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Sample records for acute subdural haematoma

  1. Medico-legal implications of acute subdural haematoma in boxing.

    PubMed

    Ng'walali, P M; Muraoka, N; Honjyo, K; Hamada, K; Kibayashi, K; Tsunenari, S

    2000-09-01

    A 16-year-old male high school student with a history of fever (38-39 degrees C) for 4 days lost consciousness following the end of a three round boxing match. He was transferred to a neurosurgical unit located 48 km away 1 h 36 min after injury. Clinical assessment at the unit revealed a comatose patient with a left acute subdural haematoma, but because of advanced brain oedema surgical management was deemed futile. At autopsy an acute subdural haematoma and a severe brain oedema were confirmed. Evaluation of physical conditions before the fight should have been more rigorous in our patient. The observations in our case support the published literature that boxing matches should be held only where neurosurgical expertise is readily available.

  2. Acute non-traumatic spinal subdural haematoma: an unusual aetiology.

    PubMed

    Seizeur, Romuald; Ahmed, Seddik Sid; Simon, Alexandre; Besson, Gérard; Forlodou, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    We report an unusual case of a spinal subdural haematoma associated with a ruptured spinal aneurysm. The delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis of this rare entity can have disastrous consequences. We discuss various possible aetiologies and its association with spinal aneurysms.

  3. Human Kluver-Bucy syndrome following acute subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Yoneoka, Y; Takeda, N; Inoue, A; Ibuchi, Y; Kumagai, T; Sugai, T; Takeda, K-I; Ueda, K

    2004-11-01

    We present a rare case of complete human Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) following recovery from transtentorial herniation caused by acute subdural haematoma (ASDH). A 17-year-old right-handed high school boy got into stupor within five minutes after 3-rounds of sparing at boxing. Emergency computed tomographic (CT) scan showed right cerebral hemispheric ASDH, which was evacuated following intentional decompressive craniectomy. After recovery of consciousness, he developed emotional changes (placidity with loss of normal fear and anger), psychic blindness, aberrant sexual behaviour, excessive oral tendencies, increased appetite, and hypermetamorphosis in order of mention, which were observed with waxing and waning from 17th to 28th hospital day. Peri-operative CT scaning and magnetic resonance imaging showed lesions of the right temporal lobe and right-dominant orbitofrontal regions including bilateral rectal and medial orbital gyri, and the intact left temporal lobe. Two pathogeneses can be thought of and the whole picture of KBS following ASDH can arise even though one (left in this case) temporal lobe is preserved, 1) in which associated orbitofrontal lesions of the frontal lobes may correlate with occurrence of KBS, or 2) cerebral blood hypoperfusion of both temporal lobes due to increased intracranial pressure and/or compression of both posterior cerebral arteries at the edge of the tentorium cerebelli occurs.

  4. Arachnoid cysts with intracystic and subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Rovira, M; Ibarra, B; Piqueras, J; Rovira, M

    1989-05-01

    Two cases of arachnoid cysts with acute intracystic and subdural haematomas are described. CT examination was performed in both cases, and showed a hyperdense expansion with thinning of the inner table of the skull. The different ways in which subdural haematomas associated with arachnoid cysts may be seen on CT are discussed.

  5. Acute spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma presenting as paraplegia and complete recovery with non-operative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Zengin, Suat; Genc, Sinan; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Mete, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma (SSDH) with no underlying pathology is a very rare condition. Only 20 cases have been previously reported. It can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasia, or trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. It occurs most commonly in the thoracic spine and presents with sudden back pain radiating to the arms, legs or trunk, and varying degrees of motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. Although the main approach to management is surgical decompression, conservative management is used as well. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with sudden severe low back pain followed by rapid onset of complete paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an anterior subdural haematoma from T9 to L1 with cord compression. Corticosteroid treatment was administered. The patient showed substantial clinical improvement after 7 days of bed rest and an intense rehabilitation programme. An MRI scan and a computed tomography angiogram did not reveal any underlying pathology to account for the subdural haematoma. PMID:22065983

  6. A subdural haematoma following 'reverse' bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J J; Bassi, S; White, B D

    2002-06-01

    Bungee jumping has been exploited commercially for 13 years and proprietors claim a good safety record. However, published case reports document a wide variety of possible injuries. To this list, we add a report of a subdural haematoma sustained during a variant of the sport, the 'reverse' bungee jump.

  7. Chronic subdural haematoma after snowboard head injury.

    PubMed

    Uzura, M; Taguchi, Y; Matsuzawa, M; Watanabe, H; Chiba, S

    2003-02-01

    Two cases of chronic subdural haematoma following a snowboard head injury are reported. Although such cases are rare in sport, the risk in snowboarders is higher than expected. Evaluation of a snowboarder with a history of head injury, albeit mild, who complains of headaches should include computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to allow rapid identification of any intracranial pathology.

  8. Subdural haematoma: an uncommon presentation of thrombocytopaenia in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Raghurama Rao, G; Subrahmanyam, N; Amareswar, A

    2010-06-01

    Isolated thrombocytopaenia can occur in 30-60% of HIV-infected patients. The majority of patients with HIV-related immune thrombocytopaenia have only minor submucosal bleeding problems. Cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage and subdural haematoma are very rare and management of such cases is a challenging problem for physicians. We report a rare case of subdural haematoma due to thrombocytopaenia in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man.

  9. Gerstmann's syndrome associated with chronic subdural haematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, S; Okumura, Y; Nakai, K; Itakura, T; Komai, N

    1998-08-01

    We report a patient who exhibited Gerstmann's syndrome in association with a chronic subdural haematoma. A 71-year-old right-handed woman presented with mild right arm and leg weakness that began 2 weeks prior to admission. Neurological examination on admission revealed a mild right hemiparesis. Neuropsychological examination revealed right-left disorientation, finger agnosia, agraphia, and acalculia, but no language disturbance. A computerized tomographic (CT) scan revealed a large left frontoparietal, extra-axial hypodense fluid collection containing scattered hypodense foci. A left parietal evacuation of the haematoma was performed. Following surgery the patient dramatically improved. We suggest that the direct compression by the chronic subdural haematoma or a hemispheric pressure difference caused Gerstmann's syndrome. This is an unusual report of a Gerstmann's syndrome following chronic subdural haematoma.

  10. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  11. Chronic subdural haematoma after riding a roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Iwao; Mine, Seiichiro; Yamaura, Akira; Fukutake, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    We report a 20-year-old man who developed a chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) after riding a "giant" roller coaster. The patient had a past history of a subdural hygroma, diagnosed six weeks after a motorcycle accident. Three months after this accident, he rode on a roller coaster, but suffered no direct head trauma during the ride. Three weeks later, he developed a CSDH requiring surgical evacuation. Roller coaster riding, associated with high velocities and extreme acceleration/deceleration forces is a modern cause of CSDH in the young, which may be increasing due to ever-faster rides.

  12. The conservative and pharmacological management of chronic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Soleman, Jehuda; Nocera, Fabio; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-01-19

    Chronic subdural haematoma (cSDH), one of the most common neurosurgical entities, occurs typically in elderly patients. The incidence is expected to double by the year 2030, owing to the continuous aging of the population. Surgery is usually the treatment of choice, but conservative treatment may be a good alternative in some situations. We provide a systematic review of studies analysing the conservative treatment options and the natural history of cSDH. Of 231 articles screened, 35 were included in this systematic review. Studies evaluating the natural history and conservative treatment modalities of cSDH remain sparse and are predominantly of low level of evidence. The natural history of cSDH remains unclear and is analysed only in case reports or very small case series. "Wait and watch" or "wait and scan" management is indicated in patients with no or minor symptoms (Markwalder score 0-1). However, it seems that there are no clear clinical or radiological signs indicating whether the cSDH will resolve spontaneously or not (type C recommendation). In symptomatic patients who are not worsening or in a comatose state, oral steroid treatment might be an alternative to surgery (type C recommendation). Tranexamic acid proved effective in a small patient series (type C recommendation), but its risk of increasing thromboembolic events in patients treated with antithrombotic or anticoagulant medication is unclear. Angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitors were evaluated only as adjuvant therapy to surgery, and their effect on the rate of recurrence remains debatable. Mannitol showed promising results in small retrospective series and might be a valid treatment modality (type C recommendation). However, the long treatment duration is a major drawback. Patients presenting without paresis can be treated with a platelet activating factor receptor antagonist (type C recommendation), since they seem to promote resolution of the haematoma, especially in patients with hygromas

  13. Concepts of neurosurgical management of chronic subdural haematoma: historical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Weigel, R; Krauss, J K; Schmiedek, P

    2004-02-01

    The history of chronic subdural haematoma (CSH), spanning from its possibly earliest beginnings throughout the centuries until the early 1980s, was investigated within the context of four different epochs. In the 'era of uncertainty', successful trephination, the modem method of choice for the treatment of CSH, was developed by neolithic men. Various historical sources indicate that patients with CSH might have undergone surgery at that time. CSH might have been one of the ailments that had spectacular courses of salvation after trephination. The entity of CSH was first described in the 'era of pioneers' in the seventeenth century by Johann Jacob Wepfer. The misconception of 'pachymeningitis hemorrhagica interna' was introduced by Rudolf Virchow in 1857. By the end of the nineteenth century it became more widely accepted that trauma was a possible cause of CSH. Successful neurosurgical treatment of CSH was first reported by Hulke in 1883. Putnam and Cushing, in 1925, focused on surgery as the treatment of choice for CSH. In the 'era of diagnostic refinement', the introduction of pneumencephalography and angiography allowed the diagnosis of CSH much earlier. Subsequently, the typical signs and symptoms of patients suffering from CSH changed from apathy and coma to headaches and discrete focal neurological symptoms. In the 'era of surgical routine', neurosurgical approaches became smaller and less invasive. Removal of the haematoma was identified as the primary goal of surgery. The use of closed system drainage markedly improved reexpansion of the brain after surgery. Burr hole craniostomy and twist drill craniostomy became the surgical treatment of first choice because of their low morbidity and mortality. There is growing evidence, however, that the neurosurgical learning curve has reached a plateau.

  14. Ruptured Intrasellar Superior Hypophyseal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Pure Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, M.; Hillard, V.; Nwagwu, C.; Zablow, B. C.; Murali, R.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Subdural haemorrhage from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is a well-known entity when associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage. However, haemorrhage confined only to the subdural space is rare because there are limited anatomical sites where extravasation can be purely subdural. We report the rare case of a patient who suffered pure subdural haematoma after the rupture of a left superior hypophyseal artery aneurysm located within the sella turcica. The patient was treated with endovascular coil embolization of the aneurysm. Angiography immediately after treatment and one month later revealed complete obliteration of the aneurysm. Six months after treatment, the patient remained symptom free. PMID:20587264

  15. Long-term survival after chronic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Appukutty; Marshman, Laurence A G; Johnston, Ross

    2016-12-01

    Outcome after chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is invariably assumed favourable: however, little data regarding long term survival (LTS) exists. One study reported excess mortality restricted to year 1, but with expected actuarial rates thereafter. We aimed to determine LTS after CSDH in a retrospective analysis relative to actuarial data from age-matched controls. Data was obtained in n=155, (M:F 97:58, 69.3±2.3years). Follow-up maxima was 14.19years (mean: 4.02±3.07years, median: 5.2years). Mortality in-hospital, at 6months, 1year, 2years and 5years was n=13 (8.39%), n=22 (14.19%), n=31 (20.35%), n=42 (27.1%) and n=54 (34.84%). LTS was significantly worse than controls (5.29±0.59years vs. 17.74±1.8years, hazard ratio [HR]: 3.52, P<0.0001). Death most frequently related to pneumonia/sepsis and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Median modified Rankin score (mRS) in those discharged home (n=94, 60.65%) was 2 [IQR: 1-3]. Discharge mRS in those who died at 6months, 1year, 2years and 5years was 5 [IQR: 3-6], 5 [IQR: 4-6], 3 [IQR: 1-3], 4 [IQR: 2-5]. Discharge mRS was significantly worse with year 1 mortality (P=0.014). LTS related to discharge mRS (HR: 37.006, P<0.001), post-operative motor-score (HR: 0.581, P=0.0026), IHD (HR: 5.186, P=0.005), warfarin-use (HR: 5.93, P=0.036) and dementia (HR: 5.39, P=0.031). No long term recurrences (LTR) were recorded. Although most were discharged home with mRS=2, LTS was markedly less than previously reported: peers lived 12.4years longer. Although greater in year 1, excess mortality was not restricted to year 1, but continued throughout prolonged follow-up. LTS related to discharge disability and dependence, and co-morbid risk factors for cerebral atrophy. No LTR suggests that, once ultimately closed, the 'subdural space' remains closed. CSDH patients represent a vulnerable group who require continued long-term medical surveillance.

  16. The next extreme sport? Subdural haematoma in a patient with arachnoid cyst after head shaking competition.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, J; Mamourian, A; Lollis, S; Duhaime, T

    2006-04-01

    A young man, engaged in a head shaking competition presented with headache, nausea and vomiting. Imaging revealed a subdural haematoma and ipsilateral arachnoid cyst. This novel mechanism of trauma underscores the predisposition to haemorrhage in patients with arachnoid cysts, even with minor trauma. Aetiology, imaging and possible treatment options are discussed.

  17. Carbon dioxide insufflation for chronic subdural haematoma: a simple addition to burr-hole irrigation and closed-system drainage.

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Takimoto, H; Nakata, H; Yoshimine, T

    2003-12-01

    Burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage is a common surgical method used for chronic subdural haematoma. However, the subdural space with air that entered during surgery sometimes remains for a prolonged period after surgery and may hamper uncomplicated healing of the subdural space. We combined a simple procedure, insufflation of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subdural space through a drainage catheter, with conventional burr-hole irrigation and closed-system drainage. By this additional procedure, both the subdural space and the gas within the space decreased rapidly, and the subdural drain could be removed within 24 h. By promoting obliteration of the subdural space, this simple combined technique may contribute to early recovery and discharge of patients, and to a reduction in the recurrence rate of the disease.

  18. [Chronic subdural haematomas. The internal architecture of the haematoma as a predictor of recurrence].

    PubMed

    García-Pallero, M Ángeles; Pulido-Rivas, Paloma; Pascual-Garvi, José M; Sola, Rafael G

    2014-10-01

    Introduccion. La arquitectura interna del hematoma subdural cronico (HSDC) es un factor muy importante que se debe tener en cuenta como predictor de recidiva. Objetivo. Analizar los factores posiblemente asociados a la recidiva de los HSDC, prestando especial atencion a dicha arquitectura. Pacientes y metodos. Hemos revisado 147 pacientes tratados desde 2010 hasta 2013. Dividimos los HSDC en cuatro tipos de acuerdo con la clasificacion de Nakaguchi de 2001. Ademas, hemos recogido diferentes caracteristicas clinicas y las hemos sometido a analisis estadistico para evaluar su posible asociacion con la tasa de recidiva de los HSDC. Resultados. La tasa de recidiva fue del 14,75% y la de mortalidad, del 4,76%. El tratamiento con anticoagulantes, el tipo de hematoma y el no usar drenaje subdural fueron factores de riesgo estadisticamente significativos para la recurrencia del HSDC. Segun la arquitectura interna, la tasa de recidiva fue del 36,36% para el tipo separado, del 15,90% para el laminar, del 8,82% para el homogeneo y del 0% para el trabecular. Dicha tasa fue significativamente mayor en el tipo separado respecto al homogeneo y trabecular. Conclusiones. El tratamiento con anticoagulantes y el no usar drenaje subdural son factores de riesgo de recurrencia de HSDC. Ademas, la division de los HSDC de acuerdo con la clasificacion de Nakaguchi puede ser util para predecir el riesgo de recurrencia, ya que la tasa de recidiva del tipo separado fue significativamente mayor que la del resto de tipos.

  19. Chronic subdural haematoma and autosomal polycystic kidney disease: report of two new cases.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Hedri, Hafedh; Lâabidi, Jannette; Raies, Lamia; Kheder, Adel; Abdallah, Taieb Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben; Maïz, Hédi Ben

    2004-10-01

    Chronic subdural haematoma (SDH) was recently described in some patients who were suffering from autosomic dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). It results in various neurological symptoms mimicking those related to intracranial aneurysms, which are relatively frequent in such patients. The authors report two cases of chronic SDH observed in two patients known to have advanced renal failure attributed to ADPKD. Medical imaging failed to reveal features of associated intracranial abnormalities such as aneurysms or arachnoid cysts. Surgical drainage resulted in a good recovery without relapse during a long period of follow up that exceeded 10 years in the first case.

  20. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents and the risk of development and recurrence of chronic subdural haematomas.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Peter; Koskinen, Lars-Owe D

    2009-10-01

    Seventy-one patients from northern Sweden were diagnosed with chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH) and treated at the Department of Neurosurgery at Umeå University Hospital over 12 months. Fifty-four patients with CSDH had a history of head trauma (trauma group), while 17 patients had no previous head trauma (non-trauma group). In the non-trauma group 71% of patients were treated with anticoagulants or antiplatelet aggregation agents (AAA) compared to 18% in the trauma group. Considering only AAA, 59% of the non-trauma patients were treated with these drugs versus 17% of patients in the trauma group. The recurrence rate for all patients was 17%. These findings confirm that the use of anticoagulants and AAA is over-represented in patients with non-traumatic CSDH. In our study, recurrence was not associated with previous use of anticoagulants or AAA.

  1. Spinal cord compression by spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Kalina, P; Drehobl, K E; Black, K; Woldenberg, R; Sapan, M

    1995-06-01

    A woman with an eight-year history of polycythemia vera presented with numbness and weakness of both legs. A large spinal haematoma was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging which was treated clinically and which subsequently resolved.

  2. Spinal cord compression by spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Kalina, P.; Drehobl, K. E.; Black, K.; Woldenberg, R.; Sapan, M.

    1995-01-01

    A woman with an eight-year history of polycythemia vera presented with numbness and weakness of both legs. A large spinal haematoma was revealed on magnetic resonance imaging which was treated clinically and which subsequently resolved. Images Figure PMID:7644407

  3. Analysis of risk factors for chronic subdural haematoma recurrence after burr hole surgery: optimal management of patients on antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Okano, Atsushi; Oya, Soichi; Fujisawa, Naoaki; Tsuchiya, Tsukasa; Indo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takumi; Chang, Han Soo; Matsui, Toru

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE. Not much is known about surgical management of patients with chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) treated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The aims of this study were to review the surgical outcomes of patients with CSDH and assess the risks of antiplatelet in their surgical management. METHODS. We retrospectively analysed 448 consecutive patients with CSDH treated by one burr hole surgery at our institution. Among them, 58 patients had been on antiplatelet therapy. We discontinued the antiplatelet agents before surgery for all 58 patients. For 51 of these 58 patients (87.9%), early surgery was performed within 0-2 days from admission. We analysed the association between recurrence and patient characteristics, including history of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy; age (< 70 years or ≥ 70 years); side; history of angiotensin receptor II blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme blocker, or statin therapy; and previous medical history of head trauma, infarction, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, haemodialysis, seizure, cancer, or liver cirrhosis. RESULTS. Recurrence occurred in 40 patients (8.9%), which was one of the lowest rates in the literature. Univariate analysis showed that only the presence of bilateral haematomas was associated with increased recurrence rate while antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy did not significantly increase recurrence risk. Also, the recurrence rate from early surgery (0-2 days from drug cessation) for patients on antiplatelet therapy was not significantly higher than that from elective surgery (5 days or more after drug cessation). However, multivariate analysis revealed that previous history of cerebral infarction was an independent risk factor for CSDH recurrence. CONCLUSIOns. Our overall data support the safety of early surgery for patients on the preoperative antiplatelet therapy without drug cessation or platelet infusion. Patients with a previous history of infarction may need to be closely followed

  4. [Haematoma of the floor of the mouth associated to acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Alejandro; Bayón, Jeremías; Gallego, Lorena; Junquera, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a haematoma in the floor of the mouth after receiving alteplase in the treatment of an acute myocardial infarction. Both the treatment received and appropriate preventive measures to avoid such haematomas are described.

  5. [Acute spinal subdural hematoma after attempted spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Likar, R; Mathiaschitz, K; Spendel, M; Krumpholz, R; Martin, E

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of a case of a subdural haematoma with resulting paraplegia after attempted spinal anaesthesia. Epidural and subdural haematomas are rare complications after central neural blockade. The complication described here was the result of an unsuccessful attempt to puncture the spinal channel. The patient was a 72-year-old woman with a fracture of the left femoral neck, which it was intended to stabilize operatively. Findings that made lumbar spinal puncture difficult were severe overweight, and lordosis and scoliosis of the lumbar spine resulting from degenerative changes. Spinal anaesthesia was suggested because the patient had eaten shortly before and because she suffered from asthma. From the aspect of haemostasis no contraindications were present, and the anaesthesist was experienced in spinal anaesthesia even under difficult anatomical conditions. Several unsuccessful attempts were made to puncture the lumbar spinal channel while the patient was lying on her right side. It was also impossible to reach the spinal channel from a median or left paramedian approach. We used atraumatic pencil-point needles (Sprotte gauge 24, 90 mm). No blood was aspirated during any of the attempts. The surgical intervention was finally performed under a general anaesthetic in view of the urgency. No significant complications occurred during the operation, and no neurological abnormalities were observed immediately after or in the next 8 h after the operation. At 12 h after the operation a paraparesis was found caudal to L3. After this had been verified by radiological and neurological tests, neurosurgical decompression was carried out as quickly as possible. During the operation a distinct subdural haematoma without any detectable source of bleeding was discovered. Even after surgical revision and evacuation of the remaining haematoma it was not possible to reverse the paraplegia, in spite of rehabilitation measures. Despite a certain fragility of the vessel and

  6. Delayed Acute Subdural Hematoma Associated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed acute subdural hematoma (DASH) is a subdural hematoma which is detected later. An initial computed tomography (CT) does not reveal any intracranial hemorrhage at all. Few patients of DASH after mild traumatic brain injury associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been published. Patient Presentation: A 63-year-old woman presented with cardiac pulmonary arrest due to acute myocardial infarction and lethal arrhythmia. She had hit her head on the road. The initial CT did not reveal any hemorrhage in the intra-cranium. She fully recovered after PCI. However, 1 hour after PCI, she lost consciousness and immediate CT showed acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The period from losing consciousness to brain herniation presenting as anisocoria was very short—only 30 minutes in our patient. Although emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed, the patient died 1 day after the operation. Conclusion: The authors encountered a patient of DASH after PCI that resulted in death. Clinicians should be aware that subdural hemorrhage can occur after PCI if no hemorrhage is noted in the initial head CT, and the operation should be performed as soon as possible when the consciousness level decreases. PMID:27526240

  7. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  8. Management of spontaneous extramedullary spinal haematomas: results in eight patients after MRI diagnosis and surgical decompression.

    PubMed Central

    Langmayr, J J; Ortler, M; Dessl, A; Twerdy, K; Aichner, F; Felber, S

    1995-01-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extradural and subdural haemorrhage is a neurosurgical emergency. Differences in clinical presentation in relation to localisation of the haematoma, value of MRI as a diagnostic tool, surgical treatment, and prognosis were investigated in a retrospective case series of eight patients with extradural (n = four) and subdural (n = four) haematomas. Results of MRI were compared with operative findings and proved to be of high sensitivity in defining the type of bleeding and delineating craniocaudal extension and ventrodorsal location. Surgical treatment by decompressive laminectomy, haematoma evacuation, and postoperative high dose corticosteroids resulted in resolution of symptoms in five patients and improvement in the clinical situation in two patients. One patient with a chronic subdural haematoma had a second operation because of arachnoidal adhesions. One patient presented with a complete cord transection syndrome due to an acute subdural haematoma and remained paraplegic. It is concluded that prompt, reliable, and non-invasive diagnosis by MRI leads to efficient surgical treatment and a favourable outcome in this rare condition. Images PMID:7561928

  9. The management of the acute traumatic subungual haematoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin; Becker, Giles; Little, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal mode of managing the acute traumatic subungual haematoma in the hand. In this context the medical literature was searched systematically and the results analysed. The final dataset consisted of four articles. The complication rates of all forms of treatment were low. The outcome in terms of nail cosmesis was generally good, although the method of outcome measurement was variable in nature. There was no difference in cosmetic outcome when comparing nail bed repair with simple decompression. In conclusion the outcome in terms of nail cosmesis does not appear to be affected by the mode of treatment. The acutely painful subungual haematoma should be decompressed, whether this be done by trephining or nail removal. Future research includes the potential for a randomised controlled trial to compare nail bed repair with trephination.

  10. Spontaneous rapid reduction of a large acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Kang, Dong Ho; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong Woo

    2009-12-01

    The majority of acute post-traumatic subdural hematomas (ASDH) require urgent surgical evacuation. Spontaneous resolution of ASDH has been reported in some cases. We report here on a case of a patient with a large amount of ASDH that was rapidly reduced. A 61-yr-old man was found unconscious following a high speed motor vehicle accident. On initial examination, his Glasgow Coma Score scale was 4/15. His pupils were fully dilated and non-reactive to bright light. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a massive right-sided ASDH. The decision was made to treat him conservatively because of his poor clinical condition. Another brain CT approximately 14 hr after the initial scan demonstrated a remarkable reduction of the previous ASDH and there was the new appearance of high density in the subdural space adjacent to the falx and the tentorium. Thirty days after his admission, brain CT revealed chronic SDH and the patient underwent surgery. The patient is currently able to obey simple commands. In conclusion, spontaneous rapid resolution/reduction of ASDH may occur in some patients. The mechanisms are most likely the result of dilution by cerebrospinal fluid and the redistribution of hematoma especially in patients with brain atrophy.

  11. Dissapearance of arachnoid cyst after rupturing into subdural space.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, C; Cetinalp, E; Caner, H; Altinors, N

    2007-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are developmental anomalies usually diagnosed in childhood. The most important complications of arachnoid cysts are subdural haematomas and hygromas and intracystic haemorrhage. In our case we present a 7-year-old boy whose arachnoid cyst ruptured into the subdural space following a mild head injury and disappeared after draining the subdural haematoma by burr-holes.

  12. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages. PMID:27630864

  13. Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma mimicking acute epidural hematoma on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Fujita, Keishi; Katayama, Wataru; Sato, Masayuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira; Sakashita, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    An 87-year-old woman presented with an atypical case of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) manifesting as disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography revealed a high density lentiform lesion in the right convexity, which was thought to be acute epidural hematoma preoperatively. Emergent decompressive craniotomy revealed an encapsulated solid fresh clot in the subdural space and a bleeding small cortical artery under the clot. The arachnoid membrane and the brain parenchyma were intact, and no other abnormal feature such as aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation was observed. The encapsulated ASDH was removed en bloc and the patient fully recovered. Histological examination confirmed that both the outer thicker and the inner membrane were fibrinous single structures without vasculature. The red blood cells constituting the clot in the capsule maintained their cell structure. The reported pathological mechanisms of lentiform ASDH are adhesion of the arachnoid membrane and the dura mater or intracapsular bleeding from sinusoidal vessels in the outer membrane of the chronic subdural hematoma. However, in our case, the arachnoid membrane had not adhered to the dura mater and the capsule was a fibrinous single structural membrane without vasculature, which probably resulted from a previous hematoma due to initial bleeding from the cortical artery. The possible mechanism in our case was that the re-bleeding dissected and flowed into the fibrinous single structural membrane, resulting in formation of the lentiform ASDH.

  14. Spontaneous acute spinal subdural hematoma: spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis--case report and review.

    PubMed

    Payer, Michael; Agosti, Reto

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematomas are highly exceptional. Neurological symptoms are usually severe, and rapid diagnosis with MRI is mandatory. Surgical evacuation has frequently been used therapeutically; however, spontaneous recovery in mild cases has also been reported. We present a case of spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis after spontaneous acute SSDH, and review the English-speaking literature.

  15. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  16. Acute cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to head injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yul; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of traumatic cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to intracranial injury. There has been no report on traumatic cervical spinal subdrual hematoma not related to intracranial injury. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room due to severe neck pain and right arm motor weakness after car collision. On admission, she presented with complete monoplegia and hypoesthesia of right arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subdural hematoma compressing spinal cord. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 210,000 red blood cells/mm(3). She was managed conservatively by administrations of steroid pulse therapy and CSF drainage. Her muscle power of right arm improved to a Grade III 16 days after admission. Follow-up MRI taken 16th days after admission revealed almost complete resolution of the hematoma. Here, the authors report a traumatic cervical spinal SDH not associated with intracranial injury.

  17. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  18. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  19. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases.

  20. Contralateral development of chronic subdural hematoma after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sucu, H Kamil; Gökmen, M; Bezircioglu, H; Tektaş, S

    2006-09-01

    Contralateral acute complications such as acute epi/subdural hematomas can be encountered after evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, though they are rare. We found only one case of chronic subdural hematoma following the surgery for contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, have been published in English language literature. A 73-year-old male admitted to our hospital with a right-sided subdural hematoma. The subdural hematoma was evacuated through a burr-hole. A left-sided subdural higroma appeared after operation and turned into classical subdural hematoma in the course of time. After evacuation of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, the patient recovered completely. All stages of the development of contralateral chronic subdural hematomas were shown by serial computed tomograms. It was suggested that traumatic chronic subdural hematomas develop from mostly subdural higromas. If contralateral subdural higroma is seen after surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, the possibility of development of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma must be kept on mind.

  1. Emergency anesthesia for evacuating a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage in a child overdosed with hypertonic saline

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, Chulananda; Bedford, James; Harpreet, Sodhi; Giombini, Mariangela; Sheikh, Asme

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old child with a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage received 10 times higher dose of hypertonic saline inadvertently immediately before surgery. This case report describes deviations in fluid management needed to alleviate salt toxicity and its adverse effects during surgery under anesthesia perioperatively. The child made an uneventful recovery with no evident residual damage at follow-up. PMID:28217157

  2. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to bleeding from metastatic chondrosarcoma of the skull

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Tamura, Ryota; Ohara, Kentaro; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intra or peritumoral hemorrhage of brain and skull tumors sometimes presents as stroke. Skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma is relatively rare, and furthermore, a case of intratumoural hemorrhage of skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma has not been reported. Case Description: A 73-year-old man underwent right lower leg amputation in the past because of chondrosarcoma and was operated for a skull metastasis. He presented with a sudden headache, and head computed tomography revealed a right acute subdural hematoma (SDH) adjacent to the recurrent skull metastatic tumor. The removal of the SDH and tumor resection were performed emergently. The intraoperative findings included metastatic invasion beyond the dura mater to as deep as the subdural space, and the histological diagnosis was metastatic chondrosarcoma. His postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: In the event of subdural invasion of a metastatic lesion, intratumoral hemorrhage may induce acute SDH, as in the present case. Similar to our case, most previous reports of intracranial chondrosarcoma hemorrhage have had an unclear etiology. Despite the rarity of this event, a patient with a history of malignancy presenting with nontraumatic acute SDH should be examined for the intratumoral hemorrhage of skull metastasis in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28303203

  3. Blood Aggravates Histological and Functional Damage after Acute Subdural Hematoma in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jussen, Daniel; Krenzlin, Harald; Papaioannou, Chrysostomos; Ens, Swetlana; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2017-02-15

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether the volume effect of the hematoma and increase of intracranial pressure (ICP) or the local effect of blood are responsible for this severe pathophysiology is unclear. Therefore, we compared subdural infusion of autologous blood and paraffin oil in a rat model of ASDH. In a histological study, we investigated the effects on acute ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue oxygen changes, and brain damage at 2, 24, and 96 h post-infusion. Inflammatory reaction was analyzed by immuno-staining for microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]) and activated astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]). Besides acute ICP and CBF changes, we investigated the development of behavior (neuroscore and beamwalk test) for up to 4 days after injury in a behavioral study. Despite comparably increased ICP, there was a more pronounced lesion growth in the blood infusion group during the first 96 h. Further, there was an increased peri-lesional immunoreactive area of Iba1 and GFAP 96 h post-infusion, primarily in the blood infusion group, whereas hippocampal damage was comparable in both infusion groups. In the behavioral evaluation, paraffin-infused animals showed a better recovery, compared with the blood infusion group. In conclusion, comparable acute time-course of ICP, CPP, and CBF clearly indicates that the differences in lesion size, inflammatory reaction, and behavioral deficits after blood- and paraffin oil-induced ASDH are partially due to blood constituents. Therefore, current data suggest that subdural hematomas should be completely removed as quickly as possible; decompression alone may not be sufficient to prevent secondary brain damage.

  4. [Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy in the Emergency Room was Effective in Severe Acute Subdural Hematoma Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Okada, Michiko; Hiraizumi, Shiho; Kato, Fumitaka; Koseki, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Yoichi; Hino, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma is unfavorable. In particular, patients with levels of consciousness of Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)3 or 4 tend to be refractory to treatment. Decompressive craniotomy should be promptly performed to remove hematoma. However, if an operating room is not immediately available, emergency burr hole surgery is sometimes performed in the emergency room(primary care room)prior to craniotomy. A previous study has reported that the interval from injury to surgery influences the outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma. Therefore, emergency decompression is important to effectively treat patients with severe acute subdural hematoma. We present the cases of two patients with acute subdural hematomas. In both cases, emergency decompressive craniotomy(hematoma removal after craniotomy and external decompression)was performed in the emergency room of the Emergency and Critical Care Center. In both cases, the surgery was followed by favorable outcomes. Case 1 was a 36-year-old female. The patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 3. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 75 minutes. Surgery began 20 minutes after diagnosis. Case 2 was a 25-year-old male. The second patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 4. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 60 minutes. Surgery was begun 40 minutes after diagnosis. In both patients, we observed anisocoria and the loss of the light reflex. However, the postoperative course was favorable, and both patients were discharged. In summary, to treat severe acute subdural hematomas, early emergency decompressive craniotomy is optimal. Emergency decompressive surgery in the emergency room is independent of operating room or staff. Therefore, emergency decompressive craniotomy may improve the outcome of patients with severe acute subdural hematomas.

  5. Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ruth; Pascual, José M; Subhi-Issa, Issa; Yus, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We report the exceptional case of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) in a 67-year-old woman that was admitted with acute hemiplegia followed by rapid deterioration in consciousness 5 months after a minor head trauma. Computed tomography (CT) showed an extracerebral biconvex shaped hyperdense mass that led to the misdiagnosis of an acute epidural hematoma. Urgent craniotomy revealed an encapsulated mass filled with solid fresh clot in the subdural space. Complete evacuation of this SDH, including both its inner and outer membranes, was achieved, and the patient recovered successfully. Histological analysis confirmed that the content of the hematoma corresponded to a newly formed clot that was enclosed between an inner membrane, composed of two collagen layers, and an outer membrane with a three layered structure. Chronic SDH may seldom present as an encapsulated solid non-organized lesion that consists of a fibrous capsule enclosing a fresh clot and lacking the thick fibrous septations that typically connect the inner and outer membranes of organized chronic SDH. This entity mimics the clinical course and radiological appearance of acute epidural hematomas and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extracerebral hyperdense biconvex shaped lesions.

  6. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study.

  7. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Soo; Shin, Woo-Ram; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-10-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH.

  8. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  9. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  10. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; NARISAWA, Ayumi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  11. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1–15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF. PMID:27920716

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  13. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH.

  14. Survival Trends After Surgery for Acute Subdural Hematoma in Adults Over a 20-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Daniel M.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Lecky, Fiona E.; Bouamra, Omar; Lawrence, Thomas; Adams, Hadie; Bond, Simon J.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine 30-day survival trends and prognostic factors following surgery for acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) in England and Wales over a 20-year period. Summary of Background Data: ASDHs are still considered the most lethal type of traumatic brain injury. It remains unclear whether the adjusted odds of survival have improved significantly over time. Methods: Using the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) database, we analyzed ASDH cases in the adult population (>16 yrs) treated surgically between 1994 and 2013. Two thousand four hundred ninety-eight eligible cases were identified. Univariable and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, using multiple imputation for missing data. Results: The cohort was 74% male with a median age of 48.9 years. Over half of patients were comatose at presentation (53%). Mechanism of injury was due to a fall (<2 m 34%, >2 m 24%), road traffic collision (25%), and other (17%). Thirty-six per cent of patients presented with polytrauma. Gross survival increased from 59% in 1994 to 1998 to 73% in 2009 to 2013. Under multivariable analysis, variables independently associated with survival were year of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, age, and pupil reactivity. The time interval from injury to craniotomy and direct admission to a neurosurgical unit were not found to be significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: A significant improvement in survival over the last 20 years was observed after controlling for multiple prognostic factors. Prospective trials and cohort studies are expected to elucidate the distribution of functional outcome in survivors. PMID:27172128

  15. Mini-Craniotomy under Local Anesthesia to Treat Acute Subdural Hematoma in Deteriorating Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria Di; Nocchi, Niccolo; Gladi, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Background and Study Aims Surgical treatment for acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) in elderly patients is still considered unsatisfactory. Series focusing on the use of conventional craniotomy or decompressive craniectomy in such patients report discouraging results. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission seems to be crucial in the decision-making process. Deteriorating patients with a GCS score between 9 and 11 are those who would benefit most from the surgical treatment. Unfortunately, elderly patients often present other comorbidities that greatly increase the risk of severe complications after major neurosurgical procedures under general anesthesia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing a mini-craniotomy under local anesthesia to treat ASDHs in a select group of elderly patients who were somnolent but still breathing autonomously at admission (GCS 9-11). Material and Methods Twenty-eight elderly patients (age > 75 years) with ASDH and a GCS score at surgery ranging from 9 to 11 were surgically treated under local anesthesia by a single burr-hole mini-craniotomy (transverse diameter 3-5 cm) and hematoma evacuation. At the end of the procedure, an endoscopic inspection of the surgical cavity was performed to look for residual clots that were not visible under direct vision. Results The median operation time was 65 minutes. Hematoma evacuation was complete in 22 cases, complete consciousness recovery was observed in all patients but one, and reoperation was required for two patients. Conclusion Historically, elderly patients with ASDH treated with a traditional craniotomy performed under general anesthesia have not had a good prognosis. Our preliminary experience with this less invasive surgical and anesthesiological approach suggests that somnolent but autonomously breathing elderly patients could benefit from this approach, achieving an adequate hematoma evacuation and bypassing the complications related to

  16. [Liver rupture of a subcapsular haematoma after pharmacologic revascularization (Streptokinase) for acute myocardial infarction--case report].

