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Sample records for acute stroke unenhanced

  1. Brain and vascular imaging of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2011-12-01

    Contemporary imaging technologies permit the rapid and accurate assessment of the acute stroke patient. These studies form the underpinning of all therapeutic approaches. Although unenhanced computed tomography remains the principal diagnostic examination to exclude hemorrhagic stroke, multimodal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be use to assess cerebral perfusion and may reveal the ischemic penumbra, thus leading to better patient selection for intravenous or intra-arterial reperfusion strategies.

  2. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management.

    PubMed

    Millet, Ingrid; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Riou, Bruno; Taourel, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1x10(-6)) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6x10(-6)) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT improves significantly diagnosis accuracy compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT optimizes appropriate hospitalization by increasing the number of discharged patients. • Systematic unenhanced CT allows detection of about one-third of acute unsuspected abdominal conditions. • It should allow boosting emergency department management decision-making confidence in old patients.

  3. Diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography urography in the evaluation of acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Hwia; Lin, Wen-Chiung; Wei, Chao-Jung; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2003-10-01

    This study prospectively evaluated the diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography (CT) urography in patients with acute renal colic. Fifty-nine patients with clinical manifestations of acute renal colic underwent unenhanced helical CT to evaluate urinary tract abnormalities. Reformatted three-dimensional CT urography was performed in all patients. The findings were correlated with ureteroscopy, surgical findings, histopathologic findings, and clinical course. CT urography detected urinary abnormalities in 57 of 59 patients with the clinical manifestation of acute renal colic, including 45 cases of urolithiasis, three urinary malignancies, one congenital abnormality, and eight ureteral strictures (due to chronic inflammation or fibrosis). CT urography showed negative findings in the urinary system in two patients, and after clinical follow-up, urinary abnormality was excluded in these patients. Incidental findings of extrarenal disease were noted in six patients (pulmonary abnormalities, n = 2; gallstones, n = 4). Only one patient with urolithiasis was misdiagnosed as having a renal tumor by CT urography. The sensitivity and specificity of CT urography in diagnosing urolithiasis was 97.8% (44/45) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Three-dimensional CT urography is a newly developed modality to evaluate anomalies of the urinary tract. The highly accurate diagnostic value of CT urography makes it a suitable alternative or substitutive modality in patients with acute flank pain.

  4. Acute ureteric calculus obstruction: unenhanced spiral CT versus HASTE MR urography and abdominal radiograph.

    PubMed

    Regan, F; Kuszyk, B; Bohlman, M E; Jackman, S

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the performance of unenhanced spiral CT to the combination of HASTE MR urography (MRU) and plain abdominal radiography (KUB) in patients suspected of having acute calculus ureteric obstruction. 64 patients with suspected acute calculus ureteric obstruction were evaluated. The presence of perirenal fluid, presence and level of ureteric obstruction and calculi were assessed on both techniques. 44 of 64 (69%) patients had acute calculus ureteric obstruction based on clinical, radiographic or surgical findings. MRU showed perirenal fluid in acute ureteric obstruction (77%) with a greater sensitivity than CT showed stranding (45%). The combination of fluid and ureteric dilation on MRU showed a sensitivity of 93% (CT 80%), specificity of 95% (CT 85%), and accuracy of 94% (CT 81%). There were 61 findings of either fluid or ureteric dilatation on MRU in 44 acutely obstructed kidneys compared with 37 similar findings on CT (p<0.005). Although there was excellent reproducibility (Kappa=/>0.75) in the finding of perirenal fluid on MRU, there was only fair interobserver agreement (Kappa<0.4) regarding perirenal stranding on CT. MRU/KUB showed ureteric calculi in 21/29 (72%) of patients with calculi seen by CT. Overall, MRU/KUB revealed 2.4 abnormalities per acutely obstructed ureter compared with 1.8 abnormalities detected by CT. MRU/KUB using HASTE sequences can diagnose the presence of acute calculus ureteric obstruction with similar accuracy to spiral CT. The technique has less observer variability and is more accurate than CT in detecting evidence of obstruction such as perirenal fluid.

  5. Acute appendicitis: comparison of low-dose and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Caroline; Tack, Denis; de Maertelaer, Viviane; Bohy, Pascale; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Van Gansbeke, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    To prospectively compare low- and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent two unenhanced multi-detector row CT examinations with 4 x 2.5-mm collimation, 120 kVp, and 30 and 100 effective mAs. Two radiologists independently read the images obtained at each dose during two sessions. Readers recorded visualization of the appendix and presence of gas in its lumen, appendicolith, periappendiceal fat stranding, cecal wall thickening, and abscess or phlegmon to measure the diameter of the appendix and to propose diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Data were compared according to dose and reader, with definite diagnosis established on basis of surgical findings (n = 37) or clinical follow-up. chi(2) tests and logistic regression were used. Measurement agreements were assessed with Cohen kappa statistics. Twenty-nine patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis. No difference was observed between the frequency of visualization of the appendix (P =.874) neither in its mean diameter (P =.101-.696, according to readers and sessions) nor in the readers' overall diagnosis (P =.788) at each dose. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of each sign were not different between doses. Fat stranding, appendicolith, and diameter were the most predictive signs, regardless of dose, yielding approximately 90% of correct diagnoses. The ability to propose a correct alternative diagnosis was not influenced by the dose. Low-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT has similar diagnostic performance as standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  6. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  7. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Naftidrofuryl for acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Leonardi-Bee, J; Steiner, T; Bath-Hextall, F

    2007-04-18

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death and the most common cause of disability in the western world. The development of drugs to limit the effects of brain damage caused by stroke continues but no routine effective treatment has yet been identified. Naftidrofuryl has been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of acute stroke in some studies, but it is unclear whether all of the evidence supports these findings. To assess the effects of naftidrofuryl in the acute phase of stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2006); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2006); MEDLINE (1966 to July 2006); EMBASE (1980 to July 2006); Science Citation Index (1981 to July 2006); National Research Register (July 2006); LILACS Database (1982 to July 2006); metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (July 2006); SUMsearch (July 2006). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing studies we searched reference lists, handsearched conference proceedings and contacted pharmaceutical companies and authors of relevant articles. We included patients with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke clinically diagnosed by a medical practitioner with or without a computerised tomography (CT) scan. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data using data extraction forms or, if available, re-analysed individual patient data. Six trials involving 1274 participants were included. We found no significant benefits of naftidrofuryl compared with placebo in reducing the risks of mortality (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.36, six studies) or combined death or dependency/disability (pooled OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.16, three studies). Pooled results showed naftidrofuryl had no significant effect on

  9. Sex and acute stroke presentation.

    PubMed

    Labiche, Lise A; Chan, Wenyaw; Saldin, Kamaldeen R; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2002-11-01

    We determine whether a sex difference exists for acute stroke emergency department presentation. The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project is a prospective observational study of acute stroke management that identified 1,189 validated strokes in nonurban community EDs from February 1998 to March 2000. Structured interview of the patient and the person with the patient at symptom onset identified the symptom or symptoms that prompted the patient to seek medical attention. Interview data were available for 1,124 (94%) patients. A physician blinded to sex classified the reported symptoms into 14 categories. Nontraditional stroke symptoms were reported by 28% of women and 19% of men (odds ratio 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 2.2). Nontraditional stroke symptoms, pain (men 8%, women 12%) and change in level of consciousness (men 12%, women 17%), were more often reported by women. Traditional stroke symptoms, imbalance (men 20%, women 15%) and hemiparesis (men 24%, women 19%), were reported more frequently by men. Trends were also found for women to present with nonneurologic symptoms (men 17%, women 21%) and men to present with gait abnormalities (men 11%, women 8%). There was no sex difference in the mean number of symptoms reported by an individual patient. This study suggests that a sex difference exists in reporting of acute stroke symptoms. Women with validated strokes present more frequently with nontraditional stroke symptoms than men. Recognition of this difference might yield faster evaluation and management of female patients with acute stroke eligible for acute therapies.

  10. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease -- can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A; Green, Abby M; Jaramillo, Diego; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children.

  11. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  12. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  13. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  14. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siket, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    Although stroke declined from the third to fifth most common cause of death in the United States, the annual incidence and overall prevalence continue to increase. Since the available US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment options are time dependent, improving early stroke care may have more of a public health impact than any other phase of care. Timely and efficient stroke treatment should be a priority for emergency department and prehospital providers. This article discusses currently available and emerging treatment options in acute ischemic stroke focusing on the preservation of salvageable brain tissue, minimizing complications, and secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2017-02-01

    This article provides an update on the state of the art of the emergency treatment of acute ischemic stroke with particular emphasis on the alternatives for reperfusion therapy. The results of several randomized controlled trials consistently and conclusively demonstrating that previously functional patients with disabling strokes from a proximal intracranial artery occlusion benefit from prompt recanalization with mechanical thrombectomy using a retrievable stent have changed the landscape of acute stroke therapy. Mechanical thrombectomy within 6 hours of symptom onset should now be considered the preferred treatment for these patients along with IV thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) within the first 4.5 hours for all patients who do not have contraindications for systemic thrombolysis. Patients who are ineligible for IV rtPA can also benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. Collateral status and time to reperfusion are the main determinants of outcome. Timely successful reperfusion is the most effective treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be optimized to maximize the number of patients with acute ischemic stroke able to receive reperfusion therapy.

  16. Therapeutic interventions in acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, K R

    1992-01-01

    1. Potential therapies for ischaemic stroke include agents to reduce oedema, to improve cerebral perfusion, to reduce excitotoxic damage, to minimise free-radical induced injury and to reduce complications such as deep venous thrombosis. 2. Of the anti-oedema drugs, steroids are ineffective and possibly dangerous; intravenous glycerol is unproven. 3. Haemodilution to reduce whole blood viscosity and improve perfusion is ineffective. Thrombolytic drugs have not been adequately tested but several randomised multicentre trials are now commencing. Early treatment and CT scanning are essential. 4. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may have wide applicability but have not been tested in the acute phase of stroke. A multi-centre trial will address this issue. 5. Neuronal cytoprotection offers exciting prospects for acute stroke treatment. Antagonists of glutamate at the NMDA receptor, calcium and sodium channel blocking agents and free radical scavenging drugs have potent effects experimentally. Several agents are now reaching clinical trials. The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been disappointing in large scale trials but some studies were flawed by late treatment. 6. Successful treatment of acute stroke is likely to combine several approaches. 7. Therapeutic trials in stroke must include CT scanning, early treatment and a multicentre approach to achieve large numbers of patients. PMID:1493080

  17. Acute Ischemic Stroke Therapy Overview.

    PubMed

    Catanese, Luciana; Tarsia, Joseph; Fisher, Marc

    2017-02-03

    The treatment of acute ischemic stroke has undergone dramatic changes recently subsequent to the demonstrated efficacy of intra-arterial (IA) device-based therapy in multiple trials. The selection of patients for both intravenous and IA therapy is based on timely imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and if IA therapy is considered noninvasive, angiography with one of these modalities is necessary to document a large-vessel occlusion amenable for intervention. More advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are available that can be used to identify a small ischemic core and ischemic penumbra, and this information will contribute increasingly in treatment decisions as the therapeutic time window is lengthened. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator remains the mainstay of acute stroke therapy within the initial 4.5 hours after stroke onset, despite the lack of Food and Drug Administration approval in the 3- to 4.5-hour time window. In patients with proximal, large-vessel occlusions, IA device-based treatment should be initiated in patients with small/moderate-sized ischemic cores who can be treated within 6 hours of stroke onset. The organization and implementation of regional stroke care systems will be needed to treat as many eligible patients as expeditiously as possible. Novel treatment paradigms can be envisioned combining neuroprotection with IA device treatment to potentially increase the number of patients who can be treated despite long transport times and to ameliorate the consequences of reperfusion injury. Acute stroke treatment has entered a golden age, and many additional advances can be anticipated. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Are the unenhanced and excretory CT phases necessary for the evaluation of acute pyelonephritis?

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Lincoln S; Torres, Ulysses S; Souza, Saulo M; Torres, Lucas R; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Background The most widely accepted computed tomography (CT) protocol for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) includes at least a pre- and post-contrast scan, which may expose patients to higher doses of ionizing radiation. Purpose To establish the accuracy, reproducibility, and degree of confidence in CT diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) and urolithiasis using only images obtained during the nephrographic phase. Material and Methods A retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients (88 women; age range, 19-70 years) with clinical and laboratory suspicion of APN and who underwent triphasic abdominal CT scans (non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phases) was performed. Two readers first evaluated independently only the nephrographic phase of scans, and, in a second session, the entire study. The diagnostic reference standard was settled by a third experienced radiologist who reviewed all triphasic scans and clinical data. Results The accuracy of only nephrographic phase for diagnosis of APN and urolithiasis was in the range of 90.3-91.78% and 96.27-99.25%, respectively. There was no significant difference in comparison with the triphasic reading (z: -0.4 - 0.2; P = 0.34-0.83). The average degree of confidence for APN also showed no significant variation for both readers ( P = 0.4 and 0.08). Almost perfect inter-observer agreements for the diagnosis of APN (k = 0.86, P < 0.001) and for urolithiasis (k = 0.84, P < 0.001) were observed when considering only the nephrographic phase. Conclusion CT assessment of APN and urolithiasis can be accurately performed using only the late nephrographic phase, with consequent dose reduction.

  19. Recovery Potential After Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Rüdiger J.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In acute stroke, the major factor for recovery is the early use of thrombolysis aimed at arterial recanalization and reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue. Subsequently, neurorehabilitative training critically improves clinical recovery due to augmention of postlesional plasticity. Neuroimaging and electrophysiology studies have revealed that the location and volume of the stroke lesion, the affection of nerve fiber tracts, as well as functional and structural changes in the perilesional tissue and in large-scale bihemispheric networks are relevant biomarkers of post-stroke recovery. However, associated disorders, such as mood disorders, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases, may induce secondary cerebral changes or aggravate the functional deficits and, thereby, compromise the potential for recovery. PMID:26617568

  20. Haemodilution for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy S; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischaemic stroke interrupts the flow of blood to part of the brain. Haemodilution is thought to improve the flow of blood to the affected areas of the brain and thus reduce infarct size. Objectives To assess the effects of haemodilution in acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2014), MEDLINE (January 2008 to October 2013) and EMBASE (January 2008 to October 2013). We also searched trials registers, scanned reference lists and contacted authors. For the previous version of the review, the authors contacted manufacturers and investigators in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials of haemodilution treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke. We included only trials in which treatment was started within 72 hours of stroke onset. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed trial quality and one review author extracted the data. Main results We included 21 trials involving 4174 participants. Nine trials used a combination of venesection and plasma volume expander. Twelve trials used plasma volume expander alone. The plasma volume expander was plasma alone in one trial, dextran 40 in 12 trials, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in five trials and albumin in three trials. Two trials tested haemodilution in combination with another therapy. Evaluation was blinded in 14 trials. Five trials probably included some participants with intracerebral haemorrhage. Haemodilution did not significantly reduce deaths within the first four weeks (risk ratio (RR) 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 1.34). Similarly, haemodilution did not influence deaths within three to six months (RR 1.05; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.20), or death and dependency or institutionalisation (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07). The results were similar in confounded and unconfounded trials, and in trials of isovolaemic and hypervolaemic haemodilution. No

  1. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ricci, S; Celani, M G; Cantisani, A T; Righetti, E

    2006-04-19

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects which may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of piracetam in acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 20 June 2005). In addition, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2005), EMBASE (1980 to April 2005), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to April 2005). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within approximately 48 hours of stroke onset. Two authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two authors. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Three trials involving 1002 people were included, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependency or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependency.

  2. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Cantisani, Teresa Anna; Righetti, Enrico

    2012-09-12

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects that may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2006 and 2009. To assess the effects of piracetam in acute, presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 15 May 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to May 2011). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within three days of stroke onset. Two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two review authors. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included three trials involving 1002 patients, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85 years, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependence or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependence.

  3. Acute stroke initiative involving an acute care team.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sean M; Keyser, Gabrielle; Winfield, Michelle; McNeil, Julie; Simko, Leslie; Price, Karen; Moffa, Donald; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Peacock, W Frank; Katzan, Irene L

    2012-06-01

    The Acute Care Team Educational Initiative (ACTEI) was developed as a quality improvement initiative for the recognition and initial management of time-sensitive medical conditions. For our first time-sensitive disease process, we focused on acute stroke [acute stroke initiative (ASI)]. As part of the larger ACTEI, the ASI included creating an ACT that responds to all suspected emergency department stroke patients. In this article, we describe the planning, process, and development of the ACTEI/ASI as well as how we created an acute response team for the diagnosis and management of suspected acute stroke.

  4. Stroke intervention: catheter-based therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    White, Christopher J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Cates, Christopher U; Levy, Elad I; McMullan, Paul W; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Weinberger, Jesse M; Wholey, Mark H

    2011-07-05

    The majority (>80%) of the three-quarters of a million strokes that will occur in the United States this year are ischemic in nature. The treatment of acute ischemic stroke is very similar to acute myocardial infarction, which requires timely reperfusion therapy for optimal results. The majority of patients with acute ischemic stroke do not receive any form of reperfusion therapy, unlike patients with acute myocardial infarction. Improving outcomes for acute stroke will require patient education to encourage early presentation, an aggressive expansion of qualified hospitals, and willing providers and early imaging strategies to match patients with their best options for reperfusion therapy to minimize complications. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2014-07-29

    Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. Thrombolytic drugs, however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal. One drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), is licensed for use in selected patients within 4.5 hours of stroke in Europe and within three hours in the USA. There is an upper age limit of 80 years in some countries, and a limitation to mainly non-severe stroke in others. Forty per cent more data are available since this review was last updated in 2009. To determine whether, and in what circumstances, thrombolytic therapy might be an effective and safe treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2013). We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, searched reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies and trialists. Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in people with definite ischaemic stroke. Two review authors applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We verified the extracted data with investigators of all major trials, obtaining additional unpublished data if available. We included 27 trials, involving 10,187 participants, testing urokinase, streptokinase, rt-PA, recombinant pro-urokinase or desmoteplase. Four trials used intra-arterial administration, while the rest used the intravenous route. Most data come from trials that started treatment up to six hours after stroke. About 44% of the trials (about 70% of the participants) were testing intravenous rt-PA. In earlier studies very few of the participants (0.5%) were aged over 80 years; in this update, 16% of participants are over 80 years of age due to the

  6. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Background Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. Thrombolytic drugs, however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal. One drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), is licensed for use in selected patients within 4.5 hours of stroke in Europe and within three hours in the USA. There is an upper age limit of 80 years in some countries, and a limitation to mainly non-severe stroke in others. Forty per cent more data are available since this review was last updated in 2009. Objectives To determine whether, and in what circumstances, thrombolytic therapy might be an effective and safe treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2013).We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, searched reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies and trialists. Selection criteria Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in people with definite ischaemic stroke. Data collection and analysis Two review authors applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We verified the extracted data with investigators of all major trials, obtaining additional unpublished data if available. Main results We included 27 trials, involving 10,187 participants, testing urokinase, streptokinase, rt-PA, recombinant pro-urokinase or desmoteplase. Four trials used intra-arterial administration, while the rest used the intravenous route. Most data come from trials that started treatment up to six hours after stroke. About 44% of the trials (about 70% of the participants) were testing intravenous rt-PA. In earlier studies very few of the participants (0

  7. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  8. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  9. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wardlaw, J M; Zoppo, G; Yamaguchi, T; Berge, E

    2003-01-01

    The majority of strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred. Successful treatment could mean that the patient is more likely to make a good recovery from their stroke. Thrombolytic drugs however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain which can be fatal. Thrombolytic therapy has now been evaluated in several randomised trials in acute ischaemic stroke. The objective of this review was to assess the safety and efficacy of thrombolytic agents in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched January 2003), MEDLINE (1966- January 2003) and EMBASE (1980-January 2003). In addition we contacted researchers and pharmaceutical companies, attended relevant conferences and handsearched four Japanese journals. Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in patients with definite ischaemic stroke. One reviewer applied the inclusion criteria and extracted the data. Trial quality was assessed. The extracted data were verified by the principal investigators of all major trials. Thus published and unpublished data were obtained where available. Eighteen trials including 5727 patients were included, but not all trials contributed data to each outcome examined in this review. Sixteen trials were double-blind. The trials tested urokinase, streptokinase, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator or recombinant pro-urokinase. Two trials used intra-arterial administration but the rest used the intravenous route. About 50% of the data (patients and trials) come from trials testing intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. There are few data from patients aged over 80 years. Much of the data comes from trials conducted in the first half of the 1990s when, in an effort to reduce delays to trial drug administration, on site randomisation methods were used that, in consequence

  10. Diagnosis of acute flank pain caused by ureteral stones: value of combined direct and indirect signs on IVU and unenhanced helical CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jen; Ng, Chip-Jin; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chiu, Te-Fa; Wong, Yon-Cheong

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of combined direct and indirect signs on intravenous urography (IVU) and unenhanced helical computed tomography (UHCT) for the diagnosis of ureteral stones in emergency patients with acute flank pain. During an 8-month period, 82 emergency patients with acute flank pain undergoing IVU and UHCT with sufficient clinical follow-up formed the study group. The presence or absence of direct sign (visualization of ureteral stones) and indirect signs on IVU and UHCT was recorded. The diagnostic accuracy of each direct/indirect sign and their combination for the diagnosis of ureteral stones on IVU and UHCT were analyzed and compared. Of the 82 patients, 66 had ureteral stones, four had passed urinary stones prior to imaging and 12 had other diseases. The diagnostic accuracies of direct signs on IVU and UHCT for the diagnosis of ureteral stones were 79.3 and 98.8%, respectively, which was more accurate than that of any single indirect sign on IVU and UHCT. However, the diagnostic accuracy of ureteral stones by IVU increased to 90.2% when using diagnostic criteria requiring the presence of a direct sign or at least three indirect signs, and by UHCT, it increased to 100% when using diagnostic criteria requiring the presence of a direct sign with at least one indirect sign. Therefore, for emergency patients with acute flank pain, the use of the above combinations of direct/indirect signs is useful as the diagnostic criterion for ureteral stones.

  11. Thrombin Generation in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lara N.; Patel, Raj; Pathansali, Rohan; Kalra, Lalit; Arya, Roopen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke remains a global leading cause of death and disability. Traditional description of plasma biology in the aftermath of acute ischaemic stroke favours development of hypercoagulability, resulting from complex interplay between plasma and endothelial factors. However, no single assay measures the overall global coagulation process. We postulate that thrombin generation would assist in identifying coagulation abnormalities after acute stroke. Aim. To investigate the coagulation abnormalities after acute ischaemic stroke using thrombin generation. Methods. We evaluated thrombin generation, measured with calibrated automated thrombography in stroke of different aetiological types (n = 170) within 48 hours of symptoms onset (baseline) and in the second week (time 2) and in normal healthy volunteers (n = 71). Results. Two-point thrombin generation assays showed prolonged lag time and time to peak at baseline (3.3 (2.9, 4.0) versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7); p = 0.005) and (3.3 (2.9, 4.0) versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7); p = 0.002), respectively, and at time 2 (3.5 (2.9, 4.2) versus 4.0 (3.1, 4.9); p = 0.004) and (5.9 (5.3, 6.6) versus 6.8 (5.8, 7.7) p = 0.05), respectively, in cardioembolic stroke (n = 39), when compared to noncardioembolic stroke (n = 117). The result was reproduced in multiple comparisons between acute ischaemic stroke subgroups and normal healthy volunteers. Endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin did not indicate hypercoagulability after acute ischaemic stroke, and thrombolytic therapy did not affect thrombin generation assays. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma is not useful in defining hypercoagulability in acute ischaemic stroke. This is similar to observed trend in coronary artery disease and contrary to other hypercoagulable states. PMID:28116215

  12. Yawning in acute anterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    Singer, Oliver C; Humpich, Marek C; Lanfermann, Heiner; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias

    2007-11-01

    Pathological yawning can be a clinical sign in disorders affecting the brainstem. Here we describe seven patients with pathological yawning caused by acute middle cerebral artery stroke, indicating that pathological yawning also occurs in supratentorial stroke. We hypothesise that excessive yawning is a consequence of lesions in cortical or subcortical areas, which physiologically control diencephalic yawning centres.

  13. [Stunned myocardium after acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Varela, Daniel; Díaz, Fernanda; Hlavnicka, Alejandro; Wainsztein, Néstor; Leiguarda, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    The so-called stunned myocardium, defined as transitory myocardial contractile dysfunction, has been clearly demonstrated in diverse clinical situations. However, stunned myocardium related to ischemic stroke has been poorly identified. We describe two patients with diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who developed eletrocardiographic changes, cardiac enzyme increasing levels and myocardial dysfunction secondary to abnormal cardiac wall motion. At the same time the patients developed acute lung injury with rapid resolution, perhaps as a consequence of neurocardiogenic components.

  14. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  15. Stroke code improves intravenous thrombolysis administration in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with "Stroke Code" (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. The study period was divided into the "pre-SC era" (January 2006 to July 2010) and "SC era" (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time.

  16. Stroke Laterality Bias in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Gavin; Wade, Carrie; McKee, Jacqueline; McCarron, Peter; McVerry, Ferghal; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-11-01

    Little is known of the impact of stroke laterality on the management process and outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital over 1 year with supratentorial AIS were eligible for inclusion in the study. Baseline characteristics and risk factors, delays in hospital admission, imaging, intrahospital transfer to an acute stoke unit, stroke severity and classification, length of hospital admission, as well as 10-year mortality were measured and compared among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. There were 141 patients (77 men, 64 women; median age 73 [interquartile range 63-79] years), There were 71 patients with left hemisphere AIS and 70 with right hemisphere AIS. Delays to hospital admission from stroke onset to neuroimaging were similar among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. Delay in transfer to an acute stroke unit (ASU) following hospital admission was on average 14 hours more for right hemisphere compared to left hemisphere AIS patients (P = .01). Laterality was not associated with any difference in 10-year survival. Patients with mild and nondominant AIS merit particular attention to minimize their intrahospital transfer time to an ASU. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stroke risk stratification in acute dizziness presentations

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, William J.; Brown, Devin L.; Burke, James F.; Hofer, Timothy P.; Tsodikov, Alexander; Hoeffner, Ellen G.; Fendrick, A.M.; Adelman, Eric E.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the ability of bedside information to risk stratify stroke in acute dizziness presentations. Methods: Surveillance methods were used to identify patients with acute dizziness and nystagmus or imbalance, excluding those with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, medical causes, or moderate to severe neurologic deficits. Stroke was defined as acute infarction or intracerebral hemorrhage on a clinical or research MRI performed within 14 days of dizziness onset. Bedside information comprised history of stroke, the ABCD2 score (age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration, and diabetes), an ocular motor (OM)-based assessment (head impulse test, nystagmus pattern [central vs other], test of skew), and a general neurologic examination for other CNS features. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association of the bedside information with stroke. Model calibration was assessed using low (<5%), intermediate (5% to <10%), and high (≥10%) predicted probability risk categories. Results: Acute stroke was identified in 29 of 272 patients (10.7%). Associations with stroke were as follows: ABCD2 score (continuous) (odds ratio [OR] 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.51), any other CNS features (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.06–6.08), OM assessment (OR 2.82; 95% CI 0.96–8.30), and prior stroke (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.05–4.57). No stroke cases were in the model's low-risk probability category (0/86, 0%), whereas 9 were in the moderate-risk category (9/94, 9.6%) and 20 were in the high-risk category (20/92, 21.7%). Conclusion: In acute dizziness presentations, the combination of ABCD2 score, general neurologic examination, and a specialized OM examination has the capacity to risk-stratify acute stroke on MRI. PMID:26511453

  18. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Nutrition for elderly acute stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Ha, Lisa; Iversen, Per Ole; Hauge, Truls

    2008-09-11

    Elderly people have an increased risk of malnutrition due to biological and physiological changes and underlying disease. Almost 90% of the stroke patients are older than 65 years, and the consequences of acute stroke may lead to additional nutritional problems. This paper reviews nutritional therapy for stroke patients. PubMed was searched (non-systematically) for prospective cohort studies of occurrence, diagnostics and consequences of undernutrition in stroke patients. Randomized trials were examined to identify clinical effects of oral protein and energy supplements or tube feeding on nutritional status and intake, functional status, infections, length of stay, quality of life and mortality. 8-35% of stroke patients are undernourished. Body weight is one of the most important parameters for assessment of nutritional status. Dysphagia occurs in up to 80% of patients with acute stroke and increases the risk of undernutrition, which again leads to prolonged length of stay, reduced functional status and poorer survival. Early nasogastric tube feeding does not increase the risk of pneumonia and may improve survival after six months. Oral supplements lead to a significantly improved nutritional intake in undernourished stroke patients, as well as improved nutritional status and survival in undernourished elderly. Nutritional treatment can improve the clinical outcome after an acute stroke, provided that there are good procedures for follow-up and monitoring of the treatment.

  1. Painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as an acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Baydin, Ahmet; Nargis, Cemil; Nural, M Selim; Aygun, Dursun; Karatas, Aydin Deniz; Bahcivan, Muzaffer

    2006-12-01

    Acute aortic dissection is an uncommon disease; however, it has a high mortality rate. Classically, aortic dissection presents with sudden and severe pain in the chest, back, or abdomen. Patients often describe tearing or ripping pain. There are a few reports of atypical findings or no pain in the literature. We report a case of painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as acute stroke.

  2. Modern medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Larry B

    2014-01-01

    The modern management of patients with ischemic stroke begins by having a system in place that organizes the provision of preventive, acute treatment, and rehabilitative services. In the acute setting, initial evaluation is aimed at rapidly establishing a diagnosis by excluding stroke mimics, distinguishing between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, and determining if the patient is a candidate for treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA, alteplase). In some centers, select patients who do not qualify for administration of IV-tPA may be considered for endovascular intervention. General measures include the use of platelet antiaggregants, treatment of fever, blood pressure management, and continuation of statins if the patient has already been taking them. Post-acute evaluation and management is aimed at secondary prevention and optimizing recovery, including recognition and treatment of post-stroke depression.

  3. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  4. Bacterial pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fu; Chang, Cheng-Yu; Hsu, Li-Cho; Tsai, Ping-Huang; Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Yuan, Mei-Kang; Lai, Yi-Chun; Liu, Yu-Chang; Wang, Wei-Shu

    2013-02-01

    The most common serious complication following acute ischemic stroke is pneumonia, which may increase mortality and worsen clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke. From June 2006 to May 2011, we retrospectively included 51 patients with pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke. We analyzed the clinical features, microbiologic data, and outcomes. Predictors of 30-day mortality were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The acute ischemic strokes were caused by large-artery atherosclerosis in 37 (72.5%) of the 51 patients. We found that the most common pathogen responsible for poststroke pneumonia was Klebsiella pneumoniae, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Ultimately, 12 patients died of progressive sepsis due to pneumonia after the acute ischemic stroke. The 30-day mortality rate was 23.5%. In the univariate analysis, patients who died within 30 days had higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, higher CURB-65 scores, elevated instability of hemodynamic status, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. In Cox regression analysis, a GCS score of <9 on the day of pneumonia onset was only significant indicator for 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 6.72; 95% confidence interval, 2.12-21.30, p = 0.001). Pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke is a severe complication. Once stroke-related pneumonia develops, neurologic assessment, CURB-65 score, and shock can be used to predict the ultimate prognosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (P<0.001 and P=0.009, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression revealed that pneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, P<0.001). In conclusion, pneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  6. Critical care in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    McDermott, M; Jacobs, T; Morgenstern, L

    2017-01-01

    Most ischemic strokes are managed on the ward or on designated stroke units. A significant proportion of patients with ischemic stroke require more specialized care. Several studies have shown improved outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke when neurocritical care services are available. Features of acute ischemic stroke patients requiring intensive care unit-level care include airway or respiratory compromise; large cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere infarction with swelling; infarction with symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation; infarction complicated by seizures; and a large proportion of patients require close management of blood pressure after thrombolytics. In this chapter, we discuss aspects of acute ischemic stroke care that are of particular relevance to a neurointensivist, covering neuropathology, neurodiagnostics and imaging, blood pressure management, glycemic control, temperature management, and the selection and timing of antithrombotics. We also focus on the care of patients who have received intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Complex clinical decision making in decompressive hemicraniectomy for hemispheric infarction and urgent management of basilar artery thrombosis are specifically addressed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryoglobulins in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukyan, L. A.; Ayvazyan, V. A.; Boyajyan, A. S.

    Cryoglobulins (Cgs) are pathogenic immune complexes, non specific markers of the inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In this study we for the first time, revealed Cgs in the blood of ischemic stroke patients and analyze their composition.

  8. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Thromboelastography in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Andrea; Wetzel, Jeremy; Roper, Tiffany; Pivalizza, Evan; McCarthy, James; Wallace, Cristina; Hess, Mary Jane; Peng, Hui; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Sangha, Navdeep; Grotta, James C

    2015-02-01

    Thromboelastography measures the dynamics of coagulation. There are limited data about thromboelastography in acute ischemic stroke other than a single study from 1974 suggesting that acute ischemic stroke patients are hypercoagulable. There have been no studies of thromboelastography in the thrombolytic era despite its potential usefulness as a measure of clot lysis. This study was designed to provide initial thromboelastography data in stroke patients before and after tissue plasminogen activator therapy and to provide the necessary preliminary data for further study of thromboelastography's ability to identify clot subtype and predict response to tissue plasminogen activator therapy. All acute ischemic stroke patients presenting between 11/2009 and 2/2011 eligible for tissue plasminogen activator therapy were screened and 56 enrolled. Blood was drawn before (52 patients) and 10 mins after tissue plasminogen activator bolus (30 patients). Demographics, vitals, labs, 24 h National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and computed tomography scan results were collected. Patients were compared with normal controls. Acute ischemic stroke patients had shorter R (4.8 ± 1.5 vs. 6.0 ± 1.7 min, P = 0.0004), greater α Angle (65.0 ± 7.6 vs. 61.5 ± 5.9°, P = 0.01), and shorter K (1.7 ± 0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7 min, P = 0.002) indicating faster clotting. Additionally, a subset formed clots with stronger platelet-fibrin matrices. Treatment with tissue plasminogen activator resulted in reduction in all indices of clot strength (LY30 = 0 (0-0.4) vs. 94.4 (15.2-95.3) P < 0.0001); however, there was considerable variability in response. Thromboelastography demonstrates that many acute ischemic stroke patients are hypercoaguable. Thromboelastography values reflect variable clot subtype and response to tissue plasminogen activator. Further study based on these data will determine if thromboelastography is useful for measuring the dynamic aspects of clot formation and monitoring lytic

  11. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  12. Management of blood pressure in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, John A; Dawson, Jesse; Quinn, Terence J

    2013-08-01

    The importance of elevated or low arterial blood pressure (BP) early after stroke, and the need for pharmacological intervention to control BP, remains controversial. Debate surrounds if, when and how to intervene. This debate is informed by conflicting results from observational data and underpowered clinical trials and substantive outcome data are lacking. Accordingly, management decisions have largely been left up to the individual treating physician and guidelines are based on 'good practice' and theory rather than level 1, grade A evidence. Substantial progress has been made in recent years, particularly in the field of hemorrhagic stroke, where recently presented and soon to completed large-scale trials may finally give us a firm evidence base. For ischemic stroke, many important studies have informed our understanding of the basic pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of BP management in acute stroke and, although not yet constituting a solid 'evidence base', are helping us from the 'cognitive quick-sand' of small studies and personal experiences.

  13. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  14. Using telemedicine for acute stroke assessment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jo; Fitzgerald, Jane; Gibson, Alison; McAdam, Joanna; Lightbody, Liz; McLoughlin, Alison; Watkins, Caroline; Day, Elaine

    In acute stroke care, urgent specialist assessment and treatment are essential to reduce the risk of death and disability. However, many patients do not receive them due to a lack of specialist services. One solution is to use telemedicine. This can give all patients with acute stroke symptoms access to immediate expert assessment and advice, regardless of when and where they present to hospital. This article describes a telemedicine system developed and implemented in Lancashire and Cumbria. In its first year of operation, 319 patients received a telestroke video assessment with a consultant stroke physician; 131 of these patients were given thrombolysis. We discuss how the service was designed, staff training and development, and the implications for nursing practice. The development of a standardised telemedicine toolkit that may facilitate future telemedicine projects is also discussed.

  15. Orthostatic haemodynamic responses in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, B; Reid, J; Fotherby, M; Crome, P

    1999-01-01

    Little is known about orthostatic blood pressure regulation in acute stroke. We determined postural haemodynamic responses in 40 patients with acute stroke (mild or moderate severity) and 40 non-stroke control in-patients, at two days (`Day 1') and one week (`Week 1') post-admission. Following a 10-minute supine rest and baseline readings, subjects sat up and blood pressure and heart rate were taken for 5 minutes. The procedure was repeated with subjects moving from supine to the standing posture. Haemodynamic changes from supine data were analysed. On standing up, the control group had a transient significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure on Day 1 but not Week 1. No significant changes were seen on either day when sitting up. In contrast to controls, the stroke group showed increases in mean arterial blood pressure on moving from supine to the sitting and standing positions on both days. Persistent postural hypotension defined as ⩾20 mmHg systolic fall occurred in <10% of either of the study groups on both days. Sitting and standing heart rates in both groups were significantly faster than supine heart rate on both days. The orthostatic blood pressure elevation is consistent with sympathetic nervous system overactivity which has been reported in acute stroke. Upright positioning as part of early rehabilitation and mobilisation following mild-to-moderate stroke would, therefore, not predispose to detrimental postural reductions in blood pressure.


Keywords: stroke; orthostatic hypotension; hypotension PMID:10715760

  16. Brain natriuretic peptide in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kenji; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Iijima, Mutsumi; Moriya, Saori; Mizuno, Satoko; Toi, Sono; Arai, Kotaro; Ashihara, Kyomi; Abe, Kayoko; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are associated with cardioembolic stroke mainly because of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms of increased serum BNP levels are hitherto unclear. We aimed to identify the factors associated with increased BNP levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured serum BNP levels in consecutive patients aged 18 years or older. Stroke subtypes were classified using the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Categorical variables included age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease (CAD), AF, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulant therapy. Continuous variables included hemoglobin, creatinine (Cr), β-thromboglobulin, platelet factor 4, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and d-dimer levels. We further determined the relationship between serum BNP and intima-media thickness, left ventricular ejection fraction, size of infarction, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at discharge. Of the 231 patients (mean age, 71 ± 12 years) with acute ischemic stroke (AIS), 36% were women. Serum BNP levels significantly correlated with CAD, AF, Cr, mRS, and cardioembolism (CE) (Dunnett method, P = .004). BNP levels were significantly higher in patients with larger infarcts, higher mRS scores, and higher CHADS2 scores. The levels were higher in patients with larger infarcts, higher mRS scores at discharge, and higher CHADS2 scores among AF patients. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological strategy in acute stroke in children.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Amalia; Limbucci, Nicola; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the preponderance of patterns of pediatric stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, their etiologies and the correct diagnostic protocol for acute management. Forty-one consecutive pediatric patients (age range 5-16 years) with an acute stroke observed in acute phase during a 10-year period, were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-three patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 cases were studied by computed tomography (CT) without MRI, and 15 underwent both CT and MRI studies. In 9 cases, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed after non-invasive preliminary assessment. Seventeen hemorrhagic (41%) and 24 ischemic (59%) strokes were found. Among hemorrhagic forms, 5 cases were due to arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 7 to cavernoma, and 2 to aneurysm. Among ischemic forms, 2 were due to sickle-cell disease, 1 to hyperomocysteinemia, 1 to moyamoya syndrome, 1 to pseudoxantoma elasticum, 3 to prothrombotic state, 1 to Fabry's disease, 1 concomitant with CO intoxication, 5 to venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 to cardio-embolic state. Etiology remains unknown in 8 cases (20.5%). This study shows a moderate prevalence of ischemic over hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, personal experience suggests that MRI is always more informative than CT and in selected cases should be the first-choice examination in the acute phase.

  18. Coffee and acute ischemic stroke onset

    PubMed Central

    Mostofsky, E.; Schlaug, G.; Mukamal, K.J.; Rosamond, W.D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Prior research suggests an acutely elevated risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in the hour after coffee intake. However, the risk of ischemic stroke associated with transient exposure to coffee remains unclear. We hypothesized that caffeine intake is associated with a transiently increased risk of ischemic stroke. Methods: In this multicenter case-crossover study, we interviewed 390 subjects (209 men, 181 women) between January 2001 and November 2006 a median of 3 days after acute ischemic stroke. Each subject's coffee consumption in the hour before stroke symptoms was compared with his or her usual frequency of consumption in the prior year. Results: Of the 390 subjects, 304 (78%) drank coffee in the prior year, 232 within 24 hours and 35 within 1 hour of stroke onset. The relative risk (RR) of stroke in the hour after consuming coffee was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–2.8; p < 0.001). There was no apparent increase in risk in the hour following consumption of caffeinated tea (RR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.4–2.0; p = 0.85) or cola (RR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.4–2.4; p = 0.95). The association between ischemic stroke in the hour after coffee consumption was only apparent among those consuming ≤1 cup per day but not for patients who consumed coffee more regularly (p for trend = 0.002). Relative risks remained similar when the sample was restricted to those who were not simultaneously exposed to other potential triggers and the results remained significant after stratifying by time of day. Conclusion: Coffee consumption transiently increases the risk of ischemic stroke onset, particularly among infrequent drinkers. PMID:20881275

  19. Effect of aphasia on acute stroke outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Marshall, Randolph S; Lazar, Ronald M

    2016-11-29

    To determine the independent effects of aphasia on outcomes during acute stroke admission, controlling for total NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and loss of consciousness. Data from the Tulane Stroke Registry were used from July 2008 to December 2014 for patient demographics, NIHSS scores, length of stay (LOS), complications (sepsis, deep vein thrombosis), and discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Aphasia was defined as a score >1 on question 9 on the NIHSS on admission and hemiparesis as >1 on questions 5 or 6. Among 1,847 patients, 866 (46%) had aphasia on admission. Adjusting for NIHSS score and inpatient complications, those with aphasia had a 1.22 day longer LOS than those without aphasia, whereas those with hemiparesis (n = 1,225) did not have any increased LOS compared to those without hemiparesis. Those with aphasia had greater odds of having a complication (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.93, p = 0.0174) than those without aphasia, which was equivalent to those having hemiparesis (OR 1.47, CI 1.09-1.99, p = 0.0137). Controlling for NIHSS scores, aphasia patients had higher odds of discharge mRS 3-6 (OR 1.42 vs 1.15). Aphasia is independently associated with increased LOS and complications during the acute stroke admission, adding $2.16 billion annually to US acute stroke care. The presence of aphasia was more likely to produce a poor functional outcome than hemiparesis. These data suggest that further research is necessary to determine whether establishing adaptive communication skills can mitigate its consequences in the acute stroke setting. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Promoting thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Maaike; Niessen, Louis W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Koudstaal, Peter J; Franke, Cees L; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijsman, Robbert; Lingsma, Hester F; Minkman, Mirella M N; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-05-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but the number of treatable patients is limited. The PRomoting ACute Thrombolysis in Ischemic StrokE (PRACTISE) trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multidimensional implementation strategy for thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke. The PRACTISE trial was a national multicenter cluster-randomized controlled trial with randomization after pairwise matching. Twelve hospitals, both urban and community, academic and nonacademic, in the Netherlands participated. All patients admitted with stroke within 24 hours from onset of symptoms were registered. The intervention included 5 implementation meetings based on the Breakthrough Series model. The primary outcome was treatment with thrombolysis. Secondary outcomes were admission within 4 hours after onset of symptoms, death or disability at 3 months, and quality of life. Overall 5515 patients were included in the study' 308 patients (12.2%) in the control centers and 393 patients (13.1%) in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis (adjusted OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.68). Among the 1657 patients with ischemic stroke admitted within 4 hours from onset, 391 (44.5%) of 880 in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis and 305 (39.3%) of 777 in the control centers; the adjusted OR for treatment with thrombolysis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.27). An intensive implementation strategy increases the proportion of patients with acute stroke treated with thrombolysis in real-life settings. An apparently pivotal factor in the improvement of the treatment rate is better application of contraindications for thrombolysis.

  1. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  2. Plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Kim, Myung Chun; Lee, Woo In

    2010-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and timely treatment improves the outcome in patients with ischemic stroke, but a rapid and sensitive blood test for ischemic stroke does not exist. This study tested whether a panel of biomarkers might be useful in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. Plasma specimens were assayed for brain natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, S100β, and a proprietary composite multimarker index (MMX). There were 139 patients in this study, 89 of whom were diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke, 11 with acute cerebral hemorrhage, and 39 with other brain disorders. The MMX value was significantly higher in the patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison to 57 healthy controls (p <0.001), but there was no significant difference between the MMX value in patients with acute ischemic stroke vs those with acute cerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.884). The discriminatory capacity of MMX was modest, with an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.714 for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke was not diagnosed by any of the biochemical markers individually. Although the data suggest that MMX may be helpful to diagnose an acute stroke, it does not discriminate between acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke.

  3. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  4. Advanced imaging in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kilburg, Craig; Scott McNally, J; de Havenon, Adam; Taussky, Philipp; Kalani, M Yashar S; Park, Min S

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation and management of acute ischemic stroke has primarily relied on the use of conventional CT and MRI techniques as well as lumen imaging sequences such as CT angiography (CTA) and MR angiography (MRA). Several newer or less-established imaging modalities, including vessel wall MRI, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, and 4D CTA and MRA, are being developed to complement conventional CT and MRI techniques. Vessel wall MRI provides high-resolution analysis of both extracranial and intracranial vasculature to help identify previously occult lesions or characteristics of lesions that may portend a worse natural history. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can be used in the acute setting as a minimally invasive way of identifying large vessel occlusions or monitoring the response to stroke treatment. It can also be used to assist in the workup for cryptogenic stroke or to diagnose a patent foramen ovale. Four-dimensional CTA and MRA provide a less invasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography to determine the extent of the clot burden and the degree of collateral blood flow in large vessel occlusions. Along with technological advances, these new imaging modalities are improving the diagnosis, workup, and management of acute ischemic stroke- roles that will continue to expand in the future.

  5. Mechanical interventions to treat acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Fussell, David; Schumacher, H Christian; Meyers, Philip M; Higashida, Randall T

    2007-01-01

    The approach to stroke therapy has historically been limited due to the existence of relatively few treatment options and the necessity for action within 3 hours of symptom onset. As neuroimaging technology advances, fertile new ground is revealed for novel therapies. Recently, a number of exciting mechanical systems have been developed with potential efficacy even hours after cerebrovascular occlusion: endovascular clot disruption, endovascular clot extraction, and angioplasty with stenting are currently under study, with promising initial results. With more options, each with greater effectiveness in a particular clinical scenario, the physician is now better equipped than ever to treat acute ischemic stroke successfully.

