

  19. Effect of methylsulfonylmethane on paraquat-induced acute lung and liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Bohlooli, Shahab

    2013-10-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a natural organosulfur compound that exhibits antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of MSM on paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung and liver injury in mice. A single dose of PQ (50 mg/kg, i.p.) induced acute lung and liver toxicity. Mice were treated with MSM (500 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 5 days. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized, and lung and liver tissues were collected for histological and biochemical analysis. Tissue samples were used to determine malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels. Blood samples were used to measure plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Histological examination indicated that MSM decreased lung and liver damage caused by PQ. Biochemical results showed that MSM treatment significantly reduced tissue levels of MDA, MPO, and TNF-α, while increased the levels of SOD, CAT, and GSH compared with PQ group. MSM treatment also significantly reduced plasma levels of ALT, GGT, and ALP. These findings suggest that MSM as a natural product attenuates PQ-induced pulmonary and hepatic oxidative injury. PMID:23595869

  20. Effect of copper status on acute toxicity of cocaine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Reddy, P.P.; Seung, S.K.; Combs, G.F.; Dulin, A.M.; Danford, D.E. )

    1989-02-09

    Both copper (Cu) nutriture and cocaine (Coc) ingestion have been shown to affect cardiovascular integrity. Therefore, the purpose of these studies was to determine if Cu status affects the acute toxicity of Coc. 20 weanling male rats (45 {plus minus} 5 g) were randomly assigned to 2 groups, 1 fed a copper deficient (CuD) (<1ppmCu) and the other a copper supplemented (CuS) diet (ca.6ppm, Cu). After 7 wks, the rats, paired for Cu status, were injected (ip) with Coc-HCl at reported LD{sub 50} doses ranging from 80-90 mg/kg bw. The CuD was established by cardiac hypertrophy, depressed hematocrit, lowered serum, liver and heart Cu compared to the CuS controls. The acute toxicity resulted in tachycardia and hyperactivity followed by ataxia with isolated muscle twitchings and violent grand-mal type seizures. For those animals that died, death was apparently due to respiratory arrest followed by ventricular fibrillation; animals that survived were killed by exsanguination. The severity of toxicity was greater for the CuD rats as evidenced by 100% exhibiting seizures compared to 80% for the CuS group. In addition, the incidence of death was 60% for the CuD group compared to 20% for the CuS rats. Although these results suggest that CuD exacerbates the toxic effects of Coc, it is not established that the effects are specific for this essential nutrient.