    PubMed

    Tomescu, Dana; Vişan, Anca; Popescu, I; Tulbure, D

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 56 years old male patient, smoker, obese, with untreated arterial hypertension, hospitalized on 16.02.07 with the diagnosis of inferior acute myocardial infarction, for which he received thrombolysis with streptokinase, followed by anticoagulation with non fractioned heparin. Two days later he started to complain of acute abdominal pain, and laboratory findings showed a low hemoglobin level. Imaging findings (ultrasonography and CT scan) showed evidence of subcapsular liver haematoma, caused by bleeding at hepatic and splenic level. He received red blood packed cells, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, activated factor VII and was transferred by helicopter to Fundeni Clinical Institute--Intensive care unit (ICU). On admission, the patient was conscious, anxious, dyspneic, with mild hypoxia, with no signs of low cardiac output and with a painful abdomen. ECG, echocardiography and elevated myocardial necrosis enzymes confirmed myocardial infarction. Shortly after admission there was a worsening of his clinical condition, with a decrease in hemoglobin level despite red blood packed cells administration (Hb=7.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (82000/mmc), with normal coagulation tests, thus suggesting active intraabdominal bleeding. Echography and CT scan confirmed bleeding. Emergency surgery was performed, showing massive haemoperitoneum (approx 4.5 L of blood), due to spontaneous rupture of a subcapsular hematoma in the liver. The surgical hemostasis was performed on the liver parenchyma laceration. Duration of surgery was 4 hours. There were no significant cardiac events during surgery (no signs of ischemia on ECG, no ST elevation), despite the need for inotropic agent. After surgery, the patient was referred to the ICU, intubated and ventilated, with inotropic support - dobutamine. Sequential ECG's, enzymatic trend and echocardiographies were performed to monitor myocardial ischemia. The outcome was favourable, no further bleeding and no

  17. Subdural Hematoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    greater than 21 days old. They have a tendency to present in older patients and after non- accidental trauma in children and may be associated with...of head trauma. In children, chronic subdural hematoma may be caused by unrecognized or unreported accidental trauma, nonaccidental trauma or...whiplash force caused by violent shaking. Subdural hematomas in infants are only rarely caused by accidental injury. A heterogeneous subdural

  18. Arachnoid cyst and chronic subdural haematoma in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III resulting from the substitution of glycine 1006 by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, W G; Lam, T P

    1996-01-01

    The features of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) resulting from the heterozygous substitution of glycine 1006 by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen were studied. He was born at term with the clinical features of severe OI, including deep grey-blue sclerae. He had severe osteopenia and all long bones were smaller than normal with cortical thinning, metaphyseal expansion, poor metaphyseal modelling, and multiple fractures. However, the vertebrae, pelvis, and shoulder girdle were of normal shape and there were few rib fractures. Histological examination of the calvarium and tibial shaft showed woven bone without lamellar bone or Haversian systems. The shafts of the long bones were widened owing to repeated fractures. Progressive enlargement of the calvarium occurred between 3 and 4.5 months of age owing to bilateral chronic subdural haematomata and a large arachnoid cyst in the Sylvian fissure. The cyst was probably developmental in origin while the subdural collections were probably the result of perinatal skull trauma. The cyst and the subdural collections resolved following drainage but ventricular dilatation with normal cerebrospinal fluid pressure followed. The proband is the first reported case of OI with a glycine substitution by alanine in the pro alpha 2(I) chain of type I procollagen. Images PMID:8728690

  19. Acute airway obstruction due to retropharyngeal haematoma caused by a large fish bone in a patient with hypertension caused by a pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Jahreiß, Linda; Zhang, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Retropharyngeal haematoma (RH) is an extremely rare but potentially life-threatening condition that requires an early diagnosis and immediate management. Acute complications arise from compression and obstruction of the upper airway and oesophagus with the risk of consecutive aspiration. We present the case of a 48-year-old man with formation of a RH after accidental ingestion of a large fish bone with hypertension as comorbidity caused by a so far undiagnosed pheochromocytoma. The patient presented with acute onset of retropharyngeal pain, dysphonia and dysphagia secondary to fish bone foreign body ingestion. His medical history was significant for uncontrolled hypertension. CT showed a large RH extending from the oropharynx to the superior mediastinum. The patient underwent emergency tracheostomy, surgical debridement and removal of the fish bone. Antihypertensive medication was utilised to control his labile blood pressure. The postoperative CT scan revealed an adrenal pheochromocytoma that was subsequently resected. PMID:25759272

  20. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma: A rare presentation of a dural intracranial fistula.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Conti, Mario Luiz Marques

    2016-03-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas are acquired lesions between the meningeal arteries and their associated draining veins. They may have highly variable clinical presentations and evolution, from severe neurological deficit to no or trivial symptoms. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in less than 24% of all dural fistulas, and the bleeding is usually subarachnoid, more infrequently intracerebral, and rarely in the subdural space. Here, we present a rare case of a patient who presented with a subdural spontaneous hemorrhage. After investigation by cerebral angiography, the diagnosis of a dural arteriovenous fistula was made. The patient underwent uneventful endovascular treatment. As there are with only a few reports in the literature of such a presentation, we present this patient and perform a brief review of the literature.

  1. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits.

  2. Symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Mahapatra, A; Pawar, S J; Sousa, J; Athale, S D

    1999-09-01

    Two unique cases of chronic calcified subdural hematomas are reported in children as a long-term complication of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Both the patients had undergone shunt procedures in infancy for congenital hydrocephalus. In one patient, the cause of the hydrocephalus was aqueduct stenosis, while in the second patient, a lumbar meningomyelocele was associated with hydrocephalus. In both these patients, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was done in infancy. In one of them, following the shunt surgery, a bilateral subdural collection was noticed which required burr hole evacuation. Both the patients remained asymptomatic for 9 years, when they presented to our center with acute raised intracranial pressure and contralateral hemiparesis. Both the patients had a relatively short history and had altered sensorium at admission. Surprisingly, in both the patients, the CT scan showed significant mass effect producing calcified subdural hematomas. The shunt systems were found to be working well at surgery. Craniotomy and excision of the calcified subdural hematomas was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patients showed satisfactory recovery, and at discharge the patients were doing well. At the follow-up at the outpatient clinic, the patients were asymptomatic.

  3. Acute Spinal Subdural Hematoma after Vertebroplasty: A Case Report Emphasizing the Possible Etiologic Role of Venous Congestion.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A; Dinh, Dzung H

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective Spinal subdural hematomas are rare events that often progress with severe neurologic deficits. Although there have been several case reports in the literature of spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas in the setting of anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, or coagulation disorders, the exact pathophysiology of such phenomena remains obscure. Methods We present the first report of a subdural hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty and provide a comprehensive review on the anatomy of venous drainage of the vertebral bodies with emphasis on the possible effects of venous congestion caused by cement obstruction. Results Because the subdural hematoma occurred in the absence of major cement extravasation to the spinal canal and two levels above the site of the vertebroplasty, we discuss the possible role of venous congestion as the main etiologic factor leading to rupture of the fragile, valveless radiculomedullary veins into the subdural space. Conclusions The reported case supports a possible new pathophysiological scheme for the development of spinal subdural hematoma in which venous congestion plays a pivotal etiologic role. The reported findings suggests that future anatomical and histologic studies investigating the response of the radiculomedullary veins to congestive venous hypertension may shed new light into the pathophysiology of spinal subdural hematomas.

  4. Rectus sheath haematoma: a rare masquerader for abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Saleem, Saad; Ghous, Ghulam

    2017-04-13

    Rectus sheath haematoma is a rare cause of abdominal pain. It can be easily confused for other causes of acute abdomen and may even lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Our patient has the rectus sheath haematoma because of violent coughing and on presentation had no obvious clinical sign pointing to the same. Diagnosis was made by a CT scan of the abdomen, and patient was treated conservatively. Rectus sheath haematomas are usually present on the posterior aspect of the rectus muscles and thus may not be clinically appreciable.

  5. Reformatted images improve the detection rate of acute traumatic subdural hematomas on brain CT compared with axial images alone.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Timothy J; Mostertz, William; Matheus, Maria Gisele; Maass-Bolles, Genevieve; Sharma, Komal; Collins, Heather R; Kranz, Peter G

    2017-02-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDHs) comprise a significant percentage of missed intracranial hemorrhage on axial brain CT. SDH detection rates could be improved with the addition of reformatted images. Though performed at some centers, the potential additional diagnostic sensitivity of reformatted images has not yet been investigated. The purpose of our study is to determine if the addition of coronal and sagittal reformatted images to an axial brain CT increases the sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute traumatic SDH. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive brain CTs acquired for acute trauma that contained new SDHs. An equivalent number of normal brain CTs served as control. Paired sets of images were created for each case: (1) axial images only ("axial only") and (2) axial, coronal, sagittal images ("reformat added"). Three readers interpreted both the axial only and companion reformat added for each case, separated by 1 month. Reading times and SDH detection rates were compared. One hundred SDH and 100 negative examinations were collected. Sensitivity and specificity for the axial-only scans were 75.7 and 94.3 %, respectively, compared with 88.3 and 98.3 % for reformat added. There was a 24.3 % false negative (missed SDH) rate with axial-only scans versus 11.7 % with reformat added (p = <0.001). Median reader interpretation times were longer with the addition of reformatted images (125 versus 89 s), but this difference was not significant (p = 0.23). The addition of coronal and sagittal images in trauma brain CT resulted in improved sensitivity and specificity as well as a reduction in SDH false negatives by greater than 50 %. Reformatted images substantially reduce the number of missed SDHs compared with axial images alone.

  6. Neurosurgical Treatment Variation of Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation of Acute Subdural Hematoma Management in Belgium and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Thomas A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; Kho, Kuan H; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-02-15

    Several recent global traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiatives rely on practice variation in diagnostic and treatment methods to answer effectiveness questions. One of these scientific dilemmas, the surgical management of the traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) might be variable among countries, among centers within countries, and even among neurosurgeons within a center, and hence be amenable for a comparative effectiveness study. The aim of our questionnaire, therefore, was to explore variations in treatment for ASDH among neurosurgeons in similar centers in a densely populated geographical area. An online questionnaire, involving treatment decisions on six case vignettes of ASDH, was sent to 93 neurosurgeons in The Netherlands and Belgium. Clinical and radiological variables differed per case. Sixty neurosurgeons filled out the questionnaire (response rate 65%). For case vignettes with severe TBI and an ASDH, there was a modest variation in the decision to evacuate the hematoma and a large variation in the decision to combine the evacuation with a decompressive craniectomy. The main reasons for operating were "neurological condition" and "mass effect." For ASDH and mild/moderate TBI, there was large variation in the decision of whether to operate or not, whereas "hematoma size" was the predominant motivation for surgery. Significant inter-center variation for the decision to evacuate the hematoma was observed (p = 0.01). Most pronounced was that 1 out of 7 (14%) neurosurgeons in one region chose a surgical strategy compared with 9 out of 10 (90%) in another region for the same scenario. In conclusion, variation exists in the neurosurgical management of TBI within an otherwise homogeneous setting. This variation supports the methodology of the international Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) initiative, and shaped the Dutch Neurotraumatology Quality Registry (Net-QuRe) initiative.

  7. Early Decompression of Acute Subdural Hematoma for Postoperative Neurological Improvement: A Single Center Retrospective Review of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Hyun, Dongkeun; Park, Hyeonseon; Kim, Eunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate survival related factors, as well as to evaluate the effects of early decompression on acute subdural hematoma (ASDH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed cases of decompressive craniectomy (DC) for decade. In total, 198 cases of DC involved ASDH were available for review, and 65 cases were excluded due to missing data on onset time and a delayed operation after closed observation with medical care. Finally, 133 cases of DC with ASDH were included in this study, and various factors including the time interval between trauma onset and operation were evaluated. Results In the present study, survival rate after DC in patients with ASDH was shown to be related to patient age (50 years old, p=0.012), brain compression ratio (p=0.042) and brain stem compression (p=0.020). Sex, preoperative mental status, and time interval between trauma onset and operation were not related with survival rate. Among those that survived (n=78), improvements in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of more than three points, compared to preoperative measurement, were more frequently observed among the early (less than 3 hours between trauma onset and operation) decompressed cases (p=0.013). However, improvements of more than 4 or 5 points on the GCS were not affected by early decompression. Conclusion Early decompression of ASDH was not correlated with survival rate, but was related with neurological improvement (more than three points on the GCS). Accordingly, early decompression in ASDH, if indicated, may be of particular benefit. PMID:27182496

  8. A review of sub acute subdural hematoma (SASDH) with our institutional experience and its management by double barrel technique (DbT): A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Soubhagya R.; Swarnakar, Pankaj K.; Mishra, Sanjib; Mishra, Sudhanshu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Behera, Sanjay K.; Nath, Pratap C.; Jena, Somnath P.; Mohanta, Itibrata; Das, Deepak; Satapathy, Mani C.; Rout, Sitansu K.; Behera, Bikash R.; Parida, Deepak K.; Rath, Tanushree S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subacute subdural hematoma (SASDH) is an entity which is yet to capture the popular imagination among the neurosurgeons. Its management is often equated clinically to that of the chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). However, their neurological deterioration is usually rapid, which seems to align them with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH). We proceed for their epidemiological evaluation. The advantages of a novel “double barrel technique (DbT)” over the conventional burrhole drainage are also presented. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on all the patients having clinical and radiological evidence of SASDH, admitted to a tertiary care referral institute, during the period August 2013 to December 2015. Postoperatively, patients were followed-up for 3–24 months. Results: 46.87% of the patients belonged to the 35–54 year age group with a male predominance (3.6:1); 68.7% had a history of alcohol abuse, whereas aspirin users were 25%. 87.5% cases were unilateral, 18.75% were hemispheric, and 46.87% were present on the left side. Altered consciousness (100%) followed by headache (37.5%) were the most common presenting clinical features. Conclusion: SASDH is an uncommon neurosurgical entity (0.89% of traumatic brain injury cases in our study) and mimics both CSDH as well as ASDH. The true incidence of SASDH may have been underestimated due to its clinical imitation with CSDH. This study in a South Asian nation also provides the epidemiological data of this rare neurosurgical entity. Outcome of surgery is good; our retrospective study confirms that “DbT” is an adequate and safe treatment. However, a better designed, randomized control trial will be needed to reinforce our findings. PMID:27904759

  9. Nasal septal haematoma in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukuezi, A B

    1992-05-01

    A prospective study of 46 consecutive patients with nasal septal haematoma admitted at the General Hospital, Owerri, Nigeria over a five year period is presented. The disease was commoner in males than females. The majority of the cases (65.6 per cent) were of unknown cause and were therefore grouped as spontaneous haematoma while 30.4 per cent were due to trauma. Trauma was more common in patients below the age of 15 years while spontaneous haematoma was common in patients above that age. All the patients with septal haematoma represented 0.2 per cent of total attendances to the ENT clinic over the period. Most of the patients presented with severe and threatening symptoms necessitating intense aggressive management. All the patients were managed by surgical incision and drainage, four had marked nasal abnormalities. Three patients died from a brain abscess as a complication of infected haematoma.

  10. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome. PMID:25750219

  11. Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma as a complication of anticoagulation in acute cerebral venous thrombosis: to stop or not to stop (the anticoagulation)?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carina; Pereira, Pedro; Rodrigues, Miguel

    2015-03-06

    Spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma is an infrequent complication of anticoagulation, potentially causing neurological dysfunction through compression of the femoral nerve or lumbar plexus. The authors report the case of a puerperal woman admitted for an extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started, with clinical improvement. The patient later reported low back pain irradiating to the right thigh and developed neurological impairment consistent with lumbar plexus dysfunction. A pelvic CT scan revealed a right iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Considering the risk of anticoagulation suspension, a conservative approach was chosen, with maintenance of anticoagulation. Clinical and functional improvement occurred, with mild right hip and knee flexion paresis as sequelae. Anticoagulation complications are challenging, especially when interruption of anticoagulation may threaten vital and functional outcomes. Therefore, a careful evaluation is essential, since no clinical guidelines are available. In this case, continuing anticoagulation provided a good functional outcome.

  12. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  13. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N J; Bot, G M; Sahabi, S; Aliu, S; Usman, B; Shilong, D J; Obande, J O; Shehu, B B

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema.

  14. [Chronic epidural haematoma mimicking meningioma].

    PubMed

    Beculić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Bajtarević, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The study presents a rare case of organised chronic epidural haematoma that imitated a meningioma. A patient was admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica due to loss of consciousness and right hemiparesis. Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan had shown an expansive intracranial process in the left parietal region which was radiologically diagnosed as a meningioma. During the operation a linear skull fracture and organised chronic epidural haematoma were found.

  15. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    PubMed

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  16. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  17. Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Houssein A; Oldfield, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the circumstances of a patient with a cauda equina syndrome due to the development of a lumbar subdural CSF collection with ventral displacement of the cauda equina shortly following posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). This unusual, but clinically significant, complication was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage of the extraarachnoid CSF collection. Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma developing after surgery for CM-I, often attributed to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, as far as the authors can determine, a spinal subdural hygroma associated with surgery for CM-I has not been recognized.

  18. [A Case of Ruptured Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Associated with Acute Subdural Hematoma, Extending from the Interhemispheric Space to the Posterior Fossa].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Yuhtaka; Yoshimura, Shouta; Somagawa, Chika; Hiu, Takeshi; Ono, Tomonori; Ushijima, Ryujirou; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a sudden severe headache without a history of head trauma. CT and MRI revealed an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) extending from the right interhemispheric space to the posterior fossa bilaterally, with a small amount of subarachnoid hemorrhage that was predominantly localized to the left side of the basal cistern. CT angiogram demonstrated a long protruding ruptured aneurysm at the junction of the right internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries (IC/PC AN) with a posteroinferior projection, associated with a small bleb located near the tentorial edge close to the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process, for which she received clipping surgery. Though rare, IC/PC AN could cause pure or nearly pure ASDH in the above-mentioned distribution. Therefore, in patients with such ASDH, especially without a history of head injury or precise information regarding the situation at the time of onset, urgent imaging evaluation and early intervention are essential to prevent devastating re-rupture events.

  19. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  20. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  1. Vulvovaginal Infralevator Haematoma Mimicking the Second Stage of Labour

    PubMed Central

    Ipinnimo, O. M.

    2017-01-01

    Even though they are quite uncommon, puerperal genital haematomas can be associated with serious maternal morbidity. Key findings are significant perineal pain and, depending on the location, visible swelling. However, attention can be drawn to its progression by the rare occurrence of persistent painful “bearing down” efforts, even after the successful delivery of the baby. The final size of this haematoma and the rare presentation make it truly uncommon. The primary goals of treatment include the prevention of further blood loss, minimizing tissue damage, relieving pain, and reducing the risk of infection. Management is generally conservative for small collections, but surgery is indispensable when they acutely expand in size or are large with worsening symptoms. PMID:28197352

  2. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  3. Visualization of an actively bleeding cortical vessel into the subdural space by CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Dalfino, John C; Boulos, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous subdural hematomas of arterial origin are rare with only a few published case reports in the literature. In the CT era, vessel imaging of extra-axial hematomas is not commonly performed. In this case report we present a patient with a large, spontaneous acute subdural hematoma that demonstrated active contrast extravasation from a small cortical vessel on CT angiography. During surgical evacuation the vessel was confirmed to be a small cortical artery that was bulging through the arachnoid membrane and bleeding into the subdural space. The historical, radiographic, and clinical aspects of this unusual cause of subdural hematoma are discussed.

  4. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  5. Managing auricular haematoma to prevent 'cauliflower ear'.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    This article describes the typical signs of auricular haematoma, how people who have the condition should be treated in emergency departments and the problems that can arise if they are managed inappropriately.

  6. Macrocephaly in infancy: benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jacqueline; Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Piatt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces (BESS) is a common finding on imaging studies indicated by macrocephaly in infancy. This finding has been associated with the presence of subdural fluid collections that are sometimes construed as suggestive of abusive head injury. The prevalence of BESS among infants with macrocephaly and the prevalence of subdural collections among infants with BESS are both poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the relative frequencies of BESS, hydrocephalus, and subdural collections in a large consecutive series of imaging studies performed for macrocephaly and to determine the prevalence of subdural fluid collections among patients with BESS. METHODS A text search of radiology requisitions identified studies performed for macrocephaly in patients ≤ 2 years of age. Studies of patients with hydrocephalus or acute trauma were excluded. Studies that demonstrated hydrocephalus or chronic subdural hematoma not previously recognized but responsible for macrocephaly were noted but not investigated further. The remaining studies were reviewed for the presence of incidental subdural collections and for measurement of the depth of the subarachnoid space. A 3-point scale was used to grade BESS: Grade 0, < 5 mm; Grade 1, 5-9 mm; and Grade 2, ≥ 10 mm. RESULTS After exclusions, there were 538 studies, including 7 cases of hydrocephalus (1.3%) and 1 large, bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (0.2%). There were incidental subdural collections in 21 cases (3.9%). Two hundred sixty-five studies (49.2%) exhibited Grade 1 BESS, and 46 studies (8.6%) exhibited Grade 2 BESS. The prevalence of incidental subdural collections among studies with BESS was 18 of 311 (5.8%). The presence of BESS was associated with a greater prevalence of subdural collections, and higher grades of BESS were associated with increasing prevalence of subdural collections. After controlling for imaging modality, the odds ratio of the association of

  7. Carotid sheath haematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jayanthi; Badkur, D S; Arora, Arneet

    2009-10-01

    Carotid sheath haematoma is a rare finding, sometimes the only injury found in cases of manual strangulation without any associated external or internal injury to the neck. One such rare case is reported in an 8 year old female victim where presence of carotid sheath haematoma not only helped to ascertain the cause of death but also helped in the reconstruction of mechanism of infliction of force on the neck.

  8. Hellp syndrome and subcapsular liver haematoma.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Maimoona; Hameed, Sajeela

    2005-11-01

    HELLP syndrome is a disease of variable presentation with high mortality and morbidity. Haemolysis in HELLP syndrome is microangiopathic. Obstruction of hepatic blood flow by fibrin deposits in sinusoids results in elevated liver enzymes. It also leads to periportal necrosis and, in severe cases, intrahepatic haemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma formation or hepatic rupture. This case report describes a patient presenting with mild hypertension with abruptio-placentae. She developed HELLP syndrome, subcapsular liver haematoma and pleural effusion after delivery.

  9. [Liver transplantation for subcapsular haematoma during HELLP Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Descheemaeker, P-N; Compagnon, P; Lavoué, V; Seguin, P; Lechaux, D; Renaud-Giono, A; Camus, C; Meunier, B; Malledant, Y

    2009-12-01

    The hepatic rupture of a subcapsular haematoma during HELLP syndrome is a rare complication carrying a high mortality. There is no clear guideline management in the literature. We report here a case of a subcapsular haematoma which required liver transplantation.

  10. [Multiple chronic subdural hematoma in shaken-baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haga, Sei; Ishido, Katsuya; Inada, Nariyasu; Sakata, Shuji

    2004-08-01

    We described a case of shaken-baby syndrome with multiple chronic subdural hematomas. A 10-month-old male baby was admitted to our hospital because of loss of consciousness and convulsions. CT scan revealed an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage extending into the interhemispheric fissure and supracerebellar space. The patient was treated conservatively, and discharged from the hospitaL Two months after ictus, a baby was admitted to our hospital with general fatigue. CT scan demonstrated multiple chronic subdural hematomas. Burr hole irrigation and drainage brought about complete disappearance of these lesions. Retrospectively, it was found that these multiple subdural hematomas were due to shaken-baby syndrome. Shaken-baby syndrome is a form of child abuse that can cause significant head injury, and subdural hematoma is the most common manifestation. It is well known that the outcome of shaken-baby syndrome is generally not good. It is important to suspect shaken-baby syndrome when a chronic subdural hematoma is seen in a baby.

  11. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  12. Do cranial subdural hematomas migrate to the lumbar spine?

    PubMed

    Moscovici, S; Paldor, I; Ramirez de-Noriega, F; Itshayek, E; Shoshan, Y; Spektor, S; Attia, M

    2011-04-01

    We report a patient with minor head trauma-related bilateral hemispheric subdural hematoma (SDH) and subsequent delayed spinal SDH or presumed migration to the lumbar spine. An acutely confused 88-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department after minor head trauma. Head CT scan revealed a small hemispheric SDH. The patient was admitted for observation. CT scan 6 hours later showed bilateral SDH with extension to the tentorium. Three days later SDH had resolved leaving bilateral subdural hygromas. Local leg weakness localized to the lumbar spine developed on day 6; spinal CT scan and MRI revealed a posterior L5-S1 collection. A pure subacute subdural hematoma compressing the cauda equina was drained after an L5 laminectomy. His lower leg weakness improved. The patient was discharged to rehabilitation two weeks after surgery. Patients with traumatic SDH who develop late-onset neurological deterioration attributable to any region of the spine should be evaluated for spinal SDH.

  13. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  14. Did Mozart have a chronic extradural haematoma?

    PubMed

    Puech, B; Puech, P F; Dhellemmes, P; Pellerin, P; Lepoutre, F; Tichy, G

    1989-11-01

    When Mozart died at the age of 36, was he suffering from the belated complications of a calcified extradural haematoma? This theory took shape during the identification process of the skull owned by the Mozarteum, when the print of calcified extradural haematoma was discovered on the left inner temporoparietal calvarial surface of the skull. This print looks like a rosette, with three distinct concentric areas. The first outer area is striated, the second middle one is granular and scattered with bony deposits, the third central one is marked with vascular grooves.

  15. Spontaneous intramural rupture and intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, W F

    1980-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural rupture or intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is a rare cause of acute pain in the chest and upper abdomen. Much less ominous than spontaneous complete rupture from which it must be distinguished, it seldom if ever necessitates operation. Five new cases are described and reviewed together with 15 collected from published reports. The dominant symptom of every case was severe and constant retrosternal or epigastric pain; concomitant dysphagia was mentioned in 11 cases. In seven the pain was preceded by or coincided with vomiting. The condition was related to other stresses in three and appeared to be truly spontaneous in 10. In approximately one-third of cases it started suddenly but more often it began as discomfort worsening rapidly. Fourteen patients vomited blood after experiencing pain but only four were given transfusions. In contradistinction to complete rupture, none had surgical emphysema and plain chest radiographs were unremarkable. All had abnormal gastrografin or barium swallows. Intramural haematomas with or without mucosal tears were seen in the 11 cases in which oesophagoscopy was performed. Fifteen patients made rapid and complete recoveries on conservative management. Of the four who did not respond satisfactorily, one had the oesophagus repaired, two had drainage of the mediastinum after failure to find the false lumen at thoracotomy, and one had only an abdominal exploration. The only death in the whole series occurred after a disastrous emergency exploration and subsequent total oesophagectomy. Images PMID:6973833

  16. Intracranial haematoma resulting from lightning stroke.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Pillai, M; Krishna Das, K V

    1991-05-01

    Intra-cerebral haemorrhage due to lightning stroke is extremely rare. We report a 45 year old woman who developed intracranial haemorrhage due to a direct lightning stroke. This was proved by CT scan. The haematoma was evacuated surgically, resulting in full neurological recovery of the patient.

  17. GDC Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms with SAH and Mass Effect by Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.-K.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Summary A 43-year-old woman was brought to the emergency room due to the sudden onset of severe headache and stuporous consciousness. She had no history of head injury. Computerized tomography scan revealed subarachnoid haemorrhage and left SDH with midline shift of about 10 mm. Cerebral angiography demonstrated anterior communicating artery and right middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysms. Her family refused operation due to her religion never to permit blood transfusion. So just aneurysm coiling and medical ICP control was planned. Guglielmi detachable coil (GDCs) embolization of the two aneurysms was successfully performed. She made a neurological recovery after embolization without evacuation of the SDH. She was discharged from hospital with no neurological deficit on day 21. We report our experience of successful GDC embolization on multiple aneurysms without craniotomy even in the selected case of mass effect. PMID:20587263

  18. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient affected of spontaneous frontoparietal subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Cerdá-Esteve, Mariaina; Badia, Mariona; Trujillano, Javier; Vilanova, Cecília; Maravall, Javier; Mauricio, Dídac

    2009-01-01

    Ever since cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) was first described in 1950, there have been debates over its existence and whether it has an important place in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia. We report the case of a neurosurgical patient with sustained hyponatraemia and abnormally high sodium loss in the urine, with signs of fluid volume depletion. Hyponatraemia was not corrected after an intravenous infusion of saline solution. Stable concentrations of blood sodium above 130 mmol/l were achieved with the administration of 100 mg of hydrocortisone daily, with an ensuing reduction in sodium elimination through the urine.

  19. Hepatic subcapsular haematoma in a premature newborn.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Aguilar, Sara; Prior, Ana Rita; Oliveira, Graça

    2013-06-03

    Subcapsular haematoma of the liver rarely occurs in neonates and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. It is a catastrophic condition that can be caused by maternal, placentar or fetal factors. A high index of suspicion is essential for early identification and stabilisation of babies with such a pathology. In a newborn with hypovolemic shock and abdominal distension, haemoperitoneum should be suspected and, along with exclusion of other aetiologies, supportive therapy should be instituted. The hepatic subcapsular haematoma has a non-specific presentation, and should be considered in very low birth weight infants with hypovolemic shock. Abdominal ultrasonography is the investigation of choice. It can delineate the lesion well, differentiate it from neoplasms, rule out rupture and aid in serial follow-up. We report a premature newborn who had this uncommon condition in the early neonatal period and survived without sequelae.

  20. [Chronic subdural hematoma: historical studies].

    PubMed

    Guénot, M

    2001-11-01

    The first description of a chronic subdural hematoma was made in 1658 by J.J. Wepfer, followed in 1761 by Morgagni. A possible case was described by Honoré de Balzac in 1840 including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. Virchow, in 1857, denied a traumatic origin, and gave the name of "pachymeningitis hemorrhagica interna" to this pathology which he explained by inflammatory processes. The traumatic etiology of chronic subdural hematoma was recognized in the XXth century, especially by Trotter in 1914. Pathophysiology was considered later on in the XXth century.

  1. Inferior vena caval filter strut perforation causing intramural duodenal haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Zoheb Berry; Organ, Nicole M.; Deane, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of intramural duodenal haematoma caused by inferior vena caval (IVC) filter strut perforation requiring innovative open and endovascular retrieval. A 32-year-old woman presents in shock with dull epigastric pain and non-bilious vomiting. She had previously had an IVC filter for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography demonstrated strut perforation into the second part of the duodenum, causing intramural haematoma and duodenal obstruction. Laparotomy facilitated evacuation of the duodenal haematoma, while the IVC filter was retrieved by endovascular means. Causes of duodenal haematoma include blunt trauma, haematologic malignancy, coagulopathy, percutaneous or endoscopic procedures, pancreatic pathology, peptic ulcer disease and aortoenteric fistula. Duodenal haematoma is rare and is usually managed conservatively or by percutaneous drainage. While this patient had a typical presentation, IVC filter strut perforation has not been described in the literature as a cause for duodenal haematoma. PMID:27887016

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  3. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  4. Spontaneous Intramural Oesophageal Haematoma in a Patient with Uncontrolled Hypertension: An Unusual Chest Pain Aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Samantha; Caruana, Clifford; Davies, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous intramural oesophageal haematoma is a rare condition that usually occurs secondary to an acute or chronic coagulation disorder. The presenting complaint is often with retrosternal chest pain and most patients are initially investigated to exclude more common causes in the differential diagnosis, such as acute coronary syndromes. Severe life-threatening bleeding or perforation seldom, if ever, arises. Case Presentation. We present a case of spontaneous oesophageal haematoma which appears to have developed gradually in a 69-year-old female with uncontrolled hypertension and antiplatelet medication use. The diagnosis was made on computed tomography imaging and was further evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Management was conservative and a follow-up endoscopy two weeks later showed almost complete resolution of the lesion. Discussion. Spontaneous oesophageal haematomas are very rare and usually result in the separation of the mucosal layer from the underlying muscle, presenting with chest pain, haematemesis, and dysphagia. Usually the diagnosis is one of exclusion, based on computed tomography imaging and endoscopy. Conservative management is almost always successful. PMID:28316858

  5. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  6. Abdominal Wall Haematoma Complicating Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, J. J. T.; Davidson, B. R.; Hobbs, K. E. F.

    1994-01-01

    Of 61 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 4 (6.25%) developed abdominal wall haematomas. This complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy may occur more commonly than existing literature suggests, and manifests in the post-operative period (days 2 to 6) by visible bruising, excessive pain or an asymptomatic drop in haematocrit. It is readily confirmed by ultrasonography. While no specific treatment is necessary apart from replacement of significant blood loss, the patient requires reassurance that this apparently alarming complication will rapidly resolve. PMID:8204548

  7. Streptococcal pharyngitis: an uncommon cause of subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Walden, Jeffrey Howard; Hess, Bryan; Rigby, Michael

    2015-09-18

    A 7-year-old girl with an unremarkable medical history presented to a local paediatric emergency department with a 7-day history of fever, sore throat and vomiting, and a 1-day history of rash. She was admitted to the hospital, with presumed Kawasaki disease. A few hours after admission, the patient had sudden onset of two witnessed tonic-clonic seizures and subsequent decreased mental status. She was transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit and started on broad-spectrum antibiotics. On hospital day 2, cerebral spinal fluid cultures and blood cultures grew Streptococcus pyogenes, and repeat physical examination was consistent with acute streptococcal pharyngitis. On hospital day 3, the patient developed left-sided hemiparesis and had another witnessed seizure. A CT scan was obtained and revealed a subdural abscess. She was transferred to a tertiary care centre and underwent craniotomy with evacuation of her subdural abscess. Surgical cultures eventually grew S. pyogenes.

  8. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions. PMID:27695560

  9. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  10. The haematoma and its role in bone healing.

    PubMed

    Schell, H; Duda, G N; Peters, A; Tsitsilonis, S; Johnson, K A; Schmidt-Bleek, K

    2017-12-01

    Fracture treatment is an old endeavour intended to promote bone healing and to also enable early loading and regain of function in the injured limb. However, in today's clinical routine the healing potential of the initial fracture haematoma is still not fully recognized. The Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) formed in Switzerland in 1956 formulated four AO principles of fracture treatment which are still valid today. Fracture treatment strategies have continued to evolve further, as for example the relatively new concept of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). This MIPO treatment strategy harbours the benefit of an undisturbed original fracture haematoma that supports the healing process. The extent of the supportive effect of this haematoma for the bone healing process has not been considered in clinical practice so far. The rising importance of osteoimmunological aspects in bone healing supports the essential role of the initial haematoma as a source for inflammatory cells that release the cytokine pattern that directs cell recruitment towards the injured tissue. In reviewing the potential benefits of the fracture haematoma, the early development of angiogenic and osteogenic potentials within the haematoma are striking. Removing the haematoma during surgery could negatively influence the fracture healing process. In an ovine open tibial fracture model the haematoma was removed 4 or 7 days after injury and the bone that formed during the first two weeks of healing was significantly reduced in comparison with an undisturbed control. These findings indicate that whenever possible the original haematoma formed upon injury should be conserved during clinical fracture treatment to benefit from the inherent healing potential.

  11. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  12. Primary enlarged craniotomy in organized chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Callovini, Giorgio Maria; Bolognini, Andrea; Callovini, Gemma; Gammone, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance--mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the "long standing" of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH.

  13. Dysphagia and airway compromise as a result of retropharyngeal haematoma following undiagnosed odontoid peg fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wronka, K S; Sznerch, N; Davies, J

    2011-09-01

    Airway compromise following a cervical spine injury is an unusual cause of respiratory distress. We describe a patient who developed a retropharyngeal haematoma that caused dysphagia, dysarthria and acute airway compromise seven days following a fall, with no other signs of cervical spine injury. The patient was found to have a type 2 fracture through the junction of the odontoid peg and body of C2 with an associated prevertebral haematoma and soft tissue oedema. Later, the patient developed stridor and required an emergency orotracheal intubation and admission to the intensive care unit. As presented in this case report, cervical fracture can result in mechanical airway compromise with an associated retropharyngeal haematoma and prevertebral soft tissue oedema. In elderly patients with a minor history of falls one should always think of possible fractures and appropriate investigations should be carried out. Retropharyngeal haematomas secondary to cervical spine fractures require a prompt multidisciplinary approach and appropriate management of both the airway and cervical spine. Joint care from the orthopaedic, anaesthetic, and ear, nose and throat teams is necessary.

  14. Iliopsoas haematoma in an adolescent Taekwondo player.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; So, W S; Ahuja, A; Chan, K M

    1996-01-01

    A 16-year-old male Taekwondo player was admitted with a 1-day history of right groin pain and a palpable mass in the right lower abdominal quadrant following a Taekwondo training session. No history of direct trauma was given, but the pain followed a high inward-to-outward kick. The patient was not on any medication, and tumour and infection were excluded. A high-resolution real-time ultrasound scan identified a well-defined, hyperechoic, heterogeneous mass in the substance of the right iliopsoas muscle, compatible with a collection of partially clotted blood, confirming the clinical diagnosis of iliopsoas haematoma. After conservative treatment the patient resumed training and is now fully asymptomatic.