  6. Riboflavin status in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gariballa, S; Ullegaddi, R

    2007-10-01

    There is experimental evidence that riboflavin (vitamin B2) supplementation reduces oxidative damage and cerebral oedema following acute stroke. To measure riboflavin levels in acute stroke before and after supplementation with this vitamin. Ninety-six acute ischaemic stroke patients had their riboflavin status measured at baseline and then randomly assigned to receive 5 mg of oral riboflavin and other B-group vitamins within 12 h of the stroke onset and then daily or no B-vitamins for 14 days. Non-fasting venous blood was obtained at baseline, days 7 and 14 post-randomization for measurement of riboflavin status using erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC). EGRAC is a measure of riboflavin tissue saturation. This assay has the advantage of being extremely stable and sensitive. EGRAC values are inversely proportional to riboflavin status, so that values greater than 1.3 indicate biochemical deficiency. Fifty-one per cent of patients studied were riboflavin deficient at baseline. Fourteen days of riboflavin supplementation significantly improved the measure of B2 status compared with the control group. Seven out of 37 patients in the supplement group (19%) were riboflavin deficient compared with 22 out of 39 patients (56%) in the control group at the end of the treatment period (P=0.035 for the differences in cumulative changes between groups over 2 weeks). A high proportion of acute stroke patients were biochemically deficient of riboflavin immediately post-infarct. Supplementation with 5 mg of riboflavin for 2 weeks significantly improved riboflavin status; however, the clinical significance of these findings is not yet known.

  7. Acute pediatric stroke: contributors to institutional cost.

    PubMed

    Turney, Colin M; Wang, Wei; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies examined the overall cost of pediatric stroke, but there are little data regarding the sources of these costs. We examined an administrative database that collected charges from 24 US children's hospitals to determine the sources of costs for acute hospital care of stroke. We used International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes to search the Pediatric Health Information System. From 2003 to 2009 there were 1667 patients who had a primary diagnosis of stroke, 703 of which were hemorrhagic and 964 were ischemic. Individual costs, excluding physician charges, were gathered under 7 categories that were ranked to determine which contributed the most to total cost. Individual costs were ranked within their categories. We analyzed costs based on stroke type. Total costs were adjusted using the US Consumer Price Index to compare increases with the rate of inflation. Median total cost for any stroke was $19,548 (interquartile range, $10,764-$40,721). The category "other/nursing" contributed the most to hospital costs followed by imaging, laboratory, and pharmacy. Brain MRI and CT contributed the most to imaging costs. Hemorrhagic strokes (median $24,843) were more expensive than ischemic strokes (median $16,954). Total cost increased from 2003 to 2009, but no overall annual trend emerged after controlling for gender, age, race, and hospital. This is the first in-depth analysis of cost for pediatric stroke care. The highest cost categories are potential targets for cost containment but are also crucial for effective diagnosis and treatment. Necessary yet prudent use of imaging technologies and inpatient stays may be strategies for cost containment.

  8. Acute embolic stroke after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiwon

    2006-03-01

    This is the case report of a 44-year-old woman presented with an acute stroke immediately after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The patient had no significant medical history other than chronic depression. She was taking sertraline, and she had had multiple previous ECT treatments without any complications. While being monitored in the recovery room within 10 minutes after the last ECT session, she was found to have sudden onset of left-sided flaccid hemiplegia and numbness along with slurred speech. On arrival to our hospital, she was found to have flaccid hemiplegia on the left side involving the face, arm, and leg (face and arm more than the leg involvement), severe dysarthria, and mild neglect syndrome (National Health Institute Stroke Scale of 14). Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head showed no signs of early ischemia, and iodine contrast CT angiography revealed right middle cerebral artery (MCA) (distal M1 segment) clot. Patient received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen (rt-PA) at 2.5 hours after the onset of symptoms, and then a total of 3.0 mg of intra-arterial (IA) rt-PA. Angiography at the end of the procedure showed successful recanalization of the M1 segment and normal vessel caliber with adequate distal flow. After the procedure, the patient made rapid improvements in all of her initial symptoms during the first 24 hours. An extensive stroke workup failed to reveal any cause of the stroke, including usual stroke and hypercoagulable risk factors. This was an acute embolic stroke immediately following an ECT, and without the aggressive thrombolytic therapy, the patient's outcome would have been poor because there was an M1 segment clot with a major MCA syndrome with relatively high National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. The neurological side effect profile of ECT is reported to be minimal with most common symptoms being headache, disorientation, and memory complaints. There is no clear cause-and-effect relationship in this case

  9. Perfusion computed tomography relative threshold values in definition of acute stroke lesions.

    PubMed

    Maija, Radzina; Gaida, Krumina; Karlis, Kupcs; Evija, Miglane

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new technique that allows fast evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics by providing perfusion maps and gives confirmation of perfusion deficits in ischemic areas. Some controversies exist regarding accuracy of quantitative detection of tissue viability: penumbra (tissue at risk) or core (necrosis). To define brain tissue viability grade on the basis of the perfusion CT parameters in acute stroke patients. A multimodal CT imaging protocol; unenhanced CT of the brain, CT angiography of head and neck blood vessels, followed by brain perfusion CT and 24 h follow-up brain CT was performed. Perfusion deficits were detected first visually, with subsequent manual quantitative and relative measurements in affected and contra-lateral hemisphere in 87 acute stroke patients. Visual perfusion deficit on perfusion CT images was found in 78 cases (38 women, 40 men; mean age, 30-84 years). Penumbra lesions (n = 49) and core lesions (n = 42) were detected by increased mean transit time (MTT) on perfusion CT maps in comparison to contra-lateral hemispheres. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) mean values in the penumbra group were increased in the penumbra group and decreased in the core group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values were decreased in penumbra and markedly decreased in core lesion. Perfusion CT measurements are reliable in estimation of penumbra and core lesions in acute stroke patients, if relative threshold values are used. The most accurate parameter of hypoperfusion is increased MTT above 190%. Relative threshold values for irreversible lesion are CBF <30-40% and CBV <40% in comparison to contra-lateral hemisphere. Penumbra lesion is characterized by MTT increase and CBF decrease, while CBV shows variable values.

  10. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  11. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  12. Gerstmann'S syndrome in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-12-01

    Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia's. Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere.

  13. Imaging in acute ischaemic stroke: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, James; Heran, Manraj K S; McGuinness, Ben; Barber, P Alan

    2017-10-01

    Prompt and accurate diagnosis is the foundation of acute ischaemic stroke care. Multiple positive endovascular thrombectomy trials in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusions have further emphasised this but also added complexity to treatment decisions. CT angiography is now routine for patients who present with an acute stroke syndrome around the world. Members of the neurology and stroke teams (rather than radiologists) are often the first doctors to lay eyes on the CT images and are best equipped to integrate the clinical picture with the imaging findings. A sound understanding of acute stroke imaging is therefore essential for clinicians who work with acute stroke patients. This review describes some pearls we have gleaned from our own experience in acute stroke imaging as well as some potential follies to be avoided. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  15. Role of perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, N

    2013-03-01

    Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and classification of acute stroke, the triage of patients to different treatment approaches and the prediction of the clinical outcome and the risk of hemorrhagic complications. A multimodal imaging protocol that includes a perfusion study allows diagnostics beyond anatomical findings by enabling the characterization of the ischemic brain tissue and the cerebral hemodynamic state. This information potentially leads to more accurate clinical decision making with the intention to select the right patients for different revascularization therapies regardless of fixed time windows. Perfusion imaging enables the detection and quantification of the irreversibly damaged infarct core and the at-risk penumbra. Parameters derived from perfusion studies can serve as surrogate markers for stroke severity and are independent predictors of the clinical outcome and the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications. The validation and standardization of the perfusion methodology is still ongoing. Currently there is emerging but no high level evidence that perfusion imaging improves the clinical outcome or has a direct impact on the decision to treat the patient with intravenous thrombolytic therapy or intra-arterial interventions. Thus, definite guidelines on the role of the perfusion imaging in the context of acute stroke cannot yet be given.

  16. Pregait balance rehabilitation in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, Noel; Zielke, Donna; Keller, Sarah; Burns, Melissa; Sharma, Asha; Krieger, Richard; Aruin, Alexander S

    2013-06-01

    Rehabilitation interventions designed to enhance balance control in individuals with acute stroke are quite limited. The goal was to develop and assess a technique of early pregait balance training involving the use of a combination of force platform visual feedback and the unweighting system in individuals with recent stroke. A total of 28 individuals with acute stroke were randomly divided into the experimental and control groups: individuals included in the experimental group received 1 week of treatment on the basis of retraining balance utilizing visual biofeedback (Balance Master) while provided with a body weight support harness system, whereas the individuals in the control group received conventional treatment. Both the groups undertook identical tests (Fugl-Meyer Balance test, Functional Independence Measure test for gait, and Fugl-Meyer lower extremity assessment) before the start of treatment and after its completion. Individuals in the experimental group showed larger gains as seen in the increased scores of the Fugl-Meyer Balance test and the Functional Independence Measure test for gait as compared with the control group. The outcome of the study provides a basis for future investigations of the applicability of the intervention in early balance rehabilitation of individuals with neurological disorders.

  17. Acute stroke endovascular treatment: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Rajah, Gary B; Shakir, Hakeem J; Davies, Jason M; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2016-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States, responsible for 1 of every 20 deaths. The efficacy of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) alone for recanalization of large-vessel occlusion (LVO) is low. Several randomized trials have now established endovascular treatment of LVO as a standard of care. Endovascular techniques continue to evolve at a rapid pace. This review seeks to report recent advances in endovascular technology, discuss the correlation between speed of reperfusion and patient outcomes, and present mobile stroke care, shortcoming of the recent technology (such as clot fragmentation), and potential solutions to overcome these drawbacks, as well as anesthetic considerations and cost-effectiveness.

  18. Diabetes and poor outcomes within 6 months after acute ischemic stroke: the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qian; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Yan, Yu; Li, Hao; Zhong, Liyong; Liu, Liping; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yongjun

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, controversy exists with regard to the impact of DM on prognosis after ischemic stroke in the Chinese population. We investigated the associations between DM and death, dependency, and stroke recurrence in patients after ischemic stroke onset in a nationwide, prospective registry, the China National Stroke Registry. The China National Stroke Registry consecutively recruited patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke in 2007 to 2008 and who were prospectively followed up for clinical and functional outcomes (death, dependency, and stroke recurrence) at 3 and 6 months after disease onset. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between DM and stroke outcomes after adjusting for potential confounding including age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, glucose level at admission, hypertension, coronary heart disease, smoking, urinary tract infection, and other factors. DM was identified in 3483 (27.0%) of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without DM, patients with DM had a significantly higher incidence of death or dependency and of recurrent stroke at 3 and 6 months after stroke onset. DM was an independent risk factor for death or dependency (adjusted odds ratio=1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.37) in patients with ischemic stroke at 6 months after onset. DM independently predicted poor outcomes in Chinese patients after acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Stent retriever thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke: Indications, results and management in 2015.

    PubMed

    Gory, B; Riva, R; Labeyrie, P E; Turjman, F

    2016-02-01

    The functional benefit of stent retriever thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke has been clearly demonstrated in recent positive MR CLEAN, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, SWIFT PRIME, REVASCAT and THRACE trials. Thrombectomy, in association with intravenous thrombolysis, should now be offered to patients with documented occlusion of the distal internal carotid or proximal middle cerebral arteries, with a relatively normal unenhanced computed tomography (CT), and within 6hours after the onset of symptoms. Thrombectomy results in a mean absolute decrease in handicap of 22% (14 to 31%). Of the 3 up to 8 patients treated, 1 is independent at 3 months according to the initial selection. In case of a contraindication to thrombolysis, early primary thrombectomy should be considered. In acute basilar artery occlusion, thrombectomy should be performed alone or combined with thrombolysis. In an effort to increase the number of patients treated, a very rapid transfer to interventional neuroradiology centers is mandatory. In the future, thrombectomy should be evaluated in patients with distal arterial occlusion, or beyond 6hours after the onset of symptoms, or when the time of symptoms onset is unknown.

  20. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

  1. [Cerebrolysin in treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B

    1995-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is composed of low molecular peptides and free amino-acids and as a nootropic drug it administered in various diseases of central nervous system. In an open clinical trial patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the region of the middle cerebral artery, were treated. Cerebrolysin was administered as intravenous infusion in daily dose of 15 ml during 21 days. Recovery in 10 patients and improvement in 3 was obtained and only one patient died. The results were compared to the large group of 108 patients treated earlier with other drugs. Therapeutic effect was similar in all groups.

  2. Gallbladder torsion resulting in gangrenous cholecystitis within a parastomal hernia: Findings on unenhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Jessica K.; Dym, R. Joshua; Sas, Norman; Rozenblit, Alla M.

    2013-01-01

    Gallbladder torsion is a rare cause of acute gangrenous cholecystitis; its occurrence within an abdominal hernia has not been previously reported. We present such a case occurring within a parastomal hernia and imaged with unenhanced CT. PMID:24421934

  3. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  4. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  5. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  6. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  7. Endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: dissecting the evidence.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Krogias, Christos; Arthur, Adam S; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability and intravenous thrombolysis has been the only approved acute reperfusion therapy (RT) for many years. Seven randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) have been recently published. These studies have changed the treatment paradigm by establishing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) as the most effective acute stroke therapy for improving functional outcome in anterior circulation ELVO with a NNT of 6. The present review will critically evaluate the results of these RCTs and of the existing meta-analyses investigating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy for AIS. Points of debate such as acute stroke imaging, posterior circulation stroke and general anesthesia will be addressed. We will also discuss health policies aiming to increase the availability of endovascular treatment for stroke patients.

  8. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  10. Acute management of stroke in Iran: Obstacles and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shahjouei, Shima; Bavarsad-Shahripour, Reza; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrpour, Masoud; Zamani, Babak; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Alexandrov, Andrei; Alexandrov, Anne; Zand, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke is among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability in the world. Iran is located in the stroke belt and has a high age-adjusted stroke incidence rate. In this multistep prospective qualitative study, we aimed at investigating the status and challenges of stroke management in Iran and explore possible solutions. Methods: In the first and second phase, we attempted to define the status of stroke management in Iran by searching the relevant literature and conducting semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in thirteen hospitals located in seven large cities in Iran. In the third phase, we tried to recommend possible solutions based on international standards and experience, as well as interviews with stroke experts in Iran and the United States. Results: Little public awareness of stroke symptoms and its urgency, low prioritization for stroke management, and an inadequate number of stroke-ready hospitals are some of the major obstacles toward timely treatment of stroke in Iran. Every hospital in our pool except two hospitals had guideline-based algorithms for the administration of intravenous thrombolysis. However, there was no single call activation system for stroke alert. Data from some of the centers showed that hospital arrival of stroke patients to final decision-making took 116-160 minutes. Although there were four endovascular programs in our target areas, there was no center with 24-hour coverage. Conclusion: There are many challenges as well as potentials for improvement of stroke care in Iran. Improving public knowledge of stroke and establishing an organized and comprehensive stroke program in the hospitals will improve acute stroke management in Iran. The Iranian ministry of health should define and advocate the establishment of stroke centers, track the rate of death and disability from stroke, introduce pathways to improve the quality of stroke care through national data monitoring systems, and eliminate

  11. The use of telemedicine in the management of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark N; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, including acute ischemic stroke, remains a major public health problem in the US and throughout the world. There has been a concerted effort to apply evidence-based practices to stroke care to improve primary and secondary prevention as well as poststroke outcomes. Geography and workforce shortages contribute to a disparity in stroke care, however, among the substantial proportion of the US population that lives outside the reach of an acute stroke-ready hospital or a primary or comprehensive stroke center. In an attempt to combat the rural-to-urban disparity and expand the availability of best stroke practices, Levine and Gorman proposed the development of telemedical outreach for acute stroke evaluation and management, which they called "telestroke." Since then, the practice of telestroke has been found to have a high interrater agreement with a bedside assessment of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, to enhance correct thrombolysis decision making as compared with telephone-only consultation, and to be cost-effective. In light of these findings and the perception of benefit by acute stroke providers and patients, there has been growing interest in and a rapid expansion of telestroke networks in the US and internationally. There are legal and financial barriers to more widespread use of telemedicine in general, including telestroke. Further research is needed to understand the potential merits of telestroke infrastructure for the many phases of stroke care including poststroke hospitalization, prevention of complications, enhancing secondary prevention, and education of patients and providers.

  12. Acute stroke care at rural hospitals in Idaho: challenges in expediting stroke care.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, James G; Norris, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Thrombolytics are currently the most effective treatment for stroke. However, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke criteria for initiation of thrombolytic therapy, most notably the 3-hour time limit from symptom onset, have proven challenging for many rural hospitals to achieve. To provide a snapshot of stroke care at rural hospitals in Idaho and to investigate the experiences of these hospitals in expediting stroke care. Using a standard questionnaire, a telephone survey of hospital staff at 21 rural hospitals in Idaho was performed. The survey focused on acute stroke care practices and strategies to expedite stroke care. The median number of stroke patients treated per year was 23.3. Patient delays were reported by 77.8% of hospitals, transport delays by 66.7%, in-hospital delays by 61.1%, equipment delays by 22.2%, and ancillary services delays by 61.1%. Approximately 67% of hospitals had implemented a clinical pathway for stroke and 80.0% had provided staff with stroke-specific training. No hospitals surveyed had a designated stroke team, and only 33.3% reported engaging in quality improvement efforts to expedite stroke care. Thrombolytics (tPA) were available and indicated for stroke at 55.6% of the hospitals surveyed. Rural hospitals in Idaho face many difficult challenges as they endeavor to meet the 3-hour deadline for thrombolytic therapy, including limited resources and experience in acute stroke care, and many different types of prehospital and in-hospital delays.

  13. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  14. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States.

  15. Relationship between QT Interval Dispersion in acute stroke and stroke prognosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Yitzchok S.; Balucani, Clotilde; Lazar, Jason; Steinberg, Leah; Gugger, James; Levine, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background QT dispersion (QTd) has been proposed as an indirect ECG measure of heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization. The predictive value of QTd in acute stroke remains controversial. We aimed to clarify the relationship between QTd and acute stroke and stroke prognosis. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using pre-specified medical subjects heading (MeSH) terms, Boolean logic and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Eligible studies (a) included ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and (b) provided QTd measurements. Results Two independent reviewers identified 553 publications. Sixteen articles were included in the final analysis. There were a total of 888 stroke patients: 59% ischemic and 41% hemorrhagic. There was considerable heterogeneity in study design, stroke subtypes, ECG assessment-time, control groups and comparison groups. Nine studies reported a significant association between acute stroke and baseline QTd. Two studies reported that QTd increases are specifically related to hemorrhagic strokes, involvement of the insular cortex, right-side lesions, larger strokes, and increases in 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol in hemorrhagic stroke. Three studies reported QTd to be an independent predictor of stroke mortality. One study each reported increases in QTd in stroke patients who developed ventricular arrhythmias and cardiorespiratory compromise. Conclusions There are few well-designed studies and considerable variability in study design in addressing the significance of QTd in acute stroke. Available data suggest that stroke is likely to be associated with increased QTd. While some evidence suggests a possible prognostic role of QTd in stroke, larger and well-designed studies need to confirm these findings. PMID:25282188

  16. Successful thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke in haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Power, Albert; Moser, Steven; Duncan, Neill

    2010-12-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity in survivors. Early thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke has been shown to dramatically improve patient outcomes. Although the age-adjusted incidence of stroke is 5-10 times greater in haemodialysis patients, the use of thrombolysis for this indication in this group of patients has not been described to date. We present a case where alteplase was used successfully for acute ischaemic stroke in a patient established on maintenance haemodialysis in the setting of an international randomized controlled trial and advocate caution with the use of systemic thrombolytics despite the favourable outcome seen with this case.

  17. Nutritional status in acute stroke: undernutrition versus overnutrition in different stroke subtypes.

    PubMed

    Choi-Kwon, S; Yang, Y H; Kim, E K; Jeon, M Y; Kim, J S

    1998-09-01

    Nutritional status in the acute stage of stroke has not been properly evaluated in different stroke subtypes. The objective of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of different subtypes of stroke patients. We studied 88 female patients with first-ever strokes. Strokes were divided into cerebral infarction (CI, n=67) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, n=21). We measured the nutritional status of the patients in the acute stage of stroke with the use of 8 parameters including 3 biochemical and 5 anthropometric ones. These variables were assessed in stroke patients and 120 age-matched controls, and were compared with each other. In the acute stage of stroke, undernourishment was significantly (P=0.000) more prevalent in the ICH group (62%) than in the CI group (25%) or controls (13%). On the other hand obesity was present in 10%, 24% and 17% in patients with ICH, those with CI, and controls, respectively, which was not significantly different (P=0.461). Only abdominal skinfold thickness was significantly greater in patients with CI than in those with ICH or controls. Conclusions - Our results illustrate that undernourishment is prevalent in acute stroke patients, significantly more so in patients with ICH than in those with CI. Stroke patients, especially those with ICH, should receive special nutritional intervention starting immediately after admission.

  18. The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke (DIAS) clinical trial program.

    PubMed

    von Kummer, Rüdiger; Albers, Gregory W; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Desmoteplase is a novel, highly fibrin-specific thrombolytic agent in phase III of clinical development. In comparison to alteplase, it has high fibrin selectivity, is associated with minimal or no neurotoxicity, and has no apparent negative effect on the blood-brain barrier. The safety and efficacy of desmoteplase is being studied in the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program. Three studies (Dose Escalation Study of Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-2) have been completed, two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials are ongoing at >200 sites worldwide (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-3 and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-4, n = 800; DIAS-3 and DIAS-4), and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation phase II trial is ongoing in Japan (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Japan, n = 48; DIAS-J). The objective of DIAS-3 and DIAS-4 is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single IV bolus injection of 90 μg/kg desmoteplase given three- to nine-hours after onset of ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 4-24, age 18-85 years). The objective of DIAS-J is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase 70 and 90 μg/kg three- to nine-hours after ischemic stroke onset in Japanese patients. Patients are included with occlusion or high-grade stenosis (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0-1) in proximal cerebral arteries on magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography but excluded with extended ischemic edema on computed tomography or diffusion-weighted imaging. Desmoteplase is the only thrombolytic agent in late-stage development for acute ischemic stroke that is now tested in patients with proven stroke pathology. The results of the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program will show whether patients with major artery occlusions

  19. Experimental acute thrombotic stroke in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Del Zoppo, G.J.; Copeland, B.R.; Harker, L.A.; Waltz, T.A.; Zyroff, J.; Hanson, S.R.; Battenberg, E.

    1986-11-01

    To study the effects of antithrombotic therapy in experimental stroke, we have characterized a baboon model of acute cerebrovascular thrombosis. In this model an inflatable silastic balloon cuff has been implanted by transorbital approach around the right middle cerebral artery (MCA), proximal to the take-off of the lenticulostriate arteries (LSA). Inflation of the balloon for 3 hours in six animals produced a stereotypic sustained stroke syndrome characterized by contralateral hemiparesis. An infarction volume of 3.2 +/- 1.5 cm3 in the ipsilateral corpus striatum was documented by computerized tomographic (CT) scanning at 10 days following stroke induction and 3.9 +/- 1.9 cm3 (n = 4) at 14 days by morphometric neuropathologic determinations of brain specimens fixed in situ by pressure-perfusion with 10% buffered formalin. Immediate pressure-perfusion fixation following deflation of the balloon was performed in 16 additional animals given Evans blue dye intravenously prior to the 3 hour MCA balloon occlusion. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy consistently confirmed the presence of thrombotic material occluding microcirculatory branches of the right LSA in the region of Evans blue stain, but not those of the contralateral corpus striatum. When autologous 111In-platelets were infused intravenously in four animals from the above group prior to the transient 3 hour occlusion of the right MCA, gamma scintillation camera imaging of each perfused-fixed whole brain demonstrated the presence of a single residual focus of 111In-platelet activity involving only the Evans blue-stained right corpus striatum. Focal right hemispheric activity was equivalent to 0.55 +/- 0.49 ml of whole blood, and the occlusion score derived from histologic examination of the microcirculation of the Evans blue-stained corpus striatum averaged 34.8 +/- 2.8.

  20. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  1. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Elevated admission blood pressure and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke: the Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Logallo, Nicola; Oygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Transient elevated blood pressure (BP) is frequent in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The pathophysiology of this response is not clear and its effect on clinical outcome has shown contradictory results. Some studies have suggested that BP elevation may represent a protective response to enhance perfusion in ischemic brain tissue. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between elevated admission BP and stroke severity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. If it is true that elevated BP represents a protective response in acute ischemia, we expected an inverse association between elevated BP and admission stroke severity, and a positive association between elevated BP and complete neurological recovery within 24 h and/or favorable short-term outcome. Patients with ischemic stroke with hospital admission <6 h after symptom onset were prospectively included in a stroke registry (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). BP was measured immediately after admission in all patients. Elevated BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess stroke severity upon admission. Mild stroke was defined as NIHSS score <8, moderate stroke as NIHSS score 8-14, and severe stroke as NIHSS score ≥15. Complete neurological recovery (CNR) was defined as no persistent ischemic stroke symptoms at 24 h after admission. Favorable short-term outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at day 7. A total of 749 patients with ischemic stroke were included, of which 621 patients (82.9%) presented with elevated BP. Elevated BP was independently associated with mild stroke (odds ratio, OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.39-3.24; p < 0.001), whereas lack of elevated BP was independently associated with severe stroke (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p < 0.001). There was a nonsignificant association between elevated BP and CNR (OR: 2.11; 95% CI: 0.96-4.68; p = 0.063), yet no association

  3. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  4. Development of an emergency department response to acute stroke ("Code Stroke").

    PubMed

    Leira, Enrique C; Ahmed, Azeemuddin

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing delays is a crucial step in improving outcomes with acute stroke therapies whose efficacy is clearly time dependent. Logistic and human barriers to rapid stroke care can be overcome with a systematic "Code Stroke" approach provided by a structured multidisciplinary acute stroke response team. Such teams should include Emergency Medical Services providers, neurologists, neurosurgeons, diagnostic radiologists, nurses, radiology technicians, laboratory personnel, hospital administrators, and emergency medicine, intensive care, and neurointerventional physicians. An acute stroke team improves treatment practices and provides a gratifying experience for patients, families, and referring physicians. On the other hand, maintaining proficiency of the team's operation is time consuming and personally onerous for team responders. Successful maintenance requires strong departmental and institutional commitment.

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  6. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95% CI 20.13-41.08, P < 0.00001). There was no obvious risk of publication bias in the meta-analysis. This meta-analysis supports that serum uric acid level has a protective effect on neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  8. Pharmaceutical sponsorship bias influences thrombolytic literature in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2011-11-01

    The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in emergency medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85%) disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Ryan Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in emergency medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85%) disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:22224134

  10. Neuroprotection in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajan A G; McMullen, Paul W

    Neuroprotection remains one of the holy grails of acute ischemic stroke therapy. The ability to protect the ischemic brain from injury until reperfusion and then to protect the brain from reperfusion injury could theoretically improve freedom from disability among stroke survivors. This manuscript reviews the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of stroke and summarizes pharmacologic and other therapies that showed promise in pre-clinical testing as neuroprotection agents. However to date, no compelling efficacy data have been published regarding any pharmacologic or other therapies. Nonetheless the search for effective neuroprotection continues at stroke centers throughout the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  12. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  13. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  14. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  15. The identification of acute stroke: an analysis of emergency calls.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie P; Carter, Bernie; Ford, Gary A; Gibson, Josephine M E; Leathley, Michael J; McAdam, Joanna J; O'Donnell, Mark; Punekar, Shuja; Quinn, Tom; Watkins, Caroline L

    2013-08-01

    Accurate dispatch of emergency medical services at the onset of acute stroke is vital in expediting assessment and treatment. We examined the relationship between callers' description of potential stroke symptoms to the emergency medical dispatcher and the subsequent classification and prioritisation of emergency medical services response. To identify key 'indicator' words used by people making emergency calls for suspected stroke, comparing these with the subsequent category of response given by the emergency medical dispatcher. A retrospective chart review (hospital and emergency medical services) in North West England (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) identified digitally recorded emergency medical services calls, which related to patients who had a diagnosis of suspected stroke at some point on the stroke pathway (from the emergency medical services call taker through to final medical diagnosis). Using content analysis, words used to describe stroke by the caller were recorded. A second researcher independently followed the same procedure in order to produce a list of 'indicator' words. Description of stroke-specific and nonstroke-specific problems reported by the caller was compared with subsequent emergency medical services dispatch coding and demographic features. Six hundred forty-three calls were made to emergency medical services of which 592 (92%) had complete emergency medical services and hospital data. The majority of callers were female (67%) and family members (55%). The most frequently reported problems first said by callers to the emergency medical dispatcher were collapse or fall (26%) and stroke (25%). Callers who identified that the patient was having a stroke were correct in 89% of cases. Calls were dispatched as stroke in 45% of cases, of which 83% had confirmed stroke. Of the first reported problems, Face Arm Speech Test stroke symptoms were mentioned in less than 5% of calls, with speech problems being the most common symptom. No

  16. Collateral lessons from recent acute ischemic stroke trials.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S

    2014-05-01

    Numerous acute ischemic stroke trials have recently published detailed results, providing an opportunity to consider the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology and their influential effect on patient outcomes. Safety and Efficacy of NeuroFlo Technology in Ischemic Stroke (SENTIS), the largest randomized controlled trial of device therapy to date, tested the potential augmentation of collateral perfusion. SYNTHESIS Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III chronicled the saga of endovascular therapy trialed against medical treatment for acute ischemic stroke. These recent randomized studies, however, largely neglect current device technology available for endovascular therapy as advanced by the TREVO2 and SOLITAIRE™(TM) FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT) studies. Such exhaustive efforts in recent trials have failed to introduce a new treatment for stroke that unequivocally improves patient outcomes. Collateral perfusion is widely recognized to vary across individuals in any population and exerts a dramatic effect on baseline variables including the time course of ischemic injury, stroke severity, imaging findings, and therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, collaterals have been recognized to influence recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and subsequent neurological outcomes after stroke. Collateral lessons may be gleaned from these trials, to expand consideration of overall study results and perhaps most importantly, alter ongoing and new trials in development. Detailed analyses of available information on collaterals from these trials demonstrate that collaterals may be more influential than the choice of treatment modality or intervention.

  17. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  18. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  19. Vertebral artery stump syndrome in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Yonehara, Toshiro

    2013-01-15

    Although the carotid artery stump as an embolic source for ischemic stroke has been well described, there have been few systematic reports of a similar syndrome in the posterior circulation (PC) after vertebral artery (VA) origin occlusion. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and characteristics of acute ischemic stroke with VA stump syndrome. Of 3463 consecutive patients who were admitted within 7 days after onset, 865 patients with acute ischemic stroke in the PC were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria of VA stump syndrome included: (1) acute ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation; (2) the VA origin occlusion identified on MRA, duplex ultrasound, CT angiography, and/or conventional angiography; (3) presence of distal antegrade flow in the ipsilateral VA; and (4) absence of other causes of ischemic stroke. Of the 865 patients with PC stroke, 12 (1.4%) were diagnosed as having VA stump syndrome. The ischemic lesions included the cerebellum in all patients. Nine patients had multiple ischemic lesions in the brain stem, thalamus, or posterior lobe other than cerebellum. On duplex ultrasound, a to-and-fro flow pattern was observed in the culprit VA in 10 patients. Three patients had recurrences of ischemic stroke in the PC during the acute phase. VA stump syndrome was not a rare mechanism of PC stroke, and there was a high rate of stroke recurrence during the acute phase. Vascular assessment by a multimodality approach can be used to promptly detect VA stump syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of acute stroke: what is the most effective strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Dunbabin, D. W.; Sandercock, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques of investigation of acute stroke syndromes have progressed rapidly in recent years, outpacing developments in effective stroke treatment. The clinician is thus faced with a variety of tests, each with different cost implications and each altering management to a greater or lesser extent. This review will concentrate on the basic tests which should be performed for all strokes (full blood count, ESR, biochemical screen, blood glucose, cholesterol, syphilis serology, chest X-ray and electrocardiogram). Additional tests may be required in selected cases: CT scan to diagnose 'non-stroke' lesions, to exclude cerebral haemorrhage if anti-haemostatic therapy is planned, and to detect strokes which may require emergency intervention (such as cerebellar stroke with hydrocephalus); echocardiography to detect cardiac sources of emboli; and in a few cases lumbar puncture and specialized haematological tests. Other tests, which are currently research tools, may be suitable for widespread use in the future including NMR, SPECT and PET scanning. PMID:2062773

  1. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-jun; Zhu, Ding-liang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hai-ya; Ji, Kai-da; Lu, Yi-ming; Gao, Ping-jin

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that a mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) occurs after acute cerebrovascular diseases, we evaluated the number of EPCs in the process of acute stroke. A total of 203 individuals were examined, including 100 patients with ischemic strokes, 36 patients with hemorrhagic strokes and 67 healthy controls. Ninety-eight patients were observed at days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after acute stroke. Circulating EPCs were defined by the surface markers CD133/KDR and analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were determined by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry using the N high sensitivity CRP Reagent. Patients with acute stroke had lower numbers of EPCs (0.037+/-0.001/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) vs. 0.06+/-0.002/100 PMNCs, P<0.05) and higher levels of serum hs-CRP (1.99 vs. 0.03 mg per 100 ml, P<0.05) than control subjects after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. There were no differences in EPCs counts or serum hs-CRP levels between patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In univariate analyses, BMI, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (T-cho), blood glucose and hs-CRP (P<0.001) were inversely correlated with EPCs counts. Multivariate analyses showed SBP and total cholesterol as independent predictors of EPCs levels. The number of EPCs gradually increased at day 7 after acute onset, remained elevated at day 14; and returned to baseline by day 28. Our results suggest a possible contribution of circulating EPCs in acute stroke. SBP and total cholesterol are independent factors of reduced EPCs numbers. A transient early increment of EPCs may result from the mobilization of EPCs in response to stroke stress.

  2. Acute single channel EEG predictors of cognitive function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Anna; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Johnstone, Stuart J; Middleton, Sandy; Wilson, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Early and accurate identification of factors that predict post-stroke cognitive outcome is important to set realistic targets for rehabilitation and to guide patients and their families accordingly. However, behavioral measures of cognition are difficult to obtain in the acute phase of recovery due to clinical factors (e.g. fatigue) and functional barriers (e.g. language deficits). The aim of the current study was to test whether single channel wireless EEG data obtained acutely following stroke could predict longer-term cognitive function. Resting state Relative Power (RP) of delta, theta, alpha, beta, delta/alpha ratio (DAR), and delta/theta ratio (DTR) were obtained from a single electrode over FP1 in 24 participants within 72 hours of a first-ever stroke. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was administered at 90-days post-stroke. Correlation and regression analyses were completed to identify relationships between 90-day cognitive function and electrophysiological data, neurological status, and demographic characteristics at admission. Four acute qEEG indices demonstrated moderate to high correlations with 90-day MoCA scores: DTR (r = -0.57, p = 0.01), RP theta (r = 0.50, p = 0.01), RP delta (r = -0.47, p = 0.02), and DAR (r = -0.45, p = 0.03). Acute DTR (b = -0.36, p < 0.05) and stroke severity on admission (b = -0.63, p < 0.01) were the best linear combination of predictors of MoCA scores 90-days post-stroke, accounting for 75% of variance. Data generated by a single pre-frontal electrode support the prognostic value of acute DAR, and identify DTR as a potential marker of post-stroke cognitive outcome. Use of single channel recording in an acute clinical setting may provide an efficient and valid predictor of cognitive function after stroke.

  3. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries.

  4. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and underlying disorders.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Okada, Yasushi; Jinnouchi, Juro; Gotoh, Seiji; Yokoyama, Yoko; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Ibayashi, Setsuro

    2006-01-01

    The Acute Candesartan Cilexetil Therapy in Stroke Survivors (ACCESS) study indicated that early treatment with an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker in acute stroke patients who had relatively high blood pressure improved cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the chronic stage. To better interpret the findings of this study, we determined whether stroke patients with high acute blood pressure had specific underlying conditions. We divided 712 consecutive patients who were hospitalized within 48 h after the onset of brain infarction into two groups: 77 patients with high acute blood pressure that met the criteria of the ACCESS study and the 635 remaining patients. Underlying risk factors and comorbidities, stroke characteristics, as well as mortality, vascular events, and disability at 3 weeks were compared between the two groups. Patients with high acute blood pressure more frequently had diabetes mellitus (p < 0.01), intracranial arterial stenosis (p < 0.02), higher levels of hemoglobin A1c (p < 0.005), higher creatinine levels (p < 0.005), and tended to more frequently have ischemic heart disease (p < 0.09) and infarcts <1.5 cm in diameter (p < 0.09) than the other patients. On multivariate analysis, high levels of hemoglobin A1c, high creatinine levels, and intracranial arterial stenosis were independently predictive of high acute blood pressure. At 3 weeks after the stroke onset, patients with high acute blood pressure were more dependent in their daily living activities (p < 0.02) and more frequently developed vascular events or death (p < 0.005) than the other patients. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and advanced renal damage appeared to correlate with acute hypertension after stroke. Since intracranial arterial stenosis also seemed to contribute to high acute blood pressure, one should be careful not to induce cerebral hypoperfusion by the early use of antihypertensives. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Predictors of Acute, Rehabilitation and Total Length of Stay in Acute Stroke: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Sien; Tan, Kristin Hx; Chen, Cynthia; Senolos, Gilmore C; Chew, Effie; Koh, Gerald Ch

    2016-09-01

    The poststroke acute and rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) are key markers of stroke care efficiency. This study aimed to describe the characteristics and identify the predictors of poststroke acute, rehabilitation and total LOS. This study also defined a subgroup of patients as "short" LOS and compared its complication rates and functional outcomes in rehabilitation with a "long" acute LOS group. A prospective cohort study (n = 1277) was conducted in a dedicated rehabilitation unit within a tertiary academic acute hospital over a 5-year period between 2004 and 2009. The functional independence measure (FIM) was the primary functional outcome measure in the rehabilitation phase. A group with an acute LOS of less than 7 days was defined as "short" acute LOS. Ischaemic strokes comprised 1019 (80%) of the cohort while the rest were haemorrhagic strokes. The mean acute and rehabilitation LOS were 9 ± 7 days and 18 ± 10 days, respectively. Haemorrhagic strokes and anterior circulation infarcts had significantly longer acute, rehabilitation and total LOS compared to posterior circulation and lacunar infarcts. The acute, rehabilitation and total LOS were significantly shorter for stroke admissions after 2007. There was poor correlation (r = 0.12) between the acute and rehabilitation LOS. In multivariate analyses, stroke type was strongly associated with acute LOS, while rehabilitation admission FIM scores were significantly associated with rehabilitation LOS. Patients in the short acute LOS group had fewer medical complications and similar FIM efficacies compared to the longer acute LOS group. Consideration for stroke type and initial functional status will facilitate programme planning that has a better estimation of the LOS duration, allowing for more equitable resource distribution across the inpatient stroke continuum. We advocate earlier transfers of appropriate patients to rehabilitation units as this ensures rehabilitation efficacy is maintained while the

  6. Trends in admission blood pressure and stroke outcome in patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack in a National Acute Stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Koton, Silvia; Eizenberg, Yoav; Tanne, David; Grossman, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is common during an acute stroke and is associated with unfavorable outcome. Management of hypertension has improved in recent years. We aimed to evaluate trends in admission BP levels in patients admitted with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) over the past decade. Data were based on the National Acute Stroke Israeli Registry. The study population comprised 6177 patients, aged at least 18 years admitted for acute stroke (4382 ischemic stroke and 476 intracerebral hemorrhage) or TIA (1227) and had data on BP levels on admission. We studied temporal trends in admission BP and preadmission antihypertensive therapy from 2004 to 2010. Admission SBP (mean ± SD) in patients with acute stroke decreased from 161 ± 29 mmHg in 2004 to 153 ± 28 mmHg in 2010 (P < 0.001). Similar trends were observed for patients with TIA. The use of three or more antihypertensive agents before stroke onset increased from 16.9% in 2004 to 20.0% in 2010 (P = 0.02). In patients with acute stroke, higher admission SBP was associated with increased stroke severity (P < 0.001). Rate of disability at discharge or in-hospital death decreased from 71.3% in 2004 to 64.8% in 2010 (P < 0.0001). Admission SBP was associated with disability at discharge or in-hospital death with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08) per 10 mmHg change in SBP. Admission SBP in patients with acute stroke and TIA decreased from 2004 to 2010 and may have contributed to the improved outcome in these patients.

  7. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Combination of acute stroke unit and short-term stroke ward with early supported discharge decreases mortality and complications after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Suwanwela, Nijasri Charnnarong; Eusattasak, Nattapong; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Piravej, Krisna; Locharoenkul, Chaichon

    2007-06-01

    The stroke unit has been established as a standard care for stroke. However, it has not been widely established in developing countries due to the lack of understanding and limited resources. To compare the complications and mortality of stroke patients admitted in the stroke unit and short-term ward with those admitted in the general medical ward. The authors prospectively collected data of acute stroke patients who were admitted after the set up of the stroke unit and stroke short-term ward in 2003, and compared with the data of those who were admitted in a general medical ward in 2001. All acute stroke patients who presented within seven days of the onset were admitted and those who had final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were studied. Patients in the stroke unit were taken care of by a multidisciplinary team approach under clinical guidelines and a care map. The short-term ward is a part of the general medical ward and stroke patients were treated by a multidisciplinary team followed by homecare treatment. The endpoints were mortality rate, neurological and medical complications during admissions, and the mean length of stay. Seven hundred and ninety-four patients were studied. Three hundred and eighty-seven patients were admitted in 2001 and 407 patients in 2003. Among patients presented 2003, three hundred and one cases were treated in the acute stroke unit whereas 106 were admitted in the short-term ward. There was no difference in stroke risk factors and stroke subtypes between the two groups, except for dyslipidemia and cigarette smoking, which were more prevalent in patients admitted in 2003. Patients in the stroke unit and the short-term ward had significantly less mortality than those in the general medical ward (8.9 and 2.1%). Overall complications in the stroke unit and the short-term ward were 16.8%, compared to 26% of those admitted into the general medical ward. Significantly less brain edema, hemorrhagic

  9. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Validation of a dysphagia screening tool in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Edmiaston, Jeff; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Loehr, Lynda; Nassief, Abdullah

    2010-07-01

    Although many dysphagia screening tools exist, none has high sensitivity and reliability or can be administered quickly with minimal training. To design and validate a swallowing screening tool to be used by health care professionals who are not speech language pathologists to identify dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. In a prospective study of 300 patients admitted to the stroke service at an urban tertiary care hospital, interrater and test-retest reliabilities of a new tool (the Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen) were established. The tool was administered by nursing staff when patients were admitted to the stroke unit. A speech language pathologist blinded to the results with the new tool administered the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability, a clinical bedside evaluation, with dysphagia operationally defined by a score less than 178. The mean time from admission to screening with the new tool was 8 hours. The mean time between administration of the new tool and the clinical bedside evaluation was 32 hours. For the new tool, interrater reliability was 93.6% and test-retest reliability was 92.5%. The new tool had a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 74% for detecting dysphagia and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 68% for detecting aspiration risk. The Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen is an easily administered and reliable tool that has sufficient sensitivity to detect both dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients.

  11. Validation of a Dysphagia Screening Tool in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmiaston, Jeff; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Loehr, Lynda; Nassief, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Background Although many dysphagia screening tools exist, none has high sensitivity and reliability or can be administered quickly with minimal training. Objective To design and validate a swallowing screening tool to be used by health care professionals who are not speech language pathologists to identify dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. Methods In a prospective study of 300 patients admitted to the stroke service at an urban tertiary care hospital, interrater and test-retest reliabilities of a new tool (the Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen) were established. The tool was administered by nursing staff when patients were admitted to the stroke unit. A speech language pathologist blinded to the results with the new tool administered the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability, a clinical bedside evaluation, with dysphagia operationally defined by a score less than 178. Results The mean time from admission to screening with the new tool was 8 hours. The mean time between administration of the new tool and the clinical bedside evaluation was 32 hours. For the new tool, interrater reliability was 93.6% and test-retest reliability was 92.5%. The new tool had a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 74% for detecting dysphagia and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 68% for detecting aspiration risk. Conclusions The Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screen is an easily administered and reliable tool that has sufficient sensitivity to detect both dysphagia and aspiration risk in acute stroke patients. PMID:19875722

  12. THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY FOR ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE BEYOND THREE HOURS

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Keim, Samuel M.; Milne, William Kenneth; Meurer, William J.; Barsan, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke within 3 h of symptom onset of highly select patients has been advocated by some groups since 1995, but trials have yielded inconsistent outcomes. One recent trial demonstrated significant improvement when the therapeutic window was extended to 4.5 h. Clinical Question Does the intravenous systemic administration of tPA within 4.5 h to select patients with acute ischemic stroke improve functional outcomes? Evidence Review All randomized controlled trials enrolling patients within 4.5 h were identified, in addition to a meta-analysis of these trial data. Results The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study III (ECASS III) clinical trials demonstrated significantly improved outcomes at 3 months, with increased rates of intracranial hemorrhage, whereas ECASS II and the Acute Noninterventional Therapy in Ischemic Stroke (ATLANTIS) study showed increased hemorrhagic complications without improving outcomes. Meta-analysis of trial data from all ECASS trials, NINDS, and ATLANTIS suggest that thrombolysis within 4.5 h improves functional outcomes. Conclusion Ischemic stroke tPA treatment within 4.5 h seems to improve functional outcomes and increases symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rates without significantly increas ing mortality. PMID:20576390

  13. Imaging biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke trials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harston, G W J; Rane, N; Shaya, G; Thandeswaran, S; Cellerini, M; Sheerin, F; Kennedy, J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke. However, this approach of routinely using imaging biomarkers to inform treatment decisions has yet to be translated into successful randomized trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review the use of imaging biomarkers in randomized controlled trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke, exploring the purposes for which the imaging biomarkers were used. We performed a systematic review of imaging biomarkers used in randomized controlled trials of acute ischemic stroke, in which a therapeutic intervention was trialed within 48 hours of symptom onset. Data bases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, strokecenter.org, and the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (1995-2014). Eighty-four studies met the criteria, of which 49 used imaging to select patients; 31, for subgroup analysis; and 49, as an outcome measure. Imaging biomarkers were broadly used for 8 purposes. There was marked heterogeneity in the definitions and uses of imaging biomarkers and significant publication bias among post hoc analyses. Imaging biomarkers offer the opportunity to refine the trial cohort by minimizing participant variation, to decrease sample size, and to personalize treatment approaches for those who stand to benefit most. However, within imaging modalities, there has been little consistency between stroke trials. Greater effort to prospectively use consistent imaging biomarkers should help improve the development of novel treatment strategies in acute stroke and improve comparison between studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. [Technical standards for the interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and its treatment is still a major challenge. For more than a decade, various mechanical devices have been developed for the recanalization of proximal artery occlusions in acute ischemic stroke but most of them have been approved for clinical use, only on the basis of uncontrolled case series. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-specific plasminogen activator administered (iv rtPA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset is so far the only approved medicinal treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction. With the introduction of stent retrievers, mechanical thrombectomy has demonstrated substantial rates of partial or complete arterial recanalization and improved outcomes compared with iv rtPA and best medical treatment alone in multiple randomized clinical trials in select patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal artery occlusions. This review discusses the evolution of endovascular stroke therapy followed by a discussion of the current technical standards of mechanical thrombectomy that have to be considered during endovascular stroke therapy and the updated treatment recommendations of the ESO Karolinska stroke update.

