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Sample records for acute stroke imaging

  1. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain and vascular imaging of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2011-12-01

    Contemporary imaging technologies permit the rapid and accurate assessment of the acute stroke patient. These studies form the underpinning of all therapeutic approaches. Although unenhanced computed tomography remains the principal diagnostic examination to exclude hemorrhagic stroke, multimodal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be use to assess cerebral perfusion and may reveal the ischemic penumbra, thus leading to better patient selection for intravenous or intra-arterial reperfusion strategies.

  5. Advanced imaging in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kilburg, Craig; Scott McNally, J; de Havenon, Adam; Taussky, Philipp; Kalani, M Yashar S; Park, Min S

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation and management of acute ischemic stroke has primarily relied on the use of conventional CT and MRI techniques as well as lumen imaging sequences such as CT angiography (CTA) and MR angiography (MRA). Several newer or less-established imaging modalities, including vessel wall MRI, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, and 4D CTA and MRA, are being developed to complement conventional CT and MRI techniques. Vessel wall MRI provides high-resolution analysis of both extracranial and intracranial vasculature to help identify previously occult lesions or characteristics of lesions that may portend a worse natural history. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can be used in the acute setting as a minimally invasive way of identifying large vessel occlusions or monitoring the response to stroke treatment. It can also be used to assist in the workup for cryptogenic stroke or to diagnose a patent foramen ovale. Four-dimensional CTA and MRA provide a less invasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography to determine the extent of the clot burden and the degree of collateral blood flow in large vessel occlusions. Along with technological advances, these new imaging modalities are improving the diagnosis, workup, and management of acute ischemic stroke- roles that will continue to expand in the future.

  6. Role of perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, N

    2013-03-01

    Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and classification of acute stroke, the triage of patients to different treatment approaches and the prediction of the clinical outcome and the risk of hemorrhagic complications. A multimodal imaging protocol that includes a perfusion study allows diagnostics beyond anatomical findings by enabling the characterization of the ischemic brain tissue and the cerebral hemodynamic state. This information potentially leads to more accurate clinical decision making with the intention to select the right patients for different revascularization therapies regardless of fixed time windows. Perfusion imaging enables the detection and quantification of the irreversibly damaged infarct core and the at-risk penumbra. Parameters derived from perfusion studies can serve as surrogate markers for stroke severity and are independent predictors of the clinical outcome and the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications. The validation and standardization of the perfusion methodology is still ongoing. Currently there is emerging but no high level evidence that perfusion imaging improves the clinical outcome or has a direct impact on the decision to treat the patient with intravenous thrombolytic therapy or intra-arterial interventions. Thus, definite guidelines on the role of the perfusion imaging in the context of acute stroke cannot yet be given.

  7. Imaging in acute ischaemic stroke: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, James; Heran, Manraj K S; McGuinness, Ben; Barber, P Alan

    2017-10-01

    Prompt and accurate diagnosis is the foundation of acute ischaemic stroke care. Multiple positive endovascular thrombectomy trials in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusions have further emphasised this but also added complexity to treatment decisions. CT angiography is now routine for patients who present with an acute stroke syndrome around the world. Members of the neurology and stroke teams (rather than radiologists) are often the first doctors to lay eyes on the CT images and are best equipped to integrate the clinical picture with the imaging findings. A sound understanding of acute stroke imaging is therefore essential for clinicians who work with acute stroke patients. This review describes some pearls we have gleaned from our own experience in acute stroke imaging as well as some potential follies to be avoided. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Imaging biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke trials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harston, G W J; Rane, N; Shaya, G; Thandeswaran, S; Cellerini, M; Sheerin, F; Kennedy, J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke. However, this approach of routinely using imaging biomarkers to inform treatment decisions has yet to be translated into successful randomized trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review the use of imaging biomarkers in randomized controlled trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke, exploring the purposes for which the imaging biomarkers were used. We performed a systematic review of imaging biomarkers used in randomized controlled trials of acute ischemic stroke, in which a therapeutic intervention was trialed within 48 hours of symptom onset. Data bases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, strokecenter.org, and the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (1995-2014). Eighty-four studies met the criteria, of which 49 used imaging to select patients; 31, for subgroup analysis; and 49, as an outcome measure. Imaging biomarkers were broadly used for 8 purposes. There was marked heterogeneity in the definitions and uses of imaging biomarkers and significant publication bias among post hoc analyses. Imaging biomarkers offer the opportunity to refine the trial cohort by minimizing participant variation, to decrease sample size, and to personalize treatment approaches for those who stand to benefit most. However, within imaging modalities, there has been little consistency between stroke trials. Greater effort to prospectively use consistent imaging biomarkers should help improve the development of novel treatment strategies in acute stroke and improve comparison between studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis.

  11. Venous imaging-based biomarkers in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Munuera, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Hernández-Pérez, María; Daunis-I-Estadella, Pepus; Dávalos, Antoni; Liebeskind, David S; Wintermark, Max; Demchuk, Andrew; Menon, Bijoy K; Thomalla, Götz; Nael, Kambiz; Pedraza, Salvador; Puig, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Vascular neuroimaging plays a decisive role in selecting the best therapy in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. However, compared with the arterial system, the role of veins has not been thoroughly studied. In this review, we present the major venous imaging-based biomarkers in ischaemic stroke. First, the presence of hypodense veins in the monophasic CT angiography ipsilateral to the arterial occlusion. Second, the asymmetry of venous drainage in the pathological cerebral hemisphere on CT and MRI dynamic angiography. Finally, the presence of hypodense veins on T2* -based MRI. From the physiological point of view, the venous imaging-based biomarkers would detect the alteration of brain perfusion (flow), as well as the optimisation of extraction oxygen mechanisms (misery perfusion). Several studies have correlated the venous imaging-based biomarkers with grade of collateral circulation, the ischaemic penumbra and clinical functional outcome. Although venous imaging-based biomarkers still have to be validated, growing evidence highlights a potential complementary role in the acute stroke clinical decision-making process. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Imaging of acute stroke prior to treatment: current practice and evolving techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mair, G

    2014-01-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke is undertaken with the aim of diagnosing the underlying cause and excluding stroke mimics. In the presence of ischaemic stroke, imaging is also needed to assess patient suitability for treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. Non-contrast CT is predominantly used, but MRI can also exclude any contraindications to thrombolysis treatment. Advanced stroke imaging such as CT and MR angiography and perfusion imaging are increasingly used in an acute setting. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the application of these advanced techniques in the imaging of acute stroke. PMID:24936980

  13. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap III Imaging Selection and Outcomes in Acute Stroke Reperfusion Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations and Further Research Priorities.

    PubMed

    Warach, Steven J; Luby, Marie; Albers, Gregory W; Bammer, Roland; Bivard, Andrew; Campbell, Bruce C V; Derdeyn, Colin; Heit, Jeremy J; Khatri, Pooja; Lansberg, Maarten G; Liebeskind, David S; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marks, Michael P; Menon, Bijoy K; Muir, Keith W; Parsons, Mark W; Vagal, Achala; Yoo, Albert J; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Baron, Jean-Claude; Fiorella, David J; Furlan, Anthony J; Puig, Josep; Schellinger, Peter D; Wintermark, Max

    2016-05-01

    The Stroke Imaging Research (STIR) group, the Imaging Working Group of StrokeNet, the American Society of Neuroradiology, and the Foundation of the American Society of Neuroradiology sponsored an imaging session and workshop during the Stroke Treatment Academy Industry Roundtable (STAIR) IX on October 5 to 6, 2015 in Washington, DC. The purpose of this roadmap was to focus on the role of imaging in future research and clinical trials. This forum brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration to discuss STIR priorities in the light of an unprecedented series of positive acute stroke endovascular therapy clinical trials. The imaging session summarized and compared the imaging components of the recent positive endovascular trials and proposed opportunities for pooled analyses. The imaging workshop developed consensus recommendations for optimal imaging methods for the acquisition and analysis of core, mismatch, and collaterals across multiple modalities, and also a standardized approach for measuring the final infarct volume in prospective clinical trials. Recent positive acute stroke endovascular clinical trials have demonstrated the added value of neurovascular imaging. The optimal imaging profile for endovascular treatment includes large vessel occlusion, smaller core, good collaterals, and large penumbra. However, equivalent definitions for the imaging profile parameters across modalities are needed, and a standardization effort is warranted, potentially leveraging the pooled data resulting from the recent positive endovascular trials. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Brain Magnetic Resonance with Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Does It Preclude Acute Stroke Diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Aragão Homem, Catarina; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Pinho e Melo, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences and correlative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps is a very sensitive way to detect acute ischemic stroke. Cases of negative MRI-DWI on acute phase of ischemic stroke are uncommon, and most of them are reported in single small-sized lesions, which in most cases are below the technical spatial resolution and in patients imaged shortly after the symptoms start. The few published cases of territorial ischemic stroke with negative DWI affect exclusively one vascular territory. We report the case of an ischemic stroke involving 2 different arteries of the posterior circulation, with a negative DWI/ADC brain MRI 18 hours after time-last-seen-well. We also suggest a possible explanation regarding the mechanism of false-negative diffusion MRI on ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Olivot, Jean Marc; Marks, Michael P

    2008-10-01

    The ability to use physiologic imaging with either magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography to help define irreversibly injured brain (the infarct core) and tissue at risk of infarct (reversible ischemic penumbra) holds great promise in the future treatment of stroke. The physiologic principles and concepts underlying the evaluation for mismatch between injured tissue and tissue at risk are similar for the 2 imaging techniques. Multimodal MR imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging/perfusion-weighted imaging/MR angiography) provides a validated penumbral selection criteria based on the results of 2 clinical trials (diffusion and perfusion imaging evaluation for understanding stroke evolution and echoplanar imaging thrombolysis evaluation). Computed tomographic perfusion parameters have also been calculated to optimize final infarct prediction. Both techniques await further study to prove their capability of selecting cases for short-term recanalization/reperfusion therapy.

  16. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, Hansen et al. proposed a fast kurtosis mapping method and demonstrated it in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, both DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26±13%, P<0.01) and fast DKI methods (23±8%, P<0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R2=0.57, P=0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting. PMID:25208309

  17. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, a fast kurtosis mapping method has been demonstrated in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, the two DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and fast DKI methods (23 ± 8%, P < 0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatches obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R(2) = 0.57, P = 0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting.

  18. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL): design and baseline analysis of an ischemic stroke registry including acute multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Michel, Patrik; Odier, Céline; Rutgers, Matthieu; Reichhart, Marc; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max; Maghraoui, Ali; Faouzi, Mohamed; Croquelois, Alexandre; Ntaios, George

    2010-11-01

    Stroke registries are valuable tools for obtaining information about stroke epidemiology and management. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) prospectively collects epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and multimodal brain imaging data of acute ischemic stroke patients in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV). Here, we provide design and methods used to create ASTRAL and present baseline data of our patients (2003 to 2008). All consecutive patients admitted to CHUV between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2008 with acute ischemic stroke within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in ASTRAL. Patients arriving beyond 24 hours, with transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoidal hemorrhage, or cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, were excluded. Recurrent ischemic strokes were registered as new events. Between 2003 and 2008, 1633 patients and 1742 events were registered in ASTRAL. There was a preponderance of males, even in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke was the most frequent type of stroke. Most strokes were of minor severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤ 4 in 40.8% of patients). Cardioembolic stroke and dissections presented with the most severe clinical picture. There was a significant number of patients with unknown onset stroke, including wake-up stroke (n=568, 33.1%). Median time from last-well time to hospital arrival was 142 minutes for known onset and 759 minutes for unknown-onset stroke. The rate of intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis between 2003 and 2008 increased from 10.8% to 20.8% in patients admitted within 24 hours of last-well time. Acute brain imaging was performed in 1695 patients (97.3%) within 24 hours. In 1358 patients (78%) who underwent acute computed tomography angiography, 717 patients (52.8%) had significant abnormalities. Of the 1068 supratentorial stroke patients who underwent acute perfusion computed tomography (61.3%), focal hypoperfusion

  19. The Role of Vascular Imaging in the Initial Assessment of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Emmad; Al-Ajlan, Fahad S; Najm, Mohamed; Menon, Bijoy K

    2016-04-01

    Over the last few years, improvement in radiological imaging and treatment has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. We have made significant advances in not only the imaging modalities themselves but also in identifying imaging parameters that can help us predict patient outcomes with both intravascular thrombolysis and endovascular thrombectomy. In this review, we describe the added utility of baseline vascular imaging including computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute ischemic stroke. We focus on information these imaging modalities provide on clot characteristics, tissue state, collateral status, and endovascular planning. We also highlight the benefits of newer imaging modalities like dynamic computed tomography angiography (CTA) and multi-phase CTA. Lastly, we also describe some of the disadvantages of vascular imaging in ischemic stroke.

  20. Acute ischemic stroke imaging: a practical approach for diagnosis and triage.

    PubMed

    Young, Joseph Yeen; Schaefer, Pamela Whitney

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a prevalent disease with significant associated morbidity and healthcare costs. There are currently effective intravenous and endovascular therapies that have the potential to improve functional outcome when used in the appropriate patient population. The utilization of various imaging modalities has been shown to be crucial in identifying which patients may benefit from these therapies. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the role that imaging plays in guiding therapeutic decisions in acute ischemic stroke patients is important.

  1. Case Report of False-Negative Diffusion-Weighted Image of Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Lai, Ji-Ching; Chen, Rong-Fu; Hu, Han-Hwa; Pan, Chau-Shiung

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 75 Final Diagnosis: Acute ischemic stroke Symptoms: Dizziness • unsteady gait Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Radiology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in Taiwan. Diffusion-weighted image (DWI) is a sensitive and common strategy used for imaging acute ischemic stroke. Case report: We present a case of a negative DWI MRI for detecting acute ischemic stroke in a clinical setting. A 75-year-old male had a DWI performed after onset of symptoms suggesting acute ischemic stroke. The initial DWI result was negative at 72 hours of presentation. The neurological symptoms of the patient persisted and DWI was repeated. After 14 days, the DWI data confirmed and demonstrated an acute ischemic stroke. The delay in DWI confirmation, from symptom onset until DWI diagnosis, was 336 hours. Conclusions: DWI may not have 100% sensitivity and accuracy in early stages of acute ischemic stroke. The time course to the development of abnormalities detected by DWI may be longer than anticipated. PMID:28111452

  2. Feasibility and Diagnostic Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Ischemic Stroke of Undetermined Origin.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Wollboldt, Christian; Bentheim, Laura Zu; Herm, Juliane; Jäger, Sebastian; Kunze, Claudia; Eberle, Holger-Carsten; Deluigi, Claudia Christina; Bruder, Oliver; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J; Morguet, Andreas J; Jensen, Christoph; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-05-01

    Etiology of acute ischemic stroke remains undetermined (cryptogenic) in about 25% of patients after state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. One-hundred and three patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven acute ischemic stroke of undetermined origin were prospectively enrolled and underwent 3-T cardiac MRI and magnetic resonance angiography of the aortic arch in addition to state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We analyzed the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and added value of cardiovascular MRI (cvMRI) compared with TEE for detecting sources of stroke. Overall, 102 (99.0%) ischemic stroke patients (median 63 years [interquartile range, 53-72], 24% female, median NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score on admission 2 [interquartile range, 1-4]) underwent cvMRI and TEE in hospital; 89 (86.4%) patients completed the cvMRI examination. In 93 cryptogenic stroke patients, a high-risk embolic source was found in 9 (8.7%) patients by cvMRI and in 11 (11.8%) patients by echocardiography, respectively. cvMRI and echocardiography findings were consistent in 80 (86.0%) patients, resulting in a degree of agreement of κ=0.24. In 82 patients with cryptogenic stroke according to routine work-up, including TEE, cvMRI identified stroke etiology in additional 5 (6.1%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement consistent with previous myocardial infarction was found in 13 (14.6%) out of 89 stroke patients completing cvMRI. Only 2 of these 13 patients had known coronary artery disease. Our study demonstrated that cvMRI was feasible in the vast majority of included patients with acute ischemic stroke. The diagnostic information of cvMRI seems to be complementary to TEE but is not replacing echocardiography after acute ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01917955. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Multiparametric, Longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Reveals Acute Injury and Chronic Recovery in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H.; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties. PMID:23940761

  4. Multiparametric, longitudinal optical coherence tomography imaging reveals acute injury and chronic recovery in experimental ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Mandeville, Emiri T; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties.

  5. Multi-Center Prediction of Hemorrhagic Transformation in Acute Ischemic Stroke using Permeability Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Scalzo, Fabien; Alger, Jeffry R.; Hu, Xiao; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Dani, Krishna A.; Muir, Keith W.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Coutts, Shelagh B.; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Liebeskind, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Permeability images derived from magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion images are sensitive to blood-brain barrier derangement of the brain tissue and have been shown to correlate with subsequent development of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke. This paper presents a multi-center retrospective study that evaluates the predictive power in terms of HT of six permeability MRI measures including contrast slope (CS), final contrast (FC), maximum peak bolus concentration (MPB), peak bolus area (PB), relative recirculation (rR), and percentage recovery (%R). Dynamic T2*-weighted perfusion MR images were collected from 263 acute ischemic stroke patients from four medical centers. An essential aspect of this study is to exploit a classifier-based framework to automatically identify predictive patterns in the overall intensity distribution of the permeability maps. The model is based on normalized intensity histograms that are used as input features to the predictive model. Linear and nonlinear predictive models are evaluated using a crossvalidation to measure generalization power on new patients and a comparative analysis is provided for the different types of parameters. Results demonstrate that perfusion imaging in acute ischemic stroke can predict HT with an average accuracy of more than 85% using a predictive model based on a nonlinear regression model. Results also indicate that the permeability feature based on the percentage of recovery performs significantly better than the other features. This novel model may be used to refine treatment decisions in acute stroke. PMID:23587928

  6. Multi-center prediction of hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke using permeability imaging features.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Alger, Jeffry R; Hu, Xiao; Saver, Jeffrey L; Dani, Krishna A; Muir, Keith W; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Liebeskind, David S

    2013-07-01

    Permeability images derived from magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion images are sensitive to blood-brain barrier derangement of the brain tissue and have been shown to correlate with subsequent development of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke. This paper presents a multi-center retrospective study that evaluates the predictive power in terms of HT of six permeability MRI measures including contrast slope (CS), final contrast (FC), maximum peak bolus concentration (MPB), peak bolus area (PB), relative recirculation (rR), and percentage recovery (%R). Dynamic T2*-weighted perfusion MR images were collected from 263 acute ischemic stroke patients from four medical centers. An essential aspect of this study is to exploit a classifier-based framework to automatically identify predictive patterns in the overall intensity distribution of the permeability maps. The model is based on normalized intensity histograms that are used as input features to the predictive model. Linear and nonlinear predictive models are evaluated using a cross-validation to measure generalization power on new patients and a comparative analysis is provided for the different types of parameters. Results demonstrate that perfusion imaging in acute ischemic stroke can predict HT with an average accuracy of more than 85% using a predictive model based on a nonlinear regression model. Results also indicate that the permeability feature based on the percentage of recovery performs significantly better than the other features. This novel model may be used to refine treatment decisions in acute stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chalela, Julio A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Nentwich, Lauren M; Luby, Marie; Butman, John A; Demchuk, Andrew M; Hill, Michael D; Patronas, Nicholas; Latour, Lawrence; Warach, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background Although the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of acute stroke is increasing, this method has not proved more effective than computed tomography (CT) in the emergency setting. We aimed to prospectively compare CT and MRI for emergency diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods We did a single-centre, prospective, blind comparison of non-contrast CT and MRI (with diffusion-weighted and susceptibility weighted images) in a consecutive series of patients referred for emergency assessment of suspected acute stroke. Scans were independently interpreted by four experts, who were unaware of clinical information, MRI-CT pairings, and follow-up imaging. Results 356 patients, 217 of whom had a final clinical diagnosis of acute stroke, were assessed. MRI detected acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic), acute ischaemic stroke, and chronic haemorrhage more frequently than did CT (p<0.0001, for all comparisons). MRI was similar to CT for the detection of acute intracranial haemorrhage. MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 164 of 356 patients (46%; 95% CI 41-51%), compared with CT in 35 of 356 patients (10%; 7-14%). In the subset of patients scanned within 3 h of symptom onset, MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 41 of 90 patients (46%; 35-56%); CT in 6 of 90 (7%; 3-14%). Relative to the final clinical diagnosis, MRI had a sensitivity of 83% (181 of 217; 78-88%) and CT of 26% (56 of 217; 20-32%) for the diagnosis of any acute stroke. Interpretation MRI is better than CT for detection of acute ischaemia, and can detect acute and chronic haemorrhage; therefore it should be the preferred test for accurate diagnosis of patients with suspected acute stroke. Because our patient sample encompassed the range of disease that is likely to be encountered in emergency cases of suspected stroke, our results are directly applicable to clinical practice. PMID:17258669

  8. Prevalence of Imaging Biomarkers to Guide the Planning of Acute Stroke Reperfusion Trials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Ball, Robyn L; Michel, Patrik; Jovin, Tudor; Desai, Manisha; Eskandari, Ashraf; Naqvi, Zack; Wintermark, Max

    2017-06-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used as selection criteria for stroke clinical trials. The goal of our study was to determine the prevalence of commonly studied imaging biomarkers in different time windows after acute ischemic stroke onset to better facilitate the design of stroke clinical trials using such biomarkers for patient selection. This retrospective study included 612 patients admitted with a clinical suspicion of acute ischemic stroke with symptom onset no more than 24 hours before completing baseline imaging. Patients with subacute/chronic/remote infarcts and hemorrhage were excluded from this study. Imaging biomarkers were extracted from baseline imaging, which included a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT), perfusion CT, and CT angiography. The prevalence of dichotomized versions of each of the imaging biomarkers in several time windows (time since symptom onset) was assessed and statistically modeled to assess time dependence (not lack thereof). We created tables showing the prevalence of the imaging biomarkers pertaining to the core, the penumbra and the arterial occlusion for different time windows. All continuous imaging features vary over time. The dichotomized imaging features that vary significantly over time include: noncontrast head computed tomography Alberta Stroke Program Early CT (ASPECT) score and dense artery sign, perfusion CT infarct volume, and CT angiography collateral score and visible clot. The dichotomized imaging features that did not vary significantly over time include the thresholded perfusion CT penumbra volumes. As part of the feasibility analysis in stroke clinical trials, this analysis and the resulting tables can help investigators determine sample size and the number needed to screen. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Computed tomography angiography in acute stroke (revisiting the 4Ps of imaging).

    PubMed

    Varadharajan, Shriram; Saini, Jitender; Acharya, Ullas V; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Imaging in acute stroke has traditionally focussed on the 4Ps-parenchyma, pipes, perfusion, and penumbra-and has increasingly relied upon advanced techniques including magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate such patients. However, as per European Magnetic Resonance Forum estimates, the availability of magnetic resonance imaging scanners for the general population in India (0.5 per million inhabitants) is quite low as compared to Europe (11 per million) and United States (35 per million), with most of them only present in urban cities. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) is more widely available and has reduced scanning duration. Computed tomography angiography of cervical and intracranial vessels is relatively simpler to perform with extended coverage and can provide all pertinent information required in such patients. This imaging review will discuss relevant imaging findings on CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke through illustrated cases.

  10. A Critical Review of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score for Evaluation of Acute Stroke Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Julian; Thomalla, Götz

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of ischemic stroke lesions on computed tomography (CT) or MRI using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is widely used to guide acute stroke treatment. We aimed to review the current evidence on ASPECTS. Originally, the score was developed for standardized lesion assessment on non-contrast CT (NCCT). Early studies described ASPECTS as a predictor of functional outcome and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after iv-thrombolysis with a threshold of ≤7 suggested to identify patients at high risk. Following studies rather pointed toward a linear relationship between ASPECTS and functional outcome. ASPECTS has also been applied to assess perfusion CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS proved to be the best predictor of outcome, outperforming NCCT-ASPECTS in some studies. For DWI-ASPECTS varying thresholds to identify patients at risk for poor outcome were reported. ASPECTS has been used for patient selection in three of the five groundbreaking trials proving efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy published in 2015. ASPECTS values predict functional outcome after thrombectomy. Moreover, treatment effect of thrombectomy appears to depend on ASPECTS values being smaller or not present in low ASPECTS, while patients with ASPECTS 5–10 do clearly benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. However, as patients with low ASPECTS values were excluded from recent trials data on this subgroup is limited. There are several limitations to ASPECTS addressed in a growing number of studies. The score is limited to the anterior circulation, the template is unequally weighed and correlation with lesion volume depends on lesion location. Overall ASPECTS is a useful and easily applicable tool for assessment of prognosis in acute stroke treatment and to help guide acute treatment decisions regardless whether MRI or CT is used. Patients with low ASPECTS values are unlikely to achieve good outcome. However, methodological constraints of

  11. A Critical Review of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score for Evaluation of Acute Stroke Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Julian; Thomalla, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of ischemic stroke lesions on computed tomography (CT) or MRI using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is widely used to guide acute stroke treatment. We aimed to review the current evidence on ASPECTS. Originally, the score was developed for standardized lesion assessment on non-contrast CT (NCCT). Early studies described ASPECTS as a predictor of functional outcome and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after iv-thrombolysis with a threshold of ≤7 suggested to identify patients at high risk. Following studies rather pointed toward a linear relationship between ASPECTS and functional outcome. ASPECTS has also been applied to assess perfusion CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS proved to be the best predictor of outcome, outperforming NCCT-ASPECTS in some studies. For DWI-ASPECTS varying thresholds to identify patients at risk for poor outcome were reported. ASPECTS has been used for patient selection in three of the five groundbreaking trials proving efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy published in 2015. ASPECTS values predict functional outcome after thrombectomy. Moreover, treatment effect of thrombectomy appears to depend on ASPECTS values being smaller or not present in low ASPECTS, while patients with ASPECTS 5-10 do clearly benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. However, as patients with low ASPECTS values were excluded from recent trials data on this subgroup is limited. There are several limitations to ASPECTS addressed in a growing number of studies. The score is limited to the anterior circulation, the template is unequally weighed and correlation with lesion volume depends on lesion location. Overall ASPECTS is a useful and easily applicable tool for assessment of prognosis in acute stroke treatment and to help guide acute treatment decisions regardless whether MRI or CT is used. Patients with low ASPECTS values are unlikely to achieve good outcome. However, methodological constraints of

  12. Reduction of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Contrast of Acute Ischemic Stroke at Short Diffusion Times.

    PubMed

    Baron, Corey Allan; Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Butcher, Kenneth; Emery, Derek; Budde, Matthew; Beaulieu, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of tissue water is a sensitive and specific indicator of acute brain ischemia, where reductions of the diffusion of tissue water are observed acutely in the stroke lesion core. Although these diffusion changes have been long attributed to cell swelling, the precise nature of the biophysical mechanisms remains uncertain. The potential cause of diffusion reductions after stroke was investigated using an advanced DWI technique, oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, that enables much shorter diffusion times and can improve specificity for alterations of structure at the micron level. Diffusion measurements in the white matter lesions of patients with acute ischemic stroke were reduced by only 8% using oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, in contrast to a 37% decrease using standard DWI. Neurite beading has recently been proposed as a mechanism for the diffusion changes after ischemic stroke with some ex vivo evidence. To explore whether beading could cause such differential results, simulations of beaded cylinders and axonal swelling were performed, yielding good agreement with experiment. Short diffusion times result in dramatically reduced diffusion contrast of human stroke. Simulations implicate a combination of neuronal beading and axonal swelling as the key structural changes leading to the reduced apparent diffusion coefficient after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Performed in Acute Perinatal Stroke Reveals Hyperperfusion Associated With Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher G; Dehaes, Mathieu; Gagoski, Borjan A; Grant, P Ellen; Rivkin, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Perfusion-weighted imaging in adults with acute stroke often reveals hypoperfusion in the ischemic core and in a surrounding area of nondiffusion-restricted penumbral tissue. Perinatal stroke is common, but the perfusion pattern is rarely documented. We aimed to describe the perfusion pattern in newborns with perinatal stroke. Neonates with clinical features of acute stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Perfusion data were obtained using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling. Strokes were classified as arterial, venous, or both. Core infarction was determined by the presence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. Perfusion-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging signal in the ischemic area were visually compared with the homologous region in the contralesional hemisphere. Electroencephalogram data were evaluated for seizure activity. In 25 neonates with acute stroke, 8 of 11 (73%) with arterial ischemic stroke demonstrated hyperperfusion, 1 of 9 (11%) with venous stroke, and 4 of 5 (80%) with both. Hypoperfusion was observed in 3 of 9 (33%) with venous and none with arterial ischemic stroke. Perfusion was normal in 4 of 9 (45%) with venous and 1 of 5 (20%) with both. Twenty-one of 24 patients (88%) with electroencephalogram data had either electrographic seizures or focal sharp waves in the ipsilesional hemisphere (11/11 arterial ischemic stroke, 6/9 venous, and 4/5 both). Perfusion-weighted imaging can be obtained in neonates with acute stroke and often reveals hyperperfusion in the infarct core. Penumbra in arterial ischemic stroke is seldom found. Hyperperfusion may be caused by poststroke reperfusion or to neuronal hyperexcitability of stroke-associated seizure. Its identification may be useful for consideration of therapy for acute neonatal stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Artificial neural network prediction of ischemic tissue fate in acute stroke imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2010-09-01

    Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging of acute stroke provides predictive value that can be used to guide stroke therapy. A flexible artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm was developed and applied to predict ischemic tissue fate on three stroke groups: 30-, 60-minute, and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and spin-spin relaxation time constant (T2) were acquired during the acute phase up to 3 hours and again at 24 hours followed by histology. Infarct was predicted on a pixel-by-pixel basis using only acute (30-minute) stroke data. In addition, neighboring pixel information and infarction incidence were also incorporated into the ANN model to improve prediction accuracy. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to quantify prediction accuracy. The major findings were the following: (1) CBF alone poorly predicted the final infarct across three experimental groups; (2) ADC alone adequately predicted the infarct; (3) CBF+ADC improved the prediction accuracy; (4) inclusion of neighboring pixel information and infarction incidence further improved the prediction accuracy; and (5) prediction was more accurate for permanent occlusion, followed by 60- and 30-minute occlusion. The ANN predictive model could thus provide a flexible and objective framework for clinicians to evaluate stroke treatment options on an individual patient basis.

  15. Advanced imaging to extend the therapeutic time window of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Marc; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Reperfusion therapy for acute stroke has evolved from the initial use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 3 hours of symptom onset to more recent guideline-recommended use up to 4.5 hours. In addition, endovascular therapy is increasingly utilized for stroke treatment and is typically initiated up to 8 hours after onset. Recent studies demonstrate that imaging of the ischemic penumbra with diffusion/perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify subgroups of patients who are likely to improve following successful reperfusion (Target Mismatch profile) and others who are at increased risk for hemorrhage and poor clinical outcomes (Malignant profile). New data indicate that stent retriever devices provide better recanalization efficacy and clinical outcomes than the previously available mechanical thrombectomy devices. Going forward, we believe that the use of penumbral imaging with validated MRI techniques, as well as the currently less well-validated computed tomography (CT) perfusion approach, will maximize benefit and reduce the risk of adverse events and poor outcomes when used both early after stroke onset and at later time points. New trials that feature diffusion/perfusion MRI or CT perfusion-based patient selection for treatment with intravenous tPA and or endovascular therapies versus nonreperfused control groups are planned or in progress. We predict that these trials will confirm the hypothesis that penumbral imaging can enhance patient selection and extend the therapeutic time window for acute ischemic stroke.

  16. A National Evaluation of Door-to-Imaging Times among Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients within the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Sauser, Kori; Bravata, Dawn M; Hayward, Rodney A; Levine, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Rapid brain imaging for ischemic stroke is important for patient outcomes. We sought to determine the proportion of ischemic stroke patients receiving brain imaging within the guideline-recommended 24 hours, and predictors of faster imaging among patients with acute symptoms. Retrospective analysis of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Office of Performance Measurement Stroke Special Project data. Of 3000 ischemic stroke patients, secondary samples included 649 presenting within 6 hours of onset, and 217 potentially tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-eligible patients (onset-to-arrival time <3 hours, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale >2). Two linear regression models examined the association between door-to-imaging time and predictors among secondary samples, accounting for clustering within hospital. Of the 3000 ischemic stroke patients, 97.1% had brain imaging within 24 hours. Among patients presenting within 6 hours of onset, median door-to-imaging time was 59 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 33-109). Predictors of faster door-to-imaging time included elevated arrival blood pressure and stroke center presentation. Among the potentially tPA-eligible patients, median door-to-imaging time was 52 minutes (IQR, 31-105); no significant predictors were identified. Nearly all ischemic stroke patients at VHA hospitals have door-to-imaging time within 24 hours. There remains room for improvement for timely brain imaging among patients with acute symptom onset. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of imaging in current acute ischemic stroke workflow for endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Menon, Bijoy K; Campbell, Bruce C V; Levi, Christopher; Goyal, Mayank

    2015-06-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by a thrombus that blocks an intracranial artery. Brain tissue beyond the blocked artery survives for a variable period of time because of blood and nutrients received through tiny vessels called collaterals. Imaging the brain and the vasculature that supplies it is therefore a vital first step in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we focus on current evidence for imaging selection of patients for endovascular therapy in the context of the recently positive clinical trials, such as Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN), Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing Computed Tomography to Recanalization Times (ESCAPE), Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment (SWIFT PRIME), and Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial (EXTEND-IA). We discuss evidence for and use of the various imaging paradigms available. We discuss how to set up quick and efficient imaging protocols for patient selection and address common concerns about the use of imaging, including time spent, contrast, radiation, and other advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we briefly comment on how imaging can integrate itself within various health systems of care in the future, thereby potentially improving patient outcomes further. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Arterial Spin Label Imaging of Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Since acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are fundamentally disruptions of brain hemodynamics, neuroimaging of brain perfusion might be expected to be of clinical utility. Recently, a noncontrast method of measuring CBF using arterial spin labeling (ASL) has become feasible in the clinical setting. It has advantages when compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) bolus contrast perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) that include lack of exposure to gadolinium-based contrast materials, improved quantitation, and decreased sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and motion. Drawbacks of ASL include reduced signal-to-noise (SNR) and high sensitivity to arterial transit delays. While deleterious for quantitative perfusion measurements, the sensitivity of ASL to late arriving blood can be beneficial to visualize collateral flow. This chapter will discuss ASL imaging findings in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke and TIA, focusing on typical appearances, common artifacts, and comparisons with bolus contrast PWI. PMID:21640300

  19. Modern imaging of the infarct core and the ischemic penumbra in acute stroke patients: CT versus MRI.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Fiebach, Jochen B; Wintermark, Max

    2009-04-01

    Thrombolysis has become an approved therapy for acute stroke. However, many stroke patients do not benefit from such treatment, since the presently used criteria are very restrictive, notably with respect to the accepted time window. Even so, a significant rate of intracranial hemorrhage still occurs. Conventional cerebral computed tomography (CT) without contrast has been proposed as a selection tool for acute stroke patients. However, more-modern MRI and CT techniques, referred to as diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-CT, have been introduced, which afford a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients as soon as their emergency admission, with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic and pathophysiological repercussions for the brain parenchyma. The objective of this article is to present the advantages and drawbacks of CT and MRI in the evaluation of acute stroke patients.

  20. Six-minute magnetic resonance imaging protocol for evaluation of acute ischemic stroke: pushing the boundaries.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Khan, Rihan; Choudhary, Gagandeep; Meshksar, Arash; Villablanca, Pablo; Tay, Jennifer; Drake, Kendra; Coull, Bruce M; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-07-01

    If magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to compete with computed tomography for evaluation of patients with acute ischemic stroke, there is a need for further improvements in acquisition speed. Inclusion criteria for this prospective, single institutional study were symptoms of acute ischemic stroke within 24 hours onset, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥3, and absence of MRI contraindications. A combination of echo-planar imaging (EPI) and a parallel acquisition technique were used on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner to accelerate the acquisition time. Image analysis was performed independently by 2 neuroradiologists. A total of 62 patients met inclusion criteria. A repeat MRI scan was performed in 22 patients resulting in a total of 84 MRIs available for analysis. Diagnostic image quality was achieved in 100% of diffusion-weighted imaging, 100% EPI-fluid attenuation inversion recovery imaging, 98% EPI-gradient recalled echo, 90% neck MR angiography and 96% of brain MR angiography, and 94% of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion scans with interobserver agreements (k) ranging from 0.64 to 0.84. Fifty-nine patients (95%) had acute infarction. There was good interobserver agreement for EPI-fluid attenuation inversion recovery imaging findings (k=0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.87) and for detection of mismatch classification using dynamic susceptibility contrast-Tmax (k=0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.94). Thirteen acute intracranial hemorrhages were detected on EPI-gradient recalled echo by both observers. A total of 68 and 72 segmental arterial stenoses were detected on contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the neck and brain with k=0.93, 95% confidence interval, 0.84 to 0.96 and 0.87, 95% confidence interval, 0.80 to 0.90, respectively. A 6-minute multimodal MR protocol with good diagnostic quality is feasible for the evaluation of patients with acute ischemic stroke and can result in significant reduction in scan time rivaling that

  1. External validation of the Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale and M1-BASIS in thrombolyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Leonard L L; Paliwal, Prakash R; Wakerley, Benjamin; Khoo, Chin M; Teoh, Hock L; Ahmad, Aftab; Ting, Eric Y; Seet, Raymond C; Ong, Venetia; Chan, Bernard P; Yohanna, Kusama; Gopinathan, Anil; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Sharma, Vijay K

    2014-10-01

    Radiological findings play an essential role in therapeutic decision making and prognostication in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale (BASIS) and Middle Cerebral Artery-BASIS (M1-BASIS) methodologies are rapid purely radiological instruments and easily applicable for patients with AIS. We validated these methods in patients with AIS treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator. For BASIS, patients were labeled as having major stroke if there was occlusion of distal internal carotid artery, proximal (both M1 and M2 segments) of middle cerebral artery or the basilar artery, or an Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score≤7. M1-BASIS differs from BASIS by classifying AIS patients with M2 occlusion as a minor stroke. We evaluated these classification systems for predicting functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score 0-1) at 3 months. Two hundred sixty-five consecutive AIS patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator were included. On multivariate analysis, younger age (odds ratio, 1.039, 95% confidence interval, 1.009-1.070; P=0.011), lower National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (odds ratio, 1.140; 95% confidence interval, 1.073-1.210; P<0.001), and minor stroke by M1-BASIS (odds ratio, 2.376; 95% confidence interval, 1.047-5.393; P=0.039) were independent predictors of good functional outcome. When compared with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the receiver operating characteristic curves for both BASIS (area under the curve, 0.721) and M1-BASIS (area under the curve, 0.795) correlated well with clinical severity scores. M1-BASIS has an additive effect with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score to predict good outcomes. The purely radiological M1-BASIS correlates well with the clinical severity of stroke and can be a reliable prognostication tool in thrombolyzed AIS patients. This system might find an important place in the current era of telestroke. © 2014

  2. Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Neurological Deterioration in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Minor Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhi; Sun, Wen; Scalzo, Fabien; Xiong, Yunyun; Zhang, Xiaohao; Qiu, Zhongming; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Xu, Gelin; Lu, Guangming; Liebeskind, David S; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    Early neurological deterioration (END) is an important factor associated with worse clinical outcome in minor strokes. Early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can provide better sensitivity to delineate stroke pathophysiology and have diagnostic value associated with causative mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between early MRI finding and the presence of END in minor stroke patients with lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Consecutive MCA minor stroke patients who were admitted to our center within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI within 24 hours of admission. We analyzed baseline characteristics, infarction patterns, and treatment algorithms. The correlation between early MRI findings and END, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score increasing more than 2 points during 72 hours after admission, was also determined. Across 211 patients meeting entry criteria between January 2010 and December 2013, internal border-zone (IBZ) infarcts on early MRI scan were observed in 23 of 65 patients with END (35.4%) and in 18 of 146 patients without END (12.3%, P < .001). Patients with IBZ infarcts were found to have more hyperlipidemia, less perforating artery infarcts, more pial artery infarcts, more cortical border-zone infarcts and more ipsilateral large arterial stenosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that IBZ infarct was independently associated with END after adjustment for other factors (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.74; P = .031). Early MRI patterns of IBZ infarction are associated with END in minor stroke patients with acute infarcts of the MCA territory. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) in the detection of acute stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulipano, P. Karina; Millar, William S.; Imielinska, Celina; Liu, Xin; Rosiene, Joel; D'Ambrosio, Anthony L.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an imaging modality that is used in the management and diagnosis of acute stroke. Common MR imaging techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) are used routinely in the diagnosis of acute infarcts. However, advances in radiology information systems and imaging protocols have led to an overload of image information that can be difficult to manage and time consuming. Automated techniques to assist in the identification of acute ischemic stroke can prove beneficial to 1) the physician by providing a mechanism for early detection and 2) the patient by providing effective stroke therapy at an early stage. We have processed DW images and ADC maps using a novel automated Relative Difference Map (RDM) method that was tailored to the identification and delineation of the stroke region. Results indicate that the technique can delineate regions of acute infarctions on DW images and ADC maps. A formal evaluation of the RDM algorithm was performed by comparing accuracy measurements between 1) expert generated ground truths with the RDM delineated DWI infarcts and 2) RDM delineated DWI infarcts with RDM delineated ADC infarcts. The accuracy measurements indicate that the RDM delineated DWI infarcts are comparable to the expert generated ground truths. The true positive volume fraction value (TPVF), between RDM delineated DWI and ADC infarcts, is nonzero for all cases with an acute infarct while the value for non-acute cases remains zero.

  4. Combining acute diffusion-weighted imaging and mean transmit time lesion volumes with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale Score improves the prediction of acute stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Albert J; Barak, Elizabeth R; Copen, William A; Kamalian, Shahmir; Gharai, Leila Rezai; Pervez, Muhammad A; Schwamm, Lee H; González, R Gilberto; Schaefer, Pamela W

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and mean transit time (MTT) lesion volumes and presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) can identify patients with acute ischemic stroke who will have a high probability of good and poor outcomes. Fifty-four patients with acute ischemic stroke who had MRI within 9 hours of symptom onset and 3-month follow-up with modified Rankin scale were evaluated. Acute DWI and MTT lesion volumes and baseline NIHSS scores were calculated. Clinical outcomes were considered good if the modified Rankin Scale was 0 to 2. The 33 of 54 (61%) patients with good outcomes had significantly smaller DWI lesion volumes (P=0.0001), smaller MTT lesion volumes (P<0.0001), and lower NIHSS scores (P<0.0001) compared with those with poor outcomes. Receiver operating characteristic curves for DWI, MTT, and NIHSS relative to poor outcome had areas under the curve of 0.889, 0.854, and 0.930, respectively, which were not significantly different. DWI and MTT lesion volumes predicted outcome better than mismatch volume or percentage mismatch. All patients with a DWI volume >72 mL (13 of 54) and an NIHSS score >20 (6 of 54) had poor outcomes. All patients with an MTT volume of <47 mL (16 of 54) and an NIHSS score <8 (17 of 54) had good outcomes. Combining clinical and imaging thresholds improved prognostic yield (70%) over clinical (43%) or imaging (54%) thresholds alone (P=0.01). Combining quantitative DWI and MTT with NIHSS predicts good and poor outcomes with high probability and is superior to NIHSS alone.

  5. Identifying the perfusion deficit in acute stroke with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yating; Margulies, Daniel S; Cameron Craddock, R; Long, Xiangyu; Winter, Benjamin; Gierhake, Daniel; Endres, Matthias; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen; Villringer, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Temporal delay in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals may be sensitive to perfusion deficits in acute stroke. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) was added to a standard stroke MRI protocol. We calculated the time delay between the BOLD signal at each voxel and the whole-brain signal using time-lagged correlation and compared the results to mean transit time derived using bolus tracking. In all 11 patients, areas exhibiting significant delay in BOLD signal corresponded to areas of hypoperfusion identified by contrast-based perfusion MRI. Time delay analysis of rsfMRI provides information comparable to that of conventional perfusion MRI without the need for contrast agents. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  6. Systematic review of perfusion imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance in acute ischemic stroke: heterogeneity of acquisition and postprocessing parameters: a translational medicine research collaboration multicentre acute stroke imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dani, Krishna A; Thomas, Ralph G R; Chappell, Francesca M; Shuler, Kirsten; Muir, Keith W; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneity of acquisition and postprocessing parameters for magnetic resonance- and computed tomography-based perfusion imaging in acute stroke may limit comparisons between studies, but the current degree of heterogeneity in the literature has not been precisely defined. We examined articles published before August 30, 2009 that reported perfusion thresholds, average lesion perfusion values, or correlations of perfusion deficit volumes from acute stroke patients <24 hours postictus. We compared acquisition parameters from published studies with guidance from the Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap(1). In addition, we assessed the consistency of postprocessing parameters. Twenty computed tomography perfusion and 49 perfusion-weighted imaging studies were included from 7152 articles. Although certain parameters were reported frequently, consistently, and in line with the Roadmap proposals, we found substantial heterogeneity in other parameters, and there was considerable variation and underreporting of postprocessing methodology. There is substantial scope to increase homogeneity in future studies, eg, through reporting standards.

  7. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    R. Knitter, James; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Yoo, Albert J.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Meyers, Philip M.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S.; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Methods— Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. Results— In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Conclusions— Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. PMID

  8. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Knitter, James R; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C; Schwamm, Lee H; Yoo, Albert J; Marshall, Randolph S; Meyers, Philip M; Yavagal, Dileep R; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2017-03-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. CT Perfusion in Acute Stroke: "Black Holes" on Time-to-Peak Image Maps Indicate Unsalvageable Brain.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Ruairi; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-11-01

    CT perfusion is becoming important in acute stroke imaging to determine optimal patient-management strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive value of time-to-peak image maps and, specifically, a phenomenon coined a "black hole" for assessing infarcted brain tissue at the time of scan. Acute stroke patients were screened for the presence of black holes and their follow-up imaging (noncontrast CT or MR) was reviewed to assess for infarcted brain tissue. Of the 23 patients with signs of acute ischemia on CT perfusion, all had black holes. The black holes corresponded with areas of infarcted brain on follow-up imaging (specificity 100%). Black holes demonstrated significantly lower cerebral blood volumes (P < .001) and cerebral blood flow (P < .001) compared to immediately adjacent tissue. Black holes on time-to-peak image maps represent areas of unsalvageable brain. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Acute Ischemic Stroke: Infarct Core Estimation on CT Angiography Source Images Depends on CT Angiography Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Hakimelahi, Reza; Chaudhry, Zeshan A.; Lev, Michael H.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; González, R. Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether the relationship between acute ischemic infarct size on concurrent computed tomographic (CT) angiography source images and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance images is dependent on the parameters of CT angiography acquisition protocols. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study had institutional review board approval, and all records were HIPAA compliant. Data in 100 patients with anterior-circulation acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion who underwent concurrent CT angiography and DW imaging within 9 hours of symptom onset were analyzed. Measured areas of hyperintensity at acute DW imaging were used as the standard of reference for infarct size. Information regarding lesion volumes and CT angiography protocol parameters was collected for each patient. For analysis, patients were divided into two groups on the basis of CT angiography protocol differences (patients in group 1 were imaged with the older, slower protocol). Intermethod agreement for infarct size was evaluated by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, as well as by using Spearman correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of marked (≥20%) overestimation of infarct size on CT angiography source images. Results: In group 1 (n = 35), median hypoattenuation volumes on CT angiography source images were slightly underestimated compared with DW imaging hyperintensity volumes (33.0 vs 41.6 mL, P = .01; ratio = 0.83), with high correlation (ρ = 0.91). In group 2 (n = 65), median volume on CT angiography source images was much larger than that on DW images (94.8 vs 17.8 mL, P < .0001; ratio = 3.5), with poor correlation (ρ = 0.49). This overestimation on CT angiography source images would have inappropriately excluded from reperfusion therapy 44.4% or 90.3% of patients eligible according to DW imaging criteria on the basis of a 100-mL absolute threshold or a 20% or greater mismatch threshold, respectively

  11. PET imaging of cerebral perfusion and oxygen consumption in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Marchal, G.; Serrati, C.; Rioux, P.; Petit-Taboue, M.C.; Viader, F.; Sayette, V. de la; Doze, F. le; Lonchon, P; Derlon, J.M.; Orgogozo, J.M.; Baron, J.C.

    1993-04-10

    The authors used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relation between combined imaging of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption 5-18 h after first middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and neurological outcome at 2 months. All 18 patients could be classified into three visually defined PET patterns of perfusion and oxygen consumption changes. Pattern 1 suggested extensive irreversible damage and was consistently associated with poor outcome. Pattern 2 suggested continuing ischemia and was associated with variable outcome. Pattern 3 with hyperperfusion and little or no metabolic alteration, was associated with excellent recovery, which suggests that early reperfusion is beneficial. This relation between PET and outcome was highly significant. The results suggest that within 5-18 h of stroke onset, PET is a good predictor of outcome in patterns 1 and 3, for which therapy seems limited. The absence of predictive value for pattern 2 suggests that it is due to a reversible ischemic state that is possibly amenable to therapy. These findings may have important implications for acute MCA stroke management and for patients' selection for therapeutic trials.

  12. Usefulness of cervical magnetic resonance imaging for detecting type A acute aortic dissection with acute stroke symptoms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD) sometimes presents with acute stroke-like symptoms. When intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) therapy is considered for acute ischemic stroke, TAAAD must be excluded. Painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke may be easily missed. Two cases of painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke in which IV-tPA therapy was considered are reported. In these cases, cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful for detecting TAAAD, and IV-tPA therapy was canceled. The mottled high signal ("snowstorm") in the common carotid artery on cervical MRA is specific for TAAAD. We have thus named this phenomenon the "snowstorm sign" and believe it can help diagnose TAAAD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automated prediction of tissue outcome after acute ischemic stroke in computed tomography perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Bennink, Edwin; de Jong, Hugo; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the extent of cerebral damage on admission in patients with acute ischemic stroke could play an important role in treatment decision making. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging can be used to determine the extent of damage. However, clinical application is hindered by differences among vendors and used methodology. As a result, threshold based methods and visual assessment of CTP images has not yet shown to be useful in treatment decision making and predicting clinical outcome. Preliminary results in MR studies have shown the benefit of using supervised classifiers for predicting tissue outcome, but this has not been demonstrated for CTP. We present a novel method for the automatic prediction of tissue outcome by combining multi-parametric CTP images into a tissue outcome probability map. A supervised classification scheme was developed to extract absolute and relative perfusion values from processed CTP images that are summarized by a trained classifier into a likelihood of infarction. Training was performed using follow-up CT scans of 20 acute stroke patients with complete recanalization of the vessel that was occluded on admission. Infarcted regions were annotated by expert neuroradiologists. Multiple classifiers were evaluated in a leave-one-patient-out strategy for their discriminating performance using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) statistics. Results showed that a RandomForest classifier performed optimally with an area under the ROC of 0.90 for discriminating infarct tissue. The obtained results are an improvement over existing thresholding methods and are in line with results found in literature where MR perfusion was used.