  15. Golfer's swing leads to a spontaneous subcapsular liver haematoma.

    PubMed

    Lumley, S; Slesser, A A P; Saunders, M; Warren, S

    2013-06-19

    We report the rare case of a patient presenting with a spontaneous hepatic subcapsular haematoma after playing golf. The patient had no underlying predisposing conditions. A CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis demonstrated a 1 cm deep low-attenuation subcapsular collection around the anterolateral aspect of the liver. The patient was treated conservatively and was discharged from inpatient care after 72 h. This is only the second reported case of a spontaneous subcapsular haematoma.

  16. [Intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreotography overinfected by Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE].

    PubMed

    Carrica, Sebastián A; Belloni, Rodrigo; Baldoni, Fernando; Yantorno, Martín; Correa, Gustavo; Bologna, Adrián; Barbero, Rodolfo; Villaverde, Augusto; Chopita, Néstor

    2014-06-01

    This case report describes a 37-year-old woman who develops an intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with papillotomy and stone extraction. The procedure requires the passage of a guidewire. The patient develops acute abdominal pain 72 hours later and a magnetic resonance shows a hematoma of 124 x 93 mm. She remains under observation. Twenty one days later she complains of upper right abdominal pain and fever. Consequently, a percutaneous drainage is performed isolating Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE. The patient has a good evolution.

  17. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  18. Comparision between Brain Atrophy and Subdural Volume to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Volumetric CT Imaging Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Choi, Seung-Won; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain atrophy and subdural hygroma were well known factors that enlarge the subdural space, which induced formation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thus, we identified the subdural volume that could be used to predict the rate of future CSDH after head trauma using a computed tomography (CT) volumetric analysis. Methods A single institution case-control study was conducted involving 1,186 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Fifty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified, and 50 patients with age and sex matched for control. Intracranial volume (ICV), the brain parenchyme, and the subdural space were segmented using CT image-based software. To adjust for variations in head size, volume ratios were assessed as a percentage of ICV [brain volume index (BVI), subdural volume index (SVI)]. The maximum depth of the subdural space on both sides was used to estimate the SVI. Results Before adjusting for cranium size, brain volume tended to be smaller, and subdural space volume was significantly larger in the CSDH group (p=0.138, p=0.021, respectively). The BVI and SVI were significantly different (p=0.003, p=0.001, respectively). SVI [area under the curve (AUC), 77.3%; p=0.008] was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH than BVI (AUC, 68.1%; p=0.001). Bilateral subdural depth (sum of subdural depth on both sides) increased linearly with SVI (p<0.0001). Conclusion Subdural space volume was significantly larger in CSDH groups. SVI was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH. Bilateral subdural depth was useful to measure SVI. PMID:27169071

  19. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture in a warfarin patient: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Bizzotto, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Acute abdominal pain may be the presenting symptom in a wide range of diseases in the elderly. Acute abdominal pain related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after a low-energy pubic rami fracture is rare and can have important consequences; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been previously described. Case Report. We present an unusual case of an 83-year-old woman taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation, admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) with acute abdominal pain and progressive anemia related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma 72 hours after a low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture. Warfarin was withheld, anticoagulation was reversed by using fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K, and concentrated red blood cells were given. Haemoglobin level gradually returned to normal with a progressive resorption of the haematoma. Conclusion. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after osteoporotic pubic rami fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the elderly. This case indicates the need for hospital admission, careful haemodynamic monitoring, and early identification of bleeding in patients with "benign" osteoporotic pubic rami fracture, especially those receiving anticoagulants, to provide an adequate management and prevent severe complications.

  20. Pathophysiology of intracranial epidural haematoma following birth.

    PubMed

    Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Heckly, Anne; Adn, Mahmoudreza; Poulain, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    Epidural haematoma in newborn infants is rare, and few specific obstetrical data related to its formation are available in the literature. The aim of this study is to discuss the pathophysiology of this condition. EDH is always a post traumatic lesion and it is only possible if the insult has produced a cleavage of the dura mater from bone. Therefore, EDH results from the mechanical forces exerted on the foetal head during birth, with or with no instrumental interference. Although it is still unclear whether the injury (and dura mater cleavage) was directly caused by the forceps or had already been inflicted by natural forces, or a combination of both however, in some patients (with neither dystocia nor skull fracture), there is no basis for explaining EDH formation, apart from propulsion of the fore coming head through the birth canal. Excessive moulding, whether or not associated with iatrogenic trauma, has been incriminated in most cases of EDH. As dystocia cannot always be anticipated, EDH will remain an ever-present cause of morbidity in the neonatal population, albeit a rare occurrence.

  1. A martial arts injury: karate induced unilateral haematoma of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Ortu, M; Vaccarezza, M; Trovati, S; Galli, M; Gervasoni, C; Vella, A

    2006-08-01

    Adrenal gland haematoma is often a complication of traumatic events. The case is reported of a 45 year old man with unilateral non-symptomatic adrenal gland haematoma caused by a trauma during martial arts practice.

  2. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  3. Simple technique for evacuation of traumatic subcutaneous haematomas under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chami, George; Chami, Belinda; Hatley, Edward; Dabis, Hossam

    2005-01-01

    Background Traumatic subcutaneous haematomas are common cases in the accident and emergency department. Occasionally, urgent evacuation is required to prevent skin necrosis. Methods We present a simple and safe technique, based on a principle similar to liposuction to evacuate traumatic subcutaneous haematomas under tension. Instruments readily available in the accident and emergency department are used without the need of general anaesthesia. Results The technique was performed in six cases without complication such as infection or re-collection of the haematoma under tension. We present two typical scenarios where urgent evacuation was indicated and the technique performed. Conclusion The technique is useful as an urgent and safe procedure in the accident and emergency department setting. PMID:16351725

  4. Delayed Diagnosis of Subdural Empyema in a Septic Child.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Adam; Capraro, Geoffry

    2015-08-03

    The prompt identification of sepsis in children is challenging, but once sepsis is identified, initiation of care and determination of proper disposition may be insufficient to ensure optimal outcomes. The best opportunity for full recovery also requires rapid identification and treatment of the infectious source. Acute bacterial sinusitis is common in the pediatric population, and although intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare, they are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. History and physical examination may be imperfectly sensitive for the presence of acute bacterial sinusitis and its intracranial complications. We present a case of pediatric sepsis in which the diagnosis of intracranial extension of bacterial sinusitis was not made during the first phase of care and describe complications that followed. Emergency physicians should consider subdural empyema in patients presenting with fever, nausea and headache with worrisome vital signs and laboratory values suggestive of a severe infection.

  5. Subdural haemorrhages in infants: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, S; Rawlinson, A; Gibbon, F; Price, J; Schulte, J; Sharples, P; Sibert, J R; Kemp, A M

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence, clinical outcome, and associated factors of subdural haemorrhage in children under 2 years of age, and to determine how such cases were investigated and how many were due to child abuse. Design Population based case series. Setting South Wales and south west England. Subjects Children under 2 years of age who had a subdural haemorrhage. We excluded neonates who developed subdural haemorrhage during their stay on a neonatal unit and infants who developed a subdural haemorrhage after infection or neurosurgical intervention. Main outcome measures Incidence and clinical outcome of subdural haemorrhage in infants, the number of cases caused by child abuse, the investigations such children received, and associated risk factors. Results Thirty three children (23 boys and 10 girls) were identified with subdural haemorrhage. The incidence was 12.8/100 000 children/year (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 20.2). Twenty eight cases (85%) were under 1 year of age. The incidence of subdural haemorrhage in children under 1 year of age was 21.0/100 000 children/year and was therefore higher than in the older children. The clinical outcome was poor: nine infants died and 15 had profound disability. Only 22 infants had the basic investigations of a full blood count, coagulation screen, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, skeletal survey or bone scan, and ophthalmological examination. In retrospect, 27 cases (82%) were highly suggestive of abuse. Conclusion Subdural haemorrhage is common in infancy and carries a poor prognosis; three quarters of such infants die or have profound disability. Most cases are due to child abuse, but in a few the cause is unknown. Some children with subdural haemorrhage do not undergo appropriate investigations. We believe the clinical investigation of such children should include a full multidisciplinary social assessment, an ophthalmic examination, a skeletal survey supplemented with a bone scan or a

  6. Sacral insufficiency fracture complicated by epidural haematoma and cauda equina syndrome in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Carmel G; Lohan, Derek G; Swords, Ronan; Murray, Margaret; Murphy, Joseph M; Roche, Clare

    2007-11-01

    We report the case of a patient with multiple myeloma (MM) and extensive lytic bone disease who presented with a short history of back pain and leg weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a sacral insufficiency fracture complicated by an epidural haematoma. Bleeding tendency in this case can be accounted for by platelet function defects, often described in plasma cell disorders in the absence of obvious coagulation abnormalities. Surgical intervention was contraindicated as a result of poor overall patient performance status (poor surgical candidate due to extensive myelomatous bone disease, previous vertebral compression fractures requiring orthopaedic stabilisation, and requiring opiate analgesia for bone pain) and management was conservative. Patients presenting with back pain and documented bone disease in the setting of myeloma should be managed with a high index of clinical suspicion and considered for urgent MR imaging to avoid missing this serious and potentially reversible complication. We report the undescribed causative association between sacral insufficiency fracture and lumbo-sacral epidural haematoma. We illustrate the MRI signal and contrast enhancement pattern of an acute presentation of epidural haematoma.

  7. Chronic subdural hematoma in capoeira sport.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Erhan; Serbes, Gökhan; Sanli, Metin; Sari, Onur; Sekerci, Zeki

    2008-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas in young people is extremely rare and has some provoking factors such as V-P shunts, arachnoid cyst, anticoagulant drug usage, vigorous sports and coagulopathies. A static or dynamic mechanical load is almost always delivered to skull associated with either mild or severe head trauma. A 25-year old-man who was previously healthy has complained of intermittent headache for six months. He had been interested in capoiera (Brazilian exciting sport) for two years and has had no any evidence of head injury. After admission, he was operated immediately because of chronic subdural hematoma. We report a patient who is the first chronic subdural hematoma in the literature due to playing capoeira.

  8. Outcome following subdural haemorrhages in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, Sandeep; Parr, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Subdural haemorrhages (SDH) are associated with significant neurodisability in affected individuals. The incidence of SDH in infants is between 12 and 25 cases per 100 000 children and most detected SDH are due to physical abuse. In the infant brain, SDH are caused by tearing of the bridging veins in the subdural space and may result in significant brain injury. The challenge of assessing outcome in infants with SDH is evaluating whether SDH or other accompanying brain insults are instrumental in the neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:17376941

  9. Incidental Finding of Malpositioned Pacing Lead in the Left Ventricle in a Patient With Subacute Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Asma; Salim, Sohail; Castillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Malposition of the right ventricular lead into the left ventricle is an unusual complication of challenging management. We report a case of an elderly woman with a dual chamber permanent pacemaker implanted 2 months before admission because of high grade AV block, who presented to our institution with sub acute subdural hematoma along the left fronto-parietal area. Incidental ventricular pacemaker lead in the left ventricle was found on chest CT scan. The patient was not candidate for anticoagulation due to her recent subdural hematoma, hence a discussion about the risks of explantation of the pacemaker lead led to patient’s lead extraction without any complication.

  10. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  11. Massive colonic haematoma following blunt trauma sustained playing rugby

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Alan; Awwad, Amir; Harding, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    A case is presented of a 24-year-old man who sustained a forceful blow to the right side of the abdomen during a tackle while playing rugby union. The patient was thought to be “winded” and could not play on. He sought medical attention several hours later at the local hospital where initial evaluation revealed mild right iliac fossa tenderness with no signs of peritonism and clinical parameters showed haemodynamic stability. Subsequent ultrasound and CT evaluation revealed a large haematoma involving the caecum and ascending colon. Emergency right haemicolectomy with primary anastomosis was performed to remove the large haematoma within the intact colonic wall. He was observed in the high dependency unit and was discharged after 7 days following an uneventful postoperative course. He continues to make significant progress some 3 months later and a full return to contact sport is being proposed within 9–12 months. PMID:21754953

  12. A rare case of subcapsular liver haematoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Victoria; Martin, Jennifer; Magee, Damian

    2015-06-25

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis. As with all surgical procedures, it carries risk, with the most commonly reported complications including infection, bile leak and bleeding. One unusual complication is subcapsular liver haematoma, the diagnosis presented here. This is a rare occurrence; only a small number of cases have been reported in the literature and as yet no conclusive cause or management plan has been found. Iatrogenic liver trauma, the use of oral and intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and anticoagulants have all been named as possible contributing factors. Particularly, the use of ketorolac has been associated with four reported cases of subcapsular haematoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The case reported here refutes that hypothesis, as neither NSAIDs nor anticoagulants were used during the treatment of this patient.

  13. Subcapsular liver haematoma as a complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kot, Marta; Nawacki, Łukasz; Krawczyk, Marek

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystectomy is a common procedure for the treatment of symptomatic cholecystitis. A rare complication is the occurrence of subcapsular haematoma of the liver. In the literature, there are only a few case reports of this type. A 25-year-old woman was admitted to the Surgical Department for surgical treatment of cholecystitis. No complications were observed intra-operatively. On the first day after surgery, the patient manifested symptoms of hypovolaemic shock. The patient was qualified for surgical treatment in the mode of emergency surgery - a giant subcapsular haematoma was found. She was referred to the Clinic of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery of the Medical University of Warsaw for further treatment. This case shows the importance of monitoring the life parameters of patients who have undergone laparoscopic surgery due to symptomatic cholecystitis during the first day after surgery.

  14. Subcapsular liver haematoma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by untrained personnel.

    PubMed

    Monsuez, Jean-Jacques; Charniot, Jean-Christophe; Veilhan, Luc Antoine; Mougué, Ferdinand; Bellin, Marie-France; Boissonnas, Alain

    2007-05-01

    Although early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims, it may also result in miscellaneous injuries. A 25-year-old inebriated man rescued from drowning in a swimming pool was apnoeic and pulseless after being pulled out of the water. Successful CPR was provided by untrained bystanders, including abdominal thrusts thought to remove water from the airways and chest compressions to provide haemodynamic support. As the patient progressively improved during his subsequent hospital stay, he complained of right upper abdominal and thoracic pain. A computed tomographic scan showed a 11 cm subcapsular haematoma contiguous to the right hepatic lobe. A favourable outcome was obtained after conservative, non-operative treatment. Subcapsular haematoma of the liver is a potentially life threatening complication that warrants consideration in survivors of cardiac arrest who have received closed chest compression and/or abdominal thrusts.

  15. Subcapsular liver haematoma as a complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kot, Marta; Krawczyk, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystectomy is a common procedure for the treatment of symptomatic cholecystitis. A rare complication is the occurrence of subcapsular haematoma of the liver. In the literature, there are only a few case reports of this type. A 25-year-old woman was admitted to the Surgical Department for surgical treatment of cholecystitis. No complications were observed intra-operatively. On the first day after surgery, the patient manifested symptoms of hypovolaemic shock. The patient was qualified for surgical treatment in the mode of emergency surgery – a giant subcapsular haematoma was found. She was referred to the Clinic of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery of the Medical University of Warsaw for further treatment. This case shows the importance of monitoring the life parameters of patients who have undergone laparoscopic surgery due to symptomatic cholecystitis during the first day after surgery. PMID:26240636

  16. Post- Thyroidectomy Haematoma Causing Severe Supraglottic Oedema and Pulmonary Oedema - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Anandaswamy, Tejesh C; Vig, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Large, long standing goiters present multiple challenges to anaesthesiologist. Post thyroidectomy haematoma is a rare but life threatening complication of thyroid surgery leading to airway obstruction. We report a case of huge goiter that underwent near total thyroidectomy and developed post thyroidectomy haematoma. Within no time it resulted in near fatal airway obstruction, pulmonary oedema and cardiac arrest. The haematoma was evacuated immediately and patient was resuscitated successfully. Pulmonary oedema was further worsened by subsequent aggressive fluid resuscitation. She was electively ventilated with PEEP and was extubated after five days. Except for right vocal cord palsy her postoperative stay was uneventful. This is unique case where a post thyoidectomy haematoma has resulted in fatal supraglottic oedema and pulmonary oedema. Early recognition, immediate intubation and evacuation of haematoma are the key to manage this complication. We highlight on the pathophysiology of haematoma and discuss the strategies to prevent similar events in future. PMID:25300409

  17. Aspirin and spinal haematoma after neuraxial anaesthesia: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Vela Vásquez, R S; Peláez Romero, R

    2015-11-01

    The safety of aspirin therapy in neuraxial anaesthesia has been historically questioned, and the current recommendations are still heterogeneous. A comprehensive review of clinical evidence and a comparative analysis of European and American guidelines were performed. Low-dose aspirin produces a selective, complete and irreversible cyclooxygenase-1 blockade, and higher doses do not increase the antiplatelet effect. Additional cyclooxygenase-2 blockade by high-dose aspirin might decrease the antithrombotic efficacy by inhibiting endothelial prostacyclin synthesis. Different doses of aspirin have been shown to be safe in a broad population subjected to neuraxial anaesthesia or analgesia. In the few case reports of spinal haematoma involving aspirin therapy, additional complicating factors were present. Considering the available evidence, the majority of national scientific societies agree that the isolated use of aspirin does not increase the risk of spinal haematoma and does not represent a contraindication to neuraxial blocks. The precautions regarding higher doses do not seem to be justified. Although aspirin alone is considered to be safe in neuraxial anaesthesia, the concurrent administration of other antithrombotic drugs significantly increases the risk of spinal haematoma and the recommended safety times for each of these other drugs must be strictly followed. An individualized assessment of the risks and benefits should be performed, before performing a neuraxial technique or catheter removal in a patient receiving aspirin.

  18. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bao-Ying; Li, Cai-Hong

    2013-03-07

    Subcapsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and there are few reports about this unusual complication worldwide. The primary symptom of most cases reported in the literature is abdominal pain. We report an unusual case with the primary symptom of fever. A 56-year-old man who had a six-month history of recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed, and stones from the common bile duct were successfully extracted with a basket. The patient had a persistent fever after ERCP, and treatment with intravenous antibiotics was unsuccessful. Computed tomography showed a 13 cm × 6 cm subcapsular hepatic haematoma filled with air and liquid on the surface of the right hepatic lobe. The patient was successfully treated with peritoneal drainage under B-ultra guidance. Subcapsular liver haematoma should be considered when hard-to- explain symptoms persist in the early period after ERCP. Percutaneous drainage is an effective treatment.

  19. Nonfatal splenic haematoma and pancytopenia in an ass.

    PubMed

    Ayala, I; Rodríguez, M J; Martos, N; Zilberschtein, J; Ruíz, I

    2004-08-01

    This report describes a case of nonfatal idiopathic splenic haematoma and pancytopenia in a female ass, a condition that has not been previously reported in this species. A 12-year-old female ass weighing 225 kg was presented with signs of anorexia, depression and prominent abdominal distension. At the onset of clinical signs there was evidence of anaemia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. A large mass was palpated per rectum. The mass was confluent with the spleen and extended across the entire width of the abdomen. Percutaneous transabdominal ultrasonography and laparoscopy under general anaesthesia confirmed the diagnosis of splenic haematoma. The ass was treated initially with intravenous polyionic fluids; vitamins, trace elements and aminoacids; clanobutin; and penicillin and gentamicin, and was transfused with whole blood. After 5 days of hospitalisation the ass appeared brighter, and after 10 days the animal was discharged to recuperate at pasture. Six months later the animal's demeanour and appetite had improved. Repeat ultrasonographic examination showed persistence of the mass, but its thickness had decreased by 2 to 3 cm. A small mineralised area suggesting organisation of the haematoma was also detected. The haematological parameters had returned to normal values and the ass was clinically normal.

  20. [Subdural, extra-arachnoid block as a complication of stellate ganglion block: documentation with ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kapral, S; Krafft, P; Gosch, M; Fridrich, P; Weinstabl, C

    1997-10-01

    We present a patient who developed a high central neural block after stellate-ganglion-blockade. The underlying pathophysiology was assessed via sonographic imaging. Stellate ganglion block was performed in a 19-year old patient according to the standard technique. Multiple aspiration tests were negative and a test dose of 3 ml bupivacaine 0.25% was injected. After a 3 min interval another 5 ml were injected. Two minutes after the local anaesthetic administration the patient reported nausea and sensations in the upper extremity. Spontaneous respiration efforts stopped, and the patient became unconscious. Tracheal intubation was performed, and the patient was ventilated in a controlled mode for two hours. Heart rate as well as blood pressure remained within the normal range. Neurologic recovery occurred rapidly and extubation was performed about two and a half hours after the event. Our sonographic studies demonstrated a local anaesthetic depot directly at the root of C 6, with a mean diameter of 10 mm and a length of 5 to 6 cm (about a third smaller than expected). Sonographic studies and clinical symptoms of our patient are most likely to occur with a subdural extra-arachnoidal block. Ultrasonographic guided puncture enhances the patient's safety by the opportunity to directly visualise transverse process, nerval root as well as local anaesthetic depot. In case of depot formation directly at the nerval root, injection may be stopped and the needle repositioned. Furthermore, direct visualisation of the great vessels (A. vertebralis) prevents intravascular injection and haematoma formation.

  1. Can subdural hematoma be a trigger for Guillain-Barré syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Nilgul; Gulsen, Salih; Avci, Aynur Yilmaz; Altinors, Nur; Zileli, Turgut; Can, Ufuk

    2009-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory polyneuropathy which follows a precipitating event in approximately two thirds of cases. Although its pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely to be a consequence of an immune-mediated process. In the literature there are three case reports of GBS following subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, and facial bone fracture after head trauma.The unique feature of our case with GBS after subdural hematoma is the presence of cerebellar symptoms. We believe that GBS results from an aberrant immune response following trauma that somehow mistakenly attacks the nerve tissue of its host, and we discuss the effects of the trauma of head injury on cellular and humoral immunities and the absence of antiganglioside antibody (anti-GD1b IgG, which is accused of ataxia and cerebellar symptoms) in this case report.

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  3. [Six cases of organized chronic subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Naoyuki; Sato, Hideki; Murakami, Taro; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Seyama, Go; Oki, Shuichi

    2008-12-01

    Surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) are performed using various methods on the basis of burr hole irrigation and drainage, but treatment for organized CSDH is rarely required. Primary operation for CSDH was performed in our hospital for 535 patients (391 men, 144 woman; age, 8 months to 104 years) between December 1991 and March 2007. Of these, 6 patients diagnosed with organized CSDH were reviewed. Five patients had a history of burr hole surgery. Computed tomography showed membranous structure and heterogenous distribution of air after burr hole surgery had perforated the subdural space. As for treatment, craniotomy was performed in all cases (small craniotomy, n=4; enlarged craniotomy, n=2), and additional treatment was required in 2 patients. Diagnosis of organized CSDH is not easy before a primary operation, but removal of both organized CSDH and the outer membrane by craniotomy in proportion to hematoma expansion is important once the presence of organized CSDH has been determined.

  4. Ictal kissing with subdural EEG recording☆

    PubMed Central

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz; Alotaibi, Faisal; Baz, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ictal kissing has been described in the literature. Five cases were reported and associated with temporal lobe epilepsy lateralizing to the nondominant hemisphere. Methods A case of ictal kissing was identified. The aim was to demonstrate the clinical, clinical and electrophysiological features (as recorded by subdural electrodes). The surgical procedure, histopathology, and imaging data were reviewed and correlated with the literature. Results A 29-year-old right-handed female, who presented with ictal right hand left arm dystonic posturing, and lip smacking, was studied. The automatism was usually followed by prolonged emotional gestures and by hugging and kissing her relative and/or attendant nurse. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed right small cortical and subcortical lesions of the right inferior frontal lobe with gliosis but without mass effect and normal-sized hippocampi. The PET scan showed hypometabolism of the right temporal lobe. Neuropsychological evaluation showed deficit in her nonverbal memory. The subdural electrodes showed high amplitude spikes over right mesial temporal lobe strips. The offsite of the ictal discharges was usually at the right frontal strips. Right standard temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy and right inferior frontal lesionectomy were performed. The patient continued to be seizure-free for one year postoperatively. Conclusion Our case report supports with subdural EEG recording the findings of the few reported cases of ictal kissing behavior lateralized to the nondominant hemisphere. However, the affectionate kissing behavior was associated with spread of the epileptic discharges to the right frontal lobe. PMID:25667835

  5. Retroperitoneal Haematoma in a Patient with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasminder; Singh, Harpreet; Jagota, Ruchi; Bala, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) has diverse manifestations ranging from asymptomatic petechial skin haemorrhages to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary haemorrhages. However, the association of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematomas with DHF is not well documented in literature. We report a rare case of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma complicating DHF. PMID:28050423

  6. Balzac's 'Pierette'. An early description of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    van den Doel, E M

    1986-12-01

    In his novel Pierrette, written in 1840, Balzac describes a case of chronic subdural hematoma, including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. The description was written at a time when subdural hematoma was not seen as a separate clinical entity, and was generally thought to be the result of inflammation.

  7. Subdural hygroma presenting as dementia with kluver-bucy symptoms.

    PubMed

    Duggal, H S; Khess, C R; Nizamie, S H

    1999-10-01

    Dementia is not an uncommon presentation in psychiatric practice. Of the various causes of reversible dementia, subdural hygroma is a lesser-known potentially reversible cause. A case of dementia with Kluver-Bucy symptoms secondary to subdural hygroma is described and implications of Kluver-Bucy symptoms in dementia are discussed.

  8. Retracted: Spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma associated with rivaroxaban treatment.

    PubMed

    Tas Tuna, A; Palabiyik, O; Beyaz, S G

    2015-08-01

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpt.12228/pdf The above article, published online on 10 November 2014 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, A. Li Wan Po, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because, unknown to the authors, another group published a similar study based on the same material in the Indian Journal of Pharmacology: Kocayigit I, Can Y, Sahinkus S, et al. Spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma during rivaroxaban therapy. Indian Journal of Pharmacology. 2014;46(3):339-340. doi:10.4103/0253-7613.132193.

  9. Comparison of subgaleal and subdural closed drainage system in the surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Sukru; Borklu, Resul Emin; Kucuk, Ahmet; Ulutabanca, Halil; Selcuklu, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One or two burr-hole craniostomies with subgaleal or subdural drainage system and irrigation are the most common methods for surgical treatment of CSDH. The aim of this study is to compare the advantages or disadvantages of these techniques used for CSDH. METHODS: Seventy patients were treated by burr-hole subdural drainage or subgaleal drainage system with irrigation. Our patients were classified into two groups according to the operative procedure as follows: Group I, one or two burr-hole craniostomy with subgaleal closed system drainage and irrigation (n=36), Group II, one or two burr-hole craniostomies with subdural closed drainage system and irrigation (n=38). We compared male and female ratios, complication rates, and age distribution between groups. RESULTS: There was no remarkable difference between recurrence rates of the two groups. Recurrence rate was 6.25% in Group I and 7.8% in Group II. Subdural empyema occurred in one of the patients in Group II. Symptomatic pneumocephalus did not develop in patients. Four patients were reoperated for recurrence at an average of 12–20 days after the operation with the same methods. CONCLUSION: Both of the techniques have a higher cure rate and a lower risk of recurrence. However, subgaleal drainage system is relatively less invasive, safe, and technically easy. So it is applicable for aged and higher risk patients. PMID:28058351

  10. Spinal Subdural Staphylococcus Aureus Abscess: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitris; Aretha, Diamanto; Fligou, Fotini; Filos, Kriton S

    2009-01-01

    Background Only 65 cases (including our case) of spinal subdural abscesses have been reported to the literature, mostly to the lumbar spine. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial. The symptoms are not caracteristic and contrast – enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) is the imaging method of choice. The early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis of the patient. Case presentation We present a patient 75 years old who had a history of diabetes and suffered acute low back pain in the region of the lumbar spine for the last 4 days before his admission to the hospital. He also experienced lower leg weakness, fever and neck stiffness. After having a brain CT scan and a lumbar puncture the patient hospitalized with the diagnosis of meningitis. Five days after his admission the diagnosis of subdural abscess secured with contrast – enhanced MRI but meanwhile the condition of the patient impaired with respiratory failure and quadriplegia and he was admitted to the ICU. A laminectomy was performed eight days after his admission into the hospital but unfortunately the patient died. Conclusion Early diagnosis and treatment are very important for the good outcome in patients with subdural abscess. Although morbidity and mortality are very high, surgical and antibiotic treatment should be established as soon as possible after the diagnosis has secured. PMID:19660120

  11. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  12. Anticoagulation-related intracranial extracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, H; Kohler, S; Huber, P; Rohner, M; Steinsiepe, K F

    1989-01-01

    From January 1981 to June 1986 116 patients with anticoagulation-related intracranial haemorrhage were referred to hospital. Seventy six of these haemorrhages were extracerebral, 69 were in the subdural and seven in the subarachnoid space. No epidural haemorrhages were identified. Compared with non-anticoagulation-related haematomas, the risk of haemorrhage was calculated to be increased fourfold in men and thirteenfold in women. An acute subdural haematoma, mostly due to contusion, was more frequently accompanied by an additional intracerebral haematoma than a chronic subdural haematoma. Trauma was a more important factor in acute subdural haematomas than in chronic. Almost half of the patients (48%) had a history of hypertension, more than a third (35%) had heart disease and about one fifth (18%) were diabetic. Headache was the most frequent initial symptom. Later decreased level of consciousness and focal neurological signs exceeded the frequency of headache. Three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage and nine patients with acute subdural haematomas died, while those with chronic subdural haematomas all survived and had at the most mild, non-disabling sequelae. Myocardial infarction (22%), pulmonary embolism (20%), and arterial disease (20%) were the most frequent reasons for anticoagulant treatment. Critical review based on established criteria for anticoagulation treatment suggests there was no medical reason to treat a third of these patients. The single most useful measure that could be taken to reduce the risk of anticoagulation-induced intracranial haemorrhage would be to identify patients who are being unnecessarily treated and to discontinue anticoagulants. PMID:2769275

  13. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Epidemiology and Natural History.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wuyang; Huang, Judy

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the epidemiology and natural history of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a common disease prevalent in the elderly population. The incidence of CSDH ranges from 1.72 to 20.6 per 100,000 persons per year. Risk factors include advancing age, male gender, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant use. Clinical progression is separated into 3 distinct periods, including the initial traumatic event, the latency period, and the clinical presentation period. The recurrence of CSDH and nonsurgical predictive factors are described in detail to provide a comprehensive understanding of the outcome of this disease.

  14. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration.

  15. Subdural hematomas in boxing: the spectrum of consequences.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vincent J; Bailes, Julian E; Cantu, Robert C; Rabb, Craig H

    2006-10-15

    Boxing is a violent sport in which every participant accepts the risk of brain damage or death. This sport has been linked to acute neurological injury and chronic brain damage. The most common life-threatening injury encountered by its participants is subdural hematoma (SDH), and the most feared consequence of chronic insult to the nervous system is dementia pugilistica, or punch drunkenness. Although advances in imaging and neuropsychological testing have improved our ability to diagnose these injuries, the unprecedented sensitivity and wide availability of these modalities have increased the detection of mild cognitive impairment and small, asymptomatic imaging abnormalities. The question has thus been raised as to where on the spectrum of these injuries an athlete should be permanently banned from the sport. In this report the authors describe six boxers who were evaluated for SDH sustained during participation in the sport, and who experienced remarkably different outcomes. Their presentations, clinical courses, and boxing careers are detailed. The athletes ranged in age from 24 to 55 years at the time of injury. Two were female and four were male; half of them were amateurs and half were professionals. Treatments ranged from observation only to decompressive craniectomy. Two of the athletes were allowed to participate in the sport after their injury (one following a lengthy legal battle), with no known sequelae. One boxer died within 48 hours of her injury and at least two suffered permanent neurological deficits. In a third, dementia pugilistica was diagnosed 40 years later, and the man died while institutionalized.

  16. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function.

  17. Aetiology, diagnosis and management of spontaneous perirenal haematomas.

    PubMed

    Brkovic, D; Moehring, K; Doersam, J; Pomer, S; Kaelble, T; Riedasch, G; Staehler, G

    1996-01-01

    This study focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic challenge posed by spontaneous perirenal haematomas (SPHs). The medical records of 18 patients with SPHs seen in the past 8 years were reviewed with respect to aetiology, diagnosis and therapeutic management. SPH was secondary to angiomyolipoma (n = 4), polycystic kidneys (n =4), panarteritis nodosa (n = 3), renal cell carcinomas (RCCs, n = 2), glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis, Morbus Wegener and cortical adenoma (one each). One case remained unclear. With appropriate imaging techniques (computed tomography and angiography) the underlying disorder was detected in 72%; in 4 cases the diagnosis was revealed by exploration and biopsy. Surgery was necessary in 16 patients. The cause of bleeding can be revealed by appropriate imaging in most cases. When imaging procedures fail to reveal the cause of SPH, exploration and biopsy are mandatory to exclude RCC. If the cause of SPH remains unclear even after exploration, patient monitoring by CT is justified.

  18. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space.

  19. Rapidly progressive lumbar subdural empyema following acromial bursal injection.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-11-01

    Spinal subdural empyemas are rare. We describe a 53-year-old male who presented with back pain, mental status changes, and sepsis. Five days prior he had undergone a triamcinolone and lidocaine injection of the acromial bursa. He also had a remote history of epidural steroid injection for thoracic back pain. Two lumbar MRI conducted 62 hours apart revealed a newly developed subdural empyema that was successfully treated with surgical evacuation and post-operative antibiotics.

  20. The subdural space: the third place to go astray.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, F; Speedy, H M

    1990-02-01

    Subdural placement of the tip of the Tuohy needle or epidural catheter may account for many unexpected complications of attempted epidural blockade, for example, 'unexplained' headache, false-negative aspiration test down needle or catheter, false-negative test dose, unilateral block, delayed total spinal and neurological sequelae, as well as profound block of delayed onset that is characteristic of subdural blockade. Cases are reported in support of this hypothesis.

  1. Bilateral pneumothorax during subdural-peritoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Ilker; Tehli, Ozkan; Kaya, Serdar; Erdogan, Ersin; Izci, Yusuf

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a very rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting in children. We report a case of an iatrogenic bilateral tension pneumothorax during the placement of a subdural-peritoneal shunting. After the placement of peritoneal catheter, oxygen saturation of the patient quickly decreased, hypotension and bradycardia occurred. Intraoperative x-rays showed the pneumothorax. A thoracostomy tube was inserted and attached to an underwater seal. Vital signs improved in a short time period. The radiological improvement had been achieved in four days. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention are life-saving for this complication. To avoid this complication, the tip of the shunt tunneler should be always palpable during the placement of the peritoneal catheter, especially in children's shunt surgery.

  2. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  3. [Chronic spinal subdural hematoma associated with chronic intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masateru; Fukuda, Shin; Ikeda, Hisato; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma (CSSH) associated with intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSH), manifesting as pain in the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs. She had fallen and struck her lumbar region and occiput while walking 2 weeks previously. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated no paresis of the lower extremities. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed left CSH. Irrigation and drainage were performed the day after admission (3 weeks after injury). The gait disturbance disappeared and the pain of the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs improved postoperatively. However, the pain reocurred 3 days after the operation. Brain CT showed no recurrence of CSH. Lumbar spinal radiography demonstrated spondylolisthesis at the L3-4 intervertebral space. Sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed CSSH extending from the T-12 level to the sacrum as isointense to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images. Axial MR imaging showed the CSSH located in the subdural space and was compressing the cauda equina anteriorly. The pain was not so severe and she refused surgery. Therefore, we selected conservative treatment and observed her clinical course as an outpatient. Her pain had gradually improved at 3 months after injury, and disappeared at 4 months. MR imaging showed reduction of the CSSH 2 months after injury, and almost complete disappearance at 5 months. CSSH is a rare disease, but early diagnosis is important because remission can be achieved by early operation. The present case illustrates spontaneous resolution is also possible, so observation may be selected if the symptoms are mild and without motor weakness. (Received: March 25, 2009, Accepted :June 16, 2009)

  4. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  5. Unexpected Tc-99m labelled erythrocyte scintigraphy finding of a patient with suspicion of active bleeding into renal haematoma.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pinar; Balci, Tansel Ansal; Celiker, Hüseyin

    2011-08-11

    A 36-year-old male patient with suspicion of active bleeding into renal haematoma loge was sent to our clinic for Tc-99m labelled erythrocyte scintigraphy. Scintigraphy showed no active bleeding to renal haematoma but coexisting active haemorrhage of stomach which was confirmed as erosive bulbitis with further endoscopy.

  6. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  7. Atypical traumatic craniocervical junction focal spinal subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Aydin, M Volkan; Sen, Orhan; Tufan, Kadir; Caner, Hakan

    2006-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare entity and post-traumatic cervical SSDH is very rare. Review of the literature revealed 8 reported cases of traumatic SSDH and only 2 were cervical. The exact mechanism and pathogenesis of SSDHs are unclear. There are still controversies about the source of bleeding and mechanisms of formation of a hematoma. Here we report a case of a unique traumatic craniocervical junction focal subdural hematoma in an 8-year-old boy and discuss the possible mechanisms of SSDHs in trauma cases.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma - an up-to-date concept.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoji; Ohno, Kikuo

    2013-06-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is prevalent among elderly populations worldwide, and its mysterious pathogenesis has been discussed in the literature for decades. The issues remaining to be solved in regard to CSDH include the initiating events; the bleeding into the subdural space and the formation of the outer and inner membranes, its development; increase and liquefaction of hematoma, the optimal treatments, and the natural history. The pathophysiology is becoming more clear due to recent findings from computed tomography studies and human models of CSDH. In this work, we review previous studies on CSDH and present a new integrated concept about the development of this common condition after head injuries.