  15. Management of acute ischaemic stroke in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Subic, A; Cermakova, P; Norrving, B; Winblad, B; von Euler, M; Kramberger, M G; Eriksdotter, M; Garcia-Ptacek, S

    2017-04-01

    An estimated 10% of stroke patients have an underlying dementia. As a consequence, health professionals often face the challenge of managing patients with dementia presenting with an acute stroke. Patients with dementia are less likely to receive thrombolysis (0.56-10% vs. 1-16% thrombolysis rates in the general population), be admitted to a stroke unit or receive some types of care. Anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention is sometimes withheld, despite dementia not being listed as an exclusion criterion in current guidelines. Studies in this population are scarce, and results have been contradictory. Three observational studies have examined intravenous thrombolysis for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in patients with dementia. In the two largest matched case-control studies, there were no significant differences between patients with and without dementia in the risks of intracerebral haemorrhage or mortality. The risk of intracerebral haemorrhage ranged between 14% and 19% for patients with dementia. Studies of other interventions for stroke are lacking for this population. Patients with dementia are less likely to be discharged home compared with controls (19% vs. 41%) and more likely to be disabled (64% vs. 59%) or die during hospitalization (22% vs. 11%). The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge about the management of ischaemic stroke in patients with pre-existing dementia, including organizational aspects of stroke care, intravenous thrombolysis, access to stroke unit care and use of supportive treatment. Evidence to support anticoagulation for secondary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation and antiplatelet therapy in nonembolic stroke will be discussed, as well as rehabilitation and how these factors influence patient outcomes. Finally, ethical issues, knowledge gaps and pathways for future research will be considered. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  16. Potential microRNA biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jing-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Xing-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a significant cause of high morbidity and mortality in the aging population globally. However, current therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke are limited. Atherosclerotic plaque is considered an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke. To identify biomarkers for carotid atheromatous plaque, bioinformatics analysis of the gene microarray data of plaque and intact tissue from individuals was performed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Multtest and Limma packages of R language, including 56 downregulated and 69 upregulated DEGs. Enriched microRNA (miRNA or miR) DEGs networks were generated using WebGestalt software and the STRING databases, and the miRNAs were validated using serum from acute ischemic stroke patients with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR). Four confirmed differentially expressed miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑22, ‑23 and ‑125) were associated with 28 upregulated DEGs, and 7 miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑30, ‑33, ‑124, ‑181, ‑218 and ‑330) were associated with 25 downregulated DEGs. Gene ontology (GO) function suggested that the confirmed miRNA‑targeted DEGs predominantly associated with signal transduction, the circulatory system, biological adhesion, striated muscle contraction, wound healing and the immune system. The confirmed miRNA‑targeted genes identified serve as potential therapeutic targets for acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  18. Therapeutically targeting neuroinflammation and microglia after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjeon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choi, Sung S; Yeo, Hyeon-Gu; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  19. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: The AnStroke Trial (Anesthesia During Stroke).

    PubMed

    Löwhagen Hendén, Pia; Rentzos, Alexandros; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Rosengren, Lars; Leiram, Birgitta; Sundeman, Henrik; Dunker, Dennis; Schnabel, Kunigunde; Wikholm, Gunnar; Hellström, Mikael; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies have found that patients receiving general anesthesia for endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke have worse neurological outcome compared with patients receiving conscious sedation. In this prospective randomized single-center study, we investigated the impact of anesthesia technique on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients. Ninety patients receiving endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke in 2013 to 2016 were included and randomized to general anesthesia or conscious sedation. Difference in neurological outcome at 3 months, measured as modified Rankin Scale score, was analyzed (primary outcome) and early neurological improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and cerebral infarction volume. Age, sex, comorbidities, admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, intraprocedural blood pressure, blood glucose, Paco2 and Pco2 modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score, and relevant time intervals were recorded. In the general anesthesia group 19 of 45 patients (42.2%) and in the conscious sedation group 18 of 45 patients (40.0%) achieved a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 (P=1.00) at 3 months, with no differences in intraoperative blood pressure decline from baseline (P=0.57); blood glucose (P=0.94); PaCO2 (P=0.68); time intervals (P=0.78); degree of successful recanalization, 91.1% versus 88.9% (P=1.00); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at 24 hours 8 (3-5) versus 9 (2-15; P=0.60); infarction volume, 20 (10-100) versus 20(10-54) mL (P=0.53); and hospital mortality (13.3% in both groups; P=1.00). In endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke, no difference was found between general anesthesia and conscious sedation in neurological outcome 3 months after stroke. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01872884. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke.

  1. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  2. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  3. Stroke navigator--a clinical decision support system for acute stroke.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Kees; Lord, William P; Lagor, Charles; Theiss, Stephan; Brosig, Torge; Siebler, Mario

    2008-11-06

    The Stroke Navigator is a clinical decision support system aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. It combines an audit trail, a differential diagnosis window, an interactive stroke protocol map, and a list of recommendations for hospital staff. It provides a patient-specific overview of the workflow status and of the available clinical findings, with the goal of improving the continuity of care. For this purpose, it uses a workflow engine that was specifically designed to meet the demands of clinical practice. The Stroke Navigator furthermore calculates and displays the probabilities of various stroke differential diagnoses. The demonstration will introduce these and other features by means of a hypothetical patient case. It will also summarize the status of alpha-testing the first prototype.

  4. Improving delivery of acute stroke therapy: The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Staub, Lara; Chan, Wenyaw; Wein, Theodore H; Bartholomew, L Kay; King, Mary; Felberg, Robert A; Burgin, W Scott; Groff, Janet; Hickenbottom, Susan L; Saldin, Kamaldeen; Demchuk, Andrew M; Kalra, Anjali; Dhingra, Anupma; Grotta, James C

    2002-01-01

    Only a small minority of acute stroke patients receive approved acute stroke therapy. We performed a community and professional behavioral intervention project to increase the proportion of stroke patients treated with approved acute stroke therapy. This study used a quasi-experimental design. Intervention and comparison communities were compared at baseline and during educational intervention. The communities were based in 5 nonurban East Texas counties. The multilevel intervention worked with hospitals and community physicians while changing the stroke identification skills, outcome expectations, and social norms of community residents. The primary goal was to increase the proportion of patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) from 1% to 6% of all cerebrovascular events in the intervention community. We prospectively evaluated 1733 patients and validated 1189 cerebrovascular events. Intravenous rTPA treatment increased from 1.38% to 5.75% among all cerebrovascular event patients in the intervention community (P=0.01) compared with a change from 0.49% to 0.55% in the comparison community (P=1.00). Among the ischemic stroke patients, an increase from 2.21% to 8.65% was noted in the intervention community (P=0.02). The comparison group did not appreciably change (0.71% to 0.86%, P=1.00). Of eligible intravenous rTPA candidates, treatment increased in the intervention community from 14% to 52% (P=0.003) and was unchanged in the comparison community (7% to 6%, P=1.00). An aggressive, multilevel stroke educational intervention program can increase delivery of acute stroke therapy. This may have important public health implications for reducing disability on a national level.

  5. The rural Prehospital Acute Stroke Triage (PAST) trial protocol: a controlled trial for rapid facilitated transport of rural acute stroke patients to a regional stroke centre.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Ashley R; Marsden, Dianne L; Parsons, Mark W; Quain, Debbie A; Spratt, Neil J; Loudfoot, Allan R; Middleton, Paul M; Levi, Christopher R

    2010-12-01

    Access to intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke is limited worldwide, particularly in regional and rural areas including in Australia. We are testing the effectiveness of a new rural Prehospital Acute Stroke Triage protocol that includes prehospital assessment and rapid transport of patients from a rural catchment to the major stroke centre in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. The local district hospitals within the rural catchment do not have the capability or infrastructure to deliver acute stroke thrombolysis. The trial has relevance to stroke clinicians, health service managers and planners responsible for rural populations. To implement a system of rapid prehospital assessment and facilitated transport that will significantly increase stroke thrombolysis rates to 10% of ischaemic stroke cases in the rural catchment. Validate an eight-point modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for use by paramedics in the prehospital setting to assess patients' potential eligibility for stroke thrombolysis. The joint project between the John Hunter Hospital Acute Stroke Team and the Ambulance Service of NSW will use a prospective cohort with an historical control group. Tools and protocols have been developed and education undertaken for ambulance field and operations centre personnel. These include a cut-down eight-item National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (Hunter NIHSS-8) score to be used in the field by paramedics and a transport decision matrix to expedite transport for a suspected stroke patient (road or road plus air transport). The primary outcome measure will be the rate of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator delivery for those who suffer an ischaemic stroke following protocol implementation, in comparison with historical rates over a corresponding period prior to implementation, for residents within the catchment. Sixty cases are required in the postimplementation time epoch to demonstrate a statistically significant absolute increase

  6. Unifying acute stroke treatment guidelines for a Bayesian belief network.

    PubMed

    Love, Alexa; Arnold, Corey W; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S; Andrada, Lewellyn; Saver, Jeffrey; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    With the large number of clinical practice guidelines available, there is an increasing need for a comprehensive unified model for acute ischemic stroke treatment to assist in clinical decision making. We present a unified treatment model derived through review of existing clinical practice guidelines, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. Using logic from the treatment model, a Bayesian belief network was defined and fitted to data from our institution's observational quality improvement database for acute stroke patients. The resulting network validates known relationships between variables, treatment decisions and outcomes, and enables the exploration of new correlative relationships not defined in current guidelines.

  7. Establishment of government-initiated comprehensive stroke centers for acute ischemic stroke management in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jei; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Ha, Yeon Soo; Shin, Dong-Ick; Kim, Seongheon; Lim, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    In 2008, the Ministry of Health and Welfare of South Korea initiated the Regional Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) program to decrease the incidence and mortality of stroke nationwide. We evaluated the performance of acute ischemic stroke management after the Regional CSC program was introduced. The Ministry of Health and Welfare established 9 Regional CSCs in different provinces from 2008 to 2010. All Regional CSCs have been able to execute the critical processes independently for stroke management since 2011. The Ministry of Health and Welfare was responsible for program development and financial support, the Regional CSC for program execution, and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for auditing the execution. We analyzed prospectively collected data on the required indices from 2011 and repeated the analysis the following year for comparison. After the Regional CSCs were established, the first brain image was taken within 1 hour from arrival at the emergency room for all patients with stroke; the length of hospital stay decreased from 14 to 12 days; for the rapid execution of thrombolysis, the first brain image was taken within 12 minutes; intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis were started within 40 and 110 minutes, respectively, after emergency room arrival; and the hospital stay of thrombolytic patients decreased from 19 to 15 days. The Regional CSC program has improved the performance of acute stroke management in South Korea and can be used as a model for rapidly improving stroke management. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Effects of different classes of antihypertensive agents on the outcome of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Papadopoulou, Maria; Kazantzidou, Pavlina; Kostaki, Stavroula; Kouparanis, Antonios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether antihypertensive treatment before stroke affects acute ischemic stroke severity and outcome. To evaluate this association, the authors studied 482 consecutive patients (age 78.8±6.7 years) admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The outcome was assessed with rates of adverse outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge ≥2). Independent predictors of severe stroke (NIHSS ≥16) were female sex and atrial fibrillation. Treatment with diuretics before stroke was associated with nonsevere stroke. At discharge, patients with adverse outcome were less likely to be treated before stroke with β-blockers or with diuretics. Independent predictors of adverse outcome were older age, higher NIHSS at admission, and history of ischemic stroke. Treatment with diuretics before stroke appears to be associated with less severe neurologic deficit in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction in a Japanese population: Takashima stroke and AMI registry, 1989-2005.

    PubMed

    Rumana, Nahid; Kita, Yoshikuni; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Takashima, Naoyuki; Ichikawa, Masaharu; Sugihara, Hideki; Morita, Yutaka; Hirose, Kunihiko; Kawakami, Kenzou; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2014-10-01

    Few comprehensive stroke and acute myocardial infarction registries of long duration exist in Japan to illustrate trends in acute case-fatality of stroke and acute myocardial infarction with greater precision. We examined 17-year case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction using an entire community-monitoring registration system to investigate trends in these rates over time in a Japanese population. Data were obtained from the Takashima Stroke and AMI Registry covering a stable population of approximately 55 000 residents of Takashima County in central Japan. We divided the total observation period of 17 years into four periods, 1989-1992, 1993-1996, 1997-2000, and 2001-2005. We calculated gender, age-specific and age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates (%) of stroke and acute myocardial infarction across these four periods. During the study period of 1989-2005, there were 341 fatal cases within 28 days of onset among 2239 first-ever stroke events and 163 fatal cases among 433 first-ever acute myocardial infarction events. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of stroke was 14·9% in men and 15·7% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of acute myocardial infarction was 34·3% in men and 43·3% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction showed insignificant differences across the four time periods. The average annual change in the acute case-fatality rate of stroke (-0·2%; 95% CI: -2·4-2·1) and acute myocardial infarction (2·7%; 95% CI: -0·7-6·1) did not change significantly across the study years. The acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction have remained stable from 1989 to 2005 in a rural and semi-urban Japanese population. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  10. Diagnostic value of prehospital ECG in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bobinger, Tobias; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Kopp, Markus; Kurka, Natalia; Arnold, Martin; Heider, Stefan; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2017-05-16

    To investigate the diagnostic yield of prehospital ECG monitoring provided by emergency medical services in the case of suspected stroke. Consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to our tertiary stroke center via emergency medical services and with available prehospital ECG were prospectively included during a 12-month study period. We assessed prehospital ECG recordings and compared the results to regular 12-lead ECG on admission and after continuous ECG monitoring at the stroke unit. Overall, 259 patients with prehospital ECG recording were included in the study (90.3% ischemic stroke, 9.7% intracerebral hemorrhage). Atrial fibrillation (AF) was detected in 25.1% of patients, second-degree or greater atrioventricular block in 5.4%, significant ST-segment elevation in 5.0%, and ventricular ectopy in 9.7%. In 18 patients, a diagnosis of new-onset AF with direct clinical consequences for the evaluation and secondary prevention of stroke was established by the prehospital recordings. In 2 patients, the AF episodes were limited to the prehospital period and were not detected by ECG on admission or during subsequent monitoring at the stroke unit. Of 126 patients (48.6%) with relevant abnormalities in the prehospital ECG, 16.7% received medical antiarrhythmic therapy during transport to the hospital, and 6.4% were transferred to a cardiology unit within the first 24 hours in the hospital. In a selected cohort of patients with stroke, the in-field recordings of the ECG detected a relevant rate of cardiac arrhythmia. The results can add to the in-hospital evaluation and should be considered in prehospital care of acute stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Dabigatran Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Buck, Brian; Sivakumar, Leka; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Butcher, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischemic stroke patients are at risk of early recurrence. We tested the feasibility and safety of initiating dabigatran in patients, within 24 hours of minor stroke in patients without atrial fibrillation. Minor stroke patients (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤3) without atrial fibrillation and evidence of acute infarction on magnetic resonance imaging were treated with dabigatran. Treatment began within 24 hours of onset and was continued for 30 days. The primary end point was symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. A total of 53 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 68 (57-77) years and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 1 (0-2) were enrolled. Baseline diffusion-weighted imaging volume was 0.8 (0.3-2.4) mL. No patients experienced symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic petechial hemorrhagic transformation on day 7, which remained stable at day 30, while continuing dabigatran. Dabigatran treatment within 24 hours of minor stroke is feasible. A larger randomized trial is required to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment approach. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT 01769703. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrexia after stroke (temperature ≥37.5°C) is associated with poor prognosis, but information on timing of body temperature changes and relationship to stroke severity and subtypes varies. Methods We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke, measured stroke severity, stroke subtype and recorded four-hourly tympanic (body) temperature readings from admission to 120 hours after stroke. We sought causes of pyrexia and measured functional outcome at 90 days. We systematically summarised all relevant previous studies. Results Amongst 44 patients (21 males, mean age 72 years SD 11) with median National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) 7 (range 0–28), 14 had total anterior circulation strokes (TACS). On admission all patients, both TACS and non-TACS, were normothermic (median 36.3°C vs 36.5°C, p=0.382 respectively) at median 4 hours (interquartile range, IQR, 2–8) after stroke; admission temperature and NIHSS were not associated (r2=0.0, p=0.353). Peak temperature, occurring at 35.5 (IQR 19.0 to 53.8) hours after stroke, was higher in TACS (37.7°C) than non-TACS (37.1°C, p<0.001) and was associated with admission NIHSS (r2=0.20, p=0.002). Poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≥3) at 90 days was associated with higher admission (36.6°C vs. 36.2°C p=0.031) and peak (37.4°C vs. 37.0°C, p=0.016) temperatures. Sixteen (36%) patients became pyrexial, in seven (44%) of whom we found no cause other than the stroke. Conclusions Normothermia is usual within the first 4 hours of stroke. Peak temperature occurs at 1.5 to 2 days after stroke, and is related to stroke severity/subtype and more closely associated with poor outcome than admission temperature. Temperature-outcome associations after stroke are complex, but normothermia on admission should not preclude randomisation of patients into trials of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23075282

  13. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Limb apraxia in acute ischemic stroke: a neglected clinical challenge?

    PubMed

    Schell, Caroline; Suchan, Julia; Himmelbach, Marc; Haarmeier, Thomas; Borchers, Svenja

    2014-04-01

    Symptoms of limb apraxia and executive dysfunctions are currently not explicitly considered by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and, thus, not routinely tested by clinicians in the acute care of patients with suspected stroke. Neuropsychological testing, clinical examination, MRI, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were performed in a right-handed patient with acute onset of left-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis due to a right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Deficits in the execution of meaningless and meaningful gestures were not detected properly on initial clinical examination but were revealed later on through neuropsychological testing. Instead, the patient's inability to respond to specific instructions in the acute care setting was mistaken to reflect severe deficits in auditory comprehension. fMRI revealed right-hemispheric localization of language in the right-handed patient. We suggest including a bedside test for limb apraxia symptoms in acute clinical care of stroke patients. The distinction between deficits in limb praxis and impairments of language can be complicated owing to the common hemispheric co-localization of the two functions.

  15. Domain-specific versus generalized cognitive screening in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Demeyere, Nele; Riddoch, M J; Slavkova, E D; Jones, K; Reckless, I; Mathieson, P; Humphreys, G W

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive assessments after stroke are typically short form tests developed for dementia that generates pass/fail classifications (e.g. the MoCA). The Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) provides a domain-specific cognitive profile designed for stroke survivors. This study compared the use of the MoCA and the OCS in acute stroke with respect to symptom specificity and aspects of clinical utility. A cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 200 stroke patients within 3 weeks of stroke completing MoCA and OCS. Demographic data, lesion side and Barthel scores were recorded. Inclusivity was assessed in terms of completion rates and reasons for non-completion were evaluated. The incidence of cognitive impairments on both the MoCA and OCS sub-domains was calculated and differences in stroke specificity, cognitive profiles and independence of the measures were addressed. The incidence of acute cognitive impairment was high: 76% of patients were impaired on MoCA, and 86% demonstrated at least one impairment on the cognitive domains assessed in the OCS. OCS was more sensitive than MoCA overall (87 vs 78% sensitivity) and OCS alone provided domain-specific information on prevalent post-stroke cognitive impairments (neglect, apraxia and reading/writing ability). Unlike the MOCA, the OCS was not dominated by left hemisphere impairments but gave differentiated profiles across the contrasting domains. The OCS detects important cognitive deficits after stroke not assessed in the MoCA, it is inclusive for patients with aphasia and neglect and it is less confounded by co-occurring difficulties in these domains.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis.

  18. Development of smartphone application that aids stroke screening and identifying nearby acute stroke care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, JoonNyung; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae Jin; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent. We developed a smartphone application that aids stroke patient self-screening and hospital selection, and may also decrease hospital arrival time. The application was developed for iPhone and Android smartphones. Map data for the application were adopted from the open map. For hospital registration, a web page (http://stroke119.org) was developed using PHP and MySQL. The Stroke 119 application includes a stroke screening tool and real-time information on nearby hospitals that provide thrombolytic treatment. It also provides information on stroke symptoms, thrombolytic treatment, and prescribed actions when stroke is suspected. The stroke screening tool was adopted from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and is displayed in a cartoon format. If the user taps a cartoon image that represents abnormal findings, a pop-up window shows that the user may be having a stroke, informs the user what to do, and directs the user to call emergency services. Information on nearby hospitals is provided in map and list views, incorporating proximity to the user's location using a Global Positioning System (a built-in function of smartphones). Users can search for a hospital according to specialty and treatment levels. We also developed a web page for hospitals to register in the system. Neurology training hospitals and hospitals that provide acute stroke care in Korea were invited to register. Seventy-seven hospitals had completed registration. This application may be useful for reducing hospital arrival times for thrombolytic candidates.

  19. Effect of hyperthermia on prognosis after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saini, Monica; Saqqur, Maher; Kamruzzaman, Anmmd; Lees, Kennedy R; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2009-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that hyperthermia is a determinant of poor outcome after ischemic stroke. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of temperature on poststroke outcome have, however, been limited by small sample sizes. We sought to evaluate the effect of temperature and timing of hyperthermia on outcome after ischemic stroke. Data of 5305 patients in acute stroke trials from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) data set were analyzed. Data for temperatures at baseline, eighth, 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours, and seventh day were assessed in relation to outcome (poor versus good) based on the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Hyperthermia was defined as temperature >37.2 degrees C and poor outcome as 90-day modified Rankin Scale >2. Hazard ratios with 95% CIs were reported for hyperthermia in relation to the outcome. Logistic regression models, in relation to hyperthermia, were fitted for a set of preselected covariates at different time points to identify predictors/determinants of hyperthermia. The average age of patients was 68.0+/-11.9 years, 2380 (44.9%) were females, and 42.3% (2233) received thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. After adjustment, hyperthermia was a statistically significant predictor of poor outcome. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for poor outcome in relation to hyperthermia at different time points were: baseline 1.2 (1.0 to 1.4), eighth hour 1.7 (1.2 to 2.2), 24th hour 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9), 48th hour 2.0 (1.5 to 2.6), 72nd hour 2.2 (1.7 to 2.9), and seventh day 2.7 (2.0 to 3.8). Gender, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >16), white blood cell count, and antibiotic use were significantly associated with hyperthermia (P< or =0.01). Hyperthermia, in acute ischemic stroke, is associated with a poor clinical outcome. The later the hyperthermia occurs within the first week, the worse the prognosis. Severity of stroke and inflammation are important determinants of

  20. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    PubMed

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (P<0.0001). Door-to-needle times were significantly longer in Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program hospitals. State PSCs had higher in-hospital risk-adjusted mortality (odds ratio 1.23, 95% confidence intervals 1.07-1.41) compared with JC PSCs. Among Get With The Guidelines-Stroke hospitals with PSC certification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C; Southerland, Andrew M; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0-2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.39; p < 0.00001). No

  2. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  3. Predictors of Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mild Stroke Scale Scores.

    PubMed

    Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Hammer, Maxim; Jovin, Tudor; Reddy, Vivek; Wechsler, Lawrence; Jadhav, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a known predictor of outcome in acute ischemic stroke, there are other factors like age, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow that may be predictors of outcome but are not assessed by the traditional NIHSS. The aim of this retrospective review was to identify predictors of outcome in mild ischemic stroke. Discharge outcomes from patients who presented to our large academic stroke center with acute ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 7189 patients reviewed, 2597 had initial NIHSS less than 5. Outcome measures were modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score 0-1 and discharge to home. In all, 65% of patients with NIHSS 0-4 were discharged directly home independent of treatment. Of those patients discharged to home, 74% were able to ambulate independently and 98% passed their dysphagia screen. Of patients not discharged directly home, 66% were unable to ambulate independently and 21% did not pass their dysphagia screen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of dysphagia screen (P = .001), ability to ambulate independently (P = .002), age (P = .016), and NIHSS (P = .005) on discharge to home but not MRS of 0-1 (P = .564). In patients with mild stroke scale scores defined as NIHSS 0-4, several factors including age, NIHSS, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow may be independent predictors of functional outcome and discharge home. These data support the development of a modified grading system for assessing functional outcome in mild stroke that considers these factors. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute stroke care in a neurologically underserved state: lessons learned from the Iowa Stroke Survey.

    PubMed

    Albright, Karen C; Schott, Todd C; Boland, Debbie F; George, Leslie; Boland, Kevin P; Wohlford-Wessels, Mary Pat; Finnerty, Edward P; Jacoby, Michael R K

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that stroke care is more fragmented in rural or neurologically underserved areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke care in Iowa and to identify factors influencing care. Each of the 118 facilities in Iowa with emergency departments was surveyed by telephone. This survey consisted of 10 questions, focusing on the existence of pre-hospital and emergency room acute stroke protocols and the availability of essential personnel and diagnostic and treatment modalities essential for acute stroke care. Of the 118 hospitals with emergency departments, 109 (92.4%) had CT available. Within the subset having CT capabilities, 89.9% (98/109) had intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) available. Of those facilities with both CT and IV t-PA, 46% (45/98) had around-the-clock in-house physician coverage. Further, 31% (14/45) of sites with CT, t-PA, and an in-house physician had a radiology technician on site. Only 12% (14/118) of centers could offer all essential components. Despite 88% of Iowa hospitals not providing all of these components, only 31% of these hospitals reported protocols for stabilization and immediate transfer of acute stroke patients. These findings indicate that the development of a stroke system is still in its infancy in Iowa. Collaborative efforts are needed to address barriers in rural Iowa and to assist facilities in providing the best possible care. Creativity will be paramount in establishing a functional statewide system to ensure optimum care for all Iowans.

  5. Investigation of vaspin level in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cura, Hasan S; Özdemir, Hasan H; Demir, Caner F; Bulut, Serpil; İlhan, Nevin; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-03-01

    Cerebrovascular event is a clinical condition characterized by symptoms and findings pertaining to loss of focal cerebral function because of the vascular causes. Atherosclerosis has a forefront role in the pathogenesis of stroke. Inflammation has an important place in the formation of atherogenesis and atherosclerosis. Visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin (vaspin) is a new adipokine, which is identified recently, associated with obesity and diabetes and also has a proinflammatory characteristic. This study was intended to investigate the relation between vaspin and stroke and stroke and other risk factors. A total of 50 patients with stroke, as 28 men (56%) and 22 women (44%), and a total of 50 healthy individuals, as 25 men (50%) and 25 women (50%), were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were taken in the acute period (first 48 hours) in the patient group, and serum vaspin levels were measured. Vaspin level was also measured in the control group. The association of vaspin with the lipid parameters, gender, and the severity of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis in the patient group was evaluated. Stenotic plaques in ICA were classified as normal, mild (stenosis under 50%), moderate (stenosis 50%-69%), severe (stenosis 70%-99% to preocclusion), and occlusion. No statistically significant difference was found between 2 groups in terms of age and gender (P > .05). Vaspin levels were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (164.73 ± 153.76 ng/mL) compared with the control group (116.21 ± 34.60 ng/mL) (P < .05). However, no relation was established between vaspin level and the severity of ICA stenosis. Vaspin levels have been shown to increase in acute ischemic stroke patients. The increased vaspin levels may vary depending on several factors in acute period of ischemic stroke. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: an update.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke.

  8. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  9. Ticagrelor versus Aspirin in Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S Claiborne; Amarenco, Pierre; Albers, Gregory W; Denison, Hans; Easton, J Donald; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence

    2016-07-07

    Ticagrelor may be a more effective antiplatelet therapy than aspirin for the prevention of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. We conducted an international double-blind, controlled trial in 674 centers in 33 countries, in which 13,199 patients with a nonsevere ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack who had not received intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis and were not considered to have had a cardioembolic stroke were randomly assigned within 24 hours after symptom onset, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive either ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose on day 1 followed by 90 mg twice daily for days 2 through 90) or aspirin (300 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg daily for days 2 through 90). The primary end point was the time to the occurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 90 days. During the 90 days of treatment, a primary end-point event occurred in 442 of the 6589 patients (6.7%) treated with ticagrelor, versus 497 of the 6610 patients (7.5%) treated with aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.01; P=0.07). Ischemic stroke occurred in 385 patients (5.8%) treated with ticagrelor and in 441 patients (6.7%) treated with aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.00). Major bleeding occurred in 0.5% of patients treated with ticagrelor and in 0.6% of patients treated with aspirin, intracranial hemorrhage in 0.2% and 0.3%, respectively, and fatal bleeding in 0.1% and 0.1%. In our trial involving patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, ticagrelor was not found to be superior to aspirin in reducing the rate of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death at 90 days. (Funded by AstraZeneca; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01994720.).

  10. Intravenous tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Behrouz, Réza

    2014-06-01

    Tenecteplase in a genetically engineered variant of alteplase. Although the two have the same mechanism of action, tenecteplase has properties that makes it a seemingly more advantageous thrombolytic. Because of its rapid single-bolus administration, its use is favored over alteplase in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Over the past few years, several clinical studies have been conducted to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke. In spite of the mixed results of these studies, experimentation with tenecteplase continues in from of clinical trials. In this article, the utility of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke will be discussed.

  11. Acute childhood arterial ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Yock-Corrales, Adriana; Mackay, Mark T; Mosley, Ian; Maixner, Wirginia; Babl, Franz E

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the presenting features of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in children presenting to the emergency department (ED). Yet, initial clinical assessment is a key step in the management pathway of stroke. We describe the presentation in the ED of children with confirmed acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes. We conducted a retrospective descriptive case series of consecutive patients aged 1 month to younger than 18 years and presenting to a single-center tertiary ED with radiologically confirmed acute ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke during a 5-year period. Patients were identified by medical record search with International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes for hemorrhagic stroke and through the hospital stroke registry for acute ischemic stroke. Signs, symptoms, and initial management were described. Fifty patients with acute ischemic stroke and 31 with hemorrhagic stroke were identified. Mean age was 8.7 years (SD 5.2), and 51% were male. Fifty-six percent were previously healthy. Median time from onset of symptoms to ED presentation was 21 hours (interquartile range 6 to 48 hours) for acute ischemic stroke and 12 hours (interquartile range 4 to 72 hours) for hemorrhagic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke presented with symptoms of focal limb weakness (64%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 49% to 77%), facial weakness (60%; 95% CI 45% to 73%), and speech disturbance (46%; 95% CI 31% to 60%). Few patients with acute ischemic stroke presented with vomiting and altered mental status. Most patients with acute ischemic stroke had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater (86%; 95% CI 73% to 94%) and presented with at least 1 focal neurologic sign (88%; 95% CI 73% to 98%). Hemorrhagic stroke presented with headache (73%; 95% CI 54% to 87%), vomiting (58%; 95% CI 40% to 75%), and altered mental status (48%; 95% CI 30% to 67%). GCS score in hemorrhagic stroke was less than 14 in 38% and less than 8 in 19% (95% CI 7% to

  12. Perfusion CT in acute stroke: effectiveness of automatically-generated colour maps.

    PubMed

    Ukmar, Maja; Degrassi, Ferruccio; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberta Antea; Neri, Francesca; Mucelli, Fabio Pozzi; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of perfusion CT (pCT) in the definition of the infarcted core and the penumbra, comparing the data obtained from the evaluation of parametric maps [cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT)] with software-generated colour maps. A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with suspected acute ischaemic strokes and who had undergone unenhanced CT and pCT carried out within 4.5 h from the onset of the symptoms. A qualitative evaluation of the CBV, CBF and MTT maps was performed, followed by an analysis of the colour maps automatically generated by the software. 26 patients were identified, but a direct CT follow-up was performed only on 19 patients after 24-48 h. In the qualitative analysis, 14 patients showed perfusion abnormalities. Specifically, 29 perfusion deficit areas were detected, of which 15 areas suggested the penumbra and the remaining 14 areas suggested the infarct. As for automatically software-generated maps, 12 patients showed perfusion abnormalities. 25 perfusion deficit areas were identified, 15 areas of which suggested the penumbra and the other 10 areas the infarct. The McNemar's test showed no statistically significant difference between the two methods of evaluation in highlighting infarcted areas proved later at CT follow-up. We demonstrated how pCT provides good diagnostic accuracy in the identification of acute ischaemic lesions. The limits of identification of the lesions mainly lie at the pons level and in the basal ganglia area. Qualitative analysis has proven to be more efficient in identification of perfusion lesions in comparison with software-generated maps. However, software-generated maps have proven to be very useful in the emergency setting. Advances in knowledge: The use of CT perfusion is requested in increasingly more patients in order to optimize the treatment, thanks also to the technological evolution of CT, which now allows a whole

  13. Cooperative efforts improve compliance with acute stroke guidelines.

    PubMed

    Albakri, Erfan A; Richards, Ferdinand; Hall, Marie; Dion, Charles; Miranda, Luis S; Turkel, Robert; Sand, Charles; Vasey, Paulette; McDonald, Kathie; Michelman, Mark; Smith, Zaid; Davison, Karen; Pfannerstill, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Guidelines for emergency treatment of stroke are not always known or followed. Florida Medical Quality Assurance, Inc. collaborated with hospitals to determine how closely the current American Heart Association (AHA) and the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) guidelines were being followed and to improve compliance with these guidelines. Medical records of patients admitted for acute stroke to 32 hospitals were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with six quality indicators (QIs) on the basis of AHA and AHCA guidelines. Hospitals were provided feedback on their levels of guideline compliance, and they subsequently implemented measures to improve compliance. After 6 months, the records of patients admitted after the provision of feedback were reviewed for compliance with the same six QIs. Compliance improved with regard to all QIs and was statistically significant for three of them. Feedback on performance, coupled with proactive collaboration with emergency department staff, resulted in improved compliance with the stroke guidelines.

  14. Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Vural, Gonul; Gumusyayla, Sadiye; Deniz, Orhan; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis plays a critical role in the cellular protection provided by antioxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a change in thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients. Patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke that had undergone magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging within the first 24 h were prospectively included in this study. The thiol, disulfide, and total thiol levels were measured during the first 24 and 72 h, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Barthel Index (BI) of the patients were recorded. Overall, the relationships between the thiol-disulfide levels of the patients and the infarct volumes, NIHSS, mRS, and BI scores were investigated. In this study, 54 patients and 53 healthy controls were included. The mean of the native thiol levels in the stroke group was 356.572 ± 61.659 μmol/L (min/max 228.00/546.40), while it was 415.453 ± 39.436 μmol/L (min/max 323.50/488.70) in the control group (p < 0.001). A negative, significant correlation was observed between the infarct volumes and native thiol levels (ρ = -0.378; p = 0.005), and the disulfide levels were similar between the groups (Z = 0.774; p = 0.439). Significant difference was found between the thiol levels of the mild and moderate-severe NIHSS groups (p = 0.026). The changes in the thiol levels under oxidative stress may be associated with the severity of the stroke. Substitution of thiol deficiency and correction of thiol-disulfide imbalance may be beneficial in ischemic stroke.

  15. NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kvistad, Christopher E.; Naess, Halvor; Øygarden, Halvor; Logallo, Nicola; Assmus, Jörg; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Neckelmann, Gesche; Thomassen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study) aimed to assess effect and safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound treatment in an unselected acute ischemic stroke population. Methods— Patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 hours after symptom onset were randomized 1:1 to either contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis (CEST) or sham CEST. A visible arterial occlusion on baseline computed tomography angiography was not a prerequisite for inclusion. Pulse-wave 2 MHz ultrasound was given for 1 hour and contrast (SonoVue) as an infusion for ≈30 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography were performed after 24 to 36 hours. Primary study end points were neurological improvement at 24 hours defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 0 or reduction of ≥4 National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale points compared with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and favorable functional outcome at 90 days defined as modified Rankin scale score 0 to 1. Results— A total of 183 patients were randomly assigned to either CEST (93 patient) or sham CEST (90 patients). The rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, or mortality were not increased in the CEST group. Neurological improvement at 24 hours and functional outcome at 90 days was similar in the 2 groups both in the intention-to-treat analysis and in the per-protocol analysis. Conclusions— CEST is safe among unselected ischemic stroke patients with or without a visible occlusion on computed tomography angiography and with varying grades of clinical severity. There was, however, statistically no significant clinical effect of sonothrombolysis in this prematurely stopped trial. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01949961. PMID:27980128

  16. Hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zonneveld, Thomas P; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Westendorp, Willeke F; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2017-04-11

    To investigate whether admission hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections and, if so, whether poststroke infections modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. We used data from acute ischemic stroke patients in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a multicenter randomized controlled trial (n = 2,550) investigating the effect of preventive antibiotics on functional outcome. Admission hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L and poststroke infection as any infection during admission judged by an expert adjudication committee. Functional outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale. Of 1,676 nondiabetic ischemic stroke patients, 338 (20%) had admission hyperglycemia. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, admission hyperglycemia was associated with poststroke infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.31, 95% CI 1.31-4.07), worse 3-month functional outcome (common aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.73), and 3-month mortality (aOR 2.11, 95% CI 1.40-3.19). Additional adjustment for poststroke infection in the functional outcome analysis, done to assess poststroke infection as an intermediate in the pathway from admission hyperglycemia to functional outcome, did not substantially change the model. In patients with recorded diabetes mellitus (n = 418), admission hyperglycemia was not associated with poststroke infection (aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15-1.58). In nondiabetic acute ischemic stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia is associated with poststroke infection and worse functional outcome. Poststroke infections did not modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia after recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Jin Soo; Song, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Hye Seon; Jung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Huimahn Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in experimental stroke models, especially after ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the clinical and radiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke patients after recanalization. A prospective cohort study at 2 stroke centers was performed. We enrolled patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation with an initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥10 who had successful recanalization (≥thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia, 2b). Patients at center A underwent a mild hypothermia (34.5°C) protocol, which included mechanical ventilation, and 48-hour hypothermia and 48-hour rewarming. Patients at center B were treated according to the guidelines without hypothermia. Cerebral edema, hemorrhagic transformation, good outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale, ≤2), mortality, and safety profiles were compared. Potential variables at baseline and during the therapy were analyzed to evaluate for independent predictors of good outcome. The hypothermia group (n=39) had less cerebral edema (P=0.001), hemorrhagic transformation (P=0.016), and better outcome (P=0.017) compared with the normothermia group (n=36). Mortality, hemicraniectomy rate, and medical complications were not statistically different. After adjustment for potential confounders, therapeutic hypothermia (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-8.9; P=0.047) and distal occlusion (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval; 1.3-40.3; P=0.022) were the independent predictors for good outcome. Absence of cerebral edema (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.2; P=0.006) and no medical complications (odds ratio, 9.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-39.9; P=0.003) were also independent predictors for good outcome during the therapy. In patients with ischemic stroke, after successful recanalization, therapeutic hypothermia may reduce risk of cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation, and lead to improved

  18. One-year outcomes and secondary prevention in patients after acute minor stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Pan, Yuesong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on secondary preventive therapy use and patient outcomes after acute minor ischemic stroke in China. This study investigated secondary prevention strategies and outcomes up to 1 year after minor ischemic stroke. Patients from the China National Stroke Registry experienced a minor ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤5) and admitted to hospital within 24 hours of symptom onset were included. One-year rates of recurrent stroke, stroke-related disability, and all-cause death were evaluated. Risk factors associated with 1-year stroke recurrence were examined in a multivariate model. The secondary prevention strategies in the acute phase were evaluated as combination of secondary prevention medication classes and the medications used in 1 year follow-up were examined. The study included 1913 patients who had experienced acute minor ischemic stroke (mean age: 65.1 years; 67.3% men; mean NIHSS score: 2.5). Rates of recurrent stroke, disability, and death were 13.2, 17.0, and 6.3% at 1 year, respectively. History of hypertension, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and atrial fibrillation were independent predictors of one-year stroke recurrence. Rate of 1 year all-cause death in patients with triple combined therapy in acute phase was 4.1%, whereas in patients with none was 14.5%. At 1 year, only half patients continued the secondary prevention medications. Outcomes in individuals in China who had experienced acute minor stroke were unfavorable, underscoring the importance of early, sustained preventive therapy in this patient population. Combination of secondary prevention medication classes was associated with a lower risk of death.

  19. Immuno-inflammatory activation in acute cardio-embolic strokes in comparison with other subtypes of ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Licata, Giuseppe; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Corrao, Salvatore; Di Sciacca, Riccardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between inflammatory biomarker blood levels, cardioembolic stroke subtype and neurological deficit. So the aim of our study is to evaluate plasma levels of immuno-inflammatory variables in patients with cardio-embolic acute ischaemic stroke compared to other diagnostic subtypes and to evaluate the relationship between immuno-inflammatory variables, acute neurological deficit and brain infarct volume. One hundred twenty patients with acute ischaemic stroke and 123 controls without a diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke were evaluated. The type of acute ischaemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST classification. We evaluated plasma levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10, E-selectin, P-selectin, sICAM-1,sVCAM-1, vWF, TPA and PAI-1. Patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cardio-embolic (CEI) showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly higher median plasma levels of TNF-alpha , IL-6 and IL-1beta. Furthermore stroke patients classified as lacunar showed, compared to other subtypes, significantly lower median plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta. Multiple linear regression showed a significant association between the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) score at admission and diagnostic subtype, infarct volume of cardio-embolic strokes and some inflammatory variables. Our findings confirm that cardio-embolic strokes have a worse clinical presentation and produce larger and more disabling strokes than other ischaemic stroke subtypes reporting a possible explanation of higher immuno-inflammatory activation of the acute phase.

  20. Spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni

    2014-06-15

    Spontaneous or traumatic bleeding is a common complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We report the case of an 83 y.o. woman with right facio-brachio-crural hemiparesis, left deviation of the head and aphasia who developed, after thrombolytic therapy, a spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma that regressed few days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of asymptomatic and spontaneous skeletal muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The occurrence of lateral cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis ipsilateral to sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma may suggest a causal relationship between local chronic inflammation of active mycobacterial infection and thrombolysis-related extravasation. This case should suggest caution in thrombolytic treatment in patients with chronic immune dysregulation and vascular inflammation such as extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  1. Treating the acute stroke patient as an emergency: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S; Lees, K; Donnan, G

    2006-01-01

    Summary Developments in acute stroke therapy have followed advances in the understanding of the evolving pathophysiology in both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). In ischaemic stroke, rapid reperfusion of the ischaemic penumbra with thrombolysis within 3 h of symptom onset is of proven benefit, but few patients currently receive therapy, mainly due to the short-time window and lack of stroke expertise. In ICH, a recent study indicated that a haemostatic agent can limit ongoing bleeding and improve outcomes when administered within 4 h of stroke onset. These advances in acute stroke therapy underlie the concept that ‘time is brain’ and that urgent intervention can limit cerebral damage. Neuroprotective therapy could offer the prospect of a greater proportion of stroke patients receiving treatment, potentially before imaging and even in the ambulance setting. Virtually all stroke patients would benefit from receiving multidisciplinary care in acute stroke units. PMID:16620351

  2. Location of Acute Infarcts and Agitation and Aggression in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Kwong; Liu, Xiang Xin; Liang, Huajun; Chen, Yang Kun; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Ahuja, Anil T; Abrigo, Jill; Mok, Vincent Chung Tong; Ungvari, Gabor S; Wong, Ka Sing; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    The role of the infarct location in the development of poststroke agitation (PSA) is largely unknown. This study examined the association between the locations of infarcts and PSA at 9 months following the index stroke in 213 patients with the Chinese version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Compared with the non-PSA group, PSA patients had a higher number and volume of acute pontine infarcts. Ventral pontine and lateral cerebellar infarcts were independent predictors of PSA in the multivariate analysis.

  3. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Early warning score predicts acute mortality in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Liljehult, J; Christensen, T

    2016-04-01

    Clinical deterioration and death among patients with acute stroke are often preceded by detrimental changes in physiological parameters. Systematic and effective tools to identify patients at risk of deterioration early enough to intervene are therefore needed. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the aggregate weighted track and trigger system early warning score (EWS) can be used as a simple observational tool to identify patients at risk and predict mortality in a population of patients with acute stroke. Patients admitted with acute stroke at the Copenhagen University Hospital, Nordsjaellands Hospital, Denmark, from May to September 2012 were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study (n = 274). Vital signs were measured immediately after admission and consistently during the hospitalization period. Based on the vital signs, a single composite EWS was calculated. Death within 30 days was used as outcome. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and a Kaplan-Meier curve were computed to examine the prognostic validity of EWS. A total of 24 patients (8.8%) died within 30 days. The prognostic performance was high for both the EWS at admission (AUROC 0.856; 95% CI 0.760-0.951; P-value < 0.001) and the maximal EWS measured (AUROC 0.949; 95% CI 0.919-0.980; P-value < 0.001). Mortality rates were lowest for admission EWS 0-1 (2%) and highest for admission EWS ≥ 5 (63%). Early warning score is a simple and valid tool for identifying patients at risk of dying after acute stroke. Readily available physiological parameters are converted to a single score, which can guide both nurses and physicians in clinical decision making and resource allocation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. Patients and methods: We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia’s. Results: Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Conclusion: Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere. PMID:23378691

  6. Aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Telman, Gregory; Kouperberg, Efim; Sprecher, Elliot; Agmon, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no data on ethnic differences in aortic atherosclerosis in Arab and Jewish patients from northern Israel with acute ischemic stroke. Data on demographic and risk factors alongside transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) data and treatment details for 509 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. The patients with aortic atheromas were older and had significantly more frequent vascular risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and smoking), as well as vascular disease (ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and carotid plaques). They were also treated with statins more often than those without aortic atheroma. Logistic regression analysis showed that age, smoking, ethnicity, and the presence of carotid plaques were independent predictors for aortic atheromas. Aortic plaques were found more frequently in Jewish patients than Arab patients (160 (41.9%) vs. 35 (27.3%); p= 0.003). This finding did not change after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, and type of antithrombotic treatment. We did not find any difference between Arab and Jewish patients in the distribution of plaques by location or complexity before and after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, or type of antithrombotic or lipid-lowering treatment. Our findings emphasize the influence of ethnicity on the prevalence of aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel. The search for genetic, cultural, socioeconomic, and other factors explaining these ethnic differences should be the topic of future studies.

  7. Socioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care: The China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuesong; Chen, Ruoling; Li, Zixiao; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-11-01

    The association of socioeconomic status (SES) with quality of stroke care is not well understood, and few studies have examined the association with different indicators of SES simultaneously. We assessed the impacts of low levels of education, occupation, and income on the quality of stroke care. We examined data from the China National Stroke Registry recording consecutive stroke patients between September 2007 and August 2008. Baseline low SES was measured using educational level <6 years, occupation as manual workers or no job, and average family income per capita at ≤¥1000 per month. Compliance with 11 performances was summarized in a composite score defined as the proportion of all needed care given. Poor quality of care was defined as having a composite score of 0.71 or less. Among 12 270 patients with ischemic stroke, 38.6% had <6 educational years, 37.6% had manual workers/no job, and 34.7% had income ≤¥1000 per month. There was an increased chance of receiving poor quality of care in patients with low education (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.28), low occupation (adjusted odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.32), and low income (adjusted odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.30), respectively. People with low SES had poor performances on some aspects of care quality. Combined effects existed among these SES indicators; those with low SES from all 3 indicators had the poorest quality of care. There was a social gradient in the quality of stroke care. Continuous efforts of socioeconomic improvement will increase the quality of acute stroke care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Imaging of acute stroke prior to treatment: current practice and evolving techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mair, G

    2014-01-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke is undertaken with the aim of diagnosing the underlying cause and excluding stroke mimics. In the presence of ischaemic stroke, imaging is also needed to assess patient suitability for treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. Non-contrast CT is predominantly used, but MRI can also exclude any contraindications to thrombolysis treatment. Advanced stroke imaging such as CT and MR angiography and perfusion imaging are increasingly used in an acute setting. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the application of these advanced techniques in the imaging of acute stroke. PMID:24936980

  9. [Endovascular treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. A stroke care plan for the region of Madrid].