  14. Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) Classification and Vascular Territory of Ischemic Stroke Lesions Diagnosed by Diffusion‐Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jong‐Won; Park, Su Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Wook‐Joo; Park, Jung Hyun; Ko, Youngchai; Yang, Mi Hwa; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon‐Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Bae, Hee‐Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between the location and the mechanism of a stroke lesion remains unclear. A diffusion‐weighted imaging study may help resolve this lack of clarity. Methods and Results We studied a consecutive series of 2702 acute ischemic stroke patients whose stroke lesions were confirmed by diffusion‐weighted imaging and who underwent a thorough etiological investigation. The vascular territory in which an ischemic lesion was situated was identified using standard anatomic maps of the dominant arterial territories. Stroke subtype was based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment, or TOAST, classification. Large‐artery atherosclerosis (37.3%) was the most common stroke subtype, and middle cerebral artery (49.6%) was the most frequently involved territory. Large‐artery atherosclerosis was the most common subtype for anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, vertebral, and anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarctions. Small vessel occlusion was the leading subtype in basilar and posterior cerebral artery territories. Cardioembolism was the leading cause in superior cerebellar artery territory. Compared with carotid territory stroke, vertebrobasilar territory stroke was more likely to be caused by small vessel occlusion (21.4% versus 30.1%, P<0.001) and less likely to be caused by cardioembolism (23.2% versus 13.8%, P<0.001). Multiple‐vascular‐territory infarction was frequently caused by cardioembolism (44.2%) in carotid territory and by large‐artery atherosclerosis (52.1%) in vertebrobasilar territory. Conclusions Information on vascular territory of a stroke lesion may be helpful in timely investigation and accurate diagnosis of stroke etiology. PMID:25112556

  15. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  16. Prominent Vessel Sign on Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging in Acute Stroke: Prediction of Infarct Growth and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuen; Chen, Chin-I; Tsai, Fong Y.; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chan, Wing P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Predicting the risk of further infarct growth in stroke patients is critical to therapeutic decision making. We aimed to predict early infarct growth and clinical outcome from prominent vessel sign (PVS) identified on the first susceptibility-weighted image (SWI) after acute stroke. Materials and Methods Twenty-two patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction had diffusion-weighted imaging, SWI, MR angiography, and clinical evaluation using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at 7–60 hours and 5–14 days after stroke onset. Late-stage clinical evaluation at 1 and 3 months used the modified Rankin Scale. The infarct area and growth were scored from 10 (none) to 0 (infarct or growth in all 10 zones) using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) system. Results Infarct growth on the second MRI occurred in 13 of 15 patients with PVS on the first MRI and not in any patient without PVS (n=7; r=0.86, P<0.001). The extent of PVS was significantly correlated with infarct growth (r=0.82, P<0.001) and early-stage outcome (P=0.02). No between-group difference in late-stage clinical outcome was found. Conclusion PVS on the first SWI after acute MCA territory stroke is a useful predictor of early infarct growth. Extensive PVS within the large MCA territory is related to poor early-stage outcome and could be useful for clinical assessment of stroke. PMID:26110628

  17. Prominent vessel sign on susceptibility-weighted imaging in acute stroke: prediction of infarct growth and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuen; Chen, Chin-I; Tsai, Fong Y; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chan, Wing P

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the risk of further infarct growth in stroke patients is critical to therapeutic decision making. We aimed to predict early infarct growth and clinical outcome from prominent vessel sign (PVS) identified on the first susceptibility-weighted image (SWI) after acute stroke. Twenty-two patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction had diffusion-weighted imaging, SWI, MR angiography, and clinical evaluation using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at 7-60 hours and 5-14 days after stroke onset. Late-stage clinical evaluation at 1 and 3 months used the modified Rankin Scale. The infarct area and growth were scored from 10 (none) to 0 (infarct or growth in all 10 zones) using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) system. Infarct growth on the second MRI occurred in 13 of 15 patients with PVS on the first MRI and not in any patient without PVS (n=7; r=0.86, P<0.001). The extent of PVS was significantly correlated with infarct growth (r=0.82, P<0.001) and early-stage outcome (P=0.02). No between-group difference in late-stage clinical outcome was found. PVS on the first SWI after acute MCA territory stroke is a useful predictor of early infarct growth. Extensive PVS within the large MCA territory is related to poor early-stage outcome and could be useful for clinical assessment of stroke.

  18. Real-time ultrasound brain perfusion imaging with analysis of microbubble replenishment in acute MCA stroke.

    PubMed

    Kern, Rolf; Diels, Anna; Pettenpohl, Johanna; Kablau, Micha; Brade, Joachim; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) allows visualization of microbubbles flowing through the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesized that analysis of microbubble tissue replenishment would enable for characterization of perfusion deficits in acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory stroke. Twenty-three patients (mean age 70.2 ± 13.2 years, 9 weeks) were included. Sequential images of bubble replenishment were acquired by transcranial rt-UPI at low mechanical index immediately after microbubble destruction. Different parameters were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs): real-time time to peak (rt-TTP), rise rate (β), and plateau (A) of acoustic intensity, and A × β was used as an index of blood flow. Results were compared with diffusion-weighted and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Parameters of rt-UPI had lower values in ROIs of ischemic as compared with normal tissue (β=0.58 ± 0.40 versus 1.25 ± 0.83; P=0.001; A=1.44 ± 1.75 versus 2.63 ± 2.31; P=0.05; A × β=1.14 ± 2.25 versus 2.98 ± 2.70; P=0.01). Real-time time to peak was delayed in ischemic tissue (11.43 ± 2.67 versus 8.88 ± 1.66 seconds; P<0.001). From the analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves, β and A × β had the largest areas under the curve with optimal cutoff values of β<0.76 and A × β<1.91. We conclude that rt-UPI with analysis of microbubble replenishment correctly identifies ischemic brain tissue in acute MCA stroke.

  19. Imaging of the brain in acute ischaemic stroke: comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barber, P; Hill, M; Eliasziw, M; Demchuk, A; Pexman, J; Hudon, M; Tomanek, A; Frayne, R; Buchan, A; t for

    2005-01-01

    Background and objectives: Controversy exists about the optimal imaging technique in acute stroke. It was hypothesised that CT is comparable with DWI, when both are read systematically using quantitative scoring. Methods: Ischaemic stroke patients who had CT within six hours and DWI within seven hours of onset were included. Five readers used a quantitative scoring system (ASPECTS) to read the baseline (b) and follow up CT and DWI. Use of MRI in acute stroke was also assessed in patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) by prospectively recording reasons for exclusion. Patients were followed clinically at three months. Results: bDWI and bCT were available for 100 consecutive patients (admission median NIHSS = 9). The mean bDWI and bCT ASPECTS were positively related (p<0.001). The level of interrater agreement ranged from good to excellent across all modalities and time periods. Bland–Altman plots showed more variability between bCT and bDWI than at 24 hours. The difference between bCT and bDWI was ⩽2 ASPECTS points. Of bCT scans with ASPECTS 8–10, 81% had DWI ASPECTS 8–10. Patients with bCT ASPECTS of 8–10 were 1.9 times more likely to have a favourable outcome at 90 days than those with a score of 0–7 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.1, p = 0.002). The relative likelihood of favourable outcome with a bDWI ASPECTS 8–10 was 1.4 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.9, p = 0.10). Of patients receiving tPA 45% had contraindications to urgent MRI. Conclusion: The differences between CT and DWI in visualising early infarction are small when using ASPECTS. CT is faster and more accessible than MRI, and therefore is the better neuroimaging modality for the treatment of acute stroke. PMID:16227545

  20. Susceptibility-weighted imaging for cerebral microbleed detection in super-acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qingke; Zhao, Zhenguo; Sui, Haijing; Xie, Xiuhai; Chen, Juan; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Li

    2013-07-01

    Fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) methods may provide more accurate detection of the highly variant time window for successful intravenous (IV) thrombolytic drug treatment (averaging 3 hours) for cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in acute stroke patients. This prospective study applies fast MRI and SWI for examination of 279 prescreened ischemic stroke patients within 12 hours of stroke onset. One hundred and sixty-two (58.1%) of 279 patients were diagnosed with super-acute ischemic stroke with restricted diffusion, hyperintense diffusion-weighted imaging signals, and no ischemic change in T2-weighted imaging, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, or T1-weighted imaging signals. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator IV thrombolysis was administered to 113 (69.75%) patients (thrombolysis group). All patients underwent regular sequence MRI and SWI follow-up. Computed tomography and MRI sequence scans revealed hemorrhagic transformations in 13 (11.50%) thrombolysis and four (8.16%) non-thrombolysis group patients. MRI-guided thrombolysis treatment produced no significant differences between the two groups. SWI revealed new CMBs in 46 (40.70%) and nine (18.37%) thrombolysis and non-thrombolysis group patients, respectively. Significantly better National Institutes of Health stroke scale (24 hours) (P<0.05), modified Rankin scale (90 days) (P<0.01), and life quality Barthal index scores were observed in CMB patients (P<0.01). SWI revealed higher CMB incidence and clinical improvement in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator IV thrombolysis-treated super-acute ischemic stroke patients, suggesting that CMBs may indicate vascular re-canalization/reperfusion. Thus, SWI can be applied to extend individual patient windows for thrombolytic treatment beyond general recommendations of treatment within 3 hours, allowing treatment up to 12 hours from stroke onset.

  1. Validating a Predictive Model of Acute Advanced Imaging Biomarkers in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bivard, Andrew; Levi, Christopher; Lin, Longting; Cheng, Xin; Aviv, Richard; Spratt, Neil J; Lou, Min; Kleinig, Tim; O'Brien, Billy; Butcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingfen; Jannes, Jim; Dong, Qiang; Parsons, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Advanced imaging to identify tissue pathophysiology may provide more accurate prognostication than the clinical measures used currently in stroke. This study aimed to derive and validate a predictive model for functional outcome based on acute clinical and advanced imaging measures. A database of prospectively collected sub-4.5 hour patients with ischemic stroke being assessed for thrombolysis from 5 centers who had computed tomographic perfusion and computed tomographic angiography before a treatment decision was assessed. Individual variable cut points were derived from a classification and regression tree analysis. The optimal cut points for each assessment variable were then used in a backward logic regression to predict modified Rankin scale (mRS) score of 0 to 1 and 5 to 6. The variables remaining in the models were then assessed using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Overall, 1519 patients were included in the study, 635 in the derivation cohort and 884 in the validation cohort. The model was highly accurate at predicting mRS score of 0 to 1 in all patients considered for thrombolysis therapy (area under the curve [AUC] 0.91), those who were treated (AUC 0.88) and those with recanalization (AUC 0.89). Next, the model was highly accurate at predicting mRS score of 5 to 6 in all patients considered for thrombolysis therapy (AUC 0.91), those who were treated (0.89) and those with recanalization (AUC 0.91). The odds ratio of thrombolysed patients who met the model criteria achieving mRS score of 0 to 1 was 17.89 (4.59-36.35, P<0.001) and for mRS score of 5 to 6 was 8.23 (2.57-26.97, P<0.001). This study has derived and validated a highly accurate model at predicting patient outcome after ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Can early effective anticoagulation prevent new lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in acute cardioembolic stroke?

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiichi; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Imamura, Eiji; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-09-01

    The timing of warfarin administration for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients with atrial fibrillation (Af) has not been established. We hypothesized that achieving targeted prothrombin time and international normalized ratio (PT-INR) at 2 weeks could prevent AIS patients with Af from developing a new lesion on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). Of consecutively enrolled AIS patients with Af between 2008 and 2011, we selected the patients who were given warfarin within 2 weeks of admission and had DW-MRI and blood test for PT-INR both on admission and at 2 weeks. Warfarin was started as early as possible and heparin was administered until the targeted PT-INR (2.0-3.0 for patients aged <70 years or 1.6-2.6 for those aged ≥70 years) was achieved. One hundred and twenty-three patients were selected, consisting of 88 patients without a new lesion and 35 patients with a new lesion. Patients with a new lesion had a significantly higher median score on National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (11.0 vs. 5.5, P = .0053), a lower rate of achieving targeted PT-INR at 2 weeks (25.7% vs. 48.9%, P = .0190), and a lower median dosage of warfarin at 2 weeks (2.0 mg vs. 2.5 mg, P = .0209) than patients without a new lesion. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that failure to achieve targeted PT-INR (P = .0298) was significantly associated with the occurrence of a new lesion. Our findings suggest that achieving targeted PT-INR at 2 weeks by using warfarin prevents new lesions in AIS patients with Af. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute Ischemic Stroke Therapy Overview.

    PubMed

    Catanese, Luciana; Tarsia, Joseph; Fisher, Marc

    2017-02-03

    The treatment of acute ischemic stroke has undergone dramatic changes recently subsequent to the demonstrated efficacy of intra-arterial (IA) device-based therapy in multiple trials. The selection of patients for both intravenous and IA therapy is based on timely imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and if IA therapy is considered noninvasive, angiography with one of these modalities is necessary to document a large-vessel occlusion amenable for intervention. More advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are available that can be used to identify a small ischemic core and ischemic penumbra, and this information will contribute increasingly in treatment decisions as the therapeutic time window is lengthened. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator remains the mainstay of acute stroke therapy within the initial 4.5 hours after stroke onset, despite the lack of Food and Drug Administration approval in the 3- to 4.5-hour time window. In patients with proximal, large-vessel occlusions, IA device-based treatment should be initiated in patients with small/moderate-sized ischemic cores who can be treated within 6 hours of stroke onset. The organization and implementation of regional stroke care systems will be needed to treat as many eligible patients as expeditiously as possible. Novel treatment paradigms can be envisioned combining neuroprotection with IA device treatment to potentially increase the number of patients who can be treated despite long transport times and to ameliorate the consequences of reperfusion injury. Acute stroke treatment has entered a golden age, and many additional advances can be anticipated. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging for Better Sensitivity to Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, S.J.; Yeom, K.W.; Antonucci, M.U.; Andre, J.B.; Rosenberg, J.; Aksoy, M.; Straka, M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Moseley, M.E.; Zaharchuk, G.; Skare, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parallel imaging facilitates the acquisition of echo-planar images with a reduced TE, enabling the incorporation of an additional image at a later TE. Here we investigated the use of a parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo EPI sequence to improve lesion conspicuity in diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo DWI data were acquired in 50 consecutive patients suspected of stroke at 1.5T. The dual-echo acquisition included 2 EPI for 1 diffusion-preparation period (echo 1 [TE = 48 ms] and echo 2 [TE = 105 ms]). Three neuroradiologists independently reviewed the 2 echoes by using the routine DWI of our institution as a reference. Images were graded on lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence, and image quality. The apparent diffusion coefficient map from echo 1 was used to validate the presence of acute infarction. Relaxivity maps calculated from the 2 echoes were evaluated for potential complementary information. RESULTS Echo 1 and 2 DWIs were rated as better than the reference DWI. While echo 1 had better image quality overall, echo 2 was unanimously favored over both echo 1 and the reference DWI for its high sensitivity in detecting acute infarcts. CONCLUSIONS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo diffusion-weighted EPI is a useful method for evaluating lesions with reduced diffusivity. The long TE of echo 2 produced DWIs that exhibited superior lesion conspicuity compared with images acquired at a shorter TE. Echo 1 provided higher SNR ADC maps for specificity to acute infarction. The relaxivity maps may serve to complement information regarding blood products and mineralization. PMID:24763417

  5. Sensitivity of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging for diagnosing acute ischemic stroke is 97.5%.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Madsen, Mette H; Schmitz, Marie L; Mikkelsen, Irene K; Fisher, Marc; Andersen, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    MRI using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the most sensitive diagnostic imaging modality for early detection of ischemia, but how accurate is it and how much does perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) add to the sensitivity have to be known. In this single-center study, we collected epidemiological, imaging, and outcome data on all patients with stroke undergoing MRI-based treatment with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator at our center from 2004 to 2010. The DWI negative patients were identified, and we calculated the sensitivity and specificity of DWI and additional PWI for diagnosing acute ischemic stroke. We compared DWI positive and negative patients to identify characteristics associated with DWI negativity. Five hundred sixty-nine consecutive patients were treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator on the basis of an acute MRI. A DWI lesion was evident in 518 patients. Forty-seven patients were DWI negative; however, a relevant PWI lesion was found in 33 of these patients. Four stroke mimics were treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator and 1 of these patients had a DWI lesion. Thus, 8% of all patients with stroke were DWI negative. The combination of DWI and PWI resulted in a sensitivity of 97.5% for the ischemic stroke diagnosis. DWI negativity was associated with less severe strokes, location in the posterior circulation, a longer time from onset to scan, and an improved 90-day outcome. The cause of small-vessel disease was more likely to be DWI negative. The combination of DWI and PWI before intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator confirms the diagnosis in 97.5% of all ischemic strokes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Optimising MR perfusion imaging: comparison of different software-based approaches in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schaafs, Lars-Arne; Porter, David; Audebert, Heinrich J; Fiebach, Jochen B; Villringer, Kersten

    2016-11-01

    Perfusion imaging (PI) is susceptible to confounding factors such as motion artefacts as well as delay and dispersion (D/D). We evaluate the influence of different post-processing algorithms on hypoperfusion assessment in PI analysis software packages to improve the clinical accuracy of stroke PI. Fifty patients with acute ischaemic stroke underwent MRI imaging in the first 24 h after onset. Diverging approaches to motion and D/D correction were applied. The calculated MTT and CBF perfusion maps were assessed by volumetry of lesions and tested for agreement with a standard approach and with the final lesion volume (FLV) on day 6 in patients with persisting vessel occlusion. MTT map lesion volumes were significantly smaller throughout the software packages with correction of motion and D/D when compared to the commonly used approach with no correction (p = 0.001-0.022). Volumes on CBF maps did not differ significantly (p = 0.207-0.925). All packages with advanced post-processing algorithms showed a high level of agreement with FLV (ICC = 0.704-0.879). Correction of D/D had a significant influence on estimated lesion volumes and leads to significantly smaller lesion volumes on MTT maps. This may improve patient selection. • Assessment on hypoperfusion using advanced post-processing with correction for motion and D/D. • CBF appears to be more robust regarding differences in post-processing. • Tissue at risk is estimated more accurately by correcting software algorithms. • Advanced post-processing algorithms show a higher agreement with the final lesion volume.

  7. Hospital variation in thrombolysis times among patients with acute ischemic stroke: the contributions of door-to-imaging time and imaging-to-needle time.

    PubMed

    Sauser, Kori; Levine, Deborah A; Nickles, Adrienne V; Reeves, Mathew J

    2014-09-01

    Given the limited time window available for treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in patients with acute ischemic stroke, guidelines recommend door-to-imaging time (DIT) within 25 minutes of hospital arrival and door-to-needle (DTN) time within 60 minutes for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Despite improvements in DITs, DTN times for tPA treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke remain suboptimal. To examine the contributions of DIT and imaging-to-needle (ITN) time to delays in timely delivery of tPA to patients with acute ischemic stroke and to assess between-hospital variation in DTN times. A cohort analysis of 1193 patients having acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tPA between January 2009 and December 2012. Multilevel linear regression models included random effects for 25 Michigan hospitals participating in the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry. The primary outcome was a continuous measure of DTN time, in minutes, from emergency department arrival to thrombolytic delivery. The mean age was 68.1 years, the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 11.0 (interquartile range, 6-17), 51.4% were female, and 37.5% were of nonwhite race/ethnicity.The mean (SD) DTN time was 82.9 (35.4) minutes, the mean (SD) DIT was 22.8 (15.9) minutes, and the mean (SD) ITN time was 60.1 (32.3) minutes. Most patients (68.4%) had DIT within 25 minutes, while 28.7% had DTN time within 60 minutes. Hospital variation accounted for 12.7% of variability in DTN times. Neither annual stroke volume nor primary stroke center designation was a significant predictor of shorter DTN time. Patient factors (age, sex, race/ethnicity, arrival mode, onset-to-arrival time, and stroke severity) explained 15.4% of the between-hospital variation in DTN times. After adjustment for patient-level factors, DIT explained 10.8% of the variation in hospital risk-adjusted DTN times, while ITN time explained 64.6%. Compared with DIT, ITN time is a

  8. Stroke intervention: catheter-based therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    White, Christopher J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Cates, Christopher U; Levy, Elad I; McMullan, Paul W; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Weinberger, Jesse M; Wholey, Mark H

    2011-07-05

    The majority (>80%) of the three-quarters of a million strokes that will occur in the United States this year are ischemic in nature. The treatment of acute ischemic stroke is very similar to acute myocardial infarction, which requires timely reperfusion therapy for optimal results. The majority of patients with acute ischemic stroke do not receive any form of reperfusion therapy, unlike patients with acute myocardial infarction. Improving outcomes for acute stroke will require patient education to encourage early presentation, an aggressive expansion of qualified hospitals, and willing providers and early imaging strategies to match patients with their best options for reperfusion therapy to minimize complications. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical outcome and imaging follow-up in acute stroke patients with normal perfusion CT and normal CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Bernd; Küsel, Tobias; Leppien, Andreas; Michels, Peter; Müller-Jensen, Axel; Fiehler, Jens

    2011-02-01

    Acute stroke multimodal CT imaging (MMCT: non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion (CTP)) may show normal results despite persistent clinical stroke. We prospectively evaluated the sensitivity/specificity of MMCT infarct detection and the clinical outcome in patients with normal MMCT findings. From April 2007 to April 2008, all patients with acute hemispheric stroke within 6 h of symptom onset who underwent complete MMCT and MRI follow-up imaging were included. MMCT analysis included occlusion type, early infarct hypodensities (EIH), mean transit time (MTT), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps according to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). Clinical assessment included symptom onset to CT scan (≤3 h/>3 h), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score (admission/discharge), and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) 90 days after stroke onset. One hundred seven were included (mean age, 68.4 years; ≤3 h, n = 84; >3 h, n = 23; intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), n = 51; ≤3 h, n = 40; >3 h, n = 11). In patients with normal MMCT on admission (n = 54), follow-up MRT detected brain infarctions in 23 patients (lacunar strokes, n = 16; infratentorial strokes, n = 4; territorial infarction, n = 3). Sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value of any infarct detection was 69.5%/99.8%/99.9%/57.2% and of a any territorial infarct detection was 93.9%/99.9%/99.9%/93.6%, respectively. In univariate regression analysis (time to CT scan, ≤3 h/>3 h; IVT: yes/no; ASPECTS EIH/CBV/MTT, 10/<10), only the evidence of normal CTP (ASPECTS MTT = 10) had a statistically significant impact (p = 0.02) on a good outcome (mRS 0.1). MMCT sensitivity in acute lacunar or infratentorial stroke was poor. But, we found a high specifity and a fairly good sensitivity in territorial infarct detection. In acute stroke patients with normal MMCT findings on admission, a good clinical prognosis can be

  10. Motor network changes associated with successful motor skill relearning after acute ischemic stroke: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Askim, Torunn; Indredavik, Bent; Vangberg, Torgil; Håberg, Asta

    2009-01-01

    . Motor learning mechanisms may be operative in stroke recovery and possibly reinforced by rehabilitative training. . To assess early motor network changes after acute ischemic stroke in patients treated with very early mobilization and task-oriented physical therapy in a comprehensive stroke unit, to investigate the association between neuronal activity and improvements in hand function, and to qualitatively explore the changes in neuronal activity in relation to motor learning. . Patients were assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging and by clinical tests within the first week after stroke and 3 months later. After discharge, all participants were offered functional training of the affected arm according to individual needs. . A total of 359 patients were screened, with 12 patients experiencing first-ever stroke, excluding primary sensorimotor cortex (MISI), with severe to moderately impaired hand function fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Laterality indexes (LIs) for MISI increase significantly during follow-up. There is increased cerebellar and striatal activation acutely, replaced by increased activation of ipsilesional MISI in the chronic phase. Bilateral somatosensory association areas and contralesional secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) area are also more active in the chronic phase. Activation of the latter region also correlates positively with improved hand function. . Restoration of hand function is associated with highly lateralized MISI. Activity in bilateral somatosensory association area and contralesional SII may represent cortical plasticity involved in successful motor recovery. The changes in motor activity between acute and chronic phases seem to correspond to a motor learning process.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Mild Symptoms: An Opportunity to Standardize Intravenous Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tyler A; Luby, Marie; Shah, Jignesh; Giannakidis, Dimitrios; Latour, Lawrence L

    2015-08-01

    Patients presenting with mild stroke symptoms are excluded inconsistently from intravenous (IV) thrombolysis. We aimed to compare acute magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with mild symptoms to those with more severe deficits to identify clinically mild patients who might benefit from IV thrombolysis. We retrospectively studied consecutive stroke patients presenting with perfusion deficit who underwent time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography within 24 hours of time last seen normal. Two raters measured the lesion volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) with mismatch (MM) calculated as PWI minus DWI. Occlusion site was categorized as "proximal," "distal," or "magnetic resonance angiography-negative" by consensus review. Stroke with mild symptoms was defined as admit National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 4 or less. Values were reported as n (%). Ninety-one patients were included; 56 (61.5%) with nonmild and 35 (38.5%) with mild symptoms. After stratifying for occlusion site, there were no differences in PWI and MM lesion volumes for the nonmild versus mild patients (P = .34-.98 and P = .54-1, respectively). Furthermore, there was a trend for thrombolyzed mild stroke patients (88%, n = 7 of 8) to more likely have a favorable clinical outcome (discharge modified Rankin score ≤ 2) versus untreated patients (70%, n = 16 of 23). When present, conspicuous vessel occlusions in clinically mild stroke patients are concomitant with similar perfusion deficit and MM volumes in more clinically severe stroke patients. Coupled with a trend toward better outcomes in mild stroke patients who were treated with IV tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), this could indicate that advanced imaging may be used in standardizing the way these patients are selected for IV t-PA therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Naftidrofuryl for acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Leonardi-Bee, J; Steiner, T; Bath-Hextall, F

    2007-04-18

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death and the most common cause of disability in the western world. The development of drugs to limit the effects of brain damage caused by stroke continues but no routine effective treatment has yet been identified. Naftidrofuryl has been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of acute stroke in some studies, but it is unclear whether all of the evidence supports these findings. To assess the effects of naftidrofuryl in the acute phase of stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2006); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2006); MEDLINE (1966 to July 2006); EMBASE (1980 to July 2006); Science Citation Index (1981 to July 2006); National Research Register (July 2006); LILACS Database (1982 to July 2006); metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (July 2006); SUMsearch (July 2006). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing studies we searched reference lists, handsearched conference proceedings and contacted pharmaceutical companies and authors of relevant articles. We included patients with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke clinically diagnosed by a medical practitioner with or without a computerised tomography (CT) scan. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data using data extraction forms or, if available, re-analysed individual patient data. Six trials involving 1274 participants were included. We found no significant benefits of naftidrofuryl compared with placebo in reducing the risks of mortality (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.36, six studies) or combined death or dependency/disability (pooled OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.16, three studies). Pooled results showed naftidrofuryl had no significant effect on

  13. Clinical Deterioration and Early Imaging Changes after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Chou, Claudia; Bourekas, Eric C; Slivka, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Clinical worsening is a known complication following acute ischemic stroke. This study attempted to determine the mechanism of deterioration by correlating clinical findings with changes on computed tomography or magnetic resonance. From a single university medical center, 30 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients who received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 3 hours of symptom onset during a 3-year period were identified from a quality database that included all hospitalized patients either admitted with strokes or with in-hospital strokes. Images were reviewed by a single neuroradiologist for changes including edema, extension of infarct, hemorrhage, herniation, and midline shift and were correlated to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores obtained from data in the medical chart. Ten patients had documented clinical deterioration with a corresponding increase in the NIHSS score. Of these, 4 patients had follow-up scans that showed worsening changes concurrent with deterioration. In the 20 patients who remained clinically stable, 3 patients had worsening changes on follow-up scans. Patients who deteriorated were no more likely to have imaging changes than those who had a stable clinical course. Appearance of herniation, both subfalcine and uncal, was the only specific imaging change associated with clinical deterioration. This study demonstrates that processes besides hemorrhage, including edema, midline shift, herniation, extension of infarct, and new infarct, are neither frequent nor specific for predicting clinical course. Other factors associated with these processes that may or may not be quantifiable on imaging are likely involved. Furthermore, in over half of the cases of worsening, deterioration occurs without associated imaging, metabolic, or infectious etiologies. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravenous and Arterial Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Indications and the Role of Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Haris; Sheth, Sunil A

    2017-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke continues to be a leading cause of disability in adults and the fifth leading cause of mortality worldwide. In the past few years, acute ischemic stroke diagnosis and management has advanced by leaps and bounds, with the lengthening of the time window for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and the establishment of endovascular stroke therapy. As a result of these changes, the focus today has shifted from proving efficacy to expanding indications and identifying all patients who may benefit from these therapies. In this pursuit, neuroimaging will continue to play a pivotal role, by shifting treatment paradigms from time-based to tissue-based. The quest to accurately determine the volume and function of salvageable brain has never been more important than now.

  15. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  16. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  17. Distinctive Patterns of Three-Dimensional Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Naoto; Okada, Kazunori; Yamagata, Shingo; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic penumbra in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can be evaluated using arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used three-dimensional ASL-MRI to examine patients with different stroke subtypes and the clinical utility of the method within 24 hours of AIS onset. The 55 male and 48 female patients (mean age, 79.0 years) underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and pulsed continuous ASL perfusion imaging to determine stroke subtype, hypoperfused ASL area, and neurological deficit severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale). Arterial transit artifacts, indicative of occlusive regions or collateral flow, and other stroke indices were compared. ASL hypoperfusion was detected in 3 of 9 patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), 2 of 27 patients with lacunar infarction (LI), 19 of 31 patients with atherothrombotic infarction (AT), and 30 of 36 patients with cardiogenic embolic infarction (CE). ASL abnormalities were significantly less frequent in LI than in AT and CE, and more frequent in CE than in TIA. ASL abnormalities were more prevalent in patients with medium-to-large DWI-assessed lesions than in those with small lesions on DWI. Patients with medium-sized lesions following AT and CE had a high frequency of diffusion-perfusion mismatch. In 4 of the 5 patients who underwent intravenous thrombolytic therapy, ASL hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch were improved and the occluded arteries were recanalized. ASL perfusion studies may provide useful clinical information allowing diffusion-perfusion mismatch detection and treatment selection in AIS patients, depending on stroke subtype. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging in Endovascular Stroke Trials

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Konark; Liebeskind, David S

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Various endovascular trials have addressed clinical outcomes without elucidating the impact of imaging studies in patient selection. The success of recent endovascular trials was bolstered by the use of advanced imaging techniques for optimal selection of reperfusion candidates. This seminal juncture in the history of stroke trials warrants further consideration on the use of imaging to guide future refinements in the treatment of acute stroke. In this article, we systematically review the imaging methodology and key facets used in all published endovascular stroke trials to date, discuss the success of recent trials using latest advanced imaging techniques and focus on the importance of imaging studies for future patient selection. PMID:26179500

  19. Early magnetic resonance imaging prediction of arterial recanalization and late infarct volume in acute carotid artery stroke.

    PubMed

    Hermier, Marc; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Adeleine, Patrice; Berthezène, Yves; Derex, Laurent; Yilmaz, Hasan; Dugor, Jean-François; Dardel, Pascal; Cotton, François; Philippeau, Frédéric; Trouillas, Paul; Froment, Jean-Claude

    2003-02-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke, early recanalization may save tissue at risk for ischemic infarction, thus resulting in smaller infarcts and better clinical outcome. The hypothesis that clinical and diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging (DWI, PWI) parameters may have a predictive value for early recanalization and final infarct size was assessed. Twenty-nine patients were prospectively enrolled and underwent sequential magnetic resonance imaging (1) within 6 hours from hemispheric stroke onset, before thrombolytic therapy; (2) at day 1; and (3) at day 60. Late infarct volume was assessed by T2 -weighted imaging. At each time, clinical status was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Twenty-eight patients had arterial occlusion at day 0 magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). They were classified into two groups according to day 1 MRA: recanalization (n = 18) versus persistent occlusion (n = 10). Any significant differences between these groups were assessed regarding (1) PWI and DWI abnormality volumes, (2) relative and absolute time-to-peak (TTP) and apparent diffusion coefficient within the lesion on DWI; and (3) day 60 lesion volume on T2 -weighted imaging. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the most powerful predictive factors for recanalization were lower baseline NIHSS score and lower baseline absolute TTP within the lesion on DWI. The best predictors of late infarct size were day 0 lesion volume on DWI and day 1 recanalization. Early PWI and DWI studies and day 1 MRA provide relevant predictive information on stroke outcome.

  20. Multiple spin-echo spectroscopic imaging for rapid quantitative assessment of N-acetylaspartate and lactate in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Astrid; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Singer, Oliver C; Neumann-Haefelin, Claudia; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    Monitoring the signal levels of lactate (Lac) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) by chemical shift imaging can provide additional knowledge about tissue damage in acute stroke. Despite the need for this metabolic information, spectroscopic imaging (SI) has not been used routinely for acute stroke patients, mainly due to the long acquisition time required. The presented data demonstrate that the application of a fast multiple spin-echo (MSE) SI sequence can reduce the measurement time to 6 min (four spin echoes per echo train, 32 x 32 matrix). Quantification of Lac and NAA in terms of absolute concentrations (i.e., mmol/l) can be achieved by means of the phantom replacement approach, with correction terms for the longitudinal and transversal relaxation adapted to the multiple spin-echo sequence. In this pilot study of 10 stroke patients (symptom onset < 24 hr), metabolite concentrations obtained from MSE-SI add important information regarding tissue viability that is not provided by other sequences (e.g., diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)). Metabolic changes extended beyond the borders of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) lesion in nine of the 10 patients, showing a rise in Lac concentrations up to 18 mmol/l, while NAA levels sometimes dropped below the detection level. Considerable differences among the patients in terms of the Lac concentrations and the size of the SI-ADC mismatch were observed.

  1. Developing Precision Stroke Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Edward; Liebeskind, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke experts stand at the cusp of a unique opportunity to advance the care of patients with cerebrovascular disorders across the globe through improved imaging approaches. NIH initiatives including the Stroke Progress Review Group promotion of imaging in stroke research and the newly established NINDS Stroke Trials network converge with the rapidly evolving concept of precision medicine. Precision stroke imaging portends the coming shift to individualized approaches to cerebrovascular disorders where big data may be leveraged to identify and manage stroke risk with specific treatments utilizing an improved neuroimaging infrastructure, data collection, and analysis. We outline key aspects of the stroke imaging field where precision medicine may rapidly transform the care of stroke patients in the next few years. PMID:24715885

  2. Clinical relevance and practical implications of trials of perfusion and angiographic imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke: a multicentre cohort imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Muir, Keith W; Macleod, Mary-Joan; Weir, Christopher; McVerry, Ferghal; Carpenter, Trevor; Shuler, Kirsten; Thomas, Ralph; Acheampong, Paul; Dani, Krishna; Murray, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background In randomised trials testing treatments for acute ischaemic stroke, imaging markers of tissue reperfusion and arterial recanalisation may provide early response indicators. Objective To determine the predictive value of structural, perfusion and angiographic imaging for early and late clinical outcomes and assess practicalities in three comprehensive stroke centres. Methods We recruited patients with potentially disabling stroke in three stroke centres, performed magnetic resonance (MR) or CT, including perfusion and angiography imaging, within 6 h, at 72 h and 1 month after stroke. We assessed the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score serially and functional outcome at 3 months, tested associations between clinical variables and structural imaging, several perfusion parameters and angiography. Results Among 83 patients, median age 71 (maximum 89), median NIHSS 7 (range 1–30), 38 (46%) received alteplase, 41 (49%) had died or were dependent at 3 months. Most baseline imaging was CT (76%); follow-up was MR (79%) despite both being available acutely. At presentation, perfusion lesion size varied considerably between parameters (p<0.0001); 40 (48%) had arterial occlusion. Arterial occlusion and baseline perfusion lesion extent were both associated with baseline NIHSS (p<0.0001). Recanalisation by 72 h was associated with 1 month NIHSS (p=0.0007) and 3 month functional outcome (p=0.048), whereas tissue reperfusion, using even the best perfusion parameter, was not (p=0.11, p=0.08, respectively). Conclusion Early recanalisation on angiography appeared to predict clinical outcome more directly than did tissue reperfusion. Acute assessment with CT and follow-up with MR was practical and feasible, did not preclude image analysis, and would enhance trial recruitment and generalisability of results. PMID:23644501

  3. Sex and acute stroke presentation.

    PubMed

    Labiche, Lise A; Chan, Wenyaw; Saldin, Kamaldeen R; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2002-11-01

    We determine whether a sex difference exists for acute stroke emergency department presentation. The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project is a prospective observational study of acute stroke management that identified 1,189 validated strokes in nonurban community EDs from February 1998 to March 2000. Structured interview of the patient and the person with the patient at symptom onset identified the symptom or symptoms that prompted the patient to seek medical attention. Interview data were available for 1,124 (94%) patients. A physician blinded to sex classified the reported symptoms into 14 categories. Nontraditional stroke symptoms were reported by 28% of women and 19% of men (odds ratio 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 2.2). Nontraditional stroke symptoms, pain (men 8%, women 12%) and change in level of consciousness (men 12%, women 17%), were more often reported by women. Traditional stroke symptoms, imbalance (men 20%, women 15%) and hemiparesis (men 24%, women 19%), were reported more frequently by men. Trends were also found for women to present with nonneurologic symptoms (men 17%, women 21%) and men to present with gait abnormalities (men 11%, women 8%). There was no sex difference in the mean number of symptoms reported by an individual patient. This study suggests that a sex difference exists in reporting of acute stroke symptoms. Women with validated strokes present more frequently with nontraditional stroke symptoms than men. Recognition of this difference might yield faster evaluation and management of female patients with acute stroke eligible for acute therapies.

  4. Detectability improvement of early sign of acute stroke on brain CT images using an adaptive partial smoothing filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongbum; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    Detection of early infarct signs on non-enhanced CT is mandatory in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We present a method for improving the detectability of early infarct signs of acute ischemic stroke. This approach is considered as the first step for computer-aided diagnosis in acute ischemic stroke. Obscuration of the gray-white matter interface at the lentiform nucleus or the insular ribbon has been an important early infarct sign, which affects decisions on thrombolytic therapy. However, its detection is difficult, since the early infarct sign is subtle hypoattenuation. In order to improve the detectability of the early infarct sign, an image processing being able to reduce local noise with edges preserved is desirable. To cope with this issue, we devised an adaptive partial smoothing filter (APSF). Because the APSF can markedly improve the visibility of the normal gray-white matter interface, the detection of conspicuity of obscuration of gray-white matter interface due to hypoattenuation could be increased. The APSF is a specifically designed filter used to perform local smoothing using a variable filter size determined by the distribution of pixel values of edges in the region of interest. By adjusting four parameters of the APSF, an optimal condition for image enhancement can be obtained. In order to determine a major one of the parameters, preliminary simulation was performed by using composite images simulated the gray-white matter. The APSF based on preliminary simulation was applied to several clinical CT scans in hyperacute stroke patients. The results showed that the detectability of early infarct signs is much improved.

  5. Prediction of hemorrhagic transformation following acute stroke: role of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tong, D C; Adami, A; Moseley, M E; Marks, M P

    2001-04-01

    Acute diffusion-weighted (DWI) and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings may correlate with secondary hemorrhagic transformation (HT) risk in patients with stroke. This information could be of value, particularly in individuals being considered for thrombolytic therapy. To determine the relationship between DWI and PWI findings and the risk of secondary HT in patients with acute stroke. Retrospective case series. Academic medical center. Twenty-seven patients with acute stroke capable of being evaluated with DWI/PWI 8 hours or less after symptom onset. Apparent diffusion coefficient values, perfusion delay measurements, and subsequent MRI or computed tomographic scans detected HT. The mean +/- SD apparent diffusion coefficient of ischemic regions that experienced HT was significantly lower than the overall mean +/- SD apparent diffusion coefficient of all ischemic areas analyzed (0.510 +/- 0.140 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s vs 623 +/- 0.113 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s; P =.004). This difference remained significant when comparing the HT-destined ischemic areas with the non-HT-destined areas within the same ischemic lesion (P =.02). Patients receiving recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) experienced HT significantly earlier than patients not receiving rt-PA (P =.002). Moreover, a persistent perfusion deficit in the area of subsequent hemorrhage at 3 to 6 hours after the initial MRI scan was identified in significantly more patients who experienced HT than in those who did not (83% vs 30%; P =.03). Both DWI and PWI scans detect abnormalities that are associated with HT. These findings support a role for MRI in identifying patients who are at increased risk for secondary HT following acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Multiparametric MRI and CT models of infarct core and favorable penumbral imaging patterns in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Chelsea S; Wintermark, Max; De Silva, Deidre A; Schaewe, Timothy J; Jahan, Reza; Starkman, Sidney; Jovin, Tudor; Hom, Jason; Jumaa, Mouhammad; Schreier, Jeffrie; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Liebeskind, David S; Alger, Jeffry R; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Objective imaging methods to identify optimal candidates for late recanalization therapies are needed. The study goals were (1) to develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) multiparametric, voxel-based predictive models of infarct core and penumbra in acute ischemic stroke patients, and (2) to develop patient-level imaging criteria for favorable penumbral pattern based on good clinical outcome in response to successful recanalization. An analysis of imaging and clinical data was performed on 2 cohorts of patients (one screened with CT, the other with MRI) who underwent successful treatment for large vessel, anterior circulation stroke. Subjects were divided 2:1 into derivation and validation cohorts. Pretreatment imaging parameters independently predicting final tissue infarct and final clinical outcome were identified. The MRI and CT models were developed and validated from 34 and 32 patients, using 943 320 and 1 236 917 voxels, respectively. The derivation MRI and 2-branch CT models had an overall accuracy of 74% and 80%, respectively, and were independently validated with an accuracy of 71% and 79%, respectively. The imaging criteria of (1) predicted infarct core ≤90 mL and (2) ratio of predicted infarct tissue within the at-risk region ≤70% identified patients as having a favorable penumbral pattern with 78% to 100% accuracy. Multiparametric voxel-based MRI and CT models were developed to predict the extent of infarct core and overall penumbral pattern status in patients with acute ischemic stroke who may be candidates for late recanalization therapies. These models provide an alternative approach to mismatch in predicting ultimate tissue fate.

  7. Current concepts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion-diffusion assessment in acute ischaemic stroke: a review & an update for the clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Lopez-Mejia, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several medical societies published joint statements about imaging recommendations for acute stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients. In following with these published guidelines, we considered it appropriate to present a brief, practical and updated review of the most relevant concepts on the MRI assessment of acute stroke. Basic principles of the clinical interpretation of diffusion, perfusion, and MRI angiography (as part of a global MRI protocol) are discussed with accompanying images for each sequence. Brief comments on incidence and differential diagnosis are also included, together with limitations of the techniques and levels of evidence. The purpose of this article is to present knowledge that can be applied in day-to-day clinical practice in specialized stroke units or emergency rooms to attend patients with acute ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack according to international standards. PMID:25758570

  8. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  9. Feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging as a screening tool for acute stroke thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Tanabe, Midori; Masuda, Kyoko; Ozaki, Hitomi; Okubo, Seiji; Suda, Satoshi; Abe, Arata; Aoki, Junya; Muraga, Kanako; Kanamaru, Takuya; Suzuki, Kentaro; Katano, Takehiro; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-09-15

    Feasibility of performing MRI first for suspected hyperacute stroke patients in real-world practice has not been fully examined. Moreover, most past studies of reducing door-to-needle time (DNT) in intravenous thrombolysis were conducted using CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of an MRI-first policy and examine the effects of a quality improvement (QI) process for reducing DNT using MRI. From January 2014 to August 2015, consecutive acute stroke patients who were treated with thrombolysis were prospectively enrolled into the present study. In principle, multimodal 1.5T-MRI was performed first for patients with suspected acute stroke. A step-by-step QI process for decreasing DNT, including prenotification by the emergency medical service, limiting the MRI sequence, and introduction of a rapid examination tool, was also implemented during this period. Time metrics for thrombolysis were compared between specific time periods. A total of 73 patients (27 women; median age 74years) were included in the present study. More than 80% of the patients were screened with MRI. More patients were managed with the MRI-first policy in the late phase (p=0.018). DNT (83min in the early phase, 68min in the middle phase, and 54min in the late phase, p<0.001) was significantly reduced across phases. The percentage of patients with DNT<60min increased significantly across time periods (p<0.001). An MRI-first policy was feasible, and DNT was substantially reduced with a QI process. This process may be applicable to other hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  11. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to CT angiography source images is a strong predictor of futile recanalization in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kawiorski, Michal M; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; García-Pastor, Andrés; Calleja, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja E; Lourido, Daniel; Marín, Begoña; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Vicente, Agustina; Sierra-Hidalgo, Fernando; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Fandiño, Eduardo; Alonso de Leciñana, María

    2016-05-01

    Reliable predictors of poor clinical outcome despite successful revascularization might help select patients with acute ischemic stroke for thrombectomy. We sought to determine whether baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) is useful in predicting futile recanalization. Data are from the FUN-TPA study registry (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT02164357) including patients with acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusion in anterior circulation, undergoing reperfusion therapies. Baseline non-contrast CT and CTA-SI-ASPECTS, time-lapse to image acquisition, occurrence, and timing of recanalization were recorded. Outcome measures were NIHSS at 24 h, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, modified Rankin scale score, and mortality at 90 days. Futile recanalization was defined when successful recanalization was associated with poor functional outcome (death or disability). Included were 110 patients, baseline NIHSS 17 (IQR 12; 20), treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT; 45 %), primary mechanical thrombectomy (MT; 16 %), or combined IVT + MT (39 %). Recanalization rate was 71 %, median delay of 287 min (225; 357). Recanalization was futile in 28 % of cases. In an adjusted model, baseline CTA-SI-ASPECTS was inversely related to the odds of futile recanalization (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7), whereas NCCT-ASPECTS was not (OR 0.8; 95 % CI 0.5-1.2). A score ≤5 in CTA-SI-ASPECTS was the best cut-off to predict futile recanalization (sensitivity 35 %; specificity 97 %; positive predictive value 86 %; negative predictive value 77 %). CTA-SI-ASPECTS strongly predicts futile recanalization and could be a valuable tool for treatment decisions regarding the indication of revascularization therapies.

  12. ASPECTS discrepancies between CT and MR imaging: analysis and implications for triage protocols in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ferdinand K; Obuchowski, Nancy A; John, Seby; Toth, Gabor; Katzan, Irene; Wisco, Dolora; Cheng-Ching, Esteban; Uchino, Ken; Man, Shu-Mei; Hussain, Shazam

    2017-03-01

    Optimal imaging triage for intervention for large vessel occlusions remains unclear. MR-based imaging provides ischemic core volumes at the cost of increased imaging time. CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) estimates are faster, but may be less sensitive. To assesses the rate at which MRI changed management in comparison with CT imaging alone. Retrospective analysis of patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing imaging triage for endovascular therapy was performed between 2008 and 2013. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of time on disagreement in MRI and CT ASPECTS scores. A total of 241 patients underwent both diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and CT. Six patients with DWI ASPECTS ≥6 and CT ASPECTS <6 were omitted, leaving 235 patients. For 47 patients, disagreement between the two modalities resulted in different treatment recommendations. The estimated probability of disagreement was 20.0% (95% CI 15.4% to 25.6%). In a multivariate logistic regression, CT ASPECTS >7 (p=0.004) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score <16 (p=0.008) were simultaneously significant predictors of agreement in ASPECTS. The time between modalities was a marginally significant predictor (p=0.080). The study suggests that patients with NIHSS scores at admission of <16 and patients with CT ASPECTS >7 have a higher likelihood of agreement between CT and DWI based on an ASPECTS cut-off value of 6. Additional MRI for triage in patients with NIHSS at admission of >16, and ASPECTS of 6 or 7 may be more likely to change management. Unsurprisingly, patients with low CT ASPECTS had good correlation with MRI ASPECTS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Stroke Laterality Bias in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Gavin; Wade, Carrie; McKee, Jacqueline; McCarron, Peter; McVerry, Ferghal; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-11-01

    Little is known of the impact of stroke laterality on the management process and outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital over 1 year with supratentorial AIS were eligible for inclusion in the study. Baseline characteristics and risk factors, delays in hospital admission, imaging, intrahospital transfer to an acute stoke unit, stroke severity and classification, length of hospital admission, as well as 10-year mortality were measured and compared among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. There were 141 patients (77 men, 64 women; median age 73 [interquartile range 63-79] years), There were 71 patients with left hemisphere AIS and 70 with right hemisphere AIS. Delays to hospital admission from stroke onset to neuroimaging were similar among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. Delay in transfer to an acute stroke unit (ASU) following hospital admission was on average 14 hours more for right hemisphere compared to left hemisphere AIS patients (P = .01). Laterality was not associated with any difference in 10-year survival. Patients with mild and nondominant AIS merit particular attention to minimize their intrahospital transfer time to an ASU. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siket, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    Although stroke declined from the third to fifth most common cause of death in the United States, the annual incidence and overall prevalence continue to increase. Since the available US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment options are time dependent, improving early stroke care may have more of a public health impact than any other phase of care. Timely and efficient stroke treatment should be a priority for emergency department and prehospital providers. This article discusses currently available and emerging treatment options in acute ischemic stroke focusing on the preservation of salvageable brain tissue, minimizing complications, and secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Total magnetic resonance imaging burden of cerebral small-vessel disease is associated with post-stroke depression in patients with acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Tang, Y; Xie, Y; Ding, C; Xiao, J; Jiang, X; Shan, H; Lin, Y; Li, C; Hu, D; Li, T; Sheng, L

    2017-02-01

    Despite extensive studies on post-stroke depression (PSD), the role of the total burden of cerebral small-vessel disease (cSVD) in its pathogenesis remains unclear. We conducted a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cohort study to investigate the relationship between total MRI burden of cSVD and PSD among patients with first-ever lacunar stroke. From June 2013 to January 2016, 374 patients were consecutively recruited. PSD was identified using the Chinese version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Brain MRI presence of silent lacunar infarcts, white-matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds and enlarged perivascular spaces was summed to an ordinal score between 0 and 4. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the contribution of total MRI cSVD burden in the prediction of PSD. Ninety patients (24.1%) were diagnosed with PSD at 3 months after stroke. Only two MRI markers of cSVD, asymptomatic lacunar infarcts and white-matter lesions, were related to PSD [odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.879-5.338; P = 0.001 and OR, 2.284; 95% CI, 1.403-3.713; P = 0.001, respectively]. Moreover, higher total MRI cSVD burden was an independent predictor for PSD (high tertile OR, 4.577; 95% CI, 2.400-8.728; P = 0.001) after adjusting for individual cSVD MRI marker and other potential confounders. This study demonstrated that greater total MRI burden of cSVD may predict the presence of PSD in patients with acute lacunar stroke. © 2016 EAN.