  9. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-05-07

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients' haemodynamic and clinic.

  10. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients’ haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  11. Structural properties of fracture haematoma: current status and future clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Friis, Thor; Glatt, Vaida; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-07-12

    Blood clots (haematomas) that form immediately following a bone fracture have been shown to be vital for the subsequent healing process. During the clotting process, a number of factors can influence the fibrin clot structure, such as fibrin polymerization, growth factor binding, cellular infiltration (including platelet retraction), protein concentrations and cytokines. The modulation of the fibrin clot structure within the fracture site has important clinical implications and could result in the development of multifunctional scaffolds that mimic the natural structure of a haematoma. Artificial haematoma structures such as these can be created from the patient's own blood and can therefore act as an ideal bone defect filling material for potential clinical application to accelerate bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. [Post-traumatic haematoma and abscess in the nasal septa of children].

    PubMed

    Cervera Escario, Javier; Calderón Nájera, Ramón; Enríquez de Salamanca, Javier; Bartolomé Benito, Margarita

    2008-03-01

    Septal haematoma following nasal trauma is a complication that, if not diagnosed and treated early, may evolve into a nasal septal abscess. We present the case of a 10-year-old male who suffered nasal trauma with fracture and an undiagnosed septal haematoma that evolved into a septal abscess. During drainage of the abscess, necrosis of the quadrangular cartilage was noted. The patient later presented collapse of the nasal dorsum and deviation of the nasal septum. This sequela was corrected by means of an osteochondral costal graft. In the presence of any nasal trauma, it is important to explore the nasal septum correctly to discard the presence of a haematoma which, if not drained early, may evolve into an abscess due to compression of the quadrangular cartilage, leading to its necrosis in a few days and later collapse of the nasal dorsum as the child grows.

  13. Mechanism of subdural effusion evolves into chronic subdural hematoma: IL-8 inducing neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Lin, Yingying; Hu, Maotong; Ding, Shenghong; Li, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is still a mysterious disease. Though great success has been has achieved by neuro-surgery treatment, the origin and development of CSDH remains unknown. Tremendous clinical observations have found the correlation of subdural effusion (SDE) and CSDH. However, systematic elucidation of CSDH's origin and progression is lacking while almost all the current hypothesis only explained partial phenomenon. This hypothesis proposes Interleukin (IL)-8 inducing neutrophil respiratory burst is the crucial impact when SDE evolves into CSDH. IL-8 initially secreted by dural border layer cells, accumulates and the concentration of IL-8 rises in the SDE cavity. Accompanied by the formation of neo-membrane under the dura meninges, IL-8 firstly prompts to establish the neo-vasculature in it, and then attracts lymphocytes aggregation in the neo-membrane. Both the newly recruited lymphocytes and endothelial cells assist the further elevation of local IL-8 concentration. When the IL-8 concentration elevated to a particular level, it attracts neutrophils to the inner wall of neo-vessels and primes them to oxidative burst. Lysosomes and superoxide released by these neutrophils make the fragile neo-capillary became leaky, and subsequently the plasma and blood cells run into SDE. However, as long as the erythrocytes come into the cavity, they shall bind large quantity of IL-8 and decrease IL-8 concentration to a lower level relatively that reduce the neutrophils recruit. When this negative feedback is stagnancy, for example, the SDE space is so large in elder man who is experiencing brain atrophy, the neo-vessels have to release more erythrocytes to bind IL-8, the liquid cavity will expand and the high intracranial pressure symptoms appeared. Our hypothesis holds potential for the proper therapeutic intervention of CSDH. IL-8 antagonist and other anti-inflammation drugs like macrolides antibiotics, glucocorticoid and atorvastatin might be optional to resist

  14. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A.; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. Materials and Methods The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Results Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Conclusions Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH. PMID:28381926

  15. Subdural empyema associated with an apparent regional hyperperfusion (luxury perfusion).

    PubMed

    DeLong, J F

    1978-12-01

    A patient with a subdural empyema demonstrated a late arterial "blush" during a 99mTc-pertechnetate cerebral dynamic flow study which "washed out" in the delayed images. Cerebral arteriography and subsequent autopsy documented inflammatory tissue surrounding the empyema, resulting in this scintigraphic pattern.

  16. Simple compressive method for treatment of auricular haematoma using dental silicone material.

    PubMed

    Choung, Y H; Park, K; Choung, P H; Oh, J H

    2005-01-01

    Most of the previous treatment methods for auricular haematoma are inconvenient for both patients and doctors because they are time-consuming and complex and must be performed under sterile conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple compressive method using a dental (silicone) impression material and comparing it with other methods for treatment of auricular haematomas. The authors aspirated a haematoma and then placed a mixed base and catalyst of silicone putty material on the anterior and posterior surfaces of the auricle in the shape of an inverted U for seven days. From the 24 cases managed with this method, 23 cases (95.8 per cent) were successfully healed. Eight patients were treated with a collodion-cotton wool cast and 16 of 19 patients were successfully treated with dental cotton-wool rolls. The average number of those visiting the hospital was 2.7 for the collodion-cotton wool cast, 6.9 for the dental cotton-wool roll, and 3.1 for dental silicone. The mean treatment durations were 8.1 days for the collodion-cotton wool cast, 13.8 days for the dental cotton-wool roll, and 8.6 days for dental silicone. The authors believe that this compressive method using dental silicone material is simple and appropriate for the treatment of auricular haematoma.

  17. Extensive gluteal haematoma after an intracapsular hip fracture in a patient on warfarin.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Bilal; Field, Michael H; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Griffiths, Dylan

    2015-06-25

    We describe a case of a patient on warfarin who developed an extensive haematoma after a hip hemiarthroplasty and was successfully treated with embolisation. This case highlights the importance of regular haematology input, careful consideration of a suitable surgical approach, close monitoring of postoperative wounds in patients on warfarin and the emerging role of embolisation.

  18. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Ik; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits. PMID:26512286

  19. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-09-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits.

  20. Intracranial subdural empyema: burr hole exploration for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shokunbi, M T; Malomo, A O

    1993-09-01

    An analysis of 19 confirmed cases of subdural empyema treated in our unit during a 29-month period ending in May 1990 revealed that this was a disease of young males (mean age 19.6 yrs: male:female ratio 5:1) that was frequently associated with paranasal sinusitis. We have identified a characteristic symptom complex which when present together with focal neurological deficits makes the diagnosis highly probable. This consists of fever, headache, altered level of consciousness and frontal scalp swelling. In a practice setting where neuroradiological confirmation of the diagnosis is not always practicable, this clinical syndrome is helpful and should prompt early burr hole exploration of the subdural space. The only deaths (2 patients; 11%) occurred in patients who presented in coma. The remaining were either normal (6 patients) or continued to improve after treatment, which consisted of multiple burr hole drainage, broad spectrum antimicrobial treatment and eradication of the source of infection.

  1. Diplopia from Subacute Bilateral Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Getaw Worku; Kalantari, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare, but life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. Subdural hematoma resulting from this procedure could present with vague symptoms such as chronic headache and could easily be missed. Chronic headache is one of the symptoms of chronic SDH in postpartum women. Diplopia as the presenting complaint in SDH secondary to peripartum spinal anesthesia has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. Here, we report a case of diplopia secondary to postpartum subacute bilateral SDHs with transtentorial herniation after spinal anesthesia in a healthy primagravid 25-year-old woman. SDH can expand gradually and the initial symptoms might be subtle as in our case, despite critically high intracranial pressure. PMID:22461938

  2. [HELLP syndrome and ruptured subcapsular hepatic haematoma. Case report and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Seren, G; Morel, J; Jospe, R; Mahul, P; Dumont, A; Cuileron, M; Tiffet, O; Auboyer, C

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of spontaneous hepatic rupture secondary to HELLP syndrome. A favourable evolution was observed after massive transfusion and surgical management limited to hepatic packing. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication of preeclampsia occurring mainly in the context of HELLP syndrome. A high maternal and foetal mortality is observed. Different therapeutic options are presented including medical, surgical and radiological interventions. A unique strategy cannot be defined. Multidisciplinary approach seems mandatory. Surgery should remain as less aggressive as possible.

  3. Unusual clotted haemothorax caused by spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Mei, Jiandong; Guan, Pujun; Lin, Feng; Pu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus (SIHO) is a relatively rare event with benign courses. Most of the patients with SIHO may experience spontaneous healing without complications. We report a case of SIHO with clotted haemothorax. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was successfully applied as a diagnostic and therapeutic method. Although conservative treatment is adequate for the majority of patients with SIHO, uniportal VATS may be a suitable option if there was clotted haemothorax. PMID:28149589

  4. The course of chronic subdural hematomas after burr-hole craniostomy with and without closed-system drainage.

    PubMed

    Markwalder, T M

    2000-07-01

    The author provides a comprehensive review of the results of surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs). The postoperative clinical course of CSH is studied with respect to the influence of neomembranous organization, cortical expansion, and subdural pressure. The importance of subdural drainage is emphasized.

  5. Scalp Haematoma in Cerebral Palsy Case due to Unknown Cause - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharamjit Singh Jitsweer

    2016-01-01

    Incidences of cerebral palsy (CP) in children are not quite common even though it is the most common motor disorder in children. Further quality of life in CP cases is not so good in young adult stages and has to face certain problems. However scalp haematoma formation in CP patient without injury to head is rarely been reported. The case is being reported for the first time from Malaysia. We report on a unique case of scalp haematoma in an 18-year-old girl of known CP patient with unknown cause. No history of trauma or fall with any of the focal neurological signs or symptoms was found. Clinical examination showed soft boggy swelling of 8 x 10 cm size, involving most of scalp and upper face. CT - scan showed scalp haematoma with right orbital extraconal lesion. She underwent incision and drainage of scalp lesion; consequently around 100 ml of clotted blood came out. At follow-up she was doing well. PMID:27504347

  6. Enhancement of isodense subdural hematoma on delayed-high-dose contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Hinck, V.C.

    1983-02-01

    A case is presented in which bilateral, isodense subdural hematomas, not readily apparent on immediate rapid-high-dose computed tomography, became enhanced and clearly visible on delayed scans. If difficulty is encountered in interpreting the immediate scan of a patient suspected of having isodense subdural hematoma, further scans after a one-hour delay may resolve the dilemma.

  7. Subdural and intracerebral hemorrhage caused by spontaneous bleeding in the middle meningeal artery after coil embolization of a cerebral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Shinya; Kakehi, Yoshiaki; Yamane, Fumitaka; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-10-01

    Nontraumatic acute subdural hemorrhage (SDH) with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is rare and is usually caused by severe bleeding from aneurysms or arteriovenous fistulas. We encountered a very rare case of spontaneous bleeding from the middle meningeal artery (MMA), which caused hemorrhage in the temporal lobe and subdural space 2 weeks after coil embolization of an ipsilateral, unruptured internal cerebral artery aneurysm in the cavernous portion. At onset, the distribution of hematoma on a computed tomography scan led us to believe that the treated intracavernous aneurysm could bleed into the intradural space. Emergency craniotomy revealed that the dura of the middle fossa was intact except for the point at the foramen spinosum where the exposed MMA was bleeding. Retrospectively, angiography just before and after embolization of the aneurysm did not show any aberrations in the MMA. Although the MMA usually courses on the outer surface of the dura and is unlikely to rupture without an external force, physicians should be aware that the MMA may bleed spontaneously and cause SDH and ICH.

  8. Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Altinel, Faruk; Altin, Cihan; Gezmis, Esin; Altinors, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH. PMID:26396617

  9. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-12-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was /sup 68/Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes.

  10. Mechanical stimulation of the pro-angiogenic capacity of human fracture haematoma: involvement of VEGF mechano-regulation.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, Aline; Duda, Georg N; Wilson, Cameron J; Thompson, Mark S; Hunter, Morgan R; Simon, Paul; Bail, Hermann J; van Scherpenzeel, Karine M; Kasper, Grit

    2010-08-01

    Compromised angiogenesis appears to be a major limitation in various suboptimal bone healing situations. Appropriate mechanical stimuli support blood vessel formation in vivo and improve healing outcomes. However, the mechanisms responsible for this association are unclear. To address this question, the paracrine angiogenic potential of early human fracture haematoma and its responsiveness to mechanical loading, as well as angiogenic growth factors involved, were investigated in vitro. Human haematomas were collected from healthy patients undergoing surgery within 72 h after bone fracture. The haematomas were embedded in a fibrin matrix, and cultured in a bioreactor resembling the in vivo conditions of the early phase of bone healing (20% compression, 1 Hz) over 3 days. Conditioned medium (CM) from the bioreactor was then analyzed. The matrices were also incubated in fresh medium for a further 24 h to evaluate the persistence of the effects. Growth factor (GF) concentrations were measured in the CM by ELISAs. In vitro tube formation assays were conducted on Matrigel with the HMEC-1 cell line, with or without inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Cell numbers were quantified using an MTS test. In vitro endothelial tube formation was enhanced by CM from haematomas, compared to fibrin controls. The angiogenesis regulators, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), were released into the haematoma CM, but not angiopoietins 1 or 2 (Ang1, 2), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Mechanical stimulation of haematomas, but not fibrin controls, further increased the induction of tube formation by their CM. The mechanically stimulated haematoma matrices retained their elevated pro-angiogenic capacity for 24 h. The pro-angiogenic effect was cancelled by inhibition of VEGFR2 signalling. VEGF concentrations in CM tended to be elevated by mechanical

  11. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  12. Osteogenic activity of human fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells is stimulated by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Miwa, M; Sakai, Y; Niikura, T; Kurosaka, M; Komori, T

    2009-02-01

    The haematoma occurring at the site of a fracture is known to play an important role in bone healing. We have recently shown the presence of progenitor cells in human fracture haematoma and demonstrated that they have the capacity for multilineage mesenchymal differentiation. There have been many studies which have shown that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulates the differentiation of a variety of cells, but none has investigated the effects of LIPUS on cells derived from human fracture tissue including human fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells (HCs). In this in vitro study, we investigated the effects of LIPUS on the osteogenic activity of HCs. Alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin secretion, the expression of osteoblast-related genes and the mineralisation of HCs were shown to be significantly higher when LIPUS had been applied but without a change in the proliferation of the HCs. These findings provide evidence in favour of the use of LIPUS in the treatment of fractures.

  13. Subdural hematoma in a teenager related to roller-coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Facha, M T; Martinez-Lopez, Manuel; Herrera-Mora, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    Reports about neurological injury related to roller-coaster rides mostly involve adults; we present a case of subdural hematoma in a pediatric patient presented 14 days after a roller-coaster ride. These rides show extreme up-and-down, to-and-fro, and rotatory acceleration/deceleration forces that could produce tensile and shearing stresses with tearing of bridging cerebral veins resulting in subdural hemorrhage. Pediatricians should consider roller-coaster riding a modern cause of subdural hematoma, as well as a possible cause of unexplained neurologic events in otherwise healthy adolescents.

  14. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  15. Placement of a subdural evacuating port system for management of iatrogenic hyperacute subdural hemorrhage following intracranial monitor placement.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Nathan, Jay K; Manley, Geoffery T; Huang, Michael C

    2013-12-01

    A 22-year-old man was admitted with a severe traumatic brain injury developed a hyperacute subdural hematoma (SDH) following attempted brain tissue oxygen monitor placement. This patient was successfully treated by placement of a subdural evacuation portal system (SEPS). The patient presented to a Level I trauma center after a severe bike versus auto accident. On admission, he was found to have a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3. The patient had small areas of intraparechymal hemorrhage as well as suspicion for diffuse axonal injury in the midbrain. Based on the patient's GCS score, neurological monitoring was indicated as a part of his intensive care unit treatment, however a SDH occurred during an attempted placement of a brain tissue oxygen monitor. This iatrogenic hyperacute SDH after burr hole monitoring device placement was treated with a SEPS drain. The SEPS drain has been shown to provide complete and/or temporary decompression of liquefied SDH. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using the SEPS to treat iatrogenic SDH associated with an intracranial monitoring device. This technique should be added to the armament of treatment options for a neurosurgeon to treat or temporize a hyperacute SDH with increased intracranial pressure in specific patients.

  16. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  17. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain imaging and computerized transaxial tomography in detecting subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Razzak, M.A.; Mudarris, F.; Christie, J.H.

    1980-04-01

    In a series of 23 patients with surgically proven subdural hematoma of durations ranging between two days to seven months, the detection rate of Tc-99m-pertechnetate brain imaging was higher than computerized transaxial tomography (CT). With dynamic perfusion scanning, the detection rate was 71.5%. In contrast, CT demonstrated the hematoma in 52% of the cases. Lastly, the result of CT scanning was dependent on the size of the subdural hematoma as evaluated at the time of operation.

  18. Brain shrinkage and subdural effusion associated with ACTH administration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Takeshige, H; Hara, H; Fukuyama, Y

    1982-01-01

    Sequential computed tomographic (CT) studies of 11 patients (aged five months to seven years) with intractable epilepsy treated with synthetic ACTH-Z showed brain shrinkage in all cases. Brain shrinkage started to appear on daily ACTH injections for seven days, reached the maximum within four weeks of administration (14 injections every day and then 7 injections every other day), and almost returned to the original status in seven out of nine cases which were followed up for one to three months after the therapy. The subjects aged less than two years showed more remarkable brain shrinkage than did those aged more than five years. Furthermore, two other cases were complicated by subdural effusion after ACTH therapy. It is the authors' assumption that both of these phenomena are caused by the high concentration of corticosteroid through a change of the water and electrolyte contents in the brain.

  19. Spontaneous Subdural Haemorrhage: A Rare Association with Plasmodium Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Shetty; Koya, Rohini; Acharya, Vasudev; Krishna, Shastry Barkur Anantha

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic disease in tropical countries and disease of universal importance. Central Nervous System (CNS) complications of malaria are severe and associated with significant mortality. Thrombocytopaenia in malaria causing haemorrhagic CNS complications is rare. We report a case of 35-year-old male patient presented with headache, vomiting and was diagnosed to have subdural haemorrhage (SDH). On examination patient was found to be febrile with peripheral smear showing evidence of Plasmodium vivax (P.vivax) infection with severe thrombocytopaenia. In endemic regions with malaria, SDH being rare presentation of malaria should be considered as a differential diagnosis in febrile patients with neurological manifestations. Rarity of spontaneous SDH in malaria and raising awareness amongst treating physicians about the same is the driving factor for reporting this case. PMID:26894111

  20. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children.

  1. Impact of Time Interval between Trauma Onset and Burr Hole Surgery on Recurrence of Late Subacute or Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-in; Kim, Jae-hoon; Kang, Hee-in; Moon, Byung-gwan; Kim, Joo-seung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although subdural hematoma (SDH) is commonly treatable by burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage, there is no clear consensus regarding appropriate management and exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence also remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with recurrence of SDH that requires burr hole surgery in the late subacute or chronic stage. We also identified the appropriate timing of surgery for reducing the recurrence. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 274 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage treated with burr hole surgery in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014. Excluding patients with acute intracranial complications or unknown time of trauma onset left 216 patients included in the study. Results Of 216 patients with SDH in the late subacute or chronic stage, recurrence was observed in 36 patients (16.7%). The timing of the operation in patients with late subacute stage (15–28 days) resulted in a significant decrease in recurrence (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.17–0.65; p=0.001) compared to chronic stage (>28 days). Otherwise, no significant risk factors were associated with recurrences including comorbidities and surgical details. Conclusion The results indicated that time from trauma onset to burr hole surgery may be important for decreasing the risk of recurrence. Therefore, unless patients can be treated conservatively without surgery, prompt surgical management is recommended in patients diagnosed as having late subacute or chronic subdural hematoma treatable by burr hole surgery, even when neurological deficits are unclear. PMID:27651869

  2. Pseudoaneurysm and intramuscular haematoma after dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie Sze-wun; Kong, Siu-wah; Sun, Kin-wai; Tsang, Pui-ki; Chow, Hung-lit

    2010-08-01

    We report the case of an 83-year-old woman who developed a pseudoaneurysm of the profunda femoris artery after dynamic hip screw fixation for an intertrochanteric femoral fracture. 23 days after the fixation, radiological investigations including colour Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography identified a pseudoaneurysm surrounded by a large intramuscular haematoma close to the profunda femoris. The patient underwent emergency evacuation and was under intensive care for 3 days and was discharged 6 weeks later, with no complications. At one-year follow-up, the wound and fracture had healed, but the patient was confined to a wheelchair. A high index of clinical suspicion and radiological imaging are necessary for making the diagnosis.

  3. Psoas abscess secondary to haematoma after a fall causing multiple osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Kathrin; Horne, Simon; Gay, David

    2012-09-07

    A 78-year-old woman presented 28 days after a low-impact fall, where she sustained a right pubic ramus fracture, with increasing left hip pain and fever. Her blood results showed a high white cell count and deranged urea and electrolytes. An MRI revealed multiple osteoporotic fractures and bilateral gluteal abscesses with left iliopsoas abscess, which had likely formed in a haematoma of a sacral fracture. She received a long course of intravenous antibiotics and CT-guided drainage of the abscesses. She developed symptoms of cauda equina, but no evidence of epidural extension of the abscess was found at operation. She required neurorehabilitation. This case highlights the complications of pelvic osteoporotic fractures, and high associated morbidity and mortality in the elderly population.

  4. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  5. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation. PMID:28357164

  6. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  7. Empyema of preexisting subdural hemorrhage caused by a rare salmonella species after exposure to bearded dragons in a foster home.

    PubMed

    Tabarani, Christy M; Bennett, Nicholas J; Kiska, Deanna L; Riddell, Scott W; Botash, Ann S; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2010-02-01

    An infant had a subdural empyema caused by the rare Salmonella species enterica subspecies houtenae (IV) serotype 44:z4,z23:- after only indirect exposure to exotic reptiles in her foster home. Infants recovering from preexisting subdural hematoma are at risk for development of empyema.

  8. Subdural effusions and lack of early pontocerebellar hypoplasia in siblings with RARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kastrissianakis, Katherina; Anand, Geetha; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Price, Sue; Prabhakar, Prab; Marinova, Jasmina; Brown, Garry; McShane, Tony

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the recently described RARS2 gene encoding for mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase give rise to a disorder characterised by early onset seizures, progressive microcephaly and developmental delay. The disorder was named pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) based on the corresponding radiological findings observed in the original cases. We report two siblings with the RARS2 mutation who displayed typical clinical features of PCH6, but who had distinct neuroimaging features. Early scans showed marked supratentorial, rather than infratentorial, atrophy, and the pons remained preserved throughout. One sibling also had bilateral subdural effusions at presentation. The deceleration in head growth pointed to an evolving genetic/metabolic process giving rise to cerebral atrophy and secondary subdural effusions. RARS2 mutations should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, subdural effusions, decelerating head growth and evidence of cerebral atrophy even in the absence of pontocerebellar hypoplasia on imaging.

  9. Recurrent, symptomatic, late-onset, contralateral subdural effusion following decompressive craniectomy treated by cranial strapping.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Roy Chowdhury, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Subdural effusions following decompressive craniotomy for trauma are usually benign, ipsilateral to the craniotomy and resolve spontaneously. Far less common and more dangerous are contralateral subdural effusions causing external cerebral herniation. We report a case of recurrent contralateral effusion and highlight the management dilemmas. Arachnoid tear is probably the cause of these collections. Contralateral subdural effusions should be suspected in patients who have delayed neurological deterioration after an initial improvement particularly in the setting of increased "flap bulge" though they may also be found in patients who remain moribund after initial surgery. There are no clear-cut guidelines on their management due to their rarity. A variety of options like subduro-peritoneal shunt and drainage with simultaneous cranioplasty may be tried. In situations where resources or patient compliance is an issue, tapping the effusion followed by cranial strapping may be tried as was done in our case.

  10. Subcapsular haematoma and multifocal necrosis as fatal liver complications following umbilical vein catheterisation in a premature baby.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Sprigg, A; Roberts, I; Bustani, P

    2006-02-01

    We describe a case of subcapsular haematoma of the right lobe (SHL) and multifocal necrosis of the left lobe (MNL) of the liver following umbilical vein catheterisation (UVC) in a female at 24 weeks' gestation. SHL and MNL have been described as uncommon complications following umbilical vein catheterisation. To our knowledge this is the first time both complications have developed in the same patient. SHL should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypovolaemic shock in this group of patients.

  11. Recurrent spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to immune thrombocytopenia in a patient with overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goh, K G; Ong, S G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune connective tissue disease may manifest as overlap syndrome with features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and myositis. Those presenting with active SLE can present with immune thrombocytopenia (IT) and may be complicated with subdural hematoma which, though rare, is potentially life-threatening. We report here a patient with overlap syndrome who had recurrent spontaneous subdural hematoma due to severe thrombocytopenia which did not respond to corticosteroids and azathioprine. Her platelet count became normal with three doses of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (IV CYC) given at 3-weekly intervals. She remained in remission with maintenance therapy with azathioprine.

  12. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  13. Metastatic prostate cancer mimicking chronic subdural hematoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashikant; Veron, Ayme; Hosseini, Pegah; Bates, Rachel; Brown, Benjamin; Guthikonda, Bharat; DeSouza, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the prostate is extremely common and is well known to metastasize to the pelvic lymph nodes and axial skeleton (vertebral column, pelvis, cranium, and proximal femur). However, reports of intracranial metastasis are rare and commonly discovered postmortem. Moreover, metastatic lesions mimicking subdural hematoma are extremely rare and are uncommonly reported in the literature. We found only three such cases in the literature. We present a unique case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with headaches after head trauma with classic radiologic findings of subdural hematoma. The diagnosis may have been made sooner with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Rediscovering the wound haematoma as a site of haemostasis during major arterial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    White, N.J.; Mehic, E.; Wang, X.; Chien, D.; Lim, E.; St. John, A.E.; Stern, S.A.; Mourad, P.D.; Rieger, M.; Fries, D.; Martinowitz, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatments for major internal bleeding after injury include permissive hypotension to decrease the rate of blood loss, intravenous infusion of plasma or clotting factors to improve clot formation, and rapid surgical haemostasis or arterial embolization to control bleeding vessels. Yet, little is known regarding major internal arterial haemostasis, or how these commonly-used treatments might influence haemostasis. Objectives (1) Use a swine model of femoral artery bleeding to understand the perivascular haemostatic response to contained arterial haemorrhage. (2) Directly confirm the association between hemodynamics and bleeding velocity. (3) Observe the feasibility of delivering an activated clotting factor directly to internal sites of bleeding using a simplified angiographic approach. Methods Ultrasound was used to measure bleeding velocity and in vivo clot formation by elastography in a swine model of contained femoral artery bleeding with fluid resuscitation. A swine model of internal pelvic and axillary artery haemorrhage was also used to demonstrate feasibility of local delivery of an activated clotting factor. Results In this model, clots formed slowly within the peri-wound hematoma , but eventually containing the bleeding. Central hemodynamics correlated positively with bleeding velocity. Infusion of recombinant human activated Factor VII into the injured artery nearby the site of major internal haemorrhage in the pelvis and axillae was feasible. Conclusions We rediscover that clot formation within the peri-wound haematoma is an integral component of haemostasis and a feasible target for treatment of major internal bleeding using activated clotting factors delivered using a simplified angiographic approach. PMID:26414624

  15. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury.

  16. Subdural Hematomas in Children under 2 Years. Accidental or Inflicted? A 10-Year Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzioumi, Dimitra; Oates, R. Kim

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of 38 children under 2 with subdural hematomas found the most common causes were nonaccidental injury (55%), accidents (39%), and nontraumatic causes (6%). Also, the frequent presence of retinal hemorrhages, bone and rib fractures, delay in presentation, and young age suggests child abuse as the most common cause of these injuries.…

  17. Role of Subdural Electrocorticography in Prediction of Long-Term Seizure Outcome in Epilepsy Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Eishi; Juhasz, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    Since prediction of long-term seizure outcome using preoperative diagnostic modalities remains suboptimal in epilepsy surgery, we evaluated whether interictal spike frequency measures obtained from extraoperative subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording could predict long-term seizure outcome. This study included 61 young patients (age…

  18. Extent of cortical generators visible on the scalp: effect of a subdural grid.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Beltrachini, Leandro; Muravchik, Carlos H; Gotman, Jean

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the non-conducting substrate of a subdural grid on the scalp electric potential distribution is studied through simulations. Using a detailed head model and the finite element method we show that the governing physics equations predict an important attenuation in the scalp potential for generators located under the grid, and an amplification for generators located under holes in the skull filled with conductive media. These effects are spatially localized and do not cancel each other. A 4 × 8 cm grid can produce attenuations of 2 to 3 times, and an 8 × 8 cm grid attenuation of up to 8 times. As a consequence, when there is no subdural grid, generators of 4 to 8 cm(2) produce scalp potentials of the same maximum amplitude as generators of 10 to 20 cm(2) under the center of a subdural grid. This means that the minimum cortical extents necessary to produce visible scalp activity determined from simultaneous scalp and subdural recordings can be overestimations.

  19. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated with preeclampsia: a case report and litterature review

    PubMed Central

    Oudghiri, Nezha; Behat, Mehdi; Elchhab, Nada; Doumiri, Mouhssine; Tazi, Anas Saoud

    2014-01-01

    A patient with pre-eclampsia at 31 weeks’ gestation developed neurologic signs. Computerized tomography revealed a large cranial subdural hematoma. This diagnostic should be considered in any pre-eclamptic patient demonstrating neurological symptoms and must be treated effectively because of the poor maternel and fetal prognosis. Our patient was succesfully treated. PMID:25829978

  20. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  1. False diagnosis of acoustic neuroma due to subdural injection during gas CT cisternogram.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E M; Holtås, S

    1986-01-01

    Gas CT cisternography is a reliable examination for the detection of small acoustic neuromas. False-positive or equivocal findings do result, however, from a small number of these examinations. In this case report inadvertent subdural injection of gas caused diagnostic difficulties.

  2. The influence of coagulopathy on outcome after traumatic subdural hematoma: a retrospective single-center analysis of 319 patients.

    PubMed

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; von der Brelie, Christian; Ebenau, Martina; Meier, Ullrich

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effects of coagulopathy on the outcome of patients with traumatic subdural hematoma (SDH). Based on a retrospective study, the records of all patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 to a large emergency hospital with acute SDH resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI) were analyzed. An initial Glasgow coma score (GCS), clinical state, and Glasgow outcome score (GOS) were recorded for all patients. All computer assisted tomography and MRI scans obtained from patients were saved on an electronic storage device and were reviewed by a neurosurgeon and a neuroradiologist. The coagulation parameters were analyzed for all patients. Coagulopathy was defined as international normalized ratio more than 1.2 or partial thromboplastin time more than 37 s. One hundred and five women and 214 men aged between 1 and 100 years (mean 59 years) were included in the study. Patients with coagulopathy had a significantly worse outcome. Almost twice as many patients died in the coagulopathy group (mean GOS 3.10 ± 1.46) than in the group without coagulopathy (mean GOS 2.16 ± 1.45), (P < 0.001). In-hospital mortality is twice as frequent in patients with coagulopathy with traumatic SDH compared with noncoagulopathic patients, even if the initial severity of the TBI does not differ.

  3. Subdural hemorrhage – a serious complication post-intrathecal chemotherapy. A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Xiu Xian; Bazargan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We need to have a high index of suspicion for subdural hemorrhage (SDH) post-lumbar puncture in hematological patients given their increased risk and the significant morbidity and mortality associated with SDHs. PMID:25678976

  4. Zygomatic haematoma in an 11-month-old helps diagnose retropharyngeal abscess, with concurrent tonsillitis and subsequent infant tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Collis, David H; Sanu, Ameeth

    2016-09-20

    An 11-month-old boy presented with a 2-day history of non-specific symptoms and a zygomatic haematoma. With aetiology uncertain after admission clerking and blood tests, a CT head scan was arranged for suspected traumatic injury and revealed a retropharyngeal abscess (RPA) with significant airway narrowing in the transverse plane. The patient received urgent intraoral abscess drainage and bilateral tonsillectomy in theatre. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion regarding RPAs. These abscesses have potentially fatal sequelae and are difficult to diagnose in the infant paediatric population.

  5. Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Eccentric Exercise Using a Vibrating Belt Machine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hey-Ran; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  6. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Paolo; Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-10-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections.

  7. Is Sinusitis Innocent?--Unilateral Subdural Empyema in an Immunocompetent Child.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Sevim; Yazar, Uğur; Cansu, Ali; Kul, Sibel; Kaya, Selçuk; Özdoğan, Elif Bahat

    2015-11-01

    Subdural empyema related to Streptococcus constellatus is extremely rare in an immunocompetent child, and also there is no reported case along with Staphylococcus lugdunensis infection. Although Streptococcus constellatus has been determined as a co-pathogen with anerobic bacteria in many infections, it has not been reported in combination with Staphylococcus lugdunensis. The authors describe a case of previously healthy 16-y-old child with unilateral subdural empyema due to these bacteria. Sinusitis was the only predisposing factor in the index case. The authors propose that some cases of culture-negative intracranial infections may be due to these infectious agents. Therefore, these agents should be considered as causes of intracranial infection in persistent complaints such as fever and headache after sinusitis in children. It is important to treat them with effective antibiotics and early surgical intervention for favorable outcome, because fatal cases were reported due to Streptococcus constellatus infections.

  8. [Chronic subdural hematoma with a markedly fibrous hypertrophic membrane. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Kuwana, N; Kojima, Y; Tanaka, N; Kitamura, H

    1990-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, who had taken low-dose oral contraceptives for 2 months before onset, developed transient dysarthria, left hemiparesis, and left hemihypesthesia. One month later, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a uniformly enhanced, convex-shaped, hypertrophic membrane with a lobulated lumen in the subdural space of the right parietal region. A right parietal craniotomy was performed. The membrane, consisting of elastic-hard, hypertrophic granulation tissue and yellowish, sticky fluid in the lumen, was readily freed and totally extirpated. Subsequently, the patient recovered without persistent symptoms. Light microscopic examination detected the sinusoidal channel layer and the fibrous layer in an alternating configuration, along with intramembranous hemorrhagic foci. Such hypertrophy must have been caused by repeated intramembranous hemorrhages and reactive granulation. Such findings of hematoma membrane have never previously been reported. Thus, this is an interesting case, clearly distinguished from typical chronic subdural hematoma.

  9. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections. PMID:27703619

  10. Refractory Spontaneous Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Rare Presentation of an Intracranial Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The author has encountered a 67-year-old man with dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) presenting as a non-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). This previously healthy patient was hospitalized due to progressive headache with subacute onset. He underwent burr-hole surgery twice for evacuating the left CSDH that was thickest at the posterior temporal area. The operative procedure and finding was not extraordinary, but subdural hematoma slowly progressed for days following the revision surgery. After investigation by super-selective external carotid angiography, a dural AVF found near the transverse-sigmoid sinus was diagnosed. Dural AVF was completely occluded with trans-arterial injecting polyvinyl alchol particles into the petrosquamosal branch of the middle meningeal artery. The patient showed a good neurological outcome with no additional intervention. Brain surgeons have to consider the possibility of dural AVF and perform cerebral angiogram if necessary when they manage the cases that have a spontaneously occurred and repeatedly recurring CSDH. PMID:28184348

  11. Escherichia coli positive infratentorial subdural empyema secondary to mastoiditis and underlying cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Omar; Varadarajan, Vinay; Youshani, Amir Saam; Willatt, David J

    2014-01-01

    Infratentorial subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency that is associated with an alarmingly high morbidity and mortality if appropriate management is delayed. It is an important differential to consider when confronted with a patient with a reduced Glasgow Coma Scale, focal neurology and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure in the presence of a head and neck infection. It is also important that the primary team managing these patients is aware of the many pathogens that may be involved, including Escherichia coli. Early recognition, prompt diagnosis, timely involvement of the appropriate multidisciplinary teams, including neurosurgery, otorhinolaryngology, radiology and microbiology should be sought, and urgent intervention are imperative in avoiding a fatal outcome. This article presents a case of E coli-positive infratentorial subdural empyema secondary to mastoiditis due to underlying cholesteatoma, and a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:24777089

  12. Second-Impact Syndrome and a Small Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Catastrophic Result of Repetitive Head Injury with a Characteristic Imaging Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Gean, Alisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There have been a handful of previously published cases of athletes who were still symptomatic from a prior head injury, and then suffered a second injury in which a thin, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) with unilateral hemisphere vascular engorgement was demonstrated on CT scan. In those cases, the cause of the brain swelling/dysautoregulation was ascribed to the presence of the acute SDH rather than to the acceleration/deceleration forces that caused the SDH. We believe that the brain swelling is due to “second-impact dysautoregulation,” rather than due to the effect of the SDH on the underlying hemisphere. To support our hypothesis, we present 10 additional cases of acute hemispheric swelling in association with small SDHs in athletes who received a second head injury while still symptomatic from a previous head injury. The clinical history and the unique neuroimaging features of this entity on CT are described and illustrated in detail. The CT findings included an engorged cerebral hemisphere with initial preservation of grey-white matter differentiation, and abnormal mass effect and midline shift that appeared disproportionately greater than the size of the SDH. In addition, the imaging similarities between our patients and those with non-accidental head trauma (shaken-baby syndrome) will be discussed. PMID:20536318

  13. Whole-Brain Radiation to Treat a Recurrent Malignant Subdural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria M; Lavrador, José Pedro; Teixeira, Joaquim; Miguéns, José

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of a recurrent malignant subdural effusion that was treated with whole-brain radiation therapy. A 72-year-old man presented with headaches and de novo left central facial palsy and right upper extremity weakness. His past medical history was remarkable for a prostatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 1999 (T4N0M0) with no metastatic disease diagnosed to date. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium showed carcinomatous meningitis and a 1.5-cm thick left hemisphere subdural collection causing a mass effect. Left-side frontal and parietal burr holes were created and a clear effusion was successfully drained under high pressure. A biopsy od the dura mater was also taken. Analysis of the effusion showed a protein concentration of 1233 mg/dL. Histopathological examination of the dura matter showed adenocarcinomatous cells. Despite the clinical improvement, serial postoperative computed tomography scans of the head showed massive recurrence of the subdural effusion. The patient was offered radiation therapy as a palliative treatment for effusion control. Whole-brain radiation therapy was performed from day 10 to 17 after surgery at a palliative dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions. No treatment-associated complications were reported. Thirty days after radiotherapy, the computed tomography scan of the head showed total resolution of the malignant effusion.