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido, J A; García Pastor, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Vivancos, J; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2013-09-01

    Endovascular therapies (intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy) after acute ischaemic stroke are being implemented in the clinical setting even as they are still being researched. Since we lack sufficient data to establish accurate evidence-based recommendations for use of these treatments, we must develop clinical protocols based on current knowledge and carefully monitor all procedures. After review of the literature and holding work sessions to reach a consensus among experts, we developed a clinical protocol including indications and contraindications for endovascular therapies use in acute ischaemic stroke. The protocol includes methodology recommendations for diagnosing and selecting patients, performing revascularisation procedures, and for subsequent patient management. Its objective is to increase the likelihood of efficacy and treatment benefit and minimise risk of complications and ineffective recanalisation. Based on an analysis of healthcare needs and available resources, a cooperative inter-hospital care system has been developed. This helps to ensure availability of endovascular therapies to all patients, a fast response time, and a good cost-to-efficacy ratio. It includes also a prospective register which serves to monitor procedures in order to identify any opportunities for improvement. Implementation of endovascular techniques for treating acute ischaemic stroke requires the elaboration of evidence-based clinical protocols and the establishment of appropriate cooperative healthcare networks guaranteeing both the availability and the quality of these actions. Such procedures must be monitored in order to improve methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypercortisolemia in acute stroke is related to the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Agnieszka; Turaj, Wojciech; Pankiewicz, Joanna; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Szermer, Paweł; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2002-04-15

    Hypercortisolemia is thought to be a marker of the stress response following stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of hypercortisolemia. The circadian variation of cortisol level and the relationship between serum cortisol levels and other stress, inflammatory, and haemostatic markers were also investigated. Seventy consecutive patients with their first ischemic stroke and 24 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Serum cortisol levels (at 6:00 AM, 10:00 AM, 6:00 PM, and 10:00 PM), 24-h urine catecholamine excretion, beta-thromboglobulin levels, and other standard biochemical and haematological parameters were measured on the first day of hospitalisation and in control subjects. Outcome measures used the Barthel Index at Day 30, as well as 30- and 90-day mortality rates. Hypercortisolemia, defined as at least two of the four measurements above the normal range of serum cortisol levels (i.e. >618 nmol/l from the morning samples and >460 nmol/l from the evening samples) was found in 25 (35.7%) of the acute stroke patients and in 3 (12.5%) of the controls (p<0.05). Hypercortisolemia was associated with older age, greater severity of neurological deficit, larger ischemic lesions on CT, and worse prognoses (p<0.05). The study did not find a correlation between serum cortisol levels and other markers of the stress response such as catecholamines excretion and glucose levels. A significant correlation between serum cortisol levels and some markers of the inflammatory response, such as fever, fibrinogen level, white blood cell (WBC) count, and beta-thromboglobulin level, was established in stroke patients. Prognostic significance of hypercortisolemia in acute stroke patients seems to be related to the inflammatory response rather than to the stress response.

  11. Glycosylated Hemoglobin and Functional Outcome after Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Simona; Bartolini, Marco; Provinciali, Leandro; Silvestrini, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated to an increased incidence of cerebral and myocardial infarction which could be reduced by long-term maintenance of optimal glycemic values. The aim of the study was to evaluate in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke the chronic glycemic status and its relationship with functional outcome. We retrospectively identified consecutive diabetic patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke. Clinical and biochemical characteristics at admission were assessed. The outcome measures were the attainment of the recommended glycosylated hemoglobin A1 (HbA1c) level and the 3-month functional status according to the modified Rankin Scale score. Among the 112 enrolled patients, 39 (34.8%) met the recommended goal of HbA1c less than 7%. Higher education level was predictive of good prestroke glycemic control (adjusted OR 1.32 per year [95% CI 1.15-1.51], P < .001). At the 3-month evaluation, 44 (39.3%) patients were classified as having a poor outcome. After categorization of HbA1c values into tertiles, a dose-response relationship with poor functional recovery was found (P = .001). The suboptimal prestroke glycemic status was an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (adjusted OR 6.22 [95% CI 1.94-19.98] for HbA1c ≥7%, P = .002). The management of DM was suboptimal in nearly two thirds of diabetic subjects presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The glycemic control before stroke occurrence was an independent prognostic factor and HbA1c values above the recommended goals increased the risk of unfavorable 3-month outcome. The improvement of DM management may be an effective strategy to either decrease the burden of cerebrovascular disease or influence its clinical course. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL): design and baseline analysis of an ischemic stroke registry including acute multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Michel, Patrik; Odier, Céline; Rutgers, Matthieu; Reichhart, Marc; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max; Maghraoui, Ali; Faouzi, Mohamed; Croquelois, Alexandre; Ntaios, George

    2010-11-01

    Stroke registries are valuable tools for obtaining information about stroke epidemiology and management. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) prospectively collects epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and multimodal brain imaging data of acute ischemic stroke patients in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV). Here, we provide design and methods used to create ASTRAL and present baseline data of our patients (2003 to 2008). All consecutive patients admitted to CHUV between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2008 with acute ischemic stroke within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in ASTRAL. Patients arriving beyond 24 hours, with transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoidal hemorrhage, or cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, were excluded. Recurrent ischemic strokes were registered as new events. Between 2003 and 2008, 1633 patients and 1742 events were registered in ASTRAL. There was a preponderance of males, even in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke was the most frequent type of stroke. Most strokes were of minor severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤ 4 in 40.8% of patients). Cardioembolic stroke and dissections presented with the most severe clinical picture. There was a significant number of patients with unknown onset stroke, including wake-up stroke (n=568, 33.1%). Median time from last-well time to hospital arrival was 142 minutes for known onset and 759 minutes for unknown-onset stroke. The rate of intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis between 2003 and 2008 increased from 10.8% to 20.8% in patients admitted within 24 hours of last-well time. Acute brain imaging was performed in 1695 patients (97.3%) within 24 hours. In 1358 patients (78%) who underwent acute computed tomography angiography, 717 patients (52.8%) had significant abnormalities. Of the 1068 supratentorial stroke patients who underwent acute perfusion computed tomography (61.3%), focal hypoperfusion

  13. Is acute reperfusion therapy safe in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysm?

    PubMed

    Mowla, Ashkan; Singh, Karanbir; Mehla, Sandhya; Ahmed, Mohammad K; Shirani, Peyman; Kamal, Haris; Krishna, Chandan; Sawyer, Robert N; Ching, Marilou; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Snyder, Kenneth V; Crumlish, Annemarie; Hopkins, L N

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are currently considered as contraindication for intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke, very likely due to a possible increase in the risk of bleeding from aneurysm rupture; however, there is limited data available on whether intravenous thrombolysis is safe for acute ischemic stroke patients with pre-existing intracranial aneurysms. To find out the safety of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and cerebrovascular images of all the patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center from the beginning of 2006 till the end of April 2014. Those with unruptured intracranial aneurysm present on cerebrovascular images prior to acute reperfusion therapy were identified. Post-thrombolysis brain imaging was reviewed to evaluate for any intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage related or unrelated to the aneurysm. A total of 637 patients received intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center during an 8·3-year period. Thirty-three (5·2%) were found to have at least one intracranial aneurysms. Twenty-three (70%) of those received only intravenous thrombolysis, and 10 patients received combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis. The size of the largest aneurysm was 10 mm in maximum diameter (range: 2-10 mm). The mean size of aneurysms was 4·8 mm. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred among the 23 patients receiving only intravenous thrombolysis. Out of those who received a combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis, one developed symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the location of acute infarct, distant to the aneurysm location. Our findings suggest that neither intravenous thrombolysis nor combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis increases the risk of aneurysmal hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke

  14. Patient refusal of thrombolytic therapy for suspected acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Vahidy, F S; Rahbar, M H; Lal, A P; Grotta, J C; Savitz, S I

    2015-08-01

    To determine factors associated with patients refusing IV t-PA for suspected acute ischemic stroke (AIS), and to compare the outcomes of patients who refused t-PA (RT) with those treated with t-PA. Patients who were treated with and refused t-PA at our stroke center were identified retrospectively. Demographics, clinical presentation, and outcome measures were collected and compared. Clinical outcome was defined as excellent (mRS: 0-1), good (mRS: 0-2), and poor (mRS: 3-6). Over 7·5 years, 30 (4·2%) patients refused t-PA. There were no demographic differences between the treated and RT groups. The rate of RT decreased over time (OR 0·63, 95% CI 0·50-0·79). Factors associated with refusal included a later symptom onset to emergency department presentation time (OR 1·02, 95% CI 1·01-1·03), lower NIHSS (OR 1·11, 95% CI 1·03-1·18), a higher proportion of stroke mimics (OR 17·61, 95% CI 6·20-50·02) and shorter hospital stay (OR 1·32, 95% CI 1·09-1·61). Among patients who were subsequently diagnosed with ischemic stroke, only length of stay was significantly shorter for refusal patients (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·06-1·78). After controlling for mild strokes and stroke mimics, clinical outcome was not different between the groups (OR 1·61, 95% CI 0·69-3·73). The incidence of patients refusing t-PA has decreased over time, yet it may be a cause for t-PA under-utilization. Patients with milder symptoms were more likely to refuse t-PA. Refusal patients presented later to the hospital and had shorter hospital stays. One out of six refusal patients (16·6%) had a stroke mimic. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhong-Song; Duckwiler, Gary R; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Szeder, Viktor; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kim, Doojin; Ali, Latisha K; Starkman, Sidney; Vespa, Paul M; Salamon, Noriko; Villablanca, J Pablo; Viñuela, Fernando; Feng, Lei; Loh, Yince; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-06-01

    The influence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) on post-thrombolytic hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains controversial. To investigate the association of CMBs with HT and clinical outcomes among patients with large-vessel occlusion strokes treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We analyzed patients with acute stroke treated with Merci Retriever, Penumbra system or stent-retriever devices. CMBs were identified on pretreatment T2-weighted, gradient-recall echo MRI. We analyzed the association of the presence, burden, and distribution of CMBs with HT, procedural complications, in-hospital mortality, and clinical outcome. CMBs were detected in 37 (18.0%) of 206 patients. Seventy-three foci of microbleeds were identified. Fourteen patients (6.8%) had ≥2 CMBs, only 1 patient had ≥5 CMBs. Strictly lobar CMBs were found in 12 patients, strictly deep CMBs in 12 patients, strictly infratentorial CMBs in 2 patients, and mixed CMBs in 11 patients. There were no significant differences between patients with CMBs and those without CMBs in the rates of overall HT (37.8% vs 45.6%), parenchymal hematoma (16.2% vs 19.5%), procedure-related vessel perforation (5.4% vs 7.1%), in-hospital mortality (16.2% vs 18.3%), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-3 at discharge. CMBs were not independently associated with HT or in-hospital mortality in patients treated with either thrombectomy or intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Patients with CMBs are not at increased risk for HT and mortality following mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Excluding such patients from mechanical thrombectomy is unwarranted. The risk of HT in patients with ≥5 CMBs requires further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Trends from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuo, Ryu; Hata, Jun; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tooru; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a potentially serious complication of acute stroke, but its incidence appears to be decreasing. The aim of this study was to elucidate the etiology of GI bleeding and its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke in recent years. Methods Using the database of the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, 6,529 patients with acute ischemic stroke registered between June 2007 and December 2012 were included in this study. We recorded clinical data including any previous history of peptic ulcer, prestroke drug history including the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and poststroke treatment with suppressing gastric acidity. GI bleeding was defined as any episode of hematemesis or melena on admission or during hospitalization. The cause and origin of bleeding were diagnosed endoscopically. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for GI bleeding and its influence on deteriorating neurologic function, death, and poor outcome. Results GI bleeding occurred in 89 patients (1.4%) under the condition that 66% of the total patients received acid-suppressing agents after admission. Multivariate analysis revealed that GI bleeding was associated with the absence of dyslipidemia (p = 0.03), a previous history of peptic ulcer (p < 0.001), and the severity of baseline neurologic deficit (p = 0.002) but not with antiplatelet drugs, anticoagulants, and NSAIDs. The source was the upper GI tract in 51% of the cases; causes included peptic ulceration (28%) and malignancies (12%), and other or unidentified causes accounted for 60%. GI bleeding mostly occurred within 1 week after stroke onset. Hemoglobin concentration fell by a median value of 2.5 g/dl in patients with GI bleeding. Among them, 28 patients underwent blood transfusion (31.5%). After adjustment for confounding factors, GI bleeding was independently associated with neurologic

  17. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  18. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration secondary to

  19. Catecholamines, Steroids and Immune Alterations in Ischemic Stroke and Other Acute Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Juliane; Vogelgesang, Antje; Dressel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of stroke patients is not only determined by the extent and localization of the ischemic lesion, but also by stroke-associated infections. Stroke-induced immune alterations, which are related to stroke-associated infections, have been described over the last decade. Here we review the evidence that catecholamines and steroids induced by stroke result in stroke-induced immune alterations. In addition, we compare the immune alterations observed in other acute diseases such as myocardial infarction, brain trauma, and surgical trauma with the changes seen in stroke-induced immune alterations. PMID:25276491

  20. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Acute Ischemic Stroke from Septic Embolus: Successful Solitaire FR Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jackson J; Bishu, Kalkidan G; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2012-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is often complicated by systemic embolization. Acute stroke due to septic emboli is a particularly dreaded complication. Optimal treatment for acute stroke in IE has not been well outlined. Fibrinolytic therapy may be associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke in the setting of IE. We present a case of IE complicated by acute stroke which was successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy. This case illustrates a role of mechanical thrombectomy devices in this patient population.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Hypoperfusion in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nael, Kambiz; Meshksar, Arash; Liebeskind, David S.; Coull, Bruce M.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Villablanca, J. Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study compares the concordance between arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) for the identification of regional hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch tissue classification using a quantitative method. Methods The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were as follows: patients with acute ischemic syndrome with symptom onset <24 hours and acquisition of both ASL and DSC MR perfusion. The volumes of infarction and hypoperfused lesions were calculated on ASL and DSC multi-parametric maps. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups using time to maximum >6 sec as the reference. In a subset of patients who were successfully recanalized, the identical analysis was performed and the infarction and hypoperfused lesion volumes were used for paired pre- and posttreatment comparisons. Results Forty-one patients met our inclusion criteria. Twenty patients underwent successful endovascular revascularization (TICI>2a), resulting in a total of 61 ASL-DSC data pairs for comparison. The hypoperfusion volume on ASL-cerebral blood flow best approximated the DSC-time to peak volume (r=0.83) in pretreatment group and time to maximum (r=0.46) after recanalization. Both ASL-cerebral blood flow and DSC-TTP overestimated the hypoperfusion volume compared with time to maximum volume in pretreatment (F=27.41, P<0.0001) and recanalized patients (F=8.78, P<0.0001). Conclusions ASL-cerebral blood flow overestimates the DSC time to maximum hypoperfusion volume and mismatch classification in patients with acute ischemic syndrome. Continued overestimation of hypoperfused volume after recanalization suggests flow pattern and velocity changes in addition to arterial transit delay can affects the performance of ASL. PMID:23988646

  3. Develop a wearable ankle robot for in-bed acute stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yupeng; Xu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Yang, Chung Yong; Guo, Xin; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    Movement training is important in motor recovery post stroke and early intervention is critical to stroke rehabilitation. However, acute stroke survivors are actively trained with activities helpful for recovery of mobility in only 13% of the time in the acute phase. Considering the first few months post stroke is critical in stroke recovery (neuroplasticity), there is a strong need for movement therapy and manipulate/mobilize the joints. There is a lack of in-bed robotic rehabilitation in acute stroke. This study seeks to meet the clinic need and deliver intensive passive and active movement therapy using a wearable robot to enhance motor function in acute stroke. Passively, the wearable robot stretches the joint to its extreme positions safely and forcefully. Actively, movement training is conducted and game playing is used to guide and motivate the patient in movement training.

  4. Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Strengths and Synergies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V

    2017-03-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is responsible for around 80% of all strokes and is a leading cause of disability and death globally. There are two potential treatment strategies: restoring blood flow (reperfusion) and preventing cellular injury (neuroprotection). As yet, all the successful trials have involved reperfusion with numerous failures of neuroprotectants. There are two proven reperfusion strategies. Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase was first demonstrated to reduce disability with publication of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke tissue plasminogen activator trial in 1995. Since that time further trials have solidified the evidence base and demonstrated benefit when alteplase is administered within 4.5 hours of stroke onset. Exploration of potentially more effective thrombolytics is still underway with tenecteplase but others, such as desmoteplase, have been unsuccessful in clinical trials. The second proven reperfusion strategy is endovascular clot retrieval. This has been practiced for several years but came of age with the publication of five strongly positive trials in 2015. This review discusses the evidence for intravenous and intra-arterial reperfusion strategies and the advantages, disadvantages, and synergies of the two approaches. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  6. Acute Stroke due to Electrocution: Uncommon or Unrecognized?

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The growing dependence on electricity in our daily lives has increased the incidence of electrocution injuries. Although several neurological injuries have been described previously, acute stroke due to electrocution is rare. Our patient, a previously healthy man, was electrocuted after he grabbed a “live” high-voltage wire. Although he was hemodynamically stable, he remained confused with language defects. MRI of the brain showed acute stroke in the bilateral anterior cerebral artery territory and watershed regions of the left middle cerebral artery territory. MR angiogram incidentally showed A1 segment aplasia of the right anterior cerebral artery. Electrocution is known to cause vasospasm leading to end-organ damage similar to that seen in stroke. In our patient, vasospasm of the left anterior circulation likely led to watershed infarcts in the left parietal lobe and bilateral frontal lobes. Due to aplasia of the A1 segment on the right side, perfusion to both frontal lobes was solely from the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:28058122

  7. Venous imaging-based biomarkers in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Munuera, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Hernández-Pérez, María; Daunis-I-Estadella, Pepus; Dávalos, Antoni; Liebeskind, David S; Wintermark, Max; Demchuk, Andrew; Menon, Bijoy K; Thomalla, Götz; Nael, Kambiz; Pedraza, Salvador; Puig, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Vascular neuroimaging plays a decisive role in selecting the best therapy in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. However, compared with the arterial system, the role of veins has not been thoroughly studied. In this review, we present the major venous imaging-based biomarkers in ischaemic stroke. First, the presence of hypodense veins in the monophasic CT angiography ipsilateral to the arterial occlusion. Second, the asymmetry of venous drainage in the pathological cerebral hemisphere on CT and MRI dynamic angiography. Finally, the presence of hypodense veins on T2* -based MRI. From the physiological point of view, the venous imaging-based biomarkers would detect the alteration of brain perfusion (flow), as well as the optimisation of extraction oxygen mechanisms (misery perfusion). Several studies have correlated the venous imaging-based biomarkers with grade of collateral circulation, the ischaemic penumbra and clinical functional outcome. Although venous imaging-based biomarkers still have to be validated, growing evidence highlights a potential complementary role in the acute stroke clinical decision-making process. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Effect of dexamethasone on brain oedema following acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A K; Mohammad, Q D; Ullah, M A; Ahsan, M M; Rahman, A; Shakoor, M A

    2011-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to asses the effects of dexamethasone on brain oedema following acute ischemic stroke in the departments of Medicine of different hospitals from July, 2003 to December, 2006. A total of 60 patients were included in the study. They were divided into two groups keeping the similarity regarding the age, sex and severity of the stroke between two groups. There were 30 patients in experimental group and 30 in control group. The level of consciousness was compared by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on 3rd, 7th and 10th day of intervention and improvement was found in both the groups, but the improvement of level of consciousness was statistically significant in Dexamethasone treated group. The volume of hypodense area did not differ significantly in two groups in CT scans before and after treatment (p=0.74). The study results demonstrate that Dexamethasone improves the level of consciousness in acute ischemic stroke associated with brain oedema but did not reduce volume of hypodense area.

  9. Intravenous rtPA thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Laloux, P

    2001-06-01

    Early intravenous thrombolysis within the first three hours has been considered in the United States as the first proven treatment in acute ischemic stroke. However, not all patients will respond to this therapy which is also associated with a risk of symptomatic, including fatal, intracranial hemorrhage. This overview addresses the issue of efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase (tPA) in acute cerebral ischemia. The rationale for thrombolytic therapy and its limits are described. The controlled studies show that intravenous tPA is effective and safe when given under restrictive conditions within 3 hours after stroke onset, but the data for a larger therapeutic window between 3 and 6 hours remain controversial. The expected functional improvement and the risk of intracranial hemorrhage greatly depend on selective clinical and imaging criteria. For this purpose, MRI, using the diffusion- and perfusion-weighted sequences combined with MR- angiography, should be preferred to CT scan in the next future. Applicability of tPA thrombolysis in current neurological practice in Belgium is discussed. Before its generalization, this therapy should be restricted to specialized stroke centers and all treated patients should be recorded in a central data bank to guarantee continued surveillance.

  10. Systemic inflammation as a therapeutic target in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Acute systemic inflammatory reaction superimposed on chronic low-grade inflammation accompanies acute ischemic stroke. Elevated blood levels of systemic inflammatory markers such as IL-6 or C-reactive protein are associated with an unfavorable functional outcome and increased mortality after stroke. Animal studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between systemic inflammation and ischemic brain damage. The mechanisms linking systemic inflammation with poor outcome include increased neutrophil infiltration of cerebral cortex, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, impaired tissue reperfusion, increased platelet activation and microvascular coagulation and complement-dependent brain injury. Non-selective (e.g., by statins) or selective (e.g., by inhibition of IL-6) attenuation of systemic inflammation, enhancement of systemic anti-inflammatory response (e.g., by infusion of IL-1 receptor antagonist), prevention of infections that exacerbate systemic inflammation or inhibition of neuronal pathways triggering inflammatory reaction are potential therapeutic targets in stroke patients. This review discusses the relationship between systemic inflammation, cerebral ischemia and prognosis in the context of therapeutic strategies.

  11. Peripheral vascular disease as remote ischemic preconditioning, for acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark; Bilgin-Freiert, Arzu; Ellingson, Benjamin; Dusick, Joshua R; Liebeskind, David; Saver, Jeff; Gonzalez, Nestor R

    2013-10-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a powerful endogenous mechanism whereby a brief period of ischemia is capable of protecting remote tissues from subsequent ischemic insult. While this phenomenon has been extensively studied in the heart and brain in animal models, little work has been done to explore the effects of RIPC in human patients with acute cerebral ischemia. This study investigates whether chronic peripheral hypoperfusion, in the form of pre-existing arterial peripheral vascular disease (PVD) that has not been surgically treated, is capable of inducing neuroprotective effects for acute ischemic stroke. Individuals with PVD who had not undergone prior surgical treatment were identified from a registry of stroke patients. A control group within the same database was identified by matching patient's demographics and risk factors. The two groups were compared in terms of outcome by NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin scale (mRS), mortality, and volume of infarcted tissue at presentation and at discharge. The matching algorithm identified 26 pairs of PVD-control patients (9 pairs were female and 17 pairs were male). Age range was 20-93 years (mean 73). The PVD group was found to have significantly lower NIHSS scores at admission (NIHSS≤4: PVD 47.1%, control 4.35%, p<0.003), significantly more favorable outcomes at discharge (mRS≤2: PVD 30.8%, control 3.84%, p<0.012), and a significantly lower mortality rate (PVD 26.9%, control 57.7%, p=0.024). Mean acute stroke volume at admission and at discharge were significantly lower for the PVD group (admission: PVD 39.6 mL, control 148.3 mL, p<0.005 and discharge: PVD 111.7 mL, control 275 mL, p<0.001). Chronic limb hypoperfusion induced by PVD can potentially produce a neuroprotective effect in acute ischemic stroke. This effect resembles the neuroprotection induced by RIPC in preclinical models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors of Mortality in Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention: Analysis of the North American Solitaire Acute Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Linfante, Italo; Walker, Gail R; Castonguay, Alicia C; Dabus, Guilherme; Starosciak, Amy K; Yoo, Albert J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Britz, Gavin W; Marden, Franklin A; Alvarez, Alexandria; Gupta, Rishi; Sun, Chun-Huan J; Martin, Coleman; Holloway, William E; Mueller-Kronast, Nils; English, Joey D; Malisch, Tim W; Bozorgchami, Hormozd; Xavier, Andrew; Rai, Ansaar T; Froehler, Michael T; Badruddin, Aamir; Nguyen, Thanh N; Taqi, M Asif; Abraham, Michael G; Janardhan, Vallabh; Shaltoni, Hashem; Novakovic, Roberta; Chen, Peng R; Kaushal, Ritesh; Nanda, Ashish; Issa, Mohammad A; Nogueira, Raul G; Zaidat, Osama O

    2015-08-01

    Failure to recanalize predicts mortality in acute ischemic stroke. In the North American Solitaire Acute Stroke registry, we investigated parameters associated with mortality in successfully recanalized patients. Logistic regression was used to evaluate baseline characteristics and recanalization parameters for association with 90-day mortality. A multivariable model was developed based on backward selection with retention criteria of P<0.05 from factors with at least marginal significance (P≤0.10), then refit to minimize the number of excluded cases (missing data). Successfully recanalized patients had lower mortality (25.2% [59/234] versus 46.9% [38/81] P<0.001). There was no difference in symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage between patients with successful versus failed recanalization (9% [21/234] versus 14% [11/79]; P=0.205). However, mortality was significantly higher in patients with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (72% [23/32] versus 26% [73/281]; P<0.001). Proximal occlusion (internal carotid artery or vertebrobasilar), initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥18, use of rescue therapy (P<0.05), and 3+ passes (P<0.10) were associated with mortality in recanalized patients. In the multivariate model with good predictive power (c index=0.72), proximal occlusion, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥18, and use of rescue therapy remained significant independent predictors of 90-day mortality. Failure to recanalize and presence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage resulted in increased mortality. Despite successful recanalization, proximal occlusion, high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and need for rescue therapy were predictors of mortality. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A Critical Review of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score for Evaluation of Acute Stroke Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Julian; Thomalla, Götz

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of ischemic stroke lesions on computed tomography (CT) or MRI using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is widely used to guide acute stroke treatment. We aimed to review the current evidence on ASPECTS. Originally, the score was developed for standardized lesion assessment on non-contrast CT (NCCT). Early studies described ASPECTS as a predictor of functional outcome and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after iv-thrombolysis with a threshold of ≤7 suggested to identify patients at high risk. Following studies rather pointed toward a linear relationship between ASPECTS and functional outcome. ASPECTS has also been applied to assess perfusion CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS proved to be the best predictor of outcome, outperforming NCCT-ASPECTS in some studies. For DWI-ASPECTS varying thresholds to identify patients at risk for poor outcome were reported. ASPECTS has been used for patient selection in three of the five groundbreaking trials proving efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy published in 2015. ASPECTS values predict functional outcome after thrombectomy. Moreover, treatment effect of thrombectomy appears to depend on ASPECTS values being smaller or not present in low ASPECTS, while patients with ASPECTS 5–10 do clearly benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. However, as patients with low ASPECTS values were excluded from recent trials data on this subgroup is limited. There are several limitations to ASPECTS addressed in a growing number of studies. The score is limited to the anterior circulation, the template is unequally weighed and correlation with lesion volume depends on lesion location. Overall ASPECTS is a useful and easily applicable tool for assessment of prognosis in acute stroke treatment and to help guide acute treatment decisions regardless whether MRI or CT is used. Patients with low ASPECTS values are unlikely to achieve good outcome. However, methodological constraints of

  14. A Critical Review of Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score for Evaluation of Acute Stroke Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Julian; Thomalla, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of ischemic stroke lesions on computed tomography (CT) or MRI using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is widely used to guide acute stroke treatment. We aimed to review the current evidence on ASPECTS. Originally, the score was developed for standardized lesion assessment on non-contrast CT (NCCT). Early studies described ASPECTS as a predictor of functional outcome and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after iv-thrombolysis with a threshold of ≤7 suggested to identify patients at high risk. Following studies rather pointed toward a linear relationship between ASPECTS and functional outcome. ASPECTS has also been applied to assess perfusion CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS proved to be the best predictor of outcome, outperforming NCCT-ASPECTS in some studies. For DWI-ASPECTS varying thresholds to identify patients at risk for poor outcome were reported. ASPECTS has been used for patient selection in three of the five groundbreaking trials proving efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy published in 2015. ASPECTS values predict functional outcome after thrombectomy. Moreover, treatment effect of thrombectomy appears to depend on ASPECTS values being smaller or not present in low ASPECTS, while patients with ASPECTS 5-10 do clearly benefit from mechanical thrombectomy. However, as patients with low ASPECTS values were excluded from recent trials data on this subgroup is limited. There are several limitations to ASPECTS addressed in a growing number of studies. The score is limited to the anterior circulation, the template is unequally weighed and correlation with lesion volume depends on lesion location. Overall ASPECTS is a useful and easily applicable tool for assessment of prognosis in acute stroke treatment and to help guide acute treatment decisions regardless whether MRI or CT is used. Patients with low ASPECTS values are unlikely to achieve good outcome. However, methodological constraints of

  15. Determinants of Emergency Medical Services Utilization Among Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients in Hubei Province in China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoxv; Yang, Tingting; Gong, Yanhong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Li, Wenzhen; Song, Xingyue; Wang, Mengdie; Hu, Bo; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) can effectively shorten the prehospital delay for patients with acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to investigate EMS utilization and its associated factors in patients with acute ischemic stroke in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015, which included 2096 patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke from 66 hospitals in Hubei province in China. A multivariable stepwise logistic regression model was undertaken to identify the factors associated with EMS utilization. Of the 2096 participants, only 323 cases (15.4%) used EMS. Those acute ischemic stroke patients who previously used EMS (odds ratio [OR] =9.8), whose National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was ≥10 (OR=3.7), who lived in urban communities (OR=2.5), who had sudden onset of symptoms (OR=2.4), who experienced their first stroke (OR=1.8), and who recognized initial symptom as stroke (OR=1.4) were more likely to use EMS. Additionally, when acute ischemic stroke patients' stroke symptom were noticed first by others (OR=2.1), rather than by the patients, EMS was more likely to be used. A very low proportion of patients with acute ischemic stroke used the EMS in Hubei province in China. Considerable education programs are required regarding knowledge of potential symptoms and the importance of EMS for stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Safety Outcomes After Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Recent Stroke.

    PubMed

    Merkler, Alexander E; Salehi Omran, Setareh; Gialdini, Gino; Lerario, Michael P; Yaghi, Shadi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Navi, Babak B

    2017-08-01

    It is uncertain whether previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of receiving intravenous thrombolysis (tPA [tissue-type plasminogen activator]) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Using administrative claims data, we identified adults with AIS who received intravenous tPA at California, New York, and Florida hospitals from 2005 to 2013. Our primary outcome was intracerebral hemorrhage, and our secondary outcomes were unfavorable discharge disposition and inpatient mortality. We used logistic regression to compare rates of outcomes in patients with and without previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of intravenous tPA for AIS. We identified 36 599 AIS patients treated with intravenous tPA, of whom 568 (1.6%) had a previous ischemic stroke in the past 3 months. Of all patients who received intravenous tPA, the rate of intracerebral hemorrhage was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7%-5.1%), and death occurred in 10.7% (95% CI, 10.4%-11.0%). After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, and the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index, previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of thrombolysis for AIS was not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.4; P=0.62), but was associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9; P=0.001) and unfavorable discharge disposition (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7; P=0.04). Among patients who receive intravenous tPA for AIS, recent ischemic stroke is not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage but is associated with a higher risk of death and unfavorable discharge disposition. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Proximal Arterial Occlusion in Acute Ischemic Stroke with Low NIHSS Scores Should Not Be Considered as Mild Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Chang, Jane; Lee, Ji Sung; Choi, Kang-Ho; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Background Untreated acute mild stroke patients have substantial 90-day disability rates and worse outcomes than those who are treated with thrombolysis. There is little information regarding which patients with acute mild stroke will benefit from thrombolysis. We sought to investigate factors that are associated with early neurological deterioration (END) and poor prognosis in patients with acute mild stroke. Methods This was a retrospective study of consecutively registered patients with acute mild stroke (NIHSS ≤3) at our tertiary stroke center between October 2008 and December 2011. END was defined as an increase in NIHSS ≥2 points between hospital days 0 and 5. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores of 0–1 at 90 days post-stroke were defined as favorable outcomes. Results A total of 378 (mean age, 65.9±13.0 years) patients were included in this study. END occurred in 55 patients (14.6%). IV-thrombolysis was performed in only 9 patients. Symptomatic arterial occlusion on the initial MRA was independently associated with END (OR, 2.206; 95% CI, 1.219–3.994; p = 0.009) by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 119 patients with symptomatic arterial occlusion, ICA occlusion was independently associated with END (OR, 8.606; 95% CI, 2.312–32.043; p = 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates that symptomatic arterial occlusion may be an important predictor of END in patients with acute mild stroke. It may therefore be important to consider that acute ischemic stroke with symptomatic arterial occlusion and low NIHSS scores may not represent mild stroke in acute periods. PMID:23976971

  18. Complementary examinations other than neuroimaging and neurosonology in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Obach, Víctor; Sánchez, Maria José; Massons, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases requires non-routine complementary examinations to be performed. Thus, in specific cases, after neuroimaging (computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging cerebral scan sequences) and neurosonology (Doppler test of the supra-aortic trunks, transcranial echography and echocardiography), which academically allow us to classify the patients according to their etiologic stroke subtype, further examinations must be used to make a correct etiologic diagnostic. The present review aims to update knowledge about the usefulness of the different tests of blood and urine, plain chest radiography, X-ray of the spine, skull and abdomen, lumbar puncture, electroencephalography, evoked potentials, polysomnography, and pathologic examination after biopsy of the artery, skin, muscles, nerves, meninges, and brain, in the management of patients who have suffered an acute stroke. PMID:28685132

  19. Prehospital transfer medicalization increases thrombolysis rate in acute ischemic stroke. A French stroke unit experience.

    PubMed

    Joux, Julien; Olindo, Stéphane; Girard-Claudon, Annette; Chausson, Nicolas; Saint-Vil, Martine; Signate, Aissatou; Edimonana, Mireille; Jeannin, Severine; Aveillan, Mathieu; Cabre, Philippe; Smadja, Didier

    2013-09-01

    Narrow therapeutic window is a major cause of thrombolysis exclusion in acute ischemic stroke. Whether prehospital medicalization increases t-PA treatment rate is investigated in the present study. Intrahospital processing times and t-PA treatment were analyzed in stroke patients calling within 6h and admitted in our stoke unit. Patients transferred by our mobile medical team (SAMU) and by Fire Department (FD) paramedics were compared. 193 (61.6%) SAMU patients and 120 (38.4%) FD patients were included within 30 months. Clinical characteristics and onset-to-call intervals were similar in the two groups. Mean door-to-imaging delay was deeply reduced in the SAMU group (52 vs. 159 min, p<0.0001) and was <25 min in 50% of SAMU patients and 14% of FD patients (p<0.0001). SAMU management was the only independent factor of early imaging (p=0.0006). t-PA administration rate was higher in SAMU group than in FD group (42% vs. 28%, p=0.04). Proportion of patients with delayed therapeutic window was higher in FD group than in SAMU group (38% vs. 26%, p<0.0001). Prehospital transfer medicalization promotes emergency room bypass, direct radiology room admission and high thrombolysis rate in acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. VEGF expression in human brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mărgăritescu, Otilia; Pirici, D; Mărgăritescu, Cl

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third most common cause of death in humans, requiring further studies to elucidate its pathophysiological background. One potential mechanism to increase oxygen delivery to the affected tissue is induction of angiogenesis. The most potent proangiogenic factor is VEGF. For this reason, our study investigated immunohistochemically VEGF reactivity in different cellular brain compartments from 15 ischemic stroke patients, as well as from 2 age control cases. By enzymatic immunohistochemistry, we investigate VEGF expression in different brain cell compartments and then we quantified its signal intensity by assessing integrated optical densities (IOD). To establish the exact cellular brain topography of VEGF immunoreactivity we performed double fluorescent immunohistochemistry series (VEGF÷NeuN, GFAP, CD68, CD105). In control samples, VEGF reactivity was observed especially in neurons from the Brodmann cortical layers IV to VI and in protoplasmic astrocytes from the deeper layers of gray matter and in endothelial cells from normal blood vessels because of systemic hypoxia generated after death. In acute ischemic stroke samples, this reactivity was noticed in all brain cellular compartments but with different intensities. The most reactive compartment was the neurons, the intensity of VEGF reaction decreasing with the lesional age from the core infarct toward intact adjacent brain cortex. With a lower intensity, VEGF reaction was noticed in astrocytes compartments, especially in gemistocytic astrocytes adjacent to the liquefaction zone. We also noticed a weak reaction in activated non-phagocytic microglia from the periphery of liquefaction zones, and high VEGF-CD105 colocalization values at the level of microvessels that surround the infarcted brain area. In conclusion, this reactivity could suggest that VEGF might exhibit neuronal and glial protective effects and also a neoangiogenic property in acute ischemic stroke, facts that may have

  1. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    PubMed Central

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  2. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Hannah J; Battey, Thomas Wk; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema, and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (ΔNIHSS ≥ 4), early neurological recovery (ΔNIHSS ≤ -4) or early neurological stability (ΔNIHSS between -3 and 3). The association between these categories and volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hemorrhage, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale score were evaluated. Results Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were less likely to be independent (modified Rankin Scale = 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with early neurological recovery ( P < 0.001). Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with early neurological recovery ( P = 0.03; P < 0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of parenchymal hemorrhage, and reperfusion ( P < 0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign and is associated with tissue injury, including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors.

  3. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Hannah J.; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (END, ΔNIHSS ≥4), early neurological recovery (ENR, ΔNIHSS, ≥−4) or early neurological stability (ENS, ΔNIHSS between −3 and 3). The association between these categories and the volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hematoma (PH) and 3 month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score were evaluated. Results Patients with END or ENS were less likely to be independent (mRS 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with ENR (P<0.001). Patients with END or ENS were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with ENR (P=0.03; P<0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of PH, and reperfusion (P<0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign, and is associated with tissue injury including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors. PMID:27334760

  4. Improving door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke: the design and rationale for the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Target: Stroke initiative.

    PubMed

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Saver, Jeffrey L; Reeves, Mathew J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Sacco, Ralph L; Schwamm, Lee H

    2011-10-01

    The benefits of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in acute ischemic stroke are time-dependent, and guidelines recommend a door-to-needle time of ≤60 minutes. However, fewer than one third of acute ischemic stroke patients who receive tPA are treated within guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. This article describes the design and rationale of Stroke, a national initiative organized by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association in partnership with other organizations to assist hospitals in increasing the proportion of tPA-treated patients who achieve guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. The initial program goal is to achieve a door-to-needle time≤60 minutes for at least 50% of acute ischemic stroke patients. Key best practice strategies previously associated with achieving faster door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke were identified. The 10 key strategies chosen by Stroke include emergency medical service prenotification, activating the stroke team with a single call, rapid acquisition and interpretation of brain imaging, use of specific protocols and tools, premixing tPA, a team-based approach, and rapid data feedback. The program includes many approaches intended to promote hospital participation, implement effective strategies, share best practices, foster collaboration, and achieve stated goals. A detailed program evaluation is also included. In the first year, Stroke has enrolled over 1200 United States hospitals. Stroke, a multidimensional initiative to improve the timeliness of tPA administration, aims to elevate clinical performance in the care of acute ischemic stroke, facilitate the more rapid integration of evidence into clinical practice, and improve outcomes.

  5. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Stroke About Stroke Stroke -- A Serious Event A stroke is serious, just ... lifestyle can help you prevent stroke. What Is Stroke? A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." ...

  6. Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Acute Stroke Care in the Florida-Puerto Rico Collaboration to Reduce Stroke Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Gardener, Hannah; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Ciliberti-Vargas, Maria A; Gutierrez, Carolina M; Asdaghi, Negar; Burgin, W Scott; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Garcia-Rivera, Enid J; Nobo, Ulises; Oluwole, Sofia; Rose, David Z; Waters, Michael F; Zevallos, Juan Carlos; Robichaux, Mary; Waddy, Salina P; Romano, Jose G; Rundek, Tatjana

    2017-02-14

    Racial-ethnic disparities in acute stroke care can contribute to inequality in stroke outcomes. We examined race-ethnic disparities in acute stroke performance metrics in a voluntary stroke registry among Florida and Puerto Rico Get With the Guidelines-Stroke hospitals. Seventy-five sites in the Florida Puerto Rico Stroke Registry (66 Florida and 9 Puerto Rico) recorded 58 864 ischemic stroke cases (2010-2014). Logistic regression models examined racial-ethnic differences in acute stroke performance measures and defect-free care (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment, in-hospital antithrombotic therapy, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, discharge antithrombotic therapy, appropriate anticoagulation therapy, statin use, smoking cessation counseling) and temporal trends. Among ischemic stroke cases, 63% were non-Hispanic white (NHW), 18% were non-Hispanic black (NHB), 14% were Hispanic living in Florida, and 6% were Hispanic living in Puerto Rico. NHW patients were the oldest, followed by Hispanics, and NHBs. Defect-free care was greatest among NHBs (81%), followed by NHWs (79%) and Florida Hispanics (79%), then Puerto Rico Hispanics (57%) (P<0.0001). Puerto Rico Hispanics were less likely than Florida whites to meet any stroke care performance metric other than anticoagulation. Defect-free care improved for all groups during 2010-2014, but the disparity in Puerto Rico persisted (2010: NHWs=63%, NHBs=65%, Florida Hispanics=59%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=31%; 2014: NHWs=93%, NHBs=94%, Florida Hispanics=94%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=63%). Racial-ethnic/geographic disparities were observed for acute stroke care performance metrics. Adoption of a quality improvement program improved stroke care from 2010 to 2014 in Puerto Rico and all Florida racial-ethnic groups. However, stroke care quality delivered in Puerto Rico is lower than in Florida. Sustained support of evidence-based acute stroke quality improvement programs is required to improve stroke care and

  7. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng-I.; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Sheng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Yuen, Chun-Man; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke. PMID:24716192

  8. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    PubMed

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market.

  9. Intracranial stents in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; Bravo Rey, I; Bravo Rodríguez, F A; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J; Oteros Fernández, R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracranial stenting as a rescue therapy after failed mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively studied 42 patients treated with intracranial stenting after failed mechanical thrombectomy between December 2008 and January 2016. We compared outcomes before and after the incorporation of stentrievers. We assessed the degree of recanalization in the carotid and basilar territories (modified TIMI score), prognostic factors, and outcome (modified Rankin Score at 3 months). Safety was evaluated in function of the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Median NIHSS was 17 in patients with carotid territory strokes and 26 in those with vertebrobasilar territory strokes. Median time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 225minutes in carotid territory strokes and 390minutes in vertebrobasilar territory strokes. A total of 10 patients underwent intravenous fibrinolytic therapy before treatment with stentrievers. Two patients developed SICH; both had undergone intravenous fibrinolytic therapy (p=0.0523). Recanalization was effective in 30 (71.4%) in the entire series: in 7 (50%) of 14 patients treated before the incorporation of stentrievers and in 23 (82.1%) of 28 treated after the incorporation of stentrievers (p=0.0666). Outcome at 3 months was good in 2 (14.3%) patients in the earlier group and in 14 (50%) patients in the later group (p=0.042). We found significant associations between recanalization and outcome (p=0.0415) and between shorter time to treatment and outcome (p=0.002). Outcome was good in 14 (48.3%) of the 29 patients with carotid territory strokes and in 2 (15.4%) of the 13 patients with vertebrobasilar territory strokes (p=0.078). Intracranial stenting is the rescue treatment when the usual treatment fails. Stentrievers must be used to eliminate the clot burden before stenting. In our study, antiplatelet treatment did not seem to increase the risk of SICH

  10. Predicting the outcome of stroke: acute stage after cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Oxbury, J M; Greenhall, R C; Grainger, K M

    1975-01-01

    On admission to hospital during the acute phase of a stroke presumed due to ischaemic infarction in one cerebral hemisphere 93 patients were examined to determine the factors associated with a poor prognosis for immediate survival. The patients particularly at risk were those who were overtly unconscious and those with any combination of impaired consciousness, dense hemiplegia, and failure of conjugate ocular gaze towards the side of the limb weakness. Necropsy evidence suggested that these signs usually indicate infarction of the whole of one middle cerebral artery territory which is often secondary to internal carotid artery occlusion and commonly produces fatal cerebral oedema. PMID:1139257

  11. [Efficacy of сerebrolysin in acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Petrova, O P; Chuprasov, A V; Matveev, N V

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the effect of cerebrolysin used in dose 30 ml daily during 10 days on rehabilitation measures in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Material and methods. The 1st group consisited of 23 patients who received standard treatment and cerebrolysin, the 2nd group included 89 patients who received standard treatment only. The severity of neurological deficits (NIHSS) and the level of disability (mRS) were assessed. Results and conclusion. A significantly earlier recovery (p<0,05) and decrease in disability were identified. A more pronounced effect was seen in young patinets and when treatment started early.