  16. Role of Genetic Variation in Collateral Circulation in the Evolution of Acute Stroke: A Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2017-03-01

    No studies have determined the effect of differences in pial collateral extent (number and diameter), independent of differences in environmental factors and unknown genetic factors, on severity of stroke. We examined ischemic tissue evolution during acute stroke, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging and histology, by comparing 2 congenic mouse strains with otherwise identical genetic backgrounds but with different alleles of the Determinant of collateral extent-1 (Dce1) genetic locus. We also optimized magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion-deficit thresholds by using histological measures of ischemic tissue. Perfusion, diffusion, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were performed on collateral-poor (congenic-Bc) and collateral-rich (congenic-B6) mice at 1, 5, and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived penumbra and ischemic core volumes were confirmed by histology in a subset of mice at 5 and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Although perfusion-deficit volumes were similar between strains 1 hour after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, diffusion-deficit volumes were 32% smaller in collateral-rich mice. At 5 hours, collateral-rich mice had markedly restored perfusion patterns showing reduced perfusion-deficit volumes, smaller infarct volumes, and smaller perfusion-diffusion mismatch volumes compared with the collateral-poor mice (P<0.05). At 24 hours, collateral-rich mice had 45% smaller T2-weighted lesion volumes (P<0.005) than collateral-poor mice, with no difference in perfusion-diffusion mismatch volumes because of penumbral death occurring 5 to 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in collateral-poor mice. Variation in collateral extent significantly alters infarct volume expansion, transiently affects perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging signatures, and impacts salvage of ischemic penumbra after stroke onset. © 2017

  17. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Hyperintense vessels on acute stroke Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery imaging: Associations with clinical and other MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bastian; Ebinger, Martin; Kufner, Anna; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C.; Christensen, Soren; Warach, Steve; Luby, Marie; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fiehler, Jens; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperintense vessels (HV) have been observed in Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) imaging of patients with acute ischemic stroke and been linked to slow flow in collateral arterial circulation. Given the potential importance of HV, we used a large, multicentre dataset of stroke patients to clarify which clinical and imaging factors play a role in HV. Methods We analyzed data of 516 patients from the previously published PRE-FLAIR study. Patients were studied by MRI within 12 hours of symptom onset. HV were defined as hyperintensities in FLAIR corresponding to the typical course of a blood vessel that was not considered the proximal, occluded main artery ipsilateral to the diffusion restriction. Presence of HV was rated by two observers and related to clinical and imaging findings. Results Presence of HV was identified in 240 of all 516 patients (47%). Patients with HV showed larger initial ischemic lesion volumes (median 12.3 vs. 4.9 ml; p<0.001) and a more severe clinical impairment (median NIHSS 10.5 vs. 6; p<0.001). In 198 patients with MR-angiography, HV were found in 80% of patients with vessel occlusion and in 17% without vessel occlusion. In a multivariable logistic regression model, vessel occlusion was associated with HV (OR 21.7%; 95% CI 9.6–49.9, p < 0.001). HV detected vessel occlusion with a specificity of 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.90) and sensitivity of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69–0.83). Conclusions HV are a common finding associated with proximal arterial occlusions and more severe strokes. HV predict arterial occlusion with high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:22933582

  19. Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and Bolus Perfusion-Weighted Imaging for Detecting Mismatch in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; El Mogy, Ibraheem S.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Albers, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) – diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch paradigm is widely used in stroke imaging studies. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an alternative perfusion method that does not require contrast. This study compares the agreement of ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch classification in stroke patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study drawn from all 1.5T MRI studies performed in 2010 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: symptom onset<5 days, DWI lesion>10 ml, acquisition of both PWI and ASL. DWI and PWI-Tmax>6 sec lesion volumes were determined using automated software. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups. Two radiologists classified ASL-DWI qualitatively into the same categories, blinded to DWI-PWI. Agreement between both individual readers and methods was assessed. RESULTS 51 studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven cases were excluded (1 due to PWI susceptibility artifact, 2 due to motion, and 4 due to severe ASL borderzone sign), resulting in 44 studies for comparison. Inter-rater agreement for ASL–DWI mismatch status was high (κ =0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.00). ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch categories agreed in 25/44 cases (57%). In the 16 of 19 discrepant cases (84%), ASL overestimated the PWI lesion size. In 34/44 cases (77%), they agreed regarding the presence of mismatch versus no mismatch. CONCLUSION Mismatch classification based on ASL and PWI agree frequently but not perfectly. ASL tends to overestimate the PWI-Tmax lesion volume. Improved ASL methodologies and/or higher field strength are necessary before ASL can be recommended for routine use in acute stroke. PMID:22539548

  20. Critical care in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    McDermott, M; Jacobs, T; Morgenstern, L

    2017-01-01

    Most ischemic strokes are managed on the ward or on designated stroke units. A significant proportion of patients with ischemic stroke require more specialized care. Several studies have shown improved outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke when neurocritical care services are available. Features of acute ischemic stroke patients requiring intensive care unit-level care include airway or respiratory compromise; large cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere infarction with swelling; infarction with symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation; infarction complicated by seizures; and a large proportion of patients require close management of blood pressure after thrombolytics. In this chapter, we discuss aspects of acute ischemic stroke care that are of particular relevance to a neurointensivist, covering neuropathology, neurodiagnostics and imaging, blood pressure management, glycemic control, temperature management, and the selection and timing of antithrombotics. We also focus on the care of patients who have received intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Complex clinical decision making in decompressive hemicraniectomy for hemispheric infarction and urgent management of basilar artery thrombosis are specifically addressed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Segmentation of infarct in acute ischemic stroke from MR apparent diffusion coefficient and trace-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Ai, Lin; He, Huiguang; Zheng, Zuofeng; Lv, Bin; Li, Wenjing; Yi, Jianhua; Chen, Xuejiao

    2009-10-01

    Evidence from several previous studies indicated that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map was likely to reveal brain regions belonging to the ischemic penumbra, that is, areas that may be at risk of infarction in a few hours following stroke onset. Trace map overcomes the anisotropic diffusions of ADC map, so it is superior for evaluation of an infarct involving white matter. Mean shift (MS) approach has been successfully used for image segmentation, particularly in brain MR images. The aim of the study was to develop a tool for rapid and reliable segmentation of infarct in human acute ischemic stroke based on the ADC and trace maps using the MS approach. In addition, a novel method of 3-dimensional visualization was presented to provide useful insights into volume datasets for clinical diagnosis. We applied the presented method to clinical data. The results showed that it was consistent, fast (about 8-10 minutes per subject) and indistinguishable from an expert using manual segmentation when used our tool.

  2. Quantitative permeability magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke: how long do we need to scan?

    PubMed

    Vidarsson, Logi; Thornhill, Rebecca E; Liu, Fang; Mikulis, David J; Kassner, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability estimation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has shown significant potential for predicting hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). In this work, the effects of scan duration on quantitative BBB permeability estimates (KPS) were investigated. Data from eight patients (three with HT) aged 37-93 years old were retrospectively studied by directly calculating the standard deviation of KPS as a function of scan time. The uncertainty in KPS was reduced only slightly for a scan time of 3 min and 30 s (4% reduction in P value from .047 to .045). When more than 3 min and 30 s of data were used, quantitative permeability MRI was able to separate those patients who proceeded to HT from those who did not (P value <.05). Our findings indicate that reducing permeability acquisition times is feasible in keeping with the need to maintain time-efficient MR protocols in the setting of AIS.

  3. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2017-02-01

    This article provides an update on the state of the art of the emergency treatment of acute ischemic stroke with particular emphasis on the alternatives for reperfusion therapy. The results of several randomized controlled trials consistently and conclusively demonstrating that previously functional patients with disabling strokes from a proximal intracranial artery occlusion benefit from prompt recanalization with mechanical thrombectomy using a retrievable stent have changed the landscape of acute stroke therapy. Mechanical thrombectomy within 6 hours of symptom onset should now be considered the preferred treatment for these patients along with IV thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) within the first 4.5 hours for all patients who do not have contraindications for systemic thrombolysis. Patients who are ineligible for IV rtPA can also benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. Collateral status and time to reperfusion are the main determinants of outcome. Timely successful reperfusion is the most effective treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be optimized to maximize the number of patients with acute ischemic stroke able to receive reperfusion therapy.

  4. Protocol for the perfusion and angiography imaging sub-study of the Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3) of alteplase treatment within six-hours of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; von Kummer, Rudiger; Carpenter, Trevor; Parsons, Mark; Lindley, Richard I; Cohen, Geoff; Murray, Veronica; Kobayashi, Adam; Peeters, Andre; Chappell, Francesca; Sandercock, Peter A G

    2015-08-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator improves outcomes in patients treated early after stroke but at the risk of causing intracranial hemorrhage. Restricting recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator use to patients with evidence of still salvageable tissue, or with definite arterial occlusion, might help reduce risk, increase benefit and identify patients for treatment at late time windows. To determine if perfusion or angiographic imaging with computed tomography or magnetic resonance help identify patients who are more likely to benefit from recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator in the context of a large multicenter randomized trial of recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator given within six-hours of onset of acute ischemic stroke, the Third International Stroke Trial. Third International Stroke Trial is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial testing recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (0·9 mg/kg, maximum dose 90 mg) started up to six-hours after onset of acute ischemic stroke, in patients with no clear indication for or contraindication to recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator. Brain imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance) was mandatory pre-randomization to exclude hemorrhage. Scans were read centrally, blinded to treatment and clinical information. In centers where perfusion and/or angiography imaging were used routinely in stroke, these images were also collected centrally, processed and assessed using validated visual scores and computational measures. The primary outcome in Third International Stroke Trial is alive and independent (Oxford Handicap Score 0-2) at 6 months; secondary outcomes are symptomatic and fatal intracranial hemorrhage, early and late death. The perfusion and angiography study additionally will examine interactions between recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator and clinical outcomes, infarct growth and recanalization in the presence or absence of perfusion

  5. Effect of Collaterals on Clinical Presentation, Baseline Imaging, Complications, and Outcome in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Fanou, E M; Knight, J; Aviv, R I; Hojjat, S-P; Symons, S P; Zhang, L; Wintermark, M

    2015-12-01

    Good CTA collaterals independently predict good outcome in acute ischemic stroke. Our aim was to evaluate the role of collateral circulation and its added benefit over CTP-derived total ischemic volume as a predictor of baseline NIHSS score, total ischemic volume, hemorrhagic transformation, final infarct size, and a modified Rankin Scale score >2. This was a retrospective study of 395 patients with stroke dichotomized by recanalization (recanalization positive/recanalization negative) and collateral status. Clot burden score was quantified on baseline CTA. Total ischemic volumes were derived from thresholded CTP maps. Final infarct size was assessed on follow-up CT/MRI. We performed uni-/multivariate analyses for each outcome, adjusting for rtPA status, using general linear (continuous variables) and logistic (binary variables) regression. Model comparison with collateral score and total ischemic volume was performed using the F or likelihood ratio test. Collateral presence independently and inversely predicted all outcomes except hemorrhagic transformation in patients who were recanalization negative and mRS >2 in patients who were recanalization positive. The greatest collateral benefit occurred in patients who were recanalization negative, contributing 16.5% and 19.2% of the variability for final infarct size and mRS >2. The collateral score model is superior to the total ischemic volume for mRS >2 prediction, but a combination of total ischemic volume and collateral score is superior for mRS >2 and final infarct prediction (24% and 28% variability, respectively). In patients who were recanalization positive, a model including collateral score and total ischemic volume was superior to that of total ischemic volume for hemorrhagic transformation and final infarct prediction but was muted compared with patients who were recanalization negative (11.3% and 16.9% variability). Collateral circulation is an independent predictor of all outcomes, but the magnitude of

  6. Change in diffusion-weighted imaging infarct volume predicts neurologic outcome at 90 days: results of the Acute Stroke Accurate Prediction (ASAP) trial serial imaging substudy.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Ding, Yong Hong; Wagner, Douglas P; Kallmes, David F; Johnston, Karen C

    2009-07-01

    Predictive models of outcome after ischemic stroke have incorporated acute diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) information with mixed results. We hypothesized that serial measurements of DWI infarct volume would be predictive of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The prospective Acute Stroke Accurate Prediction (ASAP) Study included a prespecified serial imaging subgroup who underwent DWI studies at baseline (<24 hours after symptom onset) and Day 5 (+/-2 days). DWI infarct volumes were calculated using the Analyze software (Rochester, Minn). Clinical outcomes were assessed at 3 months. Univariate and multivariable regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between change in DWI lesion volume and excellent neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0, 1, and Barthel Index >or=95). In total, 169 cases from the ASAP study had serial DWI scans with a measurable lesion at baseline, follow-up, or both. The median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 6 (interquartile range, 3 to 13). For each 10 cm(3) of growth in DWI infarct volume, the OR for achieving an excellent outcome by modified Rankin Scale was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.71) and for the Barthel Index was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.79). Adjusting for clinically important covariates, the OR for an excellent modified Rankin Scale outcome was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.37 to 0.88) and excellent Barthel Index outcome was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.56 to 1.01). Based on these data, the likelihood of achieving an excellent neurological outcome diminishes substantially with growth in DWI infarct volume in the first 5 days after ischemic stroke of mild to moderate severity.

  7. Identification of imaging selection patterns in acute ischemic stroke patients and the influence on treatment and clinical trial enrollment decision making

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven J; Albers, Gregory W; Baron, Jean-Claude; Cognard, Christophe; Dávalos, Antoni; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Fiebach, Jochen B; Fiehler, Jens; Hacke, Werner; Lansberg, Maarten G; Liebeskind, David S; Mattle, Heinrich P; Oppenheim, Catherine; Schellinger, Peter D; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wintermark, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to collect precise information on the typical imaging decisions given specific clinical acute stroke scenarios. Stroke centers worldwide were surveyed regarding typical imaging used to work up representative acute stroke patients, make treatment decisions, and willingness to enroll in clinical trials. Methods STroke Imaging Research and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging circulated an online survey of clinical case vignettes through its website, the websites of national professional societies from multiple countries as well as through email distribution lists from STroke Imaging Research and participating societies. Survey responders were asked to select the typical imaging work-up for each clinical vignette presented. Actual images were not presented to the survey responders. Instead, the survey then displayed several types of imaging findings offered by the imaging strategy, and the responders selected the appropriate therapy and whether to enroll into a clinical trial considering time from onset, clinical presentation, and imaging findings. A follow-up survey focusing on 6 h from onset was conducted after the release of the positive endovascular trials. Results We received 548 responses from 35 countries including 282 individual centers; 78% of the centers originating from Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, and United States. The specific onset windows presented influenced the type of imaging work-up selected more than the clinical scenario. Magnetic Resonance Imaging usage (27–28%) was substantial, in particular for wake-up stroke. Following the release of the positive trials, selection of perfusion imaging significantly increased for imaging strategy. Conclusions Usage of vascular or perfusion imaging by Computed Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging beyond just parenchymal imaging was the primary work-up (62–87%) across all clinical vignettes and time windows

  8. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Kim, Jong Hyo; Wiesmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p < .05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. • Perfusion CT is highly accurate for the detection of ischemic brain lesions • Perfusion CT results in high radiation exposure, therefore low-dose protocols are required • Reduction of tube current down to 72 mAs produces sufficient perfusion maps.

  9. Direct Thrombus Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongseong; Park, Jung E.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Kim, Dong-Eog

    2016-01-01

    There is an emergent need for imaging methods to better triage patients with acute stroke for tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated thrombolysis or endovascular clot retrieval by directly visualizing the size and distribution of cerebral thromboemboli. Currently, magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) angiography visualizes the obstruction of blood flow within the vessel lumen rather than the thrombus itself. The present visualization method, which relies on observation of the dense artery sign (the appearance of cerebral thrombi on a non-enhanced CT), suffers from low sensitivity. When translated into the clinical setting, direct thrombus imaging is likely to enable individualized acute stroke therapy by allowing clinicians to detect the thrombus with high sensitivity, assess the size and nature of the thrombus more precisely, serially monitor the therapeutic effects of thrombolysis, and detect post-treatment recurrence. This review is intended to provide recent updates on stroke-related direct thrombus imaging using MR imaging, positron emission tomography, or CT. PMID:27733029

  10. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  11. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation following acute ischaemic stroke: Comparison of transcranial Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Panerai, Ronney B; Jara, José L; Saeed, Nazia P; Horsfield, Mark A; Robinson, Thompson G

    2016-12-01

    Novel MRI-based dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) assessment enables the estimation of both global and spatially discriminated autoregulation index values. Before exploring this technique for the evaluation of focal dCA in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) patients, it is necessary to compare global dCA estimates made using both TCD and MRI. Both techniques were used to study 11 AIS patients within 48 h of symptom onset, and nine healthy controls. dCA was assessed by the rate of return of CBFV (Rturn) following a sudden drop induced by the thigh cuff manoeuvre. No significant between-hemisphere differences were seen in controls using either the TCD or MRI technique. Inter-hemisphere averaged Rturn values were not different between TCD (1.89 ± 0.67%/s) and MRI (2.07 ± 0.60%/s) either. In patients, there were no differences between the affected and unaffected hemispheres whether assessed by TCD (Rturn 0.67 ± 0.72 vs. 0.98 ± 1.09%/s) or MRI (0.55 ± 1.51 vs. 1.63 ± 0.63%/s). Rturn for both TCD and MRI was impaired in AIS patients compared to controls in both unaffected and affected hemispheres (ANOVA, p = 0.00005). These findings pave the way for wider use of MRI for dCA assessment in health and disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Therapeutic interventions in acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, K R

    1992-01-01

    1. Potential therapies for ischaemic stroke include agents to reduce oedema, to improve cerebral perfusion, to reduce excitotoxic damage, to minimise free-radical induced injury and to reduce complications such as deep venous thrombosis. 2. Of the anti-oedema drugs, steroids are ineffective and possibly dangerous; intravenous glycerol is unproven. 3. Haemodilution to reduce whole blood viscosity and improve perfusion is ineffective. Thrombolytic drugs have not been adequately tested but several randomised multicentre trials are now commencing. Early treatment and CT scanning are essential. 4. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may have wide applicability but have not been tested in the acute phase of stroke. A multi-centre trial will address this issue. 5. Neuronal cytoprotection offers exciting prospects for acute stroke treatment. Antagonists of glutamate at the NMDA receptor, calcium and sodium channel blocking agents and free radical scavenging drugs have potent effects experimentally. Several agents are now reaching clinical trials. The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been disappointing in large scale trials but some studies were flawed by late treatment. 6. Successful treatment of acute stroke is likely to combine several approaches. 7. Therapeutic trials in stroke must include CT scanning, early treatment and a multicentre approach to achieve large numbers of patients. PMID:1493080

  13. Medical image analysis methods in MR/CT-imaged acute-subacute ischemic stroke lesion: Segmentation, prediction and insights into dynamic evolution simulation models. A critical appraisal☆

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Carpenter, Trevor K.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, basic thresholding techniques in combination with standard statistical correlation-based data analysis tools have been widely used to investigate different aspects of evolution of acute or subacute to late stage ischemic stroke in both human and animal data. Yet, a wave of biology-dependent and imaging-dependent issues is still untackled pointing towards the key question: “how does an ischemic stroke evolve?” Paving the way for potential answers to this question, both magnetic resonance (MRI) and CT (computed tomography) images have been used to visualize the lesion extent, either with or without spatial distinction between dead and salvageable tissue. Combining diffusion and perfusion imaging modalities may provide the possibility of predicting further tissue recovery or eventual necrosis. Going beyond these basic thresholding techniques, in this critical appraisal, we explore different semi-automatic or fully automatic 2D/3D medical image analysis methods and mathematical models applied to human, animal (rats/rodents) and/or synthetic ischemic stroke to tackle one of the following three problems: (1) segmentation of infarcted and/or salvageable (also called penumbral) tissue, (2) prediction of final ischemic tissue fate (death or recovery) and (3) dynamic simulation of the lesion core and/or penumbra evolution. To highlight the key features in the reviewed segmentation and prediction methods, we propose a common categorization pattern. We also emphasize some key aspects of the methods such as the imaging modalities required to build and test the presented approach, the number of patients/animals or synthetic samples, the use of external user interaction and the methods of assessment (clinical or imaging-based). Furthermore, we investigate how any key difficulties, posed by the evolution of stroke such as swelling or reperfusion, were detected (or not) by each method. In the absence of any imaging-based macroscopic dynamic model

  14. Sensitivity of 3D Gradient Recalled Echo Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Technique Compared to Computed Tomography Angiography for Detection of Middle Cerebral Artery Thrombus in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Vijay, Kanupriya; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul

    2014-10-23

    We aimed at comparing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombus in acute stroke. Seventy-nine patients with acute MCA stroke was selected using our search engine software; only the ones showing restricted diffusion in the MCA territory on diffusion-weighted images were included. We finally selected 35 patients who had done both MRI (including SWI) and CTA. Twenty random subjects with completely normal MRI (including SWI) exam were selected as control. Two neuroradiologists (blinded to the presence or absence of stroke) reviewed the SW images and then compared the findings with CT angiogram (in patients with stroke). The number of MCA segments showing thrombus in each patient was tabulated to estimate the thrombus burden. Thrombus was detected on SWI in one or more MCA segments in 30 out of 35 patients, on the first review. Of the 30, SWI showed thrombus in more than one MCA segments in 7 patients. CTA depicted branch occlusion in 31 cases. Thrombus was seen on both SWI and CTA in 28 patients. Thrombus was noted in two patients on SWI only, with no corresponding abnormality seen on CTA. Two patients with acute MCA showed no vascular occlusion or thrombus on either CTA or SWI. Only two case of false-positive thrombus was reported in normal control subjects. Susceptibility-weighted images had sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 90% respectively, with positive predictive value 94%. Sensitivity was 86% for SWI, compared with 89% for CTA, and this difference was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). Of all the positive cases on CTA (31) corresponding thrombus was seen on SWI in 90% of subjects (28 of 31). Susceptibility-weighted imaging has high sensitivity for detection of thrombus in acute MCA stroke. Moreover, SWI is a powerful technique for estimation of thrombus burden, which can be challenging on CTA.

  15. The carotid plaque imaging in acute stroke (CAPIAS) study: protocol and initial baseline data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In up to 30% of patients with ischemic stroke no definite etiology can be established. A significant proportion of cryptogenic stroke cases may be due to non-stenosing atherosclerotic plaques or low grade carotid artery stenosis not fulfilling common criteria for atherothrombotic stroke. The aim of the CAPIAS study is to determine the frequency, characteristics, clinical and radiological long-term consequences of ipsilateral complicated American Heart Association lesion type VI (AHA-LT VI) carotid artery plaques in patients with cryptogenic stroke. Methods/Design 300 patients (age >49 years) with unilateral DWI-positive lesions in the anterior circulation and non- or moderately stenosing (<70% NASCET) internal carotid artery plaques will be enrolled in the prospective multicenter study CAPIAS. Carotid plaque characteristics will be determined by high-resolution black-blood carotid MRI at baseline and 12 month follow up. Primary outcome is the prevalence of complicated AHA-LT VI plaques in cryptogenic stroke patients ipsilateral to the ischemic stroke compared to the contralateral side and to patients with defined stroke etiology. Secondary outcomes include the association of AHA-LT VI plaques with the recurrence rates of ischemic events up to 36 months, rates of new ischemic lesions on cerebral MRI (including clinically silent lesions) after 12 months and the influence of specific AHA-LT VI plaque features on the progression of atherosclerotic disease burden, on specific infarct patterns, biomarkers and aortic arch plaques. Discussion CAPIAS will provide important insights into the role of non-stenosing carotid artery plaques in cryptogenic stroke. The results might have implications for our understanding of stroke mechanism, offer new diagnostic options and provide the basis for the planning of targeted interventional studies. Trial Registration NCT01284933 PMID:24330333

  16. Radiological strategy in acute stroke in children.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Amalia; Limbucci, Nicola; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the preponderance of patterns of pediatric stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, their etiologies and the correct diagnostic protocol for acute management. Forty-one consecutive pediatric patients (age range 5-16 years) with an acute stroke observed in acute phase during a 10-year period, were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-three patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 cases were studied by computed tomography (CT) without MRI, and 15 underwent both CT and MRI studies. In 9 cases, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed after non-invasive preliminary assessment. Seventeen hemorrhagic (41%) and 24 ischemic (59%) strokes were found. Among hemorrhagic forms, 5 cases were due to arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 7 to cavernoma, and 2 to aneurysm. Among ischemic forms, 2 were due to sickle-cell disease, 1 to hyperomocysteinemia, 1 to moyamoya syndrome, 1 to pseudoxantoma elasticum, 3 to prothrombotic state, 1 to Fabry's disease, 1 concomitant with CO intoxication, 5 to venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 to cardio-embolic state. Etiology remains unknown in 8 cases (20.5%). This study shows a moderate prevalence of ischemic over hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, personal experience suggests that MRI is always more informative than CT and in selected cases should be the first-choice examination in the acute phase.

  17. Validity of acute stroke lesion volume estimation by diffusion-weighted imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomographic Score depends on lesion location in 496 patients with middle cerebral artery stroke.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Julian; Cheng, Bastian; Ebinger, Martin; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David S; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C; Christensen, Soren; Campbell, Bruce; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Fiehler, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2014-12-01

    Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomographic Score (ASPECTS) has been used to estimate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volume in acute stroke. We aimed to assess correlations of DWI-ASPECTS with lesion volume in different middle cerebral artery (MCA) subregions and reproduce existing ASPECTS thresholds of a malignant profile defined by lesion volume ≥100 mL. We analyzed data of patients with MCA stroke from a prospective observational study of DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in acute stroke. DWI-ASPECTS and lesion volume were calculated. The population was divided into subgroups based on lesion localization (superficial MCA territory, deep MCA territory, or both). Correlation of ASPECTS and infarct volume was calculated, and receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis was performed to identify the optimal ASPECTS threshold for ≥100-mL lesion volume. A total of 496 patients were included. There was a significant negative correlation between ASPECTS and DWI lesion volume (r=-0.78; P<0.0001). With regards to lesion localization, correlation was weaker in deep MCA region (r=-0.19; P=0.038) when compared with superficial (r=-0.72; P<0.001) or combined superficial and deep MCA lesions (r=-0.72; P<0.001). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis revealed ASPECTS≤6 as best cutoff to identify ≥100-mL DWI lesion volume; however, positive predictive value was low (0.35). ASPECTS has limitations when lesion location is not considered. Identification of patients with malignant profile by DWI-ASPECTS may be unreliable. ASPECTS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of noncontrast computed tomography. However, if MRI is used, ASPECTS seems dispensable because lesion volume can easily be quantified on DWI maps. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: dissecting the evidence.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Krogias, Christos; Arthur, Adam S; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability and intravenous thrombolysis has been the only approved acute reperfusion therapy (RT) for many years. Seven randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) have been recently published. These studies have changed the treatment paradigm by establishing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) as the most effective acute stroke therapy for improving functional outcome in anterior circulation ELVO with a NNT of 6. The present review will critically evaluate the results of these RCTs and of the existing meta-analyses investigating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy for AIS. Points of debate such as acute stroke imaging, posterior circulation stroke and general anesthesia will be addressed. We will also discuss health policies aiming to increase the availability of endovascular treatment for stroke patients.

  19. Acute pediatric stroke: contributors to institutional cost.

    PubMed

    Turney, Colin M; Wang, Wei; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies examined the overall cost of pediatric stroke, but there are little data regarding the sources of these costs. We examined an administrative database that collected charges from 24 US children's hospitals to determine the sources of costs for acute hospital care of stroke. We used International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes to search the Pediatric Health Information System. From 2003 to 2009 there were 1667 patients who had a primary diagnosis of stroke, 703 of which were hemorrhagic and 964 were ischemic. Individual costs, excluding physician charges, were gathered under 7 categories that were ranked to determine which contributed the most to total cost. Individual costs were ranked within their categories. We analyzed costs based on stroke type. Total costs were adjusted using the US Consumer Price Index to compare increases with the rate of inflation. Median total cost for any stroke was $19,548 (interquartile range, $10,764-$40,721). The category "other/nursing" contributed the most to hospital costs followed by imaging, laboratory, and pharmacy. Brain MRI and CT contributed the most to imaging costs. Hemorrhagic strokes (median $24,843) were more expensive than ischemic strokes (median $16,954). Total cost increased from 2003 to 2009, but no overall annual trend emerged after controlling for gender, age, race, and hospital. This is the first in-depth analysis of cost for pediatric stroke care. The highest cost categories are potential targets for cost containment but are also crucial for effective diagnosis and treatment. Necessary yet prudent use of imaging technologies and inpatient stays may be strategies for cost containment.

  20. Comparison of CT perfusion summary maps to early diffusion-weighted images in suspected acute middle cerebral artery stroke.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Salazar, Pascal; Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Palmer, Christopher S; Truwit, Charles L; McKinney, Alexander M

    2015-04-01

    To assess the accuracy and reliability of one vendor's (Vital Images, Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN) automated CT perfusion (CTP) summary maps in identification and volume estimation of infarcted tissue in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) distribution infarcts. From 1085 CTP examinations over 5.5 years, 43 diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-positive patients were included who underwent both CTP and DWI <12 h after symptom onset, with another 43 age-matched patients as controls (DWI-negative). Automated delay-corrected postprocessing software (DC-SVD) generated both infarct "core only" and "core+penumbra" CTP summary maps. Three reviewers independently tabulated Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scores (ASPECTS) of both CTP summary maps and coregistered DWI. Of 86 included patients, 36 had DWI infarct volumes ≤70 ml, 7 had volumes >70 ml, and 43 were negative; the automated CTP "core only" map correctly classified each as >70 ml or ≤70 ml, while the "core+penumbra" map misclassified 4 as >70 ml. There were strong correlations between DWI volume with both summary map-based volumes: "core only" (r=0.93), and "core+penumbra" (r=0.77) (both p<0.0001). Agreement between ASPECTS scores of infarct core on DWI with summary maps was 0.65-0.74 for "core only" map, and 0.61-0.65 for "core+penumbra" (both p<0.0001). Using DWI-based ASPECTS scores as the standard, the accuracy of the CTP-based maps were 79.1-86.0% for the "core only" map, and 83.7-88.4% for "core+penumbra." Automated CTP summary maps appear to be relatively accurate in both the detection of acute MCA distribution infarcts, and the discrimination of volumes using a 70 ml threshold. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recovery Potential After Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Rüdiger J.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In acute stroke, the major factor for recovery is the early use of thrombolysis aimed at arterial recanalization and reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue. Subsequently, neurorehabilitative training critically improves clinical recovery due to augmention of postlesional plasticity. Neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies have revealed that the location and volume of the stroke lesion, the affection of nerve fiber tracts, as well as functional and structural changes in the perilesional tissue and in large-scale bihemispheric networks are relevant biomarkers of post-stroke recovery. However, associated disorders, such as mood disorders, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases, may induce secondary cerebral changes or aggravate the functional deficits and, thereby, compromise the potential for recovery. PMID:26617568

  2. Haemodilution for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy S; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischaemic stroke interrupts the flow of blood to part of the brain. Haemodilution is thought to improve the flow of blood to the affected areas of the brain and thus reduce infarct size. Objectives To assess the effects of haemodilution in acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2014), MEDLINE (January 2008 to October 2013) and EMBASE (January 2008 to October 2013). We also searched trials registers, scanned reference lists and contacted authors. For the previous version of the review, the authors contacted manufacturers and investigators in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials of haemodilution treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke. We included only trials in which treatment was started within 72 hours of stroke onset. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed trial quality and one review author extracted the data. Main results We included 21 trials involving 4174 participants. Nine trials used a combination of venesection and plasma volume expander. Twelve trials used plasma volume expander alone. The plasma volume expander was plasma alone in one trial, dextran 40 in 12 trials, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in five trials and albumin in three trials. Two trials tested haemodilution in combination with another therapy. Evaluation was blinded in 14 trials. Five trials probably included some participants with intracerebral haemorrhage. Haemodilution did not significantly reduce deaths within the first four weeks (risk ratio (RR) 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.34). Similarly, haemodilution did not influence deaths within three to six months (RR 1.05; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.20), or death and dependency or institutionalisation (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07). The results were similar in confounded and unconfounded trials, and in trials of isovolaemic and hypervolaemic haemodilution. No

  3. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ricci, S; Celani, M G; Cantisani, A T; Righetti, E

    2006-04-19

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects which may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of piracetam in acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 20 June 2005). In addition, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2005), EMBASE (1980 to April 2005), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to April 2005). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within approximately 48 hours of stroke onset. Two authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two authors. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Three trials involving 1002 people were included, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependency or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependency.

  4. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Cantisani, Teresa Anna; Righetti, Enrico

    2012-09-12

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects that may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2006 and 2009. To assess the effects of piracetam in acute, presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 15 May 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to May 2011). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within three days of stroke onset. Two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two review authors. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included three trials involving 1002 patients, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85 years, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependence or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependence.

  5. Comparison of susceptibility-weighted and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of penumbra in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Luo, Song; Yang, Lijuan; Wang, Lijin

    2015-10-01

    To investigate detection of ischemic penumbra in stroke patients with acute cerebral infarction by susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in comparison with perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI). This study included 18 stroke patients with acute infarction who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), SWI, PWI, and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) within 3 days after symptom onset. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) was used to evaluate lesions on DWI, SWI, and PWI. DWI-SWI and DWI-PWI mismatches were calculated. The DWI-SWI mismatch was not significantly different from the DWI-mean transit time (MTT) mismatch (P=0.163) in evaluating ischemic penumbra. The susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) in SWI occurred in 11 (61%) of 18 patients with cerebral infarction. Stenosis or occlusion of the affected vessels was identified by MRA in 10 (91%) of the 11 SVS-positive patients. The SVS on SWI was significantly associated with the occurrence of damaged vessels or the presence of thrombus in the affected vessels (P=0.047). DWI-SWI mismatch is a good marker for evaluating ischemic penumbra in stroke patients with cerebral infarction. SWI can detect thrombus in the affected vessels, and may be useful for guiding intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging Approaches to Stroke and Neurovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Dehkharghani, Seena; Andre, Jalal

    2017-01-28

    Imaging is paramount to the diagnosis and management of ischemic stroke, offering a battery of structural and functional probes of cerebrovascular physiology. The technical underpinnings of stroke imaging continue to evolve, bringing the neuroscience community increasingly closer to high-resolution, tissue-level biomarkers of brain perfusion, metabolism, and viability. The rapid expansion of neuroimaging in this domain has met with controversies, and in many respects, a lack of generalizable conclusions regarding optimized use in cerebrovascular disease. This review aims to provide the reader with the depth and scope of both established and emerging techniques, and an overview of prevailing viewpoints regarding neuroimaging in acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Diffusion-weighted imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is associated with better neurologic response to intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Yeong; Han, Sang Kuk; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Na, Ji Ung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi, Pil Cho; Lee, Jeong Hun

    2015-03-01

    To investigate differences in the effect of intravenous (IV) thrombolysis regarding the mismatch of diffusion-weighted imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (DWI-FLAIR) among acute ischemic stroke patients who visited the emergency department (ED) within 3 hours from the onset of symptoms. Among ED patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and May 2013 at a tertiary hospital, those who underwent magnetic resonance imaging before IV thrombolytic therapy were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into DWI-FLAIR mismatch and match groups. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores obtained initially, 24 hours after thrombolytic therapy, and on discharge, and early neurologic improvement (ENI) and major neurologic improvement (MNI) were compared. During the study period, 50 of the 213 acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to the ED were included. The DWI-FLAIR mismatch group showed a statistically significantly greater reduction in NIHSS both at 24 hours after thrombolytic therapy and upon discharge than did the match group (5.5 vs. 1.2, P<0.001; 6.0 vs. 2.3, P<0.01, respectively). Moreover, ENI and MNI were significantly greater for the DWI-FLAIR mismatch group than for the match group (27/36 vs. 2/14, P<0.001; 12/36 vs. 0/14, P=0.012, respectively). Among acute ischemic stroke patients who visited the ED within 3 hours from the onset of symptoms, patients who showed DWI-FLAIR mismatch showed a significantly better response to IV thrombolytic therapy than did the DWI-FLAIR match group in terms of neurologic outcome.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging-based versus computed tomography-based thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: comparison of safety and efficacy within a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gerischer, Lea Morrin; Fiebach, Jochen B; Scheitz, Jan F; Audebert, Heinrich J; Endres, Matthias; Nolte, Christian H

    2013-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, brain imaging is mandatory in the decision whether to perform intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. The most widespread used imaging modality to exclude intracranial hemorrhage is plain computed tomography (CT). However, there is an ongoing debate whether the information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve the selection of patients for thrombolysis. We investigated whether the choice of imaging modality (MRI vs. CT) affects therapy safety and the patients' outcome. Analyses are based on data from a prospective, single-center observational study that included all patients with acute ischemic stroke who received intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 h. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Safety was assessed by rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH), brain edema with mass effect and 7-day mortality. Outcome was assessed at 3 months as mortality and proportion of independent patients (modified Rankin Scale score between 0 and 2). We analyzed 345 patients of whom 141 received multimodal MRI and 204 received plain CT prior to treatment. Groups did not differ significantly in terms of age, neurological deficit, rate of elevated glucose level or rate of very high blood pressure. However, patients with CT-based thrombolysis had significantly higher rates of cardiac comorbidities (coronary artery disease, heart failure). In the MRI group, we observed a lower rate of 7-day mortality (1 vs. 10%; p = 0.001), a lower rate of SICH (1 vs. 6%; p = 0.010) and a nonsignificantly lower rate of brain edema with mass effect (2 vs. 6%; n.s.). In multivariable analysis, 7-day mortality was independently associated with MRI-based thrombolysis, even if cardiac comorbidities were taken into account. For mortality at 3 months, there was a nonsignificant difference in favor of the MRI group (16 vs. 23%; n.s.). In multivariable analyses, mortality at 3 months

  9. Imaging Stroke Patients with Unclear Onset Times

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ona; Schwamm, Lee H.; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant progress in stroke prevention and acute treatment, stroke remains a leading cause of death and adult morbidity worldwide. By defining “stroke symptom onset” in the most conservative manner, namely the time the patient was last known to be well, many patients whose onsets are unwitnessed are automatically ineligible for thrombolytic therapy even if their true time of onset would make them eligible. Many groups are trying to determine if advanced brain imaging can serve as a substitute “witness” to estimate stroke onset and duration in those patients who do not have a human witness. We review and compare some of these imaging-based approaches to thrombolysis eligbility, which if successful, can potentially expand the use of thrombolytic therapy to a broader stroke patient population. PMID:21640303

  10. Intracranial Plaque Characterization in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke Using Pre- and Post-Contrast Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging.

    PubMed

    Natori, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Makoto; Miyoshi, Mitsuharu; Ito, Kohei; Ohba, Hideki; Miyazawa, Haruna; Narumi, Shinsuke; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Harada, Taisuke; Terayama, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (VWI) techniques have been developed to assess atherosclerotic plaques in intracranial arteries, which are a cardinal cause of ischemic stroke. However, the clinical roles of plaque-related vulnerability and inflammation remain unclear. Hence, we evaluated plaque characteristics using VWI of the proximal middle cerebral artery (M1) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively examined 30 consecutive patients with acute noncardioembolic stroke in the M1 territory using pre-/postcontrast T1-weighted (T1W) three-dimensional (3D) VWI with a 3-Tesla scanner. The contrast ratio (CR) and contrast enhancement of the plaques were measured bilaterally at M1. Plaques were identified in the bilateral M1s of all patients, and no substantial stenosis existed. The M1 plaque CRs ipsilateral to the infarct (46.7%-67.9%) were significantly higher than the plaque CRs on the contralateral side (34.3%-69.4%), particularly in patients with lacunar infarcts (P <.01). In contrast, the occurrence of plaque enhancement was not different between the ipsilateral (20.0%) and contralateral (16.7%) sides. Further, the CRs in the nonlacunar group were significantly higher than the CRs in the lacunar group (P <.05), whereas enhanced plaques tended to be more frequent in the nonlacunar group, but this difference was not significant (P = .09). T1W 3D-VWI revealed that the signal intensity of M1 plaques was significantly higher in the affected side and in nonlacunar-type infarcts of patients with acute stroke, suggesting that unstable plaques in the M1 can cause stroke events presumably due to atherothrombotic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immediate Vascular Imaging Needed for Efficient Triage of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke Initially Admitted to Nonthrombectomy Centers.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Siddiqui, Khawja-Ahmeruddin; Lauer, Arne; Charidimou, Andreas; Regenhardt, Robert W; Viswanathan, Anand; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Rost, Natalia; Schwamm, Lee H

    2017-08-01

    Current guidelines for endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) used to select patients for transfer to thrombectomy-capable stroke centers (TSC) may result in unnecessary transfers. We sought to determine the impact of simulated baseline vascular imaging on reducing unnecessary transfers and clinical-imaging factors associated with receiving EVT after transfer. We identified patients with stroke transferred for EVT from 30 referring hospitals between 2010 and 2016 who had a referring hospitals brain computed tomography and repeat imaging on TSC arrival available for review. Initial Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scores and TSC vascular occlusion level were assessed. The main outcome variable was receiving EVT at TSC. Models were simulated to derive optimal triaging parameters for EVT. A total of 508 patients were included in the analysis (mean age, 69±14 years; 42% women). Application at referring hospitals of current guidelines for EVT yielded sensitivity of 92% (95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.96) and specificity of 53% (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.57) for receiving EVT at TSC. Repeated simulations identified optimal selection criteria for transfer as National Institute of Health Stroke Scale >8 plus baseline vascular imaging (sensitivity=91%; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.95; and specificity=80%; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.83). Our findings provide quantitative estimates of the claim that implementing vascular imaging at the referring hospitals would result in significantly fewer futile transfers for EVT and a data-driven framework to inform transfer policies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Acute stroke initiative involving an acute care team.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sean M; Keyser, Gabrielle; Winfield, Michelle; McNeil, Julie; Simko, Leslie; Price, Karen; Moffa, Donald; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Peacock, W Frank; Katzan, Irene L

    2012-06-01

    The Acute Care Team Educational Initiative (ACTEI) was developed as a quality improvement initiative for the recognition and initial management of time-sensitive medical conditions. For our first time-sensitive disease process, we focused on acute stroke [acute stroke initiative (ASI)]. As part of the larger ACTEI, the ASI included creating an ACT that responds to all suspected emergency department stroke patients. In this article, we describe the planning, process, and development of the ACTEI/ASI as well as how we created an acute response team for the diagnosis and management of suspected acute stroke.

  13. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  14. Previous Statin Use and High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Plaque: The Intensive Statin Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients With Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong-Won; Hwang, Jaechun; Lee, Mi Ji; Cha, Jihoon; Bang, Oh Young

    2016-07-01

    Although statin use has been linked to the stabilization of systemic atherosclerosis, its effect on symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic plaques has yet to be explored. We hypothesized that premorbid statin use is associated with plaque instability in intracranial arteries and may lead to differential patterns (size and distribution) of ischemic lesions in patients with acute intracranial atherosclerotic stroke. One hundred and thirty-six patients with acute infarcts caused by intracranial atherosclerotic stroke underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their premorbid statin use: nonuser, low-dose user, and high-dose user, according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on blood cholesterol. Symptomatic lesions in intracranial arteries were analyzed using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for vascular morphology (degree of stenosis, remodeling index, and wall index) and plaque activation (pattern and volume of enhancement). The cortical distribution and volume of ischemic brain lesions were measured using diffusion-weighted imaging. Among the enrolled patients, 38 (27.94%) were taking statins before the index stroke (22 low-dose statins and 16 high-dose statins). The degree of stenosis, remodeling index, and wall index did not differ between the 3 groups. However, the volume of plaque enhancement was significantly lower in statin users (nonuser, 33.26±40.72; low-dose user, 13.15±17.53; high-dose user, 3.13±5.26; P=0.002). Premorbid statin use was associated with a higher prevalence of nonembolic stroke and a decrease in large cortical infarcts (P=0.012). Premorbid statin usage is independently associated with reduced plaque enhancement and a decrease in large cortical lesions in patients with intracranial atherosclerotic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke (DIAS) clinical trial program.

    PubMed

    von Kummer, Rüdiger; Albers, Gregory W; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Desmoteplase is a novel, highly fibrin-specific thrombolytic agent in phase III of clinical development. In comparison to alteplase, it has high fibrin selectivity, is associated with minimal or no neurotoxicity, and has no apparent negative effect on the blood-brain barrier. The safety and efficacy of desmoteplase is being studied in the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program. Three studies (Dose Escalation Study of Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-2) have been completed, two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials are ongoing at >200 sites worldwide (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-3 and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-4, n = 800; DIAS-3 and DIAS-4), and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation phase II trial is ongoing in Japan (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Japan, n = 48; DIAS-J). The objective of DIAS-3 and DIAS-4 is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single IV bolus injection of 90 μg/kg desmoteplase given three- to nine-hours after onset of ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 4-24, age 18-85 years). The objective of DIAS-J is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase 70 and 90 μg/kg three- to nine-hours after ischemic stroke onset in Japanese patients. Patients are included with occlusion or high-grade stenosis (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0-1) in proximal cerebral arteries on magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography but excluded with extended ischemic edema on computed tomography or diffusion-weighted imaging. Desmoteplase is the only thrombolytic agent in late-stage development for acute ischemic stroke that is now tested in patients with proven stroke pathology. The results of the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program will show whether patients with major artery occlusions

  16. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. One-stop-shop stroke imaging with functional CT.

    PubMed

    Tong, Elizabeth; Komlosi, Peter; Wintermark, Max

    2015-12-01

    Advanced imaging techniques have extended beyond traditional anatomic imaging and progressed to dynamic, physiologic and functional imaging. Neuroimaging is no longer a mere diagnostic tool. Multimodal functional CT, comprising of NCCT, PCT and CTA, provides a one-stop-shop for rapid stroke imaging. Integrating those imaging findings with pertinent clinical information can help guide subsequent treatment decisions, medical management and follow-up imaging selection. This review article will briefly discuss the indication and utility of each modality in acute stroke imaging.