  14. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Luchuo, Engelbert Bain; Teuwafeu, Denis; Nepetsoun, Ines; Nkouonlack, Cyrille

    2017-01-01

    Hematological abnormalities including thrombocytopenia are common in patients living with HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection related thrombocytopenia present generally with only minor bleeding problems. But cases of subdural hematoma are very rare. A 61-year-old female with a history of HIV infection of 9 years' duration presented with a 3-month history of generalized headache associated with visual blurring and anterograde amnesia. There was no history of trauma or fever. She was treated empirically for cerebral toxoplasmosis for 6 weeks without any improvement of the symptoms. One week prior to admission, she developed weakness of the left side of the body. Clinical examination revealed left-sided hemiparesis. Computed tomography scan of the brain showed a 25 mm chronic right frontoparietotemporal subdural hematoma compressing the lateral ventricle with midline shift. There was no appreciable cerebral atrophy. A complete blood count showed leucopenia and thrombocytopenia at 92,000 cells/mm3. Her CD4-positive cell count was 48 cells/mm3 despite receiving combination antiretroviral therapy for 9 years. A complete blood count analysis suggestive of thrombocytopenia should raise suspicion of possibilities of noninfectious focal brain lesions like subdural hematoma amongst HIV infected patients presenting with nonspecific neurological symptoms. This will enable prompt diagnosis and allow early appropriate intervention. PMID:28168070

  15. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  16. Subepicardial haematoma, a rare and potentially lethal complication of CTO-PCI: case of an exceptional recovery after conservative management.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Annemiek M J; van der Schaaf, Rene J

    2014-10-09

    We present the case of an 82-year-old woman undergoing high-risk chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention (CTO-PCI) of the right coronary artery. Hours after the procedure, a subepicardial haematoma was diagnosed as a result of coronary perforation during the procedure. This rare and potentially lethal complication evolved exceptionally benignly after conservative management; our patient fully recovered. Increasingly complex procedures in high-risk patient categories warrant awareness of procedural complications, especially those that are subtle and appear relatively late, and are therefore most hazardous. Recognition of this rare complication and choosing the optimal strategy is of the utmost importance when dealing with patients who undergo PCI. We here describe the rare case of a potential lethal complication in high-risk CTO-PCI, which evolved relatively benignly.

  17. Selective impairment of facial recognition due to a haematoma restricted to the right fusiform and lateral occipital region

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y; Yamamoto, T

    2001-01-01

    A 67 year old right handed Japanese man developed prosopagnosia caused by a haemorrhage. His only deficit was the inability to perceive and discriminate unfamiliar faces, and to recognise familiar faces. He did not show deficits in visual or visuospatial perception of non-facial stimuli, alexia, visual agnosia, or topographical disorientation. Brain MRI showed a haematoma limited to the right fusiform and the lateral occipital region. Single photon emission computed tomography confirmed that there was no decreased blood flow in the opposite left cerebral hemisphere. The present case indicates that a well placed small right fusiform gyrus and the adjacent area can cause isolated impairment of facial recognition. As far as we know, there has been no published case that has demonstrated this exact lesion site, which was indicated by recent functional MRI studies as the most critical area in facial recognition.

 PMID:11459906

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances bone morphogenetic protein expression of human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Hasegawa, T; Imai, Y; Takeda, D; Akashi, M; Komori, T

    2015-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived cells (MHCs) play an important role in mandibular fracture healing and that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) accelerates this effect by stimulating various osteogenic cytokines. In the present study, we investigated how LIPUS affects the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are also known to have the ability to induce bone formation. MHCs were isolated from human mandibular fracture haematomas and the cells were divided into two groups: a LIPUS (+) group and a LIPUS (-) group, both of which were cultured in osteogenic medium. LIPUS was applied to the LIPUS (+) group 20 min a day for 4, 8, 14, and 20 days (1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2)). Real-time PCR and immunofluorescence studies were carried out to determine the expression of BMP-2, 4, and 7. Compared to the LIPUS (-) group, gene expression levels were significantly increased in the LIPUS (+) group for BMP-2 on day 20 (67.38 ± 26.59 vs. 11.52 ± 3.42, P < 0.001), for BMP-4 on days 14 (45.12 ± 11.06 vs. 9.20 ± 2.88, P = 0.045) and 20 (40.96 ± 24.81 vs. 3.22 ± 1.53, P = 0.035), and for BMP-7 on day 8 (48.11 ± 35.36 vs. 7.03 ± 3.96, P = 0.034). These findings suggest that BMP-2, 4, and 7 may be mediated by LIPUS therapy during the bone repair process.

  19. 10 Levels thoracic no-intrumented laminectomy for huge spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma removal. Report of the first case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Signorelli, Francesco; Roselli, Romeo; Jun, Zhong; Spallone, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare cause of acute back pain followed by signs and symptoms of nerve root and/or spinal cord compression, frequently associated with coagulopathies, blood dyscrasias and arterio-venous malformations. Standard management includes non-operative treatment and timely (within 24 h) surgical decompression. Presentation of case We report on the case of a huge 10 levels SSDH treated with decompressive thoracic no-instrumented laminectomy in a 45-year-old woman with good neurological recovery (from ASIA A to D). Discussion Spontaneous SSDHs without detectable structural lesion or anticoagulant therapy are very rare. Among 26 cases documented the literature harbouring SSDHs, the thoracic spine was found to be the preferred site, and the compression was usually extending over several vertebral levels. Nonoperative treatment for SSDH may be justified in presence of minimal neurologic deficits, otherwise, early decompressive laminectomy along with evacuation of hematoma are considered the treatment of choice in presence of major deficits. Conclusion To our knowledge, the present case is the most extensive laminectomy for a SSDH removal never described before. No postoperative instability occurs in 10 levels thoracic laminectomy in case the articular processes are spared. When major neurological deficits are documented, early decompressive laminectomy with evacuation of hematoma should be considered the best treatment for SSDH. PMID:26318128

  20. Use of Subperiosteal Drain Versus Subdural Drain in Chronic Subdural Hematomas Treated With Burr-Hole Trepanation: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Katharina; Schaedelin, Sabine; Mariani, Luigi; Fandino, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most frequent neurosurgical conditions affecting elderly people and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. The use of a subdural drain (SDD) after burr-hole trepanation for cSDH was proven to reduce recurrence and mortality at 6 months. To date in neurosurgery practice, evidence-based guidelines on whether an SDD or subperiosteal drain (SPD) should be used do not exist. Currently both methods are being practiced depending on the institute and/or the practicing neurosurgeon. Objective The aim of this study is to compare the reoperation rates after burr-hole trepanation and insertion of an SPD or SDD in patients with cSDH. Methods This is a prospective, noninferiority, multicenter, randomized controlled trial designed to include 220 patients over the age of 18 years presenting with a symptomatic cSDH verified on cranial computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging who are to undergo surgical evacuation with burr-hole trepanation. After informed consent is obtained, patients are randomly allocated to an SPD or SDD group. The primary endpoint is recurrence indicating a reoperation within 12 months. Results This research is investigator-initiated and has received ethics approval. Patient recruitment started in April 2013, and we expect all study-related activities to be completed by the end of 2016 or beginning of 2017. Conclusions To date, evidence-based recommendations concerning the operative treatment of cSDH are sparse. Results of this research are expected to have applications in evidence-based practice for the increasing number of patients suffering from cSDH and possibly lead to more efficient treatment of this disease with fewer postoperative complications. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01869855; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01869855 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fNK4Jlxk) PMID:27059872

  1. Subdural porous and notched mini-grid electrodes for wireless intracranial electroencephalographic recordings

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Gélinas, Sébastien; Desgent, Sébastien; Duss, Sandra; Bernier Turmel, Félix; Carmant, Lionel; Sawan, Mohamad; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2014-01-01

    Background Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) studies are widely used in the presurgical evaluation of drug-refractory patients with partial epilepsy. Because chronic implantation of intracranial electrodes carries a risk of infection, hemorrhage, and edema, it is best to limit the number of electrodes used without compromising the ability to localize the epileptogenic zone (EZ). There is always a risk that an intracranial study may fail to identify the EZ because of suboptimal coverage. We present a new subdural electrode design that will allow better sampling of suspected areas of epileptogenicity with lower risk to patients. Method Impedance of the proposed electrodes was characterized in vitro using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The appearance of the novel electrodes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was tested by placing the electrodes into a gel solution (0.9% NaCl with 14 g gelatin). In vivo neural recordings were performed in male Sprague Dawley rats. Performance comparisons were made using microelectrode recordings from rat cortex and subdural/depth recordings from epileptic patients. Histological examinations of rat brain after 3-week icEEG intracerebral electroencephalography (icEEG) recordings were performed. Results The in vitro results showed minimum impedances for optimum choice of pure gold materials for electrode contacts and wire. Different attributes of the new electrodes were identified on MRI. The results of in vivo recordings demonstrated signal stability, 50% noise reduction, and up to 6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement as compared to commercial electrodes. The wireless icEEG recording system demonstrated on average a 2% normalized root-mean-square (RMS) deviation. Following the long-term icEEG recording, brain histological results showed no abnormal tissue reaction in the underlying cortex. Conclusion The proposed subdural electrode system features attributes that could potentially translate into better ic

  2. Effect of inner membrane tearing in the treatment of adult chronic subdural hematoma: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kayaci, Selim; Kanat, Ayhan; Koksal, Vaner; Ozdemir, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    The postoperative results of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) procedures using catheterization and tearing of inner membrane (CTIM) technique have not previously been discussed in the literature. This article compares the effects of CTIM technique on brain re-expansion and re-accumulation with cases operated on with a burr-hole craniotomy and outer membrane incision (BCOMI) technique. The study involved operations on 144 patients (Group 1) using the CTIM technique and 108 patients (Group 2) using the BCOMI technique. In the operations using the CTIM technique in Group 1, the mean effusion measured in the subdural space (SDS) was 10.0 ± 0.2 mm, and for Group 2, 14.3 ± 0.6 mm in the postoperative period on the first and third days and this difference was found to be significant (p < 0.05). The means were 6.6 ± 0.2 mm for Group 1 and 10.3 ± 0.5 mm for Group 2 on the seventh day (p < 0.05). Recurrence rate was 8.3% in Group 2 and 0 in Group 1. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0001). The length of hospital stay was 7.0 ± 0.1 days for the Group 1 and 8.8 ± 0.2 days for Group 2 and this difference was significant (p < 0.05). These results indicate that the CTIM technique is preferable because it results in earlier re-expansion, lower recurrence, less subdural effusion and pneumocephalus, and shorter hospital stays.

  3. Subdural fluid collection and hydrocephalus following cervical schwannoma resection: hydrocephalus resolution after spinal pseudomeningocele repair: case report.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Nicola; Cagnazzo, Federico; Gambacciani, Carlo; Perrini, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 31-year-old man who developed neck pain and headache 2 months after the uncomplicated resection of a cervical schwannoma. MR imaging revealed infratentorial subdural fluid collections and obstructive hydrocephalus associated with cervical pseudomeningocele. The clinical symptoms, subdural fluid collections, and ventricular dilation resolved after surgical correction of the pseudomeningocele. This report emphasizes that hydrocephalus may be related to disorders of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics induced by cervical pseudomeningocele. In these rare cases, both the hydrocephalus and the symptoms are resolved by the simple correction of the pseudomeningocele.

  4. Radiologic Findings and Patient Factors Associated with 30-Day Mortality after Surgical Evacuation of Subdural Hematoma in Patients Less Than 65 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myung-Hoon; Ryu, Je Il; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Jae Min; Cheong, Jin Hwan; Yi, Hyeong-Joong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the associations between 30-day mortality and various radiological and clinical factors in patients with traumatic acute subdural hematoma (SDH). During the 11-year study period, young patients who underwent surgery for SDH were followed for 30 days. Patients who died due to other medical comorbidities or other organ problems were not included in the study population. Methods From January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2014, 318 consecutive surgically-treated traumatic acute SDH patients were registered for the study. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to analyze 30-day survival rates. We also estimated the hazard ratios of various variables in order to identify the independent predictors of 30-day mortality. Results We observed a negative correlation between 30-day mortality and Glasgow coma scale score (per 1-point score increase) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52–0.70; p<0.001). In addition, use of antithrombotics (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.27–4.33; p=0.008), history of diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.20–4.32; p=0.015), and accompanying traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.27–3.58; p=0.005) were positively associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusion We found significant associations between short-term mortality after surgery for traumatic acute SDH and lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores, use of antithrombotics, history of diabetes mellitus, and accompanying traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage at admission. We expect these findings to be helpful for selecting patients for surgical treatment of traumatic acute SDH, and for making accurate prognoses. PMID:28264246

  5. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  6. Esthesioneuroblastoma: a case report of diffuse subdural recurrence and review of recently published studies.

    PubMed

    Capelle, L; Krawitz, H

    2008-02-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignancy arising from the olfactory epithelium. We present a case history of a 75-year-old man who presented with a Kadish stage C esthesioneuroblastoma and underwent craniofacial surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Two years later he was found to have diffuse subdural deposits with distant bone and nodal metastases, treated with further radiotherapy. The patient's condition subsequently deteriorated and he died. Given this unusual pattern of failure, we review the recent published studies regarding the natural history, treatment and outcome for this tumour.

  7. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine.

  8. Subdural hematoma occurred after spinal anesthesia in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Jun Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old male patient who was infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) underwent a condyloma excision under spinal anesthesia. The patient complained of suspicious postdural puncture headache. The patient did not respond to conservative management. Subsequently, the subdural hematoma (SDH) was found through magnetic resonance imaging. In response, an epidural blood patch was used to improve the symptoms and inhibit the enlargement of the SDH. The patient was discharged after it was confirmed that a headache had subsided without increasing SDH. Anesthesiologist should be aware of other causes of headaches after spinal anesthesia in HIV-infected patients and should carefully and accurately identify the cause. PMID:28217066

  9. Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Findings of Subdural Osteoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Hyun, Dong Keun; Park, Hyeonseon; Oh, Se Yang; Yoon, Seung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a subdural osteoma. A 29-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of headaches. Computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneous high-density lesion isolated from the inner table of the frontal bone (a lucent dural line) in the right frontal convexity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extra-axial lesion with a broad base without dural tail sign and punctate enhancement pattern characteristic of abundant adipose tissue. Upon surgical excision, we found a hard bony mass clearly demarcated from the dura. The mass displayed characteristics of an osteoma upon histological examination. The symptom was relieved after operation. PMID:27195262

  10. Bilateral Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Diabetes Insipidus-Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Saquib A; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Singh, Manmohanjit; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-02-01

    Calcified chronic subdural hematomas are an occurrence rarely seen in neurosurgical clinical practice. And when they occur bilaterally, the radiologic image they present is fascinating, as is the clinical presentation, but their management may be challenging. They have been reported to present with a multitude of neurologic deficits but never with diabetes insipidus, which is described here. Due to the rarity of this pathology, the management protocol is not well defined, though there have been quite a few papers on this condition. This review article gathers information published over the years on this rare entity to suggest a treatment protocol.

  11. Psychiatric manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma: the unfolding of mystery in a homeless patient.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Paramjeet; Upadhyay, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma is not limited to neurological deficits or cognitive impairment. It may present with behavioral abnormalities. When the behavioral abnormalities present without obvious neurological deficits and in the absence of trauma, it leads to misdiagnosis. A trivial trauma may cause intracranial bleed that is either missed or ignored in the clinical history. This case report highlights the clinical picture of a homeless patient who presented with withdrawn and disorganized behavior, apathy and poverty of speech in the absence of any neurological deficit. His clinical presentation led to a possibility of psychosis and he was started on antipsychotics. He had developed extrapyramidal side effects in low dose of antipsychotic without any clinical benefit in his clinical picture. Neuroimaging done to rule out any possible organicity-revealed bilateral subdural hematoma, which was later evacuated by neurosurgical intervention in multiple settings and the patient had improved. This case report unfolds the mystery behind the psychotic presentation in a homeless adult.

  12. Automatic and Precise Localization and Cortical Labeling of Subdural and Depth Intracranial Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chaoyi; Tan, Zheng; Pan, Yali; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Lin; Ren, Liankun; Zhou, Wenjing; Wang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Object: Subdural or deep intracerebral electrodes are essential in order to precisely localize epileptic zone in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Precise localization of the implanted electrodes is critical to clinical diagnosing and treatment as well as for scientific studies. In this study, we sought to automatically and precisely extract intracranial electrodes using pre-operative MRI and post-operative CT images. Method: The subdural and depth intracranial electrodes were readily detected using clustering-based segmentation. Depth electrodes were tracked by fitting a quadratic curve to account for potential bending during the neurosurgery. The identified electrodes can be manipulated using a graphic interface and labeled to cortical areas in individual native space based on anatomical parcellation and displayed in the volume and surface space. Results: The electrodes' localizations were validated with high precision. The electrode coordinates were normalized to a standard space. Moreover, the probabilistic value being to a specific area or a functional network was provided. Conclusions: We developed an integrative toolbox to reconstruct and label the intracranial electrodes implanted in the patients with medically intractable epilepsy. This toolbox provided a convenient way to allow inter-subject comparisons and relation of intracranial EEG findings to the larger body of neuroimaging literature. PMID:28261083

  13. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  14. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  15. Fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity for refractory chronic subdural hematoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Saiko; Amagasaki, Kenichi; Shono, Naoyuki; Nakaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeat burr hole irrigation and drainage has been effective in most cases of recurrent chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), however, refractory cases require further procedures or other interventions. Case Description: An 85-year-old male presented with left CSDH, which recurred five times. The hematoma was irrigated and drained through a left frontal burr hole during the first to third surgery and through a left parietal burr hole during the fourth and fifth surgery. The hematoma had no septation and was well-evacuated during each surgery. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing ischemic heart disease was stopped after the second surgery, the hematoma cavity was irrigated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid at the third surgery, and the direction of the drainage tube was changed to reduce the postoperative subdural air collection at the fourth surgery. However, none of these interventions was effective. He was successfully treated by fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity after the fifth surgery. Conclusion: This procedure may be effective for refractory CSDH in elderly patients. PMID:27999712

  16. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    PubMed

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70%. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated.

  17. Subdural hematoma in infants without accidental or nonaccidental injury: benign external hydrocephalus, a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2011-10-01

    Benign external hydrocephalus (BEH) is considered a self-limiting condition in infants. Subdural hematoma (SDH) in infants without a history of trauma indicates nonaccidental injury (NAI). The authors studied whether SDH can complicate BEH without apparent trauma. Out of 45 children younger than 3 years with nontraumatic SDH, 9 (7 boys) with mean age 6 months had BEH as risk factor. Symptoms included increasing head size (8), fussiness, and irritability (3). Three had up-gaze restriction, 1 axial hypotonia, and 6 normal examination. Neuroimaging showed prominent extra-axial spaces; SDH was bilateral (6), subacute (5). Other etiological workup for SDH was negative except NAI in 1. Two required evacuation of SDH and subdural-peritoneal shunt; others managed conservatively. Development was normal in 8 on follow-up. On follow-up imaging of 8, SDH completely resolved in 3, markedly reduced in 3, and remained stable in 2. BEH is a risk factor for SDH in infants, thus not always benign.

  18. A Motion Simulator Ride Associated With Headache and Subdural Hematoma: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Robert A; Evans, Randolph W; Baskin, David S

    2016-02-01

    We report the first case report of symptomatic bilateral subdural hematomas (SDH) associated with riding a centrifugal motion simulator ride. A previously healthy 55-year-old male developed new onset daily headaches 1 week after going on the ride that were due to symptomatic bilateral SDH requiring operative intervention with a full recovery. There was no history of other trauma or other systemic or intracranial abnormality to account for the development of the SDH. We review the headaches and other clinical features associated with chronic SDH. Twelve cases of roller coaster headaches due to SDH associated with riding roller coasters have been reported. The pathophysiology is reviewed, which we believe is the same mechanism that may be responsible in this case. Although it is possible that this neurovascular injury is truly rare, it is also possible that this injury is underreported as patients and physicians may not make the association or physicians have not reported additional cases. The risk of this injury likely increases with age, as the size of the subdural space increases, and may support the maxim that "roller coasters and simulators are for kids."

  19. Challenging the Pathophysiologic Connection between Subdural Hematoma, Retinal Hemorrhage and Shaken Baby Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gabaeff, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse experts use diagnostic findings of subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages as near-pathognomonic findings to diagnose shaken baby syndrome. This article reviews the origin of this link and casts serious doubt on the specificity of the pathophysiologic connection. The forces required to cause brain injury were derived from an experiment of high velocity impacts on monkeys, that generated forces far above those which might occur with a shaking mechanism. These forces, if present, would invariably cause neck trauma, which is conspicuously absent in most babies allegedly injured by shaking. Subdural hematoma may also be the result of common birth trauma, complicated by prenatal vitamin D deficiency, which also contributes to the appearance of long bone fractures commonly associated with child abuse. Retinal hemorrhage is a non-specific finding that occurs with many causes of increased intracranial pressure, including infection and hypoxic brain injury. The evidence challenging these connections should prompt emergency physicians and others who care for children to consider a broad differential diagnosis before settling on occult shaking as the de-facto cause. While childhood non-accidental trauma is certainly a serious problem, the wide exposure of this information may have the potential to exonerate some innocent care-givers who have been convicted, or may be accused, of child abuse. PMID:21691518

  20. Transient cortical blindness post angiography--a case report.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T R; Johnson, P; Webster, D; Gilbert, D T; Barton, E N

    2011-06-01

    A 56-year old female reported having had a fall two weeks prior to presentation. Computed Tomography (CT) scan showed an acute right-sided convexity subdural haematoma. A computed tomography angiogram revealed no vascular anomaly. One hour post procedure she had bilateral cortical blindness. Her vision subsequently was fully restored. A diagnosis of transient cortical blindness was made. Transient cortical blindness is a rare but recognized complication ofintra-arterial injection of iodinated contrast agents.

  1. Effects of parathyroid hormone 1-34 on osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human fracture haematoma-derived cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dogaki, Yoshihiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Koga, Takaaki; Okumachi, Etsuko; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) 1-34 has been shown to accelerate fracture healing. Previously, we reported that progenitor cells with osteogenic and chondrogenic potential exist in human fracture haematoma, suggesting that the fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells (HCs) contribute to fracture healing. However, there has been no study investigating the effect of PTH on HCs. We investigated the effect of pulsatile and continuous PTH treatment on human fracture HCs in vitro. HCs were isolated from seven patients. The HCs were divided into four groups: growth medium; control [osteogenic medium (OM) without PTH]; PTH-C (OM with continuous PTH); and PTH-P (OM with pulsatile PTH) groups. Osteogenic differentiation potential and proliferation of HCs were compared among the four groups. For chondrogenesis, the HCs were divided into two groups: control [chondrogenic medium (CM) without PTH]; and PTH-C (CM with continuous PTH) groups, and chondrogenic differentiation potential was analysed. PTH treatment did not affect cell proliferation, regardless of the mode of administration. Osteogenic activity was also not significantly affected by continuous PTH treatment but significantly inhibited by pulsatile PTH treatment. Conversely, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited by continuous PTH treatment. Our results revealed that PTH treatment on HCs, either continuous or pulsatile, does not exhibit any positive effect, and indicates that exogenous PTH administration after fracture has no effect on HCs. PTH may not have a positive effect at the fracture site during the early stage of fracture healing in which haematoma formation occurs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Long-term measurement of impedance in chronically implanted depth and subdural electrodes during responsive neurostimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl A; Rutecki, Paul; Cicora, Kathy; Worrell, Greg; Drazkowski, Joseph; Shih, Jerry J; Sharan, Ashwini D; Morrell, Martha J; Williams, Justin; Wingeier, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Long-term stability of the electrode-tissue interface may be required to maintain optimal neural recording with subdural and deep brain implants and to permit appropriate delivery of neuromodulation therapy. Although short-term changes in impedance at the electrode-tissue interface are known to occur, long-term changes in impedance have not previously been examined in detail in humans. To provide further information about short- and long-term impedance changes in chronically implanted electrodes, a dataset from 191 persons with medically intractable epilepsy participating in a trial of an investigational responsive neurostimulation device (the RNS(®) System, NeuroPace, Inc.) was reviewed. Monopolar impedance measurements were available for 391 depth and subdural leads containing a total of 1564 electrodes; measurements were available for median 802 days post-implant (range 28-1634). Although there were statistically significant short-term impedance changes, long-term impedance was stable after one year. Impedances for depth electrodes transiently increased during the third week after lead implantation and impedances for subdural electrodes increased over 12 weeks post-implant, then were stable over the subsequent long-term follow-up. Both depth and subdural electrode impedances demonstrated long-term stability, suggesting that the quality of long-term electrographic recordings (the data used to control responsive brain stimulation) can be maintained over time.

  3. Continuous decoding of human grasp kinematics using epidural and subdural signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Robert D.; Rosenow, Joshua M.; Tate, Matthew C.; Slutzky, Marc W.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Restoring or replacing function in paralyzed individuals will one day be achieved through the use of brain-machine interfaces. Regaining hand function is a major goal for paralyzed patients. Two competing prerequisites for the widespread adoption of any hand neuroprosthesis are accurate control over the fine details of movement, and minimized invasiveness. Here, we explore the interplay between these two goals by comparing our ability to decode hand movements with subdural and epidural field potentials (EFPs). Approach. We measured the accuracy of decoding continuous hand and finger kinematics during naturalistic grasping motions in five human subjects. We recorded subdural surface potentials (electrocorticography; ECoG) as well as with EFPs, with both standard- and high-resolution electrode arrays. Main results. In all five subjects, decoding of continuous kinematics significantly exceeded chance, using either EGoG or EFPs. ECoG decoding accuracy compared favorably with prior investigations of grasp kinematics (mean ± SD grasp aperture variance accounted for was 0.54 ± 0.05 across all subjects, 0.75 ± 0.09 for the best subject). In general, EFP decoding performed comparably to ECoG decoding. The 7-20 Hz and 70-115 Hz spectral bands contained the most information about grasp kinematics, with the 70-115 Hz band containing greater information about more subtle movements. Higher-resolution recording arrays provided clearly superior performance compared to standard-resolution arrays. Significance. To approach the fine motor control achieved by an intact brain-body system, it will be necessary to execute motor intent on a continuous basis with high accuracy. The current results demonstrate that this level of accuracy might be achievable not just with ECoG, but with EFPs as well. Epidural placement of electrodes is less invasive, and therefore may incur less risk of encephalitis or stroke than subdural placement of electrodes. Accurately decoding motor

  4. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Hassan, Samer; Thumallapally, Nishitha; Dai, Qun

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs) led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH). Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine. PMID:26543654

  5. Subdural and depth electrode placement in the brain for validation of MEG in partial epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Elisevich, Kost; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Bowyer, Susan

    2006-03-01

    Localization of epileptogenic zones in extratemporal epilepsy is a challenging problem. We speculate that using all modalities of data in an optimal way can facilitate the localization of these zones. In this paper, we propose the following steps to transfer all modalities of data in a single reference coordinate system: 1) Segmentation of subdural and depth electrodes, and cortical surface. 2) Building 3D models of the segmented objects. 3) Registration of preoperative MRI and postoperative CT, and magnetoencephalography (MEG). The above steps result in fusion of all modalities of data, objects of interests (electrodes and cortical surface), MEG analysis results and brain mapping findings. This approach offers a means by which an accurate appreciation of the zone of epileptogenicity may be established through optimal visualization and further quantitative analyses of the fused data. It also provides a ground for validation of less expensive and noninvasive procedures, e.g., scalp EEG, MEG.

  6. Migration of traumatic intracranial subdural hematoma to lumbar spine causing radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Charles H.; Yew, Andrew Y.; Lu, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been rare reports of intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH) that migrated into the spine. All previous cases have been surgically managed and in this case report, we describe the first case of conservatively managed spinal hematoma secondary to migratory intracranial SDH. Case Description: A 26-year-old male presented with a left tentorial SDH after blunt trauma. He was conservatively managed and discharged home. He presented 8 days later with worsening lower back pain that was found to be secondary to a spinal SDH. Conclusion: Spinal hematomas can be a serious sequelae of migrated intracranial hematomas. Tentorial and other caudally located intracranial hematomas may be more prone to this phenomenon. PMID:23869281

  7. Polymicrobial subdural empyema: involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by lytA PCR and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Greve, Thomas; Clemmensen, Dorte; Ridderberg, Winnie; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Møller, Jens K

    2011-03-01

    The authors report a case of a subdural empyema (SDE) caused by a coinfection with Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus pneumoniae, initially considered a S. intermedius infection only. An otherwise healthy 11-year-old female was admitted to the hospital after 5 days of illness. Symptoms were consistent with classical SDE symptoms and progressed rapidly with finally somnolence before the first neurosurgical procedure despite relevant antibiotic treatment. Primary MRI showed an interhemispheric SDE and a postoperative control CT scan showed progression of the empyema infratentorially. The empyema was evacuated twice, day 8 and 18, with good results. Primary samples showed growth of S. intermedius only. The severity of the clinical picture elicited supplementary samples, which were additionally positive for S. pneumoniae by an in-house specific lytA PCR and/or a commercial antigen test.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  9. A preliminary study of aquaporin 1 immunolocalization in chronic subdural hematoma membranes.

    PubMed

    Basaldella, Luca; Perin, Alessandro; Orvieto, Enrico; Marton, Elisabetta; Itskevich, David; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Longatti, Pierluigi

    2010-07-01

    Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) is a molecular water channel expressed in many anatomical locations, particularly in epithelial barriers specialized in water transport. The aim of this study was to investigate AQP1 expression in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) membranes. In this preliminary study, 11 patients with CSDH underwent burr hole craniectomy and drainage. Membrane specimens were stained with a monoclonal antibody targeting AQP1 for immunohistochemical analysis. The endothelial cells of the sinusoid capillaries of the outer membranes exhibited an elevated immunoreactivity to AQP1 antibody compared to the staining intensity of specimens from the inner membrane and normal dura. These findings suggest that the outer membrane might be the source of the increased fluid accumulation responsible for chronic hematoma enlargement.

  10. Mantle Cell Lymphoma with Central Nervous System Involvement Simulating Bilateral Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    González-Bonet, Luis Germán; García-Boyero, Raimundo; Gaona-Morales, John

    2017-03-01

    We describe a 71-year-old-patient receiving antiplatelet therapy and being attended by emergency medical services for psychomotor retardation and gait disturbance. An emergency computed tomographic scan showed a bilateral subacute hematoma. The patient reported a fall 2 weeks earlier. We performed bilateral drills and saw a solid mass that was biopsied. The patient had a history of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in complete remission (results of bone marrow biopsy and whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were normal 6 months earlier). We diagnosed an intracranial MCL by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We performed magnetic resonance imaging. The results of a new bone marrow biopsy were positive for recurrence of MCL. MCL constitutes approximately 5%-6% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement between MCLs is 4.1%. After a review of the literatures we found small series comprising 3-5 cases and a multicenter study with 57 cases. Until now, the median survival was 3.7 months. Ibrutinib, an oral Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated efficacy and CNS penetration in relapsed or refractory MCL with rapid and complete response even after 1 year of follow-up. Our patient received ibrutinib and had a complete response at 3 months, which was maintained to the present (6 months). After a review of the literature, we found different pathologies that can mimic subdural hematomas. However, this is the first report of a lymphoma with CNS involvement mimicking bilateral subdural hematomas. This report contributes to the knowledge of lymphomas with CNS involvement. Its strange radiographic appearance and histologic type make it unique.

  11. Chronic subdural hematoma: Surgical management and outcome in 986 cases: A classification and regression tree approach

    PubMed Central

    Rovlias, Aristedis; Theodoropoulos, Spyridon; Papoutsakis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities in daily neurosurgical practice which carries a most favorable prognosis. However, because of the advanced age and medical problems of patients, surgical therapy is frequently associated with various complications. This study evaluated the clinical features, radiological findings, and neurological outcome in a large series of patients with CSDH. Methods: A classification and regression tree (CART) technique was employed in the analysis of data from 986 patients who were operated at Asclepeion General Hospital of Athens from January 1986 to December 2011. Burr holes evacuation with closed system drainage has been the operative technique of first choice at our institution for 29 consecutive years. A total of 27 prognostic factors were examined to predict the outcome at 3-month postoperatively. Results: Our results indicated that neurological status on admission was the best predictor of outcome. With regard to the other data, age, brain atrophy, thickness and density of hematoma, subdural accumulation of air, and antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy were found to correlate significantly with prognosis. The overall cross-validated predictive accuracy of CART model was 85.34%, with a cross-validated relative error of 0.326. Conclusions: Methodologically, CART technique is quite different from the more commonly used methods, with the primary benefit of illustrating the important prognostic variables as related to outcome. Since, the ideal therapy for the treatment of CSDH is still under debate, this technique may prove useful in developing new therapeutic strategies and approaches for patients with CSDH. PMID:26257985

  12. Spatial memory in nonhuman primates implanted with the subdural pharmacotherapy device.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, Nandor; Tang, Hai M; Baptiste, Shirn L; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Kral, John G

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the possible influence of the Subdural Pharmacotherapy Device (SPD) on spatial memory in 3 adult, male bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). The device was implanted in and above the subdural/subarachnoid space and cranium overlaying the right parietal/frontal cortex: a circuitry involved in spatial memory processing. A large test chamber, equipped with four baited and four non-baited food-ports at different locations, was used: reaches into empty food ports were counted as spatial memory errors. In this study of within-subject design, before SPD implantation (control) the animals made mean 373.3 ± 114.9 (mean ± SEM) errors in the first spatial memory test session. This value dropped to 47.7 ± 18.4 by the 8th session. After SPD implantation and alternating cycles of transmeningeal saline delivery and local cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in the implanted cortex the spatial memory error count, with the same port locations, was 33.0 ± 12.2 during the first spatial memory test session, further decreasing to 5.7 ± 3.5 by the 8th post-implantation session (P<0.001 for trend). Replacing transmeningeal saline delivery with similar delivery of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (1.0mM) by the SPD did not affect the animals' spatial memory performance, which in fact included at least one completely error-free session per animal over time. The study showed that complication-free implantation and use of the SPD over the parietal and frontal cortices for months leave spatial memory processes intact in nonhuman primates.

  13. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures High-pitched cry, irritability Increased head size (circumference) Increased sleepiness or lethargy Persistent vomiting ... head injuries, so try to keep the person's neck still if you must move them before help ...

  14. Subdural effusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... KS. Bacterial meningitis beyond the neonatal period. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Twist-Drill or Burr Hole Craniostomy for Draining Chronic Subdural Hematomas: How to Choose It for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Im, Soo Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although twist-drill craniostomy (TDC) has a number of procedural advantages and an equivalent outcome compared to burr hole craniostomy (BHC) for the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), the latter technique remains the preferred method. We analyzed symptomatic CSDHs in whom TDC at the pre-coronal suture entry point (PCSEP) was the primary method for hematoma drainage and BHC on the parietal was the secondary option. Methods CSDHs in 86 consecutive patients were included. TDC at the PCSEP, which is 1 cm anterior to coronal suture at the level of the superior temporal line, was the primary operational technique when the hematoma thickness was suitable, and BHC was performed via the parietal when TDC was unreasonable or failed. The clinical feasibility and outcomes of these approaches were analyzed. Results Of the 86 patients, 68 (79.1%) were treated by TDC, and 18 (20.9%) by BHC. All patients showed improvements in their symptoms after hematoma drainage. Neither morbidity nor mortality was associated with either technique, and there were no differences in drainage days between the groups. Ten patients had bilateral hematomas and were treated using TDC. Two patients were not sufficiently treated by TDC and, as a result, BHC was applied. Only six hematomas (7% of 86 hematomas) exhibited insufficient thickness on the computed tomography to perform TDC. Conclusion When the hematoma was thick enough, a majority of the CSDHs were drained using TDC at the PCSEP as the first procedure, which was especially useful for bilateral hematomas and in elderly patients. PMID:27857917

  16. The osteogenic activity of human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived progenitor cells is affected by bisphosphonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Hasegawa, T; Takeda, D; Akashi, M; Komori, T

    2015-03-01

    It is known that bisphosphonates (BPs) suppress the activity of osteoclasts; however, it has not been reported whether BPs affect the potential of human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived cells (MHCs) for bone differentiation. In this study, we examined whether the degree of bone differentiation changes following the administration of BP in vitro. The effects of alendronate and risedronate (10(-8) to 10(-7)M (mol/l)) on cell proliferation were evaluated at 4 and 8 days, after which BP treatment was applied for 4, 8, 14, and 20 days prior to assessing the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and performing the mineralization assay. Alendronate 10(-8) and 10(-7)M and risedronate 10(-7)M decreased the degree of cell proliferation on day 8 (P<0.05). Using an ELISA, the ALP activity of the control, alendronate 10(-8)M, risedronate 10(-8)M, and risedronate 10(-7)M groups were 112.1±10.2%, 156.1±24.3%, 138.8±16.5%, and 133.3±10.3%, respectively, at 14 days after treatment (day 0 in each group was considered to be 100%). ALP activity was significantly higher in the alendronate 10(-8)M and risedronate 10(-8) and 10(-7)M groups than in the control group (P=0.010, 0.014, and 0.009, respectively). It is possible that BPs increase the potential of MHCs for osteogenic differentiation depending on the concentration of the drug.