  12. Infarct location and sleep apnea: evaluating the potential association in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephanie M; Yaggi, H Klar; Taylor, Stanley; Qin, Li; Ivan, Cristina S; Austin, Charles; Ferguson, Jared; Radulescu, Radu; Tobias, Lauren; Sico, Jason; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Williams, Linda S; Lampert, Rachel; Miech, Edward J; Matthias, Marianne S; Kapoor, John; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-10-01

    The literature about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stroke location is conflicting with some studies finding an association and others demonstrating no relationship. Among acute ischemic stroke patients, we sought to examine the relationship between stroke location and the prevalence of OSA; OSA severity based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), arousal frequency, and measure of hypoxia; and number of central and obstructive respiratory events. Data were obtained from patients who participated in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01446913) that evaluated the effectiveness of a strategy of diagnosing and treating OSA among patients with acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Stroke location was classified by brain imaging reports into subdivisions of lobes, subcortical areas, brainstem, cerebellum, and vascular territory. The association between acute stroke location and polysomnographic findings was evaluated using logistic regression for OSA presence and negative binomial regression for AHI. Among 73 patients with complete polysomnography and stroke location data, 58 (79%) had OSA. In unadjusted models, no stroke location variable was associated with the prevalence or severity of OSA. Similarly, in multivariable modeling, groupings of stroke location were also not associated with OSA presence. These results indicate that OSA is present in the majority of stroke patients and imply that stroke location cannot be used to identify a group with higher risk of OSA. The results also suggest that OSA likely predated the stroke. Given this high overall prevalence, strong consideration should be given to obtaining polysomnography for all ischemic stroke patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Right Hemispatial Neglect: Frequency and Characterization Following Acute Left Hemisphere Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of various types of unilateral spatial neglect and associated areas of neural dysfunction after left hemisphere stroke are not well characterized. Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in distinct spatial reference frames have been identified after acute right, but not left hemisphere stroke. We studied 47 consecutive right handed patients within 48 hours of left hemisphere stroke to determine the frequency and distribution of types of right USN using cognitive testing and MRI imaging. The distribution of USN types was different from the previously reported distribution following acute right hemisphere stroke. In this left hemisphere stroke population, allocentric neglect was more frequent than egocentric neglect. PMID:17174459

  14. Rapid Short MRI Sequence Useful in Eliminating Stroke Mimics Among Acute Stroke Patients Considered for Intravenous Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Stephanie; Burdine, Joselyn; Verenes, Michael; Webster, James; Faber, Theodore; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute stroke teams are challenged by IV-tPA decision making in patients with acute neurological symptoms when the diagnosis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the rapid Brain Attack Team (BAT) MRI in selecting patients for IV-tPA administration who present acutely to the emergency room with stroke-like symptoms and an unclear diagnosis. Methods Consecutive patients were identified who presented within 4.5 hours of onset of stroke-like symptoms and considered for treatment with IV-tPA. When the diagnosis was not clear, a 9-minute BAT MRI was obtained. Stroke risk factors and NIH stroke scale obtained on presentation were compared between patients in whom BAT MRI was obtained and those in whom BAT MRI was not obtained. Similarly, comparisons were made between patients in whom BAT MRI detected abnormalities and those in whom BAT MRI did not detect abnormalities. BAT MRIs were analyzed to determine if radiological findings impacted clinical management and discharge diagnosis. Results In a 30-month period, 432 patients presenting with acute stroke-like symptoms were identified. Of these patients, 82 received BAT MRI. Patients receiving BAT MRI were younger, more likely to be smokers, and less likely to be selected for IV-tPA administration compared to those in whom a more definitive diagnosis of stroke precluded a BAT MRI. Of the 82 BAT MRIs, 25 were read as positive for acute ischemia. The patients with acute ischemia on BAT MRI were older, more likely to be males, have a history of hypercholesterolemia and atrial fibrillation, and more likely to be selected for IV-tPA administration compared to those with a negative BAT MRI. Of the 57 BAT MRIs read as negative for acute ischemia or hemorrhage, discharge diagnoses included TIA, MRI negative stroke, conversion/functional disorder, and multiple other illnesses. Conclusion In patients with acute stroke-like symptoms, BAT MRI may be used to confirm acute ischemic stroke, exclude

  15. A collaborative system for endovascular treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: the Madrid Stroke Network experience.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Fuentes, B; Ximénez-Carrillo, Á; Vivancos, J; Masjuan, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Zapata-Wainberg, G; Cruz-Culebras, A; García-Pastor, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Fandiño, E; Frutos, R; Caniego, J-L; Méndez, J-C; Fernández-Prieto, A; Bárcena-Ruiz, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2016-02-01

    The complexity and expense of endovascular treatment (EVT) for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) can present difficulties in bringing this approach closer to the patients. A collaborative node was implemented involving three stroke centres (SCs) within the Madrid Stroke Network to provide round-the-clock access to EVT for AIS. A weekly schedule was established to ensure that at least one SC was 'on-call' to provide EVT for all those with moderate to severe AIS due to large vessel occlusion, >4.5 h from symptom onset, or within this time-window but with contraindication to, or failure of, systemic thrombolysis. The time-window for treatment was 8 h for anterior circulation stroke and <24 h in posterior stroke. Outcomes measured were re-canalization rates, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months, mortality and symptomatic intra-cranial haemorrhage (SICH). Over a 2-year period (2012-2013), 303 candidate patients with AIS were considered for EVT as per protocol, and 196 (65%) received treatment. Reasons for non-treatment were significant improvement (14%), spontaneous re-canalization (26%), clinical worsening (9%) or radiological criteria of established infarction (31%). Re-canalization rate amongst treated patients was 80%. Median delay from symptom onset to re-canalization was 323 min (p25; p75 percentiles 255; 430). Mortality was 11%; independence (mRS 0-2) was 58%; SICH was 3%. Implementation of a collaborative network to provide EVT for AIS is feasible and effective. Results are good in terms of re-canalization rates and clinical outcomes. © 2015 EAN.

  16. Current management of acute ischemic stroke. Part 1: Thrombolytics and the 3-hour window.

    PubMed Central

    Herd, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To help family physicians who care for patients with acute stroke or who are involved in planning service delivery or resource allocation to understand recent developments in acute stroke care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search indicated that most data were derived from well designed, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, including all the largest international studies and large systematic reviews. MAIN MESSAGE: Treatment of acute stroke with tissue plasminogen activator seems beneficial for certain patients with certain kinds of stroke. Because thrombolytic therapy is not without risk and requires substantial resources, it should be administered only by physicians trained in its use and in centres with the necessary experience and resources. Because time is important, an organized and efficient system of stroke care with collaboration between hospital and prehospital care providers and help from ordinary citizens is essential. CONCLUSION: Management of acute stroke is an emerging discipline; many potential therapies are still experimental. PMID:11570304

  17. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  18. Stroke care: initial data from a county-based bypass protocol for patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed F; Shawver, Julie; Espinosa Morales, Aixa; Salahuddin, Hisham; Tietjen, Gretchen; Lindstrom, David; Parquette, Brent; Adams, Andrea; Korsnack, Andrea; Jumaa, Mouhammad A

    2017-07-01

    Early identification and transfer of patients with acute stroke to a primary or comprehensive stroke center results in favorable outcomes. To describe implementation and results of an emergency medical service (EMS)-driven stroke protocol in Lucas County, Ohio. All county EMS personnel (N=464) underwent training in the Rapid Arterial oCclusion Evaluation (RACE) score. The RACE Alert (RA) protocol, whereby patients with stroke and a RACE score ≥5 were taken to a facility that offered advanced therapy, was implemented in July 2015. During the 6-month study period, 109 RAs were activated. Time efficiencies, diagnostic accuracy, and mechanical thrombectomy (MT) outcomes were compared with standard 'stroke-alert' (N=142) patients from the preceding 6 months. An increased treatment rate (25.6% vs 12.6%, p<0.05) and improved time efficiency (median door-to-CT 10 vs 28 min, p<0.05; door-to-needle 46 vs 75 min, p<0.05) of IV tissue plasminogen activator within the RA cohort was achieved. The rate of MT (20.1% vs 7.7%, p=0.06) increased and treatment times improved, including median arrival-to-puncture (68 vs 128 min, p=0.04) and arrival-to-recanalization times (101 vs 205 min, p=0.001) in favor of the RA cohort. A non-significant trend towards improved outcome (50% vs 36.4%, p=0.3) in the RA cohort was noted. The RA protocol also showed improved diagnostic specificity for ischemic stroke (52.3% vs 30.1%, p<0.05). Our results indicate that EMS adaptation of the RA protocol within Lucas County is feasible and effective for early triage and treatment of patients with stroke. Using this protocol, we can significantly improve treatment times for both systemic thrombolysis and MT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Prediction of Early Recurrence After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Arsava, E Murat; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Gungor, Levent; Noh, Hyun Jin; Lordelo, Morgana de Jesus; Avery, Ross; Maier, Ilko L; Ay, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    Approximately half of recurrent strokes occur within days and weeks of an ischemic stroke. It is imperative to identify patients at imminent risk of recurrent stroke because recurrent events lead to prolonged hospitalization, worsened functional outcome, and increased mortality. To test the validity of a prognostic score that was exclusively developed to predict early risk of stroke recurrence in a multicenter setting. This hospital-based cohort study examined patients with and without magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed recurrent stroke within 90 days after an ischemic stroke. The study was performed at 3 teaching hospitals in the United States, Brazil, and South Korea and comprised adult patients admitted within 72 hours of symptom onset with a magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Recruitment to the US cohort was performed from June 1, 2009, through April 30, 2011. Recruitment to the Korean and Brazilian cohorts was performed from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2011. Data analysis was performed from June 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome was recurrent ischemic stroke as defined by a clinical incident that was clearly attributable to a new area of brain infarction occurring within the 90 days of index infarction. An investigator who was masked to the patient's recurrence status calculated the Recurrence Risk Estimator (RRE) score for each patient based on information available after initial line of testing in the emergency department. We assessed the predictive performance of the RRE by computing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The study included 1468 consecutive patients with 59 recurrent ischemic stroke events. The median age of the patients was 69 (interquartile range, 58-79) years, and 633 (43.1%) were female. The cumulative 90-day recurrence rate was 4.2% (95% CI, 3.2%-5.2%). The mean RRE score was 2.2 (95% CI, 1.9-2.5) in patients with recurrence and 1.0 (95% CI, 1

  20. Discovery of Metabolite Biomarkers for Acute Ischemic Stroke Progression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peifang; Li, Ruiting; Antonov, Anton A; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Hua, Yunfei; Guo, Huimin; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, Peijia; Chen, Lixia; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Fengguo; Zhang, Zunjian; Zhu, Yulan; Huang, Yin

    2017-02-03

    Stroke remains a major public health problem worldwide; it causes severe disability and is associated with high mortality rates. However, early diagnosis of stroke is difficult, and no reliable biomarkers are currently established. In this study, mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics was utilized to characterize the metabolic features of the serum of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) to identify novel sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis and progression. First, global metabolic profiling was performed on a training set of 80 human serum samples (40 cases and 40 controls). The metabolic profiling identified significant alterations in a series of 26 metabolites with related metabolic pathways involving amino acid, fatty acid, phospholipid, and choline metabolism. Subsequently, multiple algorithms were run on a test set consisting of 49 serum samples (26 cases and 23 controls) to develop different classifiers for verifying and evaluating potential biomarkers. Finally, a panel of five differential metabolites, including serine, isoleucine, betaine, PC(5:0/5:0), and LysoPE(18:2), exhibited potential to differentiate AIS samples from healthy control samples, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.988 and 0.971 in the training and test sets, respectively. These findings provided insights for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapeutic approaches for AIS.

  1. Central aortic pressure and pulsatility index in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Yeon; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Park, Joong Hyun; Han, Seung Min; Im, Jin Hee; Han, Sang Won; Baik, Jong Sam; Park, Jae Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between transcranial Doppler (TCD) pulsatility index (PI) and central aortic pressure by measurement of the aortic augmentation index (AIx). We enrolled 148 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients were eligible for the study if they experienced their first ischemic stroke within the preceding 7 days and were 45 years of age or older. At Day 7 (±2) after stroke onset, TCD studies were performed and AIx was measured by applanation tonometry on the same days. The mean age was 66.3 (47-90) years and 37.8% were women. The mean middle cerebral artery (MCA) PI was significantly related with age (r =.361), hypertension (r = .184), peripheral systolic blood pressure (SBP; r = .211), peripheral pulse pressure (PP; r = .396), aortic SBP (r = .184), aortic DBP (r = -.181), and aortic PP (r = .371). The basilar artery (BA) PI was significantly related with age (r = .311), peripheral DBP (r = -.267), peripheral PP (r = .358), aortic DBP (r = -.266), and aortic PP (r = .347). TCD PI was significantly related with central aortic pressure, especially PP. The PI in the MCA and BA is closely associated with the pulsatile component of BP in the systemic circulation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Oral Reading in Acute Left Hemispheric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cloutman, Lauren L.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron L.; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Hillis, Argye E.

    2010-01-01

    Oral reading is a complex skill involving the interaction of orthographic, phonological, and semantic processes. Functional imaging studies with non-impaired adult readers have identified a widely distributed network of frontal, inferior parietal, posterior temporal, and occipital brain regions involved in the task. However, while functional imaging can identify cortical regions engaged in the process under examination, it cannot identify those brain regions essential for the task. The current study aimed to identify those neuroanatomical regions critical for successful oral reading by examining the relationship between word and nonword oral reading deficits and areas of tissue dysfunction in acute stroke. We evaluated 91 patients with left hemisphere ischemic stroke with a test of oral word and nonword reading, and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging, within 24–48 hours of stroke onset. A voxel-wise statistical map showed that impairments in word and nonword reading were associated with a distributed network of brain regions, including the inferior and middle frontal gyri, the middle temporal gyrus, the supramarginal and angular gyri, and the middle occipital gyrus. In addition, lesions associated with word deficits were found to be distributed more frontally, while nonword deficits were associated with lesions distributed more posteriorly. PMID:20889196

  3. Neuroprotective effects of glycine for therapy of acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gusev, E I; Skvortsova, V I; Dambinova, S A; Raevskiy, K S; Alekseev, A A; Bashkatova, V G; Kovalenko, A V; Kudrin, V S; Yakovleva, E V

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to assess the safety and the efficacy of the pharmaceutic drug glycine in 200 patients with acute (<6 h) ischaemic stroke in the carotid artery territory. Fifty patients received placebo, 49 glycine 0.5 g/day, 51 glycine 1.0 g/day and 50 glycine 2.0 g/day for 5 days in each group. The efficacy of glycine was assessed by clinical analysis, by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of levels of blood serum autoantibodies to NMDA-binding proteines, by detection of excitatory (glutamate, aspartate) and inhibitory (glycine, GABA) amino acid concentrations and lipid peroxidation products (TBARS) in CSF. The trial confirmed the safety profile of the glycine treatment. Slight sedation was observed in 9 patients (4. 5%) as a side-effect. Other marked side-effects or adverse events were absent. The glycine treatment at the dose of 1.0-2.0 g/day was accompanied by a tendency to a decreased 30-day mortality (5.9% in 1. 0 g/day glycine and 10% in 2.0 g/day glycine groups vs. 14% in the placebo and 14.3% in 0.5 g/day glycine groups), to an improved clinical outcome on the Orgogozo Stroke Scale (p < 0.01) and the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (p < 0.01) and to a favourable functional outcome on the Barthel index (p < 0.01 in 1.0 g/day glycine vs. placebo group in patients with no or mild disability). An early normalization of autoantibody titres to NMDA-binding proteins in serum was found (p < 0.01 vs. placebo), a reduction of glutamate and aspartate levels (p < 0.05 vs. placebo), an increase in GABA concentrations (p < 0.01 vs. placebo in severe stroke patients) and also a reduction of TBARS levels (p < 0.05 vs. placebo) in CSF by day 3. Thus, the trial suggests that sublingual application of 1.0-2. 0 g/day glycine started within 6 h after the onset of acute ischaemic stroke in the carotid artery territory is safe and can exert favourable clinical effects. These results will be verified in further trials with a

  4. Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changshen; An, Zhongping; Zhao, Wenjuan; Wang, Wanjun; Gao, Chunlin; Liu, Shoufeng; Wang, Jinghua; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients. Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded. Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors. Elderly women with AIS had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-AIS patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

  5. Stop Stroke© Acute Care Coordination Medical Application: A Brief Report on Postimplementation Performance at a Primary Stroke Center.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert L; Sumathipala, Dineth; Reeves, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of the Pulsara Stop Stroke© medical application on door-to-needle (DTN) time in patients presenting to our emergency department with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The secondary objective was to evaluate the DTN performance of dedicated neurohospitalists versus private practice neurologists covering emergency department stroke call. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the Good Shepherd Health System stroke quality improvement dashboard for an 18-month period. The primary outcome was mean DTN time performance in cases with and without Stop Stroke© usage. Secondary outcome was mean DTN time between neurohospitalist and private neurologists with and without use of Stop Stroke©. During the study period, there were 85 stroke activations receiving tissue plasminogen activator (63 with Stop Stroke©, 22 without Stop Stroke©). In cases where the app was used, we observed a reduction in mean DTN time of 40 minutes (87-47 minutes), a 46% reduction. There was no significant difference in DTN time observed between the neurohospitalist and private neurologist performance independent of app usage. Mean DTN less than 60 minutes improved with app use from 18% to 85% with Stop Stroke©. In patients arriving to our primary stroke center with AIS, use of Pulsara Stop Stroke© acute care coordination app decreased mean DTN time by 40 minutes, a significant 46% improvement in this metric and is consistent with other studies of the app. We further observed a 3.7× improvement in DTN less than 60 minutes with use of the app. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regional prediction of tissue fate in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hao, Qing; Alger, Jeffry R; Hu, Xiao; Liebeskind, David S

    2012-10-01

    Early and accurate prediction of tissue outcome is essential to the clinical decision-making process in acute ischemic stroke. We present a quantitative predictive model of tissue fate that combines regional imaging features available after onset. A key component is the use of cuboids randomly sampled during the learning process. Models trained with time-to-maximum feature (Tmax) computed from perfusion weighted images (PWI) are compared to the ones obtained from the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The prediction task is formalized as a regression problem where the inputs are the local cuboids extracted from Tmax or ADC images at onset, and the output is the segmented FLAIR intensity of the tissue 4 days after intervention. Experiments on 25 acute stroke patients demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in predicting tissue fate. Results on our dataset show the superiority of the regional model vs. a single-voxel-based approach, indicate that PWI regional models outperform ADC models, and demonstrates that a nonlinear regression model significantly improves the results in comparison to a linear model.

  7. Serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 is decreased in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Douglas M; Rosado, Christian A; Haltigan, Emily A; Regenhardt, Robert W; Sumners, Colin; Waters, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cardio and neuro-protective carboxypeptidase, are dynamically altered after stroke in preclinical models. We sought to characterize the previously unexplored changes in serum ACE2 activity of stroke patients and the mechanism of these changes. Serum samples were obtained from patients during acute ischemic stroke (n=39), conditions mimicking stroke (stroke-alert, n=23), or from control participants (n=20). Enzyme activity levels were analyzed by fluorometric assay and correlated with clinical variables by regression analyses. Serum ACE2 activity was significantly lower in acute ischemic stroke as compared to both control and stroke-alert patients, followed by an increase to control levels at three days. Serum ACE2 activity significantly correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke after controlling for other factors (P=0.01). Additional associations with ACE2 activity included a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure at presentation in stroke-alert (R(2)=0.24, P=0.03), while stroke levels showed no correlation (R(2)=0.01, P=0.50). ACE2 sheddase activity was unchanged between groups. These dynamic changes in serum ACE2 activity in stroke, which concur with preclinical studies, are not likely to be driven primarily by acute changes in blood pressure or sheddase activity. These findings provide new insight for developing therapies targeting this protective system in ischemic stroke. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Review of 97 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan; Buddaraju, Kiran; Majeed, Anas; Sharma, Suryanarayana; Javali, Mahendra; Acharya, Purushottam; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has now become a standard treatment in eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who present within 4.5 h of symptom onset. Objective: To determine the usefulness of IVT and the subset of patients who will benefit from IVT in AIS within 4.5 h. Materials and Methods: Patients with AIS within 4.5 h of symptom onset who underwent IVT were studied prospectively. The study period was from October 2011 to October 2015. Results: A total of 97 patients were thrombolysed intravenously. The mean onset to needle time in all patients was 177.2 ± 62 min (range: 60–360). At 3 months follow-up, favorable outcome was seen in 65 patients (67.1%) and poor outcome including death in the remaining 32 patients (32.9%). Factors predicting favorable outcome was age <65 years (P = 0.02), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) <15 (P < 0.001), small vessel occlusion (P = 0.006), cardioembolism (P = 0.006), and random blood sugar (RBS) <250 mg/dl (P < 0.001). Factors predicting poor outcome was diabetes mellitus (P = 0.01), dyslipidemia (P = 0.01), NIHSS at admission >15 (P = 0.03), RBS >250 mg/dl (P = 0.01), Dense cerebral artery sign, age, glucose level on admission, onset-to-treatment time, NIHSS on admission score >5 (P = 0.03), and occlusion of large artery (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Milder baseline stroke severity, blood glucose <250 mg/dL, younger patients (<65 years), cardioembolic stroke, and small vessel occlusion benefit from recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:28149079

  9. Predictors of extubation success in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Hanafy, Khalid A; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients often undergo intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Prolonged intubation and MV have disadvantages and complications. Conventional extubation criteria based only on respiratory parameters are insufficient to guide extubation practices in stroke patients where capacity for airway protection is a major concern. To identify clinical and neuroanatomical markers of successful extubation in AIS patients requiring MV. Retrospective review of tertiary care hospital patient database from May 2009-November 2012 to identify consecutive patients with AIS intubated during hospitalization. We assessed the effect of age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, level of consciousness, facial weakness, dysarthria, neglect, infarct location, dysphagia, respiratory parameters and history of pneumonia on successful extubation by hospital discharge using multivariate logistic regression analysis. 112 subjects met study criteria and were included in the analysis. Age and NIHSS scores (mean±standard deviation) were 74.5±16.1years and 19±9.8, respectively; 56% were women. In multivariate analysis, NIHSS score≤15 (Odds Ratio 4.6, 95% Confidence Interval 1.9-11.3, p<0.001) and absence of dysarthria prior to intubation (Odds Ratio 3.0, 95% Confidence interval 1.1-8.3, p=0.04) were independently associated with successful extubation. Conventional respiratory parameters had no effect on extubation success in this cohort. Milder stroke and absence of dysarthria prior to intubation were independently associated with extubation success. Our findings could help inform extubation practices in patients with AIS though prospective validation is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  11. Role of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Farook, Naureen; Haussen, Diogo; Sur, Samir; Snelling, Brian; Gersey, Zachary; Yavagal, Dileep; Peterson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Systemic heparinization has become the mainstay anticoagulant in neurointerventional procedures to prevent thromboembolic complications. Its benefit during endovascular therapy for acute stroke however has not been established. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the impact of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We performed a retrospective review of our interventional stroke database from February 2009 to September 2012 for patients with anterior circulation AIS with ICA-T or MCA M1 occlusions. 76 patients were categorized into 2 groups: intraprocedural vs. no intraprocedural heparin use. Outcomes measured included reperfusion (modified TICI scale), cerebral hemorrhages (ECASS criteria), and 90-day outcomes (modified Rankin scale). Baseline characteristics were similar between heparin and non-heparin treated patients, except for presence of CAD (6% vs. 30%, p=0.01), Coumadin (0% vs. 11%, p=0.04), and NIHSS (15.6±5.0 vs. 18.1±4.6, p=0.03). There was a nonsignificantly higher reperfusion rate achieved in heparin-treated patients compared to non heparin-treated patients (63% vs. 50%, p=0.35). Patients who received heparin had significantly lower rates of hemorrhage (p=0.02). Multivariate logistic regression for good outcome revealed only age (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.95; p<0.01), ASPECTS (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.01-4.50; p=0.04), and successful reperfusion (OR 19.25; 95% CI 2.37-155.95; p<0.01) independently associated with mRS 0-2 at 90 days. The use of intraprocedural heparin in patients with AIS from MCA M1 or ICA-T occlusion was found safe. The impact of heparinization is unclear and warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The third international stroke trial (IST-3) of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sandercock, Peter; Lindley, Richard; Wardlaw, Joanna; Dennis, Martin; Lewis, Steff; Venables, Graham; Kobayashi, Adam; Czlonkowska, Anna; Berge, Eivind; Slot, Karsten Bruins; Murray, Veronica; Peeters, Andre; Hankey, Graeme; Matz, Karl; Brainin, Michael; Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Cantisani, Teresa; Gubitz, Gord; Phillips, Steve; Arauz, Antonio; Prasad, Kameshwar; Correia, Manuel; Lyrer, Phillippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is approved for use in selected patients with ischaemic stroke within 3 hours of symptom onset. IST-3 seeks to determine whether a wider range of patients may benefit. Design International, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial of intravenous rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke. Suitable patients must be assessed and able to start treatment within 6 hours of developing symptoms, and brain imaging must have excluded intracerebral haemorrhage. With 1000 patients, the trial can detect a 7% absolute difference in the primary outcome. With3500 patients, it can detect a 4.0% absolute benefit & with 6000, (mostly treated between 3 & 6 hours), it can detect a 3% benefit. Trial procedures Patients are entered into the trial by telephoning a fast, secure computerised central randomisation system or via a secure web interface. Repeat brain imaging must be performed at 24–48 hours. The scans are reviewed 'blind' by expert readers. The primary measure of outcome is the proportion of patients alive and independent (Modified Rankin 0–2) at six months (assessed via a postal questionnaire mailed directly to the patient). Secondary outcomes include: events within 7 days (death, recurrent stroke, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage), outcome at six months (death, functional status, EuroQol). Trial registration ISRCTN25765518 PMID:18559104

  13. Usefulness of cervical magnetic resonance imaging for detecting type A acute aortic dissection with acute stroke symptoms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD) sometimes presents with acute stroke-like symptoms. When intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) therapy is considered for acute ischemic stroke, TAAAD must be excluded. Painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke may be easily missed. Two cases of painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke in which IV-tPA therapy was considered are reported. In these cases, cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful for detecting TAAAD, and IV-tPA therapy was canceled. The mottled high signal ("snowstorm") in the common carotid artery on cervical MRA is specific for TAAAD. We have thus named this phenomenon the "snowstorm sign" and believe it can help diagnose TAAAD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Value of measuring serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dassan, Pooja; Keir, Geoffrey; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Brown, Martin M

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been reported that serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised after acute ischemic stroke compared to healthy controls. The aim of this prospective study was to ascertain whether serum vascular endothelial growth factor measurements could be used to distinguish between acute ischemic stroke and common stroke mimics in the emergency room. Blood samples were taken on arrival to hospital and daily for six-days, in 44 patients with suspected ischemic stroke (29 acute infarcts and 15 stroke mimics), arriving within 24 h of symptom onset. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The neurological deficit was recorded daily using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Evaluation of infarct volumes was based on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly raised in acute ischemic stroke patients on the day of symptom onset and at all other time points, compared to healthy controls (P < 0·01). The sensitivity and specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor for diagnosing acute ischemic stroke on admission to hospital were only 69% and 73%, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also elevated in four out of 15 stroke mimics, including three patients presenting with postictal paresis. Vascular endothelial growth factor has limited clinical utility in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke in the emergency room because levels are also raised in common stroke mimics. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor elevation in postictal paresis. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Pilot Scheme of Health Policy in Stroke Adjuvant Acupuncture Therapy for Acute and Subacute Ischemic Stroke in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi-Chia; Sun, Mao-Feng; Chang, Ku-Chou; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Lin, Yu-Jr; Chiu, Hsien-Hsueh Elley

    2011-01-01

    To reduce the health care burden of strokes, the Taiwan Department of Health launched the Pilot Scheme of the Health Policy in Stroke Adjuvant Acupuncture Therapy (HPSAAT) in 2006. This cross-sectional, hospital-based, match-controlled study at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center during 2006∼2008 retrospectively evaluated the clinical characteristics of acute and subacute ischemic stroke patients who electively joined the HPSAAT. The study also evaluated the safety and clinical benefits of adjuvant acupuncture in treating acute and subacute ischemic stroke patients. Twenty-six HPSAAT participants and 52 age-sex matched random controls were enrolled. The stroke baseline of the HPSAAT participants was more severe than the non-HPSAAT controls. Although the stroke severity closely correlates to mortality and comorbidity, this study noted no significant complications in the HPSAAT participants during the acupuncture treatment course. Adjuvant acupuncture was considered safe at the acute and subacute stages of ischemic stroke. Due to uneven baseline severity, the clinical benefits in reducing neurological deficits and functional recovery were not concluded in this study. PMID:21584251

  16. Peripheral Frequency of CD4+ CD28− Cells in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Buttà, Carmelo; Clemente, Giuseppe; Corte, Vittoriano della; Guggino, Giuliana; Arnao, Valentina; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Maugeri, Rosario; Squatrito, Rosario; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CD4+ CD28− T cells also called CD28 null cells have been reported as increased in the clinical setting of acute coronary syndrome. Only 2 studies previously analyzed peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke but, to our knowledge, peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in each TOAST subtype of ischemic stroke has never been evaluated. We hypothesized that CD4+ cells and, in particular, the CD28 null cell subset could show a different degree of peripheral percentage in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to clinical subtype and severity of ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to analyze peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to TOAST diagnostic subtype, and to evaluate their relationship with scores of clinical severity of acute ischemic stroke, and their predictive role in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and diagnostic subtype We enrolled 98 consecutive subjects admitted to our recruitment wards with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. As controls we enrolled 66 hospitalized patients without a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Peripheral frequency of CD4+ and CD28 null cells has been evaluated with a FACS Calibur flow cytometer. Subjects with acute ischemic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to control subjects without acute ischemic stroke. Subjects with cardioembolic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to subjects with other TOAST subtypes. We observed a significant relationship between CD28 null cells peripheral percentage and Scandinavian Stroke Scale and NIHSS scores. ROC curve analysis showed that CD28 null cell percentage may be useful to differentiate between stroke subtypes. These findings seem suggest a possible role for a T-cell component also in acute ischemic stroke clinical setting showing a different

  17. Prestroke glycemic control is associated with the functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hata, Jun; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Sambongi, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for stroke. However, it is uncertain whether prestroke glycemic control (PSGC) status affects clinical outcomes of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between PSGC status and neurological or functional outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry (FSR), a multicenter stroke registry in Japan, 3627 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours after onset were included in the present analysis. The patients were categorized into 4 groups based on their PSGC status: excellent (hemoglobin [Hb] A1c on admission<6.2%), good (6.2-6.8%), fair (6.9-8.3%) and poor (≥8.4%). Study outcomes were neurological improvement (≥4 points decrease in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score during hospitalization or 0 points on NIHSS score at discharge), neurological deterioration (≥1 point increase in NIHSS score) and poor functional outcome (death or dependency at discharge, modified Rankin Scale 2-6). The age- and sex-adjusted ORs for neurological improvement were lower, and those for neurological deterioration and a poor functional outcome were higher in patients with poorer PSGC status. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, these trends were unchanged (all probability values for trends were <0.002). These findings were comparable in patients with noncardioembolic and cardioembolic infarctions. In ischemic stroke patients, HbA1c on admission was an independent significant predictor for neurological and functional outcomes.

  18. A study of the workload and effectiveness of a comprehensive acute stroke service

    PubMed Central

    Weir, N; Buchan, A

    2005-01-01

    Methods: Prospective record of all acute referrals, diagnoses, and management decisions over a 4 month period. Results: The CSP received 572 referrals (median: 32 per week), 88% of which were made between 7 am and midnight. Of the 427 patients seen in person, 29% had not had an acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Fifty percent of patients with suspected acute stroke were referred within 3 h of symptom onset and 11% with acute ischaemic stroke (equating to 35% of those referred within 3 h of onset and seen in person) were treated with thrombolysis. Conclusion: Centralisation of services facilitates the rapid referral of, and use of acute interventions in, patients with acute stroke and TIA. Centralised services are likely to be busy (although less so at night), to attract large numbers of patients with disorders that mimic stroke and TIA, and yet still likely to treat only the minority of acute strokes using thrombolysis. These observations may help those planning similar services and underline the need to develop more widely applicable treatments for acute stroke. PMID:15897513

  19. Effectiveness of alteplase in the very elderly after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yayan, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Alteplase has traditionally been the only pharmacologic agent available for treating acute ischemic stroke worldwide, and is considered an effective and safe therapeutic drug for acute cerebral ischemia. However, the drug is usually indicated for use in patients aged <81 years due to insufficient literature regarding the drug’s safety in older individuals. Nevertheless, the elderly can benefit from alteplase after they experience an acute ischemic stroke. Age differences have been observed in the clinical presentation of acute ischemic stroke; however, the safety and efficacy of alteplase for patients with acute ischemic stroke do not depend on age or sex. Evidence of an increasing rate of intracerebral hemorrhage among the elderly with acute ischemic stroke, following alteplase treatment, has not been reported. Severe intracranial hemorrhage is a known side effect of alteplase but is not associated with age in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Alteplase can be used safely and effectively to treat elderly patients who suffer an acute ischemic stroke, including those over the age of 80 years. PMID:23950641

  20. Effectiveness of alteplase in the very elderly after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yayan, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Alteplase has traditionally been the only pharmacologic agent available for treating acute ischemic stroke worldwide, and is considered an effective and safe therapeutic drug for acute cerebral ischemia. However, the drug is usually indicated for use in patients aged <81 years due to insufficient literature regarding the drug's safety in older individuals. Nevertheless, the elderly can benefit from alteplase after they experience an acute ischemic stroke. Age differences have been observed in the clinical presentation of acute ischemic stroke; however, the safety and efficacy of alteplase for patients with acute ischemic stroke do not depend on age or sex. Evidence of an increasing rate of intracerebral hemorrhage among the elderly with acute ischemic stroke, following alteplase treatment, has not been reported. Severe intracranial hemorrhage is a known side effect of alteplase but is not associated with age in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Alteplase can be used safely and effectively to treat elderly patients who suffer an acute ischemic stroke, including those over the age of 80 years.

  1. Atherosclerosis in Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment Subtypes among Young and Middle-Aged Stroke Patients: The Norwegian Stroke in the Young Study.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Annette; Haaland, Øystein Ariansen; Naess, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic stroke patients subtyped as of undetermined cause (SUC) usually outnumber those with determined cause subtypes. Etiological stroke classifications may lead to neglect of parallel, noncausative findings. Atherosclerosis progresses over decades and is associated with high morbidity and mortality in young stroke patients in long-term follow-up studies. We compared the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in all TOAST subtypes among young patients with acute ischemic stroke. We investigated 150 patients aged 15-60 years with documented acute ischemic stroke, and 84 controls free of cardiovascular disease. Stroke etiology was classified according to TOAST criteria. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measurements were obtained from 12 standardized multiangle measurements in the common carotid artery, carotid bifurcation, and internal carotid artery. The causes of stroke were 5.3% large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA), 26.7% cardioembolism, 21.3% small-artery occlusion (SAO), 10% stroke of other determined cause, and 36.7% stroke of undetermined cause (SUC). cIMT was increased in patients with LAA (1.56 mm, P = .002), SAO (1.11 mm, P = .006), and SUC (1.10 mm, P = .004) compared to controls (cIMT 0.86 mm). Segmental cIMT distribution differed across stroke subtypes, age groups, and sexes. Atherosclerotic disease is prevalent in the majority of young and middle-aged ischemic stroke patients, requiring determined investigation and aggressive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of a model for the thrombolysis of acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Carty, Richard; Mooraby, Raouf; Paterson, John

    The National Audit Office (NAO, 2005) has reported that the priority afforded to stroke care should be increased, given its impact on health and cost to the NHS. It recommends improvements in preventing, treating and managing stroke patients in line with recent evidence. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke is a proven treatment that produces good results in significant numbers of patients (Mar et al, 2005). However, owing to various barriers, many hospitals in the UK have failed to implement effective systems to facilitate the delivery of this treatment to acute stroke patients. These barriers include a lack of skill, nursing knowledge, and 'fast-track' organization relating to thrombolysis as a treatment for acute stroke. Fears of intracranial bleeding and lack of appropriate stroke unit beds and issues of consent have also been identified as further problems (Innes and International Stroke Trial (IST-3), 2003). Taking these concerns into consideration, Scarborough District General Hospital has developed a multidisciplinary model with the Coronary Care Unit (CCU), integral to the delivery of treatment. Between 2003 and 2005, 24 stroke patients have received thrombolysis treatment and have been cared for in CCU. Outcome results have been positive, with 51% of patients demonstrating a significant benefit at 7 days post-stroke. This model has broken traditional professional and speciality boundaries to allow patients to receive treatments they otherwise would not have received. Moreover, it provides the potential for further exploration into the wider implementation of thrombolysis for acute stroke patients in the UK.

  3. A Case of an Acute Myocardial Infarction Post Thrombolytic Treatment of Ischemic Stroke - A Management Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Kalyan; Yee, Jimmy; Kumar, Vishesh; Anuwatworn, Amornpol; Stys, Tomasz; Stys, Adam; Stanton, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Acute ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction are emergency clinical events that require prompt intervention. Concurrent occurrence of both events magnifies the complexity of the clinical management. We present a case of a patient who presented with acute ischemic stroke, complicated by acute myocardial infarction shortly after thrombolytic was administered. This case highlights the importance of individualization of management especially in complex cases where there are no clear specific guidelines to follow. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  4. Aortic stiffness and plasma brain natriuretic peptide predicts mortality in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Biteker, Murat; Özden, Temel; Dayan, Akın; Tekkeşin, Ahmet İlker; Mısırlı, Cemile Handan

    2015-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic role and discriminative power of aortic stiffness and plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels in a cohort of patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke. Three hundred and ten consecutive patients aged 50 years and older with a first episode of acute ischemic stroke were prospectively evaluated. All patients were admitted to the hospital within 24 h of the onset of stroke symptoms. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Blood samples were taken for measurement of brain natriuretic peptide levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices, aortic strain and distensibility, were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by transthoracic echocardiography. The patients were followed for one-year or until death, whichever came first. Death occurred in 51 (16·5%) patients. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >13, diabetes, brain natriuretic peptide >235 pg/mL, aortic distensibility, and aortic strain were associated with all-cause mortality. The optimal cutoff level of brain natriuretic peptide to distinguish the deceased group from the survival group was 235 pg/mL (sensitivity 71·0% and specificity 63·0%) and to distinguish cardioembolic stroke from noncardioembolic stroke was 155 pg/mL (sensitivity 81% and specificity 63%). Aortic stiffness and brain natriuretic peptide predict mortality in patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke. Brain natriuretic peptide also differentiates cardioembolic stroke from noncardioembolic stroke. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  5. Acute Stroke Registry Malaysia, 2010-2014: Results from the National Neurology Registry.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Zariah A; Lee, Yvonne Y L; Ngah, Bahari Awang; Sidek, Norsima Nafizah; Looi, Irene; Hanip, Md Rafia; Basri, Hamidon B

    2015-12-01

    Stroke remains a major health burden worldwide. The incidence and prevalence rates of stroke are decreasing in developed countries, an opposite trend is taking place in the Asia Pacific, where an increasing number of patients are being diagnosed with acute stroke. The results of the present study on acute stroke in multi-ethnic Malaysia will significantly contribute to the global stroke epidemiological data. We aimed to present epidemiological data of stroke including incidence and prevalence rates as well as associated risk factors from a prospective nationwide hospital-based registry from 2010 to 2014. Patients diagnosed with stroke upon admission at the hospital were prospectively enrolled into the registry from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014. Descriptive analyses were performed. A total of 7668 patients were available for analysis. On average, patients were aged 62.7 years (standard deviation of 12.5). Ischemic stroke accounts for 79.4% of the cohort with a slightly higher proportion of male patients (55%). Ischemic stroke incidence is estimated to increase annually by 29.5% and hemorrhagic stroke by 18.7%. Hypertension is a major risk factor for both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes regardless of stroke event with an excess of 8.4% hypertensive female compare to male patients (P ≤ .001). Majority of patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes experienced mild and moderate stroke with 11.7% and 21.1%, respectively, documented as severe (P ≤ .001). The incidence and prevalence of stroke in Malaysia increased dramatically in the 5-year study period. Therefore, implementation of risk factor control strategies is important to prevent further increase of stroke burden in the country. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the end or just the beginning?

    PubMed

    Mokin, Maxim; Khalessi, Alexander A; Mocco, J; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Dumont, Travis M; Hanel, Ricardo A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Fessler, Richard D; Ringer, Andrew J; Bendok, Bernard R; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2014-01-01

    Various endovascular intraarterial approaches are available for treating patients with acute ischemic stroke who present with severe neurological deficits. Three recent randomized trials-Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke (SYNTHESIS Expansion)-evaluated the efficacy of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke and, after failing to demonstrate any significant clinical benefit of endovascular therapies, raised concerns and questions in the medical community regarding the future of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. In this paper, the authors review the evolution of endovascular treatment strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and provide their interpretation of findings and potential limitations of the three recently published randomized trials. The authors discuss the advantage of stent-retriever technology over earlier endovascular approaches and review the current status and future directions of endovascular acute stroke studies based on lessons learned from previous trials.

  7. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Is a Prognostic Marker in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jie; Huang, Wensi; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Qian; Cai, Zhengyi; Yu, Tieer; Shao, Bei

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is uncertain whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is related with functional outcome and recurrent ischemic stroke. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio with stroke severity, functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke after acute ischemic stroke. A total of 280 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio value (<2, 2-3, >3). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected for all patients. We evaluated the association between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and (1) stroke severity on admission, (2) functional outcome at 3 months, and (3) recurrent ischemic stroke. Regression analyses were performed, adjusting for confounders. After adjustment for potential confounders, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with an increased risk of stroke severity on admission (odds ratio [OR] 1.364, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.101-1.690, P = .005) and primary unfavorable outcome (OR 1.455, 95% CI 1.083-1.956, P = .013). After a median of 1.13 years (interquartile range.91-1.42) of follow-up, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with recurrent ischemic stroke after adjustment (hazard ratio 1.499, 95% CI 1.161-1.935, P = .002). Our study suggests that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with stroke severity on admission, primary unfavorable functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Continence management in acute stroke: a survey of current practices in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise-Anne; Mackey, Elizabeth; Coughlan, Kelly; Wyer, Mary; Allnutt, Nissa; Middleton, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine current national urinary incontinence management practices in Australian acute stroke units and their concordance with the National Stroke Foundation guidelines. Urinary incontinence is a common consequence after stroke and a statistically significant indicator of poor outcome, including disability and admission to institutional care. The National Stroke Foundation has produced guidelines for the acute and post-acute phase of care, offering Australian nurses evidence-based recommendations regarding stroke management including the management of urinary incontinence. In 2007-2008, dedicated acute stroke units in Australia were identified and a senior nurse from each unit was invited to participate in a 10-minute telephone survey to ascertain their current urinary continence management practices. Representatives from 41 acute stroke units participated in the survey (response rate 98%). Participants from less than half of the units reported that they had a formal plan for urinary incontinence management (n=19, 46%), and the majority of those who did not would find a formal plan useful (n=15, 79%). Two-thirds of respondents stated that they would manage urinary incontinence with indwelling catheterization (n=25, 61%). Only 30% (n=12) were 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with urinary continence management in their acute stroke unit. A large proportion of acute stroke units were yet to establish formal urinary incontinence management plans. The implementation of evidence-based urinary incontinence management plans after stroke is integral to improving patient outcomes. An increase in resources for professional development in the assessment, treatment and management of urinary incontinence is essential to improve and maintain skills in after-stroke care. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Changes in cerebral blood flow and recovery from acute stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.M.; Younkin, D.; Gordon, J.; Goldberg, H.; Graham, T.; Kushner, M.; Obrist, W.; Jaggi, J.; Rosen, M.; Reivich, M.

    1986-03-01

    We prospectively studied 14 patients with acute cerebral infarctions using serial /sup 133/Xenon inhalation cerebral determination (/sup 133/Xe-rCBF), scored neurological examinations, and neuropsychological testing. All patients underwent the same battery of tests at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after cerebral infarction to determine the prognostic value of early rCBF studies and the chronological relationship of changes in rCBF to clinical status. Baseline rCBF within 3 days of symptoms of acute stroke did not correlate with clinical neurological outcome (r = -0.17, p less than 0.30; r = -0.18, p less than 0.28, for the two indices of rCBF used). Among the 11 patients demonstrating neurological recovery, 7 improved at 1 week, significantly before increases in rCBF (p less than 0.05). We conclude that early baseline rCBF does not predict clinical outcome in patients with acute cerebral infarctions and that return of neurological function precedes rather than follows increases in rCBF.

  10. Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services.

    PubMed

    Baatiema, Leonard; Otim, Michael; Mnatzaganian, George; Aikins, Ama De-Graft; Coombes, Judith; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-02-02

    Stroke and other non-communicable diseases are important emerging public health concerns in sub-Saharan Africa where stroke-related mortality and morbidity are higher compared to other parts of the world. Despite the availability of evidence-based acute stroke interventions globally, uptake in low-middle income countries (LMIC) such as Ghana is uncertain. This study aimed to identify and evaluate available acute stroke services in Ghana and the extent to which these services align with global best practice. A multi-site, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 major referral hospitals (regional and tertiary - teaching hospitals) in Ghana from November 2015 to April 2016. Respondents included neurologists, physician specialists and medical officers (general physicians). A pre-tested, structured questionnaire was used to gather data on available hospital-based acute stroke services in the study sites, using The World Stroke Organisation Global Stroke Services Guideline as a reference for global standards. Availability of evidence-based services for acute stroke care in the study hospitals were varied and limited. The results showed one tertiary-teaching hospital had a stroke unit. However, thrombolytic therapy (thrombolysis) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke care was not available in any of the study hospitals. Aspirin therapy was administered in all the 11 study hospitals. Although eight study sites reported having a brain computed tomographic (CT) scan, only 7 (63.6%) were functional at the time of the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan) services were also limited to only 4 (36.4%) hospitals (only functional in three). Acute stroke care by specialists, especially neurologists, was found in 36.4% (4) of the study hospitals whilst none of the study hospitals had an occupational or a speech pathologist to support in the provision of acute stroke care. This study confirms previous reports of limited and variable

  11. Elevated blood pressure management in acute ischemic stroke remains controversial: could this issue be resolved?

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Dimiter I; Mineva, Petya P

    2013-01-01

    A transient elevated arterial blood pressure is common in acute ischemic stroke and is often associated with a poor prognosis. The underlying mechanisms of blood pressure elevation are not well understood and its management is still unresolved. This article focuses on pathophysiology and management of elevated blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke. There is evidence that the main causes of a transient blood pressure elevation in acute ischemic stroke are the focal cerebral hypoperfusion and the stress responses with neuroendocrine systems activation. Clinical trials have reported that blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke may have detrimental effect, probably because of impaired cerebral autoregulation. However, quantitative assessment of cerebral perfusion has not been performed during emergency blood pressure reduction in acute ischemic stroke. We suggest that ultrasound carotid artery disease evaluation and cerebral hemodynamics monitoring using bilateral transcranial ultrasonography, during blood pressure management in acute ischemic stroke might contribute to maintaining of an adequate penumbral perfusion and prevent infarct enlargement. Such an approach could individualize the antihypertensive treatment in acute ischemic stroke and improve functional outcome. Prospective studies are needed to confirm such a treatment strategy.