  18. Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke: effects of embolism and mechanical thrombectomy on the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; Matouk, Charles; Casaubon, Leanne K; Silver, Frank L; Krings, Timo; Mikulis, David J; Mandell, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of thromboembolism and mechanical thrombectomy on the vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (VW-MRI) appearance of the intracranial arterial wall. This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients with acute intracranial arterial occlusion who underwent high-resolution contrast-enhanced VW-MRI within days of stroke presentation. For each patient, we categorized arterial wall thickening and enhancement as definite, possible, or none using contralateral arteries as a reference standard. We performed χ(2) tests to compare the effects of medical therapy and mechanical thrombectomy. Sixteen patients satisfied inclusion criteria. Median time from symptom onset to VW-MRI was 3 days (interquartile range, 2 days). Among 6 patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy using a stent retriever, VW-MRI demonstrated definite arterial wall thickening in 5 (83%) and possible thickening in 1 (17%); there was definite wall enhancement in 4 (67%) and possible enhancement in 2 (33%). Among 10 patients treated with medical therapy alone, VW-MRI demonstrated definite arterial wall thickening in 3 (30%) and possible thickening in 2 (20%); there was definite wall enhancement in 2 (20%) and possible enhancement in 2 (20%). Arterial wall thickening and enhancement were more common in patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy than with medical therapy alone (P=0.037 and P=0.016, respectively). Mechanical thrombectomy results in intracranial arterial wall thickening and enhancement, potentially mimicking the VW-MRI appearance of primary arteritis. This arterial wall abnormality is less common in patients with arterial occlusion who have been treated with medical therapy alone. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Individual prediction of chronic motor outcome in the acute post-stroke stage: Behavioral parameters versus functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rehme, A.K.; Volz, L.J.; Feis, D.-L.; Eickhoff, S.B.; Fink, G.R.; Grefkes, C

    2015-01-01

    Several neurobiological factors have been found to correlate with functional recovery after brain lesions. However, predicting the individual potential of recovery remains difficult. Here we used multivariate support vector machine (SVM) classification to explore the prognostic value of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to predict individual motor outcome at 4–6 months post-stroke. To this end, twenty-one first-ever stroke patients with hand motor deficits participated in an fMRI hand motor task in the first few days post-stroke. Motor impairment was quantified assessing grip force and the Action Research Arm Test. Linear SVM classifiers were trained to predict good versus poor motor outcome of unseen new patients. We found that fMRI activity acquired in the first week post-stroke correctly predicted the outcome for 86% of all patients. In contrast, the concurrent assessment of motor function provided 76% accuracy with low sensitivity (<60%). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with initially moderate impairment and high outcome variability could not be predicted based on motor tests. In contrast, fMRI provided 87.5% prediction accuracy in these patients. Classifications were driven by activity in ipsilesional motor areas and contralesional cerebellum. The accuracy of subacute fMRI data (two weeks post-stroke), age, time post-stroke, lesion volume and location were at 50%-chance-level. In conclusion, multivariate decoding of fMRI data with SVM early after stroke enables a robust prediction of motor recovery. The potential for recovery is influenced by the initial dysfunction of the active motor system, particularly in those patients whose outcome cannot be predicted by behavioral tests. PMID:26381168

  20. Individual prediction of chronic motor outcome in the acute post-stroke stage: Behavioral parameters versus functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Rehme, Anne K; Volz, Lukas J; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Several neurobiological factors have been found to correlate with functional recovery after brain lesions. However, predicting the individual potential of recovery remains difficult. Here we used multivariate support vector machine (SVM) classification to explore the prognostic value of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to predict individual motor outcome at 4-6 months post-stroke. To this end, 21 first-ever stroke patients with hand motor deficits participated in an fMRI hand motor task in the first few days post-stroke. Motor impairment was quantified assessing grip force and the Action Research Arm Test. Linear SVM classifiers were trained to predict good versus poor motor outcome of unseen new patients. We found that fMRI activity acquired in the first week post-stroke correctly predicted the outcome for 86% of all patients. In contrast, the concurrent assessment of motor function provided 76% accuracy with low sensitivity (<60%). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with initially moderate impairment and high outcome variability could not be predicted based on motor tests. In contrast, fMRI provided 87.5% prediction accuracy in these patients. Classifications were driven by activity in ipsilesional motor areas and contralesional cerebellum. The accuracy of subacute fMRI data (two weeks post-stroke), age, time post-stroke, lesion volume, and location were at 50%-chance-level. In conclusion, multivariate decoding of fMRI data with SVM early after stroke enables a robust prediction of motor recovery. The potential for recovery is influenced by the initial dysfunction of the active motor system, particularly in those patients whose outcome cannot be predicted by behavioral tests. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Final 2 year results of the vascular imaging of acute stroke for identifying predictors of clinical outcome and recurrent ischemic eveNts (VISION) study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among patients with ischemic stroke, little attention has been paid to differentiation between stroke progression and recurrence. We assessed the role of MR imaging in predicting stroke progression, recurrent stroke, and death within 2 years of symptom onset. Methods Ischemic stroke or TIA patients were prospectively enrolled. They were examined within 12 hours and had a stroke MR completed within 24 hours of symptom onset. Patients were closely followed neurologically and examined if there was any deterioration in neurological status. Relationships between baseline clinical and imaging factors and outcomes were assessed. We also examined whether baseline stroke/TIA severity (NIHSS 0-5 versus NIHSS > 5) modified these relationships. Results A total of 334 patients were enrolled. The overall rates of progression, 2-year recurrence, and 2-year death were 8.7%, 8.0%, and 6.6%, respectively. Event rates were similar among patients with mild compared to more severe strokes: 8.3% versus 9.5% (p = 0.73) for progression, and 7.3% versus 9.9% (p = 0.59) for recurrence. The effect of baseline glucose > 8 mmol/l was consistent in predicting stroke progression, recurrent stroke and death, regardless of baseline stroke severity. In multivariable analyses, DWI lesion and intracranial occlusion predicted stroke progression only in the minor stroke/TIA group; symptomatic Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) stenosis predicted stroke recurrence only in the minor stroke/TIA group. Conclusions In a prospective study with early assessment and imaging we have found that stroke progression is different than stroke recurrence. Different imaging factors predict stroke progression versus stroke recurrence. Baseline hyperglycemia, a potentially modifiable factor, consistently predicted all three outcomes (stroke progression, recurrent stroke or death) regardless of baseline stroke severity. PMID:21513559

  2. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2014-07-29

    Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. Thrombolytic drugs, however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal. One drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), is licensed for use in selected patients within 4.5 hours of stroke in Europe and within three hours in the USA. There is an upper age limit of 80 years in some countries, and a limitation to mainly non-severe stroke in others. Forty per cent more data are available since this review was last updated in 2009. To determine whether, and in what circumstances, thrombolytic therapy might be an effective and safe treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2013). We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, searched reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies and trialists. Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in people with definite ischaemic stroke. Two review authors applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We verified the extracted data with investigators of all major trials, obtaining additional unpublished data if available. We included 27 trials, involving 10,187 participants, testing urokinase, streptokinase, rt-PA, recombinant pro-urokinase or desmoteplase. Four trials used intra-arterial administration, while the rest used the intravenous route. Most data come from trials that started treatment up to six hours after stroke. About 44% of the trials (about 70% of the participants) were testing intravenous rt-PA. In earlier studies very few of the participants (0.5%) were aged over 80 years; in this update, 16% of participants are over 80 years of age due to the

  3. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Background Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. Thrombolytic drugs, however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal. One drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), is licensed for use in selected patients within 4.5 hours of stroke in Europe and within three hours in the USA. There is an upper age limit of 80 years in some countries, and a limitation to mainly non-severe stroke in others. Forty per cent more data are available since this review was last updated in 2009. Objectives To determine whether, and in what circumstances, thrombolytic therapy might be an effective and safe treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2013).We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, searched reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies and trialists. Selection criteria Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in people with definite ischaemic stroke. Data collection and analysis Two review authors applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We verified the extracted data with investigators of all major trials, obtaining additional unpublished data if available. Main results We included 27 trials, involving 10,187 participants, testing urokinase, streptokinase, rt-PA, recombinant pro-urokinase or desmoteplase. Four trials used intra-arterial administration, while the rest used the intravenous route. Most data come from trials that started treatment up to six hours after stroke. About 44% of the trials (about 70% of the participants) were testing intravenous rt-PA. In earlier studies very few of the participants (0

  4. Relative filling time delay based on CT perfusion source imaging: a simple method to predict outcome in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cao, W; Campbell, B C V; Dong, Q; Davis, S M; Yan, B

    2014-09-01

    Collateral vessel status is strongly associated with clinical outcome in ischemic stroke but can be challenging to assess. The aim of this study was to develop a tomography perfusion source imaging-based assessment of collateral vessel status. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke who received intravenous thrombolysis or intra-arterial reperfusion therapy after CTP were retrospectively analyzed. In those with middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusion, CT perfusion source imaging was used to identify the relative filling time delay between the normal MCA Sylvian branches and those in the affected hemisphere. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were used to assess the association of the relative filling time delay with the 24-hour Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score based on noncontrast CT and the 90-day modified Rankin Scale score. There were 217 patients treated in 2009-2011 who had CTP data, of whom 60 had MCA or ICA occlusion and 55 had 90-day mRS data. The intraclass correlation coefficient for relative filling time delay was 0.95. Relative filling time delay was correlated with 24-hour ASPECTS (Spearman ρ=-0.674; P<.001) and 90-day mRS score (ρ=0.516, P<.01). Increased relative filling time delay was associated with poor radiologic outcome (ASPECTS, 0-7) (area under the curve=0.79, P<.001) and poor functional outcome (mRS score, 3-6) (area under the curve=0.77, P=.001). In multivariate logistic regression, the association of longer relative filling time delay with poor outcome remained significant, independent of age, sex, and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Relative filling time delay is a useful independent predictor of clinical outcome after ischemic stroke. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Evaluating middle cerebral artery atherosclerotic lesions in acute ischemic stroke using magnetic resonance T1-weighted 3-dimensional vessel wall imaging.

    PubMed

    Natori, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Makoto; Miyoshi, Mitsuharu; Ohba, Hideki; Katsura, Noriyuki; Yamaguchi, Mao; Narumi, Shinsuke; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Ito, Kenji; Terayama, Yasuo

    2014-04-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions in intracranial arteries are a leading cause of ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is often used to assess atherosclerotic changes by detecting luminal narrowing, whereas it cannot directly visualize atherosclerotic lesions. Here, we used a 3-dimensional vessel wall imaging (3D-VWI) technique to evaluate intracranial arterial wall changes in acute stroke. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute noncardioembolic stroke in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory who were prospectively examined with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner were studied. T1-weighted (T1-W) 3D-VWI was obtained using a flow-sensitized 3D fast-spin echo technique. Wall thickening of MCA that suggests atherosclerotic plaques was visually evaluated and the contrast ratio (CR) of signal intensity of the lesions to that of the corpus callosum was calculated and compared with stenotic changes by MRA. Wall thickenings of the MCA ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion were observed in almost all patients on 3D-VWI (94.4% and 94.4%, respectively), whereas MRA showed stenotic changes of 50% only in 1 patient (5.9%; P < .001). The CR of the thickened wall in the ipsilateral MCA was significantly higher than that in the contralateral MCA (median, .53 and .45, respectively; P = .028), suggesting of unstable plaques consisting of hemorrhage or lipid. The T1-W 3D-VWI can provide direct visualization of atherosclerotic lesions of the intracranial arteries in stroke patients, and it can detect signal change suggestive of unstable plaque. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  7. Association Between Serum Cystatin C Level and Total Magnetic Resonance Imaging Burden of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Patients With Acute Lacunar Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Cai, Jing; Lu, Rulan; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Xianju

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD). However, the relationship between serum cystatin C (CysC) level, a highly sensitive marker of impaired kidney function, and cSVD has not been fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the association between serum CysC level and total burden of cSVD on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute lacunar stroke. A total of 210 patients with first-ever acute lacunar stroke occurring within 1 week after onset were included in this study. Serum CysC level, decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and proteinuria were used to evaluate kidney function. The combined effect of the markers of cSVD on MRI, including lacunar, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, and enlarged perivascular spaces, were used to evaluate the comprehensive cSVD burden. There is a positive association between total cSVD burden and hypertension, low eGFR level, and serum CysC level. After adjustments for potential confounders by ordinal logistic regression, elevated levels of CysC as well as impaired eGFR and the presence of proteinuria were correlated with the burden of total cSVD (odds ratio [OR] 2.633, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.284-5.403; OR 2.442, 95% CI 1.213-4.918; and OR 2.151, 95% CI 1.162-3.983, respectively). The elevated level of serum CysC is associated with the total burden of cSVD in patients with acute lacunar stroke independent of conventional risk factors. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-resolved CT assessment of collaterals as imaging biomarkers to predict clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Elizabeth; Patrie, Jim; Tong, Sara; Evans, Avery; Michel, Patrik; Eskandari, Ashraf; Wintermark, Max

    2017-09-01

    Collateral circulation plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke and is increasingly recognized as a promising biomarker for predicting the clinical outcome. However, there is no single established grading system. We designed a novel machine-learning software that allows non-invasive, objective, and quantitative assessment of collaterals according to their vascular territories. Our goal is to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of this collateral score for the prediction of acute stroke outcome. This is a retrospective study of 135 patients with anterior circulation stroke treated with IV TPA. An equation using this collateral score (adjusting for age, baseline NIHSS, and recanalization) was derived to predict the clinical outcome (90-day mRS). The primary analyses focused on determining the prognostic value of our newly developed collateral scores. Secondary analyses examined the interrelationships between the collateral score and other variables. The collateral score emerged as a statistically significant prognostic biomarker for good clinical outcome (p < 0.033) among recanalized patients, but not among non-recanalized patients (p < 0.497). Our results also showed that collateral score was a predictive biomarker (p < 0.044). These results suggest that (1) patients with good collateral score derive more benefit from successful recanalization than patients with poor collateral score and (2) collateral status is inconsequential if recanalization is not achieved. Our data results reinforce the importance of careful patient selection for recanalization therapy to avoid futile recanalization. The paucity of collaterals predicts poor clinical outcome despite recanalization. On the other hand, robust collaterals warrant consideration for recanalization therapy given the better odds of good clinical outcome.

  9. Technique of diffusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Wu; He, Huiguang

    2003-05-01

    To study the application of diffusion weighted imaging and image post processing in the diagnosis of stroke, especially in acute stroke, 205 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner and the images such as T1, T2 and diffusion weighted images were obtained. Image post processing was done with "3D Med System" developed by our lab to analyze data and acquire the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. In acute and subacute stage of stroke, the signal in cerebral infarction areas changed to hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images, normal or hypointensity in T1-weighted images. In hyperacute stage, however, the signal was hyperintense just in the diffusion weighted imaes; others were normal. In the chronic stage, the signal in T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging showed hypointensity and hyperintensity in T2 weighted imaging. Because ADC declined obviously in acute and subacute stage of stroke, the lesion area was hypointensity in ADC map. With the development of the disease, ADC gradually recovered and then changed to hyperintensity in ADC map in chronic stage. Using diffusion weighted imaging and ADC mapping can make a diagnosis of stroke, especially in the hyperacute stage of stroke, and can differentiate acute and chronic stroke.

  10. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, J M; Zoppo, G; Yamaguchi, T; Berge, E

    2003-01-01

    The majority of strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred. Successful treatment could mean that the patient is more likely to make a good recovery from their stroke. Thrombolytic drugs however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain which can be fatal. Thrombolytic therapy has now been evaluated in several randomised trials in acute ischaemic stroke. The objective of this review was to assess the safety and efficacy of thrombolytic agents in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched January 2003), MEDLINE (1966- January 2003) and EMBASE (1980-January 2003). In addition we contacted researchers and pharmaceutical companies, attended relevant conferences and handsearched four Japanese journals. Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in patients with definite ischaemic stroke. One reviewer applied the inclusion criteria and extracted the data. Trial quality was assessed. The extracted data were verified by the principal investigators of all major trials. Thus published and unpublished data were obtained where available. Eighteen trials including 5727 patients were included, but not all trials contributed data to each outcome examined in this review. Sixteen trials were double-blind. The trials tested urokinase, streptokinase, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator or recombinant pro-urokinase. Two trials used intra-arterial administration but the rest used the intravenous route. About 50% of the data (patients and trials) come from trials testing intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. There are few data from patients aged over 80 years. Much of the data comes from trials conducted in the first half of the 1990s when, in an effort to reduce delays to trial drug administration, on site randomisation methods were used that, in consequence

  11. Collateral lessons from recent acute ischemic stroke trials.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S

    2014-05-01

    Numerous acute ischemic stroke trials have recently published detailed results, providing an opportunity to consider the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology and their influential effect on patient outcomes. Safety and Efficacy of NeuroFlo Technology in Ischemic Stroke (SENTIS), the largest randomized controlled trial of device therapy to date, tested the potential augmentation of collateral perfusion. SYNTHESIS Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III chronicled the saga of endovascular therapy trialed against medical treatment for acute ischemic stroke. These recent randomized studies, however, largely neglect current device technology available for endovascular therapy as advanced by the TREVO2 and SOLITAIRE™(TM) FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT) studies. Such exhaustive efforts in recent trials have failed to introduce a new treatment for stroke that unequivocally improves patient outcomes. Collateral perfusion is widely recognized to vary across individuals in any population and exerts a dramatic effect on baseline variables including the time course of ischemic injury, stroke severity, imaging findings, and therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, collaterals have been recognized to influence recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and subsequent neurological outcomes after stroke. Collateral lessons may be gleaned from these trials, to expand consideration of overall study results and perhaps most importantly, alter ongoing and new trials in development. Detailed analyses of available information on collaterals from these trials demonstrate that collaterals may be more influential than the choice of treatment modality or intervention.

  12. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thrombin Generation in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lara N.; Patel, Raj; Pathansali, Rohan; Kalra, Lalit; Arya, Roopen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke remains a global leading cause of death and disability. Traditional description of plasma biology in the aftermath of acute ischaemic stroke favours development of hypercoagulability, resulting from complex interplay between plasma and endothelial factors. However, no single assay measures the overall global coagulation process. We postulate that thrombin generation would assist in identifying coagulation abnormalities after acute stroke. Aim. To investigate the coagulation abnormalities after acute ischaemic stroke using thrombin generation. Methods. We evaluated thrombin generation, measured with calibrated automated thrombography in stroke of different aetiological types (n = 170) within 48 hours of symptoms onset (baseline) and in the second week (time 2) and in normal healthy volunteers (n = 71). Results. Two-point thrombin generation assays showed prolonged lag time and time to peak at baseline (3.3 (2.9, 4.0) versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7); p = 0.005) and (3.3 (2.9, 4.0) versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7); p = 0.002), respectively, and at time 2 (3.5 (2.9, 4.2) versus 4.0 (3.1, 4.9); p = 0.004) and (5.9 (5.3, 6.6) versus 6.8 (5.8, 7.7) p = 0.05), respectively, in cardioembolic stroke (n = 39), when compared to noncardioembolic stroke (n = 117). The result was reproduced in multiple comparisons between acute ischaemic stroke subgroups and normal healthy volunteers. Endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin did not indicate hypercoagulability after acute ischaemic stroke, and thrombolytic therapy did not affect thrombin generation assays. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma is not useful in defining hypercoagulability in acute ischaemic stroke. This is similar to observed trend in coronary artery disease and contrary to other hypercoagulable states. PMID:28116215

  14. Validation of an acute ischemic stroke model: does diffusion-weighted imaging lesion volume offer a clinically significant improvement in prediction of outcome?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Karen C; Wagner, Douglas P; Wang, Xin-Qun; Newman, George C; Thijs, Vincent; Sen, Souvik; Warach, Steven

    2007-06-01

    Prediction models for ischemic stroke outcome have the potential to contribute prognostic information in the clinical and/or research setting. The importance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in the prediction of clinical outcome, however, is unclear. The purpose of this study was to combine acute clinical data and DWI lesion volume for ischemic stroke patients to determine whether DWI improves the prediction of clinical outcome. Patients (N=382) with baseline DWI data from the Glycine Antagonist In Neuroprotection and citicoline (010 and 018) trials were used to develop the prediction models by multivariable logistic regression. Data from prospectively collected patients (N=266) from the Acute Stroke Accurate Prediction Study were used to externally validate the model equations. The models predicted either full recovery or nursing home-level disability/death, as defined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel Index, or modified Rankin Scale. The full-recovery models with DWI lesion volume had areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of 0.799 to 0.821, and those without DWI lesion volume had AUCs of 0.758 to 0.798. The nursing home-level disability/death models with DWI had AUCs of 0.832 to 0.882, and those without DWI had AUCs of 0.827 to 0.867. All models had mean absolute errors < or =0.4 for calibration. All 12 models had excellent discrimination and calibration, with 8 of 12 meeting prespecified performance criteria (AUC > or =0.8, mean absolute error < or =0.4). Although DWI lesion volume significantly increased model explanatory power, the magnitude of increase was not large enough to be clinically important.

  15. Yawning in acute anterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Singer, Oliver C; Humpich, Marek C; Lanfermann, Heiner; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias

    2007-11-01

    Pathological yawning can be a clinical sign in disorders affecting the brainstem. Here we describe seven patients with pathological yawning caused by acute middle cerebral artery stroke, indicating that pathological yawning also occurs in supratentorial stroke. We hypothesise that excessive yawning is a consequence of lesions in cortical or subcortical areas, which physiologically control diencephalic yawning centres.

  16. Imaging of prehospital stroke therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle P; Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant quality improvement efforts to streamline in-hospital acute stroke care in the conventional model, there remain inherent layers of treatment delays, which could be eliminated with prehospital diagnostics and therapeutics administered in a mobile stroke unit. Early diagnosis using Telestroke and neuroimaging while in the ambulance may enable targeted routing to hospitals with specialized care, which will likely improve patient outcomes. Key clinical trials in Telestroke, mobile stroke units with prehospital neuroimaging capability, prehospital ultrasound and co-administration of various classes of neuroprotectives, antiplatelets and antithrombin agents with intravenous thrombolysis are discussed in this article. PMID:26308602

  17. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries.

  18. [Stunned myocardium after acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Varela, Daniel; Díaz, Fernanda; Hlavnicka, Alejandro; Wainsztein, Néstor; Leiguarda, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    The so-called stunned myocardium, defined as transitory myocardial contractile dysfunction, has been clearly demonstrated in diverse clinical situations. However, stunned myocardium related to ischemic stroke has been poorly identified. We describe two patients with diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who developed eletrocardiographic changes, cardiac enzyme increasing levels and myocardial dysfunction secondary to abnormal cardiac wall motion. At the same time the patients developed acute lung injury with rapid resolution, perhaps as a consequence of neurocardiogenic components.

  19. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  20. Stroke code improves intravenous thrombolysis administration in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with "Stroke Code" (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. The study period was divided into the "pre-SC era" (January 2006 to July 2010) and "SC era" (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time.

  1. Stroke risk stratification in acute dizziness presentations

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, William J.; Brown, Devin L.; Burke, James F.; Hofer, Timothy P.; Tsodikov, Alexander; Hoeffner, Ellen G.; Fendrick, A.M.; Adelman, Eric E.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the ability of bedside information to risk stratify stroke in acute dizziness presentations. Methods: Surveillance methods were used to identify patients with acute dizziness and nystagmus or imbalance, excluding those with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, medical causes, or moderate to severe neurologic deficits. Stroke was defined as acute infarction or intracerebral hemorrhage on a clinical or research MRI performed within 14 days of dizziness onset. Bedside information comprised history of stroke, the ABCD2 score (age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration, and diabetes), an ocular motor (OM)-based assessment (head impulse test, nystagmus pattern [central vs other], test of skew), and a general neurologic examination for other CNS features. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association of the bedside information with stroke. Model calibration was assessed using low (<5%), intermediate (5% to <10%), and high (≥10%) predicted probability risk categories. Results: Acute stroke was identified in 29 of 272 patients (10.7%). Associations with stroke were as follows: ABCD2 score (continuous) (odds ratio [OR] 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.51), any other CNS features (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.06–6.08), OM assessment (OR 2.82; 95% CI 0.96–8.30), and prior stroke (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.05–4.57). No stroke cases were in the model's low-risk probability category (0/86, 0%), whereas 9 were in the moderate-risk category (9/94, 9.6%) and 20 were in the high-risk category (20/92, 21.7%). Conclusion: In acute dizziness presentations, the combination of ABCD2 score, general neurologic examination, and a specialized OM examination has the capacity to risk-stratify acute stroke on MRI. PMID:26511453

  2. 64-Slice spiral CT perfusion combined with vascular imaging of acute ischemic stroke for assessment of infarct core and penumbra

    PubMed Central

    BAO, DANG-ZHEN; BAO, HUAN-YING; YAO, LI-ZHAI; PAN, YUN-GAO; ZHU, XIN-RUI; YANG, XIAO-SONG; WANG, HE; HUANG, YI-NING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of computed tomography perfusion (CTP) parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT) and time-to-peak (TP), in a clinical study of patients with stroke. Additionally, we determined which parameter or combination of parameters are reliable in detecting the presence of an infarct and penumbra. CTP was performed within 24 h of the onset of symptoms in 20 patients with possible stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 3-7 days later and the threshold of the CTP was adjusted according to the results to provide CT images that correlated with the MRI; the MRI results were taken as the gold standard. CBV, CBF and TP contrast agent enhancement were calculated using the CT results. The CTP results were compared with the MRI findings. All CTP parameters were reliable in detecting the penumbra (P<0.001). In these parameters, changes of MTT were the most useful. CTP revealed various changes in CBF, CBV, MTT and TP in ischemic areas. CTP parameters were also reliable in detecting the infarct core (P<0.001). We determined that when detecting the penumbra, all CTP parameters are reliable, and when detecting cerebral ischemia, a combination of parameters should be used. PMID:23935734

  3. Associations of Ischemic Lesion Volume With Functional Outcome in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: 24-Hour Versus 1-Week Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bucker, Amber; Boers, Anna M; Bot, Joseph C J; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Lingsma, Hester F; Yoo, Albert J; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2017-05-01

    Ischemic lesion volume (ILV) on noncontrast computed tomography at 1 week can be used as a secondary outcome measure in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Twenty-four-hour ILV on noncontrast computed tomography has greater availability and potentially allows earlier estimation of functional outcome. We aimed to assess lesion growth 24 hours after stroke onset and compare the associations of 24-hour and 1-week ILV with functional outcome. We included 228 patients from MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands), who received noncontrast computed tomography at 24-hour and 1-week follow-up on which ILV was measured. Relative and absolute lesion growth was determined. Logistic regression models were constructed either including the 24-hour or including the 1-week ILV. Ordinal and dichotomous (0-2 and 3-6) modified Rankin scale scores were, respectively, used as primary and secondary outcome measures. Median ILV was 42 mL (interquartile range, 21-95 mL) and 64 mL (interquartile range: 30-120 mL) at 24 hours and 1 week, respectively. Relative lesion growth exceeding 30% occurred in 121 patients (53%) and absolute lesion growth exceeding 20 mL occurred in 83 patients (36%). Both the 24-hour and 1-week ILVs were similarly significantly associated with functional outcome (both P<0.001). In the logistic analyses, the areas under the curve of the receiver-operator characteristic curves were similar: 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.90) and 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.91) for including the 24-hour and 1-week ILV, respectively. Growth of ILV is common 24-hour poststroke onset. Nevertheless, the 24-hour ILV proved to be a valuable secondary outcome measure as it is equally strongly associated with functional outcome as the 1-week ILV. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  5. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  6. [Nutrition for elderly acute stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Ha, Lisa; Iversen, Per Ole; Hauge, Truls

    2008-09-11

    Elderly people have an increased risk of malnutrition due to biological and physiological changes and underlying disease. Almost 90% of the stroke patients are older than 65 years, and the consequences of acute stroke may lead to additional nutritional problems. This paper reviews nutritional therapy for stroke patients. PubMed was searched (non-systematically) for prospective cohort studies of occurrence, diagnostics and consequences of undernutrition in stroke patients. Randomized trials were examined to identify clinical effects of oral protein and energy supplements or tube feeding on nutritional status and intake, functional status, infections, length of stay, quality of life and mortality. 8-35% of stroke patients are undernourished. Body weight is one of the most important parameters for assessment of nutritional status. Dysphagia occurs in up to 80% of patients with acute stroke and increases the risk of undernutrition, which again leads to prolonged length of stay, reduced functional status and poorer survival. Early nasogastric tube feeding does not increase the risk of pneumonia and may improve survival after six months. Oral supplements lead to a significantly improved nutritional intake in undernourished stroke patients, as well as improved nutritional status and survival in undernourished elderly. Nutritional treatment can improve the clinical outcome after an acute stroke, provided that there are good procedures for follow-up and monitoring of the treatment.

  7. Treating the acute stroke patient as an emergency: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S; Lees, K; Donnan, G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Developments in acute stroke therapy have followed advances in the understanding of the evolving pathophysiology in both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). In ischaemic stroke, rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic penumbra with thrombolysis within 3 h of symptom onset is of proven benefit, but few patients currently receive therapy, mainly due to the short-time window and lack of stroke expertise. In ICH, a recent study indicated that a haemostatic agent can limit ongoing bleeding and improve outcomes when administered within 4 h of stroke onset. These advances in acute stroke therapy underlie the concept that ‘time is brain’ and that urgent intervention can limit cerebral damage. Neuroprotective therapy could offer the prospect of a greater proportion of stroke patients receiving treatment, potentially before imaging and even in the ambulance setting. Virtually all stroke patients would benefit from receiving multidisciplinary care in acute stroke units. PMID:16620351

  8. Painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as an acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Baydin, Ahmet; Nargis, Cemil; Nural, M Selim; Aygun, Dursun; Karatas, Aydin Deniz; Bahcivan, Muzaffer

    2006-12-01

    Acute aortic dissection is an uncommon disease; however, it has a high mortality rate. Classically, aortic dissection presents with sudden and severe pain in the chest, back, or abdomen. Patients often describe tearing or ripping pain. There are a few reports of atypical findings or no pain in the literature. We report a case of painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as acute stroke.

  9. Modern medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Larry B

    2014-01-01

    The modern management of patients with ischemic stroke begins by having a system in place that organizes the provision of preventive, acute treatment, and rehabilitative services. In the acute setting, initial evaluation is aimed at rapidly establishing a diagnosis by excluding stroke mimics, distinguishing between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, and determining if the patient is a candidate for treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA, alteplase). In some centers, select patients who do not qualify for administration of IV-tPA may be considered for endovascular intervention. General measures include the use of platelet antiaggregants, treatment of fever, blood pressure management, and continuation of statins if the patient has already been taking them. Post-acute evaluation and management is aimed at secondary prevention and optimizing recovery, including recognition and treatment of post-stroke depression.

  10. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  11. Bacterial pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fu; Chang, Cheng-Yu; Hsu, Li-Cho; Tsai, Ping-Huang; Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Yuan, Mei-Kang; Lai, Yi-Chun; Liu, Yu-Chang; Wang, Wei-Shu

    2013-02-01

    The most common serious complication following acute ischemic stroke is pneumonia, which may increase mortality and worsen clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke. From June 2006 to May 2011, we retrospectively included 51 patients with pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke. We analyzed the clinical features, microbiologic data, and outcomes. Predictors of 30-day mortality were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The acute ischemic strokes were caused by large-artery atherosclerosis in 37 (72.5%) of the 51 patients. We found that the most common pathogen responsible for poststroke pneumonia was Klebsiella pneumoniae, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Ultimately, 12 patients died of progressive sepsis due to pneumonia after the acute ischemic stroke. The 30-day mortality rate was 23.5%. In the univariate analysis, patients who died within 30 days had higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, higher CURB-65 scores, elevated instability of hemodynamic status, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. In Cox regression analysis, a GCS score of <9 on the day of pneumonia onset was only significant indicator for 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 6.72; 95% confidence interval, 2.12-21.30, p = 0.001). Pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke is a severe complication. Once stroke-related pneumonia develops, neurologic assessment, CURB-65 score, and shock can be used to predict the ultimate prognosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Establishment of government-initiated comprehensive stroke centers for acute ischemic stroke management in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jei; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Ha, Yeon Soo; Shin, Dong-Ick; Kim, Seongheon; Lim, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    In 2008, the Ministry of Health and Welfare of South Korea initiated the Regional Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) program to decrease the incidence and mortality of stroke nationwide. We evaluated the performance of acute ischemic stroke management after the Regional CSC program was introduced. The Ministry of Health and Welfare established 9 Regional CSCs in different provinces from 2008 to 2010. All Regional CSCs have been able to execute the critical processes independently for stroke management since 2011. The Ministry of Health and Welfare was responsible for program development and financial support, the Regional CSC for program execution, and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for auditing the execution. We analyzed prospectively collected data on the required indices from 2011 and repeated the analysis the following year for comparison. After the Regional CSCs were established, the first brain image was taken within 1 hour from arrival at the emergency room for all patients with stroke; the length of hospital stay decreased from 14 to 12 days; for the rapid execution of thrombolysis, the first brain image was taken within 12 minutes; intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis were started within 40 and 110 minutes, respectively, after emergency room arrival; and the hospital stay of thrombolytic patients decreased from 19 to 15 days. The Regional CSC program has improved the performance of acute stroke management in South Korea and can be used as a model for rapidly improving stroke management. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    CHOPP, Michael; LI, Lian; ZHANG, Li; ZHANG, Zheng-gang; LI, Qing-jiang; JIANG, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now a routine neuroimaging tool in the clinic. Throughout all phases of stroke from acute to chronic, MRI plays an important role to diagnose, evaluate and monitor the cerebral tissue undergoing stroke. This review provides a description of various MRI methods and an overview of selected MRI studies, with an embolic stroke model of rat, performed in the MRI laboratory of Department of Neurology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, US. PMID:24920874

  14. Experimental acute thrombotic stroke in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Del Zoppo, G.J.; Copeland, B.R.; Harker, L.A.; Waltz, T.A.; Zyroff, J.; Hanson, S.R.; Battenberg, E.

    1986-11-01

    To study the effects of antithrombotic therapy in experimental stroke, we have characterized a baboon model of acute cerebrovascular thrombosis. In this model an inflatable silastic balloon cuff has been implanted by transorbital approach around the right middle cerebral artery (MCA), proximal to the take-off of the lenticulostriate arteries (LSA). Inflation of the balloon for 3 hours in six animals produced a stereotypic sustained stroke syndrome characterized by contralateral hemiparesis. An infarction volume of 3.2 +/- 1.5 cm3 in the ipsilateral corpus striatum was documented by computerized tomographic (CT) scanning at 10 days following stroke induction and 3.9 +/- 1.9 cm3 (n = 4) at 14 days by morphometric neuropathologic determinations of brain specimens fixed in situ by pressure-perfusion with 10% buffered formalin. Immediate pressure-perfusion fixation following deflation of the balloon was performed in 16 additional animals given Evans blue dye intravenously prior to the 3 hour MCA balloon occlusion. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy consistently confirmed the presence of thrombotic material occluding microcirculatory branches of the right LSA in the region of Evans blue stain, but not those of the contralateral corpus striatum. When autologous 111In-platelets were infused intravenously in four animals from the above group prior to the transient 3 hour occlusion of the right MCA, gamma scintillation camera imaging of each perfused-fixed whole brain demonstrated the presence of a single residual focus of 111In-platelet activity involving only the Evans blue-stained right corpus striatum. Focal right hemispheric activity was equivalent to 0.55 +/- 0.49 ml of whole blood, and the occlusion score derived from histologic examination of the microcirculation of the Evans blue-stained corpus striatum averaged 34.8 +/- 2.8.

  15. Noncontrast Computed Tomography versus Computed Tomography Angiography Source Images for Predicting Final Infarct Size in Anterior Circulation Acute Ischemic Stroke: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Amritendu; Muthusami, Prakash; Mohimen, Aneesh; K, Srinivasan; B, Babunath; Pn, Sylaja; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2017-02-01

    There has been a recent debate regarding the superiority of computed tomography angiography source images (CTASIs) over noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) to predict the final infarct size in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We hypothesized that the parenchymal abnormality on CTASI in faster scanners would overestimate ischemic core. This prospective study assessed the correlation of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on NCCT, CTASI, and computed tomography perfusion (CTP) with final infarct size in patients within 8 hours of AIS. Follow-up with NCCT or diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 24 hours. Correlations of NCCT and CTASI with final infarct size and with CTP parameters were assessed. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients who underwent intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Inter-rater reliability was tested using Spearman's rank correlation. A P value less than .05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 105 patients were included in the final analysis. NCCT had a stronger correlation with the final infarct size than did CTASI (Spearman's ρ = .85 versus .78, P = .13). We found an overestimation of the final infarct size by CTASI in 47.6% of the cases, whereas NCCT underestimated infarct size in 60% of the patients. NCCT correlated most strongly with CBV (ρ = .93), whereas CTASI correlated most strongly with CBF (ρ = .87). Subgroup analysis showed less correlation of CTASI with final infarct size in the group that received thrombolysis versus the group that did not (ρ = .70 versus .88, P = .01). In a 256-slice scanner, the CTASI parenchymal abnormality includes ischemic penumbra and thus overestimates final infarct size-this could result in inappropriate exclusion of patients from thrombolysis or thrombectomy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Fast diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) with Inherent COrrelation-based Normalization (ICON) enhances automatic segmentation of heterogeneous diffusion MRI lesion in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Guo, Yingkun; Igarashi, Takahiro; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Wen, Lingyi; Vangel, Mark; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has been shown to augment diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the definition of irreversible ischemic injury. However, the complexity of cerebral structure/composition makes the kurtosis map heterogeneous, limiting the specificity of kurtosis hyperintensity to acute ischemia. We propose an Inherent COrrelation-based Normalization (ICON) analysis to suppress the intrinsic kurtosis heterogeneity for improved characterization of heterogeneous ischemic tissue injury. Fast DKI and relaxation measurements were performed on normal (n = 10) and stroke rats following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (n = 20). We evaluated the correlations between mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from the fast DKI sequence and relaxation rates R1 and R2 , and found a highly significant correlation between MK and R1 (p < 0.001). We showed that ICON analysis suppressed the intrinsic kurtosis heterogeneity in normal cerebral tissue, enabling automated tissue segmentation in an animal stroke model. We found significantly different kurtosis and diffusivity lesion volumes: 147 ± 59 and 180 ± 66 mm(3) , respectively (p = 0.003, paired t-test). The ratio of kurtosis to diffusivity lesion volume was 84% ± 19% (p < 0.001, one-sample t-test). We found that relaxation-normalized MK (RNMK), but not MD, values were significantly different between kurtosis and diffusivity lesions (p < 0.001, analysis of variance). Our study showed that fast DKI with ICON analysis provides a promising means of demarcation of heterogeneous DWI stroke lesions.

  17. Dabigatran Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Buck, Brian; Sivakumar, Leka; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischemic stroke patients are at risk of early recurrence. We tested the feasibility and safety of initiating dabigatran in patients, within 24 hours of minor stroke in patients without atrial fibrillation. Minor stroke patients (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤3) without atrial fibrillation and evidence of acute infarction on magnetic resonance imaging were treated with dabigatran. Treatment began within 24 hours of onset and was continued for 30 days. The primary end point was symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. A total of 53 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 68 (57-77) years and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 1 (0-2) were enrolled. Baseline diffusion-weighted imaging volume was 0.8 (0.3-2.4) mL. No patients experienced symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic petechial hemorrhagic transformation on day 7, which remained stable at day 30, while continuing dabigatran. Dabigatran treatment within 24 hours of minor stroke is feasible. A larger randomized trial is required to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment approach. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT 01769703. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (P<0.001 and P=0.009, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression revealed that pneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, P<0.001). In conclusion, pneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  19. Development of Computerized Scheme for Adjustment of Display Grayscale in Brain Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Harakawa, Tetsumi; Doi, Kunio

    We developed a computerized scheme for proper adjustment of display grayscale in brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI) with acute ischemic stroke by using thalamic signal intensity on concurrent images (b0 image). In our computerized scheme, the gray level of b0 image was first normalized, and the brain region was segmented using thresholding and labeling techniques. The lateral inclination in b0 image was then corrected semi-automatically by rotating and shifting. Each of the thalamic positions was determined by using the coordinate information in the brain region. The average signal intensity of the thalamus was measured on the region of interest (ROI) selected, and the thalamus in one side with the low signal intensity was selected. The display grayscale in DWI was finally adjusted by using the signal intensity of the selected thalamus. The thalamus positions in all cases were confirmed to be included in the thalamic outline. In 30 training cases, the average error between the thalamic signal intensity obtained from the manual selection and the computerized scheme were 1.8%±1.5, and in 30 testing cases, 1.3%±1.2. Our computerized scheme has a potential in the determination of the display grayscale of brain DWI, and would be useful to radiologists in decision-making for radiological diagnosis.

  20. Cryoglobulins in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukyan, L. A.; Ayvazyan, V. A.; Boyajyan, A. S.

    Cryoglobulins (Cgs) are pathogenic immune complexes, non specific markers of the inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In this study we for the first time, revealed Cgs in the blood of ischemic stroke patients and analyze their composition.

  1. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  2. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Right Hemispatial Neglect: Frequency and Characterization Following Acute Left Hemisphere Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of various types of unilateral spatial neglect and associated areas of neural dysfunction after left hemisphere stroke are not well characterized. Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in distinct spatial reference frames have been identified after acute right, but not left hemisphere stroke. We studied 47 consecutive right handed patients within 48 hours of left hemisphere stroke to determine the frequency and distribution of types of right USN using cognitive testing and MRI imaging. The distribution of USN types was different from the previously reported distribution following acute right hemisphere stroke. In this left hemisphere stroke population, allocentric neglect was more frequent than egocentric neglect. PMID:17174459

  4. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  5. Thromboelastography in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Andrea; Wetzel, Jeremy; Roper, Tiffany; Pivalizza, Evan; McCarthy, James; Wallace, Cristina; Hess, Mary Jane; Peng, Hui; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Sangha, Navdeep; Grotta, James C

    2015-02-01

    Thromboelastography measures the dynamics of coagulation. There are limited data about thromboelastography in acute ischemic stroke other than a single study from 1974 suggesting that acute ischemic stroke patients are hypercoagulable. There have been no studies of thromboelastography in the thrombolytic era despite its potential usefulness as a measure of clot lysis. This study was designed to provide initial thromboelastography data in stroke patients before and after tissue plasminogen activator therapy and to provide the necessary preliminary data for further study of thromboelastography's ability to identify clot subtype and predict response to tissue plasminogen activator therapy. All acute ischemic stroke patients presenting between 11/2009 and 2/2011 eligible for tissue plasminogen activator therapy were screened and 56 enrolled. Blood was drawn before (52 patients) and 10 mins after tissue plasminogen activator bolus (30 patients). Demographics, vitals, labs, 24 h National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and computed tomography scan results were collected. Patients were compared with normal controls. Acute ischemic stroke patients had shorter R (4.8 ± 1.5 vs. 6.0 ± 1.7 min, P = 0.0004), greater α Angle (65.0 ± 7.6 vs. 61.5 ± 5.9°, P = 0.01), and shorter K (1.7 ± 0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7 min, P = 0.002) indicating faster clotting. Additionally, a subset formed clots with stronger platelet-fibrin matrices. Treatment with tissue plasminogen activator resulted in reduction in all indices of clot strength (LY30 = 0 (0-0.4) vs. 94.4 (15.2-95.3) P < 0.0001); however, there was considerable variability in response. Thromboelastography demonstrates that many acute ischemic stroke patients are hypercoaguable. Thromboelastography values reflect variable clot subtype and response to tissue plasminogen activator. Further study based on these data will determine if thromboelastography is useful for measuring the dynamic aspects of clot formation and monitoring lytic

  6. Management of blood pressure in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, John A; Dawson, Jesse; Quinn, Terence J

    2013-08-01

    The importance of elevated or low arterial blood pressure (BP) early after stroke, and the need for pharmacological intervention to control BP, remains controversial. Debate surrounds if, when and how to intervene. This debate is informed by conflicting results from observational data and underpowered clinical trials and substantive outcome data are lacking. Accordingly, management decisions have largely been left up to the individual treating physician and guidelines are based on 'good practice' and theory rather than level 1, grade A evidence. Substantial progress has been made in recent years, particularly in the field of hemorrhagic stroke, where recently presented and soon to completed large-scale trials may finally give us a firm evidence base. For ischemic stroke, many important studies have informed our understanding of the basic pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of BP management in acute stroke and, although not yet constituting a solid 'evidence base', are helping us from the 'cognitive quick-sand' of small studies and personal experiences.

  7. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  8. Using telemedicine for acute stroke assessment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jo; Fitzgerald, Jane; Gibson, Alison; McAdam, Joanna; Lightbody, Liz; McLoughlin, Alison; Watkins, Caroline; Day, Elaine

    In acute stroke care, urgent specialist assessment and treatment are essential to reduce the risk of death and disability. However, many patients do not receive them due to a lack of specialist services. One solution is to use telemedicine. This can give all patients with acute stroke symptoms access to immediate expert assessment and advice, regardless of when and where they present to hospital. This article describes a telemedicine system developed and implemented in Lancashire and Cumbria. In its first year of operation, 319 patients received a telestroke video assessment with a consultant stroke physician; 131 of these patients were given thrombolysis. We discuss how the service was designed, staff training and development, and the implications for nursing practice. The development of a standardised telemedicine toolkit that may facilitate future telemedicine projects is also discussed.

  9. Orthostatic haemodynamic responses in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, B; Reid, J; Fotherby, M; Crome, P

    1999-01-01

    Little is known about orthostatic blood pressure regulation in acute stroke. We determined postural haemodynamic responses in 40 patients with acute stroke (mild or moderate severity) and 40 non-stroke control in-patients, at two days (`Day 1') and one week (`Week 1') post-admission. Following a 10-minute supine rest and baseline readings, subjects sat up and blood pressure and heart rate were taken for 5 minutes. The procedure was repeated with subjects moving from supine to the standing posture. Haemodynamic changes from supine data were analysed. On standing up, the control group had a transient significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure on Day 1 but not Week 1. No significant changes were seen on either day when sitting up. In contrast to controls, the stroke group showed increases in mean arterial blood pressure on moving from supine to the sitting and standing positions on both days. Persistent postural hypotension defined as ⩾20 mmHg systolic fall occurred in <10% of either of the study groups on both days. Sitting and standing heart rates in both groups were significantly faster than supine heart rate on both days. The orthostatic blood pressure elevation is consistent with sympathetic nervous system overactivity which has been reported in acute stroke. Upright positioning as part of early rehabilitation and mobilisation following mild-to-moderate stroke would, therefore, not predispose to detrimental postural reductions in blood pressure.


Keywords: stroke; orthostatic hypotension; hypotension PMID:10715760

  10. Brain natriuretic peptide in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kenji; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Iijima, Mutsumi; Moriya, Saori; Mizuno, Satoko; Toi, Sono; Arai, Kotaro; Ashihara, Kyomi; Abe, Kayoko; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are associated with cardioembolic stroke mainly because of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms of increased serum BNP levels are hitherto unclear. We aimed to identify the factors associated with increased BNP levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured serum BNP levels in consecutive patients aged 18 years or older. Stroke subtypes were classified using the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Categorical variables included age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease (CAD), AF, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulant therapy. Continuous variables included hemoglobin, creatinine (Cr), β-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and d-dimer levels. We further determined the relationship between serum BNP and intima-media thickness, left ventricular ejection fraction, size of infarction, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge. Of the 231 patients (mean age, 71 ± 12 years) with acute ischemic stroke (AIS), 36% were women. Serum BNP levels significantly correlated with CAD, AF, Cr, mRS, and cardioembolism (CE) (Dunnett method, P = .004). BNP levels were significantly higher in patients with larger infarcts, higher mRS scores, and higher CHADS2 scores. The levels were higher in patients with larger infarcts, higher mRS scores at discharge, and higher CHADS2 scores among AF patients. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coffee and acute ischemic stroke onset

    PubMed Central

    Mostofsky, E.; Schlaug, G.; Mukamal, K.J.; Rosamond, W.D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Prior research suggests an acutely elevated risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in the hour after coffee intake. However, the risk of ischemic stroke associated with transient exposure to coffee remains unclear. We hypothesized that caffeine intake is associated with a transiently increased risk of ischemic stroke. Methods: In this multicenter case-crossover study, we interviewed 390 subjects (209 men, 181 women) between January 2001 and November 2006 a median of 3 days after acute ischemic stroke. Each subject's coffee consumption in the hour before stroke symptoms was compared with his or her usual frequency of consumption in the prior year. Results: Of the 390 subjects, 304 (78%) drank coffee in the prior year, 232 within 24 hours and 35 within 1 hour of stroke onset. The relative risk (RR) of stroke in the hour after consuming coffee was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–2.8; p < 0.001). There was no apparent increase in risk in the hour following consumption of caffeinated tea (RR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.4–2.0; p = 0.85) or cola (RR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.4–2.4; p = 0.95). The association between ischemic stroke in the hour after coffee consumption was only apparent among those consuming ≤1 cup per day but not for patients who consumed coffee more regularly (p for trend = 0.002). Relative risks remained similar when the sample was restricted to those who were not simultaneously exposed to other potential triggers and the results remained significant after stratifying by time of day. Conclusion: Coffee consumption transiently increases the risk of ischemic stroke onset, particularly among infrequent drinkers. PMID:20881275

  12. Effect of aphasia on acute stroke outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Marshall, Randolph S; Lazar, Ronald M

    2016-11-29

    To determine the independent effects of aphasia on outcomes during acute stroke admission, controlling for total NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and loss of consciousness. Data from the Tulane Stroke Registry were used from July 2008 to December 2014 for patient demographics, NIHSS scores, length of stay (LOS), complications (sepsis, deep vein thrombosis), and discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Aphasia was defined as a score >1 on question 9 on the NIHSS on admission and hemiparesis as >1 on questions 5 or 6. Among 1,847 patients, 866 (46%) had aphasia on admission. Adjusting for NIHSS score and inpatient complications, those with aphasia had a 1.22 day longer LOS than those without aphasia, whereas those with hemiparesis (n = 1,225) did not have any increased LOS compared to those without hemiparesis. Those with aphasia had greater odds of having a complication (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.93, p = 0.0174) than those without aphasia, which was equivalent to those having hemiparesis (OR 1.47, CI 1.09-1.99, p = 0.0137). Controlling for NIHSS scores, aphasia patients had higher odds of discharge mRS 3-6 (OR 1.42 vs 1.15). Aphasia is independently associated with increased LOS and complications during the acute stroke admission, adding $2.16 billion annually to US acute stroke care. The presence of aphasia was more likely to produce a poor functional outcome than hemiparesis. These data suggest that further research is necessary to determine whether establishing adaptive communication skills can mitigate its consequences in the acute stroke setting. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Promoting thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Maaike; Niessen, Louis W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Koudstaal, Peter J; Franke, Cees L; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijsman, Robbert; Lingsma, Hester F; Minkman, Mirella M N; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-05-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but the number of treatable patients is limited. The PRomoting ACute Thrombolysis in Ischemic StrokE (PRACTISE) trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multidimensional implementation strategy for thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke. The PRACTISE trial was a national multicenter cluster-randomized controlled trial with randomization after pairwise matching. Twelve hospitals, both urban and community, academic and nonacademic, in the Netherlands participated. All patients admitted with stroke within 24 hours from onset of symptoms were registered. The intervention included 5 implementation meetings based on the Breakthrough Series model. The primary outcome was treatment with thrombolysis. Secondary outcomes were admission within 4 hours after onset of symptoms, death or disability at 3 months, and quality of life. Overall 5515 patients were included in the study' 308 patients (12.2%) in the control centers and 393 patients (13.1%) in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis (adjusted OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.68). Among the 1657 patients with ischemic stroke admitted within 4 hours from onset, 391 (44.5%) of 880 in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis and 305 (39.3%) of 777 in the control centers; the adjusted OR for treatment with thrombolysis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.27). An intensive implementation strategy increases the proportion of patients with acute stroke treated with thrombolysis in real-life settings. An apparently pivotal factor in the improvement of the treatment rate is better application of contraindications for thrombolysis.

  14. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  15. Limb apraxia in acute ischemic stroke: a neglected clinical challenge?

    PubMed

    Schell, Caroline; Suchan, Julia; Himmelbach, Marc; Haarmeier, Thomas; Borchers, Svenja

    2014-04-01

    Symptoms of limb apraxia and executive dysfunctions are currently not explicitly considered by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and, thus, not routinely tested by clinicians in the acute care of patients with suspected stroke. Neuropsychological testing, clinical examination, MRI, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were performed in a right-handed patient with acute onset of left-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis due to a right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Deficits in the execution of meaningless and meaningful gestures were not detected properly on initial clinical examination but were revealed later on through neuropsychological testing. Instead, the patient's inability to respond to specific instructions in the acute care setting was mistaken to reflect severe deficits in auditory comprehension. fMRI revealed right-hemispheric localization of language in the right-handed patient. We suggest including a bedside test for limb apraxia symptoms in acute clinical care of stroke patients. The distinction between deficits in limb praxis and impairments of language can be complicated owing to the common hemispheric co-localization of the two functions.

  16. Radionuclide imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by interruption or significant impairment of blood supply to the brain, which leads to a cascade of metabolic and molecular alterations resulting in functional disturbance and morphologic damage. The changes in regional cerebral blood flow and regional metabolism can be assessed by radionuclide imaging, especially SPECT and PET. SPECT and PET have broadened our understanding of flow and metabolic thresholds critical for maintenance of brain function and morphology: PET was essential in the transfer of the concept of the penumbra to clinical stroke and thereby had a great impact on developing treatment strategies. Receptor ligands can be applied as early markers of irreversible neuronal damage and can predict the size of the final infarcts, which is important for decisions on invasive therapy in large ("malignant") infarction. With SPECT and PET, the reserve capacity of the blood supply can be tested in obstructive arteriosclerosis, which is essential for planning interventions. The effect of a stroke on surrounding and contralateral primarily unaffected tissue can be investigated, helping to understand symptoms caused by disturbance in functional networks. Activation studies are useful to demonstrate alternative pathways to compensate for lesions and to test the effect of rehabilitative therapy. Radioisotope studies help to detect neuroinflammation and its effect on extension of tissue damage. Despite the limitations of broad clinical application of radionuclide imaging, this technology has a great impact on research in cerebrovascular diseases and still has various applications in the management of stroke. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  17. Plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Kim, Myung Chun; Lee, Woo In

    2010-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and timely treatment improves the outcome in patients with ischemic stroke, but a rapid and sensitive blood test for ischemic stroke does not exist. This study tested whether a panel of biomarkers might be useful in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. Plasma specimens were assayed for brain natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, S100β, and a proprietary composite multimarker index (MMX). There were 139 patients in this study, 89 of whom were diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke, 11 with acute cerebral hemorrhage, and 39 with other brain disorders. The MMX value was significantly higher in the patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison to 57 healthy controls (p <0.001), but there was no significant difference between the MMX value in patients with acute ischemic stroke vs those with acute cerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.884). The discriminatory capacity of MMX was modest, with an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.714 for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke was not diagnosed by any of the biochemical markers individually. Although the data suggest that MMX may be helpful to diagnose an acute stroke, it does not discriminate between acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke.