  17. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  18. Role of subdural electrocorticography in prediction of long-term seizure outcome in epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    Since prediction of long-term seizure outcome using preoperative diagnostic modalities remains suboptimal in epilepsy surgery, we evaluated whether interictal spike frequency measures obtained from extraoperative subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording could predict long-term seizure outcome. This study included 61 young patients (age 0.4–23.0 years), who underwent extraoperative ECoG recording prior to cortical resection for alleviation of uncontrolled focal seizures. Patient age, frequency of preoperative seizures, neuroimaging findings, ictal and interictal ECoG measures were preoperatively obtained. The seizure outcome was prospectively measured [follow-up period: 2.5–6.4 years (mean 4.6 years)]. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses determined how well preoperative demographic and diagnostic measures predicted long-term seizure outcome. Following the initial cortical resection, Engel Class I, II, III and IV outcomes were noted in 35, 6, 12 and 7 patients, respectively. One child died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with pseudomonas sepsis 2 days after surgery. Univariate regression analyses revealed that incomplete removal of seizure onset zone, higher interictal spike-frequency in the preserved cortex and incomplete removal of cortical abnormalities on neuroimaging were associated with a greater risk of failing to obtain Class I outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that incomplete removal of seizure onset zone was the only independent predictor of failure to obtain Class I outcome. The goodness of regression model fit and the predictive ability of regression model were greatest in the full regression model incorporating both ictal and interictal measures [R2 0.44; Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve: 0.81], slightly smaller in the reduced model incorporating ictal but not interictal measures (R2 0.40; Area under the ROC curve: 0.79) and slightly smaller

  19. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of muscle rupture with haematoma: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zapata, Ma José; Orozco, Lluís; Balius, Ramon; Soler, Robert; Bosch, Alba; Rodas, Gil; Til, Lluís; Peirau, Xavier; Urrútia, Gerard; Gich, Ignasi; Bonfill, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background The goals of the treatment of muscle injuries are to shorten the time of healing and to avoid relapses. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the healing of muscle injuries. Materials and methods A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 71 patients (81.8% males) aged 45.6 (SD=10.0) years with muscle tears in the legs and haematoma. The haematoma was evacuated in all patients. Thirty-three patients were randomised to a single dose of autologous PRP and 38 patients to simulation of PRP administration. The primary end-point was time to complete recovery of muscle injury. Secondary end-points were pain, relapses, ultrasound parameters, and adverse events. The total follow-up per patient was 12 months. Results Time to complete recovery after the treatment was 31.63 days (SD=15.38) in the PRP group, and 38.43 days (SD=18.58) in the control group (p=0.261). Pain decreased over time in both groups without statistical differences between them. Eight patients relapsed (seven in the control group, and one in the PRP group). There were no adverse effects related to the interventions. Discussion Autologous PRP did not significantly improve the time to healing compared to that in the control group. PMID:26509827

  20. Intraoperative Arachnoid Plasty Has Possibility to Prevent Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Surgery for Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    YAGI, Kenji; IRIE, Shinsuke; INAGAKI, Toru; ISHII, Yosuke; SAITO, Osamu; LEE, Tejin; NAKAGAWA, Hiroshi; SAITO, Koji; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    Some patients develop chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) after the clipping/coating of unruptured aneurysms. The risk factors are not well understood and while no preventive methods are currently available, arachnoid plasty (ARP) may intercept the development of postoperative CSDH. We investigated the risk factors for CSDH and the usefulness of ARP to prevent postoperative CSDH. Between January 2009 and June 2013, 393 patients underwent 416 aneurysm surgeries via the pterional approach at Kushiro Kojinkai Memorial Hospital. Of these, 394 aneurysms (371 patients) were included in this study. Using multivariate analysis we evaluated the relationship between the patient demographics and clinical characteristics, and the development of postoperative symptomatic CSDH. We also studied the effect of ARP performed during aneurysm surgery. We found that symptomatic CSDH developed after 20 (5.1%) of the 394 operations; it was addressed by burr hole surgery and evacuation/irrigation. Male gender, advanced age, and oral anticoagulant therapy were significant risk factors for CSDH. Additive ARP, performed in the course of 132 surgeries (33.5%) was found to be a significant negative risk factor. The incidence of CSDH was significantly lower in patients who had undergone ARP than in patients who had not undergone it (0.8% vs. 7.3%, p < 0.01). We first report that ARP is useful for the prevention of CSDH in patients treated by aneurysm surgery. PMID:26041629

  1. iElectrodes: A Comprehensive Open-Source Toolbox for Depth and Subdural Grid Electrode Localization.

    PubMed

    Blenkmann, Alejandro O; Phillips, Holly N; Princich, Juan P; Rowe, James B; Bekinschtein, Tristan A; Muravchik, Carlos H; Kochen, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The localization of intracranial electrodes is a fundamental step in the analysis of invasive electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in research and clinical practice. The conclusions reached from the analysis of these recordings rely on the accuracy of electrode localization in relationship to brain anatomy. However, currently available techniques for localizing electrodes from magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computerized tomography (CT) images are time consuming and/or limited to particular electrode types or shapes. Here we present iElectrodes, an open-source toolbox that provides robust and accurate semi-automatic localization of both subdural grids and depth electrodes. Using pre- and post-implantation images, the method takes 2-3 min to localize the coordinates in each electrode array and automatically number the electrodes. The proposed pre-processing pipeline allows one to work in a normalized space and to automatically obtain anatomical labels of the localized electrodes without neuroimaging experts. We validated the method with data from 22 patients implanted with a total of 1,242 electrodes. We show that localization distances were within 0.56 mm of those achieved by experienced manual evaluators. iElectrodes provided additional advantages in terms of robustness (even with severe perioperative cerebral distortions), speed (less than half the operator time compared to expert manual localization), simplicity, utility across multiple electrode types (surface and depth electrodes) and all brain regions.

  2. Platinum microwire for subdural electrocorticography over human neocortex: millimeter-scale spatiotemporal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Spencer; Greger, Bradley; Hanrahan, Sara; House, Paul; Brown, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum microwires, terminated at regular intervals to form a grid of contacts, were used to record electric potentials at the surface of the cerebral cortex in human subjects. The microwire grids were manufactured commercially with 75 μm platinum wire and 1 mm grid spacing, and are FDA approved. Because of their small size and spacing, these grids could be used to explore the scale of spatiotemporal dynamics in cortical surface potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to characterize their recording properties and develop a frequency-dependent electrical model of the micro-electrodes. Data recorded from multiple sites in human cortex were analyzed to explore the relationship between linear correlation and separation distance. A model was developed to explore the impact of cerebrospinal fluid on signal spread among electrodes. Spatial variation in the per-electrode performance decoding articulated speech from face-motor and Wernicke's areas of cortex was explored to understand the scale of information processing at the cortex. We conclude that there are important dynamics at the millimeter scale in human subdural electrocorticography which may be important in maximizing the performance of neural prosthetic applications.

  3. iElectrodes: A Comprehensive Open-Source Toolbox for Depth and Subdural Grid Electrode Localization

    PubMed Central

    Blenkmann, Alejandro O.; Phillips, Holly N.; Princich, Juan P.; Rowe, James B.; Bekinschtein, Tristan A.; Muravchik, Carlos H.; Kochen, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The localization of intracranial electrodes is a fundamental step in the analysis of invasive electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in research and clinical practice. The conclusions reached from the analysis of these recordings rely on the accuracy of electrode localization in relationship to brain anatomy. However, currently available techniques for localizing electrodes from magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computerized tomography (CT) images are time consuming and/or limited to particular electrode types or shapes. Here we present iElectrodes, an open-source toolbox that provides robust and accurate semi-automatic localization of both subdural grids and depth electrodes. Using pre- and post-implantation images, the method takes 2–3 min to localize the coordinates in each electrode array and automatically number the electrodes. The proposed pre-processing pipeline allows one to work in a normalized space and to automatically obtain anatomical labels of the localized electrodes without neuroimaging experts. We validated the method with data from 22 patients implanted with a total of 1,242 electrodes. We show that localization distances were within 0.56 mm of those achieved by experienced manual evaluators. iElectrodes provided additional advantages in terms of robustness (even with severe perioperative cerebral distortions), speed (less than half the operator time compared to expert manual localization), simplicity, utility across multiple electrode types (surface and depth electrodes) and all brain regions. PMID:28303098

  4. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5) that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information. PMID:26057524

  5. A new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex during subdural empyema drainage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The trigemino-cardiac reflex is defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmia, sympathetic hypotension, apnea, or gastric hypermotility during stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Clinically, trigemino-cardiac reflex has been reported to occur during neurosurgical skull-base surgery. Apart from the few clinical reports, the physiological function of this brainstem reflex has not yet been fully explored. Little is known regarding any predisposing factors related to the intraoperative occurrence of this reflex. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man who demonstrated a clearly expressed form of trigemino-cardiac reflex with severe bradycardia requiring intervention that was recorded during surgical removal of a large subdural empyema. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intracranial infection leading to perioperative trigemino-cardiac reflex. We therefore add a new predisposing factor for trigemino-cardiac reflex to the existing literature. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of the relevant literature. PMID:21118536

  6. Power and signal transmission protocol for a contactless subdural spinal cord stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Song, Suk-Heung; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A; Kuhnley, Brian; Utz, Marcel

    2013-02-01

    Wireless signal transmission will play a critical role in developing reliable subdural spinal cord stimulation systems. We have developed an approach to inductively coupling signals across the epidural spacing between the pial and epidural surfaces. The major design constraints include tolerance of coil misalignments from spinal cord geometries in addition to reasonable power efficiencies within the expected range of movement. The design of the primary side as a driving circuit is simplified by several turns of commercial magnetic wire, whereas the implanted secondary side is implemented in a micro-planar spiral coil tuned to a resonant frequency of 1.6 MHz. We present the results of wireless inductive coupling experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between primary and secondary coil antennae scaled to 10 mm. Power delivery is in the range of 400 mW at a link efficiency of 32 % for strong coupling (coil separations of 0.5 mm ) and in the range of 70 mW at 4 % efficiency for weak coupling (coil separations of 10 mm).

  7. Giant acute epidural hematoma after ventriculoperitoneal shunt: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Noleto, Gustavo; Neville, Iuri Santana; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; Saad, Felippe; Pinto, Fernando Campos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid over-drainage is a common complication of ventriculoperitoneal devices. In terms of haemorrhage, subdural haematomas are usually more frequent lesions than epidural hematomas, which, more rarely, may also be seen after ventricular shunt procedures and may lead to rapid neurological decline and even death unless a surgical procedure can be promptly performed. This study reports the case of a 47 years-old Dandy Walker man, with clinical condition compatible with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus submitted to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a high fixed pressure valve. After discharge, on the second day after the procedure, he presented with headache and impaired level of consciousness. At hospital admission he was in a coma and anisochoric. Underwent endotracheal intubation and a head CT, showed epidural hematoma. We performed emergency craniotomy to drain the hematoma, the patient died in the operating room despite resuscitation attempts. In conclusion, prompt diagnosis and emergency craniotomy is recommended in these cases. We must be aware of this possible evolution and maintain high suspicion besides a longer in-hospital observation after these procedures.

  8. A Rare Case of Primary Tuberculous Tenosynovitis in a Young Patient with an Acute History.

    PubMed

    Reed, Alistair J M; Rodrigues, Jeremy N; Al-Ghazal, Sharif; Shariff, Zakir

    2017-03-01

    We present a rare case of primary tuberculous tenosynovitis in a young patient with an acute history of non-penetrating traumatic injury. The patient had recently visited Pakistan and presented with sudden onset pain at the base of their right fifth digit after trying to catch a cricket ball. A provisional diagnosis of haematoma was made; however, ultrasonography revealed a mass attached to the A2 pulley. Surgical excision followed by histological examination and culture identified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection. This case serves to raise clinical awareness of this rare condition and highlight the importance of obtaining a travel history.

  9. Critical shunt-induced subdural hematoma treated with combined pressure-programmable valve implantation and endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, T; Vorster, S J; Luciano, M G

    2000-07-01

    The authors present 2 patients with VP shunt-induced subdural hematomas (SDH) treated with pressure-programmable valve implantation and endoscopic third ventriculostomies (TV). The first patient is an 11-year-old girl who developed a shunt-induced SDH. Revision of the shunt valve with a higher-pressure valve resulted in a prolonged deterioration of her consciousness. External ventricular drainage at low pressure led to clinical improvement. A pressure-programmable valve set at 50 mm H(2)O was implanted, and the pressure gradually increased. At a pressure of 120 mm H(2)O symptoms recurred, even though the subdural collection was beginning to decrease in size. An endoscopic TV was performed, and the valve pressure was then increased to 200 mm H(2)O without any neurological symptoms. The second patient, a 7-year-old boy with shunt-induced SDH, had recurrent SDH, even after shunt revision with placement of a higher-pressure valve, which resulted in prolonged lethargy. A pressure-programmable valve was implanted with concurrent endoscopic TV. Gradual valve pressure increases up to 200 mm H(2)O could be performed without recurrent symptoms. Eventually, the shunt system was ligated to resolve residual positional headache, and the TV has been patent for more than 3 years. In both patients, the pressure-programmable valve was useful, since the optimal CSF drainage pressure changed during the period of recovery from symptomatic subdural collections. Concurrent TV appeared to enable increasing the valve pressure gradually without any neurological symptoms. The advantages of this combined approach are discussed.

  10. Micro-field evoked potentials recorded from the porcine sub-dural cortical surface utilizing a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Hansford, Derek J; Fortin, Linda D; Obrietan, Karl H; Bergdall, Valerie K; Beversdorf, David Q

    2007-05-15

    A sub-dural surface microelectrode array designed to detect micro-field evoked potentials has been developed. The device is comprised of an array of 350-microm square gold contacts, with bidirectional spacing of 150 microm, contained within a polyimide Kapton material. Cytotoxicity testing suggests that the device is suitable for use with animal and human patients. Implementation of the device in animal studies revealed that reliable evoked potentials could be acquired. Further work will be needed to determine how these micro-field potentials, which demonstrate selectivity for one eye, relate to the distribution of the ocular dominance columns of the occipital cortex.

  11. Automated detection of extradural and subdural hematoma for contrast-enhanced CT images in emergency medical care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matoba, Naoto; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yokoi, Shinya; Aizawa, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Keiji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    We have been developing the CAD scheme for head and abdominal injuries for emergency medical care. In this work, we have developed an automated method to detect typical head injuries, rupture or strokes of brain. Extradural and subdural hematoma region were detected by comparing technique after the brain areas were registered using warping. We employ 5 normal and 15 stroke cases to estimate the performance after creating the brain model with 50 normal cases. Some of the hematoma regions were detected correctly in all of the stroke cases with no false positive findings on normal cases.

  12. Clinical Course and Results of Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematomas in Patients on Drugs Affecting Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Tomasz Andrzej; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective An apparent increase of use of drugs affecting hemostasis in our neurosurgical department since the 1990s has encouraged us to investigate whether these drugs influence the clinical course and results of surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods This retrospective analysis included 178 patients admitted for CSDH from 2007 to 2011 who were divided into two groups: on drugs affecting hemostasis (40; 22%) and no bleeding disorders (138; 78%). Medications in the first group included oral anticoagulants (33; 82.5%), antiplatelets (5; 12.5%) and low molecular weight heparins (2; 5%). Results The patients on drugs affecting hemostasis were older (74.3±7.4 vs. 68.4±14.8; p-value 0.01) and the group without bleeding disorders had more head trauma history (61% vs. 38%, p-value 0.01). The groups did not differ in bilateral hematoma rates (25% vs. 20%, p-value=NS). At diagnosis, mean hematoma thickness was lower in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (18.7±7.4 mm vs. 21.9±7.9 mm, p-value<0.01). Average stay of hospital was 1 day longer in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (11.7±4.1 vs.10.9±5.3, p-value=NS) and was related to the necessity of bleeding disorder reversal. Mean neurological status at presentation was similar between the groups (p-value=NS) as was the likelihood of hematoma recurrence (p-value=NS). Glasgow Outcome Scale results were comparable. Conclusion Patients on drugs affecting hemostasis are less often aware of a head trauma history, possibly suggesting a higher CSDH risk after minor trauma in this group. In these patients, smaller hematomas are symptomatic, probably due to faster hematoma formation. Drugs affecting hemostasis do not affect treatment results. PMID:28264245

  13. Spontaneous Resolution of Chronic Subdural Hematoma : Close Observation as a Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Chan; Yoo, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is common condition in neurosurgical field. It is difficult to select the treatment modality between the surgical method and the conservative method when patients have no or mild symptoms. The purpose of this study is to provide a suggestion that the patients could be cured with conservative treatment modality. Methods We enrolled 16 patients who had received conservative treatment for cSDH without special medications which could affect hematoma resolution such as mannitol, steroids, tranexamic acid and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The patients were classified according to the Markwalder's Grading Scale. Results Among these 16 patients, 13 (81.3%) patients showed spontaneously resolved cSDH and 3 (18.7%) patients received surgery due to symptom aggravation and growing hematoma. They were categorized into two groups based on whether they were cured with conservative treatment or not. The first group was the spontaneous resolution group. The second group was the progression-surgery group. The mean hematoma volume in the spontaneous resolution group was 43.1 mL. The mean degree of midline shift in the spontaneous resolution group was 5.3 mm. The mean hematoma volume in the progression-surgery group was 62.0 mL. The mean degree of midline shift in the second group was 6 mm. Conclusion We suggest that the treatment modality should be determined according to the patient's symptoms and clinical condition and close observation could be performed in patients who do not have any symptoms or in patients who have mild to moderate headache without neurological deterioration. PMID:27847578

  14. Factors predicting contralateral hematoma growth after unilateral drainage of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Shigeta; Ishikawa, Osamu; Miura, Keisuke; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Goto, Haruo; Maeda, Keiichiro

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a recurrence rate of 9.2%-26.5% after bur hole surgery. Occasionally patients with bilateral CSDH undergo unilateral surgery because the contralateral hematoma is deemed to be asymptomatic, and in some of these patients the contralateral hematoma may subsequently enlarge, requiring additional surgery. The authors investigated the factors related to the growth of these hematomas. METHODS Ninety-three patients with bilateral CSDH who underwent unilateral bur hole surgery at Aizu Chuo Hospital were included in a retrospective analysis. Findings on preoperative MRI, preoperative thickness of the drained hematoma, and the influence of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs were considered and evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS The overall growth rate was 19% (18 of 93 hematomas), and a significantly greater percentage of the hematomas that were iso- or hypointense on preoperative T1-weighted imaging showed growth compared with other hematomas (35.4% vs 2.3%, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that findings on preoperative T1-weighted MRI were the sole significant predictor of hematoma growth, and other factors such as antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug use, patient age, patient sex, thickness of the treated hematoma, and T2-weighted MRI findings were not significantly related to hematoma growth. The adjusted odds ratio for hematoma growth in the T1 isointense/hypointense group relative to the T1 hyperintense group was 25.12 (95% CI 3.89-51.58, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS The findings of preoperative MRI, namely T1-weighted sequences, may be useful in predicting the growth of hematomas that did not undergo bur hole surgery in patients with bilateral CSDH.

  15. Burr hole washout versus craniotomy for chronic subdural hematoma: patient outcome and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Worley, Emmagene; Shelburne, Christopher; Pullarkat, Ranjit; Watson, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH), which are frequently encountered in neurosurgical practice, are, in the majority of cases, ideally treated with surgical drainage. Despite this common practice, there is still controversy surrounding the best surgical procedure. With lack of clear evidence of a superior technique, surgeons are free to base the decision on other factors that are not related to patient care. A retrospective chart review of 119 patients requiring surgical drainage of CSDH was conducted at a large tertiary care center over a three-year period. Of the cases reviewed, 58 patients underwent craniotomy, while 61 patients underwent burr hole washout. The study focused on re-operation rates, mortality, and morbidity, as measured by Glasgow coma scores (GCS), discharge Rankin disability scores, and discharge disposition. Secondary endpoints included length of stay and cost of procedure. Burr hole washout was superior to craniotomy with respect to patient outcome, length of stay and recurrence rates. In both study groups, patients required additional surgical procedures (6.6% of burr hole patients and 24.1% of craniotomy patients) (P = 0.0156). Of the patients treated with craniotomy, 51.7% were discharged home, whereas 65.6% of the burr hole patients were discharged home. Patients who underwent burr hole washout spent a mean of 78.8 minutes in the operating suite while the patients undergoing craniotomy spent 129.4 minutes (P < 0.001). The difference in mean cost per patient, based solely on operating time, was $2,828 (P < 0.001). This does not include the further cost due to additional procedures and hospital stay. The mean length of stay after surgical intervention was 3 days longer for the craniotomy group (P = 0.0465). Based on this retrospective study, burr hole washout is superior for both patients' clinical and financial outcome; however, prospective long-term multicenter clinical studies are required to verify these findings.

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of Clarema 1% Cream and Hirudoid 40000 U.APTT Gel in the Topical Treatment of Haematomas and/or Subcutaneous Haematic Extravasations

    PubMed Central

    Polieri, Tiziana; Orsoni, Enrico; Saponati, Giorgio; Castellacci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Ninety-six caucasian both-gender patients with haematomas and/or subcutaneous haematic extravasation of traumatic or surgical origin were randomized to receive local treatment (max 10 days) with heparan sulfate cream or glycosaminoglycan-polysulphate (GAGPS) gel. Signs (oedema, disability, and colour of the lesion) and symptoms (pain at rest and at movement) (scored 0–3), the sum of the scores (primary end point), and the size of the lesion were evaluated at the baseline visit and afterwards every 5 days. The rate of the patients completely healed at the end of the study was also recorded. The results of the study showed that heparan sulfate 1% cream was comparable or superior to GAGPS gel in relieving signs and symptoms. No AEs were recorded. PMID:24977079

  17. Efficacy and Tolerability of Clarema 1% Cream and Hirudoid 40000 U.APTT Gel in the Topical Treatment of Haematomas and/or Subcutaneous Haematic Extravasations.

    PubMed

    Polieri, Tiziana; Orsoni, Enrico; Saponati, Giorgio; Castellacci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Ninety-six caucasian both-gender patients with haematomas and/or subcutaneous haematic extravasation of traumatic or surgical origin were randomized to receive local treatment (max 10 days) with heparan sulfate cream or glycosaminoglycan-polysulphate (GAGPS) gel. Signs (oedema, disability, and colour of the lesion) and symptoms (pain at rest and at movement) (scored 0-3), the sum of the scores (primary end point), and the size of the lesion were evaluated at the baseline visit and afterwards every 5 days. The rate of the patients completely healed at the end of the study was also recorded. The results of the study showed that heparan sulfate 1% cream was comparable or superior to GAGPS gel in relieving signs and symptoms. No AEs were recorded.

  18. Treatment of chronic subdural hematomas with subdural evacuating port system placement in the intensive care unit: evolution of practice and comparison with bur hole evacuation in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Flint, Alexander C; Chan, Sheila L; Rao, Vivek A; Efron, Allen D; Kalani, Maziyar A; Sheridan, William F

    2017-01-20

    OBJECTIVE The aims of this study were to evaluate a multiyear experience with subdural evacuating port system (SEPS) placement for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) in the intensive care unit at a tertiary neurosurgical center and to compare SEPS placement with bur hole evacuation in the operating room. METHODS All cases of cSDH evacuation were captured over a 7-year period at a tertiary neurosurgical center within an integrated health care delivery system. The authors compared the performance characteristics of SEPS and bur hole placement with respect to recurrence rates, change in recurrence rates over time, complications, length of stay, discharge disposition, and mortality rates. RESULTS A total of 371 SEPS cases and 659 bur hole cases were performed (n = 1030). The use of bedside SEPS placement for cSDH treatment increased over the 7-year period, from 14% to 80% of cases. Reoperation within 6 months was higher for the SEPS (15.6%) than for bur hole drainage (9.1%) across the full 7-year period (p = 0.002). This observed overall difference was due to a higher rate of reoperation during the same hospitalization (7.0% for SEPS vs 3.2% for bur hole; p = 0.008). Over time, as the SEPS procedure became more common and modifications of the SEPS technique were introduced, the rate of in-hospital reoperation after SEPS decreased to 3.3% (p = 0.02 for trend), and the difference between SEPS and bur hole recurrence was no longer significant (p = 0.70). Complications were uncommon and were similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Overall performance characteristics of bedside SEPS and bur hole drainage in the operating room were similar. Modifications to the SEPS technique over time were associated with a reduced reoperation rate.

  19. Idiopathic bilateral chronic subdural hematoma with left internal carotid artery infarct in a 3 months infant: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mahesh; Yadav, Krishan; Verma, Saurabh Kumar; Maheshwari, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) in infants is extremely rare. A very limited number of cases are known and reported in literature. The clinical presentation can be myriad varying from asymptomatic cases to gross neurological deficits. We report a case of a 3-month-old child who presented to us with repeated episodes of focal seizures of the left upper and lower limb of 1 month duration. Subsequent imaging revealed bilateral CSH (right > left) with left internal carotid artery infarct and midline shift to left by 8 mm. The child improved following burr hole evacuation of the right-sided CSH. The management of such case and a brief review of literature are discussed. PMID:28217168

  20. Extended Pneumocephalus after Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Hypotension : Case Report with Pathophysiologic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Sup; Ko, Hak Cheol; Koh, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) is a well-known disease entity and is traditionally managed with surgery. However, when associated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), the treatment strategy ought to be modified, as classical treatment could lead to unwanted consequences. A 59-year-old man presented with a case of SIH that manifested as a bilateral chronic SDH. He developed fatal extensive pneumocephalus and SDH re-accumulation as a complication of burr-hole drainage. Despite application of an epidural blood patch, the spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak continued, which required open spinal surgery. Chronic SDH management should not be overlooked, especially if the exact cause has not been determined. When chronic SDH assumed to be associated with SIH, the neurosurgeon should determine the exact cause of SIH in order to effectively correct the cause. PMID:26885290

  1. Evidence of basal temporo-occipital cortex involvement in stereoscopic vision in humans: a study with subdural electrode recordings.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Relova, José Luis; Prieto, Angel; Peleteiro, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Stereoscopic vision is based on small differences in both retinal images known as retinal disparities. We investigated the cortical responses to retinal disparities in a patient suffering from occipital epilepsy by recording evoked potentials to random dot stereograms (RDS) from subdural electrodes placed in the parieto-occipito-temporal junction, medial surface of the occipital lobe (pericalcarine cortex) and basal surface of the occipital and temporal lobes (fusiform gyrus). Clear responses to disparity present in RDS were found in the fusiform cortex. We observed that the fusiform responses discriminate the onset from the offset of the stimulus, correlation from uncorrelation, and they show a longer latency than responses found in the pericalcarine cortex. Our findings indicate that the fusiform area is involved in the processing of the stereoscopic information and shows responses that suggest a high level of stereoscopic processing.

  2. Subdural hematoma decompression model: A model of traumatic brain injury with ischemic-reperfusional pathophysiology: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shoji; Nakae, Ryuta; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Spurlock, Markus S; Mondello, Stefania; Gajavelli, Shyam; Bullock, Ross M

    2016-05-25

    The prognosis for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with subdural hematoma (SDH) remains poor. In accordance with an increasing elderly population, the incidence of geriatric TBI with SDH is rising. An important contributor to the neurological injury associated with SDH is the ischemic damage which is caused by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) producing impaired cerebral perfusion. To control intracranial hypertension, the current management consists of hematoma evacuation with or without decompressive craniotomy. This removal of the SDH results in the immediate reversal of global ischemia accompanied by an abrupt reduction of mass lesion and an ensuing reperfusion injury. Experimental models can play a critical role in improving our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and in exploring potential treatments for patients with SDH. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical background of SDH.

  3. The osteogenic activity of human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived cells is stimulated by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Hasegawa, T; Takeda, D; Akashi, M; Lee, S Y; Niikura, T; Shibuya, Y; Kurosaka, M; Komori, T

    2014-03-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation is a clinically established treatment method used to accelerate long bone fracture healing; however, this method is currently not applied to mandibular fractures. In this study, we investigated the effects of LIPUS on human mandibular fracture haematoma-derived cells (MHCs) in order to explore the possibility of applying LIPUS treatment to mandibular fractures. MHCs were isolated from five patients. The cells were divided into two groups: (1) LIPUS (+) group: MHCs cultured in osteogenic medium with LIPUS treatment; and (2) LIPUS (-) group: MHCs cultured in osteogenic medium without LIPUS treatment. The osteogenic differentiation potential and proliferation of the MHCs were compared between the two groups. The waveform used was equal to the wave conditions of a clinical fracture healing system. The gene expression levels of ALP, OC, Runx2, OSX, OPN, and PTH-R1 and mineralization were increased in the LIPUS (+) group compared to the LIPUS (-) group. There were no significant differences in cell proliferation between the two groups. These findings demonstrate the significant effects of LIPUS on the osteogenic differentiation of MHCs. This study provides significant evidence for the potential usefulness of the clinical application of LIPUS to accelerate mandibular fracture healing.

  4. Subacute subdural hematoma in a 45-year-old woman with no significant past medical history after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kim A; Kouloumberis, Pelagia; Engelhard, Herbert H

    2009-05-01

    Amusement park ride injuries have been newsworthy events for many years. The multitude and severity of these injuries has been reported many times over the past 20 years and includes spinal cord and vertebral injuries, subarachnoid hemorrhage, internal and vertebral artery dissections, and even a few cases of subdural hematoma (SDH). There has also been as many theories to explain these injuries as there have been injuries themselves including how G forces and rotational acceleration can cause both neuroparenchymal and neurovascular injury.

  5. The management and outcome for patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Paul M; Kolias, Angelos G; Joannides, Alexis J; Shapey, Jonathan; Marcus, Hani J; Gregson, Barbara A; Grover, Patrick J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Coulter, Ian C

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) will become an increasingly common presentation in neurosurgical practice as the population ages, but quality evidence is still lacking to guide the optimal management for these patients. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) was established by neurosurgical trainees in 2012 to improve research by combining the efforts of trainees in each of the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland's neurosurgical units (NSUs). The authors present the first study by the BNTRC that describes current management and outcomes for patients with CSDH throughout the UK and Ireland. This provides a resource both for current clinical practice and future clinical research on CSDH. METHODS Data on management and outcomes for patients with CSDH referred to UK and Ireland NSUs were collected prospectively over an 8-month period and audited against criteria predefined from the literature: NSU mortality < 5%, NSU morbidity < 10%, symptomatic recurrence within 60 days requiring repeat surgery < 20%, and unfavorable functional status (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6) at NSU discharge < 30%. RESULTS Data from 1205 patients in 26 NSUs were collected. Bur-hole craniostomy was the most common procedure (89%), and symptomatic recurrence requiring repeat surgery within 60 days was observed in 9% of patients. Criteria on mortality (2%), rate of recurrence (9%), and unfavorable functional outcome (22%) were met, but morbidity was greater than expected (14%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that failure to insert a drain intraoperatively independently predicted recurrence and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.011 and p = 0.048, respectively). Increasing patient age (p < 0.00001), postoperative bed rest (p = 0.019), and use of a single bur hole (p = 0.020) independently predicted unfavorable functional outcomes, but prescription of high-flow oxygen or preoperative use of antiplatelet medications did not. CONCLUSIONS This

  6. The management and outcome for patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Paul M; Kolias, Angelos G; Joannides, Alexis J; Shapey, Jonathan; Marcus, Hani J; Gregson, Barbara A; Grover, Patrick J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Coulter, Ian C

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) will become an increasingly common presentation in neurosurgical practice as the population ages, but quality evidence is still lacking to guide the optimal management for these patients. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) was established by neurosurgical trainees in 2012 to improve research by combining the efforts of trainees in each of the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland's neurosurgical units (NSUs). The authors present the first study by the BNTRC that describes current management and outcomes for patients with CSDH throughout the UK and Ireland. This provides a resource both for current clinical practice and future clinical research on CSDH. METHODS Data on management and outcomes for patients with CSDH referred to UK and Ireland NSUs were collected prospectively over an 8-month period and audited against criteria predefined from the literature: NSU mortality < 5%, NSU morbidity < 10%, symptomatic recurrence within 60 days requiring repeat surgery < 20%, and unfavorable functional status (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6) at NSU discharge < 30%. RESULTS Data from 1205 patients in 26 NSUs were collected. Bur-hole craniostomy was the most common procedure (89%), and symptomatic recurrence requiring repeat surgery within 60 days was observed in 9% of patients. Criteria on mortality (2%), rate of recurrence (9%), and unfavorable functional outcome (22%) were met, but morbidity was greater than expected (14%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that failure to insert a drain intraoperatively independently predicted recurrence and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.011 and p = 0.048, respectively). Increasing patient age (p < 0.00001), postoperative bed rest (p = 0.019), and use of a single bur hole (p = 0.020) independently predicted unfavorable functional outcomes, but prescription of high-flow oxygen or preoperative use of antiplatelet medications did not. CONCLUSIONS This

  7. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  8. Temporal and spatial distribution of activated caspase-3 after subdural kainic acid infusions in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Stephanie A; Springer, Joe E

    2003-09-29

    The molecular events initiating apoptosis following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) remain poorly understood. Soon after injury, the spinal cord is exposed to numerous secondary insults, including elevated levels of glutamate, that contribute to cell dysfunction and death. In the present study, we attempted to mimic the actions of glutamate by subdural infusion of the selective glutamate receptor agonist, kainic acid, into the uninjured rat spinal cord. Immunohistochemical colocalization studies revealed that activated caspase-3 was present in ventral horn motor neurons at 24 hours, but not 4 hours or 96 hours, following kainic acid treatment. However, at no time point examined was there evidence of significant neuronal loss. Kainic acid resulted in caspase-3 activation in several glial cell populations at all time points examined, with the most pronounced effect occurring at 24 hours following infusion. In particular, caspase-3 activation was observed in a significant number of oligodendroglia in the dorsal and ventral funiculi, and there was a pronounced loss of oligodendroglia at 96 hours following treatment. The results of these experiments indicate a role for glutamate as a mediator of oligodendroglial apoptosis in traumatic SCI. In addition, understanding the apoptotic signaling events activated by glutamate will be important for developing therapies targeting this cell death process.

  9. Effectiveness of Cortical Atrophy Scale and Indirect Indices of Brain Atrophy to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eun-Oh; Lim, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether baseline cerebral atrophy can predict the rate of future chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head trauma and compare indirect markers of brain atrophy with volumetric analysis of computed tomography (CT). Methods Single institution case-control study involving 1,476 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 2009 to December 2014. Forty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified and age, gender matched 41 patients were selected as control group. Both volumetric analyze on CT and Evans index, frontal horn index, bicaudate ratio, sylvian fissure ratio and cortical atrophy scale of 82 patients were estimated by different raters and relationship of those factors with CSDH was analyzed. Results Every indirect indices except cortical atrophy scale were not enough to give a good estimate of CSDH. Brain atrophy and cortical atrophy scale were predisposing factors of CSDH on multivariate analysis with statistical significance. Conclusion Brain atrophy was a potential prognostic factor of CSDH after trauma. In practice, patients with a value of cortical atrophy scale over moderate grade needed more attention for CSDH. PMID:27857918

  10. Blunt prenatal trauma resulting in fetal epidural or subdural hematoma: case report and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Garton, Hugh J L

    2017-01-01

    Blunt prenatal trauma is known to have consequences to the developing brain, and can result in subdural hematoma (SDH) or epidural hematoma (EDH). The authors present a case of blunt prenatal trauma resulting in a fetal SDH, intraparenchymal hematoma, and intraventricular hemorrhage, and perform a systematic review of the literature. This systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Relevant studies (up to April 2016) that reported on cases of fetal SDH or EDH after blunt prenatal trauma were identified from the PubMed database. The primary outcome was fetal mortality, and the secondary outcome was neurological outcome. Fourteen studies were included in the analysis, comprising a total of 14 patients including the present case. The average gestational age at discovery of hemorrhage was 30.1 weeks. Nine mothers were in a motor vehicle collision and 3 were assaulted; the mechanism of injury for 2 mothers was not defined. Twelve patients had SDH, 1 had EDH, and 1 had conflicting reports. Three patients had intrauterine fetal demise, and 3 died in the neonatal period after birth. Three patients had persistent neurological deficit, and 5 were neurologically intact. Fetal SDH or EDH after blunt trauma to the mother trauma is rare and is associated with mortality. However, a significant number of patients can have good neurological outcomes.