  12. Multiparametric Model for Penumbral Flow Prediction in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Livne, Michelle; Kossen, Tabea; Madai, Vince I; Zaro-Weber, Olivier; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; Mouridsen, Kim; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Sobesky, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Identification of salvageable penumbra tissue by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool for acute stroke patient stratification for treatment. However, prior studies have not attempted to combine the different perfusion maps into a predictive model. In this study, we established a multiparametric perfusion imaging model and cross-validated it using positron emission tomography perfusion for detection of penumbral flow. In a retrospective analysis of 17 subacute stroke patients with consecutive magnetic resonance imaging and H2O15 positron emission tomography scans, perfusion maps of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, time-to-maximum, and time-to-peak were constructed and combined using a generalized linear model (GLM). Both the GLM maps and the single perfusion maps alone were cross-validated with positron emission tomography-cerebral blood flow scans to predict penumbral flow on a voxel-wise level. Performance was tested by receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis, that is, the area under the curve, and the models' fits were compared using the likelihood ratio test. The GLM demonstrated significantly improved model fit compared with each of the single perfusion maps (P<1×e-5) and demonstrated higher performance, with an area under the curve of 0.91. However, the absolute difference between the performance of GLM and the best-performing single perfusion parameter (time-to-maximum) was relatively low (area under the curve difference =0.04). Our results support a dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging-based GLM as an improved model for penumbral flow prediction in stroke patients. With given perfusion maps, this model is a straightforward and observer-independent alternative for therapy stratification. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Apoptosis and Acute Brain Ischemia in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Radak, Djordje; Katsiki, Niki; Resanovic, Ivana; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Mousad, Shaker A; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to a significant proportion of neuron death following acute brain ischemia (ABI), but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Brain ischemia may lead to stroke, which is one of the main causes of long-term morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. Therefore, stroke prevention and treatment is clinically important. There are two important separate areas of the brain during ABI: the ischemic core and the ischemic penumbra. The ischemic core of the brain experiences a sudden reduction of blood flow, just minutes after ischemic attack with irreversible injury and subsequent cell death. On the other hand, apoptosis within the ischemic penumbra may occur after several hours or days, while necrosis starts in the first hours after the onset of ABI in the ischemic core. ABI is characterized by key molecular events that initiate apoptosis in many cells, such as overproduction of free radicals, Ca2+ overload and excitotoxicity. These changes in cellular homeostasis may trigger either necrosis or apoptosis, which often depends on cell type, cell age, and location in the brain. Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation, degradation of cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins, cross-linking of proteins, formation of apoptotic bodies, expression of ligands for phagocytic cell receptors and finally uptake by phagocytic cells. This review focuses on recent findings based on animal and human studies regarding the apoptotic mechanisms of neuronal death following ABI and the development of potential neuroprotective agents that reduce morbidity. The effects of statins on stroke prevention and treatment as well as on apoptotic mediators are also considered. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Acute-Phase Blood Pressure Levels Correlate With a High Risk of Recurrent Strokes in Young-Onset Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mustanoja, Satu; Putaala, Jukka; Gordin, Daniel; Tulkki, Lauri; Aarnio, Karoliina; Pirinen, Jani; Surakka, Ida; Sinisalo, Juha; Lehto, Mika; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2016-06-01

    High blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke has been associated with a poor outcome; however, this has not been evaluated in young adults. The relationship between BP and long-term outcome was assessed in 1004 consecutive young, first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 15 to 49 years enrolled in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry. BP parameters included systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at admission and 24 hours. The primary outcome measure was recurrent stroke in the long-term follow-up. Adjusted for demographics and preexisting comorbidities, Cox regression models were used to assess independent BP parameters associated with outcome. Of our patients (63% male), 393 patients (39%) had prestroke hypertension and 358 (36%) used antihypertensive treatment. The median follow-up period was 8.9 years (interquartile range 5.7-13.2). Patients with a recurrent stroke (n=142, 14%) had significantly higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.001) and 24-h SBP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure compared with patients without the recurrent stroke. Patients with SBP ≥160 mm Hg compared with those with SBP <160 mm Hg had significantly more recurrent strokes (hazard ratio 3.3 [95% confidence interval, 2.05-4.55]; P<0.001) occurring earlier (13.9 years [13.0-14.6] versus 16.2 [15.8-16.6]; P<0.001) within the follow-up period. In multivariable analyses, higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure were independently associated with the risk of recurrent stroke, while the 24-hour BP levels were not. In young ischemic stroke patients, high acute phase BP levels are independently associated with a high risk of recurrent strokes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Endovascular therapy for acute ischaemic stroke: the Pragmatic Ischaemic Stroke Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Keith W; Ford, Gary A; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Ford, Ian; Murray, Alicia; Clifton, Andrew; Brown, Martin M; Madigan, Jeremy; Lenthall, Rob; Robertson, Fergus; Dixit, Anand; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Wardlaw, Joanna; Freeman, Janet; White, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Pragmatic Ischaemic Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) trial was a multicentre, randomised, controlled clinical trial comparing intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) alone with IVT and adjunctive intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in patients who had acute ischaemic stroke with large artery occlusive anterior circulation stroke confirmed on CT angiography (CTA). Design Eligible patients had IVT started within 4.5 hours of stroke symptom onset. Those randomised to additional MT underwent thrombectomy using any Conformité Européene (CE)-marked device, with target interval times for IVT start to arterial puncture of <90 min. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving independence defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–2 at day 90. Results Ten UK centres enrolled 65 patients between April 2013 and April 2015. Median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 16 (IQR 13–21). Median stroke onset to IVT start was 120 min. In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in disability-free survival at day 90 with MT (absolute difference 11%, adjusted OR 2.12, 95% CI 0.65 to 6.94, p=0.20). Secondary analyses showed significantly greater likelihood of full neurological recovery (mRS 0–1) at day 90 (OR 7.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 37.2, p=0.010). In the per-protocol population (n=58), the primary and most secondary clinical outcomes significantly favoured MT (absolute difference in mRS 0–2 of 22% and adjusted OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 19.7, p=0.021). Conclusions The trial did not find a significant difference between treatment groups for the primary end point. However, the effect size was consistent with published data and across primary and secondary end points. Proceeding as fast as possible to MT after CTA confirmation of large artery occlusion on a background of intravenous alteplase is safe, improves excellent clinical outcomes and, in the per-protocol population, improves disability

  16. The Five Ps of Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment: Parenchyma, Pipes, Perfusion, Penumbra, and Prevention of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Felberg, Robert A.; Naidech, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Stroke is a treatable disease. Despite the therapeutic nihilism of the past, the advent of thrombolysis has changed the way stroke treatment is approached. Acute ischemic stroke is a challenging and heterogeneous disease, and treatment must be based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of ischemia. Interventions are designed to improve neuronal salvage and outcome. The underlying tenets of stroke therapy focus on the brain parenchyma, arterial flow (pipes), perfusion, the ischemic milieu or penumbra, and prevention of complications. This article focuses on the practical issues of ischemic stroke care with a brief review of supporting literature. PMID:22470250

  17. Classification of motor imagery performance in acute stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangwiriyasakul, Chayanin; Mocioiu, Victor; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; Rutten, Wim L. C.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Effective motor imagery performance, seen as strong suppression of the sensorimotor rhythm, is the key element in motor imagery therapy. Therefore, optimization of methods to classify whether the subject is performing the imagery task is a prerequisite. An optimal classification method should have high performance accuracy and use a small number of channels. We investigated the additional benefit of the common spatial pattern filtering (CSP) to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier, for different channel configurations. Methods. Ten hemispheric acute stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects were included. EEGs were recorded using 60 channels. The classifier was trained with a motor execution task. For both healthy controls and patients, analysis of recordings was initially limited to 3 and 11 electrodes recording from the motor cortex area, and later repeated using 45 electrodes. Results. No significant improvement on the addition of CSP to LDA was found (in both cases, the area under the receiving operating characteristic (AU-ROC) ≈0.70 (acceptable)). We then repeated the LDA+CSP method on recordings of 45 electrodes, since the use of imagery neuronal circuits may well extend beyond the motor area. AU-ROC rose to 0.90, but no virtual ‘most responsible’ electrode was observed. Finally, in mild-to-moderate stroke patients we could successfully use the EEG data recorded from the healthy hemisphere to train the classifier (AU-ROC ≈ 0.70). Significance. Including only the channels on the unaffected motor cortex is sufficient to train a classifier.

  18. Technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1998-02-09

    From October 1994 to June 1997, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were funded through LDRD to develop and integrate technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. The project was summarized in a Science and Technology Review article `Brain Attack` that appeared in June 1997 and again in the Center for Healthcare Technologies Report (UCRL-LR-124761). This article is the best overview of the project, epidemiology of stroke and technical progress. Most of the technical progress has been documented in conference papers and presentations and refereed journal articles. Additional technical publication can be expected as our remaining patent applications progress through the US Patent and Trademark Office. The purpose of this report is to provide an appropriate introduction and organization to the numerous publications so that interested readers can quickly find information. Because there is no documentation for the history of this project, this report provides a summary. It also provides the final status report for the LDRD funding.

  19. Reversed Robin Hood syndrome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Sharma, Vijay K; Lao, Annabelle Y; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Malkoff, Marc D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent hemodynamic and neurological changes with persisting arterial occlusions may be attributable to cerebral blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. Transcranial Doppler monitoring with voluntary breath-holding and serial NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained in patients with acute middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusions. The steal phenomenon was detected as transient, spontaneous, or vasodilatory stimuli-induced velocity reductions in affected arteries at the time of velocity increase in normal vessels. The steal magnitude (%) was calculated as [(MFVm-MFVb)/MFVb]x100, where m=minimum and b=baseline mean flow velocities (MFV) during the 15- to 30-second period of a total 30 second of breath-holding. Six patients had steal phenomenon on transcranial Doppler (53 to 73 years, NIHSS 4 to 15 points). Steal magnitude ranged from -15.0% to -43.2%. All patients also had recurrent neurological worsening (>2 points increase in NIHSS scores) at stable blood pressure. In 3 of 5 patients receiving noninvasive ventilatory correction for snoring/sleep apnea, no further velocity or NIHSS score changes were noted. Our descriptive study suggests possibility to detect and quantify the cerebral steal phenomenon in real-time. If the steal is confirmed as the cause of neurological worsening, reversed Robin Hood syndrome may identify a target group for testing blood pressure augmentation and noninvasive ventilatory correction in stroke patients.

  20. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, Hansen et al. proposed a fast kurtosis mapping method and demonstrated it in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, both DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26±13%, P<0.01) and fast DKI methods (23±8%, P<0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R2=0.57, P=0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting. PMID:25208309

  1. Validation of fast diffusion kurtosis MRI for imaging acute ischemia in a rodent model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri; Chan, Suk-Tak; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) captures ischemic tissue that is likely to infarct, and has become one of the most widely used acute stroke imaging techniques. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) has lately been postulated as a complementary MRI method to stratify the heterogeneously damaged DWI lesion. However, the conventional DKI acquisition time is relatively long, limiting its use in the acute stroke setting. Recently, a fast kurtosis mapping method has been demonstrated in fixed brains and control subjects. The fast DKI approach provides mean diffusion and kurtosis measurements under substantially reduced scan time, making it amenable to acute stroke imaging. Because it is not practical to obtain and compare different means of DKI to test whether the fast DKI method can reliably detect diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute stroke patients, our study investigated its diagnostic value using an animal model of acute stroke, a critical step before fast DKI acquisition can be routinely applied in the acute stroke setting. We found significant correlation, per voxel, between the diffusion and kurtosis coefficients measured using the fast and conventional DKI protocols. In acute stroke rats, the two DKI methods yielded diffusion and kurtosis lesions that were in good agreement. Importantly, substantial kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatch was observed using the conventional (26 ± 13%, P < 0.01) and fast DKI methods (23 ± 8%, P < 0.01). In addition, regression analysis showed that the kurtosis-diffusion lesion mismatches obtained using conventional and fast DKI methods were substantially correlated (R(2) = 0.57, P = 0.02). Our results confirmed that the recently proposed fast DKI method is capable of capturing heterogeneous diffusion and kurtosis lesions in acute ischemic stroke, and thus is suitable for translational applications in the acute stroke clinical setting.

  2. Acute vascular disruption and Aquaporin 4 loss after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Beth; Schachtrup, Christian; Tsai, Philbert S.; Shih, Andy Y.; Akassoglou, Katerina; Kleinfeld, David; Lyden, Patrick D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic protection has been demonstrated by a decrease in stroke-infarct size in transgenic mice with deficient Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression. However, it is not known if AQP4 is rapidly reduced during acute stroke in animals with normal AQP4 phenotype, which may provide a potential self-protective mechanism. Methods Adult male rats underwent transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (tMCAo) for 1 to 8 hours and reperfusion for 30 minutes. Protein and mRNA expression of AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined by Western blot and rtPCR. Fluorescence quantitation was obtained with laser scanning cytometery (LSC) for Cy5-tagged immunoreactivity along with fluorescein signals from pathological uptake of plasma-borne high molecular weight fluorescein-dextran. Cell death was assessed with in vivo Propidium Iodide (PI) nucleus labeling. Results In the ischemic hemisphere in tissue sections, patches of fluorescein-dextran uptake were overlapped with sites of focal loss of AQP4 immunoreactivity after tMCAo of 1 to 8 hours duration. However, the average levels of AQP4 protein and mRNA, in striatal homogenates, were not significantly reduced after 8 hours of tMCAo. Tissue section cytometry (LSC) of immunoreactivity in scan areas with high densities of fluorescein-dextran uptake, demonstrated reductions in AQP4, but not in IgG or GFAP, after tMCAo of 2 hours or longer. Scan areas with low densities of fluorescein-dextran did not lose AQP4. There was sparse astrocyte cell death as only 1.7 +/− 0.85 % (mean, sd) of DAPI labeled cells were PI and GFAP labeled after 8 hours of tMCAo. Conclusions During acute tMCAo, a rapid loss of AQP4 immunoreactivity from viable astrocytes can occur. However, AQP4 loss is spatially selective and occurs primarily in regions of vascular damage. PMID:19372455

  3. Acute reperfusion therapy and stroke care in Asia after successful endovascular trials.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The current status of and prospects for acute stroke care in Asia in the situation where both intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapies have been recognized as established strategies for acute stroke are reviewed. Of 15 million people annually having stroke worldwide, ≈9 million are Asians. The burdens of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are severe in Asia. The unique features of stroke in Asia include susceptibility to intracranial atherosclerosis, high prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage, effects of dietary and lifestyle habits, and several disorders with genetic causes. These features affect acute stroke care, such as the dosage of alteplase for thrombolysis and consideration of bleeding complications during antithrombotic therapy. Acute endovascular thrombectomy, as well as intravenous thrombolysis, is relatively prevalent in East Asia, but most of the other Asian countries need to develop their human resources and fundamental medical infrastructure for stroke care. A limitation of endovascular therapy in East Asia is the high prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis that can cause recanalization failure and require additional angioplasty or permanent stent insertion although intracranial stenting is not an established strategy. Multinational collaboration on stroke research among Asian countries is infrequent. Asians should collaborate to perform their own thrombolytic and endovascular trials and seek the optimal strategy for stroke care specific to Asia.

  4. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Niamh; Daly, Leslie; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Samantha; Hayden, Derek; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth; Horgan, Gillian; Sheehan, Orla; Honari, Bahman; Duggan, Joseph; Kyne, Lorraine; Dolan, Eamon; Williams, David; Wiley, Miriam; Kelly, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents. In a population-based prospective study of incident and recurrent stroke treated in hospital and community settings, we investigated direct (healthcare related) and indirect costs for a 2-year period. Survival, disability, poststroke residence, and healthcare use were determined at 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Acute hospital cost was determined using a case-mix approach, and other costs using a bottom-up approach (2007 prices). In 568 patients ascertained in 1 year (2006), the total estimated 2-year cost was $33.84 million. In the overall sample, AF-stroke accounted for 31% (177) of patients, but a higher proportion of costs (40.5% of total and 45% of nursing home costs). On a per-patient basis compared with non-AF-stroke, AF-stroke was associated with higher total (P<0.001) and acute hospital costs (P<0.001), and greater nursing home (P=0.001) and general practitioner (P<0.001) costs among 90-day survivors. After stratification by stroke severity in survivors, AF was associated with 2-fold increase in costs in patients with mild-moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0-15) stroke (P<0.001) but not in severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16; P=0.7). In our population study, AF-stroke was associated with substantially higher total, acute hospital, nursing home, and general practitioner costs per patient. Targeted programs to identify AF and prevent AF-stroke may have significant economic benefits, in addition to health benefits. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Preliminary findings of the effects of autonomic dysfunction on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Leung, Howan; Chen, Xiang Yan; Han, Jing Hao; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Eddie; Chan, Anne; Lau, Alexander; Wong, Ka Sing

    2012-05-01

    Impaired autonomic function is common in the acute poststroke phase but little is known about its effects on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. This study sought to investigate the impact of autonomic dysfunction by Ewing's classification on functional outcome 2 months after acute ischemic stroke. 34 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients within 7 days after onset were enrolled. On admission, autonomic function was assessed by Ewing's battery tests. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), autonomy in activities of daily living by the Barthel Index (BI), and global disability by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). BI and mRS were also evaluated 2 months after ischemic stroke onset. On admission, eight patients were diagnosed as minor autonomic dysfunction and 26 patients as relatively severe autonomic dysfunction. The prevalence of relatively severe autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke patients was 76.5%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the minor and severe autonomic dysfunction groups. 2 months after stroke onset, the mean BI score of patients with minor autonomic dysfunction and severe autonomic dysfunction increased from 76.3±15.3 on admission to 95.0±7.1, 66.5±15.2 on admission to 74.8±15.9 respectively. The mean BI score after 2-month stroke onset and the change in BI from admission to 2-month outcome (delta BI) in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction were lower than those in patients with minor autonomic dysfunction (all P<0.05). Autonomic dysfunction occurs in acute stroke patients. Relatively severe autonomic dysfunction is related to an unfavorable functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Madeleine; Ryan, Tony; Gardiner, Clare; Jones, Amanda

    2013-12-01

    Rapid access to acute stroke care is essential to improve stroke patient outcomes. Policy recommendations for the emergency management of stroke have resulted in significant changes to stroke services, including the introduction of hyper-acute care. To explore patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care and identify the factors that enabled or prevented stroke from being treated as a medical emergency. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 59 stroke survivors and carers who had received care at seven UK centres. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Themes emerging showed that participants recognised signs and symptoms, they were satisfied with access to emergency medical services (EMS), and they experienced setbacks in the emergency department and delays caused by the lack of availability of specialist services outside normal working hours. Awareness of the importance of time to treatment was generally attributed to the UK stroke awareness campaign, although some felt the message was not sufficiently comprehensive. This awareness led to increased frustration when participants perceived a lack of urgency in the provision of assessment and medical care. The stroke awareness social marketing campaign has contributed to public knowledge and was perceived to assist in reducing prehospital delay. It has also resulted in an enhanced knowledge of the significance of rapid treatment on admission to hospital and raised public expectation of EMS and stroke services to act fast. More research is required to assist organisational change to reduce in-hospital delay.

  7. Long-term outcome of vertebral artery origin stenosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral artery origin (VAO) stenosis is occasionally observed in patients who have acute ischemic stroke. We investigated the long-term outcomes and clinical significance of VAO stenosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We performed a prospective observational study using a single stroke center registry to investigate the risk of recurrent stroke and vascular outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke and VAO stenosis. To relate the clinical significance of VAO stenosis to the vascular territory of the index stroke, patients were classified into an asymptomatic VAO stenosis group and a symptomatic VAO stenosis group. Results Of the 774 patients who had acute ischemic stroke, 149 (19.3%) of them had more than 50% stenosis of the VAO. During 309 patient-years of follow-up (mean, 2.3 years), there were 7 ischemic strokes, 6 hemorrhagic strokes, and 2 unknown strokes. The annual event rates were 0.97% for posterior circulation ischemic stroke, 4.86% for all stroke, and 6.80% for the composite cardiovascular outcome. The annual event rate for ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation was significantly higher in patients who had symptomatic VAO stenosis than in patients who had asymptomatic stenosis (1.88% vs. 0%, p = 0.046). In a multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio, per one point increase of the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) for the composite cardiovascular outcome, was 1.46 (95% CI, 1.02-2.08, p = 0.036). Conclusions Long-term outcomes of more than 50% stenosis of the VAO in patients with acute ischemic stroke were generally favorable. Additionally, ESRS was a predictor for the composite cardiovascular outcome. Asymptomatic VAO stenosis may not be a specific risk factor for recurrent ischemic stroke in the posterior circulation. However, VAO stenosis may require more clinical attention as a potential source of recurrent stroke when VAO stenosis is observed in patients who have concurrent ischemic stroke in the posterior

  8. Role of Acute Lesion Topography in Initial Ischemic Stroke Severity and Long-Term Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven J T; Bouts, Mark J R J; Copen, William A; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro T; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2015-09-01

    Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke, correlates only moderately with traditional clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale. We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to acute ischemic stroke subjects with magnetic resonance imaging completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months modified Rankin Scale scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques, including age, sex, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Four hundred ninety subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor modified Rankin Scale at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), postcentral gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor modified Rankin Scale. More severe NIHSS involved these regions, as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and precentral gyrus. Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomic correlates of admission stroke severity and poststroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. A randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck S S; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A; Lingsma, Hester F; Yoo, Albert J; Schonewille, Wouter J; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Wermer, Marieke J H; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A; Emmer, Bart J; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F; van Dijk, Lukas C; Kappelle, L Jaap; Lo, Rob H; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L M; van Rooij, Willem Jan J; van den Berg, Jan S P; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Aerden, Leo A M; Dallinga, René J; Visser, Marieke C; Bot, Joseph C J; Vroomen, Patrick C; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H C M L; Heijboer, Roel J J; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V; den Hertog, Heleen M; Gerrits, Dick G; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M; Karas, Giorgos B; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Flach, H Zwenneke; Marquering, Henk A; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F M; Beenen, Ludo F M; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Zwam, Wim H; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2015-01-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, intraarterial treatment is highly effective for emergency revascularization. However, proof of a beneficial effect on functional outcome is lacking. We randomly assigned eligible patients to either intraarterial treatment plus usual care or usual care alone. Eligible patients had a proximal arterial occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation that was confirmed on vessel imaging and that could be treated intraarterially within 6 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin scale score at 90 days; this categorical scale measures functional outcome, with scores ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 6 (death). The treatment effect was estimated with ordinal logistic regression as a common odds ratio, adjusted for prespecified prognostic factors. The adjusted common odds ratio measured the likelihood that intraarterial treatment would lead to lower modified Rankin scores, as compared with usual care alone (shift analysis). We enrolled 500 patients at 16 medical centers in The Netherlands (233 assigned to intraarterial treatment and 267 to usual care alone). The mean age was 65 years (range, 23 to 96), and 445 patients (89.0%) were treated with intravenous alteplase before randomization. Retrievable stents were used in 190 of the 233 patients (81.5%) assigned to intraarterial treatment. The adjusted common odds ratio was 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.30). There was an absolute difference of 13.5 percentage points (95% CI, 5.9 to 21.2) in the rate of functional independence (modified Rankin score, 0 to 2) in favor of the intervention (32.6% vs. 19.1%). There were no significant differences in mortality or the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion of the anterior circulation, intraarterial treatment administered within 6 hours after stroke onset

  10. Prediction of post-stroke dementia using NINDS-CSN 5-minute neuropsychology protocol in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Mi Sun; Lee, Ju-Hun; Jung, San; Kim, Chulho; Jang, Min Uk; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Yeo Jin; Kim, Yerim; Park, Jaeseol; Kang, Yeonwook; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul

    2017-05-01

    The National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke-Canadian Stroke Network (NINDS-CSN) 5-minute neuropsychology protocol consists of only verbal tasks, and is proposed as a brief screening method for vascular cognitive impairment. We evaluated its feasibility within two weeks after stroke and ability to predict the development of post-stroke dementia (PSD) at 3 months after stroke. We prospectively enrolled subjects with ischemic stroke within seven days of symptom onset who were consecutively admitted to 12 university hospitals. Neuropsychological assessments using the NINDS-CSN 5-minute and 60-minute neuropsychology protocols were administered within two weeks and at 3 months after stroke onset, respectively. PSD was diagnosed with reference to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statement, requiring deficits in at least two cognitive domains. Of 620 patients, 512 (82.6%) were feasible for the NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol within two weeks after stroke. The incidence of PSD was 16.2% in 308 subjects who had completed follow-up at 3 months after stroke onset. The total score of the NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol differed significantly between those with and without PSD (4.0 ± 2.7, 7.4 ± 2.7, respectively; p < 0.01). A cut-off value of 6/7 showed reasonable discriminative power (sensitivity 0.82, specificity 0.67, AUC 0.74). The NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol score was a significant predictor for PSD (adjusted odds ratio 6.32, 95% CI 2.65-15.05). The NINDS-CSN 5-minute protocol is feasible to evaluate cognitive functions in patients with acute ischemic stroke. It might be a useful screening method for early identification of high-risk groups for PSD.

  11. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    PubMed

    Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth L; Duggan, Joseph; Merwick, Áine; Hannon, Niamh; Sheehan, Órla; Marnane, Michael; Horgan, Gillian; Williams, Emma B; Harris, Dawn; Kyne, Lorraine; McCormack, Patricia M E; Moroney, Joan; Grant, Tim; Williams, David; Daly, Leslie; Kelly, Peter J

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study. A population-based prospective cohort study was performed using rigorous ascertainment methods. Prestroke and acute (≤72 hours) poststroke medications were recorded. Modified Rankin score and fatality were assessed at 7, 28, and 90 days and 1 year. Of 448 ischemic stroke patients, statins were prescribed before stroke onset in 30.1% (134/445) and were begun acutely (≤72 hours) in an additional 42.5% (189/445). On logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, prestroke disability (modified Rankin scale), NIHSS score, hypertension, and aspirin, new poststroke statin therapy was independently associated with improved early and late survival (compared with statin untreated patients: OR for death, 0.12; CI, 0.03-0.54 at 7 days; OR, 0.19; CI, 0.07-0.48 at 90 days; OR, 0.26; CI, 0.12-0.55 at 1 year; P≤0.006 for all). Similar findings were observed for statin therapy before stroke onset (adjusted OR for death compared with statin-untreated-patients, 0.04; CI, 0.00-0.33; P=0.003 at 7 days; OR, 0.23; CI, 0.09-0.58; P=0.002 at 90 days; OR, 0.48; CI, 0.23-1.01; P=0.05 at 1 year). Statin therapy at stroke onset and newly begun statins were associated with improved early and late outcomes, supporting data from experimental studies. Randomized trials of statin therapy for treatment of acute stroke are needed.

  12. Urgent carotid endarterectomy in patients with recent/crescendo transient ischaemic attacks or acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Dorigo, W; Pulli, R; Nesi, M; Alessi Innocenti, A; Pratesi, G; Inzitari, D; Pratesi, C

    2011-03-01

    Objective of this study was to review the results of urgent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed in patients with recent (< 24 h) or crescendo (at least 2 episodes in 24 h) transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or with acute stroke in a single centre experience. From January 2000 to December 2008, 75 patients underwent urgent CEA for severe internal carotid artery stenosis and recent/crescendo TIA (51 patients, TIA group) or acute stroke (24 patients, stroke group). In patients with acute stroke the intervention was proposed on the basis of clinical and instrumental features (patient conscious, patency of middle cerebral artery, no lesions or limited brain infarction at CT scan) according to neurologists' suggestion. Data from all the interventions were prospectively collected in a dedicated database, which included main pre-, intra- and postoperative parameters. Independent neurological assessment with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score calculation was performed before the operation and within the 30th postoperative day. Early (< 30 days) results were evaluated in terms of mortality, modifications in NIHSS values and stroke and death rates. The surveillance program consisted of clinical and ultrasonographic examinations at 1, 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Follow-up results (survival, occurrence of ipsilateral stroke in TIA group, recurrence of stroke in stroke group) were analysed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Among patients presenting with TIA, 28 had crescendo TIAs and 23 had a recent TIA; In stroke group, two patients had a stroke in evolution, eight patients had a recent major non-disabling stroke and 14 patients had a recent minor stroke. Preoperative mean value of NIHSS score in stroke group was 4.7 (SD 3.2). There were 2 perioperative (< 30 days) deaths, both in stroke group, in one case due to acute respiratory failure and to fatal stroke in the other one (preoperative NIHSS value 9, postoperative 17), with a cumulative 30-day

  13. Brain Magnetic Resonance with Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Does It Preclude Acute Stroke Diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Aragão Homem, Catarina; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Pinho e Melo, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences and correlative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps is a very sensitive way to detect acute ischemic stroke. Cases of negative MRI-DWI on acute phase of ischemic stroke are uncommon, and most of them are reported in single small-sized lesions, which in most cases are below the technical spatial resolution and in patients imaged shortly after the symptoms start. The few published cases of territorial ischemic stroke with negative DWI affect exclusively one vascular territory. We report the case of an ischemic stroke involving 2 different arteries of the posterior circulation, with a negative DWI/ADC brain MRI 18 hours after time-last-seen-well. We also suggest a possible explanation regarding the mechanism of false-negative diffusion MRI on ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospitalized Infection as a Trigger for Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Logan T; Alonso, Alvaro; Pankow, James S; Folsom, Aaron R; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi

    2016-06-01

    Acute triggers for ischemic stroke, which may include infection, are understudied, as is whether background cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk modifies such triggering. We hypothesized that infection increases acute stroke risk, especially among those with low CVD risk. Hospitalized strokes and infections were identified in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort. A case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression were used to compare hospitalized infections among patients with stroke (14, 30, 42, and 90 days before stroke) with corresponding control periods 1 year and 2 years before stroke. Background CVD risk was assessed at both visit 1 and the visit most proximal to stroke, with risk dichotomized at the median. A total of 1008 adjudicated incident ischemic strokes were included. Compared with control periods, hospitalized infection was more common within 2 weeks before stroke (14-day odds ratio [OR], 7.7; 95% CI, 2.1-27.3); the strength of association declined with increasing time in the exposure window before stroke (30-day OR, 5.7 [95% CI, 2.3-14.3]; 42-day OR, 4.5 [95% CI, 2.0-10.2]; and 90-day OR, 3.6 [95% CI, 2.1-6.5]). Stroke risk was higher among those with low compared with high CVD risk, with this interaction reaching statistical significance for some exposure periods. These results support the hypothesis that hospitalized infection is a trigger of ischemic stroke and may explain some cryptogenic strokes. Infection control efforts may prevent strokes. CVD preventive therapies may prevent strokes if used in the peri-infection period, but clinical trials are needed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Pharmacological therapy of acute ischaemic stroke: Achievements and problems.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Antonio; Ferrari, Federica; Villa, Roberto F

    2015-09-01

    Acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Its incidence and prevalence increase considerably with age and numbers will grow with an ageing population. Consequently, the impact of AIS on costs is soaring. AIS is caused by the abrupt occlusion of an intracranial vessel resulting in reduced blood flow to the brain region supplied. The ischaemic core (which is irreversibly lesioned) is surrounded by the penumbra region with less severe flow reduction, lower functional impairment and potential recovery. Therefore, the fundamental treatment of AIS relies on prompt recanalisation and reperfusion of the threatened, but potentially salvageable, ischaemic penumbra. With this aim, intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) remains the current strategy. However, thrombolysis is underused, owing to various exclusion criteria that limit the number of treated patients. Other thrombolytics are under investigation. Endovascular therapy with mechanical recanalisation devices is also increasingly applied, though definite evidence of its benefit is lacking. Moreover, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are acute complications to be treated in AIS. This review analyses the current status, the problems, the perspectives and the cost-effectiveness of the pharmacological therapy for AIS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stenting in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Dabus, Guilherme; Linfante, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40–81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES). These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion. PMID:22163225

  17. Trends in management and outcome of hospitalized patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: the National Acute Stroke Israeli (NASIS) registry.

    PubMed

    Tanne, David; Koton, Silvia; Molshazki, Noa; Goldbourt, Uri; Shohat, Tamar; Tsabari, Rakefet; Grossman, Ehud; Bornstein, Natan M

    2012-08-01

    Improving stroke management, guideline adherence, and outcome is a global priority. Our aim was to examine trends in nationwide use of reperfusion therapy, stroke in-hospital management, and outcome. Data were based on the triennial 2-month period of the National Acute Stroke Israeli registry (February to March 2004, March to April 2007, April to May 2010). The registry includes unselected patients admitted to all hospitals nationwide. There were in total 6279 patients: ischemic stroke, 4452 (70.9%); intracerebral hemorrhage, 485 (7.7%); undetermined stroke, 97 (1.6%); and transient ischemic attacks, 1245 (19.8%). Overall use of reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke increased from 0.4% in 2004% to 5.9% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 17.0; 95% CI, 7.5-38.7). Use of CT or MR angiography for ischemic events increased from 2.1% in 2004% to 16.6% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 6.8-13.9). Overall use of antithrombotics and anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation did not differ between periods, whereas clopidogrel use increased nearly 3-fold to 41% and statin use nearly 2-fold to 68%. The relative odds of providing reperfusion therapy, using CT or MR angiography, and prescribing anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation were higher among hospitals with large as compared with small stroke patient volumes. In-hospital mortality after acute ischemic stroke decreased from 7.2% in 2004 to 3.9% in 2010 (P<0.001; adjusted OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0), whereas there was no significant change in odds of poor functional outcome. Based on a nationwide stroke registry, use of reperfusion therapy, vascular imaging, and statins is steadily increasing, whereas in-hospital mortality is decreasing.

  18. Carotid Ultrasonography Can Identify Stroke Patients Ineligible for Intravenous Thrombolysis Therapy due to Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Hama, Yuka; Koga, Masatoshi; Tokunaga, Keisuke; Takizawa, Hotake; Miyashita, Kotaro; Iba, Yutaka; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is the most common acute aortic condition requiring urgent surgical therapy. Due to lack of typical symptoms, it is sometimes difficult to identify acute aortic dissection causing ischemic stroke. We report a case of a patient with acute ischemic stroke who was deemed ineligible for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment based on a finding of acute aortic dissection detected by carotid ultrasonography. After urgent aortic replacement surgery, the patient recovered with no neurological deficit. This case underscores the crucial role of carotid ultrasonography for the investigation of possible underlying acute aortic dissection when considering the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy for hyperacute stroke. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  19. Prediction of outcome in patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke with CT perfusion and CT angiography: the Dutch acute stroke trial (DUST) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of clinical outcome in the acute stage of ischaemic stroke can be difficult when based on patient characteristics, clinical findings and on non-contrast CT. CT perfusion and CT angiography may provide additional prognostic information and guide treatment in the early stage. We present the study protocol of the Dutch acute Stroke Trial (DUST). The DUST aims to assess the prognostic value of CT perfusion and CT angiography in predicting stroke outcome, in addition to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT. For this purpose, individualised prediction models for clinical outcome after stroke based on the best predictors from patient characteristics and CT imaging will be developed and validated. Methods/design The DUST is a prospective multi-centre cohort study in 1500 patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke. All patients undergo non-contrast CT, CT perfusion and CT angiography within 9 hours after onset of the neurological deficits, and, if possible, follow-up imaging after 3 days. The primary outcome is a dichotomised score on the modified Rankin Scale, assessed at 90 days. A score of 0–2 represents good outcome, and a score of 3–6 represents poor outcome. Three logistic regression models will be developed, including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT (model A), with addition of CT angiography (model B), and CT perfusion parameters (model C). Model derivation will be performed in 60% of the study population, and model validation in the remaining 40% of the patients. Additional prognostic value of the models will be determined with the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, calibration plots, assessment of goodness-of-fit, and likelihood ratio tests. Discussion This study will provide insight in the added prognostic value of CTP and CTA parameters in outcome prediction of acute stroke patients. The prediction models that will be developed in this study may help guide future

  20. Effects of blood pressure-lowering treatment in different subtypes of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Per Morten; Bath, Philip M W; Berge, Eivind

    2015-03-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in acute stroke. We have investigated whether the effect of treatment is different in different subtypes of ischemic stroke. SCAST was a randomized- and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2029 patients presenting within 30 hours of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg. Ischemic stroke subtype was categorized by the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification. There were 2 primary effect variables: the composite vascular end point of vascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke during the first 6 months and functional outcome at 6 months. A total of 1733 patients with ischemic stroke were included: total anterior circulation infarcts in 129, partial anterior in 850, posterior in 236, and lacunar in 510 patients. For functional outcome there was a significant trend toward a better effect of candesartan in patients with larger infarcts (total anterior circulation or partial anterior circulation) than in patients with smaller infarcts (lacunar infarction; P=0.02). For the composite vascular end point, there were no differences in treatment effect. The results suggest that the effect of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan may differ according to different types of acute ischemic stroke, but this needs to be confirmed in future trials. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00120003. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulation preceding acute ischemic stroke--prevalence and outcomes: Comprehensive chart review.

    PubMed

    Vanga, Subba R; Satti, Sudhakar R; Williams, James; Weintraub, William; Doorey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are the therapy of choice to prevent thromboembolism in patients at risk. Discontinuation of OAC prior to elective medical and surgical procedures may reduce the risk of bleeding, but may expose patients to increased risk of thromboembolism and ischemic stroke. The current public health burden of ischemic strokes associated with OAC discontinuation is unknown. We aimed to study the prevalence OAC discontinuation in patients who presented with acute ischemic stroke as well as the outcomes of these strokes. Retrospective cross-sectional study by intensive chart review of all acute ischemic stroke patients over 6 months in a large tertiary care community hospital. A total of 431 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted during study period, of which 11 (2.6%) had OAC discontinuation within 120 days prior to the index admission. Several strokes occurred after relatively brief discontinuations. The patient group with discontinuation was older, had higher comorbidities and also had a clinically significant stroke and resulting higher mortality and morbidity. About 2.6% or 1 in every 38 of all ischemic stokes occurred after OAC discontinuation. Strokes occurring after OAC discontinuation also have higher mortality and morbidity. Our data suggest that any planned discontinuation of OAC, however brief, should be carefully considered.

  2. Techniques for improving efficiency in the emergency department for patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jauch, Edward C; Holmstedt, Christine; Nolte, Justin

    2012-09-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed significant strides in the management of acute stroke. The most significant advance, reperfusion therapy, has changed relatively little, but the integrated healthcare systems-stroke systems-established to effectively and safely administer stroke treatments have evolved greatly. Driving change is the understanding that "time is brain." Data are compelling that the likelihood of improvement is directly tied to time of reperfusion. Regional stroke systems of care ensure patients arrive at the most appropriate stroke-capable hospital in which intrahospital systems have been created to process the potential stroke patient as quickly as possible. The hospital-based systems are comprised of prehospital care providers, emergency department physicians and nurses, stroke team members, and critical ancillary services such as neuroimaging and laboratory. Given their complexity, these systems of care require maintenance. Through teamwork and ownership of the process, more patients will be saved from potential death and long-term disability.

  3. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed.

  4. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  5. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  6. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  7. Right Hemispatial Neglect: Frequency and Characterization Following Acute Left Hemisphere Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of various types of unilateral spatial neglect and associated areas of neural dysfunction after left hemisphere stroke are not well characterized. Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in distinct spatial reference frames have been identified after acute right, but not left hemisphere stroke. We studied 47 consecutive right handed…

  8. Early Clinical Implications of Microalbuminuria in Patients with Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stroke accounts for the second leading cause of death, about 11.13% of total deaths worldwide. Microalbuminuria is known to be associated with increased risk of mortality in ischaemic stroke patients. But there have been no studies to assess whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Aim This study aims to investigate whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Materials and Methods This is a prospective study of patients with ischaemic stroke (who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset) who were consecutively admitted in three tertiary care centres during the time period from November 2013 to June 2015. Early clinical outcomes in patients were assessed by investigating the presence of Early Neurological Deterioration (END) using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Urine albumin creatinine ratio was divided into two categories – Normal (less than 30mg/g of creatinine) or Urine Microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/g of creatinine). Results Total 42 out of 70 patients (60%) were found to have microalbuminuria. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, microalbuminuria was found to be independently associated with END in patients with acute ischaemic stroke (p=0.044). Conclusion In the early periods following acute ischaemic stroke, patients with microalbuminuria have worse clinical outcome. PMID:27790489

  9. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  10. Right Hemispatial Neglect: Frequency and Characterization Following Acute Left Hemisphere Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Davis, Cameron; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of various types of unilateral spatial neglect and associated areas of neural dysfunction after left hemisphere stroke are not well characterized. Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in distinct spatial reference frames have been identified after acute right, but not left hemisphere stroke. We studied 47 consecutive right handed…

  11. The association baseline NIH Stroke Scale score with ABO blood-subtypes in young patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Longchang; Yin, Jianrui; He, Yihua; Yang, Xinguang; Gao, Cong

    2014-09-01

    The presence of the A and B blood group antigens has been associated with risk of arterial thrombosis. The aim of the current study was to design a new simpler form of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) for use on admission, and assess the association of blood groups with NIHSS score in young stroke patients. We conducted this study in 1311 young Chinese adults with acute ischemic cerebral stroke. The outcome measures included a composite favorable outcome (defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 0 or 2) and poor outcome (defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 3 or 6) at discharge; a minor strokes (NIHSS scores 0-5) and severe strokes (NIHSS scores ≥6). Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the association between ABO blood groups and stroke severity. Regression analysis confirmed in relative to patients with AB subtype, Oxfordshire community stroke project classification (OCSP) subtype and serum white blood cell (WBC) were the major predictors for stroke severity. Meanwhile, diabetes, serum triglyceride and uric acid levels were determined as independent indicators of stroke severity in A, B and O blood subtype respectively. The optimal cutoff score of the baseline NIHSS was ≤5 for patients with non-O subtype, the optimal cutoff score of the baseline NIHSS was ≤7 for patients with blood O subtype. Our analysis provide compelling information regarding the ABO blood groups differences in predictors of stroke severity and the different validity of NIHSS scores in predicting prognosis at discharge between O subtype and non-O subtype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap III Imaging Selection and Outcomes in Acute Stroke Reperfusion Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations and Further Research Priorities.

    PubMed

    Warach, Steven J; Luby, Marie; Albers, Gregory W; Bammer, Roland; Bivard, Andrew; Campbell, Bruce C V; Derdeyn, Colin; Heit, Jeremy J; Khatri, Pooja; Lansberg, Maarten G; Liebeskind, David S; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marks, Michael P; Menon, Bijoy K; Muir, Keith W; Parsons, Mark W; Vagal, Achala; Yoo, Albert J; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Baron, Jean-Claude; Fiorella, David J; Furlan, Anthony J; Puig, Josep; Schellinger, Peter D; Wintermark, Max

    2016-05-01

    The Stroke Imaging Research (STIR) group, the Imaging Working Group of StrokeNet, the American Society of Neuroradiology, and the Foundation of the American Society of Neuroradiology sponsored an imaging session and workshop during the Stroke Treatment Academy Industry Roundtable (STAIR) IX on October 5 to 6, 2015 in Washington, DC. The purpose of this roadmap was to focus on the role of imaging in future research and clinical trials. This forum brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration to discuss STIR priorities in the light of an unprecedented series of positive acute stroke endovascular therapy clinical trials. The imaging session summarized and compared the imaging components of the recent positive endovascular trials and proposed opportunities for pooled analyses. The imaging workshop developed consensus recommendations for optimal imaging methods for the acquisition and analysis of core, mismatch, and collaterals across multiple modalities, and also a standardized approach for measuring the final infarct volume in prospective clinical trials. Recent positive acute stroke endovascular clinical trials have demonstrated the added value of neurovascular imaging. The optimal imaging profile for endovascular treatment includes large vessel occlusion, smaller core, good collaterals, and large penumbra. However, equivalent definitions for the imaging profile parameters across modalities are needed, and a standardization effort is warranted, potentially leveraging the pooled data resulting from the recent positive endovascular trials. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Natteru, P.; Mohebbi, M. R.; George, P.; Wisco, D.; Gebel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010), who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57) of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36) were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p = 0.03), have been admitted to the cardiology service (p = 0.01), have atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03), have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p = 0.03), and have a prior history of stroke (p = 0.05), whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p < 0.0001), it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28050311

  14. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrinsic factors influencing help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation.

    PubMed

    Zock, Elles; Kerkhoff, Henk; Kleyweg, Ruud Peter; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-01

    The proportion of stroke patients eligible for intravenous or intra-arterial treatment is still limited because many patients do not seek medical help immediately after stroke onset. The aim of our study was to explore which intrinsic factors and considerations influence help-seeking behaviour of relatively healthy participants, confronted with stroke situations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 non-stroke participants aged 50 years or older. We presented 5 clinical stroke situations as if experienced by the participants themselves. Recognition and interpretation of symptoms were evaluated and various factors influencing help-seeking behaviour were explored in-depth. We used the thematic synthesis method for data analysis. Five themes influencing help-seeking behaviour in a stroke situation were identified: influence of knowledge, views about seriousness, ideas about illness and health, attitudes towards others and beliefs about the emergency medical system. A correct recognition of stroke symptoms or a correct interpretation of the stroke situations did not automatically result in seeking medical help. Interestingly, similar factors could lead to different types of actions between participants. Many intrinsic, as well as social and environmental factors are of influence on help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation. All these factors seem to play a complex role in help-seeking behaviour with considerable inter-individual variations. Accomplishing more patients eligible for acute stroke treatment, future research should focus on better understanding of all factors at various levels grounded in a theory of help-seeking behaviour.

  16. Prognostic significance of smoking in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 3 months of onset.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoko; Origasa, Hideki; Nagao, Takehiko; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Okuhara, Yoshiyasu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2013-08-01

    Various factors that have been implicated in recovery after the acute phase of stroke have not been well evaluated. To identify prognostic factors affecting outcomes at 90 days after stroke from the viewpoint of recovery patterns, we enrolled 660 patients from the Edaravone and Argatroban Stroke Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke study database. Fourteen groups of patients were identified based on an analysis of their recovery patterns according to changes in their National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores during the first 21 days. These groups were then divided into 2 groups: favorable recovery trend (patterns 1-3; n = 486) and poor recovery trend (patterns 4-14; n = 174). Patterns with >80% of the patients experiencing a favorable outcome (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≤ 4 at 90 days) were defined as the favorable recovery trend group, whereas patterns that included ≤ 80% favorable outcomes were defined as the poor recovery trend group. Using the poor recovery trend group, logistic regression analysis found that after controlling for covariates, lower scores at admission, fewer ischemic lesions, and nonsmoking were significant prognostic factors for a favorable outcome at 90 days. Based on a detailed analysis of the relationship between recovery patterns after stroke and clinical outcomes in the chronic stage of stroke, smoking cessation may improve the prognosis of patients after stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recurrent Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, and Major Vascular Events during the First Year after Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Multicenter Prospective Observational Study about Recurrence and Its Determinants after Acute Ischemic Stroke I.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyusik; Park, Tai Hwan; Kim, Nayoung; Jang, Min Uk; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Jong-Moo; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Han, Moon-Ku; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Oh, Mi Sun; Choi, Jay Chol; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hong, Keun-Sik; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are at high risk of subsequent vascular events. The aim of this study was to estimate rates of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and major vascular events during the first year after AIS in Korea. Through a multicenter stroke registry in Korea, 12,227 consecutive cases of AIS were identified between November 2010 and May 2013 and were followed up for recurrent stroke, MI, and major vascular events up to 1 year after stroke. Cumulative 30-day, 90-day and 1-year rates were 2.7%, 3.9%, and 5.7% for recurrent stroke; .1%, .3%, and .5% for MI; and 8.1%, 10.6%, and 13.7% for major vascular events, indicating that the early period is at high risk of recurrent stroke and major vascular events. The risk of recurrent stroke was substantially higher than the risk of MI: 13.0 times at 90 days and 11.4 times at 1 year. Compared to those with small-vessel occlusion (SVO), those with ischemic stroke subtypes other than SVO had a higher risk of recurrent stroke as well as major vascular events. Other common independent predictors for recurrent stroke and major vascular events were diabetes and prior stroke history. During the first year after AIS, one in 18 had recurrent stroke and one in 7 major vascular events. More than two thirds of recurrent stroke and three quarters of major vascular events developed within 90 days in a Korean cohort of stroke patients. Better prevention strategies are required for high-risk patients during this high-risk period. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Day-by-Day Blood Pressure Variability and Functional Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke: Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kenji; Kai, Hisashi; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Hata, Jun; Ago, Tetsuro; Nakane, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) variability and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate whether in-hospital day-by-day BP variability is associated with functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Using the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, we included 2566 patients with a first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent before the onset and were hospitalized within 24 hours. BP was measured daily, and its variability was assessed by SD, coefficients of variance, and variations independent of mean. Poor functional outcome was assessed by modified Rankin Scale scores ≥3 at 3 months. After adjustment for multiple confounding factors including age, sex, risk factors, stroke features, baseline severity, thrombolytic therapy, antihypertensive agents, and mean BP, day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage (4-10 days after onset) was independently associated with a poor functional outcome (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the top versus bottom quartile of systolic BP variability, 1.51 [1.09-2.08] for SD; 1.63 [1.20-2.22] for coefficients of variance; 1.64 [1.21-2.24] for variations independent of mean). Similar trends were also observed for diastolic BP variability. These trends were unchanged in patients who were not treated with antihypertensive drugs. In contrast, no association was found between indices of BP variability during the acute stage and functional outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. These data suggest that intraindividual day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage is associated with the 3-month functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Feasibility and Diagnostic Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Ischemic Stroke of Undetermined Origin.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Wollboldt, Christian; Bentheim, Laura Zu; Herm, Juliane; Jäger, Sebastian; Kunze, Claudia; Eberle, Holger-Carsten; Deluigi, Claudia Christina; Bruder, Oliver; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J; Morguet, Andreas J; Jensen, Christoph; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-05-01

    Etiology of acute ischemic stroke remains undetermined (cryptogenic) in about 25% of patients after state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. One-hundred and three patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven acute ischemic stroke of undetermined origin were prospectively enrolled and underwent 3-T cardiac MRI and magnetic resonance angiography of the aortic arch in addition to state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We analyzed the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and added value of cardiovascular MRI (cvMRI) compared with TEE for detecting sources of stroke. Overall, 102 (99.0%) ischemic stroke patients (median 63 years [interquartile range, 53-72], 24% female, median NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score on admission 2 [interquartile range, 1-4]) underwent cvMRI and TEE in hospital; 89 (86.4%) patients completed the cvMRI examination. In 93 cryptogenic stroke patients, a high-risk embolic source was found in 9 (8.7%) patients by cvMRI and in 11 (11.8%) patients by echocardiography, respectively. cvMRI and echocardiography findings were consistent in 80 (86.0%) patients, resulting in a degree of agreement of κ=0.24. In 82 patients with cryptogenic stroke according to routine work-up, including TEE, cvMRI identified stroke etiology in additional 5 (6.1%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement consistent with previous myocardial infarction was found in 13 (14.6%) out of 89 stroke patients completing cvMRI. Only 2 of these 13 patients had known coronary artery disease. Our study demonstrated that cvMRI was feasible in the vast majority of included patients with acute ischemic stroke. The diagnostic information of cvMRI seems to be complementary to TEE but is not replacing echocardiography after acute ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01917955. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Characteristics of Inpatient Care and Rehabilitation for Acute First-Ever Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. Materials and Methods This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. Results A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Conclusion Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke. PMID:25510773

  1. Characteristics of inpatient care and rehabilitation for acute first-ever stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke.