  18. Development of smartphone application that aids stroke screening and identifying nearby acute stroke care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, JoonNyung; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae Jin; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent. We developed a smartphone application that aids stroke patient self-screening and hospital selection, and may also decrease hospital arrival time. The application was developed for iPhone and Android smartphones. Map data for the application were adopted from the open map. For hospital registration, a web page (http://stroke119.org) was developed using PHP and MySQL. The Stroke 119 application includes a stroke screening tool and real-time information on nearby hospitals that provide thrombolytic treatment. It also provides information on stroke symptoms, thrombolytic treatment, and prescribed actions when stroke is suspected. The stroke screening tool was adopted from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and is displayed in a cartoon format. If the user taps a cartoon image that represents abnormal findings, a pop-up window shows that the user may be having a stroke, informs the user what to do, and directs the user to call emergency services. Information on nearby hospitals is provided in map and list views, incorporating proximity to the user's location using a Global Positioning System (a built-in function of smartphones). Users can search for a hospital according to specialty and treatment levels. We also developed a web page for hospitals to register in the system. Neurology training hospitals and hospitals that provide acute stroke care in Korea were invited to register. Seventy-seven hospitals had completed registration. This application may be useful for reducing hospital arrival times for thrombolytic candidates.

  19. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  20. Infarct location and sleep apnea: evaluating the potential association in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephanie M; Yaggi, H Klar; Taylor, Stanley; Qin, Li; Ivan, Cristina S; Austin, Charles; Ferguson, Jared; Radulescu, Radu; Tobias, Lauren; Sico, Jason; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Williams, Linda S; Lampert, Rachel; Miech, Edward J; Matthias, Marianne S; Kapoor, John; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-10-01

    The literature about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stroke location is conflicting with some studies finding an association and others demonstrating no relationship. Among acute ischemic stroke patients, we sought to examine the relationship between stroke location and the prevalence of OSA; OSA severity based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), arousal frequency, and measure of hypoxia; and number of central and obstructive respiratory events. Data were obtained from patients who participated in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01446913) that evaluated the effectiveness of a strategy of diagnosing and treating OSA among patients with acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Stroke location was classified by brain imaging reports into subdivisions of lobes, subcortical areas, brainstem, cerebellum, and vascular territory. The association between acute stroke location and polysomnographic findings was evaluated using logistic regression for OSA presence and negative binomial regression for AHI. Among 73 patients with complete polysomnography and stroke location data, 58 (79%) had OSA. In unadjusted models, no stroke location variable was associated with the prevalence or severity of OSA. Similarly, in multivariable modeling, groupings of stroke location were also not associated with OSA presence. These results indicate that OSA is present in the majority of stroke patients and imply that stroke location cannot be used to identify a group with higher risk of OSA. The results also suggest that OSA likely predated the stroke. Given this high overall prevalence, strong consideration should be given to obtaining polysomnography for all ischemic stroke patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of CT perfusion imaging for detecting acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Biesbroek, J M; Niesten, J M; Dankbaar, J W; Biessels, G J; Velthuis, B K; Reitsma, J B; van der Schaaf, I C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT perfusion (CTP) for the detection of ischemic stroke by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of published reports. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library using the terms 'perfusion computed tomography', 'ischemic stroke' and synonyms. We included studies that: (1) reported original data, (2) studied the diagnostic value of CTP for detecting ischemic stroke, (3) used MRI-DWI, follow-up MRI or follow-up CT as the reference standard, (4) included at least 10 patients who were suspected of ischemic stroke, and (5) reported the number of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives for the diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Fifteen studies were finally included in the current review with a total of 1,107 patients. A pooled analysis resulted in a sensitivity of 80% (95% confidence interval, CI: 72-86%) and a specificity of 95% (95% CI: 86-98%). Almost two thirds of the false negatives were due to small lacunar infarcts; the remaining false negatives were mostly due to limited coverage. The current systematic review shows that CTP has a high sensitivity and a very high specificity for detecting infarcts. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Is carpal tunnel syndrome present in acute stroke patients? An investigative study using clinical and imaging screening tools.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Loochtan, Aaron I; Dresser, Brian; Chang, Jianhong; Farjat, Alfredo E; Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobson-Webb, Lisa D

    2017-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is known to develop post-stroke. Median nerve ultrasound (US) is an inexpensive, effective means of screening. In this prospective feasibility study, we compared the ability of the physical exam, the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and median nerve US to screen for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) within 72hours of stroke onset. We enrolled 24 consecutive patients. Using US, 19 (79%, p=0.0386) of the 24 patients screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 20 (83%, p=0.0042) on the nonparetic side. With clinical examination, only 11 out of 24 (46%) screened positive for CTS on the paretic side and 8 (33%) on the nonparetic side. The BCTQ did not predict CTS. US can be an effective screening tool post-stroke. Further research is needed to determine specificity and efficacy compared to electrodiagnostic testing in this population.

  3. Mechanical interventions to treat acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Fussell, David; Schumacher, H Christian; Meyers, Philip M; Higashida, Randall T

    2007-01-01

    The approach to stroke therapy has historically been limited due to the existence of relatively few treatment options and the necessity for action within 3 hours of symptom onset. As neuroimaging technology advances, fertile new ground is revealed for novel therapies. Recently, a number of exciting mechanical systems have been developed with potential efficacy even hours after cerebrovascular occlusion: endovascular clot disruption, endovascular clot extraction, and angioplasty with stenting are currently under study, with promising initial results. With more options, each with greater effectiveness in a particular clinical scenario, the physician is now better equipped than ever to treat acute ischemic stroke successfully.

  4. Riboflavin status in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gariballa, S; Ullegaddi, R

    2007-10-01

    There is experimental evidence that riboflavin (vitamin B2) supplementation reduces oxidative damage and cerebral oedema following acute stroke. To measure riboflavin levels in acute stroke before and after supplementation with this vitamin. Ninety-six acute ischaemic stroke patients had their riboflavin status measured at baseline and then randomly assigned to receive 5 mg of oral riboflavin and other B-group vitamins within 12 h of the stroke onset and then daily or no B-vitamins for 14 days. Non-fasting venous blood was obtained at baseline, days 7 and 14 post-randomization for measurement of riboflavin status using erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC). EGRAC is a measure of riboflavin tissue saturation. This assay has the advantage of being extremely stable and sensitive. EGRAC values are inversely proportional to riboflavin status, so that values greater than 1.3 indicate biochemical deficiency. Fifty-one per cent of patients studied were riboflavin deficient at baseline. Fourteen days of riboflavin supplementation significantly improved the measure of B2 status compared with the control group. Seven out of 37 patients in the supplement group (19%) were riboflavin deficient compared with 22 out of 39 patients (56%) in the control group at the end of the treatment period (P=0.035 for the differences in cumulative changes between groups over 2 weeks). A high proportion of acute stroke patients were biochemically deficient of riboflavin immediately post-infarct. Supplementation with 5 mg of riboflavin for 2 weeks significantly improved riboflavin status; however, the clinical significance of these findings is not yet known.

  5. Features of brain magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted images of aortogenic embolic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Jun-Ichiro; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Makihara, Noriko; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

     The features of acute aortogenic embolic stroke on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have not been fully elucidated, so we compared patients with acute aortogenic embolic stroke and those with acute cardioembolic stroke.  This study included 40 consecutive patients with acute aortogenic embolic stroke, and 40 age- and sex-matched patients with acute cardioembolic stroke. The diagnosis of aortogenic embolic stroke was made when patients met 5 criteria: (1)acute neurologic event lasting >24h; (2) positive signals on DWI; (3) atherosclerotic lesions ≥3.5-mm thick at the aortic arch on transesophageal echocardiography; (4) neuroradiologic features suggesting embolic stroke, such as lesions involving the brain cortex or the re-opening phenomenon of previously occluded vessels on Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA); and (5) absence of other embolic sources, including heart disease and carotid stenosis. The number, site, and maximal diameter of the infarct lesions on DWI were compared between the aortogenic and cardiogenic groups. The aortogenic patients more frequently had ≥3 lesions (25.0% vs. 2.5%, P<0.01), lesions with a maximal diameter <30mm (77.5% vs. 20.0%, P< 0.001), and vertebrobasilar system lesions (55.0% vs. 10.0%, P< 0.001) than the cardiogenic patients.  Acute aortogenic embolic stroke is characterized by multiple (≥3) and small lesions, and involvement of the vertebrobasilar system. 

  6. Is acute reperfusion therapy safe in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysm?

    PubMed

    Mowla, Ashkan; Singh, Karanbir; Mehla, Sandhya; Ahmed, Mohammad K; Shirani, Peyman; Kamal, Haris; Krishna, Chandan; Sawyer, Robert N; Ching, Marilou; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Snyder, Kenneth V; Crumlish, Annemarie; Hopkins, L N

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are currently considered as contraindication for intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke, very likely due to a possible increase in the risk of bleeding from aneurysm rupture; however, there is limited data available on whether intravenous thrombolysis is safe for acute ischemic stroke patients with pre-existing intracranial aneurysms. To find out the safety of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and cerebrovascular images of all the patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center from the beginning of 2006 till the end of April 2014. Those with unruptured intracranial aneurysm present on cerebrovascular images prior to acute reperfusion therapy were identified. Post-thrombolysis brain imaging was reviewed to evaluate for any intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage related or unrelated to the aneurysm. A total of 637 patients received intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center during an 8·3-year period. Thirty-three (5·2%) were found to have at least one intracranial aneurysms. Twenty-three (70%) of those received only intravenous thrombolysis, and 10 patients received combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis. The size of the largest aneurysm was 10 mm in maximum diameter (range: 2-10 mm). The mean size of aneurysms was 4·8 mm. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred among the 23 patients receiving only intravenous thrombolysis. Out of those who received a combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis, one developed symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the location of acute infarct, distant to the aneurysm location. Our findings suggest that neither intravenous thrombolysis nor combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis increases the risk of aneurysmal hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke

  7. Acute embolic stroke after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiwon

    2006-03-01

    This is the case report of a 44-year-old woman presented with an acute stroke immediately after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The patient had no significant medical history other than chronic depression. She was taking sertraline, and she had had multiple previous ECT treatments without any complications. While being monitored in the recovery room within 10 minutes after the last ECT session, she was found to have sudden onset of left-sided flaccid hemiplegia and numbness along with slurred speech. On arrival to our hospital, she was found to have flaccid hemiplegia on the left side involving the face, arm, and leg (face and arm more than the leg involvement), severe dysarthria, and mild neglect syndrome (National Health Institute Stroke Scale of 14). Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head showed no signs of early ischemia, and iodine contrast CT angiography revealed right middle cerebral artery (MCA) (distal M1 segment) clot. Patient received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen (rt-PA) at 2.5 hours after the onset of symptoms, and then a total of 3.0 mg of intra-arterial (IA) rt-PA. Angiography at the end of the procedure showed successful recanalization of the M1 segment and normal vessel caliber with adequate distal flow. After the procedure, the patient made rapid improvements in all of her initial symptoms during the first 24 hours. An extensive stroke workup failed to reveal any cause of the stroke, including usual stroke and hypercoagulable risk factors. This was an acute embolic stroke immediately following an ECT, and without the aggressive thrombolytic therapy, the patient's outcome would have been poor because there was an M1 segment clot with a major MCA syndrome with relatively high National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. The neurological side effect profile of ECT is reported to be minimal with most common symptoms being headache, disorientation, and memory complaints. There is no clear cause-and-effect relationship in this case

  8. Role of Acute Lesion Topography in Initial Ischemic Stroke Severity and Long-Term Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven J T; Bouts, Mark J R J; Copen, William A; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro T; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2015-09-01

    Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke, correlates only moderately with traditional clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale. We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to acute ischemic stroke subjects with magnetic resonance imaging completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months modified Rankin Scale scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques, including age, sex, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Four hundred ninety subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor modified Rankin Scale at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), postcentral gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor modified Rankin Scale. More severe NIHSS involved these regions, as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and precentral gyrus. Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomic correlates of admission stroke severity and poststroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  10. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  11. Improving door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke: the design and rationale for the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Target: Stroke initiative.

    PubMed

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Saver, Jeffrey L; Reeves, Mathew J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Sacco, Ralph L; Schwamm, Lee H

    2011-10-01

    The benefits of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in acute ischemic stroke are time-dependent, and guidelines recommend a door-to-needle time of ≤60 minutes. However, fewer than one third of acute ischemic stroke patients who receive tPA are treated within guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. This article describes the design and rationale of Stroke, a national initiative organized by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association in partnership with other organizations to assist hospitals in increasing the proportion of tPA-treated patients who achieve guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. The initial program goal is to achieve a door-to-needle time≤60 minutes for at least 50% of acute ischemic stroke patients. Key best practice strategies previously associated with achieving faster door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke were identified. The 10 key strategies chosen by Stroke include emergency medical service prenotification, activating the stroke team with a single call, rapid acquisition and interpretation of brain imaging, use of specific protocols and tools, premixing tPA, a team-based approach, and rapid data feedback. The program includes many approaches intended to promote hospital participation, implement effective strategies, share best practices, foster collaboration, and achieve stated goals. A detailed program evaluation is also included. In the first year, Stroke has enrolled over 1200 United States hospitals. Stroke, a multidimensional initiative to improve the timeliness of tPA administration, aims to elevate clinical performance in the care of acute ischemic stroke, facilitate the more rapid integration of evidence into clinical practice, and improve outcomes.

  12. Gerstmann'S syndrome in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-12-01

    Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia's. Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere.

  13. Value of measuring serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dassan, Pooja; Keir, Geoffrey; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Brown, Martin M

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been reported that serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised after acute ischemic stroke compared to healthy controls. The aim of this prospective study was to ascertain whether serum vascular endothelial growth factor measurements could be used to distinguish between acute ischemic stroke and common stroke mimics in the emergency room. Blood samples were taken on arrival to hospital and daily for six-days, in 44 patients with suspected ischemic stroke (29 acute infarcts and 15 stroke mimics), arriving within 24 h of symptom onset. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The neurological deficit was recorded daily using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Evaluation of infarct volumes was based on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly raised in acute ischemic stroke patients on the day of symptom onset and at all other time points, compared to healthy controls (P < 0·01). The sensitivity and specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor for diagnosing acute ischemic stroke on admission to hospital were only 69% and 73%, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also elevated in four out of 15 stroke mimics, including three patients presenting with postictal paresis. Vascular endothelial growth factor has limited clinical utility in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke in the emergency room because levels are also raised in common stroke mimics. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor elevation in postictal paresis. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Hand Motor Recovery after Sub-Acute Stroke: A Study Combined fMRI with Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ruwei; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Zhang, Yumei; Song, Zheng; Jiang, Wen; Shi, Chuanying; Li, Mengyuan; Ai, Lin; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that motor recovery of stroke can be assessed by the cortical activity and the structural integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST), but little is known about the relation between the cortical activity and the structural integrity during motor recovery. In the present study, we investigated the changes in brain activities evoked by twenty days’ functional electrical stimulation (FES) training in twelve sub-acute stroke patients with unilateral upper-limb disability. We compared cortex activity evoked by wrist movement of eleven stroke patients to that of eleven age-matched healthy subjects to figure out how cortex activity changed after stroke. We also measured the structural integrity represented by the fractional anisotropy (FA) asymmetry of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) to find the relationship between the brain activity and the structure integrity. In our study, we found that patients with sub-acute stroke have shown greater activity in the contralesional primary motor cortex (M1) during the affected hand’s movement compared with healthy group, while the activity in ipsilesional M1 was decreased after the therapy compared to that before therapy, and the contralesional non-primary motor cortex showed greater activity after therapy. At the baseline we found that the positive correlation between the FA asymmetry of PLIC and the contralesional non-primary motor cortex activity showed that the greater damaged CST, the greater contralesional non-primary motor cortex recruited. While the negative correlation between them after the FES training indicates that after recovery the non-primary motor cortex plays different role in different stroke phases. Our study demonstrates that functional organization of a residual distributed motor system is related to the degree of disruption to the CST, and the non-primary motor areas plays an important role in motor recovery. PMID:23724030

  15. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  16. Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Vural, Gonul; Gumusyayla, Sadiye; Deniz, Orhan; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis plays a critical role in the cellular protection provided by antioxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a change in thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients. Patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke that had undergone magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging within the first 24 h were prospectively included in this study. The thiol, disulfide, and total thiol levels were measured during the first 24 and 72 h, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Barthel Index (BI) of the patients were recorded. Overall, the relationships between the thiol-disulfide levels of the patients and the infarct volumes, NIHSS, mRS, and BI scores were investigated. In this study, 54 patients and 53 healthy controls were included. The mean of the native thiol levels in the stroke group was 356.572 ± 61.659 μmol/L (min/max 228.00/546.40), while it was 415.453 ± 39.436 μmol/L (min/max 323.50/488.70) in the control group (p < 0.001). A negative, significant correlation was observed between the infarct volumes and native thiol levels (ρ = -0.378; p = 0.005), and the disulfide levels were similar between the groups (Z = 0.774; p = 0.439). Significant difference was found between the thiol levels of the mild and moderate-severe NIHSS groups (p = 0.026). The changes in the thiol levels under oxidative stress may be associated with the severity of the stroke. Substitution of thiol deficiency and correction of thiol-disulfide imbalance may be beneficial in ischemic stroke.

  17. NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kvistad, Christopher E.; Naess, Halvor; Øygarden, Halvor; Logallo, Nicola; Assmus, Jörg; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Neckelmann, Gesche; Thomassen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study) aimed to assess effect and safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound treatment in an unselected acute ischemic stroke population. Methods— Patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 hours after symptom onset were randomized 1:1 to either contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis (CEST) or sham CEST. A visible arterial occlusion on baseline computed tomography angiography was not a prerequisite for inclusion. Pulse-wave 2 MHz ultrasound was given for 1 hour and contrast (SonoVue) as an infusion for ≈30 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography were performed after 24 to 36 hours. Primary study end points were neurological improvement at 24 hours defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 0 or reduction of ≥4 National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale points compared with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and favorable functional outcome at 90 days defined as modified Rankin scale score 0 to 1. Results— A total of 183 patients were randomly assigned to either CEST (93 patient) or sham CEST (90 patients). The rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, or mortality were not increased in the CEST group. Neurological improvement at 24 hours and functional outcome at 90 days was similar in the 2 groups both in the intention-to-treat analysis and in the per-protocol analysis. Conclusions— CEST is safe among unselected ischemic stroke patients with or without a visible occlusion on computed tomography angiography and with varying grades of clinical severity. There was, however, statistically no significant clinical effect of sonothrombolysis in this prematurely stopped trial. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01949961. PMID:27980128

  18. Pregait balance rehabilitation in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, Noel; Zielke, Donna; Keller, Sarah; Burns, Melissa; Sharma, Asha; Krieger, Richard; Aruin, Alexander S

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation interventions designed to enhance balance control in individuals with acute stroke are quite limited. The goal was to develop and assess a technique of early pregait balance training involving the use of a combination of force platform visual feedback and the unweighting system in individuals with recent stroke. A total of 28 individuals with acute stroke were randomly divided into the experimental and control groups: individuals included in the experimental group received 1 week of treatment on the basis of retraining balance utilizing visual biofeedback (Balance Master) while provided with a body weight support harness system, whereas the individuals in the control group received conventional treatment. Both the groups undertook identical tests (Fugl-Meyer Balance test, Functional Independence Measure test for gait, and Fugl-Meyer lower extremity assessment) before the start of treatment and after its completion. Individuals in the experimental group showed larger gains as seen in the increased scores of the Fugl-Meyer Balance test and the Functional Independence Measure test for gait as compared with the control group. The outcome of the study provides a basis for future investigations of the applicability of the intervention in early balance rehabilitation of individuals with neurological disorders.

  19. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; McEvoy, Sinead H; Cunningham, Jane; Ti, Joanna P; Looby, Seamus; O'Hare, Alan; Williams, David; Brennan, Paul; Thornton, John

    2015-07-01

    Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute stroke endovascular treatment: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Rajah, Gary B; Shakir, Hakeem J; Davies, Jason M; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2016-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, responsible for 1 of every 20 deaths. The efficacy of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) alone for recanalization of large-vessel occlusion (LVO) is low. Several randomized trials have now established endovascular treatment of LVO as a standard of care. Endovascular techniques continue to evolve at a rapid pace. This review seeks to report recent advances in endovascular technology, discuss the correlation between speed of reperfusion and patient outcomes, and present mobile stroke care, shortcoming of the recent technology (such as clot fragmentation), and potential solutions to overcome these drawbacks, as well as anesthetic considerations and cost-effectiveness.

  1. Diabetes and poor outcomes within 6 months after acute ischemic stroke: the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qian; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Yan, Yu; Li, Hao; Zhong, Liyong; Liu, Liping; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yongjun

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, controversy exists with regard to the impact of DM on prognosis after ischemic stroke in the Chinese population. We investigated the associations between DM and death, dependency, and stroke recurrence in patients after ischemic stroke onset in a nationwide, prospective registry, the China National Stroke Registry. The China National Stroke Registry consecutively recruited patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke in 2007 to 2008 and who were prospectively followed up for clinical and functional outcomes (death, dependency, and stroke recurrence) at 3 and 6 months after disease onset. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between DM and stroke outcomes after adjusting for potential confounding including age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, glucose level at admission, hypertension, coronary heart disease, smoking, urinary tract infection, and other factors. DM was identified in 3483 (27.0%) of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without DM, patients with DM had a significantly higher incidence of death or dependency and of recurrent stroke at 3 and 6 months after stroke onset. DM was an independent risk factor for death or dependency (adjusted odds ratio=1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.37) in patients with ischemic stroke at 6 months after onset. DM independently predicted poor outcomes in Chinese patients after acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

  3. Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services.

    PubMed

    Baatiema, Leonard; Otim, Michael; Mnatzaganian, George; Aikins, Ama De-Graft; Coombes, Judith; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-02-02

    Stroke and other non-communicable diseases are important emerging public health concerns in sub-Saharan Africa where stroke-related mortality and morbidity are higher compared to other parts of the world. Despite the availability of evidence-based acute stroke interventions globally, uptake in low-middle income countries (LMIC) such as Ghana is uncertain. This study aimed to identify and evaluate available acute stroke services in Ghana and the extent to which these services align with global best practice. A multi-site, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 major referral hospitals (regional and tertiary - teaching hospitals) in Ghana from November 2015 to April 2016. Respondents included neurologists, physician specialists and medical officers (general physicians). A pre-tested, structured questionnaire was used to gather data on available hospital-based acute stroke services in the study sites, using The World Stroke Organisation Global Stroke Services Guideline as a reference for global standards. Availability of evidence-based services for acute stroke care in the study hospitals were varied and limited. The results showed one tertiary-teaching hospital had a stroke unit. However, thrombolytic therapy (thrombolysis) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke care was not available in any of the study hospitals. Aspirin therapy was administered in all the 11 study hospitals. Although eight study sites reported having a brain computed tomographic (CT) scan, only 7 (63.6%) were functional at the time of the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan) services were also limited to only 4 (36.4%) hospitals (only functional in three). Acute stroke care by specialists, especially neurologists, was found in 36.4% (4) of the study hospitals whilst none of the study hospitals had an occupational or a speech pathologist to support in the provision of acute stroke care. This study confirms previous reports of limited and variable

  4. [Cerebrolysin in treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B

    1995-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is composed of low molecular peptides and free amino-acids and as a nootropic drug it administered in various diseases of central nervous system. In an open clinical trial patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the region of the middle cerebral artery, were treated. Cerebrolysin was administered as intravenous infusion in daily dose of 15 ml during 21 days. Recovery in 10 patients and improvement in 3 was obtained and only one patient died. The results were compared to the large group of 108 patients treated earlier with other drugs. Therapeutic effect was similar in all groups.

  5. Prehospital transfer medicalization increases thrombolysis rate in acute ischemic stroke. A French stroke unit experience.

    PubMed

    Joux, Julien; Olindo, Stéphane; Girard-Claudon, Annette; Chausson, Nicolas; Saint-Vil, Martine; Signate, Aissatou; Edimonana, Mireille; Jeannin, Severine; Aveillan, Mathieu; Cabre, Philippe; Smadja, Didier

    2013-09-01

    Narrow therapeutic window is a major cause of thrombolysis exclusion in acute ischemic stroke. Whether prehospital medicalization increases t-PA treatment rate is investigated in the present study. Intrahospital processing times and t-PA treatment were analyzed in stroke patients calling within 6h and admitted in our stoke unit. Patients transferred by our mobile medical team (SAMU) and by Fire Department (FD) paramedics were compared. 193 (61.6%) SAMU patients and 120 (38.4%) FD patients were included within 30 months. Clinical characteristics and onset-to-call intervals were similar in the two groups. Mean door-to-imaging delay was deeply reduced in the SAMU group (52 vs. 159 min, p<0.0001) and was <25 min in 50% of SAMU patients and 14% of FD patients (p<0.0001). SAMU management was the only independent factor of early imaging (p=0.0006). t-PA administration rate was higher in SAMU group than in FD group (42% vs. 28%, p=0.04). Proportion of patients with delayed therapeutic window was higher in FD group than in SAMU group (38% vs. 26%, p<0.0001). Prehospital transfer medicalization promotes emergency room bypass, direct radiology room admission and high thrombolysis rate in acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  7. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  8. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  9. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  10. Complementary examinations other than neuroimaging and neurosonology in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Obach, Víctor; Sánchez, Maria José; Massons, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases requires non-routine complementary examinations to be performed. Thus, in specific cases, after neuroimaging (computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging cerebral scan sequences) and neurosonology (Doppler test of the supra-aortic trunks, transcranial echography and echocardiography), which academically allow us to classify the patients according to their etiologic stroke subtype, further examinations must be used to make a correct etiologic diagnostic. The present review aims to update knowledge about the usefulness of the different tests of blood and urine, plain chest radiography, X-ray of the spine, skull and abdomen, lumbar puncture, electroencephalography, evoked potentials, polysomnography, and pathologic examination after biopsy of the artery, skin, muscles, nerves, meninges, and brain, in the management of patients who have suffered an acute stroke. PMID:28685132

  11. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Oral Reading in Acute Left Hemispheric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cloutman, Lauren L.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron L.; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Hillis, Argye E.

    2010-01-01

    Oral reading is a complex skill involving the interaction of orthographic, phonological, and semantic processes. Functional imaging studies with non-impaired adult readers have identified a widely distributed network of frontal, inferior parietal, posterior temporal, and occipital brain regions involved in the task. However, while functional imaging can identify cortical regions engaged in the process under examination, it cannot identify those brain regions essential for the task. The current study aimed to identify those neuroanatomical regions critical for successful oral reading by examining the relationship between word and nonword oral reading deficits and areas of tissue dysfunction in acute stroke. We evaluated 91 patients with left hemisphere ischemic stroke with a test of oral word and nonword reading, and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging, within 24–48 hours of stroke onset. A voxel-wise statistical map showed that impairments in word and nonword reading were associated with a distributed network of brain regions, including the inferior and middle frontal gyri, the middle temporal gyrus, the supramarginal and angular gyri, and the middle occipital gyrus. In addition, lesions associated with word deficits were found to be distributed more frontally, while nonword deficits were associated with lesions distributed more posteriorly. PMID:20889196

  12. Intravenous rtPA thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Laloux, P

    2001-06-01

    Early intravenous thrombolysis within the first three hours has been considered in the United States as the first proven treatment in acute ischemic stroke. However, not all patients will respond to this therapy which is also associated with a risk of symptomatic, including fatal, intracranial hemorrhage. This overview addresses the issue of efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase (tPA) in acute cerebral ischemia. The rationale for thrombolytic therapy and its limits are described. The controlled studies show that intravenous tPA is effective and safe when given under restrictive conditions within 3 hours after stroke onset, but the data for a larger therapeutic window between 3 and 6 hours remain controversial. The expected functional improvement and the risk of intracranial hemorrhage greatly depend on selective clinical and imaging criteria. For this purpose, MRI, using the diffusion- and perfusion-weighted sequences combined with MR- angiography, should be preferred to CT scan in the next future. Applicability of tPA thrombolysis in current neurological practice in Belgium is discussed. Before its generalization, this therapy should be restricted to specialized stroke centers and all treated patients should be recorded in a central data bank to guarantee continued surveillance.

  13. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Hannah J; Battey, Thomas Wk; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema, and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (ΔNIHSS ≥ 4), early neurological recovery (ΔNIHSS ≤ -4) or early neurological stability (ΔNIHSS between -3 and 3). The association between these categories and volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hemorrhage, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale score were evaluated. Results Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were less likely to be independent (modified Rankin Scale = 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with early neurological recovery ( P < 0.001). Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with early neurological recovery ( P = 0.03; P < 0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of parenchymal hemorrhage, and reperfusion ( P < 0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign and is associated with tissue injury, including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors.

  14. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Hannah J.; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (END, ΔNIHSS ≥4), early neurological recovery (ENR, ΔNIHSS, ≥−4) or early neurological stability (ENS, ΔNIHSS between −3 and 3). The association between these categories and the volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hematoma (PH) and 3 month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score were evaluated. Results Patients with END or ENS were less likely to be independent (mRS 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with ENR (P<0.001). Patients with END or ENS were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with ENR (P=0.03; P<0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of PH, and reperfusion (P<0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign, and is associated with tissue injury including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors. PMID:27334760

  15. Regional prediction of tissue fate in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hao, Qing; Alger, Jeffry R; Hu, Xiao; Liebeskind, David S

    2012-10-01

    Early and accurate prediction of tissue outcome is essential to the clinical decision-making process in acute ischemic stroke. We present a quantitative predictive model of tissue fate that combines regional imaging features available after onset. A key component is the use of cuboids randomly sampled during the learning process. Models trained with time-to-maximum feature (Tmax) computed from perfusion weighted images (PWI) are compared to the ones obtained from the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The prediction task is formalized as a regression problem where the inputs are the local cuboids extracted from Tmax or ADC images at onset, and the output is the segmented FLAIR intensity of the tissue 4 days after intervention. Experiments on 25 acute stroke patients demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in predicting tissue fate. Results on our dataset show the superiority of the regional model vs. a single-voxel-based approach, indicate that PWI regional models outperform ADC models, and demonstrates that a nonlinear regression model significantly improves the results in comparison to a linear model.

  16. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  17. In Acute Stroke, Can CT Perfusion-Derived Cerebral Blood Volume Maps Substitute for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Identifying the Ischemic Core?

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Morais, Livia T.; Wu, Ona; Schwamm, Lee H.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; González, R. Gilberto; Yoo, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In the treatment of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke, increasing evidence suggests the importance of measuring the volume of the irreversibly injured “ischemic core.” The gold standard method for doing this in the clinical setting is diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), but many authors suggest that maps of regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) derived from computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTP) can substitute for DWI. We sought to determine whether DWI and CTP-derived CBV maps are equivalent in measuring core volume. Methods 58 patients with suspected stroke underwent CTP and DWI within 6 hours of symptom onset. We measured low-CBV lesion volumes using three methods: “objective absolute,” i.e. the volume of tissue with CBV below each of six published absolute thresholds (0.9–2.5 mL/100 g), “objective relative,” whose six thresholds (51%-60%) were fractions of mean contralateral CBV, and “subjective,” in which two radiologists (R1, R2) outlined lesions subjectively. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of each method, threshold, and radiologist in detecting infarction, and the degree to which each over- or underestimated the DWI core volume. Additionally, in the subset of 32 patients for whom follow-up CT or MRI was available, we measured the proportion of CBV- or DWI-defined core lesions that exceeded the follow-up infarct volume, and the maximum amount by which this occurred. Results DWI was positive in 72% (42/58) of patients. CBV maps’ sensitivity/specificity in identifying DWI-positive patients were 100%/0% for both objective methods with all thresholds, 43%/94% for R1, and 83%/44% for R2. Mean core overestimation was 156–699 mL for objective absolute thresholds, and 127–200 mL for objective relative thresholds. For R1 and R2, respectively, mean±SD subjective overestimation were -11±26 mL and -11±23 mL, but subjective volumes differed from DWI volumes by up to 117 and 124

  18. Multimodal use of computed tomography in early acute stroke, part 2.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, R; Tambasco, N; Cardaioli, G; Parnetti, L; Paloni, F; Boranga, B; Pelliccioli, G P

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scan remains the most widely technique in the cerebrovascular emergency, as it is largely available, minimally invasive, fast, cheap and reliable. Noncontrast enhanced CT (NeCT) imaging can show early signs of infarction in ischemic stroke; however, it could not show if the ischemic tissue is irreversibly damaged. CT perfusion (CTP) imaging has been shown to predict stroke location and size and can provide information about ischemic cerebral parenchyma not definitively compromised. CT angiography (CTA) could highlight stenosis or occlusion both in intracranial and extracranial vessels. By combining NeCT, CTP, and CTA the entire cerebrovascular axis can be imaged during acute stroke. Currently, the term "multimodal CT" indicates the combined use of these three techniques in order to obtain a complete picture of the extension of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients.

  19. Imaging network level language recovery after left PCA stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Rajani; Long, Charltien; Purcell, Jeremy J.; Faria, Andreia V.; Lindquist, Martin; Jarso, Samson; Race, David; Davis, Cameron; Posner, Joseph; Wright, Amy; Hillis, Argye E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The neural mechanisms that support aphasia recovery are not yet fully understood. Our goal was to evaluate longitudinal changes in naming recovery in participants with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke using a case-by-case analysis. Methods: Using task based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and detailed language testing, we longitudinally studied the recovery of the naming network in four participants with PCA stroke with naming deficits at the acute (0 week), sub acute (3–5 weeks), and chronic time point (5–7 months) post stroke. Behavioral and imaging analyses (task related and resting state functional connectivity) were carried out to elucidate longitudinal changes in naming recovery. Results: Behavioral and imaging analysis revealed that an improvement in naming accuracy from the acute to the chronic stage was reflected by increased connectivity within and between left and right hemisphere “language” regions. One participant who had persistent moderate naming deficit showed weak and decreasing connectivity longitudinally within and between left and right hemisphere language regions. Conclusions: These findings emphasize a network view of aphasia recovery, and show that the degree of inter- and intra- hemispheric balance between the language-specific regions is necessary for optimal recovery of naming, at least in participants with PCA stroke. PMID:27176918

  20. Acute management of stroke in Iran: Obstacles and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shahjouei, Shima; Bavarsad-Shahripour, Reza; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrpour, Masoud; Zamani, Babak; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Alexandrov, Andrei; Alexandrov, Anne; Zand, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke is among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability in the world. Iran is located in the stroke belt and has a high age-adjusted stroke incidence rate. In this multistep prospective qualitative study, we aimed at investigating the status and challenges of stroke management in Iran and explore possible solutions. Methods: In the first and second phase, we attempted to define the status of stroke management in Iran by searching the relevant literature and conducting semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in thirteen hospitals located in seven large cities in Iran. In the third phase, we tried to recommend possible solutions based on international standards and experience, as well as interviews with stroke experts in Iran and the United States. Results: Little public awareness of stroke symptoms and its urgency, low prioritization for stroke management, and an inadequate number of stroke-ready hospitals are some of the major obstacles toward timely treatment of stroke in Iran. Every hospital in our pool except two hospitals had guideline-based algorithms for the administration of intravenous thrombolysis. However, there was no single call activation system for stroke alert. Data from some of the centers showed that hospital arrival of stroke patients to final decision-making took 116-160 minutes. Although there were four endovascular programs in our target areas, there was no center with 24-hour coverage. Conclusion: There are many challenges as well as potentials for improvement of stroke care in Iran. Improving public knowledge of stroke and establishing an organized and comprehensive stroke program in the hospitals will improve acute stroke management in Iran. The Iranian ministry of health should define and advocate the establishment of stroke centers, track the rate of death and disability from stroke, introduce pathways to improve the quality of stroke care through national data monitoring systems, and eliminate

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Visualize Stroke and Characterize Stroke Recovery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Graham, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (e.g., medications, diet, and exercise) can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (e.g., thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke) are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement toward the view that the brain is capable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future (Broderick and William, 2004). As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research. Here we provide a basic review of MRI physical principles and applications for assessing stroke, looking toward the future role MRI may play in improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery. PMID:23750149

  2. How useful is imaging in predicting outcomes in stroke rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Stinear, Cathy M; Ward, Nick S

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging plays an important role in acute stroke diagnosis and management, but it is not routinely used in rehabilitation settings. Incorporating imaging information in rehabilitation planning may eventually translate to better outcomes after stroke. Here we review the prediction of outcomes after stroke using magnetic resonance imaging. There are clear and specific relationships between the anatomy of the stroke lesion and impairments at the time of scanning, and at later time points in recovery. However, most studies demonstrate these relationships in groups of patients at the chronic stage. In order to be useful for rehabilitation, neuroimaging needs to provide prognostic information for individual patients at a much earlier stage. Recent studies have used diffusion tensor imaging and functional neuroimaging to address this, with promising results. Combining neuroimaging with clinical and neurophysiological assessments may also be useful. Future work in this area may support the tailoring of rehabilitation for individual patients based on their capacity for neural reorganization and recovery. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  3. The use of telemedicine in the management of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark N; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, including acute ischemic stroke, remains a major public health problem in the US and throughout the world. There has been a concerted effort to apply evidence-based practices to stroke care to improve primary and secondary prevention as well as poststroke outcomes. Geography and workforce shortages contribute to a disparity in stroke care, however, among the substantial proportion of the US population that lives outside the reach of an acute stroke-ready hospital or a primary or comprehensive stroke center. In an attempt to combat the rural-to-urban disparity and expand the availability of best stroke practices, Levine and Gorman proposed the development of telemedical outreach for acute stroke evaluation and management, which they called "telestroke." Since then, the practice of telestroke has been found to have a high interrater agreement with a bedside assessment of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, to enhance correct thrombolysis decision making as compared with telephone-only consultation, and to be cost-effective. In light of these findings and the perception of benefit by acute stroke providers and patients, there has been growing interest in and a rapid expansion of telestroke networks in the US and internationally. There are legal and financial barriers to more widespread use of telemedicine in general, including telestroke. Further research is needed to understand the potential merits of telestroke infrastructure for the many phases of stroke care including poststroke hospitalization, prevention of complications, enhancing secondary prevention, and education of patients and providers.

  4. Hyperintense basilar artery on FLAIR MR imaging: diagnostic accuracy and clinical impact in patients with acute brain stem stroke.

    PubMed

    Gawlitza, M; Quäschling, U; Hobohm, C; Otto, J; Voigt, P; Hoffmann, K-T; Lobsien, D

    2014-08-01

    FLAIR-hyperintense vessels are known to be a sign of sluggish collateral blood flow in hemispheric vessel occlusion. Additionally, they seem to have a prognostic implication. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the hyperintense configuration of the basilar artery (FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery) as a marker of basilar artery occlusion and as a predictor of patient outcome. We retrospectively identified 20 patients with basilar artery occlusion who initially underwent MR imaging with subsequent DSA. The diagnostic accuracy of the FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery sign was tested by 4 independent readers in a case-control design, and the relation among FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery and DWI posterior circulation-ASPECTS, patient outcome, and patient survival was evaluated. To grade the extent of the FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery sign, we generated a score by counting the number of sections from the basilar tip to the foramen magnum in which a hyperintense signal in the vessel lumen was present multiplied by the section thickness. The FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery sign showed moderate sensitivity (65%-95%) but very good specificity (95%-100%) and accuracy (85%-93%) for the detection of basilar artery occlusion. Substantial or excellent inter-reader agreement was observed (Cohen κ, 0.64-0.85). The FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery inversely correlated with the posterior circulation-ASPECTS (r = -0.67, P = .01). Higher FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery scores were associated with patient death (28.3 ± 13.7 versus 13.4 ± 11.1, P < .05). The FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery sign proved to be a valuable marker of vessel occlusion and may substantially support the diagnosis of basilar artery occlusion. The established FLAIR-hyperintense basilar artery score may be helpful for the prediction of individual patient survival. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Acute stroke care at rural hospitals in Idaho: challenges in expediting stroke care.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, James G; Norris, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Thrombolytics are currently the most effective treatment for stroke. However, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke criteria for initiation of thrombolytic therapy, most notably the 3-hour time limit from symptom onset, have proven challenging for many rural hospitals to achieve. To provide a snapshot of stroke care at rural hospitals in Idaho and to investigate the experiences of these hospitals in expediting stroke care. Using a standard questionnaire, a telephone survey of hospital staff at 21 rural hospitals in Idaho was performed. The survey focused on acute stroke care practices and strategies to expedite stroke care. The median number of stroke patients treated per year was 23.3. Patient delays were reported by 77.8% of hospitals, transport delays by 66.7%, in-hospital delays by 61.1%, equipment delays by 22.2%, and ancillary services delays by 61.1%. Approximately 67% of hospitals had implemented a clinical pathway for stroke and 80.0% had provided staff with stroke-specific training. No hospitals surveyed had a designated stroke team, and only 33.3% reported engaging in quality improvement efforts to expedite stroke care. Thrombolytics (tPA) were available and indicated for stroke at 55.6% of the hospitals surveyed. Rural hospitals in Idaho face many difficult challenges as they endeavor to meet the 3-hour deadline for thrombolytic therapy, including limited resources and experience in acute stroke care, and many different types of prehospital and in-hospital delays.

  6. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  7. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States.

  8. Relationship between QT Interval Dispersion in acute stroke and stroke prognosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Yitzchok S.; Balucani, Clotilde; Lazar, Jason; Steinberg, Leah; Gugger, James; Levine, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background QT dispersion (QTd) has been proposed as an indirect ECG measure of heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization. The predictive value of QTd in acute stroke remains controversial. We aimed to clarify the relationship between QTd and acute stroke and stroke prognosis. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using pre-specified medical subjects heading (MeSH) terms, Boolean logic and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Eligible studies (a) included ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and (b) provided QTd measurements. Results Two independent reviewers identified 553 publications. Sixteen articles were included in the final analysis. There were a total of 888 stroke patients: 59% ischemic and 41% hemorrhagic. There was considerable heterogeneity in study design, stroke subtypes, ECG assessment-time, control groups and comparison groups. Nine studies reported a significant association between acute stroke and baseline QTd. Two studies reported that QTd increases are specifically related to hemorrhagic strokes, involvement of the insular cortex, right-side lesions, larger strokes, and increases in 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol in hemorrhagic stroke. Three studies reported QTd to be an independent predictor of stroke mortality. One study each reported increases in QTd in stroke patients who developed ventricular arrhythmias and cardiorespiratory compromise. Conclusions There are few well-designed studies and considerable variability in study design in addressing the significance of QTd in acute stroke. Available data suggest that stroke is likely to be associated with increased QTd. While some evidence suggests a possible prognostic role of QTd in stroke, larger and well-designed studies need to confirm these findings. PMID:25282188

  9. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p < 0.05) included disability prior to stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  10. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  11. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration secondary to

  12. Prediction of outcome in patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke with CT perfusion and CT angiography: the Dutch acute stroke trial (DUST) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of clinical outcome in the acute stage of ischaemic stroke can be difficult when based on patient characteristics, clinical findings and on non-contrast CT. CT perfusion and CT angiography may provide additional prognostic information and guide treatment in the early stage. We present the study protocol of the Dutch acute Stroke Trial (DUST). The DUST aims to assess the prognostic value of CT perfusion and CT angiography in predicting stroke outcome, in addition to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT. For this purpose, individualised prediction models for clinical outcome after stroke based on the best predictors from patient characteristics and CT imaging will be developed and validated. Methods/design The DUST is a prospective multi-centre cohort study in 1500 patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke. All patients undergo non-contrast CT, CT perfusion and CT angiography within 9 hours after onset of the neurological deficits, and, if possible, follow-up imaging after 3 days. The primary outcome is a dichotomised score on the modified Rankin Scale, assessed at 90 days. A score of 0–2 represents good outcome, and a score of 3–6 represents poor outcome. Three logistic regression models will be developed, including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT (model A), with addition of CT angiography (model B), and CT perfusion parameters (model C). Model derivation will be performed in 60% of the study population, and model validation in the remaining 40% of the patients. Additional prognostic value of the models will be determined with the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, calibration plots, assessment of goodness-of-fit, and likelihood ratio tests. Discussion This study will provide insight in the added prognostic value of CTP and CTA parameters in outcome prediction of acute stroke patients. The prediction models that will be developed in this study may help guide future

  13. Successful thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke in haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Power, Albert; Moser, Steven; Duncan, Neill

    2010-12-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity in survivors. Early thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke has been shown to dramatically improve patient outcomes. Although the age-adjusted incidence of stroke is 5-10 times greater in haemodialysis patients, the use of thrombolysis for this indication in this group of patients has not been described to date. We present a case where alteplase was used successfully for acute ischaemic stroke in a patient established on maintenance haemodialysis in the setting of an international randomized controlled trial and advocate caution with the use of systemic thrombolytics despite the favourable outcome seen with this case.

  14. Nutritional status in acute stroke: undernutrition versus overnutrition in different stroke subtypes.

    PubMed

    Choi-Kwon, S; Yang, Y H; Kim, E K; Jeon, M Y; Kim, J S

    1998-09-01

    Nutritional status in the acute stage of stroke has not been properly evaluated in different stroke subtypes. The objective of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of different subtypes of stroke patients. We studied 88 female patients with first-ever strokes. Strokes were divided into cerebral infarction (CI, n=67) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, n=21). We measured the nutritional status of the patients in the acute stage of stroke with the use of 8 parameters including 3 biochemical and 5 anthropometric ones. These variables were assessed in stroke patients and 120 age-matched controls, and were compared with each other. In the acute stage of stroke, undernourishment was significantly (P=0.000) more prevalent in the ICH group (62%) than in the CI group (25%) or controls (13%). On the other hand obesity was present in 10%, 24% and 17% in patients with ICH, those with CI, and controls, respectively, which was not significantly different (P=0.461). Only abdominal skinfold thickness was significantly greater in patients with CI than in those with ICH or controls. Conclusions - Our results illustrate that undernourishment is prevalent in acute stroke patients, significantly more so in patients with ICH than in those with CI. Stroke patients, especially those with ICH, should receive special nutritional intervention starting immediately after admission.

  15. The third international stroke trial (IST-3) of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sandercock, Peter; Lindley, Richard; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dennis, Martin; Lewis, Steff; Venables, Graham; Kobayashi, Adam; Czlonkowska, Anna; Berge, Eivind; Slot, Karsten Bruins; Murray, Veronica; Peeters, Andre; Hankey, Graeme; Matz, Karl; Brainin, Michael; Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Cantisani, Teresa; Gubitz, Gord; Phillips, Steve; Arauz, Antonio; Prasad, Kameshwar; Correia, Manuel; Lyrer, Phillippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is approved for use in selected patients with ischaemic stroke within 3 hours of symptom onset. IST-3 seeks to determine whether a wider range of patients may benefit. Design International, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial of intravenous rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke. Suitable patients must be assessed and able to start treatment within 6 hours of developing symptoms, and brain imaging must have excluded intracerebral haemorrhage. With 1000 patients, the trial can detect a 7% absolute difference in the primary outcome. With3500 patients, it can detect a 4.0% absolute benefit & with 6000, (mostly treated between 3 & 6 hours), it can detect a 3% benefit. Trial procedures Patients are entered into the trial by telephoning a fast, secure computerised central randomisation system or via a secure web interface. Repeat brain imaging must be performed at 24–48 hours. The scans are reviewed 'blind' by expert readers. The primary measure of outcome is the proportion of patients alive and independent (Modified Rankin 0–2) at six months (assessed via a postal questionnaire mailed directly to the patient). Secondary outcomes include: events within 7 days (death, recurrent stroke, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage), outcome at six months (death, functional status, EuroQol). Trial registration ISRCTN25765518 PMID:18559104

  16. Expedited computed tomography perfusion and angiography in acute ischemic stroke: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Nina T; Cernetich, John; Kanamalla, Uday S; Kochan, Jeffrey P; Reimer, Hannah; Freeman, Brent; Jungreis, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Acute ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment are among the most challenging in Emergency Medicine. Perfusion computed tomography (CTP) can increase the sensitivity for detecting ischemic stroke and, especially with the addition of CT angiography (CTA), improve decision-making regarding thrombolytic therapy compared to non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) alone. However, because acute stroke protocols do not generally include procedures for multimodal imaging, they are not commonly performed. In addition, there is concern that additional studies could delay or preclude therapy in patients otherwise eligible for thrombolytic therapy. To demonstrate the feasibility of perfusion CTP and CTA in addition to NCCT of the brain in the emergency assessment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Starting January 2008, multimodal (CTP and CTA) imaging was added to NCCT in the Emergency Department (ED) initial assessment of patients with stroke of ≤ 5 h duration. Over the subsequent 9 months, we measured the time from ED arrival to imaging and to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment and compared these times to patients evaluated with CT alone. From January to October 2008, 95 patients had CTP and CTA studies in addition to NCCT for acute ischemic stroke. There were no differences between the average time to CT study or to rt-PA treatment between patients evaluated with multimodal CT imaging and patients assessed with NCCT alone. Combining CTP and CTA with NCCT is feasible and does not adversely increase the time to CT imaging or rt-PA treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early brain temperature elevation and anaerobic metabolism in human acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Marshall, Ian; Cvoro, Vera; Wartolowska, Karolina; Haga, Kristin; Armitage, Paul A; Bastin, Mark E; Dennis, Martin S

    2009-04-01

    Early after acute ischaemic stroke, elevation of brain temperature might augment tissue metabolic rate and conversion of ischaemic but viable tissue to infarction. This might explain the observed link between pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. We tested this hypothesis by measuring brain temperature and lactate concentration with multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging across the acute ischaemic stroke lesion and normal brain as determined on diffusion imaging. We compared patterns of lactate concentration (reported in 'institutional units') and temperature elevation in diffusion lesion core, potential penumbra, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brain and with stroke severity. Amongst 40 patients with moderate to severe acute stroke imaged up to 26 h after onset, lactate concentration was highest in the ischaemic lesion core (42 versus 26 units in potential penumbra, P < 0.05), whereas temperature was highest in the potential penumbra (37.7 versus 37.3 degrees C in lesion core, P < 0.05). Neither sub-regional temperature nor lactate concentration correlated with stroke severity. With increasing time after stroke, ipsilateral brain temperature did not change, but contralateral hemisphere temperature was higher in patients scanned at later times; lactate remained elevated in the lesion core, but declined in potential penumbral and ipsilateral normal tissue at later times. We conclude that early brain temperature elevation after stroke is not directly related to lactate concentration, therefore augmented metabolism is unlikely to explain the relationship between early pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. Early brain temperature elevation may result from different mechanisms to those which raise body temperature after stroke. Further studies are required to determine why early brain temperature elevation is highest in potential penumbral tissue.