  11. Epidemiological characteristics of 778 patients who underwent surgical drainage of chronic subdural hematomas in Brasília, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) are common in neurosurgical practice. There are no publications that report large series of the epidemiological characteristics of this pathology in Brazil. The purpose is to describe a large series of surgical cases and analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients with CSDH admitted into Neurosurgical Services at the Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasília, Brazil from 2006 to 2011. Age, sex, clinical feature, etiology, surgical procedure, side, clinical outcome, and recurrence were reviewed. Statistical tests were used to analyze data, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The series included 778 patients. There were 643 (82.6%) male patients with a mean age of 64.3 ± 15.9 (range, 14–93) years. The principal symptom was headache (58.9%). The most frequent origin was a fall (282 cases, 36.2%), but the origin remained unclear in 281 (36.1%) patients. Mild head injury occurred in 540 (69.4%) cases. Burr holes with drainage were used as the surgical procedure in 96.5% patients, and 687 (88.3%) patients had a positive outcome. Mortality was 0%. Recurrence was observed in 42 cases. Conclusions The occurrence of CSDHs is more common in elderly men. Treatment with burr holes and drainage is a simple and safe method for treatment. In our experience, CSDH presents decreased morbidity and mortality. PMID:23452673

  12. The Efficacy of Titanium Burr Hole Cover for Reconstruction of Skull Defect after Burr Hole Trephination of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Im, Tae-Seop; Suh, Sang-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Ryu, Kee-Young; Kang, Dong-Gee

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although burr hole trephination is a safe and effective surgical option to treat patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), it often results in a small but undesirable scalp depression from burr hole defect. This study is to evaluate the efficacy of titanium burr hole cover (BHC) for reconstruction of skull defects in these patients. Methods A hundred and ninety-six cases of burr hole trephinations for CSDHs between January 2009 and December 2013 were assigned into two groups; Gelfoam packing only (GPO) and reconstruction using titanium BHC group, according to the modalities of burr hole reconstructions. The incidences and depths of scalp depressions and incidences of postoperative complications such as infections or instrument failures were analyzed in both groups. We also conducted telephone surveys to evaluate the cosmetic and functional outcomes from patient's aspect. Results Significantly lower incidence (p<0.0001) and smaller mean depth (p<0.0001) of scalp depressions were observed in BHC than GPO group. No statistical differences were seen in postoperative infection rates (p=0.498) between the two groups. There were no instrument failures in BHC group. According to the telephone surveys, 73.9% of respondents with scalp depressions had cosmetic inferiority complexes and 62.3% experienced functional handicaps during activities of daily life. Conclusion Titanium BHC is highly effective for reconstruction of skull defect after burr hole trephination of CSDH, and provides excellent cosmetic and functional outcomes without significant complications. PMID:27169038

  13. First long term in vivo study on subdurally implanted micro-ECoG electrodes, manufactured with a novel laser technology.

    PubMed

    Henle, C; Raab, M; Cordeiro, J G; Doostkam, S; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Stieglitz, T; Rickert, J

    2011-02-01

    A novel computer aided manufacturing (CAM) method for electrocorticography (ECoG) microelectrodes was developed to be able to manufacture small, high density microelectrode arrays based on laser-structuring medical grade silicone rubber and high purity platinum. With this manufacturing process, we plan to target clinical applications, such as presurgical epilepsy monitoring, functional imaging during cerebral tumor resections and brain-computer interface control in paralysed patients, in the near future. This paper describes the manufacturing, implantation and long-term behaviour of such an electrode array. In detail, we implanted 8-channel electrode arrays subdurally over rat cerebral cortex over a period of up to 25 weeks. Our primary objective was to ascertain the electrode's stability over time, and to analyse the host response in vivo. For this purpose, impedance measurements were carried out at regular intervals over the first 18 weeks of the implantation period. The impedances changed between day 4 and day 7 after implantation, and then remained stable until the end of the implantation period, in accordance with typical behaviour of chronically implanted microelectrodes. A post-mortem histological examination was made to assess the tissue reaction due to the implantation. A mild, chronically granulated inflammation was found in the area of the implant, which was essentially restricted to the leptomeninges. Overall, these findings suggest that the concept of the presented ECoG-electrodes is promising for use in long-term implantations.

  14. Present epidemiology of chronic subdural hematoma in Japan: analysis of 63,358 cases recorded in a national administrative database.

    PubMed

    Toi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Takai, Hiroki; Hara, Keijiro; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Matsubara, Shunji; Otani, Makoto; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Uno, Masaaki

    2017-02-03

    OBJECTIVE Aging of the population may lead to epidemiological changes with respect to chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The objectives of this study were to elucidate the current epidemiology and changing trends of CSDH in Japan. The authors analyzed patient information based on reports using a Japanese administrative database associated with the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system. METHODS This study included patients with newly diagnosed CSDH who were treated in hospitals participating in the DPC system. The authors collected data from the administrative database on the following clinical and demographic characteristics: patient age, sex, and level of consciousness on admission; treatment procedure; and outcome at discharge. RESULTS A total of 63,358 patients with newly diagnosed CSDH and treated in 1750 DPC participation hospitals were included in this study. Analysis according to patient age showed that the most common age range for these patients was the 9th decade of life (in their 80s). More than half of patients 70 years old or older presented with some kind of disturbance of consciousness. Functional outcomes at discharge were good in 71.6% (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score 0-2) of cases and poor in 28.4% (mRS score 3-6). The percentage of poor outcomes tended to be higher in elderly patients. Approximately 40% of patients 90 years old or older could not be discharged to home. The overall recurrence rate for CSDH was 13.1%. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a chronological change in the age distribution of CSDH among Japanese patients, which may be affecting the prognosis of this condition. In the aging population of contemporary Japan, patients in their 80s were affected more often than patients in other age categories, and approximately 30% of patients with CSDH required some help at discharge. CSDH thus may no longer have as good a prognosis as had been thought.

  15. Computational Study on Subdural Cortical Stimulation - The Influence of the Head Geometry, Anisotropic Conductivity, and Electrode Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyeon; Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is a method used to inject electrical current through electrodes beneath the dura mater, and is known to be useful in treating brain disorders. However, precisely how SuCS must be applied to yield the most effective results has rarely been investigated. For this purpose, we developed a three-dimensional computational model that represents an anatomically realistic brain model including an upper chest. With this computational model, we investigated the influence of stimulation amplitudes, electrode configurations (single or paddle-array), and white matter conductivities (isotropy or anisotropy). Further, the effects of stimulation were compared with two other computational models, including an anatomically realistic brain-only model and the simplified extruded slab model representing the precentral gyrus area. The results of voltage stimulation suggested that there was a synergistic effect with the paddle-array due to the use of multiple electrodes; however, a single electrode was more efficient with current stimulation. The conventional model (simplified extruded slab) far overestimated the effects of stimulation with both voltage and current by comparison to our proposed realistic upper body model. However, the realistic upper body and full brain-only models demonstrated similar stimulation effects. In our investigation of the influence of anisotropic conductivity, model with a fixed ratio (1∶10) anisotropic conductivity yielded deeper penetration depths and larger extents of stimulation than others. However, isotropic and anisotropic models with fixed ratios (1∶2, 1∶5) yielded similar stimulation effects. Lastly, whether the reference electrode was located on the right or left chest had no substantial effects on stimulation. PMID:25229673

  16. Intraoperative Ultrasonography during Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematomas: A Technique to Release Isolated Deep-seated Hematomas—Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, Satoru; MOCHIZUKI, Takahiro; OSAWA, Shigeyuki; KUMABE, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    After the drainage of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), residual isolated deep-seated hematomas (IDHs) may recur. We introduce intraoperative ultrasonography to detect and remove such IDHs. Intra-operative ultrasonography is performed with fine transducers introduced via burr holes. Images obtained before dural opening show the CSDHs, hyper- and/or hypoechoic content, and mono- or multilayers. Images are also acquired after irrigation of the hematoma under the dura. Floating hyperechoic spots (cavitations) on the brain cortex created by irrigation confirm the release of all hematoma layers; areas without spots represent IDHs. Their overlying thin membranes are fenestrated with a dural hook for irrigation. Ultrasonographs were evaluated in 43 CSDHs (37 patients); 9 (21%) required IDH fenestration. On computed tomography scans, 17 were homogeneous-, 6 were laminar-, 16 were separated-, and 4 were trabecular type lesions. Of these, 2 (11.8%), 3 (50%), 4 (25%), and 0, respectively, manifested IDHs requiring fenestration. There were no technique-related complications. Patients subjected to IDH fenestration had lower recurrence rates (11.1% vs. 50%, p = 0.095) and required significantly less time for brain re-expansion (mean 3.78 ± 1.62 vs. 18 ± 5.54 weeks, p = 0.0009) than did 6 patients whose IDHs remained after 48 conventional irrigation and drainage procedures. Intraoperative ultrasonography in patients with CSDHs facilitates the safe release of hidden IDHs. It can be expected to reduce the risk of postoperative hematoma recurrence and to shorten the brain re-expansion time. PMID:26345671

  17. Biomechanics of subdural hemorrhage in American football: review of the literature in response to rise in incidence.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Jonathan A; Zuckerman, Scott; Abla, Adib A; Mocco, J; Bode, Ken; Eads, Todd

    2014-02-01

    The number of catastrophic head injuries recorded during the 2011 football season was the highest since data collection began in 1984--the vast majority of these cases were secondary to subdural hemorrhage (SDH). The incidence of catastrophic head injury continues to rise: the average yearly incidence from 2008 to 2012 was 238% that of the average yearly incidence from 1998 to 2002. Greater than 95% of the football players who suffered catastrophic head injury during this period were age 18 or younger. Currently, the helmet industry utilizes a standard based on data obtained at Wayne State University approximately 50 years ago that seeks to limit severity index--a surrogate marker of translational acceleration. In this manuscript, we utilize a focused review of the literature to better characterize the biomechanical factors associated with SDH following collisions in American football and discuss these data in the context of current helmet standard. Review of the literature indicates the rotational acceleration (RA) threshold above which the risk of SDH becomes appreciable is approximately 5,000 rad/s(2). This value is not infrequently surmounted in typical high school football games. In contrast, translational accelerations (TAs) experienced during even elite-level impacts in football are not of sufficient magnitude to result in SDH. This information raises important questions about the current helmet standard--in which the sole objective is limitation of TA. Further studies will be necessary to better define whether helmet constructs and quality assurance standards designed to limit RA will also help to decrease the risk of catastrophic head injury in American football.

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  19. Successful antibiotic treatment for subdural empyema and seizure due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a complication of halo orthosis usage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Akira; Miyamoto, Kei; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Hosoe, Hideo; Shinoda, Jun; Iwama, Toru; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2012-11-01

    Halo orthosis is used for cervical spine fixation after spinal surgery or injury. Although superficial infection at pin sites occurs frequently, intracranial development of infection, including brain abscesses, is very rare. We experienced subdural empyema due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused by intracranial penetration of halo pins. A 38-year-old woman with a 4-year history of rheumatoid arthritis experienced severe myelopathy due to atlanto-axial dislocation and vertical subluxation. Reduction and immobilization using a halo vest resulted in neurologic improvement; she later underwent occipital bone to C2 fusion using posterior instrumentation. Three months after halo orthosis fixation, she complained of a headache, experienced a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and became unconscious for 10 min. Computed tomography revealed pneumoencephalus, and Gd-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema, enhancement of the overlying dura in the left partial lobe, and subdural and subarachnoidal empyema. Following removal of the halo vest, there was a purulent discharge from the left-posterior pin site. Culture of the discharge was positive for MRSA. The patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin for 2 weeks, followed by cefozopran hydrochloride for 4 weeks. Her symptoms improved, and additional surgery was not required. At latest follow-up, 10 years after the seizure, she is neurologically stable without any recurrence of the infection.

  20. Blood pressure lowering in acute phase of stroke: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Patarroyo, Sully Xiomara Fuentes

    2012-01-01

    Persistent controversy exists as to whether there are worthwhile beneficial effects of early, rapid lowering of elevated blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke. Elevated BP or ‘hypertension’ (i.e. systolic >140 mmHg) is common in stroke, especially in patients with pre-existing hypertension and large strokes, due to variable ‘autonomic stress’ and raised intracranial pressure. While positive associations between BP levels and poor outcomes are evident across a range of studies, very low BP levels and large reductions in BP have also been shown to predict death and dependence, more so for ischaemic stroke (IS) than intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). Accumulating evidence indicates that early BP lowering can reduce haematoma expansion in ICH, but there is uncertainty over whether this translates into improved clinical outcomes, particularly since such an effect was not evident from haemostatic therapy in clinical trials. Guidelines generally recommend control of high systolic BP (>180 mmHg), but recent evidence indicates that even more modest elevation (>140 mmHg) increases risks of cerebral oedema and haemorrhagic transformation following thrombolysis in IS. Thus, any potential benefits of rapid BP lowering in acute stroke, particularly in IS, must be balanced against the potential risks of worsening cerebral ischaemia from altered autoregulation/perfusion. This paper explores current knowledge regarding the management of hypertension in acute stroke and introduces ongoing clinical trials aimed at resolving such a critical issue in the care of patients with acute stroke. PMID:23342232

  1. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  2. An uncommon cause of headache after headbanging at a party.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Van Giel, Roel; Mortelmans, Luc; van den Hauwe, Luc

    2009-08-01

    Subdural haematomas can result from bridging vein rupture. Rotational acceleration in the sagittal plane and in a forward direction, as in falls, is very likely the 'mechanical' cause of subdural haematoma, as shown in cadaveric studies. Some recreational activities, for example roller-coaster rides and bungee jumping, have been associated with subdural haematoma, owing to acceleration/deceleration or repetitive head movements. We report a case of chronic subdural haemorrhage in a male teenager without precipitating factors and no history of head trauma. This case shows the value of good history-taking in medical diagnosis and that one should be aware of the risks of violent sports or dancing and the minimal clinical signs encountered.

  3. A chronic subdural hematoma in a patient receiving combination therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takashi; Ohshima, Shigetoshi; Miura, Kouichi; Shibuya, Tomomi; Sato, Wataru; Dohmen, Takahiro; Kamada, Kentaro; Kanata, Ryo; Sakai, Toshitaka; Chiba, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Yuko; Minami, Shinichiro; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-01-01

    A 70-year-old man who suffered from chronic hepatitis C was infected with HCV genotype 1 and exhibited a high viral load. He had hypertension and had consumed the equivalent of 50 g of ethanol per day. He was treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. After 51 weeks, he developed an unsteady gait while walking and demonstrated Barre's sign on the right foot and a headache. Contrast computed tomography showed a subdural hematoma with a mass effect. The patient was treated with drainage and aspiration surgery via a burr hole. Following the drainage procedure, there were no neurological sequelae. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin was discontinued. Fortunately, a sustained virological response was achieved.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  5. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  6. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  7. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  8. Severe head injury in children: emergency access to neurosurgery in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, R C; Morris, K P; Forsyth, R J; Hawley, C A; Parslow, R C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the scale of acute neurosurgery for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood, and whether surgical evacuation for haematoma is achieved within four hours of presentation to an emergency department. Methods A 12 month audit of emergency access to all specialist neurosurgical and intensive care services in the UK. Severe TBI in a child was defined as that necessitating admission to intensive care. Results Of 448 children with severe head injuries, 91 (20.3%) underwent emergency neurosurgery, and 37% of these surgical patients had at least one non‐reactive and dilated pupil. An acute subdural or epidural haematoma was present in 143/448 (31.9%) children, of whom 66 (46.2%) underwent surgery. Children needing surgical evacuation of haematoma were at a median distance of 29 km (interquartile range (IQR) 11.8–45.7) from their neurosurgical centre. One in four children took longer than one hour to reach hospital after injury. Once in an accident and emergency department, 41% took longer than fours hours to arrive at the regional centre. The median interval between time of accident and arrival at the surgical centre was 4.5 hours (IQR 2.23–7.73), and 79% of inter‐hospital transfers were undertaken by the referring hospital rather than the regional centre. In cases where the regional centre undertook the transfer, none were completed within four hours of presentation—the median interval was 6.3 hours (IQR 5.1–8.12). Conclusions The system of care for severely head injured children in the UK does not achieve surgical evacuation of a significant haematoma within four hours. The recommendation to use specialist regional paediatric transfer teams delays rather than expedites the emergency service. PMID:16794092

  9. [Computerized axial tomography of the skull - diagnostic possibilities and clinical results (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kazner, E; Lanksch, W; Steinhoff, H; Wilske, J

    1975-10-01

    -coup are demonstrated. All types of acute intracranial haematomas may be diagnosed easily. With chronic subdural haematomas the new method fails if the contents of the haematoma shows the same absorption values as brain tissue. Late sequelae of head trauma such as contusion defects and necrosis of tissue after oedema can be seen in the tomogram. With infantile hydrocephalus, subdural effusions and malformations of the brain, computerized axial tomography offers a complete diagnosis so that other invasive, neuroradiological investigations may be avoided. Orbital tumors are picked out with great clarity. The high definition matrix allows the demonstration of the optic nerve, the lense and the suspension of the eyeball. Without doubt in the coming years computerized axial tomography will play a dominant role in the diagnosis of brain disorders.

  10. Histopathological study of the outer membrane of the dura mater in chronic sub dural hematoma: Its clinical and radiological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bokka, Sriharsha; Trivedi, Adarsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic subdural hematoma is an old clot of blood on the surface of the brain between dura and arachnoid membranes. These liquefied clots most often occur in patients aged 60 and older with brain atrophy. When the brain shrinks inside the skull over time, minor head trauma can cause tearing of blood vessels over the brain surface, resulting in a slow accumulation of blood over several days to weeks. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the role of membrane in hematoma evaluation and to correlate its histopathology with clinic-radiological aspects of the condition and overall prognosis of patients. Material and Methods: The study incorporated all cases of chronic SDH admitted to the Neurosurgery department of JLN Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, between November 2011 and November 2013. All such cases were analyzed clinically, radiologically like site, size, thickness in computed tomography, the attenuation value, midline shift and histopathological features were recorded. Criteria for Inclusion: All cases of chronic subdural haematoma irrespective of age and sex were incorporated into the study. Criteria for Exclusion: All cases of acute subdural haematoma and cases of chronic sub dural hematoma which were managed conservatively irrespective of age and sex were excluded from the study Results: In our series of cases, the most common histopathological type of membrane was the inflammatory membrane (Type II) seen in 42.30% of cases followed by hemorrhagic inflammatory membrane (Type III) seen in 34.62% of cases while scar inflammatory type of membrane (Type IV) was seen in 23.08% of cases. No case with noninflammatory type (Type I) was encountered. PMID:26889276

  11. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  12. Simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural hematomas as rare cause of headache in puerperium following epidural analgesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Župan, Željko; Sotošek Tokmadžić, Vlatka; Matanić-Manestar, Marinka; Šustić, Alan; Antončić, Igor; Dunatov, Siniša; Pavlović, Ivan; Antulov, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the first case of simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and bilateral subdural hematomas (SDHs) following epidural analgesia for labor and delivery and to point out the difficulty of establishing such a diagnosis in the presence of postpartum headache. A 26-year old primigravida with a history of epilepsy received epidural analgesia for delivery. Three days after the uneventful spontaneous vaginal delivery she complained about the headache. Patient responded very well to the pain medication and oral hydration, and the headache was relieved. Ten days after the delivery, the headache reoccurred, and an epidural blood patch was performed that successfully relieved her symptom. Stronger progressive headache with nausea reappeared two days later and the parturient was readmitted to hospital. Urgent neuroimaging examinations detected CVT of right the transverse sinus, ipsilateral cortical veins, and partially occluded superior sagittal sinus, as well as bilateral subacute/chronic SDHs. The treatment of the patient with low molecular weight heparin and antiaggregation therapy was effective. In this case, the diagnosis was delayed because of atypical clinical presentation and potentially confounding events (epidural analgesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. Otherwise, unrecognized intracranial complications and delay of appropriate therapy could be life-threatening. PMID:22911532

  13. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  14. Does the central sulcus divide motor and sensory functions? Cortical mapping of human hand areas as revealed by electrical stimulation through subdural grid electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nii, Y; Uematsu, S; Lesser, R P; Gordon, B

    1996-02-01

    To clarify the exact anatomic relationship of electrically identified hand areas to the central sulcus, we constructed cortical surface renderings of magnetic resonance images (MRI) to locate the central sulcus accurately and measured the distances of stimulated points from the central sulcus and the Sylvian fissure. We obtained hand responses in 33 patients who underwent implantation of subdural grid electrodes for evaluation and surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy and analyzed these responses according to the presence of motor, sensory, mixed motor and sensory, and arrest responses. Hand motor responses occurred not only in the precentral gyrus but also in the postcentral gyrus, with great variability in superior-to-inferior distribution. Sensory responses also occurred in both the precentral and postcentral gyri with a distribution more ventral than that of motor responses. Mixed motor and sensory responses tended to be limited to the middle part of the central sulcus. Sites where electrical stimulation arrested simple hand repetitive voluntary movements occurred widely throughout the premotor and primary sensorimotor cortices. These data indicate a marked variability in the location of the human cortical hand area, and suggest that motor and sensory hand cortices overlap and are not divided in a simple manner by the central sulcus.

  15. Quantitative evaluation for brain CT/MRI coregistration based on maximization of mutual information in patients with focal epilepsy investigated with subdural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ken, Soléakhéna; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Giulietti, Giovanni; Sebastiano, Fabio; De Carli, Diego; Garreffa, Girolamo; Colonnese, Claudio; Passariello, Roberto; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2007-07-01

    Patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy may require intracranial investigations with subdural electrodes. These must be correctly localized with respect to the brain cortical surface and require appropriate monitoring. For this purpose, coregistration techniques, which fuse preimplantation 3D magnetic resonance imaging scans with postimplantation computed tomography scans, have been implemented. In order to reduce localization errors due to the fusion process, we used a coregistration method based on the maximization of mutual information (MI) in 11 patients with extratemporal epilepsy who were invasively investigated. Our registration method is based on three processing steps: rigid-body transformation for coregistration, computation of MI as a similarity measure and the use of the Downhill Simplex optimization method. After consistency analysis, the shift of the registration method reached 0.14+/-0.27 mm in translation and 0.03+/-0.14 degrees in rotation, and the accuracies assessed on voxels of skull surface and voxels of the center of the brain volume were 1.42+/-0.61 and 1.15+/-0.53 mm, respectively. The accuracy of the fusion process reached submillimeter range, and results were considered reliable for surgical planning in all studied patients.

  16. Direct Exploration of the Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobe in Semantic Memory: Cortical Stimulation and Local Field Potential Evidence From Subdural Grid Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueno, Taiji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Saito, Satoru; Hoffman, Paul; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Semantic memory is a crucial higher cortical function that codes the meaning of objects and words, and when impaired after neurological damage, patients are left with significant disability. Investigations of semantic dementia have implicated the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, in general, as crucial for multimodal semantic memory. The potentially crucial role of the ventral ATL subregion has been emphasized by recent functional neuroimaging studies, but the necessity of this precise area has not been selectively tested. The implantation of subdural electrode grids over this subregion, for the presurgical assessment of patients with partial epilepsy or brain tumor, offers the dual yet rare opportunities to record cortical local field potentials while participants complete semantic tasks and to stimulate the functionally identified regions in the same participants to evaluate the necessity of these areas in semantic processing. Across 6 patients, and utilizing a variety of semantic assessments, we evaluated and confirmed that the anterior fusiform/inferior temporal gyrus is crucial in multimodal, receptive, and expressive, semantic processing.

  17. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  18. Survival after Left Ventricular Free Wall Rupture in an Elderly Woman with Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated Only Medically

    PubMed Central

    Roa-Castro, Víctor Hugo; Molina-Bello, Ervin; Valenzuela-Suárez, Hector; Rotberg-Jagode, Tobías; Espinola-Zavaleta, Nilda

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle is rare and may occur as a result of transmural myocardial infarction. The course of rupture after acute myocardial infarction varies from a catastrophic event, with an acute tear leading to immediate death (acute rupture), or slow and incomplete tear leading to a late rupture (subacute rupture). Incomplete rupture may occur when the thrombus and haematoma together with the pericardium seal the rupture of the left ventricle and may develop into a pseudoaneurysm. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential in this condition. Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is the first-choice method for most patients with suspected left ventricular pseudoaneurysm (LVP) and suggests left ventricular rupture in 85% to 90% of patients. We report the case of an 87-year-old woman presenting with symptoms and findings of myocardial infarction and left ventricular free wall rupture with a pseudoaneurysm formation diagnosed by echocardiography and confirmed on CT, MRI, and NM. She received only intense medical treatment, because she refused surgery with a favorable outcome. After 24-month followup, she is in NYHA functional class II. The survival of this patient is due to the contained pseudoaneurysm by dense pericardial adhesions, related to her previous coronary bypass surgery. PMID:22953155

  19. Intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke: experience with a superselective catheter embedded in the clot.

    PubMed Central

    Casto, L; Caverni, L; Camerlingo, M; Censori, B; Moschini, L; Servalli, M C; Partziguian, T; Belloni, G; Mamoli, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report experience of intra-arterial thrombolysis for acute stroke, performed with a microcatheter navigated into the intracranial circulation to impale the clot. METHODS--Patients were selected on the following criteria: (1) clinical examination suggesting a large vessel occlusion in stroke patients between 18 and 75 years; (2) no radiographic signs of large actual ischaemia on CT at admission; (3) angiographically documented occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) stem or of the basilar artery (BA), without occlusion of the ipsilateral extracranial internal carotid artery or of both the vertebral arteries; (4) end of the entire procedure within six hours of stroke. 12 patients with acute stroke were recruited, eight of whom had occlusion of the MCA stem and four of the BA. Urokinase was used as the thrombolytic agent. RESULTS--Complete recanalisation in six MCA stem and in two BA occurred, and partial recanalisation in two MCA stem and one BA. There was no recanalisation in one BA. A clinically silent haemorrhage occurred in two patients, and a parenchymal haematoma in one patient, all in MCA occlusions. At four months five patients achieved self sufficiency (four with MCA and one with BA occlusion). Six patients were dependent (three totally), and one died. CONCLUSIONS--The strict criteria of eligibility allowing the enrollment of very few patients and the procedure itself, requiring particular neuroradiological expertise, make this procedure not routine. Nevertheless, the approach can be considered a possible option for patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Images PMID:8648335

  20. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  1. Acute Blindness.

    PubMed

    Meekins, Jessica M

    2015-09-01

    Sudden loss of vision is an ophthalmic emergency with numerous possible causes. Abnormalities may occur at any point within the complex vision pathway, from retina to optic nerve to the visual center in the occipital lobe. This article reviews specific prechiasm (retina and optic nerve) and cerebral cortical diseases that lead to acute blindness. Information regarding specific etiologies, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for vision is discussed.

  2. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008–2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3%) were males and 31 (22.7%) females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%). The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%), while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%). One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%). The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety. PMID:25883478

  3. Experience from two decades of the Cambridge Rapid Access Neurology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Axinte, Laura T; Fiddes, Barnaby D; Donaghy, Alastair; Whyte, Adam; Allen, Chris; Sawcer, Stephen J; Adam, Robert J; Stacpoole, Sybil R L

    2015-10-01

    We report on the evolution of the rapid access neurology clinic (established in 1995) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Annualised attendance data demonstrate an ever increasing demand, with primary headache disorders now accounting for more than 40% of referrals. Secondary causes of headache (including intracranial tumours, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, carotid or vertebral artery dissection and subdural haematomas) remain infrequent. In all such cases, there were additional diagnostic clues. The number of patients referred with problems related to chronic neurological diseases has fallen considerably, reflecting the roles of specialist nurses and clinics. Imaging investigation of choice shifted from computerised tomography scan (45 to 16%) towards magnetic resonance imaging (17 to 47%). Management is increasingly on an outpatient basis, often without the need for a follow-up appointment. The experience presented here should inform further development of rapid access neurology clinics across the UK and suggests the need for acute headache services, in line with those for transient ischaemic attack and first seizure.

  4. Acute laminitis.

    PubMed

    Baxter, G M

    1994-12-01

    Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive laminae along the dorsal aspect of the digit and is considered to be a secondary complication of several predisposing or primary factors. Affected horses are usually very lame, have increased digital pulses, are painful to hoof testers along the toe of the foot, and have evidence of downward rotation or distal displacement of the distal phalanx present on radiographs. Treatments for acute laminitis include anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-endotoxin therapy, vasodilators, antithrombotic therapy, corrective trimming and shoeing, and surgical procedures. Treatment regimens are very controversial and the true efficacy of these treatments is unknown. The quality of laminae damage that occurs with laminitis, however, probably has greater influence on the success of treatment and outcome of the horse than the treatment regimen itself.

  5. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  6. Microdialysis sampling of carbamazepine, phenytoin and phenobarbital in subcutaneous extracellular fluid and subdural cerebrospinal fluid in humans: an in vitro and in vivo study of adsorption to the sampling device.

    PubMed

    Lindberger, Martin; Tomson, Torbjörn; Lars, Ståhle

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if binding of the drugs to the sampling equipment during microdialysis would influence the results for carbamazepine, phenytoin and phenobarbital. In vitro experiments with microdialysis catheters and separate parts of catheters were performed to estimate the degree of drug binding to the dialysis equipment. A mathematical model to calculate drug binding and recovery is proposed. In vivo protein unbound carbamazepine concentrations in subcutaneous extracellular fluid at different flow rates (6 patients), unbound carbamazepine (1 patient) and unbound phenobarbital (I patient) in subdural cerebrospinal fluid and subcutaneous extracellular fluid were estimated and the in vivo data were compared to the in vitro results and data generated by the mathematical model. Binding to the soft outlet polyurethane tubing was extensive and variable for phenytoin, which precluded in vivo testing, but limited and more predictable for carbamazepine and phenobarbital. None of the three compounds bound to the hard internaltubing. Phenytoin and phenobarbital did not bind to the dialysis membrane, while a small degree of binding may be present for carbamazepine. In vivo estimates of carbamazepine protein unbound subcutaneous extracellular concentrations by microdialysis, adjusted for binding to the plastic tubing, were 81% of protein unbound plasma concentrations. In single case studies, subdural cerebrospinal fluid and subcutaneous extracellular levels of carbamazepine and phenobarbital were similar and when corrected for binding to the plastic tubings they were also close to protein unbound plasma concentrations. Microdialysis can be used for reliable estimations of protein unbound carbamazepine and possibly phenobarbital concentrations when drug binding to the plastic tubing is considered. Reliable estimation of unbound phenytoin is not possible at present.

  7. Pupillary evaluation for differential diagnosis of coma

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Y; Nakazato, N; Stein, G

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the usefulness of bedside evaluation of pupils in determining the aetiology of coma by adopting a probabilistic approach. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients presenting with coma were enrolled in this prospective cohort during the 12 month study period in the emergency room of a community teaching hospital. Patients underwent structured clinical examinations and laboratory and imaging tests. Assignment of aetiology of coma was based on strict adherence to predetermined criteria and achieved by consensus of the two physician investigators. One year follow up was obtained in all patients. Results: Aetiology of coma was determined in 98% of the patients. It was metabolic in 69 patients (60%) and structural in 46 patients (40%). Metabolic causes included drug overdose, acute alcohol intoxication, hypoglycaemia, sepsis, and pneumonia. Structural causes included intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral infarction, subdural haematoma, and epidural haematoma. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed light reflex loss (likelihood ratio for positive test result 3.59) and anisocoria (likelihood ratio for positive test result 9.0) as independent predictors of structural origin. Conclusions: In this prospective study of patients presenting to the emergency room of a community based teaching hospital with coma, in about 60% the coma is of metabolic origins and in about 40% of structural origins. Light reflex loss and anisocoria suggest a structural aetiology. PMID:12566553

  8. Acute bacterial parotitis following acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, V K; Kimbrough, D J; Jarquin-Valdivia, A A

    2009-06-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis (ABP) is a relatively uncommon condition that tends to occur in debilitated older patients. We report a case of an older woman that presented with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage who developed ABP. This morbidity led to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy and gastrostomy, all of which were not initially needed. We discuss the proposed physiopathology and etiopathogenesis of ABP in adults.

  9. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  11. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  12. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  14. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  15. Rare manifestations in a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhijai; Suri, Vikas; Jain, Sanjay; Varma, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Osler-Weber-Rendu disease (OWRD) is a rare vascular dysplasia that presents most commonly with epistaxis. The most dreaded complication, however, is an intracranial haemorrhage. We present a patient with two rare manifestations of OWRD, subdural haematoma and portal venous hypertension, both seldom reported in the literature. The patient made a full recovery and continues to do well at this time. PMID:25564593

  16. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  17. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  19. The Safety and Efficacy of Dexmedetomidine vs. Sufentanil in Monitored Anesthesia Care during Burr-Hole Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Retrospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Feng, Lei; Bai, Fenfen; Zhang, Zongwang; Zhao, Yong; Ren, Chunguang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a very common clinical emergency encountered in neurosurgery. While both general anesthesia (GA) and monitored anesthesia care (MAC) can be used during CSDH surgery, MAC is the preferred choice among surgeons. Further, while dexmedetomidine (DEX) is reportedly a safe and effective agent for many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, there have been no trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in CSDH surgery. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in MAC during burr-hole surgery for CSDH. Methods: In all, 215 fifteen patients underwent burr-hole surgery for CSDH with MAC and were divided into three groups: Group D1 (n = 67, DEX infusion at 0.5 μg·kg−1 for 10 min), Group D2 (n = 75, DEX infusion at 1 μg·kg−1 for 10 min), and Group S (n = 73, sufentanil infusion 0.3 μg·kg−1 for 10 min). Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) of all three groups was maintained at 3. Anesthesia onset time, total number of intraoperative patient movements, hemodynamics, total cumulative dose of DEX, time to first dose and amount of rescue midazolam or fentanyl, percentage of patients converted to alternative sedative or anesthetic therapy, postoperative recovery time, adverse events, and patient and surgeon satisfaction scores were recorded. Results: The anesthesia onset time was significantly less in group D2 (17.36 ± 4.23 vs. 13.42 ± 2.12 vs. 15.98 ± 4.58 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P < 0.001). More patients in groups D1 and S required rescue midazolam to achieve RSS = 3 (74.63 vs. 42.67 vs. 71.23%, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P < 0.001). However, the total dose of rescue midazolam was significantly higher in group D1 (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.3 vs. 2.0 ± 0.4 mg, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P < 0.001). The time to first dose of rescue midazolam was significantly longer in group D2 (17.32 ± 4.47 vs. 23.56 ± 5.36 vs. 16.55 ± 4.91 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P < 0

  20. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  1. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  2. Infant acute myocarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tilouche, Samia; Masmoudi, Tasnim; Sahnoun, Maha; Chkirbène, Youssef; Mestiri, Sarra; Boughamoura, Lamia; Ben Dhiab, Mohamed; Souguir, Mohamed Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium with heterogeneous clinical manifestations and progression. In clinical practice, although there are many methods of diagnosis of acute myocarditis, the diagnosis remains an embarrassing dilemma for clinicians. The authors report the case of 9-month-old infant who was brought to the Pediatric Emergency Department with sudden onset dyspnea. Examination disclosed heart failure and resuscitation was undertaken. The electrocardiogram showed an ST segment elevation in the anterolateral leads with a mirror image. Cardiac enzyme tests revealed a significant elevation of troponin and creatine phosphokinase levels. A diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was made, and heparin therapy was prescribed. The infant died on the third day after admission with cardiogenic shock. The autopsy showed dilatation of the ventricles and massive edema of the lungs. Histological examinations of myocardium samples revealed the presence of a marked lymphocytic infiltrate dissociating myocardiocytes. Death was attributed to acute myocarditis. The authors call attention to the difficulties of differential diagnosis between acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction especially in children, and to the important therapeutic implications of a correct diagnosis. PMID:28210569

  3. Adult Acute Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K.; Wells, D. G.; Clink, H. McD.; Kay, H. E. M.; Powles, R.; McElwain, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as “adult acute leukaemia” and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4141625

  4. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies.

  5. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  6. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  7. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  8. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  9. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  12. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  13. Acute pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jessica; Graham, David; O'Reilly, Sarah; Punton, Gillian

    2016-02-03

    Acute pulmonary oedema is a distressing and life-threatening illness that is associated with a sudden onset of symptoms. For the best possible patient outcomes, it is essential that nurses in all clinical areas are equipped to accurately recognise, assess and manage patients with acute pulmonary oedema. This article outlines the pathophysiology of acute cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, and suggests a systematic approach to the recognition and management of its most serious manifestations. Long-term care and symptom recognition are discussed and suggestions for ongoing patient self-management are provided.

  14. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented.

  15. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Apr 05, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week! Mar 23, 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week is ONE ... 2017 National Porphyria Awareness Week (NPAW) 2017 date: Mar 1, 2017 FDA Meeting for Acute Porphyrias is ...

  16. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  17. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  18. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  19. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  20. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Cao, Yang; Lau, Hon Yen; Huang, Jiali; Puneet, Padmam; Chevali, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. It is a disease of variable severity in which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. It is generally believed that the earliest events in acute pancreatitis occur within acinar cells. Acinar cell injury early in acute pancreatitis leads to a local inflammatory reaction. If this inflammatory reaction is marked, it leads to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). An excessive SIRS leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). MODS associated with acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. At the same time, recent research has demonstrated the importance of acinar cell death in the form of apoptosis and necrosis as a determinant of pancreatitis severity. In this review, we will discuss about our current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  1. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  3. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  5. Acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, Robert; Crijns, Harry J.; Heymans, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Acute myocarditis is one of the most challenging diagnosis in cardiology. At present, no diagnostic gold standard is generally accepted, due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This leads to the need for new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical analysis of endomyocardial biopsies. Recent findings using these new diagnostic tests resulted in increased interest in inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a better understanding of its pathophysiology, the recognition in overlap of virus-mediated damage, inflammation, and autoimmune dysregulation. Novel results also pointed towards a broader spectrum of viral genomes responsible for acute myocarditis, indicating a shift of enterovirus and adenovirus to parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6. The present review proposes a general diagnostic approach, focuses on the viral aetiology and associated autoimmune processes, and reviews treatment options for patients with acute viral myocarditis. PMID:18617482

  6. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  7. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse.