  2. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  3. Twenty four hour pulse pressure predicts long term recurrence in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, G; Spengos, K; Zakopoulos, N; Manios, E; Xinos, K; Vassilopoulos, D; Vemmos, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of different blood pressure (BP) components during the acute stage of stroke on the risk of recurrent stroke is controversial. The present study aimed to investigate by 24 hour BP monitoring a possible association between acute BP values and long term recurrence. Methods: A total of 339 consecutive patients with first ever acute stroke underwent 24 hour BP monitoring within 24 hours of ictus. Known stroke risk factors and clinical findings on admission were documented. Patients given antihypertensive medication during BP monitoring were excluded. The outcome of interest during the one year follow up was recurrent stroke. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyse association of casual and 24 hour BP recordings with one year recurrence after adjusting for stroke risk factors, baseline clinical characteristics, and secondary prevention therapies. Results: The cumulative one year recurrence rate was 9.2% (95% CI 5.9% to 12.3%). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed age, diabetes mellitus, and 24 hour pulse pressure (PP) as the only significant predictors for stroke recurrence. The relative risk for one year recurrence associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 hour PP was 1.323 (95% CI 1.019 to 1.718, p = 0.036). Higher casual PP levels were significantly related to an increased risk of one year recurrence on univariate analysis, but not in the multivariate Cox regression model. Conclusions: Elevated 24 hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher risk of long term recurrence. Further research is required to investigate whether the risk of recurrent stroke can be reduced to a greater extent by decreasing the pulsatile component of BP in patients with acute stroke. PMID:16170077

  4. Transient ischemic attack and acute ischemic stroke: associations with retinal microvascular signs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie Jin; Baker, Michelle L; Hand, Peter J; Hankey, Graeme J; Lindley, Richard I; Rochtchina, Elena; Wong, Tien Y; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Small vessel disease plays a role in cerebral events. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and patterns of retinal microvascular signs (surrogates for cerebral small vessel disease) among patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute stroke and population control subjects. Patients with TIA or acute stroke aged ≥49 years admitted to hospitals in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, were recruited to the Multi-Centre Retina and Stroke Study (n=693, 2005 to 2007). Control subjects were Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged ≥49 years without TIAs or stroke (n=3384, 1992 to 1994, west of Sydney). TIA, ischemic stroke, or primary intracerebral hemorrhage was classified using standardized neurological assessments, including neuroimaging. Retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking, enhanced arteriolar light reflex) were assessed from retinal photographs masked to clinical information. Patients with TIA or acute stroke were older than control subjects and more likely to have stroke risk factors. After adjustment for study site and known risk factors, all retinal microvascular signs were more common in patients with TIA or acute stroke than in control subjects (OR, 1.9 to 8.7; P<0.001). Patients with TIA and those with ischemic stroke had similar prevalences of nondiabetic retinopathy (26.9% versus 29.5%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.6), diabetic retinopathy (55.5% versus 50.0%; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.4 to 3.6), focal arteriolar narrowing (15.6% versus 18.4%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.5), and arteriovenous nicking (23.0% versus 17.8%; OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7 to 2.7). Patients with TIA and acute stroke may share similar risk factors or pathogenic mechanisms.

  5. Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xue-Ting; Kang, De-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to conduct an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) to provide a contemporary review of the evidence for delivery of Traditional Chinese Patent Medicine (TCPMs) for patients with acute ischemic stroke. SRs were assessed for quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool and the Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ). We assessed the quality of the evidence of high methodological quality (an AMSTAR score ≥9 or an OQAQ score ≥7) for reported outcomes using the GRADE (the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. (1) Dan Shen agents: tiny trends toward the improvement in different neurological outcomes (RR = 1.16, 1.10, 1.23, 1.08, 1.12); (2) Mailuoning: a tiny trend toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18); (3) Ginkgo biloba: tiny trends toward improvement in the neurological outcome (RR = 1.18, MD = 0.81); (4) Dengzhanhua: a tiny trend toward an improvement in neurological (RR = 1.23); (5) Acanthopanax: a small positive (RR = 1.17, 1.31) result on neurological improvement reported; (6) Chuanxiong-type preparations: neurological functional improved (MD = 2.90);(7) Puerarin: no better effect on the rate of death or disability (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.35–1.87); (8) Milk vetch: no better effect on the rate of death (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83);(9) Qingkailing: rate of death reduced (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.11–2.83). Limitations in the methodological quality of the RCTs, inconsistency and imprecision led to downgrading of the quality of the evidence, which varied by review and by outcome. Consequently, there are currently only weak evidences to support those TCPMs. The 9 TCPMs may be effective in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for those TCPMs’ usage. PMID:27015174

  6. Leukoaraiosis, intracerebral hemorrhage, and functional outcome after acute stroke thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Wilson, Duncan; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Tiamkao, Somsak; Jichi, Fatima; Palumbo, Vanessa; Hill, Michael D.; Buchan, Alastair M.; Jung, Simon; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Henninger, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review and pooled meta-analysis of published studies to assess whether the presence of leukoaraiosis on neuroimaging before treatment with thrombolysis (IV or intra-arterial) is associated with an increased risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) or poor functional outcome. Methods: We included studies of patients with acute ischemic stroke, treated with IV or intra-arterial thrombolysis, which assessed functional outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale [mRS]) or sICH in relation to leukoaraiosis on pretreatment neuroimaging (CT or MRI). We used random-effects models to calculate pooled relative risks (RR) of sICH and poor functional outcome (mRS ≥ 2) for any vs no leukoaraiosis (using any rating scale) and for no to mild vs moderate to severe leukoaraiosis (using the Van Swieten or Fazekas Schmidt scale). Results: We identified 15 studies (total n = 6,967). For sICH outcome, the RR was 1.65 (n = 5,551; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26–2.16, p = 0.001) with an absolute risk (AR) increase of 2.5% for any leukoaraiosis vs none. The RR was 2.4 (n = 4,192; 95% CI 1.83–3.14, p = 0.001) with an AR increase of 6.2% for moderate to severe vs no to mild leukoaraiosis. For poor functional outcome; the RR was 1.30 (n = 3,401; 95% CI 1.19–1.42, p = 0.001) with an AR increase of 15.4% for any leukoaraiosis vs none. The RR was 1.31 (n = 3,659; 95% CI 1.22–1.42, p = 0.001) with an AR increase of 17.5% for moderate to severe vs no to mild leukoaraiosis. No statistical heterogeneity was noted for any of the analyses. Conclusions: Leukoaraiosis presence and severity are consistently associated with an increased risk of sICH and poor functional outcome after IV or intra-arterial thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:28130468

  7. Influence of emergency room fee on acute stroke presentation in a public hospital in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Hui, Andrew Che-Fai; Leung, Cecilia Shuk-Fong; Wong, Ka Sing

    2004-01-01

    A new system of emergency room fee-for-service was recently introduced at public hospitals in Hong Kong. A prospective observational study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the emergency room consultation fee system on presentation delay of acute stroke patients and evaluation of timing of patient presentation with acute stroke. We reviewed 2 specified periods (2-month interval each) before and after the consultation fee system at a public hospital. Primary outcome measures were time from onset of stroke symptoms to arrival at hospital, and predictors of such a time delay. A total of 173 subjects were recruited before institution of the consultation fee system, and 189 after inception of the new system. The mean age was 71 years. The median delay between symptom onset and arrival at hospital was 9 h. Acute ischemic stroke accounted for 91% of the stroke diagnoses. The median baseline NIHSS score measured 6. The median delay for patients before the emergency room consultation fee system was 9.7 h, compared with 8.4 h after introduction of the consultation fee (p = 0.66). At presentation, patients admitted during the consultation fee system were significantly more likely to be unconscious and be in a worse functional premorbid state. We found no difference in the frequency of general practitioner contact between the 2 study periods. Overall, univariate analyses showed that patient age, baseline NIHSS score, consciousness level upon arrival at the emergency department and premorbid ambulatory status were significant factors associated with the timing of presentation after acute stroke. A multivariate linear regression model demonstrated two independent factors: patient age younger than 70 years was independently related to presentation delay, whereas severity of stroke as indicated by unconsciousness upon arrival was associated with shorter delay. While we demonstrated no delays in acute stroke presentation accrued from enactment of the emergency room fee

  8. Score for atrial fibrillation detection in acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients in a Brazilian population: The acute stroke atrial fibrillation scoring system

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Marcelo Marinho; Rodrigues, Ana Clara Tude; Alves, Monique Bueno; Neto, Miguel Cendoroglo; Silva, Gisele Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that increases the risk of stroke by four- to five-fold. We aimed to establish a profile of patients with atrial fibrillation from a population of patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack using clinical and echocardiographic findings. METHODS: We evaluated patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary hospital with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. Subjects were divided into an original set (admissions from May 2009 to October 2010) and a validation set (admissions from November 2010 to April 2013). The study was designed as a cohort, with clinical and echocardiographic findings compared between patients with and without atrial fibrillation. A multivariable model was built, and independent predictive factors were used to produce a predictive grading score for atrial fibrillation (Acute Stroke AF Score-ASAS). RESULTS: A total of 257 patients were evaluated from May 2009 to October 2010 and included in the original set. Atrial fibrillation was diagnosed in 17.5% of these patients. Significant predictors of atrial fibrillation in the multivariate analysis included age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scores, and the presence of left atrial enlargement. These predictors were used in the final logistic model. For this model, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.79. The score derived from the logistic regression analysis was The model developed from the original data set was then applied to the validation data set, showing the preserved discriminatory ability of the model (c statistic = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Our risk score suggests that the individual risk for atrial fibrillation in patients with acute ischemic stroke can be assessed using simple data, including age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scores at admission, and the presence of left atrial enlargement. PMID:24714831

  9. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Telemedicine Service for the Treatment of Acute Stroke Patients: TeleStroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health care service based on telemedicine can reduce both physical and time barriers in stroke treatments. Moreover, this service connects centers specializing in stroke treatment with other centers and practitioners, thereby increasing accessibility to neurological specialist care and fibrinolytic treatment. Objective Development, implementation, and evaluation of a care service for the treatment of acute stroke patients based on telemedicine (TeleStroke) at Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. Methods The evaluation phase, conducted from October 2008 to January 2011, involved patients who presented acute stroke symptoms confirmed by the emergency physician; they were examined using TeleStroke in two hospitals, at a distance of 16 and 110 kilometers from Virgen del Rocío University Hospital. We analyzed the number of interconsultation sheets, the percentage of patients treated with fibrinolysis, and the number of times they were treated. To evaluate medical professionals’ acceptance of the TeleStroke system, we developed a web-based questionnaire using a Technology Acceptance Model. Results A total of 28 patients were evaluated through the interconsultation sheet. Out of 28 patients, 19 (68%) received fibrinolytic treatment. The most common reasons for not treating with fibrinolysis included: clinical criteria in six out of nine patients (66%) and beyond the time window in three out of nine patients (33%). The mean “onset-to-hospital” time was 69 minutes, the mean time from admission to CT image was 33 minutes, the mean “door-to-needle” time was 82 minutes, and the mean “onset-to-needle” time was 150 minutes. Out of 61 medical professionals, 34 (56%) completed a questionnaire to evaluate the acceptability of the TeleStroke system. The mean values for each item were over 6.50, indicating that respondents positively evaluated each item. This survey was assessed using the Cronbach alpha test to determine the reliability of the

  10. The cost-effectiveness of primary stroke centers for acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Guzauskas, Gregory F; Boudreau, Denise M; Villa, Kathleen F; Levine, Steven R; Veenstra, David L

    2012-06-01

    Primary stroke centers (PSC) have demonstrated improved survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treating AIS patients in a PSC compared with a nonPSC hospital setting. We developed a decision analytic model to project the lifetime outcomes and costs of 2 hypothetical cohorts of 75 AIS patients. Clinical data were derived from a recent observational study comparing PSC- and nonPSC-admitted patients, clinical trials, longitudinal cohort studies, and health state preference studies. Cost data were based on Medicare reimbursement and other published sources. We used a healthcare payer perspective, and the primary outcomes were incremental life expectancy, quality-adjusted life years, and healthcare costs. We performed sensitivity and scenario analyses to evaluate uncertainty in the results. Admission to a PSC resulted in a gain of 0.22 years of life (95% credible range [CR], 0.12-0.33) and 0.15 quality-adjusted life years (95% CR, 0.08-0.23) per patient, at a cost of $3600 (95% CR, $2400-$5000) per patient, compared with admission to a nonPSC hospital. The incremental cost/quality-adjusted life year gained was $24 000, and all probabilistic simulation results were below the $100 000/quality-adjusted life year threshold. In scenario analyses accounting for as few as 7 and as many as 500 AIS patients/year per PSC, cost-effectiveness improved as the number of AIS patients admitted per year increased. Our study indicates that care at a PSC for patients with AIS is cost-effective and improves outcomes across a wide range of possible scenarios.

  11. Evaluation of the intravenous magnesium sulfate effect in clinical improvement of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Daryoush; Moradian, Nasrin; Rezaei, Mansour

    2013-04-01

    Evidence is mounting that magnesium may play a critical role in the development of strokes and the healing process during and after a stroke. Magnesium is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist that has been shown to be neuroprotective in many preclinical models of ischemic and excitotoxic brain injury. This study was performed to evaluate the intravenous magnesium sulfate effect in clinical improvement of patients with acute ischemic stroke. One hundred and seven patients with acute ischemic stroke signs and symptoms lasting less than 12 hours were included in the study and were divided into two groups, 55 patients received 4 g of MgSO(4) over 15 minutes and then 16 g over the next 24 hours, and 52 patients were received matching placebo. The study primary end point was stroke related neurologic deficit evaluation by the national institute of stroke scale (NIHSS). Patients receiving MgSO(4) showed significant recovery compared with the group of patients receiving placebo. This study suggests that magnesium sulfate can be used as a safe and useful neuroprotective agent in acute ischemic stroke and lacunar stroke patients may represent a relevant and practical target population for agents with biological activity in white matter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prior Antithrombotic Use Is Associated With Favorable Mortality and Functional Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Myint, Phyo K; Hellkamp, Anne S; Fonarow, Gregg C; Reeves, Matthew J; Schwamm, Lee H; Schulte, Phillip J; Xian, Ying; Suter, Robert E; Bhatt, Deepak L; Saver, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Eric D; Smith, Eric E

    2016-08-01

    Antithrombotics are the mainstay of treatment in primary and secondary prevention of stroke, and their use before an acute event may be associated with better outcomes. Using data from Get With The Guidelines-Stroke with over half a million acute ischemic strokes recorded between October 2011 and March 2014 (n=540 993) from 1661 hospitals across the United States, we examined the unadjusted and adjusted associations between previous antithrombotic use and clinical outcomes. There were 250 104 (46%) stroke patients not receiving any antithrombotic before stroke; of whom approximately one third had a documented previous vascular indication. After controlling for clinical and hospital factors, patients who were receiving antithrombotics before stroke had better outcomes than those who did not, regardless of whether a previous vascular indication was present or not: adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) were 0.82 (0.80-0.84) for in-hospital mortality, 1.18 (1.16-1.19) for home as the discharge destination, 1.15 (1.13-1.16) for independent ambulatory status at discharge, and 1.15 (1.12-1.17) for discharge modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1. Previous antithrombotic therapy was independently associated with improved clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Ensuring the use of antithrombotics in appropriate patient populations may be associated with benefits beyond stroke prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperhomocysteinemia, Folateo and B12 Vitamin in Iranian Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Hoseinali Qeilichnia; Qabai, Mojdeh; Chaman, Reza; Fard, Hamed Amiri; Qaffarpoor, Majid

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of some factors such as serum levels of homocysteine, folate and B12 vitamin with stroke in acute ischemic stroke patients. METHODS In this case control study, serum levels of homocysteine, folate and B12 vitamin in 93 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital between September 2008 and January 2010, and 93 healthy controls were measured. Cerebrovascular risk factors including age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, coronary artery disease and obesity were recorded. The results were compared between the case and control groups. RESULTS The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of fasting total homocysteine (tHcy) level in acute ischemic stroke patients was 20.58 ± 19.6 µmol/l, which was significantly higher than that of control group being 14.11 ± 9.5 µmol/l (P = 0.002). 39 (41.9%) stroke cases and 25 (26.8%) controls had hyperhomocysteinemia. There were no significant relationships between tHcy, folate and B12 vitamin levels with the above mentioned cerebrovascular risk factors except for smoking (p> 0.05). No significant difference in B12 vitamin and folate levels between patients and healthy controls were detected (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION Hyperhomocysteinemia is common in Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke and might play a role as an independent risk factor in stroke. PMID:22577454

  15. Blood pressure lowering in acute phase of stroke: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Patarroyo, Sully Xiomara Fuentes

    2012-01-01

    Persistent controversy exists as to whether there are worthwhile beneficial effects of early, rapid lowering of elevated blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke. Elevated BP or ‘hypertension’ (i.e. systolic >140 mmHg) is common in stroke, especially in patients with pre-existing hypertension and large strokes, due to variable ‘autonomic stress’ and raised intracranial pressure. While positive associations between BP levels and poor outcomes are evident across a range of studies, very low BP levels and large reductions in BP have also been shown to predict death and dependence, more so for ischaemic stroke (IS) than intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). Accumulating evidence indicates that early BP lowering can reduce haematoma expansion in ICH, but there is uncertainty over whether this translates into improved clinical outcomes, particularly since such an effect was not evident from haemostatic therapy in clinical trials. Guidelines generally recommend control of high systolic BP (>180 mmHg), but recent evidence indicates that even more modest elevation (>140 mmHg) increases risks of cerebral oedema and haemorrhagic transformation following thrombolysis in IS. Thus, any potential benefits of rapid BP lowering in acute stroke, particularly in IS, must be balanced against the potential risks of worsening cerebral ischaemia from altered autoregulation/perfusion. This paper explores current knowledge regarding the management of hypertension in acute stroke and introduces ongoing clinical trials aimed at resolving such a critical issue in the care of patients with acute stroke. PMID:23342232

  16. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000-1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000-1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000-1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000-1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Myelin basic protein and ischemia modified albumin levels in acute ischemic stroke cases.

    PubMed

    Can, Serdar; Akdur, Okhan; Yildirim, Ahmet; Adam, Gurhan; Cakir, Dilek Ulker; Karaman, Handan Isin Ozisik

    2015-01-01

    To investigate early diagnostic effects of serum myelin basic protein (MBP) and ischemic modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with ischemic stroke. Fifty patients who presented to an emergency service with acute ischemic stroke between June 2013 to March 2014 were evaluated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty four healthy cases were included as control group. All patients' serum IMA and MBP level were assessed. Mean IMA value was 0.52±0.25 cases with acute ischemic stroke and serum IMA levels were significantly higher than the control group (p<0.01). No statistical significance was observed between acute ischemic stroke group and control group related to the MBP serum levels (P>0.05). Statistically significant correlation was detected between the volumes of diffusion restriction on MRI and NIHSS score (P=0.002, r=0.43) and IMA (P=0.015, r=0.344) levels. We have found that serum IMA levels are elevated in acute ischemic stroke cases and these levels are correlated with the ischemic tissue volume. MBP levels do not increase in early period of stroke cases.

  18. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke.

  19. Predictors for poststroke outcomes: the Tel Aviv Brain Acute Stroke Cohort (TABASCO) study protocol.

    PubMed

    Ben Assayag, Einor; Korczyn, Amos D; Giladi, Nir; Goldbourt, Uri; Berliner, A Sholmo; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Kliper, Efrat; Hallevi, Hen; Shopin, Ludmila; Hendler, Talma; Baashat, Dafna Ben; Aizenstein, Orna; Soreq, Hermona; Katz, Noomi; Solomon, Zahava; Mike, Anat; Usher, Sali; Hausdorff, Jeff M; Auriel, Eitan; Shapira, Itzhak; Bornstein, Natan M

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that even survivors of mild stroke experience residual damage, which persists and in fact increases in subsequent years. About 45% of stroke victims remain with different levels of disability. Identifying factors associated with poststroke cognitive and neurological decline could potentially yield more effective therapeutic opportunities. We hypothesize that data based on biochemical, neuroimaging, genetic and psychological measures can, in aggregate, serve as better predictors for subsequent disability, cognitive and neurological deterioration, and suggest possible interventions. The Tel-Aviv Brain Acute Stroke Cohort (TABASCO) study is an ongoing, prospective cohort study that will recruit approximately 1125 consecutive first-ever mild-moderate stroke patients. It is designed to evaluate the association between predefined demographic, psychological, inflammatory, biochemical, neuroimaging and genetic markers, measured during the acute phase, and long-term outcome: subsequent cognitive deterioration, vascular events (including recurrent strokes), falls, affect changes, functional everyday difficulties and mortality. This study is an attempt to comprehensively investigate the long-term outcome of mild-moderate strokes. Its prospective design will provide quantitative data on stroke recurrence, the incidence of other vascular events and the evaluation of cognitive, affective and functional decline. Identifying the factors associated with poststroke cognitive and functional decline could potentially yield more effective therapeutic approaches. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  20. Point-of-Care-Testing in Acute Stroke Management: An Unmet Need Ripe for Technological Harvest.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Dorin; Eltzov, Evgeni; Seet, Raymond C S; Marks, Robert S; Tok, Alfred I Y

    2017-08-03

    Stroke, the second highest leading cause of death, is caused by an abrupt interruption of blood to the brain. Supply of blood needs to be promptly restored to salvage brain tissues from irreversible neuronal death. Existing assessment of stroke patients is based largely on detailed clinical evaluation that is complemented by neuroimaging methods. However, emerging data point to the potential use of blood-derived biomarkers in aiding clinical decision-making especially in the diagnosis of ischemic stroke, triaging patients for acute reperfusion therapies, and in informing stroke mechanisms and prognosis. The demand for newer techniques to deliver individualized information on-site for incorporation into a time-sensitive work-flow has become greater. In this review, we examine the roles of a portable and easy to use point-of-care-test (POCT) in shortening the time-to-treatment, classifying stroke subtypes and improving patient's outcome. We first examine the conventional stroke management workflow, then highlight situations where a bedside biomarker assessment might aid clinical decision-making. A novel stroke POCT approach is presented, which combines the use of quantitative and multiplex POCT platforms for the detection of specific stroke biomarkers, as well as data-mining tools to drive analytical processes. Further work is needed in the development of POCTs to fulfill an unmet need in acute stroke management.

  1. Point-of-Care-Testing in Acute Stroke Management: An Unmet Need Ripe for Technological Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Eltzov, Evgeni; Seet, Raymond C. S.; Marks, Robert S.; Tok, Alfred I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Stroke, the second highest leading cause of death, is caused by an abrupt interruption of blood to the brain. Supply of blood needs to be promptly restored to salvage brain tissues from irreversible neuronal death. Existing assessment of stroke patients is based largely on detailed clinical evaluation that is complemented by neuroimaging methods. However, emerging data point to the potential use of blood-derived biomarkers in aiding clinical decision-making especially in the diagnosis of ischemic stroke, triaging patients for acute reperfusion therapies, and in informing stroke mechanisms and prognosis. The demand for newer techniques to deliver individualized information on-site for incorporation into a time-sensitive work-flow has become greater. In this review, we examine the roles of a portable and easy to use point-of-care-test (POCT) in shortening the time-to-treatment, classifying stroke subtypes and improving patient’s outcome. We first examine the conventional stroke management workflow, then highlight situations where a bedside biomarker assessment might aid clinical decision-making. A novel stroke POCT approach is presented, which combines the use of quantitative and multiplex POCT platforms for the detection of specific stroke biomarkers, as well as data-mining tools to drive analytical processes. Further work is needed in the development of POCTs to fulfill an unmet need in acute stroke management. PMID:28771209

  2. Evolution of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Przybylowski, Colin J; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a common medical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A small proportion of AIS patients meet eligibility criteria for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and its efficacy for large vessel occlusion is poor. Therefore, an increasing number of patients with AIS are being treated with endovascular mechanical thrombectomy when IVT is ineffective or contraindicated. Rapid advancement in catheter-based and endovascular device technology has led to significant improvements in rates of cerebral reperfusion with these devices. Stentrievers and modern aspiration catheters have now surpassed earlier generation devices in the degree and rapidity of revascularization. This progress has been achieved with no concurrent increase in risk of major complications or mortality, both when used alone or in combination with IVT. The initial randomized controlled trials comparing endovascular therapy to IVT for AIS failed to show superior outcomes with endovascular treatment, but key limitations of each trial may limit the significance of these results to current practice. While endovascular devices and operator experience continue to evolve, we are optimistic that this will be accompanied by improvements in patient outcomes. This review highlights the major endovascular devices used in current practice and the trials which have investigated their efficacy. PMID:25405185

  3. Evolution of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Przybylowski, Colin J; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-11-16

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a common medical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A small proportion of AIS patients meet eligibility criteria for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and its efficacy for large vessel occlusion is poor. Therefore, an increasing number of patients with AIS are being treated with endovascular mechanical thrombectomy when IVT is ineffective or contraindicated. Rapid advancement in catheter-based and endovascular device technology has led to significant improvements in rates of cerebral reperfusion with these devices. Stentrievers and modern aspiration catheters have now surpassed earlier generation devices in the degree and rapidity of revascularization. This progress has been achieved with no concurrent increase in risk of major complications or mortality, both when used alone or in combination with IVT. The initial randomized controlled trials comparing endovascular therapy to IVT for AIS failed to show superior outcomes with endovascular treatment, but key limitations of each trial may limit the significance of these results to current practice. While endovascular devices and operator experience continue to evolve, we are optimistic that this will be accompanied by improvements in patient outcomes. This review highlights the major endovascular devices used in current practice and the trials which have investigated their efficacy.

  4. An interdisciplinary visual team in an acute and sub-acute stroke unit: Providing assessment and early rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Norup, Anne; Guldberg, Anne-Mette; Friis, Claus Radmer; Deurell, Eva Maria; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte

    2016-07-15

    To describe the work of an interdisciplinary visual team in a stroke unit providing early identification and assessment of patients with visual symptoms, and secondly to investigate frequency, type of visual deficits after stroke and self-evaluated impact on everyday life after stroke. For a period of three months, all stroke patients with visual or visuo-attentional deficits were registered, and data concerning etiology, severity and localization of the stroke and initial visual symptoms were registered. One month after discharge patients were contacted for follow-up. Of 349 acute stroke admissions, 84 (24.1%) had visual or visuo-attentional deficits initially. Of these 84 patients, informed consent was obtained from 22 patients with a mean age of 67.7 years(SD 10.1), and the majority was female (59.1%). Based on the initial neurological examination, 45.4% had some kind of visual field defect, 27.2% had some kind of oculomotor nerve palsy, and about 31.8% had some kind of inattention or visual neglect. The patients were contacted for a phone-based follow-up one month after discharge, where 85.7% reported changes in their vision since their stroke. In this consecutive sample, a quarter of all stroke patients had visual or visuo-attentional deficits initially. This emphasizes how professionals should have increased awareness of the existence of such deficits after stroke in order to provide the necessary interdisciplinary assessment and rehabilitation.

  5. Endovascular therapy in children with acute ischemic stroke: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine; Orbach, Darren B

    2012-09-25

    This review provides a summary of the currently available data pertaining to the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke in children. The literature is scarce and is lacking much-needed prospective trials. No study in the literature on the well-established systemic or local thrombolysis trials has included children. Mechanical thrombectomy trials using clot retriever devices have also excluded patients younger than 18 years. The current review is limited to case series of interventional acute ischemic stroke therapy in children and the potential future of endovascular ischemic stroke therapy in this patient population. Recommendations in this review represent the opinion of the authors, based on review of the limited literature covering endovascular acute ischemic stroke therapy in children.

  6. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p < 0.05) included disability prior to stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  7. Worldwide reported use of IV tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Mittal, Manoj K; McLane, Hannah C; Shen, Gordon C; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Lyons, Jennifer L; Shinohara, Russell T; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Mateen, Farrah J

    2014-04-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator is the most effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, and its use may therefore serve as an indicator of the available level of acute stroke care. The greatest burden of stroke is in low- and middle-income countries, but the extent to which intravenous tissue plasminogen activator is used in these countries is unreported. A systematic review was performed searching each country name AND 'stroke' OR 'tissue plasminogen activator' OR 'thrombolysis' using PubMed, Embase, Global Health, African Index Medicus, and abstracts published in the International Journal of Stroke (Jan. 1, 1996-Oct. 1, 2012). The reported use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was then analyzed according to country-level income status, total expenditure on health per capita, and mortality and disability-adjusted life years due to stroke. There were 118,780 citations reviewed. Of 214 countries and independent territories, 64 (30%) reported use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke in the medical literature: 3% (1/36) low-income, 19% (10/54) lower-middle-income, 33% (18/54) upper-middle-income, and 50% (35/70) high-income-countries (test for trend, P < 0.001). When considering country-level determinants of reported intravenous tissue plasminogen activator use for acute ischemic stroke, total healthcare expenditure per capita (odds ratio 3.3 per 1000 international dollar increase, 95% confidence interval 1.4-9.9, P = 0.02) and reported mortality rate from cerebrovascular disease (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.99-1.06, P = 0.02) were significant, but reported disability-adjusted life years from cerebrovascular diseases and gross national income per capita were not (P > 0.05). Of the 10 countries with the highest disability-adjusted life years due to stroke, only one reported intravenous tissue plasminogen activator use. By reported use, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for

  8. Drivers of costs associated with reperfusion therapy in acute stroke: the Interventional Management of Stroke III Trial.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Mauldin, Patrick D; Hill, Michael D; Yeatts, Sharon D; Spilker, Judith A; Foster, Lydia D; Khatri, Pooja; Martin, Renee; Jauch, Edward C; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Palesch, Yuko Y; Broderick, Joseph P

    2014-06-01

    The Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III study tested the effect of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) alone when compared with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy and collected cost data to assess the economic implications of the 2 therapies. This report describes the factors affecting the costs of the initial hospitalization for acute stroke subjects from the United States. Prospective cost analysis of the US subjects was treated with intravenous tPA alone or with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy in the IMS III trial. Results were compared with expected Medicare payments. The adjusted cost of a stroke admission in the study was $35 130 for subjects treated with endovascular therapy after intravenous tPA treatment and $25 630 for subjects treated with intravenous tPA alone (P<0.0001). Significant factors related to costs included treatment group, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time from stroke onset to intravenous tPA, age, stroke location, and comorbid diabetes mellitus. The mean cost for subjects who had routine use of general anesthesia as part of endovascular therapy was $46 444 when compared with $30 350 for those who did not have general anesthesia. The costs of embolectomy for IMS III subjects and patients from the National Inpatient Sample cohort exceeded the Medicare diagnosis-related group payment in ≥75% of patients. Minimizing the time to start of intravenous tPA and decreasing the use of routine general anesthesia may improve the cost-effectiveness of medical and endovascular therapy for acute stroke. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359424. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Implication of the recent positive endovascular intervention trials for organizing acute stroke care: European perspective.

    PubMed

    Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2015-06-01

    Timely recanalization leads to improved patient outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Recent trial results demonstrated a strong benefit for endovascular therapies over standard medical care in patients with acute ischemic stroke and a major intracranial artery occlusion≤6 hours or even beyond from symptom onset and independent of patients' age. Previous studies have shown the benefit of intravenous thrombolysis that had gradually, albeit slowly, reshaped acute stroke care worldwide. Now, given the superior benefits of endovascular intervention, the whole structure of acute stroke care needs to be reorganized to meet patient needs and to deliver evidence-based treatments effectively. However, a blueprint for success with novel stroke treatments should be composed of numerous elements and requires efforts from various parties. Regarding the endovascular therapies, the strengths of Europe include highly organized democratic society structures, high rate of urbanization, well-developed revenue-based healthcare systems, and high income levels, whereas the obstacles include the east-west disparity in wealth, the ongoing economic crisis hindering spread of fairly costly new treatments, and the quickly aging population putting more demands on health care in general. Regional and national plans for covering whole population with 24/7 adequate acute stroke care are necessary in close cooperation of professionals and decision-makers. Europe-wide new training programs for expert physicians in stroke care should be initiated shortly. European Stroke Organisation has a unique role in providing expertise, consultation, guidelines, and versatile training in meeting new demands in stroke care. This article discusses the current situation, prospects, and challenges in Europe offering personal views on potential solutions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Relationship of meteorological factors and acute stroke events in Kaunas (Lithuania) in 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Tamasauskiene, Laura; Rastenyte, Daiva; Radisauskas, Ricardas; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Tamasauskas, Domantas; Vaiciulis, Vidmantas; Kranciukaite-Butylkiniene, Daina; Milinaviciene, Egle

    2017-04-01

    Some researchers have hypothesised that meteorological factors may have an impact on acute cerebrovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine an impact of some meteorological factors on occurrence of acute cerebrovascular events in the middle-aged Kaunas population. Kaunas stroke register data were used. Data on meteorological factors for the time period from 2000 to 2010 were obtained from the Lithuanian Hydrometeorological Service Kaunas Meteorological Station. We analysed 4038 cases with stroke. Ischemic strokes composed 80.4% and haemorrhagic strokes-19.6%. According to Poisson regression analysis, significant negative correlation between ischemic, haemorrhagic and all types of stroke and ambient air temperature was found (β coefficient - 0.007, -0.016, -0.009, p < 0.001, respectively). Results of ARIMA showed that ambient temperature of the day of stroke onset was associated with the occurrence of ischemic, haemorrhagic and all types of stroke: when temperature was lower, the risk of stroke was higher (-0.006, -0.003, -0.009, p < 0.001, respectively). Low temperature on the event day and 1 and 2 days before the event was associated with higher incidence of haemorrhagic stroke in women. Low ambient temperature on the event day increased incidence of haemorrhagic stroke in subjects 55-64 years. High wind speed on the event day was associated with higher incidence of ischemic stroke in older subjects. Meteorological factors may have some impact on the risk of acute cerebrovascular events. Health care providers should focus on preventive measures, which can reduce these risks.

  11. Neurohormonal activation in ischemic stroke: effects of acute phase disturbances on long-term mortality.

    PubMed

    Anne, Mäkikallio; Juha, Korpelainen; Timo, Mäkikallio; Mikko, Tulppo; Olli, Vuolteenaho; Kyösti, Sotaniemi; Heikki, Huikuri; Vilho, Myllylä

    2007-08-01

    A stress response consisting of elevated levels of cortisol and catecholamines is common after acute stroke. The plasma levels of natriuretic peptides are known to be elevated after ischemic stroke, but the relations of these neurohormonal systems in the acute phase of stroke and their impact on long-term prognosis have not been studied previously. A series of 51 consecutive patients (mean age 68+/-11 years) with an ischemic first-ever stroke underwent a comprehensive clinical investigation, scoring of their neurologic deficit by Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS), Barthel Index (BI) and Modified Ranking Scale (MRS) as well as measurements of plasma cortisol, norepinephrine, epinephrine, ACTH and atrial (N-ANP) and brain (N-BNP) natriuretic peptides on the 2nd and 7th days after ischemic stroke. The patients were followed up for 44+/-21 months. Higher levels of cortisol, ACTH and natriuretic peptides were observed in the stroke patients who died (n=22) during the follow-up than in the stroke survivors. Cortisol levels associated significantly with the 2nd and 7th day N-ANP and N-BNP levels, catecholamine levels (r= 0.55 - 0.94, p<0.01 for all) and measures of neurologic deficit (r= 0.36 - -0.44, p<0.05). High acute phase cortisol levels assessed either in the morning (RR=5.4, p<0.05) or in the evening (RR=5.8, p<0.05) predicted long-term mortality after stroke in multivariate analysis. Activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in ischemic stroke is associated with elevated levels of natriuretic peptides. High cortisol and natriuretic peptide values predict long-term mortality after ischemic stroke, suggesting that this profound neurohumoral disturbance is prognostically unfavourable.

  12. The iScore predicts total healthcare costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ewara, Emmanuel M; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Bravata, Dawn M; Williams, Linda S; Fang, Jiming; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    The ischemic Stroke risk score is a validated prognostic score which can be used by clinicians to estimate patient outcomes after the occurrence of an acute ischemic stroke. In this study, we examined the association between the ischemic Stroke risk score and patients' 30-day, one-year, and two-year healthcare costs from the perspective of a third party healthcare payer. Patients who had an acute ischemic stroke were identified from the Registry of Canadian Stroke Network. The 30-day ischemic Stroke risk score prognostic score was determined for each patient. Direct healthcare costs at each time point were determined using administrative databases in the province of Ontario. Unadjusted mean and the impact of a 10-point increase ischemic Stroke risk score and a patient's risk of death or disability on total cost were determined. There were 12,686 patients eligible for the study. Total unadjusted mean costs were greatest among patients at high risk. When adjusting for patient characteristics, a 10-point increase in the ischemic Stroke risk score was associated with 8%, 7%, and 4% increase in total costs at 30 days, one-year, and two-years. The same increase was found to impact patients at low, medium, and high risk differently. When adjusting for patient characteristics, patients in the high-risk group had the highest total costs at 30 days, while patients at medium risk had the highest costs at both one and two-years. The ischemic Stroke risk score can be useful as a predictor of healthcare utilization and costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  13. The iScore predicts poor functional outcomes early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Raptis, Stavroula; Kapral, Moira K; Liu, Ying; Tu, Jack V; Mamdani, Muhammad; Austin, Peter C

    2011-12-01

    The iScore is a prediction tool originally developed to estimate the risk of death after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. Our objective was to determine whether the iScore could also predict poor functional outcomes. We applied the iScore to patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke at multiple hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 2003 and 2008, who had been identified from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network regional stroke center database (n=3818) and from an external data set, the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network Ontario Stroke Audit (n=4635). Patients were excluded if they were included in the sample used to develop and validate the initial iScore. Poor functional outcomes were defined as: (1) death at 30 days or disability at discharge, in which disability was defined as having a modified Rankin Scale 3 to 5; and (2) death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The prevalence of poor functional outcomes in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and the Ontario Stroke Audit, respectively, were 55.7% and 44.1% for death at 30 days or disability at discharge and 16.9% and 16.2%, respectively, for death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The iScore stratified the risk of poor outcomes in low- and high-risk individuals. Observed versus predicted outcomes showed high correlations: 0.988 and 0.940 for mortality or disability and 0.985 and 0.993 for mortality or institutionalization in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and Ontario Stroke Audit cohorts. The iScore can be used to estimate the risk of death or a poor functional outcome after an acute ischemic stroke.

  14. Emergency transfer of acute stroke patients within the East Saxony telemedicine stroke network: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Kepplinger, Jessica; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Kristian; Puetz, Volker; Wojciechowski, Claudia; Schneider, Hauke; Gahn, Georg; Back, Tobias; Schackert, Gabriele; Reichmann, Heinz; von Kummer, Ruediger; Bodechtel, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Telemedicine may facilitate the selection of stroke patients who require emergency transfer to a comprehensive stroke center to receive additional therapies other than intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. We sought to analyze frequency, patient characteristics, and specific therapies among emergently transferred patients within the telemedical Stroke East Saxony Network. We reviewed consecutive patients who were transferred emergently from remote spoke sites to hub sites. Certified stroke neurologists performed teleconsultations 24/7, with access to high-speed videoconferencing and transfer of brain images. Emergent transfers were initiated when considered necessary by the stroke neurologist. In 2009 and 2010, we conducted 1413 teleconsultations and subsequently recommended transfer in 339 (24%) patients [mean age 64 ± 14 years, 54% males, median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 5 (interquartile range, IQR 12). The mean teleconsultation-to-arrival time was 1·7 ± 0·8 h (median 1·6 h). Sixty-eight (20%) transferred patients had a nonstroke diagnosis. The remaining 271 (80%) patients had stroke diagnoses [ischemic stroke, 114 (34%); transient ischemic attack, 8 (2%); and intracranial haemorrhage, 149 (44%)]. Forty (35%) ischemic stroke patients received tissue plasminogen activator at spoke sites ('drip and ship'). Of the 240 stroke patients emergently transferred to the main hub site, 119 (49·6%) received at least one specific stroke therapy. A remarkable number of stroke patients can be transferred within a telemedical network to enable the delivery of specific stroke therapies that require advanced multispecialty expertise. Whether associated logistic efforts and costs have an impact on patients' clinical outcomes needs to be evaluated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  15. [Acute hemiplegia and hemianesthesia together with decreased tendon reflexes mimicking acute stroke representing a conversion disorder].

    PubMed

    Schif, Aharon; Ravid, Sarit; Hafner, Hava; Shahar, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Acute hemiplegia and hemianesthesia is commonly caused by obstruction of major cortical arteries. Such a presentation secondary to a conversion reaction is very rare, especially in the pediatric age group. The authors report an adolescent presenting with acute complete left-sided hemiplegia and sensory loss together with decreased tendon reflexes mimicking an acute arterial stroke. Examination revealed Hoover's sign was present and the patient was oblivious to his stern neurological state. Movement of his paralytic limbs was observed during sleep. Cortical and spinal CT, cortical MRI, motor and somatosensory evoked potentials and a PET study were all normal. As such, the diagnosis of psychogenic hemiplegia was established, apparently within a period that the patient had experienced severe emotional stress while questioning his gender identity. After three days, the adolescent began to move the paralytic limbs along gradual resolution of sensory deficit, leading to complete clinical recovering within two months. Although extremely rare, a conversion reaction should be taken into account in children presenting with acute hemiplegia and anaesthesia, even accompanied with decreased tendon reflexes, when the patient is oblivious to his alleged grave state, and when clinical observations such as Hoover's sign remain intact, substantiated by normal extensive radiological and neurophysiological investigation. Intact motor evoked potentials serve as a key for the diagnosis of psychogenic hemiplegia and, should therefore be performed in suspected cases.

  16. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk assessment of deep-vein thrombosis after acute stroke: a prospective study using clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Ping; Zheng, Hua-Guang; Wang, David Z; Wang, Yi-Long; Hussain, Mohammed; Sun, Hai-Xin; Wang, An-Xin; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Dong, Ke-Hui; Wang, Chun-Xue; He, Wen; Ning, Bin; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) represents a serious complication in acute stroke patients with pulmonary embolus (PE) as a potential outcome. Prediction of DVT may help with formulating a proper prevention strategy. To assess of the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in acute stroke patients, we developed and validated a clinical score in a cohort study. Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis after Acute Stroke in China (INVENT-China) is a multicenter prospective cohort study. The potential predictive variables for DVT at baseline were collected, and the presence of DVT was evaluated using ultrasonography on the 14 ± 3 days. Data were randomly assigned to either a training data set or a test data set. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop risk scores to predict DVT in the training data set and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to validate the score in the test data set. From 2006-2007, 862 hospital-based acute stroke patients were enrolled in China. The overall incidence of DVT after acute stroke within two weeks was 12.4% (95%CI 10.3-14.7%). A seven-point score derived in the training data set (age [≥65 years = 1], sex [female gender = 1]), obesity [BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) = 1], active cancer [yes = 2], stroke subtype [cerebral hemorraghe = 1], muscle weakness [≥2 on Lower limb NIHSS score = 1] was highly predictive of 14-day risk of DVT(c statistic = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.64-0.76, P < 0.001), in the overall study population(c statistic = 0.65, 95% CI 0.59-0.70, P < 0.001). This clinical score may help identify acute stroke patients with high risk of DVT. In addition, it also serves as a platform to develop further models of DVT prediction in stroke patients based on clinical factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of neurogenic dysphagia in Iraqi patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Zeki N; Al-Shimmery, Ehsan K; Taha, Mufeed A

    2010-04-01

    To clinically assess neurogenic dysphagia, and to correlate its presence with demographic features, different stroke risk factors, anatomical arterial territorial stroke types, and pathological stroke types. Seventy-two stroke inpatients were studied between July 2007 and February 2008, at the Departments of Medicine and Neurology at Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, and Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil, Iraq. All patients were assessed using the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability score (MASA), Modified Rankin Scale, and the Stroke Risk Scorecard. All patients were reassessed after one month. There were 40 males and 32 females. Sixty-eight patients had ischemic stroke, and 4 had primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). According to the MASA score, 55% of anterior circulation stroke (ACS) cases were associated with dysphasia, and 91% of lateral medullary syndrome cases were associated with dysphagia. Fifty-six percent of ACS dysphagic cases improved within the first month. Forty percent of dysphagic patients died in the one month follow up period, and in most, death was caused by aspiration pneumonia. We observed no significant differences regarding demographic features of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be an indicator of the severity of stroke causing higher mortality and morbidity in affected patients. It was not related to the stroke risk factors and the type of stroke. It is essential from a prognostic point of view to assess swallowing, and to treat its complications early.

  19. Accuracy of Administrative Data for the Coding of Acute Stroke and TIAs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ruth; Mondor, Luke; Porter, Joan; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-11-01

    Administrative data validation is essential for identifying biases and misclassification in research. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of diagnostic codes for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) using the Ontario Stroke Registry (OSR) as the reference standard. We identified stroke and TIA events in inpatient and emergency department (ED) administrative data from eight regional stroke centres in Ontario, Canada, from April of 2006 through March of 2008 using ICD-10-CA codes for subarachnoid haemorrhage (I60, excluding I60.8), intracerebral haemorrhage (I61), ischemic (H34.1 and I63, excluding I63.6), unable to determine stroke (I64), and TIA (H34.0 and G45, excluding G45.4). We linked administrative data to the Ontario Stroke Registry and calculated sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). We identified 5,270 inpatient and 4,411 ED events from the administrative data. Inpatient administrative data had an overall sensitivity of 82.2% (95% confidence interval [CI 95%]=81.0, 83.3) and a PPV of 68.8% (CI 95%=67.5, 70.0) for the diagnosis of stroke, with notable differences observed by stroke type. Sensitivity for ischemic stroke increased from 66.5 to 79.6% with inclusion of I64. The sensitivity and PPV of ED administrative data for diagnosis of stroke were 56.8% (CI 95%=54.8, 58.7) and 59.1% (CI 95%=57.1, 61.1), respectively. For all stroke types, accuracy was greater in the inpatient data than in the ED data. The accuracy of stroke identification based on administrative data from stroke centres may be improved by including I64 in ischemic stroke type, and by considering only inpatient data.