  18. Myelin basic protein and ischemia modified albumin levels in acute ischemic stroke cases.

    PubMed

    Can, Serdar; Akdur, Okhan; Yildirim, Ahmet; Adam, Gurhan; Cakir, Dilek Ulker; Karaman, Handan Isin Ozisik

    2015-01-01

    To investigate early diagnostic effects of serum myelin basic protein (MBP) and ischemic modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with ischemic stroke. Fifty patients who presented to an emergency service with acute ischemic stroke between June 2013 to March 2014 were evaluated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty four healthy cases were included as control group. All patients' serum IMA and MBP level were assessed. Mean IMA value was 0.52±0.25 cases with acute ischemic stroke and serum IMA levels were significantly higher than the control group (p<0.01). No statistical significance was observed between acute ischemic stroke group and control group related to the MBP serum levels (P>0.05). Statistically significant correlation was detected between the volumes of diffusion restriction on MRI and NIHSS score (P=0.002, r=0.43) and IMA (P=0.015, r=0.344) levels. We have found that serum IMA levels are elevated in acute ischemic stroke cases and these levels are correlated with the ischemic tissue volume. MBP levels do not increase in early period of stroke cases.

  19. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  20. Trends in management and outcome of hospitalized patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: the National Acute Stroke Israeli (NASIS) registry.

    PubMed

    Tanne, David; Koton, Silvia; Molshazki, Noa; Goldbourt, Uri; Shohat, Tamar; Tsabari, Rakefet; Grossman, Ehud; Bornstein, Natan M

    2012-08-01

    Improving stroke management, guideline adherence, and outcome is a global priority. Our aim was to examine trends in nationwide use of reperfusion therapy, stroke in-hospital management, and outcome. Data were based on the triennial 2-month period of the National Acute Stroke Israeli registry (February to March 2004, March to April 2007, April to May 2010). The registry includes unselected patients admitted to all hospitals nationwide. There were in total 6279 patients: ischemic stroke, 4452 (70.9%); intracerebral hemorrhage, 485 (7.7%); undetermined stroke, 97 (1.6%); and transient ischemic attacks, 1245 (19.8%). Overall use of reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke increased from 0.4% in 2004% to 5.9% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 17.0; 95% CI, 7.5-38.7). Use of CT or MR angiography for ischemic events increased from 2.1% in 2004% to 16.6% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 6.8-13.9). Overall use of antithrombotics and anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation did not differ between periods, whereas clopidogrel use increased nearly 3-fold to 41% and statin use nearly 2-fold to 68%. The relative odds of providing reperfusion therapy, using CT or MR angiography, and prescribing anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation were higher among hospitals with large as compared with small stroke patient volumes. In-hospital mortality after acute ischemic stroke decreased from 7.2% in 2004 to 3.9% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0), whereas there was no significant change in odds of poor functional outcome. Based on a nationwide stroke registry, use of reperfusion therapy, vascular imaging, and statins is steadily increasing, whereas in-hospital mortality is decreasing.

  1. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  2. Multiparametric Model for Penumbral Flow Prediction in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Livne, Michelle; Kossen, Tabea; Madai, Vince I; Zaro-Weber, Olivier; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; Mouridsen, Kim; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Sobesky, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Identification of salvageable penumbra tissue by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool for acute stroke patient stratification for treatment. However, prior studies have not attempted to combine the different perfusion maps into a predictive model. In this study, we established a multiparametric perfusion imaging model and cross-validated it using positron emission tomography perfusion for detection of penumbral flow. In a retrospective analysis of 17 subacute stroke patients with consecutive magnetic resonance imaging and H2O15 positron emission tomography scans, perfusion maps of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, time-to-maximum, and time-to-peak were constructed and combined using a generalized linear model (GLM). Both the GLM maps and the single perfusion maps alone were cross-validated with positron emission tomography-cerebral blood flow scans to predict penumbral flow on a voxel-wise level. Performance was tested by receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis, that is, the area under the curve, and the models' fits were compared using the likelihood ratio test. The GLM demonstrated significantly improved model fit compared with each of the single perfusion maps (P<1×e-5) and demonstrated higher performance, with an area under the curve of 0.91. However, the absolute difference between the performance of GLM and the best-performing single perfusion parameter (time-to-maximum) was relatively low (area under the curve difference =0.04). Our results support a dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging-based GLM as an improved model for penumbral flow prediction in stroke patients. With given perfusion maps, this model is a straightforward and observer-independent alternative for therapy stratification. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Electromagnetic induction holography imaging for stroke detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lulu

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the application of the electromagnetic induction holography (EMIH) approach to imaging the electromagnetic activity of the brain, with a particular focus on stroke detection. An integral equation formulation is presented to describe the scattered magnetic field from the distribution of optically small dielectric and magnetic objects of arbitrary shapes adsorbed onto a planar electromagnetic substrate. A numerical computer model was developed in a MATLAB environment to validate the theory. Several realistic human head models were developed to investigate the detectability of strokes with the multi-channel EMIH system. Small strokes can be clearly identified with the correct location and size in the reconstructed head images. The simulation results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting and imaging small strokes using the approach.

  4. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Elevated admission blood pressure and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke: the Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Logallo, Nicola; Oygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Transient elevated blood pressure (BP) is frequent in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The pathophysiology of this response is not clear and its effect on clinical outcome has shown contradictory results. Some studies have suggested that BP elevation may represent a protective response to enhance perfusion in ischemic brain tissue. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between elevated admission BP and stroke severity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. If it is true that elevated BP represents a protective response in acute ischemia, we expected an inverse association between elevated BP and admission stroke severity, and a positive association between elevated BP and complete neurological recovery within 24 h and/or favorable short-term outcome. Patients with ischemic stroke with hospital admission <6 h after symptom onset were prospectively included in a stroke registry (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). BP was measured immediately after admission in all patients. Elevated BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess stroke severity upon admission. Mild stroke was defined as NIHSS score <8, moderate stroke as NIHSS score 8-14, and severe stroke as NIHSS score ≥15. Complete neurological recovery (CNR) was defined as no persistent ischemic stroke symptoms at 24 h after admission. Favorable short-term outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at day 7. A total of 749 patients with ischemic stroke were included, of which 621 patients (82.9%) presented with elevated BP. Elevated BP was independently associated with mild stroke (odds ratio, OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.39-3.24; p < 0.001), whereas lack of elevated BP was independently associated with severe stroke (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p < 0.001). There was a nonsignificant association between elevated BP and CNR (OR: 2.11; 95% CI: 0.96-4.68; p = 0.063), yet no association

  6. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  7. Prediction of Early Recurrence After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Arsava, E Murat; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Gungor, Levent; Noh, Hyun Jin; Lordelo, Morgana de Jesus; Avery, Ross; Maier, Ilko L; Ay, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    Approximately half of recurrent strokes occur within days and weeks of an ischemic stroke. It is imperative to identify patients at imminent risk of recurrent stroke because recurrent events lead to prolonged hospitalization, worsened functional outcome, and increased mortality. To test the validity of a prognostic score that was exclusively developed to predict early risk of stroke recurrence in a multicenter setting. This hospital-based cohort study examined patients with and without magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed recurrent stroke within 90 days after an ischemic stroke. The study was performed at 3 teaching hospitals in the United States, Brazil, and South Korea and comprised adult patients admitted within 72 hours of symptom onset with a magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Recruitment to the US cohort was performed from June 1, 2009, through April 30, 2011. Recruitment to the Korean and Brazilian cohorts was performed from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2011. Data analysis was performed from June 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome was recurrent ischemic stroke as defined by a clinical incident that was clearly attributable to a new area of brain infarction occurring within the 90 days of index infarction. An investigator who was masked to the patient's recurrence status calculated the Recurrence Risk Estimator (RRE) score for each patient based on information available after initial line of testing in the emergency department. We assessed the predictive performance of the RRE by computing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The study included 1468 consecutive patients with 59 recurrent ischemic stroke events. The median age of the patients was 69 (interquartile range, 58-79) years, and 633 (43.1%) were female. The cumulative 90-day recurrence rate was 4.2% (95% CI, 3.2%-5.2%). The mean RRE score was 2.2 (95% CI, 1.9-2.5) in patients with recurrence and 1.0 (95% CI, 1

  8. Development of an emergency department response to acute stroke ("Code Stroke").

    PubMed

    Leira, Enrique C; Ahmed, Azeemuddin

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing delays is a crucial step in improving outcomes with acute stroke therapies whose efficacy is clearly time dependent. Logistic and human barriers to rapid stroke care can be overcome with a systematic "Code Stroke" approach provided by a structured multidisciplinary acute stroke response team. Such teams should include Emergency Medical Services providers, neurologists, neurosurgeons, diagnostic radiologists, nurses, radiology technicians, laboratory personnel, hospital administrators, and emergency medicine, intensive care, and neurointerventional physicians. An acute stroke team improves treatment practices and provides a gratifying experience for patients, families, and referring physicians. On the other hand, maintaining proficiency of the team's operation is time consuming and personally onerous for team responders. Successful maintenance requires strong departmental and institutional commitment.

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  10. Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Using T2'/R2' Mapping: Influence of Relative Cerebral Blood Volume.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Alexander; Deichmann, Ralf; Nöth, Ulrike; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Berkefeld, Joachim; Singer, Oliver C; Klein, Johannes C; Wagner, Marlies

    2017-06-01

    Quantitative T2'/R2' mapping detect locally increased concentrations of deoxygenated hemoglobin-causing a decrease of T2' and increase of R2'-and might reflect increased cerebral oxygen extraction fraction. Because increases of (relative) cerebral blood volume (rCBV) may influence T2' and R2' through accumulation of deoxygenated hemoglobin, we aimed to investigate the impact of rCBV on T2'/R2' in patients with ischemic stroke. Data from patients with acute internal carotid artery and middle cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. T2', R2', and rCBV were measured within the ischemic core, slightly and severely hypoperfused areas, and their relationship was examined. A strong negative correlation with rCBV was found for R2' (r=-0.544; P=0.002), and T2' correlated positively with rCBV (r=0.546; P=0.001) in time-to-peak-delayed areas. T2'/R2' within hypoperfused tissue remained unchanged at normal or elevated rCBV levels. T2' decrease/R2' increase within hypoperfused areas in ischemic stroke is not caused by local elevations of rCBV but most probably only by increased cerebral oxygen extraction fraction. However, considering rCBV is crucial to assess extent of oxygen extraction fraction changes by means of T2'/R2'. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95% CI 20.13-41.08, P < 0.00001). There was no obvious risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. This meta-analysis supports that serum uric acid level has a protective effect on neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  12. Pharmaceutical sponsorship bias influences thrombolytic literature in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2011-11-01

    The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in emergency medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85%) disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke.

  13. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in emergency medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85%) disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:22224134

  14. Early ischemic change on CT versus diffusion-weighted imaging for patients with stroke receiving intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy: stroke acute management with urgent risk-factor assessment and improvement (SAMURAI) rt-PA registry.

    PubMed

    Nezu, Tomohisa; Koga, Masatoshi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Furui, Eisuke; Kimura, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Okada, Yasushi; Okuda, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Naganuma, Masaki; Maeda, Koichiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2011-08-01

    Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a quantitative topographical score to evaluate early ischemic change in the middle cerebral arterial territory on CT as well as on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The aim of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between CT-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS for patients with hyperacute stroke and their associations with outcomes after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator therapy based on a multicenter registry. ASPECTS was assessed on both CT and DWI before intravenous 0.6 mg/kg alteplase in 360 patients with stroke (119 women, 71 ± 11 years old). The outcomes were symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours and independence at 3 months defined by a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2. DWI-ASPECTS was positively correlated with CT-ASPECTS (ρ=0.511, P<0.001) and was lower than CT-ASPECTS (median 8 [interquartile range, 6 to 9] versus 9 [8 to 10], P<0.001). Higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (standardized partial regression coefficient [β] 0.061, P<0.001) and cardioembolic stroke (β 0.35, P<0.001) were related to this discrepancy. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting sICH (12 patients) using ASPECTS was 0.673 (95% CI, 0.503 to 0.807) by CT and 0.764 (95% CI, 0.635 to 0.858) by DWI (P=0.275). The area for predicting independence at 3 months (192 patients) was 0.621 (0.564 to 0.674) by CT and 0.639 (0.580 to 0.694) by DWI (P=0.535). For patients with hyperacute stroke, DWI-ASPECTS scored approximately 1 point lower than CT-ASPECTS. Both CT-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS were useful predictors of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage and independence at 3 months after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator.

  15. Neuroprotection in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajan A G; McMullen, Paul W

    Neuroprotection remains one of the holy grails of acute ischemic stroke therapy. The ability to protect the ischemic brain from injury until reperfusion and then to protect the brain from reperfusion injury could theoretically improve freedom from disability among stroke survivors. This manuscript reviews the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of stroke and summarizes pharmacologic and other therapies that showed promise in pre-clinical testing as neuroprotection agents. However to date, no compelling efficacy data have been published regarding any pharmacologic or other therapies. Nonetheless the search for effective neuroprotection continues at stroke centers throughout the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endovascular Interventions for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review of Recent Trials.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Bryan M

    2016-03-01

    To review recent endovascular intervention trials for acute ischemic stroke. Recent, randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions for acute ischemic stroke were identified. The search terms "endovascular" AND "stroke" were used and filter for "randomized controlled trial" was applied; the period searched was January 1, 2013, to October 31, 2015. Randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions in acute ischemic stroke published within the past 3 years (2013-2015). A total of 8 trials are reviewed: 3 trials published in 2013 demonstrated neutral results for endovascular interventions, and 5 trials published in 2015 demonstrated positive results for endovascular interventions. Potential reasons for the change in outcomes include better patient selection and improvement indevice technology. Patient selection improvements included selecting patients with salvageable brain tissue with an identifiable thrombus on perfusion imaging. The major improvement in device technology was the introduction of the Solitaire Flow Restoration stent retriever and the Trevo stent retriever, both of which have improved recanalization rates compared with earlier devices. Adjunctive medication considerations include the mode of sedation (general or conscious), intraprocedural anticoagulation with heparin, and intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator. The use of endovascular devices for treating acute ischemic stroke is likely to increase as more centers become capable of integrating them into their stroke programs. It is important for pharmacists to understand the trials that evaluated endovascular interventions because differences exist with respect to device, adjunctive medication, and patient selection, all of which affect patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  18. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  19. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  20. Imaging retina to study dementia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Ikram, M Kamran; Chen, Christopher; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-03-01

    With increase in life expectancy, the number of persons suffering from common age-related brain diseases, including neurodegenerative (e.g., dementia) and cerebrovascular (e.g., stroke) disease is expected to rise substantially. As current neuro-imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging may not be able to detect subtle subclinical changes (resolution <100-500 μm) in dementia and stroke, there is an urgent need for other complementary techniques to probe the pathophysiology of these diseases. The retina - due to its anatomical, embryological and physiological similarities with the brain - offers a unique and accessible "window" to study correlates and consequences of subclinical pathology in the brain. Retinal components such as the microvasculature and retinal ganglion cell axons can now be visualized non-invasively using different retinal imaging techniques e.g., ocular fundus photography and optical coherence tomography. Advances in retinal imaging may provide new and potentially important insights into cerebrovascular neurodegenerative processes in addition to what is currently possible with neuro-imaging. In this review, we present an overview of the current literature on the application of retinal imaging in the study of dementia and stroke. We discuss clinical implications of these studies, novel state-of-the-art retinal imaging techniques and future directions aimed at evaluating whether retinal imaging can be an additional investigation tool in the study of dementia and stroke.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Daniel A; Dehkharghani, Seena

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is indispensable in the evaluation of patients presenting with central nervous system emergencies. Although computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of initial assessment and triage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become vital in expanding diagnostic capabilities, refining management strategies, and developing our understanding of disease processes. Ischemic stroke and cerebral venous thrombosis are 2 areas wherein MRI is actively revolutionizing patient care. Familiarity with the imaging manifestations of these 2 disease processes is crucial for any radiologist reading brain MR studies. In this review, the fundamentals of image interpretation will be addressed in-depth. Furthermore, advanced imaging techniques which are redefining the role of emergency MRI will be outlined, with a focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie image interpretation. In particular, emerging data surrounding the use of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke management portend dramatic shifts in neurointerventional management. To this end, a review of the recent stroke literature will hopefully enhance the radiologist's role in both meaningful reporting and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  2. The identification of acute stroke: an analysis of emergency calls.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie P; Carter, Bernie; Ford, Gary A; Gibson, Josephine M E; Leathley, Michael J; McAdam, Joanna J; O'Donnell, Mark; Punekar, Shuja; Quinn, Tom; Watkins, Caroline L

    2013-08-01

    Accurate dispatch of emergency medical services at the onset of acute stroke is vital in expediting assessment and treatment. We examined the relationship between callers' description of potential stroke symptoms to the emergency medical dispatcher and the subsequent classification and prioritisation of emergency medical services response. To identify key 'indicator' words used by people making emergency calls for suspected stroke, comparing these with the subsequent category of response given by the emergency medical dispatcher. A retrospective chart review (hospital and emergency medical services) in North West England (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) identified digitally recorded emergency medical services calls, which related to patients who had a diagnosis of suspected stroke at some point on the stroke pathway (from the emergency medical services call taker through to final medical diagnosis). Using content analysis, words used to describe stroke by the caller were recorded. A second researcher independently followed the same procedure in order to produce a list of 'indicator' words. Description of stroke-specific and nonstroke-specific problems reported by the caller was compared with subsequent emergency medical services dispatch coding and demographic features. Six hundred forty-three calls were made to emergency medical services of which 592 (92%) had complete emergency medical services and hospital data. The majority of callers were female (67%) and family members (55%). The most frequently reported problems first said by callers to the emergency medical dispatcher were collapse or fall (26%) and stroke (25%). Callers who identified that the patient was having a stroke were correct in 89% of cases. Calls were dispatched as stroke in 45% of cases, of which 83% had confirmed stroke. Of the first reported problems, Face Arm Speech Test stroke symptoms were mentioned in less than 5% of calls, with speech problems being the most common symptom. No

  3. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  4. Vertebral artery stump syndrome in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Yonehara, Toshiro

    2013-01-15

    Although the carotid artery stump as an embolic source for ischemic stroke has been well described, there have been few systematic reports of a similar syndrome in the posterior circulation (PC) after vertebral artery (VA) origin occlusion. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and characteristics of acute ischemic stroke with VA stump syndrome. Of 3463 consecutive patients who were admitted within 7 days after onset, 865 patients with acute ischemic stroke in the PC were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria of VA stump syndrome included: (1) acute ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation; (2) the VA origin occlusion identified on MRA, duplex ultrasound, CT angiography, and/or conventional angiography; (3) presence of distal antegrade flow in the ipsilateral VA; and (4) absence of other causes of ischemic stroke. Of the 865 patients with PC stroke, 12 (1.4%) were diagnosed as having VA stump syndrome. The ischemic lesions included the cerebellum in all patients. Nine patients had multiple ischemic lesions in the brain stem, thalamus, or posterior lobe other than cerebellum. On duplex ultrasound, a to-and-fro flow pattern was observed in the culprit VA in 10 patients. Three patients had recurrences of ischemic stroke in the PC during the acute phase. VA stump syndrome was not a rare mechanism of PC stroke, and there was a high rate of stroke recurrence during the acute phase. Vascular assessment by a multimodality approach can be used to promptly detect VA stump syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of acute stroke: what is the most effective strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Dunbabin, D. W.; Sandercock, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques of investigation of acute stroke syndromes have progressed rapidly in recent years, outpacing developments in effective stroke treatment. The clinician is thus faced with a variety of tests, each with different cost implications and each altering management to a greater or lesser extent. This review will concentrate on the basic tests which should be performed for all strokes (full blood count, ESR, biochemical screen, blood glucose, cholesterol, syphilis serology, chest X-ray and electrocardiogram). Additional tests may be required in selected cases: CT scan to diagnose 'non-stroke' lesions, to exclude cerebral haemorrhage if anti-haemostatic therapy is planned, and to detect strokes which may require emergency intervention (such as cerebellar stroke with hydrocephalus); echocardiography to detect cardiac sources of emboli; and in a few cases lumbar puncture and specialized haematological tests. Other tests, which are currently research tools, may be suitable for widespread use in the future including NMR, SPECT and PET scanning. PMID:2062773

  6. Effect of median-nerve electrical stimulation on BOLD activity in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Manganotti, P; Storti, S F; Formaggio, E; Acler, M; Zoccatelli, G; Pizzini, F B; Alessandrini, F; Bertoldo, A; Toffolo, G M; Bovi, P; Beltramello, A; Moretto, G; Fiaschi, A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activation during somatosensory electrical stimulation of the median nerve in acute stroke patients and to determine its correlation with ischemic damage and clinical recovery over time. Fourteen acute stroke patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during contralesional median-nerve electrical stimulation 12-48 h after stroke. Findings were then validated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and motor evoked potential by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Poor clinical recovery at three months was noted in four patients with no activation in the early days after stroke, whereas good clinical recovery was observed in eight patients with a normal activation pattern in the primary sensory motor area in the acute phase. In two patients BOLD activation correlated weakly with clinical recovery. Findings from TMS and DTI partially correlated with clinical recovery and functional scores. Clinically relevant insights into the "functional reserve" of stroke patients gained with peripheral nerve stimulation during fMRI may carry prognostic value already in the acute period of a cerebrovascular accident. BOLD activation maps could provide insights into the functional organization of the residual systems and could contribute to medical decision making in neurological and rehabilitative treatment. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognostic value of single-photon emission tomography in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Weir, C J; Bolster, A A; Tytler, S; Murray, G D; Corrigall, R S; Adams, F G; Lees, K R

    1997-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in the investigation of acute stroke. We investigated the relationship between SPET data and functional outcome in a large group of acute stroke patients. One hundred and eight patients underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPET after acute ischaemic stroke. We categorised the clinical presentation according to the Oxford classification of acute stroke. Outcome was measured 1 year after stroke using mortality and the Barthel Index for survivors. SPET scans were interpreted without reference to the clinical data using a semi-automatic technique. Three experienced observers determined the presence of luxury perfusion using suitably scaled SPET images in conjunction with the CT scan. Both SPET volume and severity of deficit were significantly negatively correlated with Barthel Index at 1 year (rs=-0.310, P<0.0001, and rs=-0.316, P<0.0001 respectively). In patients scanned with SPET within 16 h of stroke onset, the correlations were more strongly negative (rs=-0.606, P<0. 001, and rs=-0.492, P<0.005 respectively). Luxury perfusion was not associated (chi2=0.073, df=1, P=0.79) with good functional outcome (Barthel score >/=60). Stepwise logistic regression identified Oxford classification, total deficit volume and patient's age as significant predictors of functional outcome. Overall predictive accuracy was 72%. Predictive accuracy was better in patients who received SPET within 16 h of stroke onset. SPET provides useful information about the functional outcome of acute stroke at 1 year. However, the accuracy of prediction decreases the longer SPET is delayed. Prognostication using SPET in combination with clinical assessment and other investigations may also be considered.

  8. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-jun; Zhu, Ding-liang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hai-ya; Ji, Kai-da; Lu, Yi-ming; Gao, Ping-jin

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that a mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) occurs after acute cerebrovascular diseases, we evaluated the number of EPCs in the process of acute stroke. A total of 203 individuals were examined, including 100 patients with ischemic strokes, 36 patients with hemorrhagic strokes and 67 healthy controls. Ninety-eight patients were observed at days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after acute stroke. Circulating EPCs were defined by the surface markers CD133/KDR and analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were determined by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry using the N high sensitivity CRP Reagent. Patients with acute stroke had lower numbers of EPCs (0.037+/-0.001/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) vs. 0.06+/-0.002/100 PMNCs, P<0.05) and higher levels of serum hs-CRP (1.99 vs. 0.03 mg per 100 ml, P<0.05) than control subjects after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. There were no differences in EPCs counts or serum hs-CRP levels between patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In univariate analyses, BMI, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (T-cho), blood glucose and hs-CRP (P<0.001) were inversely correlated with EPCs counts. Multivariate analyses showed SBP and total cholesterol as independent predictors of EPCs levels. The number of EPCs gradually increased at day 7 after acute onset, remained elevated at day 14; and returned to baseline by day 28. Our results suggest a possible contribution of circulating EPCs in acute stroke. SBP and total cholesterol are independent factors of reduced EPCs numbers. A transient early increment of EPCs may result from the mobilization of EPCs in response to stroke stress.

  9. Acute single channel EEG predictors of cognitive function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Anna; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Johnstone, Stuart J; Middleton, Sandy; Wilson, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Early and accurate identification of factors that predict post-stroke cognitive outcome is important to set realistic targets for rehabilitation and to guide patients and their families accordingly. However, behavioral measures of cognition are difficult to obtain in the acute phase of recovery due to clinical factors (e.g. fatigue) and functional barriers (e.g. language deficits). The aim of the current study was to test whether single channel wireless EEG data obtained acutely following stroke could predict longer-term cognitive function. Resting state Relative Power (RP) of delta, theta, alpha, beta, delta/alpha ratio (DAR), and delta/theta ratio (DTR) were obtained from a single electrode over FP1 in 24 participants within 72 hours of a first-ever stroke. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was administered at 90-days post-stroke. Correlation and regression analyses were completed to identify relationships between 90-day cognitive function and electrophysiological data, neurological status, and demographic characteristics at admission. Four acute qEEG indices demonstrated moderate to high correlations with 90-day MoCA scores: DTR (r = -0.57, p = 0.01), RP theta (r = 0.50, p = 0.01), RP delta (r = -0.47, p = 0.02), and DAR (r = -0.45, p = 0.03). Acute DTR (b = -0.36, p < 0.05) and stroke severity on admission (b = -0.63, p < 0.01) were the best linear combination of predictors of MoCA scores 90-days post-stroke, accounting for 75% of variance. Data generated by a single pre-frontal electrode support the prognostic value of acute DAR, and identify DTR as a potential marker of post-stroke cognitive outcome. Use of single channel recording in an acute clinical setting may provide an efficient and valid predictor of cognitive function after stroke.

  10. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and underlying disorders.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Okada, Yasushi; Jinnouchi, Juro; Gotoh, Seiji; Yokoyama, Yoko; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Ibayashi, Setsuro

    2006-01-01

    The Acute Candesartan Cilexetil Therapy in Stroke Survivors (ACCESS) study indicated that early treatment with an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker in acute stroke patients who had relatively high blood pressure improved cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the chronic stage. To better interpret the findings of this study, we determined whether stroke patients with high acute blood pressure had specific underlying conditions. We divided 712 consecutive patients who were hospitalized within 48 h after the onset of brain infarction into two groups: 77 patients with high acute blood pressure that met the criteria of the ACCESS study and the 635 remaining patients. Underlying risk factors and comorbidities, stroke characteristics, as well as mortality, vascular events, and disability at 3 weeks were compared between the two groups. Patients with high acute blood pressure more frequently had diabetes mellitus (p < 0.01), intracranial arterial stenosis (p < 0.02), higher levels of hemoglobin A1c (p < 0.005), higher creatinine levels (p < 0.005), and tended to more frequently have ischemic heart disease (p < 0.09) and infarcts <1.5 cm in diameter (p < 0.09) than the other patients. On multivariate analysis, high levels of hemoglobin A1c, high creatinine levels, and intracranial arterial stenosis were independently predictive of high acute blood pressure. At 3 weeks after the stroke onset, patients with high acute blood pressure were more dependent in their daily living activities (p < 0.02) and more frequently developed vascular events or death (p < 0.005) than the other patients. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and advanced renal damage appeared to correlate with acute hypertension after stroke. Since intracranial arterial stenosis also seemed to contribute to high acute blood pressure, one should be careful not to induce cerebral hypoperfusion by the early use of antihypertensives. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Predictors of Acute, Rehabilitation and Total Length of Stay in Acute Stroke: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Sien; Tan, Kristin Hx; Chen, Cynthia; Senolos, Gilmore C; Chew, Effie; Koh, Gerald Ch

    2016-09-01

    The poststroke acute and rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) are key markers of stroke care efficiency. This study aimed to describe the characteristics and identify the predictors of poststroke acute, rehabilitation and total LOS. This study also defined a subgroup of patients as "short" LOS and compared its complication rates and functional outcomes in rehabilitation with a "long" acute LOS group. A prospective cohort study (n = 1277) was conducted in a dedicated rehabilitation unit within a tertiary academic acute hospital over a 5-year period between 2004 and 2009. The functional independence measure (FIM) was the primary functional outcome measure in the rehabilitation phase. A group with an acute LOS of less than 7 days was defined as "short" acute LOS. Ischaemic strokes comprised 1019 (80%) of the cohort while the rest were haemorrhagic strokes. The mean acute and rehabilitation LOS were 9 ± 7 days and 18 ± 10 days, respectively. Haemorrhagic strokes and anterior circulation infarcts had significantly longer acute, rehabilitation and total LOS compared to posterior circulation and lacunar infarcts. The acute, rehabilitation and total LOS were significantly shorter for stroke admissions after 2007. There was poor correlation (r = 0.12) between the acute and rehabilitation LOS. In multivariate analyses, stroke type was strongly associated with acute LOS, while rehabilitation admission FIM scores were significantly associated with rehabilitation LOS. Patients in the short acute LOS group had fewer medical complications and similar FIM efficacies compared to the longer acute LOS group. Consideration for stroke type and initial functional status will facilitate programme planning that has a better estimation of the LOS duration, allowing for more equitable resource distribution across the inpatient stroke continuum. We advocate earlier transfers of appropriate patients to rehabilitation units as this ensures rehabilitation efficacy is maintained while the

  12. Dabigatran following acute transient ischemic attack and minor stroke II (DATAS II).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kuan H; Sharma, Mukul; Benavente, Oscar; Gioia, Laura; Field, Thalia S; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Butcher, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke are at high risk of early recurrent cerebrovascular events. Anticoagulation with heparin or warfarin acutely after ischemic stroke is at least as efficacious as aspirin for preventing recurrent events but is associated with an increased risk of clinical worsening due to hemorrhagic transformation. Aim and hypothesis We aim to demonstrate the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, in acute cerebrovascular syndrome patients. The primary hypothesis is that symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rates in dabigatran and aspirin-treated patients will be similar. Sample size estimates At least 136 participants in two groups required to demonstrate an absolute between-group difference in the rate of hemorrhagic transformation of 5.6% with 80% power, assuming alpha = 5%. Methods and design A randomized, multicenter open-label clinical trial (NCT02295826). Three-hundred participants with a transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤ 9) will undergo magnetic resonance imaging within 72 h of symptom onset and will be randomized to aspirin 81 mg daily or dabigatran 150 mg twice daily for 30 days. Participants undergo repeat magnetic resonance imaging at 30 days and clinical assessment to 90 days. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rate. Secondary outcomes include recurrent stroke and new ischemic lesions on repeat magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion This study will determine the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran in patients with acute transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke and will inform the design of a phase III randomized trial aimed at demonstrating reduced recurrent early ischemic events after acute transient ischemic attack/stroke.

  13. Validation of FLAIR hyperintense lesions as imaging biomarkers to predict the outcome of acute stroke after intra-arterial thrombolysis following intravenous tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong-Won; Kim, Kyeong Joon; Noh, Won-Young; Jang, Myung Suk; Yang, Mi Hwa; Han, Moon-Ku; Kwon, O-Ki; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) given within 4.5 h of symptom onset is accepted as the standard treatment of ischemic stroke. Persistent occlusion of cerebral arteries despite intravenous thrombolysis and unremitting neurologic deficits lead us to consider additional intra-arterial approaches. The aim of this study was to elucidate the potential of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI performed during or immediately after intravenous thrombolysis for predicting clinical outcomes of subsequent intra-arterial thrombolysis. With a prospective stroke registry database of patients hospitalized in our institution from January 2004 to February 2010, we identified ischemic stroke patients with the following conditions: (1) presentation within 2.5 h of onset, (2) treated with intravenous tPA based on brain CT, (3) persistent occlusion on subsequent MRI/MR angiography, including a FLAIR sequence, and (4) eventually treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings including initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), follow-up NIHSS at the 7th day or discharge, modified Rankin scale (mRS) score at 3 months, and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation were captured. FLAIR images were reviewed by 2 investigators blinded to clinical information independently and dichotomized into the absence and presence of FLAIR change within the diffusion-restriction lesions. Of the 57 patients who met these conditions, FLAIR-hyperintense lesions (FHL) were observed in 32 (56.1%). The FHL-negative group was 69.1 ± 12.1 years old on average and the FHL-positive group 67.3 ± 11.0 years old. In both groups, hypertension was the most common vascular risk factor, cardioembolic stroke was the most common subtype, and distal middle cerebral artery was the most common site of occlusion. The incidence of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation was 4.0% in the FHL-negative group and 9.4% in the FHL-positive group (p = 0

  14. Trends in admission blood pressure and stroke outcome in patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack in a National Acute Stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Koton, Silvia; Eizenberg, Yoav; Tanne, David; Grossman, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is common during an acute stroke and is associated with unfavorable outcome. Management of hypertension has improved in recent years. We aimed to evaluate trends in admission BP levels in patients admitted with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) over the past decade. Data were based on the National Acute Stroke Israeli Registry. The study population comprised 6177 patients, aged at least 18 years admitted for acute stroke (4382 ischemic stroke and 476 intracerebral hemorrhage) or TIA (1227) and had data on BP levels on admission. We studied temporal trends in admission BP and preadmission antihypertensive therapy from 2004 to 2010. Admission SBP (mean ± SD) in patients with acute stroke decreased from 161 ± 29 mmHg in 2004 to 153 ± 28 mmHg in 2010 (P < 0.001). Similar trends were observed for patients with TIA. The use of three or more antihypertensive agents before stroke onset increased from 16.9% in 2004 to 20.0% in 2010 (P = 0.02). In patients with acute stroke, higher admission SBP was associated with increased stroke severity (P < 0.001). Rate of disability at discharge or in-hospital death decreased from 71.3% in 2004 to 64.8% in 2010 (P < 0.0001). Admission SBP was associated with disability at discharge or in-hospital death with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08) per 10 mmHg change in SBP. Admission SBP in patients with acute stroke and TIA decreased from 2004 to 2010 and may have contributed to the improved outcome in these patients.

  15. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perfusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Xingfeng; Zhu, Fuping

    2003-05-01

    To study the technique and application of perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) in the diagnosis and medical treatment of acute stroke, 25 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner. The Data analysis was done with "3D Med System" developed by our Lab to process the data and obtain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, cerebral blood volume (CBV) map, cerebral blood flow (CBF) map as well as mean transit time (MTT) map. In accute stage of stroke, normal or slightly hypointensity in T1-, hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images were seen in the cerebral infarction areas. There were hypointensity in CBV map, CBF map and ADC map; and hyperintensity in MTT map that means this infarct area could be saved. If the hyperintensity area in MTT map was larger than the area in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the larger part was called penumbra and could be cured by an appropriate thrombolyitic or other therapy. The CBV, CBF and MTT maps are very important in the diagnosis and medical treatment of acute especially hyperacute stroke. Comparing with DWI, we can easily know the situation of penumbra and the effect of curvative therapy. Besides, we can also make a differential diagnosis with this method.

  17. Combination of acute stroke unit and short-term stroke ward with early supported discharge decreases mortality and complications after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Suwanwela, Nijasri Charnnarong; Eusattasak, Nattapong; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Piravej, Krisna; Locharoenkul, Chaichon

    2007-06-01

    The stroke unit has been established as a standard care for stroke. However, it has not been widely established in developing countries due to the lack of understanding and limited resources. To compare the complications and mortality of stroke patients admitted in the stroke unit and short-term ward with those admitted in the general medical ward. The authors prospectively collected data of acute stroke patients who were admitted after the set up of the stroke unit and stroke short-term ward in 2003, and compared with the data of those who were admitted in a general medical ward in 2001. All acute stroke patients who presented within seven days of the onset were admitted and those who had final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were studied. Patients in the stroke unit were taken care of by a multidisciplinary team approach under clinical guidelines and a care map. The short-term ward is a part of the general medical ward and stroke patients were treated by a multidisciplinary team followed by homecare treatment. The endpoints were mortality rate, neurological and medical complications during admissions, and the mean length of stay. Seven hundred and ninety-four patients were studied. Three hundred and eighty-seven patients were admitted in 2001 and 407 patients in 2003. Among patients presented 2003, three hundred and one cases were treated in the acute stroke unit whereas 106 were admitted in the short-term ward. There was no difference in stroke risk factors and stroke subtypes between the two groups, except for dyslipidemia and cigarette smoking, which were more prevalent in patients admitted in 2003. Patients in the stroke unit and the short-term ward had significantly less mortality than those in the general medical ward (8.9 and 2.1%). Overall complications in the stroke unit and the short-term ward were 16.8%, compared to 26% of those admitted into the general medical ward. Significantly less brain edema, hemorrhagic

  18. Time to stroke magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Burke, James F; Sussman, Jeremy B; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Kerber, Kevin A

    2013-08-01

    Recent guidelines on stroke neuroimaging from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recommend magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over computed tomography (CT) for stroke diagnosis when patients present within 12 hours of onset. We sought to estimate the proportion of stroke MRI that is performed within 12 hours. Using the best available data, we estimated total time from symptom onset to MRI with a Monte Carlo simulation. We modeled 3 times to MRI: time to presentation, time to emergency department (ED) MRI, and time to inpatient MRI. Total time to MRI was estimated by summing these time components while varying model parameters around our base model. Sensitivity analyses assessed the relative importance of model parameters to overall MRI timing. In 2009, we estimate that 66% of stroke patients underwent MRI, 14% received an MRI in the ED, and 68% of all MRIs were obtained on hospital day 0 or 1. We estimate that 29% (95% confidence interval 24-33%) of stroke MRIs are obtained within 12 hours of onset. Sensitivity analyses revealed that even large clinical changes (eg, decreasing time to presentation) would only moderately influence this proportion. For example, if mean time to presentation were reduced to 30 minutes (from the base case estimate of 16 hours), the proportion of stroke MRI performed within 12 hours would only increase to 55.3%. Stroke guidelines favor the use of MRI over CT only during the first 12 hours from symptom onset, yet less than one-third of stroke MRIs are actually performed within this timeframe. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  19. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Telemedicine Service for the Treatment of Acute Stroke Patients: TeleStroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care service based on telemedicine can reduce both physical and time barriers in stroke treatments. Moreover, this service connects centers specializing in stroke treatment with other centers and practitioners, thereby increasing accessibility to neurological specialist care and fibrinolytic treatment. Objective Development, implementation, and evaluation of a care service for the treatment of acute stroke patients based on telemedicine (TeleStroke) at Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. Methods The evaluation phase, conducted from October 2008 to January 2011, involved patients who presented acute stroke symptoms confirmed by the emergency physician; they were examined using TeleStroke in two hospitals, at a distance of 16 and 110 kilometers from Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. We analyzed the number of interconsultation sheets, the percentage of patients treated with fibrinolysis, and the number of times they were treated. To evaluate medical professionals’ acceptance of the TeleStroke system, we developed a web-based questionnaire using a Technology Acceptance Model. Results A total of 28 patients were evaluated through the interconsultation sheet. Out of 28 patients, 19 (68%) received fibrinolytic treatment. The most common reasons for not treating with fibrinolysis included: clinical criteria in six out of nine patients (66%) and beyond the time window in three out of nine patients (33%). The mean “onset-to-hospital” time was 69 minutes, the mean time from admission to CT image was 33 minutes, the mean “door-to-needle” time was 82 minutes, and the mean “onset-to-needle” time was 150 minutes. Out of 61 medical professionals, 34 (56%) completed a questionnaire to evaluate the acceptability of the TeleStroke system. The mean values for each item were over 6.50, indicating that respondents positively evaluated each item. This survey was assessed using the Cronbach alpha test to determine the reliability of the

  20. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Very low cerebral blood volume predicts parenchymal hematoma in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hermitte, Laure; Cho, Tae-Hee; Ozenne, Brice; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Ribe, Lars; Baron, Jean-Claude; Østergaard, Leif; Derex, Laurent; Hjort, Niels; Fiehler, Jens; Pedraza, Salvador; Hermier, Marc; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Berthezène, Yves

    2013-08-01

    Parenchymal hematoma (PH) may worsen the outcome of patients with stroke. The aim of our study was to confirm the relationship between the volume of very low cerebral blood volume (CBV) and PH using a European multicenter database (I-KNOW). A secondary objective was to explore the impact of early reperfusion and recanalization. The volume of cerebral tissue with CBV≤2.5th percentile of the normal hemisphere was calculated within the acute diffusion-weighted imaging lesion. Hemorrhagic transformation was assessed on day 2 MRI according to the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II criteria. Recanalization and reperfusion were assessed on 3-hour follow-up MRI. Of the 110 patients, hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 59 patients, including 7 PH. In univariate analysis, the acute National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (P=0.002), acute diffusion-weighted imaging lesion volume (P=0.02), and thrombolysis (P=0.03), but not very low CBV (P=0.52), were associated with hemorrhagic transformation. The volume of very low CBV was the only predictor of PH (P=0.007). Early reperfusion and recanalization had no influence on either hemorrhagic transformation or PH. Very low CBV was the only independent predictor of PH in patients with acute stroke.

  2. Deconvolution with simple extrapolation for improved cerebral blood flow measurement in dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging during acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Smith, Michael Richard; Frayne, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging is a clinical technique for measuring brain blood flow parameters during stroke and other ischemic events. Ischemia in brain tissue can be difficult to accurately measure or visualize when using MR-derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps. The deconvolution techniques used to estimate flow can introduce a mean transit time-dependent bias following application of noise stabilization techniques. The underestimation of the CBF values, greatest in normal tissues, causes a decrease in the image contrast observed in CBF maps between normally perfused and ischemic tissues; resulting in ischemic areas becoming less conspicuous. Through application of the proposed simple extrapolation technique, CBF biases are reduced when missing high-frequency signal components in the MR data removed during deconvolution noise stabilization are restored. The extrapolation approach was compared with other methods and showed a statistically significant increase in image contrast in CBF maps between normal and ischemic tissues for white matter (P<.05) and performed better than most other methods for gray matter. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that extrapolated CBF maps better-detected penumbral regions. Extrapolated CBF maps provided more accurate CBF estimates in simulations, suggesting that the approach may provide a better prediction of outcome in the absence of treatment.

  3. Validation of a dysphagia screening tool in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Edmiaston, Jeff; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Loehr, Lynda; Nassief, Abdullah

    2010-07-01

    Although many dysphagia screening tools exist, none has high sensitivity and reliability or can be administered quickly with minimal training. To design and validate a swallowing screening tool to be used by health care professionals who are not speech language pathologists to identify dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. In a prospective study of 300 patients admitted to the stroke service at an urban tertiary care hospital, interrater and test-retest reliabilities of a new tool (the Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen) were established. The tool was administered by nursing staff when patients were admitted to the stroke unit. A speech language pathologist blinded to the results with the new tool administered the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability, a clinical bedside evaluation, with dysphagia operationally defined by a score less than 178. The mean time from admission to screening with the new tool was 8 hours. The mean time between administration of the new tool and the clinical bedside evaluation was 32 hours. For the new tool, interrater reliability was 93.6% and test-retest reliability was 92.5%. The new tool had a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 74% for detecting dysphagia and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 68% for detecting aspiration risk. The Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen is an easily administered and reliable tool that has sufficient sensitivity to detect both dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients.

  4. Validation of a Dysphagia Screening Tool in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmiaston, Jeff; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Loehr, Lynda; Nassief, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Background Although many dysphagia screening tools exist, none has high sensitivity and reliability or can be administered quickly with minimal training. Objective To design and validate a swallowing screening tool to be used by health care professionals who are not speech language pathologists to identify dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. Methods In a prospective study of 300 patients admitted to the stroke service at an urban tertiary care hospital, interrater and test-retest reliabilities of a new tool (the Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen) were established. The tool was administered by nursing staff when patients were admitted to the stroke unit. A speech language pathologist blinded to the results with the new tool administered the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability, a clinical bedside evaluation, with dysphagia operationally defined by a score less than 178. Results The mean time from admission to screening with the new tool was 8 hours. The mean time between administration of the new tool and the clinical bedside evaluation was 32 hours. For the new tool, interrater reliability was 93.6% and test-retest reliability was 92.5%. The new tool had a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 74% for detecting dysphagia and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 68% for detecting aspiration risk. Conclusions The Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen is an easily administered and reliable tool that has sufficient sensitivity to detect both dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. PMID:19875722

  5. THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY FOR ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE BEYOND THREE HOURS

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Keim, Samuel M.; Milne, William Kenneth; Meurer, William J.; Barsan, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke within 3 h of symptom onset of highly select patients has been advocated by some groups since 1995, but trials have yielded inconsistent outcomes. One recent trial demonstrated significant improvement when the therapeutic window was extended to 4.5 h. Clinical Question Does the intravenous systemic administration of tPA within 4.5 h to select patients with acute ischemic stroke improve functional outcomes? Evidence Review All randomized controlled trials enrolling patients within 4.5 h were identified, in addition to a meta-analysis of these trial data. Results The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study III (ECASS III) clinical trials demonstrated significantly improved outcomes at 3 months, with increased rates of intracranial hemorrhage, whereas ECASS II and the Acute Noninterventional Therapy in Ischemic Stroke (ATLANTIS) study showed increased hemorrhagic complications without improving outcomes. Meta-analysis of trial data from all ECASS trials, NINDS, and ATLANTIS suggest that thrombolysis within 4.5 h improves functional outcomes. Conclusion Ischemic stroke tPA treatment within 4.5 h seems to improve functional outcomes and increases symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rates without significantly increas ing mortality. PMID:20576390

  6. [Technical standards for the interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and its treatment is still a major challenge. For more than a decade, various mechanical devices have been developed for the recanalization of proximal artery occlusions in acute ischemic stroke but most of them have been approved for clinical use, only on the basis of uncontrolled case series. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-specific plasminogen activator administered (iv rtPA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset is so far the only approved medicinal treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction. With the introduction of stent retrievers, mechanical thrombectomy has demonstrated substantial rates of partial or complete arterial recanalization and improved outcomes compared with iv rtPA and best medical treatment alone in multiple randomized clinical trials in select patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal artery occlusions. This review discusses the evolution of endovascular stroke therapy followed by a discussion of the current technical standards of mechanical thrombectomy that have to be considered during endovascular stroke therapy and the updated treatment recommendations of the ESO Karolinska stroke update.

  7. Management of acute ischaemic stroke in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Subic, A; Cermakova, P; Norrving, B; Winblad, B; von Euler, M; Kramberger, M G; Eriksdotter, M; Garcia-Ptacek, S

    2017-04-01

    An estimated 10% of stroke patients have an underlying dementia. As a consequence, health professionals often face the challenge of managing patients with dementia presenting with an acute stroke. Patients with dementia are less likely to receive thrombolysis (0.56-10% vs. 1-16% thrombolysis rates in the general population), be admitted to a stroke unit or receive some types of care. Anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention is sometimes withheld, despite dementia not being listed as an exclusion criterion in current guidelines. Studies in this population are scarce, and results have been contradictory. Three observational studies have examined intravenous thrombolysis for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in patients with dementia. In the two largest matched case-control studies, there were no significant differences between patients with and without dementia in the risks of intracerebral haemorrhage or mortality. The risk of intracerebral haemorrhage ranged between 14% and 19% for patients with dementia. Studies of other interventions for stroke are lacking for this population. Patients with dementia are less likely to be discharged home compared with controls (19% vs. 41%) and more likely to be disabled (64% vs. 59%) or die during hospitalization (22% vs. 11%). The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge about the management of ischaemic stroke in patients with pre-existing dementia, including organizational aspects of stroke care, intravenous thrombolysis, access to stroke unit care and use of supportive treatment. Evidence to support anticoagulation for secondary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation and antiplatelet therapy in nonembolic stroke will be discussed, as well as rehabilitation and how these factors influence patient outcomes. Finally, ethical issues, knowledge gaps and pathways for future research will be considered. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  8. Efficacy of Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomographic Perfusion-Selected Patients in SWIFT PRIME Trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    PubMed

    Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Jahan, Reza; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Bonafe, Alain; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Cognard, Christophe; Yavagal, Dileep R; Albers, Gregory W

    2017-06-01

    The majority of patients enrolled in SWIFT PRIME trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke) had computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) imaging before randomization; 34 patients were randomized after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with middle cerebral artery and distal carotid occlusions were randomized to treatment with tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator) alone or tPA+stentriever thrombectomy. The primary outcome was the distribution of the modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days. Patients with the target mismatch profile for enrollment were identified on MRI and CTP. MRI selection was performed in 34 patients; CTP in 139 patients. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 in both groups. Target mismatch profile was present in 95% (MRI) versus 83% (CTP). A higher percentage of the MRI group was transferred from an outside hospital (P=0.02), and therefore, the time from stroke onset to randomization was longer in the MRI group (P=0.003). Time from emergency room arrival to randomization did not differ in CTP versus MRI-selected patients. Baseline ischemic core volumes were similar in both groups. Reperfusion rates (>90%/TICI [Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction] score 3) did not differ in the stentriever-treated patients in the MRI versus CTP groups. The primary efficacy analysis (90-day mRS score) demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in both subgroups (MRI, P=0.02; CTP, P=0.01). Infarct growth was reduced in the stentriever-treated group in both MRI and CTP groups. Time to randomization was significantly longer in MRI-selected patients; however, site arrival to randomization times were not prolonged, and the benefits of endovascular therapy were similar. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01657461. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Potential microRNA biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jing-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Xing-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a significant cause of high morbidity and mortality in the aging population globally. However, current therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke are limited. Atherosclerotic plaque is considered an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke. To identify biomarkers for carotid atheromatous plaque, bioinformatics analysis of the gene microarray data of plaque and intact tissue from individuals was performed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Multtest and Limma packages of R language, including 56 downregulated and 69 upregulated DEGs. Enriched microRNA (miRNA or miR) DEGs networks were generated using WebGestalt software and the STRING databases, and the miRNAs were validated using serum from acute ischemic stroke patients with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR). Four confirmed differentially expressed miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑22, ‑23 and ‑125) were associated with 28 upregulated DEGs, and 7 miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑30, ‑33, ‑124, ‑181, ‑218 and ‑330) were associated with 25 downregulated DEGs. Gene ontology (GO) function suggested that the confirmed miRNA‑targeted DEGs predominantly associated with signal transduction, the circulatory system, biological adhesion, striated muscle contraction, wound healing and the immune system. The confirmed miRNA‑targeted genes identified serve as potential therapeutic targets for acute ischemic stroke.

  10. Discrimination of acute ischemic stroke from nonischemic vertigo in patients presenting with only imbalance.

    PubMed

    Honda, Shoji; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio; Uchino, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Some patients who present with an acute feeling of imbalance are experiencing an ischemic stroke that is not evident on computed tomography (CT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke and nonischemic vertigo patient groups and to investigate independent factors associated with ischemic stroke. We examined 332 consecutive patients with an acute feeling of imbalance who showed no neurologic findings or responsible lesions on CT scan at the hyperacute phase. We examined their clinical backgrounds, physical findings, and laboratory examinations, with ischemic stroke diagnosed by later CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We identified 41 (12.3%) ischemic stroke patients. Atrial fibrillation (odds ratio 4.1; 95% confidence interval 1.4-11.5), white blood cell count (10(3)/μL, 1.4; 1.2-1.6), head and/or neck pain (4.6; 2.1-10.3), first attack of imbalance feeling (3.3; 1.1-12.2), and dizziness (3.7; 1.7-8.3) were significant and independent factors associated with ischemic stroke among patients with an acute feeling of imbalance. We used these factors to calculate an "imbalance score"; 1 point was given for the presence of each factor and a score of 3-5 points was independently associated with ischemic stroke. An awareness of these factors may indicate that further examinations including MRI are necessary to rule out ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emergency transfer of acute stroke patients within the East Saxony telemedicine stroke network: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Kepplinger, Jessica; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Kristian; Puetz, Volker; Wojciechowski, Claudia; Schneider, Hauke; Gahn, Georg; Back, Tobias; Schackert, Gabriele; Reichmann, Heinz; von Kummer, Ruediger; Bodechtel, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Telemedicine may facilitate the selection of stroke patients who require emergency transfer to a comprehensive stroke center to receive additional therapies other than intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. We sought to analyze frequency, patient characteristics, and specific therapies among emergently transferred patients within the telemedical Stroke East Saxony Network. We reviewed consecutive patients who were transferred emergently from remote spoke sites to hub sites. Certified stroke neurologists performed teleconsultations 24/7, with access to high-speed videoconferencing and transfer of brain images. Emergent transfers were initiated when considered necessary by the stroke neurologist. In 2009 and 2010, we conducted 1413 teleconsultations and subsequently recommended transfer in 339 (24%) patients [mean age 64 ± 14 years, 54% males, median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 5 (interquartile range, IQR 12). The mean teleconsultation-to-arrival time was 1·7 ± 0·8 h (median 1·6 h). Sixty-eight (20%) transferred patients had a nonstroke diagnosis. The remaining 271 (80%) patients had stroke diagnoses [ischemic stroke, 114 (34%); transient ischemic attack, 8 (2%); and intracranial haemorrhage, 149 (44%)]. Forty (35%) ischemic stroke patients received tissue plasminogen activator at spoke sites ('drip and ship'). Of the 240 stroke patients emergently transferred to the main hub site, 119 (49·6%) received at least one specific stroke therapy. A remarkable number of stroke patients can be transferred within a telemedical network to enable the delivery of specific stroke therapies that require advanced multispecialty expertise. Whether associated logistic efforts and costs have an impact on patients' clinical outcomes needs to be evaluated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  12. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  13. Quality of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke in the world wide web.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Ana; Paiva, Dagmara; Azevedo, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The quality of health information in the Internet may be low. This is a concerning issue in cardiovascular diseases which warrant patient self-management. We aimed to assess the quality of Portuguese websites as a source of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke. We used the search terms 'enfarte miocardio' and 'acidente vascular cerebral' (Portuguese terms for myocardial infarction and stroke) on Google(®), on April 5th and 7th 2011, respectively, using Internet Explorer(®). The first 200 URL retrieved in each search were independently visited and Portuguese websites in Portuguese language were selected. We analysed and classified 121 websites for structural characteristics, information coverage and accuracy of the web pages with items defined a priori, trustworthiness in general according to the Health on the Net Foundation and regarding treatments using the DISCERN instrument (48 websites). Websites were most frequently commercial (49.5%), not exclusively dedicated to acute myocardial infarction/ stroke (94.2%), and with information on medical facts (59.5%), using images, video or animation (60.3%). Websites' trustworthiness was low. None of the websites displayed the Health on the Net Foundation seal. Acute myocardial infarction/ stroke websites differed in information coverage but the accuracy of the information was acceptable, although often incomplete. The quality of information on acute myocardial infarction/ stroke in Portuguese websites was acceptable. Trustworthiness was low, impairing users' capability of identifying potentially more reliable content.

  14. Ischemia-modified albumin and heart fatty acid-binding protein: could early ischemic cardiac biomarkers be used in acute stroke management?

    PubMed

    Herisson, Fanny; Delaroche, Odile; Auffray-Calvier, Elisabeth; Duport, Benjamin Daumas; Guillon, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    The detection of biomarkers such as ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) and heart fatty acid-binding protein (HFABP) is used in the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. As these biomarkers are not organ specific, we tested them in the neurovascular field. A total of 41 patients with acute stroke were enrolled (31 ischemic strokes and 10 intracerebral hemorrhages). IMA and HFABP levels were measured in serum samples collected within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. Clinical, imaging, and outcome data were recorded. No difference in baseline IMA or HFABP was found between patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. There was no correlation among biomarker levels at admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, or stroke volume. Neither of the biomarkers could predict short-term prognosis. IMA and HFABP do not appear to be relevant in acute stroke management. Copyright (c) 2010 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutically targeting neuroinflammation and microglia after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjeon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choi, Sung S; Yeo, Hyeon-Gu; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  16. Clinically Confirmed Stroke With Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Stephen D.J.; Doubal, Fergus N.; Dennis, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We sought to establish whether the presence (versus absence) of a lesion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion weighting (DWI-MRI) at presentation with acute stroke is associated with worse clinical outcomes at 1 year. Methods— We recruited consecutive patients with a nondisabling ischemic stroke and performed DWI-MRI. Patients were followed up at 1 year to establish stroke recurrence (clinical or on MRI), cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised,<88) and modified Rankin Scale. Results— A median of 4 days post stroke, one third (76/264; 29%) of patients did not have a DWI lesion (95% confidence interval, 23%–35%). There was no statistically significant difference between those with and without a DWI lesion with respect to age or vascular risk factors. Patients without a lesion were more likely to be women or have previous stroke. At 1 year, 11 of 76 (14%) patients with a DWI-negative index stroke had a clinical diagnosis of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack, 33% had cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised <88), and 40% still had modified Rankin Scale >1, no different from DWI-positive patients; DWI-positive patients were more likely to have a new lesion on MRI (14%), symptomatic or asymptomatic, than DWI-negative patients (2%; P=0.02). Our data were consistent with 6 other studies (total n=976), pooled proportion of DWI-negative patients was 21% (95% confidence interval, 12%–32%). Conclusions— Nearly one third of patients with nondisabling stroke do not have a relevant lesion on acute DWI-MRI. Patients with negative DWI-MRI had no better prognosis than patients with a lesion. DWI-negative stroke patients should receive secondary prevention. PMID:26419965

  17. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: The AnStroke Trial (Anesthesia During Stroke).

    PubMed

    Löwhagen Hendén, Pia; Rentzos, Alexandros; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Rosengren, Lars; Leiram, Birgitta; Sundeman, Henrik; Dunker, Dennis; Schnabel, Kunigunde; Wikholm, Gunnar; Hellström, Mikael; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies have found that patients receiving general anesthesia for endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke have worse neurological outcome compared with patients receiving conscious sedation. In this prospective randomized single-center study, we investigated the impact of anesthesia technique on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients. Ninety patients receiving endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke in 2013 to 2016 were included and randomized to general anesthesia or conscious sedation. Difference in neurological outcome at 3 months, measured as modified Rankin Scale score, was analyzed (primary outcome) and early neurological improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and cerebral infarction volume. Age, sex, comorbidities, admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, intraprocedural blood pressure, blood glucose, Paco2 and Pco2 modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score, and relevant time intervals were recorded. In the general anesthesia group 19 of 45 patients (42.2%) and in the conscious sedation group 18 of 45 patients (40.0%) achieved a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 (P=1.00) at 3 months, with no differences in intraoperative blood pressure decline from baseline (P=0.57); blood glucose (P=0.94); PaCO2 (P=0.68); time intervals (P=0.78); degree of successful recanalization, 91.1% versus 88.9% (P=1.00); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at 24 hours 8 (3-5) versus 9 (2-15; P=0.60); infarction volume, 20 (10-100) versus 20(10-54) mL (P=0.53); and hospital mortality (13.3% in both groups; P=1.00). In endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke, no difference was found between general anesthesia and conscious sedation in neurological outcome 3 months after stroke. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01872884. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke.

  19. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  20. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  1. The influence of gender on 'tissue at risk' in acute stroke: A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging study in a rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Macrae, I Mhairi; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This is the first study to assess the influence of sex on the evolution of ischaemic injury and penumbra. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male (n = 9) and female (n = 10) Sprague-Dawley rats. Diffusion-weighted imaging was acquired over 4 h and infarct determined from T2 images at 24 h post-permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Penumbra was determined retrospectively from serial apparent diffusion coefficient lesions and T2-defined infarct. Apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume was significantly smaller in females from 0.5 to 4 h post permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion as was infarct volume. Penumbral volume, and its loss over time, was not significantly different despite the sex difference in acute and final lesion volumes.

  2. Troponin elevation in acute ischemic stroke (TRELAS) - protocol of a prospective observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Levels of the cardiac muscle regulatory protein troponin T (cTnT) are frequently elevated in patients with acute ischemic stroke and elevated cTnT predicts poor outcome and mortality. The pathomechanism of troponin release may relate to co-morbid coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia or, alternatively, to neurogenic cardiac damage due to autonomic activation after acute ischemic stroke. Therefore, there is uncertainty about how acute ischemic stroke patients with increased cTnT levels should be managed regarding diagnostic and therapeutic workup. Methods/Design The primary objective of the prospective observational trial TRELAS (TRoponin ELevation in Acute ischemic Stroke) is to investigate the frequency and underlying pathomechanism of cTnT elevation in acute ischemic stroke patients in order to give guidance for clinical practice. All consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 72 hours after symptom onset to the Department of Neurology at the Campus Benjamin Franklin of the University Hospital Charité will be screened for cTnT elevations (i.e. >= 0.05 μg/l) on admission and again on the following day. Patients with increased cTnT will undergo coronary angiography within 72 hours. Diagnostic findings of coronary angiograms will be compared with age- and gender-matched patients presenting with Non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction to the Department of Cardiology. The primary endpoint of the study will be the occurrence of culprit lesions in the coronary angiogram indicating underlying co-morbid obstructive coronary artery disease. Secondary endpoints will be the localization of stroke in the cerebral imaging and left ventriculographic findings of wall motion abnormalities suggestive of stroke-induced global cardiac dysfunction. Discussion TRELAS will prospectively determine the frequency and possible etiology of troponin elevation in a large cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The findings are expected to contribute to

  3. Troponin elevation in acute ischemic stroke (TRELAS)--protocol of a prospective observational trial.

    PubMed

    Scheitz, Jan F; Mochmann, Hans-Christian; Nolte, Christian H; Haeusler, Karl G; Audebert, Heinrich J; Heuschmann, Peter U; Laufs, Ulrich; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Endres, Matthias

    2011-08-08

    Levels of the cardiac muscle regulatory protein troponin T (cTnT) are frequently elevated in patients with acute ischemic stroke and elevated cTnT predicts poor outcome and mortality. The pathomechanism of troponin release may relate to co-morbid coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia or, alternatively, to neurogenic cardiac damage due to autonomic activation after acute ischemic stroke. Therefore, there is uncertainty about how acute ischemic stroke patients with increased cTnT levels should be managed regarding diagnostic and therapeutic workup. The primary objective of the prospective observational trial TRELAS (TRoponin ELevation in Acute ischemic Stroke) is to investigate the frequency and underlying pathomechanism of cTnT elevation in acute ischemic stroke patients in order to give guidance for clinical practice. All consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 72 hours after symptom onset to the Department of Neurology at the Campus Benjamin Franklin of the University Hospital Charité will be screened for cTnT elevations (i.e. ≥ 0.05 μg/l) on admission and again on the following day. Patients with increased cTnT will undergo coronary angiography within 72 hours. Diagnostic findings of coronary angiograms will be compared with age- and gender-matched patients presenting with Non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction to the Department of Cardiology. The primary endpoint of the study will be the occurrence of culprit lesions in the coronary angiogram indicating underlying co-morbid obstructive coronary artery disease. Secondary endpoints will be the localization of stroke in the cerebral imaging and left ventriculographic findings of wall motion abnormalities suggestive of stroke-induced global cardiac dysfunction. TRELAS will prospectively determine the frequency and possible etiology of troponin elevation in a large cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The findings are expected to contribute to clarify pathophysiologic concepts of

  4. Stroke navigator--a clinical decision support system for acute stroke.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Kees; Lord, William P; Lagor, Charles; Theiss, Stephan; Brosig, Torge; Siebler, Mario

    2008-11-06

    The Stroke Navigator is a clinical decision support system aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. It combines an audit trail, a differential diagnosis window, an interactive stroke protocol map, and a list of recommendations for hospital staff. It provides a patient-specific overview of the workflow status and of the available clinical findings, with the goal of improving the continuity of care. For this purpose, it uses a workflow engine that was specifically designed to meet the demands of clinical practice. The Stroke Navigator furthermore calculates and displays the probabilities of various stroke differential diagnoses. The demonstration will introduce these and other features by means of a hypothetical patient case. It will also summarize the status of alpha-testing the first prototype.

  5. Improving delivery of acute stroke therapy: The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Staub, Lara; Chan, Wenyaw; Wein, Theodore H; Bartholomew, L Kay; King, Mary; Felberg, Robert A; Burgin, W Scott; Groff, Janet; Hickenbottom, Susan L; Saldin, Kamaldeen; Demchuk, Andrew M; Kalra, Anjali; Dhingra, Anupma; Grotta, James C

    2002-01-01

    Only a small minority of acute stroke patients receive approved acute stroke therapy. We performed a community and professional behavioral intervention project to increase the proportion of stroke patients treated with approved acute stroke therapy. This study used a quasi-experimental design. Intervention and comparison communities were compared at baseline and during educational intervention. The communities were based in 5 nonurban East Texas counties. The multilevel intervention worked with hospitals and community physicians while changing the stroke identification skills, outcome expectations, and social norms of community residents. The primary goal was to increase the proportion of patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) from 1% to 6% of all cerebrovascular events in the intervention community. We prospectively evaluated 1733 patients and validated 1189 cerebrovascular events. Intravenous rTPA treatment increased from 1.38% to 5.75% among all cerebrovascular event patients in the intervention community (P=0.01) compared with a change from 0.49% to 0.55% in the comparison community (P=1.00). Among the ischemic stroke patients, an increase from 2.21% to 8.65% was noted in the intervention community (P=0.02). The comparison group did not appreciably change (0.71% to 0.86%, P=1.00). Of eligible intravenous rTPA candidates, treatment increased in the intervention community from 14% to 52% (P=0.003) and was unchanged in the comparison community (7% to 6%, P=1.00). An aggressive, multilevel stroke educational intervention program can increase delivery of acute stroke therapy. This may have important public health implications for reducing disability on a national level.

  6. The rural Prehospital Acute Stroke Triage (PAST) trial protocol: a controlled trial for rapid facilitated transport of rural acute stroke patients to a regional stroke centre.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Ashley R; Marsden, Dianne L; Parsons, Mark W; Quain, Debbie A; Spratt, Neil J; Loudfoot, Allan R; Middleton, Paul M; Levi, Christopher R

    2010-12-01

    Access to intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke is limited worldwide, particularly in regional and rural areas including in Australia. We are testing the effectiveness of a new rural Prehospital Acute Stroke Triage protocol that includes prehospital assessment and rapid transport of patients from a rural catchment to the major stroke centre in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. The local district hospitals within the rural catchment do not have the capability or infrastructure to deliver acute stroke thrombolysis. The trial has relevance to stroke clinicians, health service managers and planners responsible for rural populations. To implement a system of rapid prehospital assessment and facilitated transport that will significantly increase stroke thrombolysis rates to 10% of ischaemic stroke cases in the rural catchment. Validate an eight-point modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for use by paramedics in the prehospital setting to assess patients' potential eligibility for stroke thrombolysis. The joint project between the John Hunter Hospital Acute Stroke Team and the Ambulance Service of NSW will use a prospective cohort with an historical control group. Tools and protocols have been developed and education undertaken for ambulance field and operations centre personnel. These include a cut-down eight-item National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (Hunter NIHSS-8) score to be used in the field by paramedics and a transport decision matrix to expedite transport for a suspected stroke patient (road or road plus air transport). The primary outcome measure will be the rate of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator delivery for those who suffer an ischaemic stroke following protocol implementation, in comparison with historical rates over a corresponding period prior to implementation, for residents within the catchment. Sixty cases are required in the postimplementation time epoch to demonstrate a statistically significant absolute increase

  7. Imaging of a clinically relevant stroke model: glucose hypermetabolism revisited.

    PubMed

    Arnberg, Fabian; Grafström, Jonas; Lundberg, Johan; Nikkhou-Aski, Sahar; Little, Philip; Damberg, Peter; Mitsios, Nicholas; Mulder, Jan; Lu, Li; Söderman, Michael; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Holmin, Staffan

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic stroke has been shown to cause hypermetabolism of glucose in the ischemic penumbra. Experimental and clinical data indicate that infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia is a potential therapeutic target in acute stroke. However, clinical studies aiming for glucose control in acute stroke have neither improved functional outcome nor reduced mortality. Thus, further studies on glucose metabolism in the ischemic brain are warranted. We used a rat model of stroke that preserves collateral flow. The animals were analyzed by [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging during 90-minute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and during 60 minutes after reperfusion. Results were correlated to magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral blood flow, diffusion of water, lactate formation, and histological data on cell death and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We detected an increased [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake within ischemic regions succumbing to infarction and in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed impairment of blood flow to ischemic levels in the infarct and a reduction of cerebral blood flow in the peri-infarct region. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed lactate in the ischemic region and absence of lactate in the peri-infarct region. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed apoptosis and blood-brain barrier breakdown within the infarct. The increased uptake of [2-(18)F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose in cerebral ischemia most likely reflects hypermetabolism of glucose meeting increased energy needs of ischemic and hypoperfused brain tissue, and it occurs under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions measured by local lactate production. Infarct-related systemic hyperglycemia could serve to facilitate glucose supply to the ischemic brain. Glycemic control by insulin treatment could negatively influence this mechanism. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Significance of large vessel intracranial occlusion causing acute ischemic stroke and TIA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wade S; Lev, Michael H; English, Joey D; Camargo, Erica C; Chou, Maggie; Johnston, S Claiborne; Gonzalez, Gilberto; Schaefer, Pamela W; Dillon, William P; Koroshetz, Walter J; Furie, Karen L

    2009-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion (LVO)-vertebral, basilar, carotid terminus, middle and anterior cerebral arteries-likely portends a worse prognosis than stroke unassociated with LVO. Because little prospective angiographic data have been reported on a cohort of unselected patients with stroke and with transient ischemic attack, the clinical impact of LVO has been difficult to quantify. The Screening Technology and Outcome Project in Stroke Study is a prospective imaging-based study of stroke outcomes performed at 2 academic medical centers. Patients with suspected acute stroke who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset and who underwent multimodality CT/CT angiography were approached for consent for collection of clinical data and 6-month assessment of outcome. Demographic and clinical variables and 6-month modified Rankin Scale scores were collected and combined with blinded interpretation of the CT angiography data. The OR of each variable, including occlusion of intracranial vascular segment in predicting good outcome and 6-month mortality, was calculated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Over a 33-month period, 735 patients with suspected stroke were enrolled. Of these, 578 were adjudicated as stroke and 97 as transient ischemic attack. Among patients with stroke, 267 (46%) had LVO accounting for the stroke and 13 (13%) of patients with transient ischemic attack had LVO accounting for transient ischemic attack symptoms. LVO predicted 6-month mortality (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.7 to 7.3; P<0.001). Six-month good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score Stroke Scale and age, independently predicted outcome. Large vessel intracranial occlusion accounted for nearly half of acute ischemic strokes in unselected patients

  9. Unifying acute stroke treatment guidelines for a Bayesian belief network.

    PubMed

    Love, Alexa; Arnold, Corey W; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S; Andrada, Lewellyn; Saver, Jeffrey; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    With the large number of clinical practice guidelines available, there is an increasing need for a comprehensive unified model for acute ischemic stroke treatment to assist in clinical decision making. We present a unified treatment model derived through review of existing clinical practice guidelines, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. Using logic from the treatment model, a Bayesian belief network was defined and fitted to data from our institution's observational quality improvement database for acute stroke patients. The resulting network validates known relationships between variables, treatment decisions and outcomes, and enables the exploration of new correlative relationships not defined in current guidelines.

  10. Utility of CT perfusion scanning in patient selection for acute stroke intervention: experience at University at Buffalo Neurosurgery-Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter T; Snyder, Kenneth V; Yashar, Parham; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2011-06-01

    Computed tomography perfusion scanning generates physiological flow parameters of the brain parenchyma, allowing differentiation of ischemic penumbra and core infarct. Perfusion maps, along with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, are used as the bases for endovascular stroke intervention at the authors' institute, regardless of the time interval from stroke onset. With case examples, the authors illustrate their perfusion-based imaging guidelines in patient selection for endovascular treatment in the setting of acute stroke.

  11. Acute cerebrovascular disease in the young: the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study.

    PubMed

    Rolfs, Arndt; Fazekas, Franz; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Martus, Peter; Holzhausen, Martin; Böttcher, Tobias; Heuschmann, Peter U; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Tanislav, Christian; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Putaala, Jukaa; Huber, Roman; Bodechtel, Ulf; Lichy, Christoph; Enzinger, Christian; Schmidt, Reinhold; Hennerici, Michael G; Kaps, Manfred; Kessler, Christof; Lackner, Karl; Paschke, Eduard; Meyer, Wolfgang; Mascher, Hermann; Riess, Olaf; Kolodny, Edwin; Norrving, Bo

    2013-02-01

    Strokes have especially devastating implications if they occur early in life; however, only limited information exists on the characteristics of acute cerebrovascular disease in young adults. Although risk factors and manifestation of atherosclerosis are commonly associated with stroke in the elderly, recent data suggests different causes for stroke in the young. We initiated the prospective, multinational European study Stroke in Young Fabry Patients (sifap) to characterize a cohort of young stroke patients. Overall, 5023 patients aged 18 to 55 years with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke (3396), hemorrhagic stroke (271), transient ischemic attack (1071) were enrolled in 15 European countries and 47 centers between April 2007 and January 2010 undergoing a detailed, standardized, clinical, laboratory, and radiological protocol. Median age in the overall cohort was 46 years. Definite Fabry disease was diagnosed in 0.5% (95% confidence interval, 0.4%-0.8%; n=27) of all patients; and probable Fabry disease in additional 18 patients. Males dominated the study population (2962/59%) whereas females outnumbered men (65.3%) among the youngest patients (18-24 years). About 80.5% of the patients had a first stroke. Silent infarcts on magnetic resonance imaging were seen in 20% of patients with a first-ever stroke, and in 11.4% of patients with transient ischemic attack and no history of a previous cerebrovascular event. The most common causes of ischemic stroke were large artery atherosclerosis (18.6%) and dissection (9.9%). Definite Fabry disease occurs in 0.5% and probable Fabry disease in further 0.4% of young stroke patients. Silent infarcts, white matter intensities, and classical risk factors were highly prevalent, emphasizing the need for new early preventive strategies. Clinical Trial Registration Information- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.Unique identifier: NCT00414583.

  12. Effects of different classes of antihypertensive agents on the outcome of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Papadopoulou, Maria; Kazantzidou, Pavlina; Kostaki, Stavroula; Kouparanis, Antonios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether antihypertensive treatment before stroke affects acute ischemic stroke severity and outcome. To evaluate this association, the authors studied 482 consecutive patients (age 78.8±6.7 years) admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The outcome was assessed with rates of adverse outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge ≥2). Independent predictors of severe stroke (NIHSS ≥16) were female sex and atrial fibrillation. Treatment with diuretics before stroke was associated with nonsevere stroke. At discharge, patients with adverse outcome were less likely to be treated before stroke with β-blockers or with diuretics. Independent predictors of adverse outcome were older age, higher NIHSS at admission, and history of ischemic stroke. Treatment with diuretics before stroke appears to be associated with less severe neurologic deficit in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Assessment of relationship between acute ischemic stroke and heart disease--protocol of a prospective observational trial.

    PubMed

    Kral, Michal; Skoloudik, David; Sanak, Daniel; Veverka, Tomas; Bartkova, Andrea; Dornak, Tomas; Hutyra, Martin; Vindis, David; Ulehlova, Jana; Slavik, Ludek; Svabova, Marija; Kubickova, Veronika; Herzig, Roman; Kanovsky, Petr

    2012-09-01

    Stroke and acute myocardial infarction are the leading causes of death and disability in industrialized countries. Multiple interactions exist between the various forms of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and risk factors for development of stroke and major cardiovascular events are similar. There is currently no clear link between acute coronary syndrome and stroke, although it has been repeatedly described. In addition, there are currently no clear recommendations for how to proceed in the case of signs of myocardial damage in patients with acute stroke and how to manage the next follow-up. METHODS-DESIGN: In this prospective observational trial, 500 consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted at the Comprehensive Stroke Center will be enrolled within 12 h from stroke onset. The set of examinations will consist of: 1) Acute brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging 2) Laboratory tests: A) within 12 h from stroke onset: NT pro B-type of natriuretic peptide, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, creatinekinase MB, troponin T (cTnT), interleukin 6, procalcitonin, high sensitive C-reactive protein and D-dimers. B) control level of cTnT after 4 h from admission C) non-acute laboratory samples within 60 h from stroke onset: glycated haemoglobine, serum lipids; 3) Electrocardiogram (ECG) on admission and 4 h from stroke onset; 4) Transesophageal or transthoracal echocardiography and 24-h ECG-Holter within 15 days from stroke onset; 5) Neurosonological examination within 60 h from stroke onset; 6) Thirty patients with a positive finding of acute myocardial ischemia (ECG, cTnT) will be examined by coronary angiography (CAG); 7) Epidemiological data will be acquired. The epidemiological characteristics of the whole sample of patients; correlation between differences between group of cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients and group of patients with ischemic stroke of another etiology; correlation of infarction volume on DWI-MRI with the level of c

  14. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke in childhood: how much does restricted diffusion matter?

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; He, Lucy; Jordan, Lori C; Cooper, Calvin; Froehler, Michael T; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy holds promise for children with large cerebral arterial occlusions, although there are few reports in this population. We report a case of retrievable stent-assisted mechanical thrombectomy in a 5-year-old with basilar artery occlusion, despite late presentation and extensive initial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) restriction. This resulted in successful Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction 2B reperfusion and excellent clinical outcome. At 6-week follow-up he was completely back to baseline with no residual deficits (pediatric stroke outcome measure=0, modified Rankin scale=0). At 3-month follow-up the patient has not had any recurrent stroke or concern for stroke-like symptoms. We review the literature on mechanical thrombectomy and DWI changes in acute stroke in early to middle childhood (<12 years old).

  15. Clinical Scales Do Not Reliably Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients With Large-Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Turc, Guillaume; Maïer, Benjamin; Naggara, Olivier; Seners, Pierre; Isabel, Clothilde; Tisserand, Marie; Raynouard, Igor; Edjlali, Myriam; Calvet, David; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mas, Jean-Louis; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    It remains debated whether clinical scores can help identify acute ischemic stroke patients with large-artery occlusion and hence improve triage in the era of thrombectomy. We aimed to determine the accuracy of published clinical scores to predict large-artery occlusion. We assessed the performance of 13 clinical scores to predict large-artery occlusion in consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing clinical examination and magnetic resonance or computed tomographic angiography ≤6 hours of symptom onset. When no cutoff was published, we used the cutoff maximizing the sum of sensitivity and specificity in our cohort. We also determined, for each score, the cutoff associated with a false-negative rate ≤10%. Of 1004 patients (median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score, 7; range, 0-40), 328 (32.7%) had an occlusion of the internal carotid artery, M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, or basilar artery. The highest accuracy (79%; 95% confidence interval, 77-82) was observed for National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score ≥11 and Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation Scale score ≥5. However, these cutoffs were associated with false-negative rates >25%. Cutoffs associated with an false-negative rate ≤10% were 5, 1, and 0 for National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation Scale, and Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Severity Scale, respectively. Using published cutoffs for triage would result in a loss of opportunity for ≥20% of patients with large-artery occlusion who would be inappropriately sent to a center lacking neurointerventional facilities. Conversely, using cutoffs reducing the false-negative rate to 10% would result in sending almost every patient to a comprehensive stroke center. Our findings, therefore, suggest that intracranial arterial imaging should be performed in all patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 6 hours of symptom onset. © 2016 American Heart Association

  16. Acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction in a Japanese population: Takashima stroke and AMI registry, 1989-2005.

    PubMed

    Rumana, Nahid; Kita, Yoshikuni; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Takashima, Naoyuki; Ichikawa, Masaharu; Sugihara, Hideki; Morita, Yutaka; Hirose, Kunihiko; Kawakami, Kenzou; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2014-10-01

    Few comprehensive stroke and acute myocardial infarction registries of long duration exist in Japan to illustrate trends in acute case-fatality of stroke and acute myocardial infarction with greater precision. We examined 17-year case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction using an entire community-monitoring registration system to investigate trends in these rates over time in a Japanese population. Data were obtained from the Takashima Stroke and AMI Registry covering a stable population of approximately 55 000 residents of Takashima County in central Japan. We divided the total observation period of 17 years into four periods, 1989-1992, 1993-1996, 1997-2000, and 2001-2005. We calculated gender, age-specific and age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates (%) of stroke and acute myocardial infarction across these four periods. During the study period of 1989-2005, there were 341 fatal cases within 28 days of onset among 2239 first-ever stroke events and 163 fatal cases among 433 first-ever acute myocardial infarction events. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of stroke was 14·9% in men and 15·7% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of acute myocardial infarction was 34·3% in men and 43·3% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction showed insignificant differences across the four time periods. The average annual change in the acute case-fatality rate of stroke (-0·2%; 95% CI: -2·4-2·1) and acute myocardial infarction (2·7%; 95% CI: -0·7-6·1) did not change significantly across the study years. The acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction have remained stable from 1989 to 2005 in a rural and semi-urban Japanese population. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Diagnostic value of prehospital ECG in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bobinger, Tobias; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Kopp, Markus; Kurka, Natalia; Arnold, Martin; Heider, Stefan; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2017-05-16

    To investigate the diagnostic yield of prehospital ECG monitoring provided by emergency medical services in the case of suspected stroke. Consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to our tertiary stroke center via emergency medical services and with available prehospital ECG were prospectively included during a 12-month study period. We assessed prehospital ECG recordings and compared the results to regular 12-lead ECG on admission and after continuous ECG monitoring at the stroke unit. Overall, 259 patients with prehospital ECG recording were included in the study (90.3% ischemic stroke, 9.7% intracerebral hemorrhage). Atrial fibrillation (AF) was detected in 25.1% of patients, second-degree or greater atrioventricular block in 5.4%, significant ST-segment elevation in 5.0%, and ventricular ectopy in 9.7%. In 18 patients, a diagnosis of new-onset AF with direct clinical consequences for the evaluation and secondary prevention of stroke was established by the prehospital recordings. In 2 patients, the AF episodes were limited to the prehospital period and were not detected by ECG on admission or during subsequent monitoring at the stroke unit. Of 126 patients (48.6%) with relevant abnormalities in the prehospital ECG, 16.7% received medical antiarrhythmic therapy during transport to the hospital, and 6.4% were transferred to a cardiology unit within the first 24 hours in the hospital. In a selected cohort of patients with stroke, the in-field recordings of the ECG detected a relevant rate of cardiac arrhythmia. The results can add to the in-hospital evaluation and should be considered in prehospital care of acute stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. A randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck S S; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A; Lingsma, Hester F; Yoo, Albert J; Schonewille, Wouter J; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Wermer, Marieke J H; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A; Emmer, Bart J; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F; van Dijk, Lukas C; Kappelle, L Jaap; Lo, Rob H; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L M; van Rooij, Willem Jan J; van den Berg, Jan S P; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Aerden, Leo A M; Dallinga, René J; Visser, Marieke C; Bot, Joseph C J; Vroomen, Patrick C; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H C M L; Heijboer, Roel J J; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V; den Hertog, Heleen M; Gerrits, Dick G; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M; Karas, Giorgos B; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Flach, H Zwenneke; Marquering, Henk A; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F M; Beenen, Ludo F M; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Zwam, Wim H; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2015-01-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, intraarterial treatment is highly effective for emergency revascularization. However, proof of a beneficial effect on functional outcome is lacking. We randomly assigned eligible patients to either intraarterial treatment plus usual care or usual care alone. Eligible patients had a proximal arterial occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation that was confirmed on vessel imaging and that could be treated intraarterially within 6 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin scale score at 90 days; this categorical scale measures functional outcome, with scores ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 6 (death). The treatment effect was estimated with ordinal logistic regression as a common odds ratio, adjusted for prespecified prognostic factors. The adjusted common odds ratio measured the likelihood that intraarterial treatment would lead to lower modified Rankin scores, as compared with usual care alone (shift analysis). We enrolled 500 patients at 16 medical centers in The Netherlands (233 assigned to intraarterial treatment and 267 to usual care alone). The mean age was 65 years (range, 23 to 96), and 445 patients (89.0%) were treated with intravenous alteplase before randomization. Retrievable stents were used in 190 of the 233 patients (81.5%) assigned to intraarterial treatment. The adjusted common odds ratio was 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.30). There was an absolute difference of 13.5 percentage points (95% CI, 5.9 to 21.2) in the rate of functional independence (modified Rankin score, 0 to 2) in favor of the intervention (32.6% vs. 19.1%). There were no significant differences in mortality or the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion of the anterior circulation, intraarterial treatment administered within 6 hours after stroke onset

  19. Multi-modal CT in Stroke Imaging: New Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ledezma, Carlos J.; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive non-invasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. PMID:19195537

  20. Do acute phase markers explain body temperature and brain temperature after ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, William N.; Thomas, Ralph; Lowe, Gordon; Rumley, Ann; Karaszewski, Bartosz; Armitage, Paul; Marshall, Ian; Lymer, Katherine; Dennis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Both brain and body temperature rise after stroke but the cause of each is uncertain. We investigated the relationship between circulating markers of inflammation with brain and body temperature after stroke. Methods: We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke and measured brain temperature at hospital admission and 5 days after stroke with multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in normal brain and the acute ischemic lesion (defined by diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]). We measured body temperature with digital aural thermometers 4-hourly and drew blood daily to measure interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen, for 5 days after stroke. Results: In 44 stroke patients, the mean temperature in DWI-ischemic brain soon after admission was 38.4°C (95% confidence interval [CI] 38.2–38.6), in DWI-normal brain was 37.7°C (95% CI 37.6–37.7), and mean body temperature was 36.6°C (95% CI 36.3–37.0). Higher mean levels of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were associated with higher temperature in DWI-normal brain at admission and 5 days, and higher overall mean body temperature, but only with higher temperature in DWI-ischemic brain on admission. Conclusions: Systemic inflammation after stroke is associated with elevated temperature in normal brain and the body but not with later ischemic brain temperature. Elevated brain temperature is a potential mechanism for the poorer outcome observed in stroke patients with higher levels of circulating inflammatory markers. PMID:22744672

  1. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  2. Rapid Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: What a General Radiologist Should Know.

    PubMed

    Du, Elizabeth H Y; Shankar, Jai J S

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality and the third leading cause of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide. For each minute of an ischemic stroke, an estimated 1.9 million brain cells die. The year 2015 saw the unprecedented publication of 5 multicentre, randomized, controlled trials. These studies showed that patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large-vessel thrombus occlusion of the proximal anterior circulation had significantly reduced disability at 90 days when treated with endovascular thrombectomy and usual stroke care compared to usual stroke care alone. As a result, endovascular thrombectomy is now the new North American and European standard of care for suitable patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large-vessel proximal anterior circulation occlusion. We review key take-home messages in this paradigm shift for radiologists, including the importance of time and workflow efficiency, what currently constitutes appropriate preimaging patient selection and imaging criteria, the use of newer generation thrombectomy devices, safety outcomes, as well as further areas still in need of elucidation. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrity of normal-appearing white matter and functional outcomes after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Mark R; Wu, Ona; Cougo, Pedro; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Cloonan, Lisa; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin M; Kanakis, Allison S; Boulouis, Gregoire; Karadeli, Hasan H; Lauer, Arne; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2017-05-02

    To characterize the effect of white matter microstructural integrity on cerebral tissue and long-term functional outcomes after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Consecutive AIS patients with brain MRI acquired within 48 hours of symptom onset and 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score were included. Acute infarct volume on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWIv) and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHv) on T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI were measured. Median fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity values were calculated within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in the hemisphere contralateral to the acute lesion. Regression models were used to assess the association between diffusivity metrics and acute cerebral tissue and long-term functional outcomes in AIS. Level of significance was set at p < 0.05 for all analyses. Among 305 AIS patients with DWIv and mRS score, mean age was 64.4 ± 15.9 years, and 183 participants (60%) were male. Median NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 1-8), and median normalized WMHv was 6.19 cm(3) (IQR 3.0-12.6 cm(3)). Admission stroke severity (β = 0.16, p < 0.0001) and small vessel stroke subtype (β = -1.53, p < 0.0001), but not diffusivity metrics, were independently associated with DWIv. However, median FA in contralesional NAWM was independently associated with mRS score (β = -9.74, p = 0.02), along with age, female sex, NIHSS score, and DWIv. FA decrease in NAWM contralateral to the acute infarct is associated with worse mRS category at 90 days after stroke. These data suggest that white matter integrity may contribute to functional recovery after stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Cerebral blood volume affects blood–brain barrier integrity in an acute transient stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuning; Kim, Jeong Kon; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Farrar, Christian T; Huang, Paul L; Suh, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Seon Joo; Shim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Hyungjoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Kim, Young Ro

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient vascular reserve after an ischemic stroke may induce biochemical cascades that subsequently deteriorate the blood–brain barrier (BBB) function. However, the direct relationship between poor cerebral blood volume (CBV) restoration and BBB disruption has not been examined in acute stroke. To quantify BBB integrity at acute stages of transient stroke, in particular for cases in which extravasation of the standard contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) is not observed, we adopted the water exchange index (WEI), a novel magnetic resonance image-derived parameter to estimate the water permeability across the BBB. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and R2 relaxation rate constant were also measured for outlining the tissue abnormality, while fractional CBV and WEI were quantified for assessing vascular alterations. The significantly decreased ADC and R2 in the ischemic cortices did not correlate with the changes in CBV or WEI. In contrast, a strong negative correlation between the ipsilesional WEI and CBV was found, in which stroke mice were clustered into two groups: (1) high WEI and low CBV and (2) normal WEI and CBV. The low CBV observed for mice with a disrupted BBB, characterized by a high WEI, indicates the importance of CBV restoration for maintaining BBB stability in acute stroke. PMID:23462571

  5. MRI-guided selection of patients for treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Richard; Krakauer, John W

    2014-08-01

    To summarize what is known about the use of MRI in acute stroke treatment (predominantly thrombolysis), to examine the assumptions and theories behind the interpretation of magnetic resonance images of acute ischemic stroke and how they are used to select patients for therapies, and to suggest directions for future research. Recent studies have been contradictory about the usefulness of MRI in selecting patients for treatment. New MRI models for selecting patients have emerged that focus not only on the ischemic penumbra but also on the infarct core. Fixed time-window selection parameters are being replaced by timing-based individualized MRI stroke features. New ways to interpret traditional MRI stroke sequences are emerging. Although the efficacy of acute stroke treatment is time dependent, the use of fixed time windows cannot account for individual differences in infarct evolution, which could potentially be detected with MRI. Although MRI shows promise for identifying patients who should be treated, as well as excluding patients who should not be treated, definitive evidence is still lacking. Future research should focus on validating the use of MRI to select patients for intravenous therapies in extended time windows.

  6. Distance to thrombus in acute middle cerebral artery occlusion: a predictor of outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Benjamin; Gawlitza, Matthias; Schob, Stefan; Hobohm, Carsten; Raviolo, Mariana; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Lobsien, Donald

    2015-03-01

    In patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke, therapeutic decisions are influenced by the location of the occlusion. This study aimed to analyze clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic MCA stroke treated with systemic intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, according to the location of the occlusion. Of 621 patients screened, 136 with acute stroke and MCA occlusion confirmed by CT angiography were retrospectively included in this study. The distance from the carotid T to the thrombus (DT) on coronal maximum intensity projection images and the thrombus length were measured. The correlation between DT and the modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days was analyzed. DT was an independent predictor of clinical outcome in stroke patients treated with IVT. A long DT was significantly correlated with a good clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days ≤2). A poor clinical outcome was exponentially more likely than a good outcome when the DT was <16 mm (P<0.001). The thrombus length was not correlated with the modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days. A long thrombus (>8 mm) occurred significantly more often in the proximal MCA than the distal MCA (P<0.001). DT is an independent predictor of clinical outcome in patients with acute MCA occlusion treated with IVT. In acute stroke with MCA occlusion confirmed by CT angiography and DT <16 mm, the likelihood of a good clinical outcome after treatment with IVT was exponentially <50%. This might warrant the evaluation of other therapy forms than IVT in patients with proximal MCA occlusion. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrexia after stroke (temperature ≥37.5°C) is associated with poor prognosis, but information on timing of body temperature changes and relationship to stroke severity and subtypes varies. Methods We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke, measured stroke severity, stroke subtype and recorded four-hourly tympanic (body) temperature readings from admission to 120 hours after stroke. We sought causes of pyrexia and measured functional outcome at 90 days. We systematically summarised all relevant previous studies. Results Amongst 44 patients (21 males, mean age 72 years SD 11) with median National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) 7 (range 0–28), 14 had total anterior circulation strokes (TACS). On admission all patients, both TACS and non-TACS, were normothermic (median 36.3°C vs 36.5°C, p=0.382 respectively) at median 4 hours (interquartile range, IQR, 2–8) after stroke; admission temperature and NIHSS were not associated (r2=0.0, p=0.353). Peak temperature, occurring at 35.5 (IQR 19.0 to 53.8) hours after stroke, was higher in TACS (37.7°C) than non-TACS (37.1°C, p<0.001) and was associated with admission NIHSS (r2=0.20, p=0.002). Poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≥3) at 90 days was associated with higher admission (36.6°C vs. 36.2°C p=0.031) and peak (37.4°C vs. 37.0°C, p=0.016) temperatures. Sixteen (36%) patients became pyrexial, in seven (44%) of whom we found no cause other than the stroke. Conclusions Normothermia is usual within the first 4 hours of stroke. Peak temperature occurs at 1.5 to 2 days after stroke, and is related to stroke severity/subtype and more closely associated with poor outcome than admission temperature. Temperature-outcome associations after stroke are complex, but normothermia on admission should not preclude randomisation of patients into trials of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23075282

  8. Validating a threshold of ocular gaze deviation for the prediction of acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    McKean, D; Kudari, M; Landells, M; Grant, D; Johnson, S; López de Heredia, L; Yanny, S; Woo, E K

    2014-12-01

    To determine a threshold at which the degree of ocular gaze deviation (OGD) on axial imaging is highly specific for the prediction of acute ischaemic stroke. A retrospective analysis of 517 patients who had received MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for suspected acute stroke was performed. The degree of OGD was measured in all patients and the presence and location of infarction determined. The difference in OGD between groups was compared using the independent t-test for normally distributed data and the Mann-Whitney test for non-normal data. The sensitivity and specificity for degrees of OGD in the prediction of acute infarction was calculated using a receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The imaging of 448 patients meeting the inclusion criteria was reviewed. Acute infarct was demonstrated in 34.8% (n=156). There was a significant difference in the degree of OGD between patients with an acute infarct and those without evidence of acute ischaemia (p<0.001). ROC curve analysis for OGD demonstrated area under the curve (AUC) = 0.619 with increasing degrees of OGD more specific for acute infarct. OGD >11.95° had a sensitivity of 17% and specificity of 95.9% in predicting acute infarction. Significant OGD>11.95° has a high specificity for acute infarct. This threshold may provide a helpful additional sign in the detection of subtle acute infarct, particularly on axial CT brain imaging. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Domain-specific versus generalized cognitive screening in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Demeyere, Nele; Riddoch, M J; Slavkova, E D; Jones, K; Reckless, I; Mathieson, P; Humphreys, G W

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive assessments after stroke are typically short form tests developed for dementia that generates pass/fail classifications (e.g. the MoCA). The Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) provides a domain-specific cognitive profile designed for stroke survivors. This study compared the use of the MoCA and the OCS in acute stroke with respect to symptom specificity and aspects of clinical utility. A cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 200 stroke patients within 3 weeks of stroke completing MoCA and OCS. Demographic data, lesion side and Barthel scores were recorded. Inclusivity was assessed in terms of completion rates and reasons for non-completion were evaluated. The incidence of cognitive impairments on both the MoCA and OCS sub-domains was calculated and differences in stroke specificity, cognitive profiles and independence of the measures were addressed. The incidence of acute cognitive impairment was high: 76% of patients were impaired on MoCA, and 86% demonstrated at least one impairment on the cognitive domains assessed in the OCS. OCS was more sensitive than MoCA overall (87 vs 78% sensitivity) and OCS alone provided domain-specific information on prevalent post-stroke cognitive impairments (neglect, apraxia and reading/writing ability). Unlike the MOCA, the OCS was not dominated by left hemisphere impairments but gave differentiated profiles across the contrasting domains. The OCS detects important cognitive deficits after stroke not assessed in the MoCA, it is inclusive for patients with aphasia and neglect and it is less confounded by co-occurring difficulties in these domains.

  11. A patient with acute aortic dissection presenting with bilateral stroke - A rare experience.

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Brozda, Olimpia; Brozda, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a rare, life-threatening condition requiring early recognition and proper treatment. Although chest pain remains the most frequent initial symptom, clinical manifestation of aortic dissection varies. Rarely aortic dissection starts with neurological symptoms such as ischemic stroke, which is usually right-sided. A danger of performing thrombolytic therapy in these patients exists if aortic dissection is overlooked. Herein, we present a case of a patient with acute aortic dissection without typical chest pain whose initial manifestation was bilateral stroke. The uncommon presentation which masked the underlying condition delayed implementation of appropriate management. Moreover, the late admission to hospital prevented the patient from administration of recombined tissue plasminogen activator that would certainly decrease chances of survival. Presented case highlights the need for thorough physical examination at admission to hospital in all patients with acute stroke and points out the necessity of proper clinical work-up including adequate aorta imaging modalities of patients with acute stroke and suggestive findings of aortic dissection.

  12. Intracranial plaque enhancement from high resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging predicts stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Moon, Jangsup; Shin, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jaeseok; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Han, Moon Hee; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with frequent stroke recurrence. High resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) can provide atheroma information related to its vulnerability. We performed HRMRI in stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis to determine whether plaque characteristics from vessel wall imaging can predict future stroke recurrence. Between July 2011 and June 2013, acute stroke patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis were prospectively enrolled and 3-tesla HRMRI was performed on the relevant artery. The plaque enhancement was visually determined from T1 post-gadolinium enhancement image. Stroke recurrence was monitored after index event and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to identify factors related to future stroke recurrence. A total of 138 patients were included with a median follow-up of 18 months. There were 39 stroke recurrences. Plaque enhancement was detected in 108 patients (78.3%), and 37 of them experienced stroke recurrence. Among 30 stroke patients without plaque enhancement, two patients experienced stroke recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated a significant difference in event free survival between the patients with plaque enhancement and those patients without plaque enhancement (event rates at year 1: 30.3% vs. 6.8%, log-rank test, p = 0.004). Multivariate Cox-regression analysis showed that the plaque enhancement from HRMRI was independently associated with stroke recurrence (hazard ratio: 7.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.74-31.75, p = 0.007). Intracranial plaque enhancement from HRMRI is associated with stroke recurrence among the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  13. NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study): Randomized Controlled Contrast-Enhanced Sonothrombolysis in an Unselected Acute Ischemic Stroke Population.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Kvistad, Christopher E; Naess, Halvor; Øygarden, Halvor; Logallo, Nicola; Assmus, Jörg; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Kurz, Kathinka D; Neckelmann, Gesche; Thomassen, Lars

    2017-02-01

    The NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study) aimed to assess effect and safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound treatment in an unselected acute ischemic stroke population. Patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 hours after symptom onset were randomized 1:1 to either contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis (CEST) or sham CEST. A visible arterial occlusion on baseline computed tomography angiography was not a prerequisite for inclusion. Pulse-wave 2 MHz ultrasound was given for 1 hour and contrast (SonoVue) as an infusion for ≈30 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography were performed after 24 to 36 hours. Primary study end points were neurological improvement at 24 hours defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 0 or reduction of ≥4 National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale points compared with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and favorable functional outcome at 90 days defined as modified Rankin scale score 0 to 1. A total of 183 patients were randomly assigned to either CEST (93 patient) or sham CEST (90 patients). The rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, or mortality were not increased in the CEST group. Neurological improvement at 24 hours and functional outcome at 90 days was similar in the 2 groups both in the intention-to-treat analysis and in the per-protocol analysis. CEST is safe among unselected ischemic stroke patients with or without a visible occlusion on computed tomography angiography and with varying grades of clinical severity. There was, however, statistically no significant clinical effect of sonothrombolysis in this prematurely stopped trial. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01949961. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of late seizure after stroke.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Mutsumi; Kawabata, Yuichi; Joki, Hideto; Kushi, Yuji; Yokoi, Yasutaka; Sasame, Jo; Seki, Shunsuke; Mori, Kentaro; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Shima, Hiroshi; Nomura, Motohiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-04-15

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive modality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to evaluate cerebral perfusion without a contrast agent. The usefulness of ASL for diagnosis in the acute phase of late seizure after stroke was evaluated. Twelve consecutive patients diagnosed with late seizure after stroke were enrolled in this study. MRI including ASL was performed for each patient at the time of the emergency department visit. Eight of the patients underwent electroencephalography (EEG). All patients showed hyperperfusion around the stroke lesion on ASL. Only 6 patients showed high signal intensity along the cerebral cortex around the stroke lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging. The patients who underwent EEG showed slow activity, but paroxysmal discharges such as spikes or sharp waves were not observed. ASL was able to reveal hyperperfusion and was of great diagnostic value in the peri-ictal phase of late seizure after stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of hyperthermia on prognosis after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saini, Monica; Saqqur, Maher; Kamruzzaman, Anmmd; Lees, Kennedy R; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2009-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that hyperthermia is a determinant of poor outcome after ischemic stroke. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of temperature on poststroke outcome have, however, been limited by small sample sizes. We sought to evaluate the effect of temperature and timing of hyperthermia on outcome after ischemic stroke. Data of 5305 patients in acute stroke trials from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) data set were analyzed. Data for temperatures at baseline, eighth, 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours, and seventh day were assessed in relation to outcome (poor versus good) based on the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Hyperthermia was defined as temperature >37.2 degrees C and poor outcome as 90-day modified Rankin Scale >2. Hazard ratios with 95% CIs were reported for hyperthermia in relation to the outcome. Logistic regression models, in relation to hyperthermia, were fitted for a set of preselected covariates at different time points to identify predictors/determinants of hyperthermia. The average age of patients was 68.0+/-11.9 years, 2380 (44.9%) were females, and 42.3% (2233) received thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. After adjustment, hyperthermia was a statistically significant predictor of poor outcome. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for poor outcome in relation to hyperthermia at different time points were: baseline 1.2 (1.0 to 1.4), eighth hour 1.7 (1.2 to 2.2), 24th hour 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9), 48th hour 2.0 (1.5 to 2.6), 72nd hour 2.2 (1.7 to 2.9), and seventh day 2.7 (2.0 to 3.8). Gender, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >16), white blood cell count, and antibiotic use were significantly associated with hyperthermia (P< or =0.01). Hyperthermia, in acute ischemic stroke, is associated with a poor clinical outcome. The later the hyperthermia occurs within the first week, the worse the prognosis. Severity of stroke and inflammation are important determinants of

  16. Validity of shape as a predictive biomarker of final infarct volume in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Frindel, Carole; Rouanet, Anaïs; Giacalone, Mathilde; Cho, Tae-Hee; Østergaard, Leif; Fiehler, Jens; Pedraza, Salvador; Baron, Jean-Claude; Wiart, Marlène; Berthezène, Yves; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Rousseau, David

    2015-04-01

    This study examines whether lesion shape documented on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging during acute stroke improves the prediction of the final infarct volume compared with lesion volume only. Diffusion-weighted imaging data and clinical information were retrospectively reviewed in 110 consecutive patients who underwent (n=67) or not (n=43) thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Three-dimensional shape analysis was performed on admission diffusion-weighted imaging data and 5 shape descriptors were developed. Final infarct volume was measured on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging data performed 30 days after stroke. Shape analysis of acute ischemic lesion and more specifically the ratio of the bounding box volume to the lesion volume before thrombolytic treatment improved the prediction of the final infarct for patients undergoing thrombolysis (R(2)=0.86 in model with volume; R(2)=0.98 in model with volume and shape). Our findings suggest that lesion shape contains important predictive information and reflects important environmental factors that might determine the progression of ischemia from the core. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    PubMed

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (P<0.0001). Door-to-needle times were significantly longer in Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program hospitals. State PSCs had higher in-hospital risk-adjusted mortality (odds ratio 1.23, 95% confidence intervals 1.07-1.41) compared with JC PSCs. Among Get With The Guidelines-Stroke hospitals with PSC certification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C; Southerland, Andrew M; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0-2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.39; p < 0.00001). No

  19. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  20. Demographic, clinical, and radiologic predictors of neurologic deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Ueno, Yuji; Kawamura, Miyako; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2013-04-01

    One-third of patients with acute ischemic stroke develop early neurologic worsening, which is associated with increased mortality and long-term functional disability. We investigated the predictive factors for neurologic deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 1 week of onset. We retrospectively investigated 643 patients who were admitted within 2 days of acute ischemic stroke between April 2007 and March 2010. Neurologic deterioration was defined as an increase of 4 points or more in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score within 1 week of admission. We retrieved data on demographic and clinical characteristics, medications, and stroke subtypes. Out of 537 patients, deterioration was noted in 64 patients (11.9%; deterioration group). Multivariate analysis identified history of myocardial infarction (P < .001), NIHSS score ≥8 at onset (P < .001), high leukocyte count (P = .035), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥140 mg/dL (P = .002), and hemoglobin A1c ≥7% (P = .006) as significant factors associated with deterioration. Branch atheromatous disease was more frequent in the deterioration group, and >90% of patients with deterioration either were discharged to nursing home care or died. Multivariate analysis of magnetic resonance imaging findings identified internal carotid/middle cerebral artery occlusion (each P < .001), striate capsular infarction (P = .030), pontine infarction (P = .047), and lesion size of 15-30 mm (P = .011) as independent factors associated with deterioration. Stroke patients with a high low-density lipoprotein level, high hemoglobin A1c level on admission, a history of myocardial infarction, and high NIHSS score are at high risk for neurologic deterioration. Patients with multiple risk factors for deterioration can benefit most from intensive monitoring. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Age, Sex, and Racial Differences in Neuroimaging Use in Acute Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Vagal, A; Sanelli, P; Sucharew, H; Alwell, K A; Khoury, J C; Khatri, P; Woo, D; Flaherty, M; Kissela, B M; Adeoye, O; Ferioli, S; De Los Rios La Rosa, F; Martini, S; Mackey, J; Kleindorfer, D

    2017-10-01

    Limited information is available regarding differences in neuroimaging use for acute stroke work-up. Our objective was to assess whether race, sex, or age differences exist in neuroimaging use and whether these differences depend on the care center type in a population-based study. Patients with stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic) and transient ischemic attack were identified in a metropolitan, biracial population using the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study in 2005 and 2010. Multivariable regression was used to determine the odds of advanced imaging use (CT angiography/MR imaging/MR angiography) for race, sex, and age. In 2005 and 2010, there were 3471 and 3431 stroke/TIA events, respectively. If one adjusted for covariates, the odds of advanced imaging were higher for younger (55 years or younger) compared with older patients, blacks compared with whites, and patients presenting to an academic center and those seen by a stroke team or neurologist. The observed association between race and advanced imaging depended on age; in the older age group, blacks had higher odds of advanced imaging compared with whites (odds ratio, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.12-1.61; P < .01), and in the younger group, the association between race and advanced imaging was not statistically significant. Age by race interaction persisted in the academic center subgroup (P < .01), but not in the nonacademic center subgroup (P = .58). No significant association was found between sex and advanced imaging. Within a large, biracial stroke/TIA population, there is variation in the use of advanced neuroimaging by age and race, depending on the care center type. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Predictors of Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mild Stroke Scale Scores.

    PubMed

    Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Hammer, Maxim; Jovin, Tudor; Reddy, Vivek; Wechsler, Lawrence; Jadhav, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a known predictor of outcome in acute ischemic stroke, there are other factors like age, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow that may be predictors of outcome but are not assessed by the traditional NIHSS. The aim of this retrospective review was to identify predictors of outcome in mild ischemic stroke. Discharge outcomes from patients who presented to our large academic stroke center with acute ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 7189 patients reviewed, 2597 had initial NIHSS less than 5. Outcome measures were modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score 0-1 and discharge to home. In all, 65% of patients with NIHSS 0-4 were discharged directly home independent of treatment. Of those patients discharged to home, 74% were able to ambulate independently and 98% passed their dysphagia screen. Of patients not discharged directly home, 66% were unable to ambulate independently and 21% did not pass their dysphagia screen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of dysphagia screen (P = .001), ability to ambulate independently (P = .002), age (P = .016), and NIHSS (P = .005) on discharge to home but not MRS of 0-1 (P = .564). In patients with mild stroke scale scores defined as NIHSS 0-4, several factors including age, NIHSS, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow may be independent predictors of functional outcome and discharge home. These data support the development of a modified grading system for assessing functional outcome in mild stroke that considers these factors. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute stroke care in a neurologically underserved state: lessons learned from the Iowa Stroke Survey.

    PubMed

    Albright, Karen C; Schott, Todd C; Boland, Debbie F; George, Leslie; Boland, Kevin P; Wohlford-Wessels, Mary Pat; Finnerty, Edward P; Jacoby, Michael R K

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that stroke care is more fragmented in rural or neurologically underserved areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke care in Iowa and to identify factors influencing care. Each of the 118 facilities in Iowa with emergency departments was surveyed by telephone. This survey consisted of 10 questions, focusing on the existence of pre-hospital and emergency room acute stroke protocols and the availability of essential personnel and diagnostic and treatment modalities essential for acute stroke care. Of the 118 hospitals with emergency departments, 109 (92.4%) had CT available. Within the subset having CT capabilities, 89.9% (98/109) had intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) available. Of those facilities with both CT and IV t-PA, 46% (45/98) had around-the-clock in-house physician coverage. Further, 31% (14/45) of sites with CT, t-PA, and an in-house physician had a radiology technician on site. Only 12% (14/118) of centers could offer all essential components. Despite 88% of Iowa hospitals not providing all of these components, only 31% of these hospitals reported protocols for stabilization and immediate transfer of acute stroke patients. These findings indicate that the development of a stroke system is still in its infancy in Iowa. Collaborative efforts are needed to address barriers in rural Iowa and to assist facilities in providing the best possible care. Creativity will be paramount in establishing a functional statewide system to ensure optimum care for all Iowans.

  4. Risk of stroke in imaging-proven subclavian steal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xia; Bai, Harrison Xiao; Wang, Zhili; Yang, Li

    2017-03-31

    To determine the risk of stroke in patients with subclavian steal syndrome (SSS). We identified 165 patients with imaging-provenSSS from two hospitals. Demographic, clinical and imaging data were retrospectively collected. Patients were followed up for stroke events. Stroke occurred in 43 patients with a median follow-up of 28months. Seven of these cases were identified prospectively and 36 cases retrospectively. On multivariate analysis, presence of symptoms at presentation (p=0.029) was a significant predictor of stroke. Presence of symptoms at presentation predicted stroke in imaging-proven SSS.

  5. The Association of Lesion Location and Sleep Related Breathing Disorder in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Teuber, Anja; Wersching, Heike; Young, Peter; Dittrich, Ralf; Ritter, Martin; Dziewas, Rainer; Minnerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) are common in patients with ischemic stroke and are associated with poor outcome. SRBD after stroke were assumed to be a direct consequence of injury of specific central nervous system structures. However, whether specific locations of ischemic infarcts cause SRBD is yet unknown. We therefore investigated the association of ischemic lesion location with SRBD. Methods Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated on our stroke unit were included in a prospective observational study. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and polygraphy in the acute phase after stroke. SRBD was defined by an apnea—hypopnea index (AHI) ≥10. MRI were evaluated using standardized maps to depict voxel-wise probability distribution of infarction for patients with and without SRBD. Groups were compared using logistic regression analysis. Results Of 142 patients included, 86 (59%) had a SRBD. Age, body mass index and prevalence of arterial hypertension were significantly higher in patients with SRBD. There was no statistically significant association between any lesion location and SRBD. Conclusion We found no association of lesion location and SRBD in stroke patients, whereas established risk factors for SRBD, known from general population, were significantly associated with SRBD. Given the high prevalence of SRBD in stroke patients, these findings suggest that cerebral ischemia facilitates the occurrence of SRBD in patients with pre-existing risk factors rather than causing it by damaging specific central nervous system structures. Our findings can be used to identify stroke patients who might benefit from polygraphy screening. PMID:28135315

  6. Screening for NOTCH3 gene mutations among 151 consecutive Korean patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Song, Sook-Keun; Lee, Jung Seok; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a single-gene disorder of cerebral small blood vessels caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The initial detection of CADASIL may be more difficult among Asian populations because common clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging findings are not frequently found in these populations. The purpose of this study was to screen the NOTCH3 gene for mutations among consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke from our region in Korea. Between April 2008 and March 2009, 151 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were screened for NOTCH3 mutations. All patients underwent a detailed clinical examination and structured interview for clinical symptoms and family history. We reviewed brain magnetic resonance imaging data from stroke patients to assess the severity of white-matter hyperintensity lesions, the number of cerebral microbleeds, and the number of lacunar infarctions. Polymerase chain reaction was used to screen exons 3, 4, 6, 11, and 18 of the NOTCH3 gene. Among 151 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, 6 patients (4.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-7.1) possessed a NOTCH3 gene mutation. All patients exhibited the same R544C mutation in exon 11. Four of these 6 patients presented with large artery atherosclerosis. The prevalence of CADASIL in patients with neuroimaging features consistent with advanced small-vessel disease was 36.0% (95% CI 8.0-64.8). In this region, NOTCH3 gene mutations are frequently found in acute stroke patients who present with neuroimaging features consistent with advanced small-vessel disease. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term follow-up of incidental intracranial aneurysms in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon-Sang; Shon, Young-Min; Kim, Beum Saeng; Cho, A-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    The natural history of incidental intracranial aneurysms in patients with acute ischemic stroke is not well known. Therefore, we performed a 2-year follow-up of clinical outcomes and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) findings of incidentally found aneurysm in acute ischemic stroke patients. We included acute ischemic stroke patients who presented within 7 days of stroke onset. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and CTA. Demographics, clinical outcome, presence of aneurysm, aneurysm type, location, and diameter of aneurysm were identified. CTA was performed at least 2 years after the initial examination. The development of all cases of hemorrhage related to aneurysmal rupture and long-term clinical outcome were checked. Incidental intracranial aneurysms were found in 19 (6.1%) of the 314 patients. The sex (female) and old age were associated with the presence of incidental intracranial aneurysms. Favorable outcome (modified Rankin scale score 0-2) at 3 months showed no difference between the patients with aneurysm and those without (72.2% v 75.2%; P = .78). No aneurysm rupture or subarachnoid hemorrhage has occurred during the 2-year follow-up period. Follow-up CTA could be performed in 10 out of the 19 patients with aneurysm. Nine of them showed no change regarding to aneurysm shape and size, and the aneurysm disappeared in 1 patient. In our study, the prevalence of incidental aneurysm among acute ischemic stroke patients was 6.1%. After 2 years of follow-up, there was no aneurysm rupture or subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the diameter and shape of aneurysms did not change except for 1 patient in whom the aneurysm disappeared. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical implications of eye deviation on admission CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Payabvash, S; Qureshi, I; Qureshi, A I

    2016-12-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of eye deviation detected on the admission computed tomography (CT) of acute ischaemic stroke patients. The clinical and imaging data from the Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trials 1 and 2 were analysed. Two reviewers evaluated all admission CT images for the presence of eye deviation, and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRs) scores were ascertained. Disability or death was defined as mRS score >2, at 3-month follow-up. Of 1,223 patients included in the present series, 352 (28.8%) had rightward and 331 (27.1%) had leftward eye deviation on admission CT. Patients with eye deviation on CT had higher admission NIHSS score and larger middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarct volume (based on ASPECTS). The presence of eye deviation on CT was associated with higher rates of haemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours (19.8% versus 13.5%, p=0.004), and higher rates of disability or death at 3-month follow-up (53.1% versus 35.7%, p<0.001). Mediation analysis showed that radiological eye deviation relation with higher rate of disability or death is predominantly due to its association with higher admission NIHSS scores, lower ASPECTS, and to a lesser extent patients' older age. The presence of eye deviation on CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients is associated with larger anterior circulation stroke volumes, higher risk of 24-hour haemorrhagic transformation, and 3-month disability or death. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of vaspin level in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cura, Hasan S; Özdemir, Hasan H; Demir, Caner F; Bulut, Serpil; İlhan, Nevin; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-03-01

    Cerebrovascular event is a clinical condition characterized by symptoms and findings pertaining to loss of focal cerebral function because of the vascular causes. Atherosclerosis has a forefront role in the pathogenesis of stroke. Inflammation has an important place in the formation of atherogenesis and atherosclerosis. Visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin (vaspin) is a new adipokine, which is identified recently, associated with obesity and diabetes and also has a proinflammatory characteristic. This study was intended to investigate the relation between vaspin and stroke and stroke and other risk factors. A total of 50 patients with stroke, as 28 men (56%) and 22 women (44%), and a total of 50 healthy individuals, as 25 men (50%) and 25 women (50%), were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were taken in the acute period (first 48 hours) in the patient group, and serum vaspin levels were measured. Vaspin level was also measured in the control group. The association of vaspin with the lipid parameters, gender, and the severity of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis in the patient group was evaluated. Stenotic plaques in ICA were classified as normal, mild (stenosis under 50%), moderate (stenosis 50%-69%), severe (stenosis 70%-99% to preocclusion), and occlusion. No statistically significant difference was found between 2 groups in terms of age and gender (P > .05). Vaspin levels were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (164.73 ± 153.76 ng/mL) compared with the control group (116.21 ± 34.60 ng/mL) (P < .05). However, no relation was established between vaspin level and the severity of ICA stenosis. Vaspin levels have been shown to increase in acute ischemic stroke patients. The increased vaspin levels may vary depending on several factors in acute period of ischemic stroke. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  11. Reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: an update.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke.

  12. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  13. Ticagrelor versus Aspirin in Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S Claiborne; Amarenco, Pierre; Albers, Gregory W; Denison, Hans; Easton, J Donald; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence

    2016-07-07

    Ticagrelor may be a more effective antiplatelet therapy than aspirin for the prevention of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. We conducted an international double-blind, controlled trial in 674 centers in 33 countries, in which 13,199 patients with a nonsevere ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack who had not received intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis and were not considered to have had a cardioembolic stroke were randomly assigned within 24 hours after symptom onset, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive either ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose on day 1 followed by 90 mg twice daily for days 2 through 90) or aspirin (300 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg daily for days 2 through 90). The primary end point was the time to the occurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 90 days. During the 90 days of treatment, a primary end-point event occurred in 442 of the 6589 patients (6.7%) treated with ticagrelor, versus 497 of the 6610 patients (7.5%) treated with aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.01; P=0.07). Ischemic stroke occurred in 385 patients (5.8%) treated with ticagrelor and in 441 patients (6.7%) treated with aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.00). Major bleeding occurred in 0.5% of patients treated with ticagrelor and in 0.6% of patients treated with aspirin, intracranial hemorrhage in 0.2% and 0.3%, respectively, and fatal bleeding in 0.1% and 0.1%. In our trial involving patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, ticagrelor was not found to be superior to aspirin in reducing the rate of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death at 90 days. (Funded by AstraZeneca; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01994720.).

  14. Associations between diffusion and perfusion parameters, N-acetyl aspartate, and lactate in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cvoro, Vera; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Marshall, Ian; Armitage, Paul A; Rivers, Carly S; Bastin, Mark E; Carpenter, Trevor K; Wartolowska, Karolina; Farrall, Andrew J; Dennis, Martin S

    2009-03-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, the amount of neuronal damage in hyperintense areas on MR diffusion imaging (DWI) is unclear. We used spectroscopic imaging to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, a marker of normal neurons) and lactate (a marker of ischemia) to compare with diffusion and perfusion values in the diffusion lesion in acute ischemic stroke. We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke prospectively and performed MR diffusion weighted (DWI), perfusion, and spectroscopic imaging. We coregistered the images, outlined the visible diffusion lesion, and extracted metabolite, perfusion, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values from the diffusion lesion. 42 patients were imaged, from 1.5 to 24 hours after stroke. In the DWI lesion, although NAA was reduced, there was no correlation between NAA and ADC or perfusion values. However, raised lactate correlated with reduced ADC (Spearman rho=0.32, P=0.04) and prolonged mean transit time (MTT, rho=0.31, P=0.04). Increasing DWI lesion size was associated with lower NAA and higher lactate (rho=-0.44, P=0.003; rho=0.49, P=0.001 respectively); NAA fell with increasing times to imaging (rho=-0.3, P=0.03), but lactate did not change. Although larger confirmatory studies are needed, the correlation of ADC and MTT with lactate but not NAA suggests that ADC and MTT are better markers of the presence of ischemia than of cumulative neuronal loss. Further studies should define more precisely the rate of neuronal loss and relationship to diffusion and perfusion parameters with respect to the depth and duration of ischemia.

  15. Ischemic penumbra in acute stroke: Demonstration by PET with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Hu, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    Ischemic penumbra (IP) in acute stroke has gained clinical interest since tissue functions may be recovered if perfusion can be reestablished. However, such therapeutic intervention is {open_quotes}blind{close_quotes} since clinical examination can not distinguish IP from developing infarction. In vivo demonstration of IP may have significance for stroke patient management. This study was a preliminary evaluation of detecting IP in vivo by F-18 fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]-FMISO), a hypoxic imaging agent. Static PET imaging was performed after IV injection of 370 MBq of [F-18]-FMISO at 20 and 120 min. Tomograms were reconstructed and evaluated visually in correlation with CT or MR scans. In acute stroke, patients (pts) were called back for the second PET study one month after the initial study. CT was used for confirming infarction. In 6 pts with acute cerebral infarction, three of them had intense [F-18]-FMISO retention in the penumbra surrounding the central, eclipse-like zone of absent radio-activity (infarction) at 2 hr in the acute state, and the penumbra disappeared in association with increased area of infarction on CT in one case in the chronic state. In five pts with chronic infarction, all had no penumbra of [F-18]-FMISO retention. In summary, our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using [F-18]-FMISO PET to detect ischemic penumbra in vivo.

  16. Does primary stroke center certification change ED diagnosis, utilization, and disposition of patients with acute stroke?

    PubMed

    Ballard, Dustin W; Reed, Mary E; Huang, Jie; Kramer, Barbara J; Hsu, John; Chettipally, Uli

    2012-09-01

    We examined the impact of primary stroke center (PSC) certification on emergency department (ED) use and outcomes within an integrated delivery system in which EDs underwent staggered certification. A retrospective cohort study of 30,461 patients seen in 17 integrated delivery system EDs with a primary diagnosis of transient ischemic attack (TIA), intracranial hemorrhage, or ischemic stroke between 2005 and 2008 was conducted. We compared ED stroke patient visits across hospitals for (1) temporal trends and (2) pre- and post-PSC certification-using logistic and linear regression models to adjust for comorbidities, patient characteristics, and calendar time, to examine major outcomes (ED throughput time, hospital admission, radiographic imaging utilization and throughput, and mortality) across certification stages. There were 15,687 precertification ED visits and 11,040 postcertification visits. Primary stroke center certification was associated with significant changes in care processes associated with PSC certification process, including (1) ED throughput for patients with intracranial hemorrhage (55 minutes faster), (2) increased utilization of cranial magnetic resonance imaging for patients with ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-2.60), and (3) decrease in time to radiographic imaging for most modalities, including cranial computed tomography done within 6 hours of ED arrival (TIA: 12 minutes faster, ischemic stroke: 11 minutes faster), magnetic resonance imaging for patients with ischemic stroke (197 minutes faster), and carotid Doppler sonography for TIA patients (138 minutes faster). There were no significant changes in survival. Stroke center certification was associated with significant changes in ED admission and radiographic utilization patterns, without measurable improvements in survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intravenous tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Behrouz, Réza

    2014-06-01

    Tenecteplase in a genetically engineered variant of alteplase. Although the two have the same mechanism of action, tenecteplase has properties that makes it a seemingly more advantageous thrombolytic. Because of its rapid single-bolus administration, its use is favored over alteplase in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Over the past few years, several clinical studies have been conducted to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke. In spite of the mixed results of these studies, experimentation with tenecteplase continues in from of clinical trials. In this article, the utility of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke will be discussed.

  18. Acute childhood arterial ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Yock-Corrales, Adriana; Mackay, Mark T; Mosley, Ian; Maixner, Wirginia; Babl, Franz E

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the presenting features of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in children presenting to the emergency department (ED). Yet, initial clinical assessment is a key step in the management pathway of stroke. We describe the presentation in the ED of children with confirmed acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes. We conducted a retrospective descriptive case series of consecutive patients aged 1 month to younger than 18 years and presenting to a single-center tertiary ED with radiologically confirmed acute ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke during a 5-year period. Patients were identified by medical record search with International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes for hemorrhagic stroke and through the hospital stroke registry for acute ischemic stroke. Signs, symptoms, and initial management were described. Fifty patients with acute ischemic stroke and 31 with hemorrhagic stroke were identified. Mean age was 8.7 years (SD 5.2), and 51% were male. Fifty-six percent were previously healthy. Median time from onset of symptoms to ED presentation was 21 hours (interquartile range 6 to 48 hours) for acute ischemic stroke and 12 hours (interquartile range 4 to 72 hours) for hemorrhagic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke presented with symptoms of focal limb weakness (64%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 49% to 77%), facial weakness (60%; 95% CI 45% to 73%), and speech disturbance (46%; 95% CI 31% to 60%). Few patients with acute ischemic stroke presented with vomiting and altered mental status. Most patients with acute ischemic stroke had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater (86%; 95% CI 73% to 94%) and presented with at least 1 focal neurologic sign (88%; 95% CI 73% to 98%). Hemorrhagic stroke presented with headache (73%; 95% CI 54% to 87%), vomiting (58%; 95% CI 40% to 75%), and altered mental status (48%; 95% CI 30% to 67%). GCS score in hemorrhagic stroke was less than 14 in 38% and less than 8 in 19% (95% CI 7% to

  19. Association of CT perfusion parameters with hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jain, A R; Jain, M; Kanthala, A R; Damania, D; Stead, L G; Wang, H Z; Jahromi, B S

    2013-10-01

    Prediction of hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke could help determine treatment and prognostication. With increasing numbers of patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing multimodal CT imaging, we examined whether CT perfusion could predict hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent CTP scanning within 12 hours of symptom onset were examined. Patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were defined as cases and controls, respectively, and were matched as to IV rtPA administration and presentation NIHSS score (± 2). Relative mean transit time, relative CBF, and relative CBV values were calculated from CTP maps and normalized to the contralateral side. Receiver operating characteristic analysis curves were created, and threshold values for significant CTP parameters were obtained to predict hemorrhagic transformation. Of 83 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 16 developed hemorrhagic transformation (19.28%). By matching, 38 controls were found for only 14 patients with hemorrhagic transformation. Among the matched patients with hemorrhagic transformation, 13 developed hemorrhagic infarction (6 hemorrhagic infarction 1 and 7 hemorrhagic infarction 2) and 1 developed parenchymal hematoma 2. There was no significant difference between cases and controls with respect to age, sex, time to presentation from symptom onset, and comorbidities. Cases had significantly lower median rCBV (8% lower) compared with controls (11% higher) (P = .009; odds ratio, 1.14 for a 0.1-U decrease in rCBV). There was no difference in median total volume of ischemia, rMTT, and rCBF among cases and controls. The area under the receiver operating characteristic was computed to be 0.83 (standard error, 0.08), with a cutoff point for rCBV of 1.09. Of the examined CTP parameters, only lower rCBV was found to be significantly associated with a relatively higher chance of hemorrhagic transformation.

  20. Predictors for Cerebral Edema in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treated With Intravenous Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Magnus; Azevedo, Elsa; Dawson, Jesse; Egido, Jose A; Falcou, Anne; Ford, Gary A; Holmin, Staffan; Mikulik, Robert; Ollikainen, Jyrki; Wahlgren, Nils; Ahmed, Niaz

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral edema (CED) is a severe complication of acute ischemic stroke. There is uncertainty regarding the predictors for the development of CED after cerebral infarction. We aimed to determine which baseline clinical and radiological parameters predict development of CED in patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis. We used an image-based classification of CED with 3 degrees of severity (less severe CED 1 and most severe CED 3) on postintravenous thrombolysis imaging scans. We extracted data from 42 187 patients recorded in the SITS International Register (Safe Implementation of Treatments in Stroke) during 2002 to 2011. We did univariate comparisons of baseline data between patients with or without CED. We used backward logistic regression to select a set of predictors for each CED severity. CED was detected in 9579/42 187 patients (22.7%: 12.5% CED 1, 4.9% CED 2, 5.3% CED 3). In patients with CED versus no CED, the baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was higher (17 versus 10; P<0.001), signs of acute infarct was more common (27.9% versus 19.2%; P<0.001), hyperdense artery sign was more common (37.6% versus 14.6%; P<0.001), and blood glucose was higher (6.8 versus 6.4 mmol/L; P<0.001). Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, hyperdense artery sign, blood glucose, impaired consciousness, and signs of acute infarct on imaging were independent predictors for all edema types. The most important baseline predictors for early CED are National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, hyperdense artery sign, higher blood glucose, decreased level of consciousness, and signs of infarct at baseline. The findings can be used to improve selection and monitoring of patients for drug or surgical treatment. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Lack of Gender Disparities in Emergency Department Triage of Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Tracy E.; Choo, Esther K.; Seigel, Todd A.; Palms, Danielle; Silver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous literature has shown gender disparities in the care of acute ischemic stroke. Compared to men, women wait longer for brain imaging and are less likely to receive intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Emergency department (ED) triage is an important step in the rapid assessment of stroke patients and is a possible contributor to disparities. It is unknown whether gender differences exist in ED triage of acute stroke patients. Our primary objective was to determine whether gender disparities exist in the triage of acute stroke patients as defined by Emergency Severity Index (ESI) levels and use of ED critical care beds. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients age ≥18 years presenting to a large, urban, academic ED within six hours of symptom onset between January 2010, and December 2012. Primary outcomes were triage to a non-critical ED bed and Emergency Severity Index (ESI) level. Primary outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records by a blinded data manager; secondary outcome data and covariates were abstracted by trained research assistants. We performed bivariate and multivariate analyses. Logistic regression was performed using age, race, insurance status, mode of and time to arrival, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and presence of atypical symptoms as covariates. Results There were 537 patients included in this study. Women were older (75.6 vs. 69.5, p<0.001), and more women had a history of atrial fibrillation (39.8% vs. 25.3%, p<0.001). Compared to 9.5% of men, 10.3% of women were triaged to a non-critical care ED bed (p=0.77); 92.1% of women were triaged as ESI 1 or 2 vs. 93.6% of men (p=0.53). After adjustment, gender was not associated with triage location or ESI level, though atypical symptoms were associated with higher odds of being triaged to a non-critical care bed (aOR 1.98, 95%CI [1.03 – 3.81]) and 3.04 times higher odds

  2. A male Fabry disease patient treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Jukka T; Sillanpää, Niko; Kantola, Ilkka

    2015-02-01

    The use of intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is associated with improved outcomes. Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disease with vascular endothelial deposits. Affected males with the classic phenotype develop renal, cardiac, and cerebrovascular disease and die prematurely. However, Fabry disease is rare in young men with first ischemic stroke of undetermined cause. We report a 38-year-old man with acute aphasia and a left M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery thrombus with no recanalization who was finally diagnosed with Fabry disease after left ventricular hypertrophy of undetermined cause had been identified. A gene test revealed a R227X mutation typical of Fabry disease with the classical phenotype. To our knowledge our patient is the first reported male Fabry patient who was given intravenous thrombolytic therapy and the first reported Fabry patient who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy between 3 and 4.5 hours of the symptom onset. Despite favorable prognostic indicators on admission imaging, our patient suffered a significant stroke and had an unfavorable clinical outcome. Fortunately, the episode was not complicated by intracranial hemorrhage. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in treating patients with Fabry disease and acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Advanced imaging improves prediction of hemorrhage after stroke thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Parsons, Mark W; Churilov, Leonid; Desmond, Patricia M; Barber, P Alan; Butcher, Kenneth S; Levi, Christopher R; De Silva, Deidre A; Lansberg, Maarten G; Mlynash, Michael; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Straka, Matus; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    Very low cerebral blood volume (VLCBV), diffusion, and hypoperfusion lesion volumes have been proposed as predictors of hemorrhagic transformation following stroke thrombolysis. We aimed to compare these parameters, validate VLCBV in an independent cohort using DEFUSE study data, and investigate the interaction of VLCBV with regional reperfusion. The EPITHET and DEFUSE studies obtained diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients 3 to 6 hours from onset of ischemic stroke. EPITHET randomized patients to tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or placebo, and all DEFUSE patients received tPA. VLCBV was defined as cerebral blood volume<2.5th percentile of brain contralateral to the infarct. Parenchymal hematoma (PH) was defined using European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study criteria. Reperfusion was assessed using subacute perfusion MRI coregistered to baseline imaging. In DEFUSE, 69 patients were analyzed, including 9 who developed PH. The >2 ml VLCBV threshold defined in EPITHET predicted PH with 100% sensitivity, 72% specificity, 35% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value. Pooling EPITHET and DEFUSE (163 patients, including 23 with PH), regression models using VLCBV (p<0.001) and tPA (p=0.02) predicted PH independent of clinical factors better than models using diffusion or time to maximum>8 seconds lesion volumes. Excluding VLCBV in regions without reperfusion improved specificity from 61 to 78% in the pooled analysis. VLCBV predicts PH after stroke thrombolysis and appears to be a more powerful predictor than baseline diffusion or hypoperfusion lesion volumes. Reperfusion of regions of VLCBV is strongly associated with post-thrombolysis PH. VLCBV may be clinically useful to identify patients at significant risk of hemorrhage following reperfusion. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  4. Regional Pediatric Acute Stroke Protocol: Initial Experience During 3 Years and 13 Recanalization Treatments in Children.

    PubMed

    Tabone, Laurence; Mediamolle, Nicolas; Bellesme, Celine; Lesage, Fabrice; Grevent, David; Ozanne, Augustin; Naggara, Olivier; Husson, Beatrice; Desguerre, Isabelle; Lamy, Catherine; Denier, Christian; Kossorotoff, Manoelle

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate hyperacute management of pediatric arterial ischemic stroke, setting up dedicated management pathways is the first recommended step to prove the feasibility and safety of such treatments. A regional pediatric stroke alert protocol including 2 centers in the Paris-Ile-de-France area, France, was established. Consecutive pediatric patients (28 days-18 years) with confirmed arterial ischemic stroke who had acute recanalization treatment (intravenous r-tPA [recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator], endovascular procedure, or both) according to the regional pediatric stroke alert were retrospectively reviewed during a 40-month period. Thirteen children, aged 3.7 to 16.6 years, had recanalization treatment. Median time from onset to magnetic resonance imaging was 165 minutes (150-300); 9 out of 13 had large-vessel occlusion. Intravenous r-tPA was used in 11 out of 13 patients, with median time from onset to treatment of 240 minutes (178-270). Endovascular procedure was performed in patients time-out for intravenous r-tPA (n=2) or after intravenous r-tPA inefficiency (n=2). No intracranial or peripheral bleeding was reported. One patient died of malignant stroke; outcome was favorable in 11 out of 12 survivors (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2). Hyperacute recanalization treatment in pediatric stroke, relying on common protocols and adult/pediatric ward collaboration, is feasible. Larger systematic case collection is encouraged. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Cooperative efforts improve compliance with acute stroke guidelines.

    PubMed

    Albakri, Erfan A; Richards, Ferdinand; Hall, Marie; Dion, Charles; Miranda, Luis S; Turkel, Robert; Sand, Charles; Vasey, Paulette; McDonald, Kathie; Michelman, Mark; Smith, Zaid; Davison, Karen; Pfannerstill, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Guidelines for emergency treatment of stroke are not always known or followed. Florida Medical Quality Assurance, Inc. collaborated with hospitals to determine how closely the current American Heart Association (AHA) and the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) guidelines were being followed and to improve compliance with these guidelines. Medical records of patients admitted for acute stroke to 32 hospitals were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with six quality indicators (QIs) on the basis of AHA and AHCA guidelines. Hospitals were provided feedback on their levels of guideline compliance, and they subsequently implemented measures to improve compliance. After 6 months, the records of patients admitted after the provision of feedback were reviewed for compliance with the same six QIs. Compliance improved with regard to all QIs and was statistically significant for three of them. Feedback on performance, coupled with proactive collaboration with emergency department staff, resulted in improved compliance with the stroke guidelines.

  6. Hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Thomas P; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Westendorp, Willeke F; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2017-04-11

    To investigate whether admission hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections and, if so, whether poststroke infections modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. We used data from acute ischemic stroke patients in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a multicenter randomized controlled trial (n = 2,550) investigating the effect of preventive antibiotics on functional outcome. Admission hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L and poststroke infection as any infection during admission judged by an expert adjudication committee. Functional outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale. Of 1,676 nondiabetic ischemic stroke patients, 338 (20%) had admission hyperglycemia. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, admission hyperglycemia was associated with poststroke infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.31, 95% CI 1.31-4.07), worse 3-month functional outcome (common aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.73), and 3-month mortality (aOR 2.11, 95% CI 1.40-3.19). Additional adjustment for poststroke infection in the functional outcome analysis, done to assess poststroke infection as an intermediate in the pathway from admission hyperglycemia to functional outcome, did not substantially change the model. In patients with recorded diabetes mellitus (n = 418), admission hyperglycemia was not associated with poststroke infection (aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15-1.58). In nondiabetic acute ischemic stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia is associated with poststroke infection and worse functional outcome. Poststroke infections did not modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia after recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Jin Soo; Song, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Hye Seon; Jung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Huimahn Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in experimental stroke models, especially after ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the clinical and radiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke patients after recanalization. A prospective cohort study at 2 stroke centers was performed. We enrolled patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation with an initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥10 who had successful recanalization (≥thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia, 2b). Patients at center A underwent a mild hypothermia (34.5°C) protocol, which included mechanical ventilation, and 48-hour hypothermia and 48-hour rewarming. Patients at center B were treated according to the guidelines without hypothermia. Cerebral edema, hemorrhagic transformation, good outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale, ≤2), mortality, and safety profiles were compared. Potential variables at baseline and during the therapy were analyzed to evaluate for independent predictors of good outcome. The hypothermia group (n=39) had less cerebral edema (P=0.001), hemorrhagic transformation (P=0.016), and better outcome (P=0.017) compared with the normothermia group (n=36). Mortality, hemicraniectomy rate, and medical complications were not statistically different. After adjustment for potential confounders, therapeutic hypothermia (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-8.9; P=0.047) and distal occlusion (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval; 1.3-40.3; P=0.022) were the independent predictors for good outcome. Absence of cerebral edema (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.2; P=0.006) and no medical complications (odds ratio, 9.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-39.9; P=0.003) were also independent predictors for good outcome during the therapy. In patients with ischemic stroke, after successful recanalization, therapeutic hypothermia may reduce risk of cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation, and lead to improved

  8. [Operations on carotid arteries in an acute stage of ischaemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, I M

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at specifying the indications for operations performed on carotid arteries in an acute period of ischaemic stroke and assessing the results thus obtained. Between January 2008 and July 2010, we carried out a total of 372 operations on carotid arteries in three hundred and sixty patients. Of these, thirty-two subjects were operated on in an acute period of stroke. Neurovisualization was performed by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). The condition of the carotid arteries was assessed by means of duplex scanning (DS). The operations performed on the carotid arteries were as follows: thrombembolectomy (n=4), carotid thrombendarterectomy (n 5), carotid endarterectomy (CEAE, n=21), and stent grafting of the internal carotid arteries (1СA, n 2). Five CEAE operations were carried out after thrombolysis. The interventions on the carotid arteries were performed within 6 hours to 12 days from the onset of the first symptoms of ischaemic stroke. Neurologists were actively engaged in both determining the indications for the operations and monitoring of neurological functions. There were no perioperative complications encountered. Regression of the neurological deficit during 7 days of in-hospital follow up occurred in sixteen patients (50%) (neurological deficit scoring 1-2 by the Rankin scale). One patient (3%) developed ischaemic stroke on postoperative day 3 after CEAE. Two patients were diagnosed as having transitory ischaemic attacks. Stenting turned out successful in the both patients. The remote results at terms ranging from 12 months to 2 years were followed up in fifteen patients. Of these, twelve patients (80%) showed complete restoration of neurological functions (Rankin scale scoring 0). Neither lethal outcomes nor relapsing strokes were observed over the follow-up period. The obtained outcomes strongly suggest certain advantages and advisability of active surgical policy of treating patients

  9. One-year outcomes and secondary prevention in patients after acute minor stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Pan, Yuesong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on secondary preventive therapy use and patient outcomes after acute minor ischemic stroke in China. This study investigated secondary prevention strategies and outcomes up to 1 year after minor ischemic stroke. Patients from the China National Stroke Registry experienced a minor ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤5) and admitted to hospital within 24 hours of symptom onset were included. One-year rates of recurrent stroke, stroke-related disability, and all-cause death were evaluated. Risk factors associated with 1-year stroke recurrence were examined in a multivariate model. The secondary prevention strategies in the acute phase were evaluated as combination of secondary prevention medication classes and the medications used in 1 year follow-up were examined. The study included 1913 patients who had experienced acute minor ischemic stroke (mean age: 65.1 years; 67.3% men; mean NIHSS score: 2.5). Rates of recurrent stroke, disability, and death were 13.2, 17.0, and 6.3% at 1 year, respectively. History of hypertension, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and atrial fibrillation were independent predictors of one-year stroke recurrence. Rate of 1 year all-cause death in patients with triple combined therapy in acute phase was 4.1%, whereas in patients with none was 14.5%. At 1 year, only half patients continued the secondary prevention medications. Outcomes in individuals in China who had experienced acute minor stroke were unfavorable, underscoring the importance of early, sustained preventive therapy in this patient population. Combination of secondary prevention medication classes was associated with a lower risk of death.

  10. Immuno-inflammatory activation in acute cardio-embolic strokes in comparison with other subtypes of ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Licata, Giuseppe; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Corrao, Salvatore; Di Sciacca, Riccardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between inflammatory biomarker blood levels, cardioembolic stroke subtype and neurological deficit. So the aim of our study is to evaluate plasma levels of immuno-inflammatory variables in patients with cardio-embolic acute ischaemic stroke compared to other diagnostic subtypes and to evaluate the relationship between immuno-inflammatory variables, acute neurological deficit and brain infarct volume. One hundred twenty patients with acute ischaemic stroke and 123 controls without a diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke were evaluated. The type of acute ischaemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST classification. We evaluated plasma levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10, E-selectin, P-selectin, sICAM-1,sVCAM-1, vWF, TPA and PAI-1. Patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cardio-embolic (CEI) showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly higher median plasma levels of TNF-alpha , IL-6 and IL-1beta. Furthermore stroke patients classified as lacunar showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly lower median plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta. Multiple linear regression showed a significant association between the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) score at admission and diagnostic subtype, infarct volume of cardio-embolic strokes and some inflammatory variables. Our findings confirm that cardio-embolic strokes have a worse clinical presentation and produce larger and more disabling strokes than other ischaemic stroke subtypes reporting a possible explanation of higher immuno-inflammatory activation of the acute phase.

  11. Clinically Confirmed Stroke With Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Longitudinal Study of Clinical Outcomes, Stroke Recurrence, and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Makin, Stephen D J; Doubal, Fergus N; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-11-01

    We sought to establish whether the presence (versus absence) of a lesion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion weighting (DWI-MRI) at presentation with acute stroke is associated with worse clinical outcomes at 1 year. We recruited consecutive patients with a nondisabling ischemic stroke and performed DWI-MRI. Patients were followed up at 1 year to establish stroke recurrence (clinical or on MRI), cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised,<88) and modified Rankin Scale. A median of 4 days post stroke, one third (76/264; 29%) of patients did not have a DWI lesion (95% confidence interval, 23%-35%). There was no statistically significant difference between those with and without a DWI lesion with respect to age or vascular risk factors. Patients without a lesion were more likely to be women or have previous stroke. At 1 year, 11 of 76 (14%) patients with a DWI-negative index stroke had a clinical diagnosis of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack, 33% had cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised<88), and 40% still had modified Rankin Scale>1, no different from DWI-positive patients; DWI-positive patients were more likely to have a new lesion on MRI (14%), symptomatic or asymptomatic, than DWI-negative patients (2%; P=0.02). Our data were consistent with 6 other studies (total n=976), pooled proportion of DWI-negative patients was 21% (95% confidence interval, 12%-32%). Nearly one third of patients with nondisabling stroke do not have a relevant lesion on acute DWI-MRI. Patients with negative DWI-MRI had no better prognosis than patients with a lesion. DWI-negative stroke patients should receive secondary prevention. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni

    2014-06-15

    Spontaneous or traumatic bleeding is a common complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We report the case of an 83 y.o. woman with right facio-brachio-crural hemiparesis, left deviation of the head and aphasia who developed, after thrombolytic therapy, a spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma that regressed few days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of asymptomatic and spontaneous skeletal muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The occurrence of lateral cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis ipsilateral to sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma may suggest a causal relationship between local chronic inflammation of active mycobacterial infection and thrombolysis-related extravasation. This case should suggest caution in thrombolytic treatment in patients with chronic immune dysregulation and vascular inflammation such as extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of optimizing acute stroke care services for thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Penaloza-Ramos, Maria Cristina; Sheppard, James P; Jowett, Sue; Barton, Pelham; Mant, Jonathan; Quinn, Tom; Mellor, Ruth M; Sims, Don; Sandler, David; McManus, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    Thrombolysis in acute stroke is effective up to 4.5 hours after symptom onset but relies on early recognition, prompt arrival in hospital, and timely brain scanning. This study aimed to establish the cost-effectiveness of increasing thrombolysis rates through a series of hypothetical change strategies designed to optimize the acute care pathway for stroke. A decision-tree model was constructed, which relates the acute management of patients with suspected stroke from symptom onset to outcome. Current practice was modeled and compared with 7 change strategies designed to facilitate wider eligibility for thrombolysis. The model basecase consisted of data from consenting patients following the acute stroke pathway recruited in participating hospitals with data on effectiveness of treatment and costs from published sources. All change strategies were cost saving while increasing quality-adjusted life years gained. Using realistic estimates of effectiveness, the change strategy with the largest potential benefit was that of better recording of onset time, which resulted in 3.3 additional quality-adjusted life years and a cost saving of US $46,000 per 100,000 population. All strategies increased the number of thrombolysed patients and the number requiring urgent brain imaging (by 9% to 21% dependent on the scenario). Assuming a willingness-to-pay of US $30,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained, the potential budget available to deliver the interventions in each strategy ranged from US $50,000 to US $144,000. These results suggest that any strategy that increases thrombolysis rates will result in cost savings and improved patient quality of life. Healthcare commissioners could consider this model when planning improvements in stroke care.

  14. Additional diagnostic value of computed tomography perfusion for detection of acute ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Algra, Ale; Vos, Jan Albert; Niesten, Joris M; van Seeters, Tom; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Schonewille, Wouter J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2015-04-01

    Detection of acute infarction in the posterior circulation is challenging. We aimed to determine the additional value of tomograpy (CT) perfusion to noncontrast CT and CT angiography source images for infarct detection and localization in patients suspected of acute ischemic posterior circulation stroke. Patients with suspected acute ischemic posterior circulation stroke were selected from the Dutch acute Stroke Trial (DUST) study. Patients underwent noncontrast CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion within 9 hours after stroke onset and CT or MRI on follow-up. Images were evaluated for signs and location of ischemia. Discrimination of 3 hierarchical logistic regression models (noncontrast CT [A], added CT angiography source images [B], and CT perfusion [C]) was compared with C-statistics. Of 88 patients, 76 (86%) had a clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke on discharge and 42 patients (48%) showed a posterior circulation infarct on follow-up imaging. Model C (area under the curve from the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.94) predicted an infarct in the posterior circulation territory better than models A (area under the curve from the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.76; P(C versus A)<0.001) and B (area under the curve from the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.79; P(C versus B)<0.001). CT perfusion has significant additional diagnostic values to noncontrast CT and CT angiography source images for detecting ischemic changes in patients suspected of acute posterior circulation stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Recurrent Ischemic Lesions After Acute Atherothrombotic Stroke: Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin Versus Aspirin Alone.

    PubMed

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eung Gyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Chang, Dae Il; Rha, Joung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Kim, Dong Eog; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Hahn-Young; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Soo Joo; Choi, Jay Chol; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sun U; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Sohn, Sung-Il; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kang, Dong-Wha; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Lee, Jun; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis, clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone might be more effective to prevent recurrent cerebral ischemia. However, there is no clear evidence. In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized 358 patients with acute ischemic stroke of presumed large artery atherosclerosis origin within 48 hours of onset to clopidogrel (75 mg/d without loading dose) plus aspirin (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) or to aspirin alone (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) for 30 days. The primary outcome was new symptomatic or asymptomatic ischemic lesion on magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days. Secondary outcomes were 30-day functional disability, clinical stroke recurrence, and composite of major vascular events. Safety outcome was any bleeding. Of 358 patients enrolled, 334 (167 in each group) completed follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The 30-day new ischemic lesion recurrence rate was comparable between the clopidogrel plus aspirin and the aspirin monotherapy groups (36.5% versus 35.9%; relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.35; P=0.91). Of the recurrent ischemic lesions, 94.2% were clinically asymptomatic. There were no differences in secondary outcomes between the 2 groups. Any bleeding were more frequent in the combination group than in the aspirin monotherapy group, but the difference was not significant (16.7% versus 10.7%; P=0.11). One hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the clopidogrel plus aspirin group. Clopidogrel plus aspirin might not be superior to aspirin alone for preventing new ischemic lesion and clinical vascular events in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00814268. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Location of Acute Infarcts and Agitation and Aggression in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Kwong; Liu, Xiang Xin; Liang, Huajun; Chen, Yang Kun; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Ahuja, Anil T; Abrigo, Jill; Mok, Vincent Chung Tong; Ungvari, Gabor S; Wong, Ka Sing; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    The role of the infarct location in the development of poststroke agitation (PSA) is largely unknown. This study examined the association between the locations of infarcts and PSA at 9 months following the index stroke in 213 patients with the Chinese version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Compared with the non-PSA group, PSA patients had a higher number and volume of acute pontine infarcts. Ventral pontine and lateral cerebellar infarcts were independent predictors of PSA in the multivariate analysis.

  17. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Early warning score predicts acute mortality in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Liljehult, J; Christensen, T

    2016-04-01

    Clinical deterioration and death among patients with acute stroke are often preceded by detrimental changes in physiological parameters. Systematic and effective tools to identify patients at risk of deterioration early enough to intervene are therefore needed. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the aggregate weighted track and trigger system early warning score (EWS) can be used as a simple observational tool to identify patients at risk and predict mortality in a population of patients with acute stroke. Patients admitted with acute stroke at the Copenhagen Univers