  8. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  9. Low back pain (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may increase in severity and duration over time. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments for acute low back pain? What are the effects of local injections for acute low back pain? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for acute low back pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics (paracetamol, opioids), back exercises, back schools, bed rest, behavioural therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, epidural corticosteroid injections, lumbar supports, massage, multidisciplinary treatment programmes, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), spinal manipulation, temperature treatments (short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice, heat), traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  10. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Hypothyroid acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Birewar, Sonali; Oppenheimer, Mark; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-03-01

    Muscular disorders and even hypothyroid myopathy with elevated muscle enzymes are commonly seen in hypothyroidism. In this paper, we report a case of acute renal failure in a 35-year old male patient with myalgia. His serum creatinine reached a level of 2.4 mg/dl. Later, his myalgia was found to be due to hypothyroidism with TSH of over 500 uiv/ml. With thyroid replacement therapy, myalgia and his serum creatinine stabilized and subsequently improved. Hypothyroidism, although rare, has been reported as a definite and authentic cause of rhabdomyolysis. As a result, hypothyroidism must be considered in patients presenting with acute renal failure and elevated muscle enzymes.

  12. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  13. Recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vishal; Ganguly, Ishita

    2014-09-28

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is commonly encountered, but less commonly understood clinical entity, especially idiopathic RAP, with propensity to lead to repeated attacks and may be chronic pancreatitis if attacks continue to recur. A great number of studies have been published on acute pancreatitis, but few have focused on RAP. Analysing the results of clinical studies focusing specifically on RAP is problematic in view due to lack of standard definitions, randomised clinical trials, standard evaluation protocol used and less post intervention follow-up duration. With the availability of newer investigation modalities less number of etiologies will remains undiagnosed. This review particularly is focused on the present knowledge in understanding of RAP.

  14. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  15. Therapeutic Targeting of P2X7 after TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-16

    evacuation of acute subdural hematoma : brain shift and the dynamics of extraaxial collections. Neurol Res, 26(7), 763-766. Cold, G. E., & Jensen, F. T...of consecutive bilateral surgeries for patients with acute 31 Kimbler, Donald E N10-P10 subdural hematoma who develop contralateral acute epi...or subdural hematoma . Surg Neurol, 60(1), 23-30; discussion 30. Miller, J. D., Becker, D. P., Ward, J. D., Sullivan, H. G., Adams, W. E., & Rosner, M

  16. [Acute pancreatitis due to lupus].

    PubMed

    Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Zribi, Riadh; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2004-02-01

    Among digestive clinical presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, acute pancreatitis remains a serious affection with very poor prognosis. To date, pathogenesis is still unclear. We report two cases of fatal acute pancreatitis related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  18. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  19. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  20. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  1. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  2. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  3. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  4. Acute stroke initiative involving an acute care team.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sean M; Keyser, Gabrielle; Winfield, Michelle; McNeil, Julie; Simko, Leslie; Price, Karen; Moffa, Donald; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Peacock, W Frank; Katzan, Irene L

    2012-06-01

    The Acute Care Team Educational Initiative (ACTEI) was developed as a quality improvement initiative for the recognition and initial management of time-sensitive medical conditions. For our first time-sensitive disease process, we focused on acute stroke [acute stroke initiative (ASI)]. As part of the larger ACTEI, the ASI included creating an ACT that responds to all suspected emergency department stroke patients. In this article, we describe the planning, process, and development of the ACTEI/ASI as well as how we created an acute response team for the diagnosis and management of suspected acute stroke.

  5. PEBL: A Code for Penetrating and Blunt Trauma, Based on the H-ICDA index

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    an acute right subdural hematoma . This type of injury is encoded as follows: The depressed skull fracture has the format 800.Za and is encoded 800.02...dimension 3 worst lesion has deficit of > 1.5 cm 852.Z Subdural or epidural Z = 0 closed (cannot be open) hematoma a = I right 852.Zab 2 left 3 side...not specified b = I epidural hematoma 2 acute subdural with cerebral injury (contusion) in same site 3 acute subdural without cerebral injury 4 acute

  6. Acute organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2014-04-20

    Acute organophosphorus poisoning continues to be a detrimental problem and a potential cause of mortality especially in developing countries. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme is the main mechanism of toxicity of such pesticides and measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity is the commonly used laboratory diagnosis approved for the purpose. It is now proved beyond any doubt that early intervention is beneficial for cases of acute organophosphorus poisoning and, therefore, considerable current interest has been generated for development of point of care testing tool for screening of the same. However, to the best of our knowledge so far the matter is not reviewed from the view of point of care testing tool development. In this paper, this subject is reviewed highlighting the methodological aspects and point of care testing tool development in the context of organophosphorus poisoning.

  7. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Weigand, M A; Mayer, K

    2012-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the clinical manifestation of an acute lung injury caused by a variety of direct and indirect injuries to the lung. The cardinal clinical feature of ARDS, refractory arterial hypoxemia, is the result of protein-rich alveolar edema with impaired surfactant function, due to vascular leakage and dysfunction with consequently impaired matching of ventilation to perfusion. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of ARDS has led to the development of novel therapies, pharmacological strategies, and advances in mechanical ventilation. However, protective ventilation is the only confirmed option in ARDS management improving survival, and few other therapies have translated into improved oxygenation or reduced ventilation time. The development of innovative therapy options, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have the potential to further improve survival of this devastating disease.

  8. [Schistosomiasis and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta; Santos, Ângela; Clemente, Horácio; Lourenço, Augusto; Costa, Sandra; Grácio, Maria Amélia; Belo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis associated to Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni infection has been found in patients submitted to urgent appendectomy at the Hospital Américo Boavida in Luanda. Due to the high prevalence and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) in the country, we suspect that the involvement of Schistosoma infection on appendicular pathology could be very frequent, in particular for those individuals more exposed to the parasite transmission. We report two clinical cases of acute appendicitis whose surgical specimens of the appendix revealed S. haematobium and S. mansoni eggs in histological samples. The reported patients live in endemic areas and have been exposed to schistosome during childhood, which may explain the infection's chronicity. Information of these clinical cases could be relevant, particularly for surgery specialists and clinical pathologists, due to the possibility of finding more patients with concurrent appendicitis and schistosomiasis.

  9. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  10. Myopathy in acute hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A. W.; Ma, J. T.; Yu, Y. L.; Wang, C. C.; Woo, E. K.; Lam, K. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Yeung, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hypothyroid myopathy has so far been reported in long standing cases of hypothyroidism. We describe two adult patients with myopathy associated with acute transient hypothyroidism. Both presented with severe muscle aches and cramps, stiffness and spasms. Muscle enzymes were markedly elevated and electromyography in one patient showed myopathic features. Histological changes were absent in muscle biopsy, probably because of the short duration of metabolic disturbance. The myopathy subsided promptly when the hypothyroid state was reversed. PMID:3422868

  11. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  12. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  13. Acute toxicity of arsenobetaine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaise, T.; Watanabe, S.; Itoh, K.

    1985-01-01

    The acute toxicity of arsenobetaine was studied in male mice. No deaths were observed with oral administration of 10 g/kg of arsenobetaine. Therefore the LD/sub 50/ value was higher than 10 g/kg. This compound was found in urine in the non-metabolized form. No particular toxic symptoms were observed following administration. These suggest that arsenobetaine has low toxicity and is not metabolized in mice.

  14. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  15. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Kolias, Angelos G.; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A.; Pickard, John D.; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Murray, Gordon D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of “opening the skull” in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  16. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Angelos G; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Pickard, John D; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Murray, Gordon D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented.

  17. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication.

  18. [Acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute upper airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Carpintero-Moreno, F; Olivares-López, A; Borrás-Rubio, E; Alvarez-López, M J; García-Izquierdo, A

    1992-01-01

    We report a 72 years old woman with mild arterial hypertension and no other pathological history who presented an acute pulmonary edema due to acute obstruction of the upper airway secondary to vocal chord paralysis developing during the immediate postoperative phase of thyroidectomy. The acute pulmonary edema resolved after application of tracheal reintubation, mechanical ventilation controlled with end expiratory positive pressure, diuretics, morphine, and liquid restriction. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic possibilities of this infrequent clinical picture and we suggest that all patients who suffered and acute obstruction of the upper airways require a careful clinical surveillance in order to prevent the development of the pulmonary syndrome.

  19. Acute psychotic disorder and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Agrawal, J K; Srivastava, A S; Bhardwaj, V K; Bose, B S

    1994-04-01

    A variable array of neuroglycopenic symptoms are frequently encountered in the hypoglycemic stage, but acute psychotic disorders are quite rare. A fifty five year old female presented with an acute psychosis following oral sulfonylurea induced hypoglycemia without preceding features of adrenomedullary stimulation. This case report suggests that an acute and transient psychotic disorder may be an important neuroglycopenic feature and its early recognition protects the patient from severe hypoglycemic brain damage in a state of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  20. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  1. Acute brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, GT

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem. PMID:26688392

  2. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  3. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition with multiple causes and a high mortality rate. Approximately 150,000 cases are reported in the United States annually, making ARDS a public health concern. Management of the condition is complex because of its severity, and medical imaging is essential for both the diagnosis and management of ARDS. This article introduces common signs, symptoms, risk factors, and causes of ARDS. Diagnostic criteria, histopathology, treatment strategies, and prognostic information also are discussed. The article explains the value of medical imaging studies of ARDS, especially radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasonography.

  5. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  6. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  7. Acute abdomen. Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M B; Boswell, W C; Arensman, R M

    1997-05-01

    The outcome for children with common surgical conditions that cause an acute abdomen is discussed. These conditions include appendicitis, intussusception, malrotation, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal obstructions, and nonorganic pain. Emphasis is placed on surgical intervention and disease processes that significantly affect outcome. The outcome of many of the diseases discussed is strongly influenced by the timing of diagnosis and treatment. These children should have prompt care and intervention to prevent morbidity and mortality. In addition, many children who present with common pediatric surgical emergencies have other medical conditions and are best treated in an environment that has a multidisciplinary team to handle their care and decrease the long-term complications.

  8. Acute emphysematous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Abengowe, C U; McManamon, P J

    1974-11-16

    Acute emphysematous cholecystitis is an uncommon condition caused by gas-forming organisms and characterized by the presence of gas in the wall and lumen of the gallbladder. Its incidence is higher among male diabetics. AEC in an elderly North American diabetic man with Indian ancestry is reported with a brief review of the world literature. The diagnosis was made preoperatively with the aid of plain radiographic films of the abdomen. A gangrenous distended gallbladder was removed at operation. Clostridium perfringens was cultured from the gallbladder contents and wall. If AEC is suspected, intensive antimicrobial therapy and fluid and electrolyte replacement should be given prior to early surgical intervention.

  9. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  10. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matĕjovic, M; Novák, I; Srámek, V; Rokyta, R; Hora, P; Nalos, M

    1999-04-26

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the general term used for severe acute respiratory failure of diverse aetiology. It is associated with a high morbidity, mortality (50-70%), and financial costs. Regardless of aetiology, the basic pathogenesis of ARDS is a systemic inflammatory response leading to a diffuse inflammatory process that involves both lungs, thus causing diffuse alveolar and endothelial damage with increased pulmonary capillary permeability and excessive extravascular lung water accumulation. ARDS is commonly associated with sepsis and multiple organ failure. The clinical picture involves progressive hypoxaemia, radiographic evidence of pulmonary oedema, decreased lung compliance and pulmonary hypertension. Despite the scientific and technological progress in critical care medicine, there is no specific ARDS therapy available at the moment and its management remains supportive. Therapeutic goals include resolution of underlying conditions, maintenance of acceptable gas exchange and tissue oxygenation and prevention of iatrogenic lung injury. Many new specific therapeutic strategies have been developed, however, most of them require further scientific evaluation. The paper reviews definition, basic pathogenesis and pathophysiology of ARDS and discusses current concepts of therapeutic possibilities of ARDS.

  11. [Acute coronary syndrome -- 2012].

    PubMed

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2012-12-23

    The acute coronary syndrome is the most severe form of coronary artery disease. It is an immediate threat of life and the mortality rate can be high without proper therapy and patient management. Based on the first ECG, two different forms can be distinguished: acute coronary syndrome with and without ST elevation. Besides adequate medication, management of these patients is an essential part of treatment. In case of ST elevation, coronarography and percutaneous coronary intervention is needed in general, within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. When ST elevation is not detected on the ECG, individual ischemic risk factors and predictable mortality of the patient may define the necessity and the date of the invasive examination. The Hungarian hemodynamic laboratory network covers almost the whole country and, therefore, practically each patient may receive a state-of-the-art therapy. Although indicators of cardiovascular diseases are still prominent, the mortality rate of myocardial Infarction is decreasing in Hungary due to the well-organized invasive care.

  12. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner’s syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. PMID:25564592

  13. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  15. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature.

  17. Electroencephalography: Subdural Multi-Electrode Brain Chip.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    form new memories) had suffered incidental damage to the hippocampus during the surgical procedure [14]. Animal studies, performed by Dr. Mishkin ...the cortex. Doctors Mishkin and Appenzeller report that the most likely location for memories is the cortical areas where sensory impressions take...535 (1991). 70 [13] Mind and Brain. "Gerald D. Fischbach," Scientific American, 267(3) (1992). [14] Mishkin , Mortimer and Tim Appenzellar. "The

  18. Acute care surgery in evolution.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kimberly A; Rozycki, Grace S

    2010-09-01

    At the center of the development of acute care surgery is the growing difficulty in caring for patients with acute surgical conditions. Care demands continue to grow in the face of an escalating crisis in emergency care access and the decreasing availability of surgeons to cover emergency calls. To compound this problem, there is an ever-growing shortage of general surgeons as technological advances have encouraged subspecialization. Developed by the leadership of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the specialty of acute care surgery offers a training model that would produce a new breed of specialist with expertise in trauma surgery, surgical critical care, and elective and emergency general surgery. This article highlights the evolution of the specialty in hope that these acute care surgeons, along with practicing general surgeons, will bring us closer to providing superb and timely care for patients with acute surgical conditions.

  19. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. [Acute postpartum psychoses].

    PubMed

    Tabbane, K; Charfi, F; Dellagi, L; Guizani, L; Boukadida, L

    1999-11-01

    The post-partum is a high risk period for the development of acute psychotic disorders. The frequence of post-partum psychoses is evaluated at 1 to 2 per 1,000 births. Post-partum psychosis include major affective disorders which is the most frequent diagnosis. The clinical pictures have specific characteristics: rapid change of symptomatology, liability of mood, and frequent confusional signs. The short-term prognosis is generally good but the risk of recurrence of the mental disorder, in or outside puerperal context, is high. At clinical, evolutive and genetic levels, the studies do not provide arguments for nosological autonomy of post-partum psychosis. At therapeutic level, the ECT is particularly efficient in this indication.

  1. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, paediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of AOM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'AOM', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take-home message? AOM is a very common problem affecting the majority of children at least once and places a large burden on health care systems throughout the world. Although symptomatic relief is often enough for most children, more severe and protracted cases require treatment with antibiotics, especially in younger children.

  2. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  4. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Ahmad, Bakhtiar; Ahmed, Zahoor; Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured cerebral aneurysm is the most common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Rarely cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) may present initially as acute SAH, and clinically mimics aneurysmal bleed. We report 2 cases of CVST who presented with severe headache associated with neck pain and focal seizures. Non-contrast brain CT showed SAH, involving the sulci of the convexity of hemisphere (cSAH) without involving the basal cisterns. Both patients received treatment with anticoagulants and improved. Awareness of this unusual presentation of CVST is important for early diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the inclusion of vascular neuroimaging like MRI with venography or CT venography in the diagnostic workup of SAH, especially in a patient with strong clinical suspicion of CVST or in a patient where neuroimaging showed cSAH. PMID:25630784

  5. Acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm and mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Andreas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Béliveau, Patrick; Potvin, Jean-Michel; Levesque, Pierre; Fillion, Nancy; Tremblay, Benoit; Larose, Éric; Gaudreault, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old healthy man consulted to our center because of typical on-and-off chest-pain and an electrocardiogram showing ST-segment elevation in inferior leads. An urgent coronary angiography showed angiographically normal coronary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging confirmed acute myocarditis. Although acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm is an uncommon association, it is important to recognize it, particularly for the management for those patients presenting with ST-segment elevation and suspect myocardial infarction and angiographically normal coronary arteries. The present report highlights the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to identify acute myocarditis as the underlying cause. PMID:25276306

  6. Acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm and mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Andreas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Béliveau, Patrick; Potvin, Jean-Michel; Levesque, Pierre; Fillion, Nancy; Tremblay, Benoit; Larose, Eric; Gaudreault, Valérie

    2014-09-26

    A 24-year-old healthy man consulted to our center because of typical on-and-off chest-pain and an electrocardiogram showing ST-segment elevation in inferior leads. An urgent coronary angiography showed angiographically normal coronary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging confirmed acute myocarditis. Although acute myocarditis triggering coronary spasm is an uncommon association, it is important to recognize it, particularly for the management for those patients presenting with ST-segment elevation and suspect myocardial infarction and angiographically normal coronary arteries. The present report highlights the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to identify acute myocarditis as the underlying cause.

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  9. Acute abdomen caused by both acute appendicitis and epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Hamada, Shinichi; Okanoue, Toyotake; Kawamura, Akihiro; Inoue, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Chikai, Takashi; Hiroi, Makoto; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Acute appendicitis often presents as right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain, severe tenderness at the point of McBurny or Lanz, and Blumberg's sign. Scrotal events with appendicitis are very rare. In our case, a 63-year-old Japanese man presented with severe RLQ pain and high fever. Physical examination revealed severe tenderness (including both points of McBurny and Lanz) and Blumberg's sign. The scrotum was slightly swollen and showed local heat with severe testicular pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed ascites in a pelvic space and the right side of the spermatic cord was swollen. Emergency operation was performed and the final diagnosis was catarrhal appendicitis and acute epididymitis. This is the first report of acute appendicitis concomitant with acute epididymitis.

  10. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  11. [Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Sivak, G; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1996-04-01

    We performed 417 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, including 58 for acute cholecystitis, between September 1991 and April 1995,. All operations were successful, with no mortality or complications. In about 10%, the laparoscopic approach failed and we converted to open cholecystectomy. Average post-operative hospitalization was 24 hours. We also performed primary open cholecystectomies in 55 patients with acute cholecystitis, because of limitations of operating room and staff availability for unscheduled laparoscopic surgery. In these patients, hospital stay was longer and rate of complications higher. In our opinion laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe and the preferred approach in acute cholecystitis.

  12. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  13. [Shaken baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rebuffat, E

    2009-09-01

    Nearly all non accidental head injuries of children are shaken baby syndromes. The non accidental head trauma refers to a traumatic encephalopathy inflicted by an adult to a child. The syndrome combines subdural haematoma, retinal haemorrhages and absence of any external lesion. The mortality and morbidity rates of the SBS are high and the SBS is the main cause of death in hospitals handling child abuse. The incidence is not well-known and most probably underestimated. Numerous risk factors linked to the aggressor, to the victim and to the factual context have been identified. The diagnosis remains difficult to make, mainly due to the absence of reliable anamnesis in a majority of cases. It should be envisaged for all infants presenting unexplained acute encephalopathy. Imagery and ophthalmologic examination are the first examinations that are required to make such diagnosis. A cerebral RMI allowed for important progress both on the level of the diagnosis and the prognosis as well as on the level of the understanding of lesions. The physiopathogeny of this syndrome has considerably progressed in recent years which raise promising prospects for therapy. The treatment of babies with SBS requires highly competent teams including paediatric neurosurgeons but also teams specialised in child abuse which can quickly take care of the families. In view of the seriousness of the problem, several communication campaigns directed to young parents and the public have been organized recently in several countries among which Belgium.

  14. Intracranial tumoural haemorrhage--a report of 58 cases.

    PubMed

    Yuguang, Liu; Meng, Liu; Shugan, Zhu; Yuquan, Jiang; Gang, Li; Xingang, Li; Chengyuan, Wu

    2002-11-01

    In order to study the computerized tomographic (CT) appearances and clinical characteristics of intracranial tumoural haemorrhage (ITH), we analyzed retrospectively fifty-eight patients with ITH and reviewed the literature. As a result, 91% patients had acute or subacute onset and 26% manifested haemorrhage as their first symptoms. CT scanning indicated that intratumoural bleeding occurred in 23 cases, bleeding into parenchyma 18 cases, subarachnoid space 6 cases, ventricle 3 cases and subdural space 8 cases. Thirty-eight patients had emergency operations and the others had selective operations. Both tumours and haematomas were removed all together in all patients. Fifty-five patients were cured or improved and three died during the perioperative stage in our series. Among the patients with ITH, there were 21 metastatic tumours, 19 gliomas, 10 meningiomas, 6 pituitary adenomas, 1 melanoma and 1 acoustic neurilemoma. The onset of most ITH resembled that of cerebrovascular diseases. The location of ITH and the CT appearances of ITH varied in different cerebral tumours. Radical removal of brain tumours with haemorrhage is an effective treatment for ITH, which can greatly decrease the perioperative mortality rate and improve the prognoses of patients.

  15. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  16. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  17. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  18. [Acute muscle weakness: differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Antoniuk, Sérgio A

    2013-09-06

    Acute muscle weakness, a common disorder in pediatrics, can occur from impairment of any part of the motor unit, including the upper motor neuron, lower motor neuron, peripheral nerve, neuromuscular junction or muscle. It usually manifests itself as an acute or hyperacute motor disorder of progressive or rapidly progressive course. Acute muscle weakness is a neuromuscular emergency, especially if it affects the respiratory or oropharyngeal musculature. The location of the motor weakness and associated neurological signs and symptoms usually indicate the location of the lesion. The onset, speed and clinical evolution, as well as other data from the patient's history, suggest the pathophysiological differential diagnosis. Successful treatment depends on the immediate and correct differential diagnosis. This paper presents the main differential diagnosis of main neuromuscular diseases that cause acute muscle weakness in children.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tabakovic, Mithat; Salkic, Nermin N.; Bosnjic, Jasmina; Alibegovic, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare but life-threatening complication in patients with transplanted kidney. The incidence of acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation ranges from 2% to 7%, with mortality rate between 50 and 100%. We report a case of a female patient aged 46 years, developing an interstitial acute pancreatitis 8 years following a renal transplantation. The specific aethiological factor was not clearly established, although possibility of biliary pancreatitis with spontaneous stone elimination and/or medication-induced pancreatitis remains the strongest. Every patient after renal transplantation with an acute onset of abdominal pain should be promptly evaluated for presence of pancreatitis with a careful application of the most appropriate diagnostic procedure for each individual patient. PMID:23259142

  20. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Luis; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The current treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia yields poor results, with expected cure rates in the order of 30–40% depending on the biological characteristics of the leukaemic clone. Therefore, new agents and schemas are intensively studied in order to improve patients’ outcomes. This review summarizes some of these new paradigms, including new questions such as which anthracycline is most effective and at what dose. High doses of daunorubicin have shown better responses in young patients and are well tolerated in elderly patients. Monoclonal antibodies are promising agents in good risk patients. Drugs blocking signalling pathways could be used in combination with chemotherapy or in maintenance with promising results. Epigenetic therapies, particularly after stem cell transplantation, are also discussed. New drugs such as clofarabine and flavopiridol are reviewed and the results of their use discussed. It is clear that many new approaches are under study and hopefully will be able to improve on the outcomes of the commonly used ‘7+3’ regimen of an anthracycline plus cytarabine with daunorubicin, which is clearly an ineffective therapy in the majority of patients. PMID:21861539

  2. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  3. Acute asthma: under attack.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, Niranjan

    2002-06-01

    The burden of asthma (death, disability, and an increasing prevalence) makes it a major public health problem worldwide. In an effort to decrease this burden, investigators are studying many aspects of this disease. The role of race, ethnicity, infections, and pollutants as triggers, as well as the risk factors are now being defined. Research into methods to decrease acute exacerbations and improve emergency and in-hospital management, using standardized protocols and incentives for follow-up care, has yielded valuable information but has met with limited success. Adherence to the national guidelines has been poor and to some extent can be attributed to the lack of a practical method of measuring the degree of lung inflammation and cumbersome treatment protocols. Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive marker of inflammation and may provide a rational method to titrate corticosteroid and leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy. The best route and dosing regimen for corticosteroid administration (oral vs intramuscular vs nebulized) are the subject of several studies, with no clear-cut winner. The burden of asthma in developing countries with limited financial resources has also triggered a search for simpler, cheaper, and practical methods for beta-agonist delivery using indigenous spacers. Recent research in asthma has unveiled our incomplete knowledge of the disease but has also provided a sense of where efforts should be expended. Research into the genetics and pharmacogenetics of asthma and into the societal factors limiting the delivery of optimal care is likely to yield useful and practical information.

  4. [Acute zincteral oral poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kamenczak, A; Pokorska, M; Wołek, E; Kobyłecka, K

    Zinc vapour poisoning by inhalation in the form of zinc fever is more frequent than oral zinc product poisoning, the product used in therapy. The main aim of the study was the evaluation of clinical manifestation present after Zincteral ingestion as well as attempt to find the relationship between the presence and aggravation of the clinical manifestation and zinc level in the blood. The course of acute clinical suicidal poisoning by ingestion of Zincteral 50 tablets (10.0 g) and 100 tablets (20.0 g) is presented. The clinical picture revealed the following symptoms and signs: tachycardia, changes of arterial BP, vascular shock; dyspeptic nausea, vomiting cramps in abdominal region, diarrhoea. Damage of the parenchymatous organs, mainly liver was evident. In pregnant woman (9-week-pregnancy) on the 12-th day of her stay in the Clinic complete miscarriage took place accompanied by haemorrhage from reproductive organs. The kind and exacerbation of the clinical manifestations in relation to the zinc level in body fluid were analysed.

  5. Acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Laura; Bernal, William

    2015-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare critical illness with high mortality whose successful management requires early recognition and effective initial management. Though it may result from a wide variety of causes, in the UK and much of the developed world most cases result from paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity, and administration of antidotal N-acetyl cysteine at first recognition is key. Involvement of local critical care services should occur at an early stage for stabilisation, monitoring and supportive care with parallel discussion with specialist liver centres to identify those patients who may benefit from transfer. Prognostic criteria are applied to identify patients for emergency liver transplantation, and candidates for surgery are prioritised on waitlisting schemes. Outcomes now approach that of elective surgery. However, the majority of cases, and particularly those with paracetamol-induced disease, recover with supportive medical care alone. Overall outcomes for patients with ALF have improved dramatically over the last three decades, but mortality remains unacceptable and further advances in care are required.

  6. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2012-05-01

    Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction and is caused by drugs in >90% of cases. It is rare, with an incidence of 1-5 patients per million per year. The clinical manifestations are characterised by fever and the rapid appearance of disseminated sterile pustules 3-5 days after the commencement of treatment. It is accompanied by marked neutrophilia. Mucous membranes are not typically involved. The drugs conferring the highest risk of AGEP according to the EuroSCAR study are aminopenicillins, pristinamycin, hydroxychloroquine, antibacterial sulphonamides, terbinafine and diltiazem. The pathogenesis of AGEP involves the initial influx of CD8 cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the apoptosis of keratinocytes and formation of vesicles. Then CXCL-8-producing and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor-producing CD4 cells enter the epidermis, resulting in neutrophil mediated inflammation and the formation of pustules. As a result, the histology reveals intraepidermal, usually subcorneal, pustules and an accompanying neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate. Epicutaneous patch testing may also support the diagnosis by causing a localised pustular reaction 48-96 h after the offending drug is applied. The condition usually resolves by 15 days after the causative drug is withdrawn but oral corticosteroid therapy may be necessary in some individuals. The mortality rate is up to 5% and mostly occurs in elderly people who have significant comorbidities.

  7. Autophagy in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Man J.; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major kidney disease associated with poor clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury is multifactorial and is characterized by tubular cell injury and death. Recent studies have demonstrated autophagy induction in proximal tubular cells during acute kidney injury. The regulatory mechanisms of tubular cell autophagy are poorly understood; however, some recent findings have set up a foundation for further investigation. Although autophagy may promote cell death under certain experimental conditions, pharmacological and autophagy-related gene knockout studies have established a renoprotective role for autophagy in acute kidney injury. The mechanisms by which autophagy protects cells from injury and how, possibly, its pro-survival role switches to pro-death under certain conditions are discussed. Further research is expected to help us understand the regulatory network of tubular cell autophagy, define its precise roles in specific context of acute kidney injury, and identify autophagy-targeting strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:24485026

  8. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  9. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  10. Acute Diarrheal Syndromic Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kam, H.J.; Choi, S.; Cho, J.P.; Min, Y.G.; Park, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In an effort to identify and characterize the environmental factors that affect the number of patients with acute diarrheal (AD) syndrome, we developed and tested two regional surveillance models including holiday and weather information in addition to visitor records, at emergency medical facilities in the Seoul metropolitan area of Korea. Methods With 1,328,686 emergency department visitor records from the National Emergency Department Information system (NEDIS) and the holiday and weather information, two seasonal ARIMA models were constructed: (1) The simple model (only with total patient number), (2) the environmental factor-added model. The stationary R-squared was utilized as an in-sample model goodness-of-fit statistic for the constructed models, and the cumulative mean of the Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) was used to measure post-sample forecast accuracy over the next 1 month. Results The (1,0,1)(0,1,1)7 ARIMA model resulted in an adequate model fit for the daily number of AD patient visits over 12 months for both cases. Among various features, the total number of patient visits was selected as a commonly influential independent variable. Additionally, for the environmental factor-added model, holidays and daily precipitation were selected as features that statistically significantly affected model fitting. Stationary R-squared values were changed in a range of 0.651-0.828 (simple), and 0.805-0.844 (environmental factor-added) with p<0.05. In terms of prediction, the MAPE values changed within 0.090-0.120 and 0.089-0.114, respectively. Conclusion The environmental factor-added model yielded better MAPE values. Holiday and weather information appear to be crucial for the construction of an accurate syndromic surveillance model for AD, in addition to the visitor and assessment records. PMID:23616829

  11. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  12. Pancreatic pseudocyst after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Ken; Ito, Tetsuhide; Arita, Yoshiyuki; Sadamoto, Yojiro; Harada, Naohiko; Yamaguchi, Koji; Tanaka, Masao; Nakano, Itsuro; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2006-04-01

    Acute organophosphate poisoning (OP) shows several severe clinical symptoms due to its strong blocking effect on cholinesterase. Acute pancreatitis is one of the complications associated with acute OP, but this association still may not be widely recognized. We report here the case of a 73-year-old man who had repeated abdominal pain during and after the treatment of acute OP. Hyperamylasemia and a 7-cm pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail were noted on investigations. We diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst that likely was secondary to an episode of acute pancreatitis following acute OP. He was initially treated with a long-term intravenous hyperalimentation, protease inhibitors and octerotide, but eventually required surgical intervention, a cystgastrostomy. Acute pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia are known to be possible complications of acute OP. It is necessary to examine and assess pancreatic damage in patients with acute OP.

  13. Acute pancreatitis: The stress factor

    PubMed Central

    Binker, Marcelo G; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that may cause life-threatening complications. Etiologies of pancreatitis vary, with gallstones accounting for the majority of all cases, followed by alcohol. Other causes of pancreatitis include trauma, ischemia, mechanical obstruction, infections, autoimmune, hereditary, and drugs. The main events occurring in the pancreatic acinar cell that initiate and propagate acute pancreatitis include inhibition of secretion, intracellular activation of proteases, and generation of inflammatory mediators. Small cytokines known as chemokines are released from damaged pancreatic cells and attract inflammatory cells, whose systemic action ultimately determined the severity of the disease. Indeed, severe forms of pancreatitis may result in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, characterized by a progressive physiologic failure of several interdependent organ systems. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened, and stressors can include physical or mental forces, or combinations of both. Depending on the timing and duration, stress can result in beneficial or harmful consequences. While it is well established that a previous acute-short-term stress decreases the severity of experimentally-induced pancreatitis, the worsening effects of chronic stress on the exocrine pancreas have received relatively little attention. This review will focus on the influence of both prior acute-short-term and chronic stress in acute pancreatitis. PMID:24914340

  14. Acute liver failure due to acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wand, S; Waeschle, R M; Von Ahsen, N; Hawighorst, T; Bräuer, A; Quintel, M

    2012-04-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare but serious liver disease and typically occurs during the third trimester. It carries the risk for significant perinatal and maternal mortality. Therefore an early diagnosis and delivery, followed by close monitoring and optimized management of the impaired liver function with all associated problems are necessary to prevent maternal and foetal death. This case report focuses on the management of acute liver failure due to AFLP in a 31 year old women treated in our intensive care unit (ICU) after an emergency C-section.

  15. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  16. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients.

  17. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  18. Appendicular sarcoidosis mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunjan, Tia; Chaudery, Muzzafer; Zaidi, Ahsan; Beggs, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Appendicular sarcoidosis is a very rare cause of acute abdominal pain, with only seven cases reported previously in the literature. A 45-year-old woman, known to have sarcoidosis, presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of epigastric and right iliac fossa abdominal pain. At diagnostic laparoscopy, an acutely inflamed appendix was found and removed as well as an omental mass which was biopsied. Subsequent histopathological examination of the appendix demonstrated appendicular sarcoidosis without acute appendicitis and chronic inflammatory changes in the omental biopsy. The patients’ symptoms completely resolved postoperatively. It is important to undertake urgent operative intervention in patients with sarcoidosis who present with right iliac fossa pain, owing to the high risk of perforation. PMID:23162022

  19. [Microbiology in acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Bingen, E

    1998-04-15

    Acute otitis media is the most common bacterial infection in the child under 5 years of age and the leading reason for antibiotic prescriptions in Western countries. The choice of optimal antibiotic treatment is based essentially on microbiologic epidemiologic studies. The bacteria most often responsible for otitis belong to the commensal flora of the nasopharynx. French studies using paracentesis show that the main bacteria responsible for acute otitis media are H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis. The epidemiology of resistance to antibiotics has recently changed, with the appearance of pneumococcal strains having reduced sensitivity to penicillin, and which have played a major role in treatment failures.

  20. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence. PMID:28149030

  1. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-12-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence.

  2. [Acute vertigo of neurological origin].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Højgaard, Joan L Sunnleyg; Kondziella, Daniel

    2013-11-04

    Acute vertigo of neurological origin may be caused by haemorrhages and tumours in the posterior fossa and, most frequently, by ischaemic infarction in the vertebrobasilar circulation. Urgent diagnosis is necessary to avoid further ischaemic episodes, herniation due to cerebellar oedema and/or fatal brainstem infarction. The history should focus on accompanying neurological symptoms. However, vertigo with cerebellar lesions may be monosymptomatic and then bedside evaluation of oculomotor function is the key to correct diagnosis. This paper discusses the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical evaluation of acute vertigo of neurological origin.

  3. [Intravascular lymphoma causing acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Kröber, S M

    2007-02-01

    A 65-year old man presented with acute abdominal pain and fever. The initial diagnosis was small bowel gangrene. Pathology revealed small to large abdominal vessels obliterated by cells of intravascular B-cell-lymphoma (IVL). Visceral IVL involvement is common at autopsy but rarely reported in patients with acute abdomen. The subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy, which in typical cases is characterized by cephalic or cutaneous manifestation. Few cases showed involvement of large vessels which in combination to fibrin thrombi may lead to infarction of the organ involved. Thus IVL should be considered in cases of ischemic diseases with fever of unknown origin.

  4. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-05-26

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax.

  5. Amoebiasis Presenting as Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Imai, Jin; Mizukami, Hajime; Uda, Shuji; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Nomura, Eiji; Tajiri, Takuma; Watanabe, Norihito; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2016-12-20

    We report a case of amoebic appendicitis without colitis symptoms. Acute appendicitis is commonly encountered by gastroenterologists in their daily practice. The number of cases of amoebiasis increases annually in Japan, and is thought to be associated with an increase in sexually transmitted disease or travel to endemic areas. However, acute amoebic appendicitis is rare and the prognosis is very poor compared to nonamoebic appendicitis. In our case, appendectomy was performed immediately after onset, and the patient was discharged without complications. It is difficult to differentiate between amoebic and nonamoebic appendicitis preoperatively, and the possibility of amoebic appendicitis should be kept in mind.

  6. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident.

  7. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms might suggest that ... of samples used to test for acute myeloid leukemia If signs and symptoms and/or the results ...

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  9. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  10. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  11. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  13. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Missed Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is a rare complication of acute appendicitis. We present a case of missed appendicitis in a 52-year-old female which presented as a right-sided hydronephrosis. 2 days after admission to the Department of Urology CT revealed acute appendicitis for what open appendectomy was performed. Acute appendicitis can lead to obstructive uropathy by periappendiceal inflammation due to adjacency. Urologists, surgeons, and emergency physicians should be aware of this rare complication of atypical acute appendicitis. PMID:27818827

  14. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Dirofilariasis Mimicking an Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Mirko; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Prestipino, Marco; Giovenali, Paolo; Appignani, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Human infections caused by Dirofilaria repens have been reported in many areas of the world. We describe a case of a 3-year-old child with an intrascrotal mass caused by D repens mimicking an acute scrotum. This represents the first case of scrotal dirofilariasis described in pediatric age with such an unusual presentation.

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  18. The Acute Care Theater Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Rany J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of Illinois' medical school has a third-year program of weekly role-playing exercises focusing on management of acute medical problems. Students are responsible for creating the cases, complete with scenarios and treatment teams, simulating them, and successfully treating or reaching an impasse. Little teacher preparation time is…

  19. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint.

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A What's in this article? ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...