  20. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  1. Association between Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Functional Outcomes at Three Months in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook-Joo; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) was associated with stroke occurrence and mortality. However, few studies have published the impact of LVD on functional stroke outcomes in the acute stroke period. We enrolled 1554 patients who were admitted to Dong-A University Hospital between January 2011 and November 2014. To determine the functional outcomes, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months after stroke was used. The severity of LVD was defined depending on ejection fraction (EF): (1) severe (EF ≤ 40%); (2) mild (40% < EF < 55%); and (3) normal (EF ≥ 55%). EF was measured using transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography. The distribution of mRS scores at 3 months after stroke was presented using LVD. Multivariable analysis was performed to predict poor functional outcomes. Of the 1554 patients, 1417 had normal LV function, 87 had mild LVD, and 50 had severe LVD. Patients with LVD were older and had a high incidence of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, and severe stroke symptoms. With respect to treatment, patients with LVD received more thrombolysis and more anticoagulation medication after stroke. Stroke-related disability at discharge and at 3 months was significantly associated with LVD. In the multivariable analyses, old age, diabetes mellitus, high initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke mechanism, and LVD were independent predictors of poor functional outcomes at 3 months. LVD is associated with poor functional outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Centralizing Acute Stroke Services on Stroke Care Provision in Two Large Metropolitan Areas in England

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen; Hoffman, Alex; Hunter, Rachael M.; Boaden, Ruth; McKevitt, Christopher; Perry, Catherine; Pursani, Nanik; Rudd, Anthony G.; Turner, Simon J.; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D.A.; Fulop, Naomi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— In 2010, Greater Manchester and London centralized acute stroke care into hyperacute units (Greater Manchester=3, London=8), with additional units providing ongoing specialist stroke care nearer patients’ homes. Greater Manchester patients presenting within 4 hours of symptom onset were eligible for hyperacute unit admission; all London patients were eligible. Research indicates that postcentralization, only London’s stroke mortality fell significantly more than elsewhere in England. This article attempts to explain this difference by analyzing how centralization affects provision of evidence-based clinical interventions. Methods— Controlled before and after analysis was conducted, using national audit data covering Greater Manchester, London, and a noncentralized urban comparator (38 623 adult stroke patients, April 2008 to December 2012). Likelihood of receiving all interventions measured reliably in pre- and postcentralization audits (brain scan; stroke unit admission; receiving antiplatelet; physiotherapist, nutrition, and swallow assessments) was calculated, adjusting for age, sex, stroke-type, consciousness, and whether stroke occurred in-hospital. Results— Postcentralization, likelihood of receiving interventions increased in all areas. London patients were overall significantly more likely to receive interventions, for example, brain scan within 3 hours: Greater Manchester=65.2% (95% confidence interval=64.3–66.2); London=72.1% (71.4–72.8); comparator=55.5% (54.8–56.3). Hyperacute units were significantly more likely to provide interventions, but fewer Greater Manchester patients were admitted to these (Greater Manchester=39%; London=93%). Differences resulted from contrasting hyperacute unit referral criteria and how reliably they were followed. Conclusions— Centralized systems admitting all stroke patients to hyperacute units, as in London, are significantly more likely to provide evidence-based clinical

  3. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  4. Motor recovery monitoring using acceleration measurements in post acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Rao, Aravinda S; Fang, Kun; Yan, Bernard; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-04-16

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Its recovery and treatment depends on close clinical monitoring by a clinician especially during the first few hours after the onset of stroke. Patients who do not exhibit early motor recovery post thrombolysis may benefit from more aggressive treatment. A novel approach for monitoring stroke during the first few hours after the onset of stroke using a wireless accelerometer based motor activity monitoring system is developed. It monitors the motor activity by measuring the acceleration of the arms in three axes. In the presented proof of concept study, the measured acceleration data is transferred wirelessly using iMote2 platform to the base station that is equipped with an online algorithm capable of calculating an index equivalent to the National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) motor index. The system is developed by collecting data from 15 patients. We have successfully demonstrated an end-to-end stroke monitoring system reporting an accuracy of calculating stroke index of more than 80%, highest Cohen's overall agreement of 0.91 (with excellent κ coefficient of 0.76). A wireless accelerometer based 'hot stroke' monitoring system is developed to monitor the motor recovery in acute-stroke patients. It has been shown to monitor stroke patients continuously, which has not been possible so far with high reliability.

  5. Critical Early Thrombolytic & Endovascular Reperfusion Therapy For Acute Ischemic Stroke Victims: A Call for Adjunct Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Today, there is an enormous amount of excitement in the field of stroke victim care due to the recent success of MR. CLEAN, SWIFT PRIME, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, and REVASCAT endovascular trials. Successful intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activation (rt-PA) clinical trials [i.e.: National Institutes of Neurodegenerative Disease and Stroke (NINDS) stroke trial; Third European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASSIII) and Third International Stroke study (IST-3)] also need to be emphasized. In the recent endovascular and thrombolytic trials, there is statistically significant improvement using both the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Score (mRS) scale, but neither approach promotes complete recovery in patients enrolled within any particular NIHSS or mRS score tier. Absolute improvement (mRS 0–2 at 90 days) with endovascular therapy is 13.5–31%, whereas thrombolytics alone also significantly improve patient functional independence, but to a lesser degree (NINDS rt-PA trial 13%). This article has 3 main goals: (1) first to emphasize the utility and cost-effectiveness of rt-PA to treat stroke; (2) second to review the recent endovascular trials with respect to efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness as a stroke treatment; and (3) to further consider and evaluate strategies to develop novel neuroprotective drugs. A thesis will be put forth so that future stroke trials and therapy development can optimally promote recovery so that stroke victims can return to “normal” life. PMID:26314402

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chalela, Julio A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Nentwich, Lauren M; Luby, Marie; Butman, John A; Demchuk, Andrew M; Hill, Michael D; Patronas, Nicholas; Latour, Lawrence; Warach, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background Although the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of acute stroke is increasing, this method has not proved more effective than computed tomography (CT) in the emergency setting. We aimed to prospectively compare CT and MRI for emergency diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods We did a single-centre, prospective, blind comparison of non-contrast CT and MRI (with diffusion-weighted and susceptibility weighted images) in a consecutive series of patients referred for emergency assessment of suspected acute stroke. Scans were independently interpreted by four experts, who were unaware of clinical information, MRI-CT pairings, and follow-up imaging. Results 356 patients, 217 of whom had a final clinical diagnosis of acute stroke, were assessed. MRI detected acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic), acute ischaemic stroke, and chronic haemorrhage more frequently than did CT (p<0.0001, for all comparisons). MRI was similar to CT for the detection of acute intracranial haemorrhage. MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 164 of 356 patients (46%; 95% CI 41-51%), compared with CT in 35 of 356 patients (10%; 7-14%). In the subset of patients scanned within 3 h of symptom onset, MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 41 of 90 patients (46%; 35-56%); CT in 6 of 90 (7%; 3-14%). Relative to the final clinical diagnosis, MRI had a sensitivity of 83% (181 of 217; 78-88%) and CT of 26% (56 of 217; 20-32%) for the diagnosis of any acute stroke. Interpretation MRI is better than CT for detection of acute ischaemia, and can detect acute and chronic haemorrhage; therefore it should be the preferred test for accurate diagnosis of patients with suspected acute stroke. Because our patient sample encompassed the range of disease that is likely to be encountered in emergency cases of suspected stroke, our results are directly applicable to clinical practice. PMID:17258669

  7. Surface expression of P-selectin on platelets is related with clinical worsening in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae-Kwan; Jeong, Min-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lim, Yeong-Jin; Ha, Byung-Ryp; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Jae Woo

    2002-01-01

    Platelet activation has a critical role in arterial disorders. In this study, we showed that the upregulation of P-selectin expression on platelets was related with clinical worsening in acute ischemic stroke. We serially (within 24 hr, at 72 hr, and 7 days) measured the expression of P-selectin on platelets in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n=45) and investigated the correlation between their extents and clinical severity of ischemic stroke. A significant relationship between the P-selectin expressions and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was observed at 72 hr and 7 days after ischemic stroke onset. Patients with clinical deterioration showed significantly increased expression of P-selectin on platelets as compared to those without deterioration. These results suggest that the P-selectin expression on platelets may contribute to the aggravation of clinical course in acute ischemic stroke. Thus, adequate manipulation of activated platelets is an important therapeutic strategy in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:12483007

  8. Acute ischemic stroke in a child with cyanotic congenital heart disease due to non-compliance of anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Misbahuddin; James, Anish F.; Qureshi, Raheel S.; Saraf, Sapan; Ahluwalia, Tina; Mukherji, Joy Dev; Kole, Tamorish

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common presentation in geriatric patients in emergency department but rarely seen in pediatric patients. In case of acute ischemic stroke in pediatric age group, management is different from that of adult ischemic stroke where thrombolysis is a good op. METHODS: We report a case of a 17-year-old male child presenting in emergency with an episode of acute ischemic stroke causing left hemiparesis with left facial weakness and asymmetry. The patient suffered from cyanotic congenital heart disease for which he had undergone Fontan operation previously. He had a history of missing his daily dose of warfarin for last 3 days prior to the stroke. RESULTS: The patient recovered from acute ischemic stroke without being thrombolyzed. CONCLUSION: In pediatric patients, acute ischemic stroke usually is evolving and may not require thrombolysis. PMID:25215056

  9. Starting early: integration of self-management support into an acute stroke service.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Petra; Gawned, Sara; Jones, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Self-management support following stroke is rare, despite emerging evidence for impact on patient outcomes. The promotion of a common approach to self-management support across a stroke pathway requires collaboration between professionals. To date, the feasibility of self-management support in acute stroke settings has not been evaluated. The Bridges stroke self-management package (SMP) is based on self-efficacy principles. It is delivered by professionals and supported by a patient-held workbook. The aim of this project was to introduce the Bridges stroke SMP to the multidisciplinary staff of a London hyperacute and acute stroke unit. The 'Plan Do Study Act' (PDSA) cycle guided iterative stages of project development, with normalisation process theory helping to embed the intervention into existing ways of working. Questionnaires explored attitudes, beliefs and experiences of the staff who were integrating self-management support into ways of working in the acute stroke setting. Self-management support training was delivered to a total of 46 multidisciplinary stroke staff. Of the staff who attended the follow-up training, 66% had implemented Bridges self-management support with patients since initial training, and 100% felt their practice had changed. Questionnaire findings demonstrated that staff attitudes and beliefs had changed following training, particularly regarding ownership and type of rehabilitation goals set, and prioritisation of self-management support within acute stroke care. Staff initiated an audit of washing and dressing practices pre- and post-training. This was designed to evaluate the number of occasions when techniques were used by staff to facilitate patients' independence and self-management. They found that the number of occasions featuring optimum practice went from 54% at baseline to 63% at three months post-training. This project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating self-management support into an acute stroke setting. Further

  10. Aphasia burden to hospitalised acute stroke patients: need for an early rehabilitation programme.

    PubMed

    Bersano, A; Burgio, F; Gattinoni, M; Candelise, L

    2009-12-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the frequency of aphasia and to describe the characteristics of aphasics among a large sample of acute stroke patients in Italy. Out of the 11 572 stroke patients hospitalised within 48 h from stroke onset, included in the PROSIT study, we selected 9594 alert cases for the estimation of aphasia frequency. The presence of aphasia was accepted when registered in the clinical records at the first neurological examination. All patients/caregivers underwent to a 2-year telephone follow-up evaluation. Twenty-eight per cent of alert acute stroke patients had aphasia, which was associated with arm and/or limb weakness in 74% of cases. In our series, aphasia was more frequent in females than males, in patients older than 75 years and was associated with more severe stroke. Aphasics, compared with nonaphasics, died more frequently. Aphasia was also significantly associated with residual poststroke disability. This is the first study considering the frequency of aphasia in a wide population of hospitalised acute stroke patients. The presence of aphasia is more common in patients with severe stroke and contributes to residual disability. Our findings should be considered for setting early specific rehabilitation programmes.

  11. Increased Circulating Exosomal miRNA-223 Is Associated with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yajing; Song, Yaying; Huang, Jun; Qu, Meijie; Zhang, Yu; Geng, Jieli; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jianrong; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) are novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for various diseases including vascular disease. However, specific exosomal miRNAs expression in stroke patients has not been reported yet. Here, we explored whether circulating exosomal miRNAs can serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and discussed the potential for clinical application. Blood samples were collected from acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 72 h (n = 50). Circulating exosomes were exacted by Exoquick exosome isolation kit and characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Western blot was performed to assess the expression of exosomal protein makers. Exosomal miRNA-223 (miR-223) was detected by RT-PCR assay. The relationship between the expression levels of miR-223 and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, brain infarct volume, and neurological outcomes were analyzed. Circulating exosomes were isolated and the size of vesicles ranged between 30 and 100 nm. The identification of exosomes was further confirmed by the detection of specific exosomal protein markers CD9, CD63, and Tsg101. Exosomal miR-223 in acute ischemic stroke patients was significantly upregulated compared to control group (p < 0.001). Exosomal miR-223 level was positively correlated with NIHSS scores (r = 0.31, p = 0.03). Exosomal miR-223 expression in stroke patients with poor outcomes was higher than those with good outcomes (p < 0.05). Increased exosomal miR-223 was associated with acute ischemic stroke occurrence, stroke severity, and short-term outcomes. Future studies with large sample are needed to assess the clinical application of exosomal miR-223 as a novel biomarker for ischemic stroke diagnosis. PMID:28289400

  12. 'Living a life in shades of grey': experiencing depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Siren E; Kirkevold, Marit; Engedal, Knut; Kim, Hesook S

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the lived experience of stroke survivors suffering from depressive symptoms in the acute phase; addressing the following questions: (a) what is the nature of depression as experienced by post-stroke patients in the acute phase? (b) what is it like to live with depression within the first weeks following stroke? Post-stroke depression occurs in at least one quarter of stroke survivors and is linked to poorer outcomes. This qualitative study is methodologically grounded in hermeneutic phenomenology, influenced by van Manen and Ricoeur. A descriptive, qualitative design was used applying in-depth interviews as the method of data collection with nine participants. The data collection took place in 2008. The material revealed two main themes that generate the feeling and description of 'living a life in shades of grey': (a) being trapped and (b) losing oneself. 'Shades of grey' could be understood as being confined in a new life-world and losing oneself as the person one knew. The participants confirmed suffering from depressive symptoms, but depression was not seen as meaningful on its own. They related their experiences of post-stroke depression in the acute phase to the losses they experienced. Nurses ought to take into account the depth of the life changes that stroke survivors may experience. There is a need for continued empirical research on how nurses may help and support stroke survivors dealing with depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke and how depressive symptoms develop over time. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Balwinder; Parsaik, Ajay K; Prokop, Larry J; Mittal, Manoj K

    2013-10-01

    To consolidate the evidence from randomized trials for the use of endovascular therapy (ET) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We searched major databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus) from their inception to February 12, 2013, for randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of ET compared with standard of care for acute ischemic stroke. Pooled absolute and relative risk estimates were synthesized by using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed by using Q statistic and I(2) statistic. Subset analysis was performed for patients with severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥20). The study was conducted from January 15, 2013 to April 30, 2013. Of the 1252 retrieved articles, 5 randomized trials enrolling 1197 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Seven hundred eleven patients received ET, and 486 received intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator. There was no significant improvement in any of the outcomes in patients receiving ET compared with those receiving IV thrombolysis. On subgroup analysis, ET was found to have better outcomes in patients with severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥20), showing a dose-response gradient and improving excellent, good, and fair outcomes by an additional 4%, 7%, and 13%, respectively, compared with IV thrombolysis. Overall, ET is not superior to IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic strokes (level B recommendation). However, ET showed promise and improved outcomes in patients with severe strokes, but the evidence is limited due to sample size. There is a need for further trials evaluating the role of ET in this high-risk group. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation and beat to beat blood pressure control are impaired in acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eames, P; Blake, M; Dawson, S; Panerai, R; Potter, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertension and chronic cerebrovascular disease are known to alter static cerebral autoregulation (CA) but the effects of acute stroke on dynamic CA (dCA) have not been studied in detail. Those studies to date measuring dCA have used sympathetically induced blood pressure (BP) changes, which may themselves directly affect dCA. This study assessed whether dCA is compromised after acute stroke using spontaneous blood pressure (BP) changes as the stimulus for the dCA response. Methods: 56 patients with ischaemic stroke (aged 70 (SD 9) years), studied within 72 hours of ictus were compared with 56 age, sex, and BP matched normal controls. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) with non-invasive beat to beat arterial BP levels, surface ECG, and transcutaneous CO2 levels and a dynamic autoregulatory index (dARI) calculated. Results: Beat to beat BP, but not pulse interval variability was significantly increased and cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) decreased in the patients with stroke. Dynamic CA was significantly reduced in patients with stroke compared with controls (strokes: ARI 3.8 (SD 2.2) and 3.2 (SD 2.0) for pressor and depressor stimuli respectively v controls: ARI 4.7 (SD 2.2) and 4.5 (SD 2.0) respectively (p<0.05 in all cases)). There was no difference between stroke and non-stroke hemispheres in ARI, which was also independent of severity of stroke, BP, BP variability, BRS, sex, and age. Conclusion: Dynamic cerebral autoregulation, as assessed using spontaneous transient pressor and depressor BP stimuli, is globally impaired after acute ischaemic stroke and may prove to be an important factor in predicting outcome. PMID:11909905

  15. Early brain temperature elevation and anaerobic metabolism in human acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Marshall, Ian; Cvoro, Vera; Wartolowska, Karolina; Haga, Kristin; Armitage, Paul A; Bastin, Mark E; Dennis, Martin S

    2009-04-01

    Early after acute ischaemic stroke, elevation of brain temperature might augment tissue metabolic rate and conversion of ischaemic but viable tissue to infarction. This might explain the observed link between pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. We tested this hypothesis by measuring brain temperature and lactate concentration with multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging across the acute ischaemic stroke lesion and normal brain as determined on diffusion imaging. We compared patterns of lactate concentration (reported in 'institutional units') and temperature elevation in diffusion lesion core, potential penumbra, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brain and with stroke severity. Amongst 40 patients with moderate to severe acute stroke imaged up to 26 h after onset, lactate concentration was highest in the ischaemic lesion core (42 versus 26 units in potential penumbra, P < 0.05), whereas temperature was highest in the potential penumbra (37.7 versus 37.3 degrees C in lesion core, P < 0.05). Neither sub-regional temperature nor lactate concentration correlated with stroke severity. With increasing time after stroke, ipsilateral brain temperature did not change, but contralateral hemisphere temperature was higher in patients scanned at later times; lactate remained elevated in the lesion core, but declined in potential penumbral and ipsilateral normal tissue at later times. We conclude that early brain temperature elevation after stroke is not directly related to lactate concentration, therefore augmented metabolism is unlikely to explain the relationship between early pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. Early brain temperature elevation may result from different mechanisms to those which raise body temperature after stroke. Further studies are required to determine why early brain temperature elevation is highest in potential penumbral tissue.

  16. Revisiting 'progressive stroke': incidence, predictors, pathophysiology, and management of unexplained early neurological deterioration following acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seners, Pierre; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-28

    Early neurological deterioration (END) following acute ischemic stroke is a serious clinical event strongly associated with poor outcome. Regarding specifically END occurring within 24 h following stroke onset, apart from straightforward causes such as symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage and malignant edema, the cause of END remains unclear in more than a half of cases. In the latter situation, patients are often referred to as 'progressive stroke', a default clinical category that does not imply underlying mechanisms, precluding informed management. In this review article, we summarize the available evidence on the incidence, predictors, and associated factors of unexplained END, and discuss its underlying pathophysiology. We particularly address the hemodynamic and thrombotic mechanisms that likely play a critical role in unexplained END, and in turn highlight potential new avenues to prevent and manage this ominous event.

  17. [CLINICAL-HEMODYNAMIC PECULIARITIES OF THE COURSE OF HEMODYNAMIC ISCHEMIC STROKE IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Shkrobot, S; Sokhor, N; Milevska-Vovchuk, L; Yasniy, O; Shkrobot, L

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the research is to study the peculiarities of cardiac morphometric parameters, the parameters of central hemodynamics and their impact on the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period. 116 patients were performed Echo-Doppler-cardiography in acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in order to evaluate cardiac morphometric parameters. These patients were also performed transcranial duplex scanning. The results established that among significant clinical factors that influence the course of the acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke the most important are: the size of the focus, the level of consciousness on the 1st day, primary systolic arterial pressure, age of the patient. Hemodynamic ischemic stroke occurs on the background of changes of cardiac morphometric parameters and the disorders of the central hemodynamics. There is a close connection between the severity of hemodynamic ischemic stroke on the 7th and 14th day with the ejection fraction, the size of left atrium, the thickness of posterior wall of left ventricle, final diastolic size of left ventricle. The interrelation between the parameters of cerebral hemodynamics and cardiac morphometric parameters was established. cardiac morphometric parameters and parameters of central hemodynamics can be predictors of the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period.

  18. Trends in Recruitment Rates for Acute Stroke Trials, 1990-2014.

    PubMed

    Feldman, William B; Kim, Anthony S; Chiong, Winston

    2017-03-01

    Slow recruitment in acute stroke trials hampers the evaluation of new therapies and delays the adoption of effective therapies into clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates whether recruitment efficiency and rates have increased in acute stroke trials from 1990 to 2014. Acute stroke trials from 2010 to 2014 were identified by a search of PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Database of Research in Stroke, and the Stroke Trials Registry. These trials were compared to a previously published data set of trials conducted from 1990 to 2004. The median recruitment efficiency of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 0.41 participants/site/month compared with 0.26 participants/site/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.14). The median recruitment rate of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 26.8 participants/month compared with 19.0 participants/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.13). For acute stroke trials, neither recruitment efficiency nor recruitment rates have increased over the past 25 years and, if anything, have declined. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Informed consent: the rate-limiting step in acute stroke trials.

    PubMed

    Rose, David Z; Kasner, Scott E

    2011-01-01

    Successful implementation of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) for neuro-vascular emergencies such as cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, or subarachnoid hemorrhage is extraordinarily challenging. Besides establishing an accurate, hyper-expedited diagnosis among many mimics in a person with acute neurological deficits, informed consent must be obtained from this vulnerable group of patients who may be unable to convey their own wishes, grasp the gravity of their situation, or give a complete history or examination. We review the influences, barriers, and factors investigators encounter when providing established and putative stroke therapies, and focus on informed consent, the most important research protector of human subjects, as the rate-limiting step for enrollment into acute stroke RCTs. The informed consent process has received relatively little attention in the stroke literature, but is especially important for stroke victims with acute cognitive, aural, lingual, motor, or visual impairments. Consent by a surrogate may not accurately reflect the patient's wishes. Further, confusion about trial methodology, negative opinions of placebo-controlled studies, and therapeutic misconception by patients or surrogates may impede trial enrollment and requires further study. Exception from informed consent offers an opportunity that is rarely if ever utilized for stroke RCTs. Ultimately, advancing the knowledge base and treatment paradigms for acute stroke is essential but autonomy, beneficence (non-malfeasance), and justice must also be carefully interwoven into any well-designed RCT.

  20. Knowledge of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke among community residents in western urban China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Zheng, Min; Chen, Shuqun; Ou, Shu; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ni; Cao, Yingying; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy rate for acute ischemic stroke remains low, and improving public awareness of thrombolytic therapy may be helpful to reduce delay and increase chances of thrombolytic therapy. Our purpose was to survey the level of knowledge about thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke among community residents in Yuzhong district, Chongqing, China. In 2011, a population-based face-to-face interview survey was conducted in Yuzhong district, Chongqing. A total of 1500 potential participants aged ≥18 years old were selected using a multi-stage sampling method. A total of 1101 participants completed the survey. Only 23.3% (95% CI = 20.8 to 25.8) were aware of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke, of whom 59.9% (95% CI = 53.9 to 65.9) knew the time window. Awareness of thrombolytic therapy was higher among young people, those with higher levels of education and household income, those with health insurance, and those who knew all 5 stroke warning signs, while awareness of the time window was higher among those aged 75 years or older. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that awareness of thrombolytic therapy was independently associated with age, education level, health insurance and knowledge of stroke warning signs (P<0.05). In this population-based survey the community residents have poor awareness of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

  1. Safety of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients with saccular intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manoj K; Seet, Raymond C S; Zhang, Yi; Brown, Robert D; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2013-07-01

    It is not known if the presence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms can increase the risk of hemorrhage after thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. The goal of our study was to evaluate the risk of hemorrhage after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke patients with intracranial aneurysms. This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive cases of patients with acute ischemic stroke who were treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator at Mayo Clinic between March 2002 and June 2011 and who were evaluated with invasive or noninvasive intracranial angiography. Univariate analyses were performed with the t, Chi-square, and Fisher exact tests where appropriate. Intracranial angiograms were performed in 105 patients (85 magnetic resonance angiography, 19 computed tomography angiography, and 1 catheter arteriography). The mean age of the patients was 69 ± 14 years. The mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission was 8 ± 5. A total of 12 incidental saccular aneurysms were found in 10 (9.5%) patients, and all 10 of these patients were white. There were no subarachnoid hemorrhages during the hospital stay in any patient with or without intracranial aneurysm. The rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and 3-month clinical outcomes were similar in patients with or without intracranial aneurysms. Intravenous thrombolysis was safe among our patients with acute ischemic stroke and incidental intracranial saccular aneurysm. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endovascular Interventions for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review of Recent Trials.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Bryan M

    2016-03-01

    To review recent endovascular intervention trials for acute ischemic stroke. Recent, randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions for acute ischemic stroke were identified. The search terms "endovascular" AND "stroke" were used and filter for "randomized controlled trial" was applied; the period searched was January 1, 2013, to October 31, 2015. Randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions in acute ischemic stroke published within the past 3 years (2013-2015). A total of 8 trials are reviewed: 3 trials published in 2013 demonstrated neutral results for endovascular interventions, and 5 trials published in 2015 demonstrated positive results for endovascular interventions. Potential reasons for the change in outcomes include better patient selection and improvement indevice technology. Patient selection improvements included selecting patients with salvageable brain tissue with an identifiable thrombus on perfusion imaging. The major improvement in device technology was the introduction of the Solitaire Flow Restoration stent retriever and the Trevo stent retriever, both of which have improved recanalization rates compared with earlier devices. Adjunctive medication considerations include the mode of sedation (general or conscious), intraprocedural anticoagulation with heparin, and intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator. The use of endovascular devices for treating acute ischemic stroke is likely to increase as more centers become capable of integrating them into their stroke programs. It is important for pharmacists to understand the trials that evaluated endovascular interventions because differences exist with respect to device, adjunctive medication, and patient selection, all of which affect patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Prognostic value of single-photon emission tomography in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Weir, C J; Bolster, A A; Tytler, S; Murray, G D; Corrigall, R S; Adams, F G; Lees, K R

    1997-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in the investigation of acute stroke. We investigated the relationship between SPET data and functional outcome in a large group of acute stroke patients. One hundred and eight patients underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPET after acute ischaemic stroke. We categorised the clinical presentation according to the Oxford classification of acute stroke. Outcome was measured 1 year after stroke using mortality and the Barthel Index for survivors. SPET scans were interpreted without reference to the clinical data using a semi-automatic technique. Three experienced observers determined the presence of luxury perfusion using suitably scaled SPET images in conjunction with the CT scan. Both SPET volume and severity of deficit were significantly negatively correlated with Barthel Index at 1 year (rs=-0.310, P<0.0001, and rs=-0.316, P<0.0001 respectively). In patients scanned with SPET within 16 h of stroke onset, the correlations were more strongly negative (rs=-0.606, P<0. 001, and rs=-0.492, P<0.005 respectively). Luxury perfusion was not associated (chi2=0.073, df=1, P=0.79) with good functional outcome (Barthel score >/=60). Stepwise logistic regression identified Oxford classification, total deficit volume and patient's age as significant predictors of functional outcome. Overall predictive accuracy was 72%. Predictive accuracy was better in patients who received SPET within 16 h of stroke onset. SPET provides useful information about the functional outcome of acute stroke at 1 year. However, the accuracy of prediction decreases the longer SPET is delayed. Prognostication using SPET in combination with clinical assessment and other investigations may also be considered.

  4. Impact of emergency department transitions of care on thrombolytic use in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Madej-Fermo, Olga P; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gil; Abbott, Lincoln; McCullough, Louise D

    2012-04-01

    In-hospital mortality is higher for certain medical conditions based on the time of presentation to the emergency department. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived to the emergency department during a nursing shift change had similar rates of thrombolytic use and functional outcomes compared with patients presenting during nonshift change hours. A retrospective review of patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting to the emergency department of a primary stroke center from 2005 through 2010. The time to notify the stroke team, perform a head CT scan, and to start intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was assessed. Thrombolysis rates, mortality rate, discharge disposition, change in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and change in modified Barthel Index at 3 and 12 months were assessed. Of 3133 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 917 met criteria for inclusion. Arrival during nursing shift change, weekends, and July through September had no impact on process times, thrombolysis rates, and functional outcomes. Arrival at night did result in longer time to intra-arterial but not to intravenous thrombolysis, higher mortality rate, and smaller gain in functional status as measured by the modified Barthel Index at 3 months. The degree of emergency department "busyness" also did not influence tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment times. Presentation during a nursing shift change, a time of transition of care, did not delay thrombolytic use in eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke. Presentation with acute ischemic stroke at night did result in delays of care for patients undergoing interventional therapies.

  5. Results of Membrane-Activated Chelator Stroke Intervention randomized trial of DP-b99 in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bornstein, Natan; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Gorelick, Philip B; Rosenberg, Gilad; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2013-03-01

    DP-b99, a lipophilic moderate-affinity chelator of zinc, was postulated to improve recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We evaluated the safety and therapeutic effects of DP-b99 in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. The Membrane-Activated Chelator Stroke Intervention trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, parallel-group trial of intravenous DP-b99 administered for 4 consecutive days (NCT00893867). Acute ischemic stroke patients within 9 hours of onset, but untreated by alteplase, with a baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 10 to 16, and evidence of language dysfunction, visual field defect, and neglect were eligible. The primary efficacy analysis compared distributions of functional status measured by modified Rankin score in the intent-to-treat population of patients with any post-treatment outcome, adjusted for initial severity. Functional and neurological recovery were secondary measures. Home time was an exploratory end point. Enrollment terminated at n=446 after the planned interim analysis determined futility; follow-up continued. Final modified Rankin score distributions were equal between DP-b99 and placebo-treated groups (P=0.10; P(adj) adjusted for baseline age and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale=0.21). Fewer patients recovered to modified Rankin score ≤1 in the DP-b99-treated group (45/218; 20.6%) than after placebo (63/219; 28.8%) (P=0.05; P(adj)=0.10). Similarly, fewer patients attained National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1 after DP-b99 (42/218; 19.3%) than placebo (56/219; 25.6%; P=0.10; P(adj)=0.26). Mortality was similar between DP-b99 and placebo intent-to-treat groups (36/218; 16.5% vs 33/219; 15.1%; P=0.68). Home time was unchanged by treatment (median 36 vs 36.5 days; P=0.25). Despite encouraging preclinical and phase II trial data, DP-b99 shows no evidence of efficacy in treating human ischemic stroke.

  6. [The changing case-fatality of acute stroke in Beijing during 1984 to 2000].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-Yi; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Jun; Jia, Yan-Na

    2007-05-01

    To analyse the trends and distributions of case-fatality within 28 days after stroke in the population aged 35 - 74 in Beijing from 1984 to 2000 and to explore the possible influencing factors for case-fatality. In Sino-MONICA Project, acute stroke events were registered in a standardized way in men and women aged 35 - 74 years in Beijing from 1984 to 2000. Death even was defined as death within 28 days after stroke onset. From January 1 1984 to December 31 2000, 13,556 patients were registered, and 3905 died within 28 days of stroke onset. (1) The overall case-fatality within 28 days after stroke was 28.8% from 1984 to 2000, and the case-fatality were 63.2% for cerebral infarction (CI) and 34.8% for cerebral haemorrhage (CH) respectively. (2) The case-fatality for stroke declined 1.51% (P < 0.01) in men and 1.83% (P < 0.01) in women annually during 1984 to 2000, and the decline rate for CH and CI were 1.48% and 0.51% per year respectively. (3) The case-fatality ratio between men and women was 1:1.13 (P < 0.01). The case fatality for stroke was higher in rural area (38.7%) than in urban area (26.3%) (P < 0.01), and higher for recurrent stroke (36.1%) than for initial stroke (25.2%) (P < 0.01). The overall 28-day case-fatality after stroke onset decreased continually in the population aged 35 - 74 in Beijing during 1984 to 2000. The biggest contribution was from the decline of case-fatality of cerebral haemorrhage of stroke. In order to decrease the incidence of stroke, promoting the quality of health care and secondary prevention for stroke will be necessary, especially in rural area.

  7. Urine-Specific Gravity-Based Hydration Prevents Stroke in Evolution in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Jen; Tsai, Yen-Yun; Hsiao, Kuang-Yu; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Huang, Yen-Chu; Lee, Meng; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2017-09-01

    Early neurological deterioration after ischemic stroke (stroke-in-evolution [SIE]) is associated with poorer outcomes. Previous studies have demonstrated a link between hydration status and the development of SIE. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that rehydration therapy, administered on the basis of urine-specific gravity (USG) findings, might reduce the development of SIE. We conducted a single-arm prospective study of patients with acute ischemic stroke with historical controls. For the study group, a USG higher than 1.010 was taken as an indication for rehydration. Control group patients were rehydrated without referring to USG. An increase in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 4 or higher within 3 days was defined as having SIE. A total of 445 patients were analyzed, 167 in the study group and 278 in the control group. The proportion of patients who developed SIE was numerically, but not significantly, lower in the study group (5.9%; 10 of 167) compared with the control group (11.5%; 32 of 278). Among patients with a USG higher than 1.010 at admission, the SIE rate was significantly reduced in the study group compared with the control group (6.1% versus 16.0%; P = .021), while the rate of SIE was similar in those with a USG of 1.010 or lower at admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that USG-based hydration was an independent factor associated with reducing SIE. USG might be a convenient and useful method for guiding fluid therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. USG-based hydration reduced the incidence of SIE among patients with a USG higher than 1.010 at admission. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting outcome in hyper-acute stroke: validation of a prognostic model in the Third International Stroke Trial (IST3).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steff C; Sandercock, Peter A G; Dennis, Martin S

    2008-04-01

    Models are used to adjust for case mix and to stratify treatment allocation in clinical trials and can, if accurate enough, be used to aid decision-making in individual patients. We aimed to validate, in patients assessed within 6 hours of onset, a previously described six simple variable (SSV) model that was developed in stroke patients who were assessed sub-acutely. The explanatory variables in the model are age, living alone, independent pre-stroke, Glasgow Coma Scale verbal score, ability to lift arms and ability to walk. The six variables were collected at randomisation in the Third International Stroke Trial (IST3) trial of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in ischaemic stroke. We assessed survival to 30 days and functional status at 6 months using the Oxford Handicap Scale. We constructed receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves to establish the model's discriminatory performance and tested its calibration by charting predicted versus actual outcomes. 537 patients (mean age, 74 years) were included, of whom 422 (79%) survived 30 days and 179 (33%) were alive and independent at 6 months. The SSV model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.73 for 30-day survival and 0.82 for independent survival at 6 months. Calibration was satisfactory. This study confirms the external validity of the SSV model in an ischaemic stroke population assessed within 6 hours of symptom onset. The SSV model comprising easily collected variables can therefore be used to stratify patients in hyper-acute stroke trials, but probably is not accurate enough for decision-making in individual patients.

  9. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group (P=0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P=0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; P<0.05, repeated 2-way ANOVA) and phosphorylated HSP27 (P<0.001) but not plasma S100-β, matrix metalloproteinase-9, endocannabinoids, or arterial compliance. RIC after acute stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Population-based study of blood biomarkers in prediction of sub-acute recurrent stroke

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Helen C; Burgess, Annette I; Poole, Debbie L; Mehta, Ziyah; Silver, Louise E; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Risk of recurrent stroke is high in the first few weeks after TIA or stroke and clinic risk prediction tools have only limited accuracy, particularly after the hyper-acute phase. Previous studies of the predictive value of biomarkers have been small, been done in selected populations and have not concentrated on the acute phase or on intensively treated populations. We aimed to determine the predictive value of a panel of blood biomarkers in intensively treated patients early after TIA and stroke. Methods We studied 14 blood biomarkers related to inflammation, thrombosis, atherogenesis and cardiac or neuronal cell damage in early TIA or ischaemic stroke in a population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Biomarker levels were related to 90-day risk of recurrent stroke as Hazard Ratio (95%CI) per decile increase, adjusted for age and sex. Results Among 1292 eligible patients there were 53 recurrent ischaemic strokes within 90 days. There were moderate correlations (r>0.40; p<0001) between the inflammatory biomarkers and between the cell damage and thrombotic subsets. However, associations with risk of early recurrent stroke were weak, with significant associations limited to Interleukin-6 (HR=1.12, 1.01-1.24; p=0.035) and C-reactive protein (1.16, 1.02-1.30; p=0.019). When stratified by type of presenting event, P-selectin predicted stroke after TIA (1.31, 1.03-1.66; p=0.028) and C-reactive protein predicted stroke after stroke (1.16, 1.01-1.34; p=0.042). These associations remained after fully adjusting for other vascular risk factors. Conclusion In the largest study to date, we found very limited predictive utility for early recurrent stroke for a panel of inflammatory, thrombotic and cell damage biomarkers. PMID:25158774

  11. Hospitalization for infection and risk of acute ischemic stroke: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Elkind, Mitchell S V; Carty, Cara L; O'Meara, Ellen S; Lumley, Thomas; Lefkowitz, David; Kronmal, Richard A; Longstreth, W T

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about the acute precipitants of ischemic stroke, although evidence suggests infections contribute to risk. We hypothesized that acute hospitalization for infection is associated with the short-term risk of stroke. The case-crossover design was used to compare hospitalization for infection during case periods (90, 30, or 14 days before an incident ischemic stroke) and control periods (equivalent time periods exactly 1 or 2 years before stroke) in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a population-based cohort of 5888 elderly participants from 4 US sites. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Confirmatory analyses assessed hazard ratios of stroke from Cox regression models, with hospitalization for infection as a time-varying exposure. During a median follow-up of 12.2 years, 669 incident ischemic strokes were observed in participants without a baseline history of stroke. Hospitalization for infection was more likely during case than control time periods; for 90 days before stroke, OR=3.4 (95% CI, 1.8 to 6.5). The point estimates of risks were higher when we examined shorter intervals: for 30 days, OR=7.3 (95% CI, 1.9 to 40.9), and for 14 days, OR=8.0 (95% CI, 1.7 to 77.3). In survival analyses, risk of stroke was associated with hospitalization for infection in the preceding 90 days, adjusted hazard ratio=2.4 (95% CI, 1.6 to 3.4). Hospitalization for infection is associated with a short-term increased risk of stroke, with higher risks observed for shorter intervals preceding stroke.

  12. ADVANCE: An effective and feasible technique in acute stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Gurkas, Erdem; Akpinar, Cetin Kursad; Aytac, Emrah

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose Different techniques regarding efficient utilization of thrombectomy devices have been reported. Here, we described a novel technique named ADVANCE that is based on advancing a distal access catheter over the stent retriever. In this study, we aimed to report our initial results with this novel thrombectomy technique. Methods and results Sixty-seven consecutive acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke patients (35 male, 32 female) between January 2015 and January 2016 who were treated by mechanical thrombectomy were included in this prospective study. Patients were classified randomly into two groups: patients treated with either the ADVANCE technique or standard technique. Patients had a mean age of 61.1 ± 12.9 years. The average NIHSS score was 15.8 ± 3.8. In the ADVANCE group, the successful revascularization (mTICI 2b-3) rate was 87.1% and the 90-day good functional outcome rate (mRS 0-2) was 74.1%. The revascularization rate in the ADVANCE group was significantly ( p = 0.005) better than the standard technique group and good functional outcome at 90 days in the ADVANCE group was non-significantly better than the standard technique group ( p = 0.052). Conclusions ADVANCE is the first comparison of this technique to standard stent retriever thrombectomy with a higher rate of revascularization with no emboli to new territory and fewer distal emboli to target territory. This safe and efficient technique needs to be validated in large patient series in new thrombectomy trials.

  13. Increasing atrial fibrillation prevalence in acute ischemic stroke and TIA.

    PubMed

    Otite, Fadar Oliver; Khandelwal, Priyank; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Romano, Jose G; Sacco, Ralph L; Malik, Amer M

    2016-11-08

    To evaluate trends in atrial fibrillation (AF) prevalence in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and TIA in the United States. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to retrospectively compute weighted prevalence of AF in AIS (n = 4,355,140) and TIA (n = 1,816,459) patients admitted to US hospitals from 2004 to 2013. Multivariate-adjusted models were used to evaluate the association of AF with clinical factors, mortality, length of stay, and cost. From 2004 to 2013, AF prevalence increased by 22% in AIS (20%-24%) and by 38% in TIA (12%-17%). AF prevalence varied by age (AIS: 6% in 50-59 vs 37% in ≥80 years; TIA: 4% in 50-59 vs 24% in ≥80 years), sex (AIS: male 19% vs female 25%; TIA: male 15% vs female 14%), race (AIS: white 26% vs black 12%), and region (AIS: Northeast 25% vs South 20%). Advancing age, female sex, white race, high income, and large hospital size were associated with increased odds of AF in AIS. AF in AIS was a risk factor for in-hospital death (odds ratio 1.93, 95% confidence interval 1.89-1.98) but mortality in AIS with AF decreased from 11.6% to 8.3% (p < 0.001). Compared to no AF, AF was associated with increased cost of $2,310 and length of stay 1.1 days in AIS. AF prevalence in AIS and TIA has continued to increase. Disparity in AF prevalence in AIS and TIA exists by patient and hospital factors. AF is associated with increased mortality in AIS. Innovative AIS preventive strategies are needed in patients with AF, especially in the elderly. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. The role of unenhanced CT alone for the management of headache in an emergency department. A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Benoît; Platon, Alexandra; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Becker, Christoph D; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Perneger, Thomas; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Lövblad, Karl Olof; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether unenhanced CT alone could be sufficient for the screening of patients admitted with a suspicion of secondary headache in an emergency center. A feasibility study including consecutive patients admitted to our emergency department for acute non-traumatic headache, in whom a brain CT was required by the emergency physician, was conducted over a 3-month period of time. Patients with a suspicion of intracranial pathology, which can only be depicted by i.v. images (arterial dissection, venous thrombosis, or postoperative complication) were recorded but excluded from analysis. All patients underwent both unenhanced and i.v. enhanced cerebral CT, including CT angiography. Unenhanced CTs were reviewed by two radiologists, blinded to the clinical data, to the radiological reports and to the i.v. enhanced images. Unenhanced CT were sorted by the radiologists into three groups: (1) normal CT, (2) benign finding that could explain headache without need of injection of contrast media, (3) evidence of an intracranial pathology, requiring further imaging. Results were compared to i.v. enhanced CT images. A brain CT was required in 105 patients (34 males, 71 females) during the study period, 74 (70%) of them met our inclusion criteria. Fifty-nine (80%) were sorted in group 1 (normal), four (5%) in group 2, 11 (15%) in group 3. No further finding that could explain acute headache was found on i.v. CT images in patients of group 1 or 2. A significant pathology was confirmed by i.v. CT in all patients of group 3. This feasibility study suggests that a normal unenhanced CT might be sufficient to exclude the cause of headache in the initial screening of a selected group of patients admitted with cephalalgia. It compels researchers to perform further prospective studies to confirm the current data on a larger amount of patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Corte, Vittoriano Della; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile. PMID:27043681

  16. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile.

  17. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords “cortisol” and “stroke” and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity. PMID:24477489

  18. Absolute and Relative Contraindications to IV rt-PA for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the contraindications to the administration of intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) originated as exclusion criteria in major stroke trials. These were derived from expert consensus for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) trial. Despite the fact that the safety and efficacy of IV rtPA has been repeatedly confirmed in large international observational studies over the past 20 years, most patients with acute ischemic stroke disappointingly still do not receive thrombolytic treatment. Some of the original exclusion criteria have proven to be unnecessarily restrictive in real-world clinical practice. It has been suggested that application of relaxed exclusion criteria might increase the IV thrombolysis rate up to 20% with comparable outcomes to thrombolysis with more conventional criteria. We review the absolute and relative contraindications to IV rtPA for acute ischemic stroke, discussing the underlying rationale and evidence supporting these exclusion criteria. PMID:26288669

  19. Computerized vs. Paper-Pencil Assessment of Cognitive Change following Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Maude-Marie; Laforce, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common among patients with stroke and early recognition can optimize patient care. To determine the validity of computerized cognitive testing in an adult population with acute ischemic stroke. Validation study comparing computerized vs paper-pencil assessments at two time points three months apart in a stroke unit. Correlation analyses between computerized (using CogState Brief Battery) and paper-pencil testing (using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment) both at study entry and follow-up visits. We found moderate to strong significant correlations between the two instruments at study entry and follow-up sessions. Executive dysfunctions were the main cognitive changes. Test-retest correlations were strong. The CogState Brief Battery is a valid alternative for clinicians who wish to measure cognitive skills following acute ischemic stroke. Limitations of computerized testing are discussed.

  20. Tools and early management of language and swallowing disorders in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Flamand-Roze, Constance; Cauquil-Michon, Cécile; Denier, Christian

    2012-02-01

    The role of the stroke units in improving morbidity, mortality, and recovery from stroke is clearly demonstrated. However, acute management of language disorders in these specialized units remains controversial, and management of swallowing disorders is usually nonstandardized. The recent validation of a scale for rapid screening of language disorders (LAST [Language Screening Test]) in acute stroke patients should allow optimization of their detection and early management. Swallowing disorders should be screened and managed using a standardized protocol. Following early initial evaluation repeated on a daily basis, they justify tailored rehabilitation sessions, adaptation of food textures, team formation, and families' information. The use of these protocols implies the cooperation and coordination of the medical and paramedical teams and the daily presence of speech therapists. These aspects are crucial for patients in the stroke units to achieve full benefits from the management proposed in this paper, leading to diminution of complications and better long-term functional prognosis.

  1. Multimodal use of computed tomography in early acute stroke, part 2.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, R; Tambasco, N; Cardaioli, G; Parnetti, L; Paloni, F; Boranga, B; Pelliccioli, G P

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scan remains the most widely technique in the cerebrovascular emergency, as it is largely available, minimally invasive, fast, cheap and reliable. Noncontrast enhanced CT (NeCT) imaging can show early signs of infarction in ischemic stroke; however, it could not show if the ischemic tissue is irreversibly damaged. CT perfusion (CTP) imaging has been shown to predict stroke location and size and can provide information about ischemic cerebral parenchyma not definitively compromised. CT angiography (CTA) could highlight stenosis or occlusion both in intracranial and extracranial vessels. By combining NeCT, CTP, and CTA the entire cerebrovascular axis can be imaged during acute stroke. Currently, the term "multimodal CT" indicates the combined use of these three techniques in order to obtain a complete picture of the extension of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients.