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Sample records for acute subdural haematoma

  1. Chronic subdural haematoma, an unusual injury from playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Keller, T M; Holland, M C

    1998-12-01

    Although the literature records instances of acute epidural haematoma and acute subdural haematoma related to playing basketball, there has not been a report of chronic subdural haematoma as a basketball injury. With the burgeoning interest in this sport in the United Kingdom and Europe, the possibility of this particular neurotrauma increases. Such an injury, along with the diagnosis and management of this often insidious lesion, is documented in this case report. PMID:9865409

  2. Spinal Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Manish K, Kothari; Chandrakant, Shah Kunal; Abhay M, Nene

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal cord compression syndromes. It’s early diagnosis is essential. Chronological appearance of these bleeds vary on MRI. Case Report: A 56 year old man presented with progressive left lower limb radiculopathy and paraesthesias with claudication of three days duration. MRI revealed a subdural space occupying lesion compressing the cauda equina at L5-S1 level producing a ‘Y’ shaped dural sac (Y sign), which was hyperintense on T1W imaging and hypointense to cord on T2W image. The STIR sequence showed hyperintensity to cord. There was no history of bleeding diathesis. The patient underwent decompressive durotomy and biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Spinal subdural hematoma may present with rapidly progressive neurological symptoms. MRI is the investigation of choice. The knowledge of MRI appearance with respect to the chronological stage of the bleed is essential to avoid diagnostic and hence surgical dilemma PMID:27299051

  3. Acute spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma presenting as paraplegia and complete recovery with non-operative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Zengin, Suat; Genc, Sinan; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Mete, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma (SSDH) with no underlying pathology is a very rare condition. Only 20 cases have been previously reported. It can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasia, or trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. It occurs most commonly in the thoracic spine and presents with sudden back pain radiating to the arms, legs or trunk, and varying degrees of motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. Although the main approach to management is surgical decompression, conservative management is used as well. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with sudden severe low back pain followed by rapid onset of complete paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an anterior subdural haematoma from T9 to L1 with cord compression. Corticosteroid treatment was administered. The patient showed substantial clinical improvement after 7 days of bed rest and an intense rehabilitation programme. An MRI scan and a computed tomography angiogram did not reveal any underlying pathology to account for the subdural haematoma. PMID:22065983

  4. CT evaluation of intracranial subdural haematoma: an Accra experience.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Jumah, K B; Iddrisu, M

    2002-12-01

    This is a descriptive analysis of the Computed Tomographic (CT) findings in 50 cases of intracranial subdural haematoma in Accra. The majority of patients were adults, though no age group was immune. The frequent aetiological factor in the series was trauma. Other remote causes such as meningitis and sickle cell disease were reported. The male to female ratio was 2.6:1, while the mean age was 32.4 years. Subdural Haematoma (SDH) was classified into various subtypes by their CT densities. The commonest type, the hyperdense or acute haematoma was reported in 56% of the patients. CT features noted in the series, include ventricular alteration, seen in 31 (62%) and were more often noted in the acute and isodense bleeds. Ipsilateral effacement of cerebral sulci was observed in only 10% of cases. Concave haematoma borders were reported in 76%. SDH were more often found on the left aspect of the cranium (52%), particularly in the frontal and pariental lobes. Evacuated surgery was done in only 9 of the series, where haematoma was demonstrated in more than 3 tomographic slices. Flake-like calcifications were found in three cases of long standing haematoma. Against the above background CT can be described as an appropriate diagnostic tool in clinical evaluation of SDH. PMID:15027771

  5. Tension pneumocephalus following evacuation of chronic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B S; Tewari, M K; Khosla, V K; Pathak, A; Kak, V K

    1989-01-01

    Five cases of a rare complication of tension pneumocephalus following evacuation of chronic subdural haematoma are described. This occurred in 8% of all cases of chronic subdural haematoma treated following installation of a CT scanner. The chronically compressed brain contributes to the ingress of this intracranial air. The increase in the brain bulk and gradual re-expansion of the brain, in the early postoperative period, competes with the trapped subdural air resulting in a rise in intracranial pressure leading to neurological deterioration. Twist drill craniostomy and aspiration, using a brain cannula with a three-way connector, has produced excellent results. PMID:2789723

  6. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis diagnosed after traumatic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Arpa, J; Sánchez, C; Vega, A; Cruz-Martínez, A; Ferrer, T; López-Pajares, R; Muñoz, J; Barreiro, P

    1995-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year old man, who, after presenting with subacute traumatic subdural haematoma, was diagnosed as CTX. He presented a ten year history of progressive deterioration of cognitive functions, unsteadiness of gait and surgery for bilateral cataracts at age 21. Cholestanol level in serum was 120.7 mmol/liter, and cholestanol/cholesterol ratio 2.52%. Bile alcohols in urine were 23, 25-pentol: 2.2665 mg/mmol creatinine, 24, 25-pentol: 1.3226 mg/mmol creatinine, and 27-nor-24, 25-pentol: 0.7363 mg/mmol creatinine. Electrophysiological study was consistent with a mixed demyelinating and axonal neuropathy. The assessment of autonomic nervous system (ANS) showed a postganglionic cholinergic failure accompanying somatic peripheral neuropathy. Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated markedly low amplitude and poorly defined waves, and almost symmetrical peak V and I to V interpeak latency (IPL) slight delays. Two nodular, bilateral, symmetrical lesions, strongly suggestive of calcifications, in the cerebellar white matter on CT and MRI were noted. On T2-weighted images diffuse high signal lesions were found in the cerebellar white matter, and multiple, hyperintense cerebral foci of demyelination or gliosis. MRI study of the Achilles tendon showed neither enlargement of the tendon, nor areas of lipid deposits. After ten months of treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (750 mg/d) the clinical course was unaffected and the neurophysiological measures, CT and MRI remained unchanged. PMID:8597991

  7. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  8. Current diagnosis and treatment of chronic subdural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, IA

    2015-01-01

    A developed society is usually also characterized by an elderly population, which has a continuous percentage growth. This population frequently presents a cumulus of medical pathologies. With the development of the medication and surgical treatment of different affections, the life span has increased and the pathology of an old patient has diversified as far as the cumulus of various pathological diseases in the same person is concerned. Chronic subdural pathologies represent an affection frequently met in neurosurgery practice. Any neurosurgeon, neurologist and not only, has to be aware of the possibility of the existence of a chronic subdural haematoma, especially when the patient is old and is subjected to an anticoagulant or antiaggregant treatment, these 2 causes being by far the etiological factors most frequently met in chronic subdural haematomas. With an adequate diagnosis and treatment, usually surgical, the prognosis is favorable. Although the surgical treatment presents a categorical indication in most of the cases, the fact that there are many surgical techniques, a great relapse rate, as well as the numerous studies, which try to highlight the efficiency of a technique as compared to another, demonstrate that the treatment of these haematomas is far from reaching a consensus among the neurosurgeons. The latest conservatory treatment directions are still being studied and need many years to be confirmed. Abbreviations: CT = computerized tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PMID:26351527

  9. Clinical evolutional aspects of chronic subdural haematomas – literature review

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, IA; Constantinescu, AI

    2015-01-01

    Apparently trivial, one of the most frequent pathologies in neurosurgical practice, chronic subdural haematoma, continues to be a challenge for the neurosurgeons both from the therapeutic and postoperatory complications point of view, taking into account that it is frequently met in elders, who usually present a complex pathology. The fact that, by definition, there is a latent period between the moment the brain injury, usually minor, occurs and the appearance of clinical symptomatology, frequently makes the trauma be ignored, this complicating the diagnosis and most of the times delaying the application of the adequate treatment. Developing slowly in time, in weeks or months, the aspect that chronic subdural haematoma usually occurs in elders should not be neglected, its clinical symptomatology often debuting with memory and attention disorders, so that the patient is usually referred to psychiatrists or neurologists, only a paraclinical investigation (CT scan or MRI) being able to establish the diagnosis. Even the appearance of the lateral signs is subjected to many diagnosis confusions because patients deny the existence of a trauma in over 50% of the cases. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, CSDH = chronic subdural haematoma, HMW = high molecular weight, F = frontal, T = temporal, P = parietal PMID:26361507

  10. Spinal subdural haematoma in a parturient after attempted epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Halpern, S H; MacDonald, D; Huh, C

    1993-04-01

    We report a case of spinal subdural haematoma with neurological deficit in a 36-yr-old woman following Caesarean section for severe preeclampsia and placental abruption. She had been taking chronic trifluoperazine treatment for depression. Her activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was 49 sec (normal = 26-36) but all other tests of coagulation were normal. Epidural anaesthesia was attempted but, despite a negative test dose, injection of local anaesthetic resulted in a generalized seizure and general anaesthesia was induced. Seventy-two hours after delivery, she was found to have bilateral leg weakness, urinary incontinence, absent rectal sphincter tone and asymmetrical leg reflexes. The diagnosis of spinal haematoma was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. She underwent emergency laminectomy and made a full neurological recovery. PMID:8485794

  11. Remote Cerebellar Haemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Numan; Gök, Sevki; Soyalp, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Remote cerebellar haemorrhage (RCH) is an unusual complication of supratentorial neurosurgical procedures. Even the rarer is cerebellar haemorrhage occurring after supratentorial burr hole drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). The exact mechanism is still unclear despite some possible causative factors such as rapid evacuation of haematoma and overdrainage of CSF (Cerebrospinal Fluid). We report a 80-year-old male patient who developed cerebellar haemorrhage after burr hole drainage of left frontoparietal chronic subdural haematoma and discuss the possible aetiological mechanisms through the review of the current literature. PMID:27437296

  12. Subdural haematoma and effusion in infancy: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, C; Childs, A; Wynne, J; Livingston, J; Seal, A

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine incidence, aetiology, and clinical features of subdural haematoma and effusion (SDH/E) in infancy throughout the British Isles. Methods: Cases were notified to the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit over 12 months by paediatricians, neurosurgeons, and paediatric and forensic pathologists. Results: A total of 186 infants (121 boys, 65 girls) aged 0–2 years were identified. Annual incidence of SDH/E for the UK and Republic of Ireland is 12.54/100 000 aged 0–2 (95% CI 10.3 to 14.62) and 24.1/100 000 aged 0–1 (95% CI 20.89 to 28.18). A total of 106 infants suffered non-accidental head injury (NAHI), 7 accidental head injury, 26 a perinatal cause, 7 a non-traumatic medical condition, 23 meningitis, and in 17 the cause was undetermined; 35 infants died. Significant differences were found in injury pattern, body weight, and Townsend score between NAHI and SDH/E from other cause. There were fewer diagnostic investigations in non-NAHI cases. Delay in diagnosis of greater than a week occurred in 48/181. Conclusion: SDH/E is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infancy. NAHI is the predominant cause of SDH/E. SDH/E can present in a non-specific and varied way and must be considered in any infant who is unwell. Determining the cause of the SDH/E in some cases continues to present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:16113132

  13. [Cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural haematoma: complications of spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Fabricius, J; Klotz, J M; Hofmann, E; Behr, R; Neumann-Haefelin, T

    2012-10-01

    We report on the case of a spontaneous intracranial hypotension with subdural hygroma, as well as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), both known complications of intracranial hypotension. The 45-year-old patient was subsequently treated - according to current guidelines for CVT - with anticoagulation, but developed subdural haematoma (SDH), which required neurosurgical treatment. Our case highlights the complex pathophysiological sequelae of intracranial hypotension, as well as the occasionally difficult treatment decisions. Subdural hygroma probably predisposes patients to SDH during anticoagulation. Thus, the potential benefit of anticoagulation needs to be weighed against the risk of SDH on an individual basis. PMID:23033205

  14. Progression of chronic subdural haematomas in an infant boy after abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Wuerfel nee Tysiak, E; Petersen, Dirk; Gottschalk, Stefan; Gerling, Ivana; Gliemroth, Jan; Thyen, Ute

    2012-11-01

    Abusive head trauma is a serious form of child abuse that can lead to severe neuropsychological sequelae or death in infants. In questionable cases, without a confession from the caregivers and ambiguous clinical information, evidence for the diagnosis of abusive head trauma is often based on typical patterns that have been observed in neuro-imaging. This study shows the progressive evolution of multifocal chronic subdural haematomas, including re-bleedings, in a case of abusive head trauma in an infant boy who was documented with repeated magnetic resonance imaging. The chronic subdural haematomas occurred during closely monitored in-patient rehabilitative care, and repeated maltreatment did not appear to be likely. Due to excessive growth, neurosurgical intervention with endoscopic craniotomy, evacuation of the subdural haematomas and temporal external cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed with a favourable recovery. This study discusses the current pathophysiological knowledge concerning the development and clinical course of chronic subdural haematomas and draws relevant conclusions for the clinical practice and psychosocial management of caring for victims of abusive head trauma. PMID:22421521

  15. The impact of computed tomography on the treatment of chronic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, A H; Joshy, N

    1982-01-01

    Twenty four consecutive patients with chronic subdural haematoma were treated by burr hole evacuation. Pre-operative and post-operative CT scans were performed and all patients developed a re-collection of fluid within the first week. This did not adversely influence clinical improvement and resolved spontaneously. Images PMID:7161611

  16. Computerised tomography of intracranial subdural haematoma in Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Agunloye, A M; Adeyinka, A O; Obajimi, M O; Malomo, A; Shokunbi, M T

    2003-09-01

    The high mortality and morbidity associated with intra-cranial subdural hematoma (SDH), has declined significantly with the introduction of Computerised Tomography (CT) for the evaluation of the brain in suspected cases. One hundred patients with CT-diagnosed SDH at the Radiology department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan between January 1999 and December 2000 were reviewed. The mean age was 47.4 years. The most frequent cause of SDH was head injury 61 (61%). The observed CT appearances of SDH included 66 (66%) of chronic (hypodense), 30 (30%) of acute (hyperdense) and 4 (4%) of acute-en-chronic (mixed density) lesions. There were more unilateral 83 (83%) lesions than bilateral 17 (17%). The lesions were right-sided in 45 (45%) cases and left-sided in 38 (38%). A total of 169 lesions were detected as some patients had multiple sites, however, the parietal 78 (46.2%) and frontal 64 (37.9%) lobes were mostly affected. We conclude that brain CT scan offers the advantage of prompt determination and precise anatomical localization of SDH, which significantly aids management. PMID:15030079

  17. Follow-up in patients with subdural haematomas using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans-Juergen; Richter, Barbel; Lott, Carsten; Dick, Wolfgang; Boor, Stephan; Hanley, Daniel F.

    1998-12-01

    Secondary haemorrhage is an important cause of brain injury following initial therapy of subdural haematoma (SDH). Early identification and treatment of secondary haemorrhage improves neurologic outcome. Near infrared light at a wavelength of 760 nm shows a high absorption for haemoglobin. The difference in absorbance of light ((Delta) OD) at the wavelength of 760 nm between both hemispheres is measured to detect SDH. We have prospectively studied 20 patients with the CT diagnosis of SDH using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Unilateral subdural haematomas were detected by NIRS in 15 out of 16 patients. Bilateral SDH were detected in 2 out of 3 patients. The median of (Delta) OD was reduced from initially 0.32 (0.05 - 0.85) to 0.1 (0.02 - 0.49) at hospital discharge. The complete resorption of the haematoma has been observed in 12 patients by NIRS. In 7 patients we still obtained pathologic values at discharge. The haematomas were not completely resolved, as proved by the CT scans prior to discharge. Our results showed repeated application of NIRS in patients with SDH help to document the clinical course after surgical treatment. Follow-up NIR evaluation of patients with SDH using NIRS may allow early treatment without time delay and a reduction of secondary brain injury as well as treatment costs.

  18. Dating of Early Subdural Haematoma: A Correlative Clinico-Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali Gundu; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Determination of post-traumatic interval remains one of the foremost important goals of any forensic investigation related to human crimes. The estimation of time since injury in cases of subdural haemorrhage has been studied only by a few investigators on the histological and radiological front. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the post-traumatic interval of Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) based on Hounsfield Unit measurements (HU) on Computed Tomography (CT) in surviving victims of head injury. Materials and Methods The study included a total of 100 cases of closed head injury with subdural haemorrhage. The Post-traumatic Time Interval (PTI) varied from 0.5 hours to a maximum of 249 hours, with a mean of 54.2 hours. Results Statistically significant results were obtained between the HU measurements of the SDH and the post-traumatic intervals and were found to be statistically significant. A rough attempt was made to determine the effect of haematoma volume on attenuation and was found out to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion The density of the subdural haematoma decreases with increase in the post-traumatic interval that concurs with the limited number of studies being conducted in the past. We concluded that further sorting of cases could be done according to its age with additional research and uniformity in the methodology. PMID:27190831

  19. [First manic episode in the elderly--consider a subdural haematoma due to head trauma as cause].

    PubMed

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Bakker, Miranda; Stek, Max L

    2010-01-01

    A manic episode in old age presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician due to the different symptomatology often difficult to distinguish from delirium, dementia, agitated depression and psychosis. To complicate matters further, a first episode of mania in later life is very often based on underlying physical and cerebral pathology ('secondary mania'). Many causes of 'secondary mania', including neurological, systemic or endocrine diseases, infections, intoxications, apnoea, post-thoracic surgery and vitamin B12 deficiency have been described to date, but there have been no reports on subdural haematomas in this context. However, the elderly are more prone to subdural haematomas following head trauma than younger patients. We present two case reports of older patients with a first manic episode in later life probably caused by subdural haematomas. A first episode of mania in later life always requires thorough assessment of the patient to determine physical and cerebral pathology. PMID:20456795

  20. Effect of patients' age on management of acute intracranial haematoma: prospective national study

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Philip T; Smith, Rik D; Parke, Timothy R J

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the management of head injuries differs between patients aged ⩾65 years and those <65. Design Prospective observational national study over four years. Setting 25 Scottish hospitals that admit trauma patients. Participants 527 trauma patients with extradural or acute subdural haematomas. Main outcome measures Time to cranial computed tomography in the first hospital attended, rates of transfer to neurosurgical care, rates of neurosurgical intervention, length of time to operation, and mortality in inpatients in the three months after admission. Results Patients aged ⩾65 years had lower survival rates than patients <65 years. Rates were 15/18 (83%) v 165/167 (99%) for extradural haematoma (P=0.007) and 61/93 (66%) v 229/249 (92%) for acute subdural haematoma (P<0.001). Older patients were less likely to be transferred to specialist neurosurgical care (10 (56%) v 142 (85%) for extradural haematoma (P=0.005) and 56 (60%) v 192 (77%) for subdural haematoma (P=0.004)). There was no significant difference between age groups in the incidence of neurosurgical interventions in patients who were transferred. Logistic regression analysis showed that age had a significant independent effect on transfer and on survival. Older patients had higher rates of coexisting medical conditions than younger patients, but when severity of injury, initial physiological status at presentation, or previous health were controlled for in a log linear analysis, transfer rates were still lower in older patients than in younger patients (P<0.001). Conclusions Compared with those aged under 65 years, people aged 65 and over have a worse prognosis after head injury complicated by intracranial haematoma. The decision to transfer such patients to neurosurgical care seems to be biased against older patients. What is already known on this topicOlder patients with acute intracranial haematomas have significantly higher mortality and poorer functional outcome than

  1. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-07-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  2. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. Three days after surgery, weakness of the extremities developed, and contralateral acute subdural bleeding within the previous subdural hygroma was diagnosed by CT scan of the brain. The pathophysiological mechanism of this rare complication was discussed, and the relevant literature was also reviewed. PMID:24983286

  3. Sudden worsening after subdural haematoma surgery: will there be a corpus callosum injury?

    PubMed Central

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Lodoli, Giovanni; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) which occurred after chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) surgery. The patient was admitted to our hospital for drowsiness and marked asthenia. The cerebral CT scan revealed a CSDH and surgery allowed to improve the symptoms, but after several days we observed a sudden worsening. The patient developed left-sided myoclonic seizures followed by left hemiplegia and worsening drowsiness. Electrolytes imbalance and inflammatory causes were excluded. The CT scan showed a right cerebral swelling and the subsequent MRI revealed a single lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum, hyperintense on diffusion-weighted images. After osmotic therapy the patient improved and on day 10 of admission the MRI showed a complete resolution of the lesion. This is the first report that described an association between CSDH and MERS. Possible aetiopathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24862419

  4. Traumatic acute subdural hygroma mimicking acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kamezaki, Takao; Yanaka, Kiyoyuki; Fujita, Keishi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Nose, Tadao

    2004-04-01

    Subdural hygroma is a frequent delayed complication of head trauma. Most hygromas are clinically 'silent' and a few cases have shown slow deterioration in the chronic stage. We report a case of subdural hygroma showing unique radiological findings and rapid deterioration. A 74-years-old female presented with a mild headache and consciousness disturbance after head injury. Computed tomography showed a midline shift as a result of two components piling up in the subdural space; the outer components showed low density, the inner components high density. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that these two subdural components were subdural hygroma and subarachnoid hematoma. Simple burr hole irrigation, rather than large craniotomy, was thought to be more appropriate treatment to reduce the mass effect. Simple burr hole irrigation was performed to remove the subdural hygroma and the patient showed an excellent recovery. Careful examination of the radiological findings prevented an unnecessary procedure in this case. A possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. PMID:14975427

  5. Risk Factors for Subdural Haematoma in Patients with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Hu, Bei-Bei; Xu, Qing-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Lou, Min

    2015-01-01

    Subdural haematoma (SDH) is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). In serious cases, SIH patients who present with SDHs develop neurological deficits, a decreased level of consciousness, or cerebral herniation, and may even require an urgent neurosurgical drainage. Despite numerous publications on SDHs, few report its potential risk factors in patients with SIH. In this study, we retrospectively investigated 93 consecutive SIH patients and divided them into an SDH group (n = 25) and a non-SDH (NSDH) group (n = 68). The clinical and radiographic characteristics of these 93 patients were analyzed, and then univariate analysis and further multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify the potential risk factors for the development of SDHs. The univariate analysis showed that advanced age, male gender, longer clinical course, dural enhancement, and the venous distension sign were associated with the development of SDHs. However, multivariate analysis only included the latter three factors. Our study reveals important radiological manifestations for predicting the development of SDHs in patients with SIH. PMID:25853681

  6. Epidural blood patch for spontaneous intracranial hypotension with chronic subdural haematoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Jin, Dan; Pan, Kong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Spinal leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to be the primary cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Subdural haematoma (SDH) is a serious complication of SIH. This current report presents a case of bilateral SDH with SIH that was treated with epidural blood patching (EBP). A 43-year-old male complained of experiencing orthostatic headaches for 2 months without neurological signs. The patient worsened in a local hospital and was transferred to the Sir Run Run Hospital. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral SDH with a midline shift. The patient underwent emergency trephination in the left frontal temporal region. Postoperative magnetic resonance myelography showed a CSF leak originating at the T11-L2 level. As a consequence of clinical deterioration of the patient, EBP was subsequently performed at the T12-L1 level. The headache was rapidly relieved and later the SDH was completely absorbed. This case report and literature review aims to remind clinicians that SIH can cause SDH and that EBP is a viable treatment option. PMID:27225863

  7. [Haematoma of the floor of the mouth associated to acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Alejandro; Bayón, Jeremías; Gallego, Lorena; Junquera, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a haematoma in the floor of the mouth after receiving alteplase in the treatment of an acute myocardial infarction. Both the treatment received and appropriate preventive measures to avoid such haematomas are described. PMID:21163462

  8. Acute subdural hematoma: morbidity, mortality, and operative timing.

    PubMed

    Wilberger, J E; Harris, M; Diamond, D L

    1991-02-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematoma remains one of the most lethal of all head injuries. Since 1981, it has been strongly held that the critical factor in overall outcome from acute subdural hematoma is timing of operative intervention for clot removal; those operated on within 4 hours of injury may have mortality rates as low as 30% with functional survival rates as high as 65%. Data were reviewed for 1150 severely head-injured patients (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores 3 to 7) treated at a Level 1 trauma center between 1982 and 1987; 101 of these patients had acute subdural hematoma. Standard treatment protocol included aggressive prehospital resuscitation measures, rapid operative intervention, and aggressive postoperative control of intracranial pressure (ICP). The overall mortality rate was 66%, and 19% had functional recovery. The following variables statistically correlated (p less than 0.05) with outcome; motorcycle accident as a mechanism of injury, age over 65 years, admission GCS score of 3 or 4, and postoperative ICP greater than 45 mm Hg. The time from injury to operative evacuation of the acute subdural hematoma in regard to outcome morbidity and mortality was not statistically significant even when examined at hourly intervals although there were trends indicating that earlier surgery improved outcome. The findings of this study support the pathophysiological evidence that, in acute subdural hematoma, the extent of primary underlying brain injury is more important than the subdural clot itself in dictating outcome; therefore, the ability to control ICP is more critical to outcome than the absolute timing of subdural blood removal. PMID:1988590

  9. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages.

  10. Management of spontaneous extramedullary spinal haematomas: results in eight patients after MRI diagnosis and surgical decompression.

    PubMed Central

    Langmayr, J J; Ortler, M; Dessl, A; Twerdy, K; Aichner, F; Felber, S

    1995-01-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extradural and subdural haemorrhage is a neurosurgical emergency. Differences in clinical presentation in relation to localisation of the haematoma, value of MRI as a diagnostic tool, surgical treatment, and prognosis were investigated in a retrospective case series of eight patients with extradural (n = four) and subdural (n = four) haematomas. Results of MRI were compared with operative findings and proved to be of high sensitivity in defining the type of bleeding and delineating craniocaudal extension and ventrodorsal location. Surgical treatment by decompressive laminectomy, haematoma evacuation, and postoperative high dose corticosteroids resulted in resolution of symptoms in five patients and improvement in the clinical situation in two patients. One patient with a chronic subdural haematoma had a second operation because of arachnoidal adhesions. One patient presented with a complete cord transection syndrome due to an acute subdural haematoma and remained paraplegic. It is concluded that prompt, reliable, and non-invasive diagnosis by MRI leads to efficient surgical treatment and a favourable outcome in this rare condition. Images PMID:7561928

  11. Abnormal brain scan with subacute extradural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J. Barrie; Langford, Keith H.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients are described with proven subacute extradural haematomas, each with an abnormal cerebral scan of diagnostic assistance. A possible mechanism of production of the subacute extradural haematoma is discussed, and appears to be similar to the mechanism involved in the subacute subdural haematoma. The means by which the abnormal scan results in such cases is also examined, from which it appears that non-specific meningeal membrane inflammatory reaction surrounding the haematoma is significant. Images PMID:5478950

  12. Acute enlargement of subdural hygroma due to subdural hemorrhage in a victim of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Hyodoh, Hideki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Mizuo, Keisuke

    2015-03-01

    An 11-month-old female baby was found dead by her mother. Cranial postmortem CT prior to the forensic autopsy showed dilatation of bilateral extra-axial spaces and ventricles. The autopsy revealed a new linear fracture of the left parietal bone and occipital bone, and a healed linear fracture of the right parietal bone and occipital bone like a mirror image of the left one as well. Intracranially, 230ml of subdural fluid were collected, which was mixed with blood. There was a fresh hemorrhage around a bridging vein of the left parietal lobe and the dura mater. Moreover, the outer side of the cerebrum and the inner side of the dura mater were covered by a thin membrane, which mater might have been previously formed because of being positive for Fe-staining and anti-CD68 antibody. A subdural hematoma might have been developed when the right side of the skull was previously fractured, which was transformed into a subdural hygroma. Subsequently, it is likely that, after the left side fracture of the skull occurred, the subdural hygroma rapidly enlarged due to hemorrhaging from the bridging vein, which resulted in intracranial hypertension, because microbleeding was detected in the brain stem. Accordingly, we diagnosed the cause and manner of death as intracranial hypertension due to subdural hemorrhage in subdural hygroma, and homicide, including child abuse, respectively. PMID:25457269

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with subdural haematoma as first presentation for systemic lupus erythematosus with negative antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Alboudi, Ayman; Sarathchandran, Pournamy; Alrukn, Suhail; Al Madani, Abubaker

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, without any previous comorbidities presenting with acute onset headache, altered sensorium and unsteadiness of gait. Neurological evaluation revealed a drowsy patient with papilloedema, bilateral lateral rectus palsy, generalised hyper-reflexia and up going plantar responses. Urgent imaging performed showed extensive cortical venous sinus thrombosis. Workup for secondary causes of cortical venous sinus thrombosis revealed very high titres of antinuclear antibody and anti-dsDNA, but negative antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA). In hospital she started developing other complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Urine evaluation revealed proteinuria and granular casts suggestive of glomerulonephritis. Cardiac evaluation revealed moderate pericardial effusion. We have discussed neurolupus as initial presentation of SLE and the rare occurrence of major neurovascular complications without secondary APLA syndrome. PMID:25080548

  14. Lingual Haematoma due to Tenecteplase in a Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Muhlis; Salturk, Ziya; Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Yağcı, Serkan; Coşkun Bal, Gökçen

    2013-01-01

    The use of intravenous thrombolytic agents has revolutionised the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. However, the improvement in mortality rate achieved with these drugs is tempered by the risk of serious bleeding complications, including intracranial haemorrhage. Tenecteplase is a genetically engineered mutant tissue plasminogen activator. Haemorrhagic complications of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are well known. Compared to other tPAs, tenecteplase use leads to lower rates of bleeding complications. Here, we report a case of unusual site of spontaneous bleeding, intralingual haematoma during tenecteplase therapy following acute myocardial infarction, which caused significant upper airway obstruction and required tracheotomy to maintain the patient's airway. Clinical dilemmas related to securing the airway or reversing the effects of tissue plasminogen activator are discussed. PMID:23862086

  15. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  16. Acute subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hanish; Chaudhary, Ashwani; Mahajan, Anuj; Paul, Birinder

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare type of stroke primarily affecting young women. Diagnosis is generally delayed or overlooked due to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms. Subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is very rare. We report a case of 40-year-old female with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis who presented to us with an acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage besides venous infarct. Management of such patients is complicated due to the rarity of the condition and contraindication for the use of anticoagulation. We conducted a thorough literature search through PubMed and could find only nine cases of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27057237

  17. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases. PMID:26362305

  18. Acute subdural hematoma in a high school football player.

    PubMed

    Litt, D W

    1995-03-01

    A 16-year-old football player developed a headache following a collision during a game. When his headache persisted for 1 week, he underwent a computerized tomographic (CT) scan to determine the cause. Findings were normal and a concussion was diagnosed. Seventeen days after the injury, the athlete reported disappearance of his symptoms. Provocative testing failed to recreate symptoms. The athlete continued to deny any symptoms and was cleared for unlimited participation 30 days after the initial injury. In the next game, the athlete collided with an opposing player, ran to the sidelines, and deteriorated on the sidelines after complaining of dizziness. Local Emergency Medical Squad personnel intubated him and transported him to a local hospital emergency room. Attending neurosurgeons diagnosed a right subdural hematoma by CT scan. A burr hole craniotomy evacuated the lesion. The operative report noted a second area of chronic membrane formation consistent with past head trauma. This lesion had escaped detection on two CT scans. In an interview 4 months postoperatively, the athlete admitted having experienced constant symptoms between the first and second injuries. PMID:16558315

  19. [Subdural empyema due to gemella morbillorum as a complication of acute sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Boto, Leonor Reis; Calado, Cláudia; Vieira, Marisa; Camilo, Cristina; Abecasis, Francisco; Campos, Alexandre R; Correia, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Subdural empyema is a life-threatening infection that may complicate acute sinusitis. The authors report the case of a previously healthy 10 year-old girl who presented with subdural empyema due to Gemella morbillorum after an untreated maxillary, ethmoidal and esphenoidal sinusitis. Despite immediate drainage of the empyema and underlying primary infection and treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics, she later developed frontal cerebritis and refractory intracranial hypertension, needing urgent decompressive craniectomy. She recovered gradually, maintaining to date slight right hemyparesis and aphasia. Even though it is considered a low virulence organism, G. morbillorum has been increasingly described in central nervous system infection. In this case, the prompt institution of broad spectrum antibiotics and surgical drainage, as well as the agressive treatment of complications, including decompressive craniectomy, were crucial to the patient's recovery. PMID:22015038

  20. [Surgical Outcome of Acute and Subacute Subdural Hematoma with Endoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Yoshioka, Tsutomu; Hirata, Yoko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Tomohiro; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-06-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and subacute subdural hematoma(SASDH)evacuations are commonly performed through a large craniotomy or with external decompression surgery to avoid secondary brain injury. In the field of head trauma, minimally invasive surgeries performed with neuroendoscopy were recently reported. We report 12 patients with ASDH( n=9) and SASDH (n=3)w ho underwent endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy between November 2013 and May 2015. All patients were over 65 years of age(mean age, 78.8 years[range, 65-91 years]) and had subdural hematomas without extensive contusion. The mean preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)score was 8.75 (range, 4-13). In three patients, we observed the bleeding point and substantially coagulated it. Decompression in all patients was adequate after surgery. Patients with a preoperative GCS score of 4-6 showed poor outcomes, whereas those with a score >9 showed relatively good outcomes. We performed the operations safely in patients who were on antithrombotic therapy or had a systemic bleeding tendency pre-injury. Endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy is a safe and minimally invasive procedure in patients older than 65 years with comorbidities. PMID:27270143

  1. [Acute Subdural Hematoma in Snowboarders:A Multivariate Analysis of 79 Cases].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinya; Fukuda, Osamu; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Snowboarding-related head injuries have become less common as the number of snowboarders has decreased;however, severe head injuries, such as acute subdural hematomas, occur every snowboarding season. We investigated the characteristics of cases of snowboarding-related acute subdural hematoma treated at our hospital. A total of 3,632 patients with snowboarding-related head injuries seen at our hospital between the 1995/96 and 2012/13 snowboarding seasons were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine(2.2%)patients were diagnosed with acute subdural hematomas using computed tomography. We statistically analyzed the patient questionnaire responses, clinical records, and radiological findings. We compared the findings of the acute subdural hematoma(ASDH)group with those of the non-ASDH group. Among beginners, falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, and injuries of unknown origin were significantly more common in the ASDH group. On the other hand, among the intermediate snowboarders, incidents involving jumps, jump failure, and collisions with other snowboarders were more common in the non-ASDH group. Secondly, in an analysis involving subjects who had an ASDH, we compared the beginner group with the intermediate/advanced group. Falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, pure ASDH, diffuse brain swelling, and death were more common in the beginner group, and ASDH combined with contusions or subarachnoid hemorrhaging and incidents involving a jump were more common in the intermediate/advanced group. Finally, we summarized the cases of 10 subjects with an ASDH as well as diffuse brain swelling. Nine of the 10 patients died, 8 were first-timers or beginners, 6 had incidents involving flat or gentle slopes, and 5 had fallen on a slope. Snowboarding is a recreational sport;therefore, snowboarders must take responsibility for their actions. However, snowboarders, especially beginners, could decrease their risk of ASDH if they are informed about ASDH and

  2. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  3. Subdural effusion

    MedlinePlus

    A subdural effusion is a collection of fluid trapped between the surface of the brain and the outer lining of ... A subdural effusion is a rare complication of bacterial meningitis . Subdural effusion is more common in infants and in persons ...

  4. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; NARISAWA, Ayumi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  5. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Karibe, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Motonobu; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Narisawa, Ayumi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-15

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  6. Subdural effusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... subdural effusion is a rare complication of bacterial meningitis . Subdural effusion is more common in infants and in persons who have meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae . Symptoms Bulging fontanelles in ...

  7. Craniotomy or Decompressive Craniectomy for Acute Subdural Hematomas: Surgical Selection and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young Sub; Yang, Kook Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Craniotomy (CO) and decompressive craniectomy (DC) are two main surgical options for acute subdural hematomas (ASDH). However, optimal selection of surgical modality is unclear and decision may vary with surgeon's experience. To clarify this point, we analyzed preoperative findings and surgical outcome of patients with ASDH treated with CO or DC. Methods From January 2010 to December 2014, data for 46 patients with ASDH who underwent CO or DC were retrospectively reviewed. The demographic, clinical, imaging and clinical outcomes were analyzed and statistically compared. Results Twenty (43%) patients underwent CO and 26 (57%) patients received DC. In DC group, preoperative Glascow Coma Scale was lower (p=0.034), and more patient had non-reactive pupil (p=0.004). Computed tomography findings of DC group showed more frequent subarachnoid hemorrhage (p=0.003). Six month modified Rankin Scale showed favorable outcome in 60% of CO group and 23% of DC group (p=0.004). DC was done in patient with more unfavorable preoperative features (p=0.017). Patients with few unfavorable preoperative features (<6) had good outcome with CO (p<0.001). Conclusion In selective cases of few unfavorable clinical findings, CO may also be an effective surgical option for ASDH. Although DC remains to be standard of surgical modality for patients with poor clinical status, CO can be an alternative considering the possible complications of DC. PMID:27182498

  8. Subdural infusion of dexamethasone inhibits leukomyelitis after acute spinal cord injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kwiecien, Jm; Jarosz, B; Urdzikova, L M; Rola, R; Dabrowski, W

    2015-01-01

    Trauma in spinal cord injury often results in massive damage to the white matter and in damage to myelin that results in a severe phagocyte-rich infiltration apparently directed at removing immunologically toxic myelin debris. In the epidural balloon crush injury to the rat cranial thoracic spinal cord, the dorsal column was crushed, which at one week post-op resulted in its obliteration by a severe infiltration by a virtually pure population of macrophages that internalized all damaged myelin. A week-long subdural infusion of dexamethasone, a stable synthetic corticosteroid, resulted in remarkable inhibition of the macrophage infiltration of the crush cavity and in the lack of removal of myelin debris by phagocytosis. In this study we demonstrated that spinal cord injury results in a severe inflammatory response directed at massively damaged myelin, and we inhibited this response with a subdural infusion of a powerful anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. PMID:25909874

  9. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematoma is usually the result of a serious head injury. When it occurs this way, it is called ... subdural hematomas are among the deadliest of all head injuries. The bleeding fills the brain area very rapidly, ...

  10. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  11. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas.

    PubMed

    Rochat, P; Johannesen, H H; Poulsgård, L; Bøgeskov, L

    2002-12-01

    Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas, where the second haematoma evolves after surgical removal of the first haematoma, are rarely reported. We report two cases of this entity. One patient was involved in a road traffic accident and the other was suffering from a head injury after an assault. CT scans showed that both patients had an unilateral epidural haematoma with a thin presumably epidural haemorrhage on the opposite side. Both patients were operated for their epidural haematomas, but did not improve after surgical treatment, and postoperative CT scans revealed evolving of an epidural haematoma on the opposite side. After evacuation of the second epidural haematoma both patients recovered quickly. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas are rare, but must be considered in the postoperative intensive care treatment in patients with epidural haematomas. Both cases emphasize the need for intensive care monitoring after an operation for an epidural haematoma and the need for CT scans if the patient does not improve quickly after removal of the haematoma. This is especially important if a small contralateral haematoma is seen on the initial CT scan. PMID:12445923

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... Ling GSF. Traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  13. Effects of diclofenac sodium on the hippocampus of rats with acute subdural hematoma: histological, stereological, and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, A P; Kaplan, S; Aksoy, A; Altunkaynak, Bz; Yurt, Kk; Elibol, E; Çokluk, C; Onger, Me

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the potential effects of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and diclofenac sodium (DS) therapy following ASDH on the rat hippocampus. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were used and divided into four groups. 0.1 ml of non-heparinized autologous blood from the tail vein of the animals in the non-treatment group (NTG) and treatment group (TG) was injected into the subdural space. The TG received intramuscular diclofenac sodium at a 15 mg/kg dose daily from the postoperative second hour to the seventh day after the operation. The control group (CG) and sham group (SG) were used for control and sham operations, respectively. On the postoperative eighth day, all animals were sacrificed, and the hippocampi of all animals were stereologically and histologically evaluated. Also blood samples of the animals were biochemically analyzed. As a result of the study, the mean number of neurons in CA1, CA2, and CA3 regions of the hippocampus and the total number of neurons were decreased in the hippocampus samples of the NTG and especially the TG subjects. When comparing the second blood samples, there was no difference between the levels of adrenaline and serotonin among the groups. However, after the operation, noradrenalin levels in the treatment group were found to be higher than those of the sham and control groups (p < 0.05). In the NTG and TG, histopathological findings were observed such as Nissl condensation as well as completely dead and indistinguishable neurons with abnormally shaped, shrunken cytoplasm and nuclei. Also necrotic areas on the specimens of the TG were seen. In immunohistochemical sections, c-FOS positivity was decreased in the NTG and especially the TG. Otherwise, PGC-1 positive cells were increased in the NTG and especially the TG. In this study, it was shown for the first time by means of stereological techniques that using DS after ASDH caused a decrease in the number of hippocampal neurons (CA1, CA2, and CA3

  14. Acute aggravation of subdural fluid collection associated with dural metastasis of malignant neoplasms: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shigeyoshi; Kotani, Akio; Takimoto, Toshiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2014-10-01

    A 63-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with serious headache and vomiting. Five months before admission, she had undergone surgery for a primary advanced gastric cancer. Neuroradiological examinations revealed subdural fluid collection. We twice performed evacuation of the subdural fluid collection. However, aggravation of her state of consciousness progressed and she passed away. Histological examinations demonstrated that the dural veins were infiltrated by numerous tumor cells that produced mucus; however, ruptured vessels were not found. Furthermore, the subdural fluid collection increased shortly after the initial operation. We infer that the cause of the collection, which was associated with the dural metastasis of malignant tumors, was not only mucin secretion by tumor cells but also a rapid increase in perfusion pressure in the vessels of the dura mater, resulting in extravasation of plasma components into the subdural space. Our case demonstrates that the pathogenetic mechanism that is specific for subdural fluid collection caused by dural metastasis of malignant tumors differs from the mechanism of production of subdural hematoma associated with dural metastasis. PMID:24036578

  15. Early Decompression of Acute Subdural Hematoma for Postoperative Neurological Improvement: A Single Center Retrospective Review of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Shim, Yu Shik; Hyun, Dongkeun; Park, Hyeonseon; Kim, Eunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate survival related factors, as well as to evaluate the effects of early decompression on acute subdural hematoma (ASDH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed cases of decompressive craniectomy (DC) for decade. In total, 198 cases of DC involved ASDH were available for review, and 65 cases were excluded due to missing data on onset time and a delayed operation after closed observation with medical care. Finally, 133 cases of DC with ASDH were included in this study, and various factors including the time interval between trauma onset and operation were evaluated. Results In the present study, survival rate after DC in patients with ASDH was shown to be related to patient age (50 years old, p=0.012), brain compression ratio (p=0.042) and brain stem compression (p=0.020). Sex, preoperative mental status, and time interval between trauma onset and operation were not related with survival rate. Among those that survived (n=78), improvements in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of more than three points, compared to preoperative measurement, were more frequently observed among the early (less than 3 hours between trauma onset and operation) decompressed cases (p=0.013). However, improvements of more than 4 or 5 points on the GCS were not affected by early decompression. Conclusion Early decompression of ASDH was not correlated with survival rate, but was related with neurological improvement (more than three points on the GCS). Accordingly, early decompression in ASDH, if indicated, may be of particular benefit. PMID:27182496

  16. Cerebral Infarction following Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants and Young Children: Predictors and Significance of FLAIR Vessel Hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    MOMOSE, Hiroaki; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; AOKI, Rie; ATSUMI, Hideki; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    A phenomenon of cerebral infarction following acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) in infants and young children, termed cerebral infarction following ASDH (CIASDH), has been well recognized, though both its mechanisms and risk factors have been poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the predictors for CIASDH in a population of ASDH, and to evaluate the imaging studies to presume the mechanisms of CIASDH. We retrospectively examined consecutive children 6 years of age or younger, who were diagnosed with ASDH and were admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2014. In 57 consecutive children with ASDH, 12 (21.1%) developed CIASDH. The multivariate analysis revealed five predictors for CIASDH: presence of seizure, consciousness disturbance at admission, absence of skull fracture, hematoma thickness ≥ 5 mm on computed tomography (CT), and midline shift ≥ 3 mm on CT (p < 0.05). In three of six patients (50%) undergoing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) within 5 days of admission, serpentine hyperintensities in the subarachnoid space (FLAIR vessel hyperintensities) were demonstrated. MR angiography showed neither occlusion nor stenosis of the cerebral arteries. Single photon emission CT performed at admission in one patient showed a cerebral blood flow reduction in the ASDH side. All the children with CIASDH showed unfavorable outcomes at discharge. Children showing multiple predictors at admission should be carefully observed for development of CIASDH. Evaluation of the imaging studies suggested that a blood flow disturbance in the level of peripheral arteries to microcirculation was one candidate for possible mechanisms to induce the CIASDH. PMID:26041626

  17. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  18. Escherichia coli subdural empyema following subdural hygroma in elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki Sung; Yee, Gi Taek; Han, Seong Rok; Lee, Chae Hyuk

    2010-06-01

    Subdural empyema of the brain is an uncommon disorder that occurs more frequently in children than in adult. Authors report a very rare of subdural empyema following the subdural hygroma after mild head injury. The exact mechanism of infection is not known. However, we have to consider subdural infection as one of differential diagnosis in elderly patient with subdural hygroma when new abnormal density lesion is developed in the subdural space. PMID:20617097

  19. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  20. [A Case of Ruptured Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Associated with Acute Subdural Hematoma, Extending from the Interhemispheric Space to the Posterior Fossa].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Yuhtaka; Yoshimura, Shouta; Somagawa, Chika; Hiu, Takeshi; Ono, Tomonori; Ushijima, Ryujirou; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a sudden severe headache without a history of head trauma. CT and MRI revealed an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) extending from the right interhemispheric space to the posterior fossa bilaterally, with a small amount of subarachnoid hemorrhage that was predominantly localized to the left side of the basal cistern. CT angiogram demonstrated a long protruding ruptured aneurysm at the junction of the right internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries (IC/PC AN) with a posteroinferior projection, associated with a small bleb located near the tentorial edge close to the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process, for which she received clipping surgery. Though rare, IC/PC AN could cause pure or nearly pure ASDH in the above-mentioned distribution. Therefore, in patients with such ASDH, especially without a history of head injury or precise information regarding the situation at the time of onset, urgent imaging evaluation and early intervention are essential to prevent devastating re-rupture events. PMID:27270151

  1. Massive pre-placental and subchorionic haematoma.

    PubMed

    Loi, K; Tan, K T

    2006-12-01

    We report an unusual case of massive pre-placental and subchorionic haematoma occurring in a 26-year-old woman who presented with antepartum haemorrhage at 24 weeks gestation. Ultrasonography showed a subchorionic haematoma in the lower posterior uterine wall measuring 5.0 cm in largest diameter. There was also a separate irregular multiloculated structure measuring 4.3 cm in largest diameter on the surface of the placenta, due to a pre-placental haematoma. The subchorionic haematoma diminished in size over time, while the pre-placental haematoma continued to grow, measuring 9.0 cm at 28 weeks, and 9.3 cm at 32 weeks. At 32 weeks, the patient presented with premature rupture of membranes and four days later, an emergency caesarean section was performed when the patient had another episode of severe antepartum haemorrhage. Both mother and child recovered well. The current literature on such haematomas is reviewed. PMID:17139407

  2. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  3. Macrocephaly in infancy: benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jacqueline; Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Piatt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces (BESS) is a common finding on imaging studies indicated by macrocephaly in infancy. This finding has been associated with the presence of subdural fluid collections that are sometimes construed as suggestive of abusive head injury. The prevalence of BESS among infants with macrocephaly and the prevalence of subdural collections among infants with BESS are both poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the relative frequencies of BESS, hydrocephalus, and subdural collections in a large consecutive series of imaging studies performed for macrocephaly and to determine the prevalence of subdural fluid collections among patients with BESS. METHODS A text search of radiology requisitions identified studies performed for macrocephaly in patients ≤ 2 years of age. Studies of patients with hydrocephalus or acute trauma were excluded. Studies that demonstrated hydrocephalus or chronic subdural hematoma not previously recognized but responsible for macrocephaly were noted but not investigated further. The remaining studies were reviewed for the presence of incidental subdural collections and for measurement of the depth of the subarachnoid space. A 3-point scale was used to grade BESS: Grade 0, < 5 mm; Grade 1, 5-9 mm; and Grade 2, ≥ 10 mm. RESULTS After exclusions, there were 538 studies, including 7 cases of hydrocephalus (1.3%) and 1 large, bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (0.2%). There were incidental subdural collections in 21 cases (3.9%). Two hundred sixty-five studies (49.2%) exhibited Grade 1 BESS, and 46 studies (8.6%) exhibited Grade 2 BESS. The prevalence of incidental subdural collections among studies with BESS was 18 of 311 (5.8%). The presence of BESS was associated with a greater prevalence of subdural collections, and higher grades of BESS were associated with increasing prevalence of subdural collections. After controlling for imaging modality, the odds ratio of the association of

  4. Is Subdural Peritoneal Shunt Placement an Effective Tool for the Management of Recurrent/Chronic Subdural Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Valerio, Jose E; Delgado, Victor; Escalante, Jennifer A; Lopez, Nithia; Wolf, Aizik L

    2016-01-01

    Objective  To describe a surgical technique and to report using a retrospective study the efficacy of peritoneal shunts for the treatment of recurrent/chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). We describe the considerations, complications, and outcomes related to this technique. Methods  In a retrospective cohort study, 125 charts with a diagnosis of subacute/chronic subdural hematoma were assigned for evaluation. Of the charts reviewed, 18 charts were found from subjects with a diagnosis of recurrent sub-acute or chronic subdural hematoma. All patients had undergone initial surgical treatment of their condition followed by peritoneal shunt placement to help alleviate intracranial pressure. Factors including the age, size of subdural hematoma, number of previous events, BMI, complications, survival, and clinical course were analyzed. Results  After subdural peritoneal shunt placement all patients had full neurological recovery with no complaints of headaches, lethargy, weakness, confusion or seizures. None of the cases had new subdural hematoma episodes after placement for a minimum of a two-year period (mean 26.1 months) (range 24.3-48.6 months). No postoperative complications were reported. The rates of postoperative hemorrhage, infection, distal catheter revision, and perioperative seizures was found to be zero percent. Shunt drainage was successful in all cases, draining 85% of the blood in the first 48 hours. There was no significant relationship between complications and the use of anticoagulants four weeks after surgery. Conclusions Peritoneal shunts, though rarely used, are a viable option in the treatment of sub-acute/chronic subdural hematomas. When pursuing this treatment, this technique is recommended to mitigate the risks of repeat surgical intervention and lessen perioperative time in high-risk patients. PMID:27335718

  5. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of traumatic subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Lee, K S

    1998-07-01

    Subdural hygroma (SDG) is a common post-traumatic lesion. Despite its common occurrence, the pathogenesis and clinical significance are uncertain. The author reviewed the literature to clarify the present knowledge on the pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this controversial lesion. A trivial trauma can cause a separation of the dura-arachnoid interface, which is the basic requirement for the development of a SDG. If the brain shrinks due to brain atrophy, excessive dehydration or decreased intracranial pressure, fluid collection may develop by a passive effusion. Most SDGs resolve when the brain is well expanded. However, a few SDGs become chronic subdural haematomas, when the necessary conditions persist over several weeks. Since the majority of patients with a SDG do not show a mass effect, surgery is rarely required. Outcome is closely related to the primary head injury not to the SDG itself. The complexity of SDG depends on various factors including the dynamics of absorption and expansion, duration of observation, and indication and rate of surgery, besides variety of the primary head injury in types and severity. SDG is a common epiphenomenon of head injury. PMID:9653522

  6. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  7. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Angelo; Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  8. Subdural hydatid cyst presenting as recurrent subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abrar A; Ramzan, Altaf U; Nizami, Furqan A; Malik, Nayil K; Dar, Bashir; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hydatid disease is an uncommon entity that usually is parenchymal in location. Presence of hydatid cyst in subdural location is being reported for the first time in the literature. A 13-year-old female child with the diagnosis of hydatid disease of brain was operated. She was advised to take albendazole which she did not take. In postoperative period she developed recurrent subdural hygroma for which multiple surgical interventions were done and finally cause of recurrent subdural hygroma was found to be hydatid cyst in the subdural space. The patient had initially undergone craniotomy for the excision of hydatid cyst. Later on she developed subdural hygroma for which the burr hole drainage was done twice. At time of third recurrence subduro-peritoneal (SDP) shunt was done. When she had recurrence again along with hydrocephalus, than VP shunt and revision of the SDP shunt was planned. While doing revision of SDP shunt, hydatid cyst was seen emerging from the burr hole site. A craniotomy was done to remove the hydatid cyst from the subdural space. Since then there has been no recurrent collection. Complete surgical excision is the best treatment modality to treat hydatid cyst of brain. Accidental spillage of the contents can have lead to recurrence, so every effort must be taken to prevent spillage of contents. Postoperatively all the patients must be put on antihelminthics. PMID:27366285

  9. Subdural hydatid cyst presenting as recurrent subdural hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abrar A.; Ramzan, Altaf U.; Nizami, Furqan A.; Malik, Nayil K.; Dar, Bashir; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hydatid disease is an uncommon entity that usually is parenchymal in location. Presence of hydatid cyst in subdural location is being reported for the first time in the literature. A 13-year-old female child with the diagnosis of hydatid disease of brain was operated. She was advised to take albendazole which she did not take. In postoperative period she developed recurrent subdural hygroma for which multiple surgical interventions were done and finally cause of recurrent subdural hygroma was found to be hydatid cyst in the subdural space. The patient had initially undergone craniotomy for the excision of hydatid cyst. Later on she developed subdural hygroma for which the burr hole drainage was done twice. At time of third recurrence subduro-peritoneal (SDP) shunt was done. When she had recurrence again along with hydrocephalus, than VP shunt and revision of the SDP shunt was planned. While doing revision of SDP shunt, hydatid cyst was seen emerging from the burr hole site. A craniotomy was done to remove the hydatid cyst from the subdural space. Since then there has been no recurrent collection. Complete surgical excision is the best treatment modality to treat hydatid cyst of brain. Accidental spillage of the contents can have lead to recurrence, so every effort must be taken to prevent spillage of contents. Postoperatively all the patients must be put on antihelminthics. PMID:27366285

  10. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a postpartum rectus sheath haematoma.

    PubMed

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; Mohamed, Mohamed; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute severe abdominal pain at 4 days postpartum. CT of the abdomen revealed a type II rectus sheath haematoma for which she was initially treated conservatively and discharged. A few hours later, she returned to the ED with a picture suggestive of peritonitis. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed and revealed haemoperitoneum and a ruptured area on the posterior rectus sheath. Approximately 2 L of blood was aspirated. Haemostatic control was achieved and closed suction drains secured in position. The patient was discharged in stable condition on postadmission day 6. She continued to follow-up on an outpatient basis and was doing well 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26961567

  11. Peri-colonic haematoma following routine colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Page, Felicity; Adedeji, Olfunso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of an extra-luminal haematoma following routine colonoscopy. This case highlights an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication in which there is little published literature to date. Presentation of case A 73 year old male presented with abdominal pain and a reduction in haemoglobin following an uneventful colonoscopy. The imaging had been required as part of colorectal cancer follow up. Initial differential diagnosis included colonic perforation and the patient was admitted for further investigations. Same day CT scan imaging revealed an extra-luminal haematoma in the mid descending colon. The patient was managed non-operatively and was discharged with antibiotics following a period of observation. Discussion Colonoscopy is a highly effective imaging modality for direct visualisation of the lower gastrointestinal tract and for simultaneous diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. In recent years the use of colonoscopy has increased greatly, this is largely due to an increasingly aging population, increased availability of the resource and as a consequence of the implementation of the Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. Extra-colonic bleeding following colonoscopy is rare. Causes that have been identified in the literature include splenic injury, mesenteric tears, hepatic injury and retroperitoneal haemorrhage. To the authors' knowledge, there is very little published literature specifically on isolated peri-colonic haematomas following colonoscopy. Conclusion This case highlights an unusual but potentially life threatening complication following colonoscopy. Endoscopists and clinicians should be aware of the diagnosis to allow for early recognition and appropriate management. PMID:26900460

  12. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  13. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Conclusion: Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage. PMID:26862454

  14. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  15. Bleeding in the subarachnoid space: a possible complication during laser therapy for equine progressive ethmoid haematoma.

    PubMed

    Vreman, S; Wiemer, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-10-01

    A 10-year-old KWPN (Royal Warmblood Studbook of the Netherlands) gelding was euthanized after developing severe neurological symptoms preceded by severe epistaxis during laser treatment for progressive ethmoid haematoma (PEH) in the right nasal cavity. Postmortem examination of the head revealed a large amount of clotted blood between the right ventral and dorsal conchae in the nasal cavity and acute haemorrhage in the right subarachnoid space. Histologically, there was moderate, acute polioencephalomalacia in the neuropil adjacent to the haemorrhage. The haemorrhages were most likely caused by the laser treatment and therefore should be considered a possible complication that could lead to severe peracute neurological symptoms. PMID:24199337

  16. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  17. Subacute Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Bilateral DBS Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Pahapill, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) in patients with implanted deep brain stimulating (DBS) electrodes are rare. Only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. No clear management guidelines exist regarding the management of the hematoma and the existing electrodes. We describe a 68-year-old female with bilateral DBS electrodes, who presented with acute, severe hemiparesis due to a large subacute SDH with associated electrode displacement. Urgent hematoma evacuation reversed the hemiparesis; the electrodes were left undisturbed. Brain reexpansion occurred promptly. The patient was able to benefit from stable DBS therapies within 3 weeks of hematoma evacuation, maintained at 1.5-year follow-up. The case highlights that despite relative electrode migration due to a subdural hematoma, the electrodes may not require revision during initial hematoma evacuation or in a delayed fashion. Timely hematoma evacuation, coupled with brain reexpansion, may be adequate for the electrode to travel back to its original position and effect reasonable DBS therapies. PMID:26779357

  18. Iliopsoas haematoma in an adolescent Taekwondo player.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; So, W S; Ahuja, A; Chan, K M

    1996-01-01

    A 16-year-old male Taekwondo player was admitted with a 1-day history of right groin pain and a palpable mass in the right lower abdominal quadrant following a Taekwondo training session. No history of direct trauma was given, but the pain followed a high inward-to-outward kick. The patient was not on any medication, and tumour and infection were excluded. A high-resolution real-time ultrasound scan identified a well-defined, hyperechoic, heterogeneous mass in the substance of the right iliopsoas muscle, compatible with a collection of partially clotted blood, confirming the clinical diagnosis of iliopsoas haematoma. After conservative treatment the patient resumed training and is now fully asymptomatic. PMID:8739719

  19. Golfer's swing leads to a spontaneous subcapsular liver haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Lumley, S; Slesser, A A P; Saunders, M; Warren, S

    2013-01-01

    We report the rare case of a patient presenting with a spontaneous hepatic subcapsular haematoma after playing golf. The patient had no underlying predisposing conditions. A CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis demonstrated a 1 cm deep low-attenuation subcapsular collection around the anterolateral aspect of the liver. The patient was treated conservatively and was discharged from inpatient care after 72 h. This is only the second reported case of a spontaneous subcapsular haematoma. PMID:23784769

  20. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  1. [Intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreotography overinfected by Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE].

    PubMed

    Carrica, Sebastián A; Belloni, Rodrigo; Baldoni, Fernando; Yantorno, Martín; Correa, Gustavo; Bologna, Adrián; Barbero, Rodolfo; Villaverde, Augusto; Chopita, Néstor

    2014-06-01

    This case report describes a 37-year-old woman who develops an intraparenchymal hepatic haematoma after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with papillotomy and stone extraction. The procedure requires the passage of a guidewire. The patient develops acute abdominal pain 72 hours later and a magnetic resonance shows a hematoma of 124 x 93 mm. She remains under observation. Twenty one days later she complains of upper right abdominal pain and fever. Consequently, a percutaneous drainage is performed isolating Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE. The patient has a good evolution. PMID:25199307

  2. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  3. A Standardized Classification for Subdural Hematomas- I.

    PubMed

    Alves, José Luís; Santiago, João Gonçalo; Costa, Guerreiro; Mota Pinto, Anabela

    2016-09-01

    Subdural hematomas are a frequent and highly heterogeneous traumatic disorder, with significant clinical and socioeconomic consequences. In clinical and medicolegal practice, subdural hematomas are classified according to its apparent age, which significantly influences its intrinsic pathogenic behavior, forensic implications, clinical management, and outcome. Although practical, this empirical classification is somewhat arbitrary and scarcely informative, considering the remarkable heterogeneity of this entity. The current research project aims at implementing a comprehensive multifactorial classification of subdural hematomas, allowing a more standardized and coherent assessment and management of this condition. This new method of classification of subdural hematomas takes into account its intrinsic and extrinsic features, using imaging data and histopathological elements, to provide an easily apprehensible and intuitive nomenclature. The proposed classification unifies and organizes all relevant details concerning subdural hematomas, hopefully improving surgical care and forensic systematization. PMID:27428027

  4. Epidural haematoma and stroller-associated injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, A C; Fong, D

    1997-10-01

    We present a severe case of head injury in an infant associated with stroller use and review similar reports from the literature. A case report and a literature search of the Medline database from 1966 to 6/1996 using the terms 'perambulator', 'parm', 'stroller', or 'baby carriage'. Reports in English describing injuries associated with their use are reviewed. We report a case of epidural haematoma in a 10 months old girl who sustained the injury after falling from a stroller. Safety harnesses were not worn during the incident. There was no skull fracture. Complete recovery followed surgical evacuation of the blood clot. Five reports describing stroller-related injuries were found in the English literature. Most injuries were mild. Three cases of death were reported of which two were classified as child abuse. The prevalence of unintentional stroller-associated injury is not clear. Mild injury, mostly to the head region, is probably common. Life-threatening injuries are rare but these are potentially preventable if strollers are properly designed and safety recommendations are followed. PMID:9401893

  5. ‘Subarachnoid cyst’ after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Low Y. Y.; Wai Hoe, NG

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the ‘cyst’ is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this ‘cyst’ develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  6. Brain abscess and subdural empyema. Factors influencing mortality and results of various surgical techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Van Alphen, H A; Dreissen, J J

    1976-01-01

    The authors review the results of various surgical techniques in relation to mortality and morbidity in 100 consecutive cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. The mortality rate is the same with total excision and fractional drainage of brain abscesses, although in acute and subacute cases slight differences between both techniques are seen. In terms of morbidity, fractional drainage appears to be more favourable than total excision. The authors believe that factors other than surgical procedure influence mortality in cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. These factors are defined in detail. Images PMID:932767

  7. Efficacy of thigh protectors in preventing thigh haematomas.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B

    2000-03-01

    Thigh haematomas are extremely common in Australian Rules Football (ARF). This is in contrast to contact sports overseas, the likely reason is the increased use of thigh protectors as part of team uniforms in contact sports such as American football. Thigh haematomas can have a significant impact on an athlete's performance, ranging from short term performance impairment, muscle deconditioning and compartment syndromes, to long term problems, such as career threatening myositis ossificans and possibly muscle tears. To assess the efficacy of thigh protectors made for Australian Football, a prospective study was undertaken involving two teams in the elite junior (U 18) VSFL competition in SE Australia. One team wore thigh protectors over the course of the season while the other team acted as controls and did not wear thigh protectors. The control group suffered nine thigh haematomas, while the protected group had none (p<0.01). The possible de-conditioning effect of the haematomas was evidenced by two of the control group suffering torn quadriceps within four weeks of the haematoma. The protectors were generally well tolerated by all but one player, except in hot conditions, when they were uncomfortable. PMID:10839226

  8. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  9. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  10. Comparision between Brain Atrophy and Subdural Volume to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Volumetric CT Imaging Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Choi, Seung-Won; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain atrophy and subdural hygroma were well known factors that enlarge the subdural space, which induced formation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thus, we identified the subdural volume that could be used to predict the rate of future CSDH after head trauma using a computed tomography (CT) volumetric analysis. Methods A single institution case-control study was conducted involving 1,186 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Fifty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified, and 50 patients with age and sex matched for control. Intracranial volume (ICV), the brain parenchyme, and the subdural space were segmented using CT image-based software. To adjust for variations in head size, volume ratios were assessed as a percentage of ICV [brain volume index (BVI), subdural volume index (SVI)]. The maximum depth of the subdural space on both sides was used to estimate the SVI. Results Before adjusting for cranium size, brain volume tended to be smaller, and subdural space volume was significantly larger in the CSDH group (p=0.138, p=0.021, respectively). The BVI and SVI were significantly different (p=0.003, p=0.001, respectively). SVI [area under the curve (AUC), 77.3%; p=0.008] was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH than BVI (AUC, 68.1%; p=0.001). Bilateral subdural depth (sum of subdural depth on both sides) increased linearly with SVI (p<0.0001). Conclusion Subdural space volume was significantly larger in CSDH groups. SVI was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH. Bilateral subdural depth was useful to measure SVI. PMID:27169071

  11. Intrapulmonary haematoma complicating mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonmarchand, G; Lefebvre, E; Lerebours-Pigeonnière, G; Genevois, A; Massari, P; Leroy, J

    1988-01-01

    Intrapulmonary haematomas occurred during mechanical ventilation of two patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bullous dystrophy. In both cases, the haematomas were revealed by blood-stained aspirates, a fall in haemoglobin level, and the appearance of radiological opacities. Haematoma occurrence in the area of a bulla which recently has rapidly increased in size, suggests that the haematoma is due to the rupture of stretched vessels embedded in the wall of the bulla. PMID:3379188

  12. Interhemispheric subdural empyema--case report.

    PubMed

    Stephanov, S; Sidani, A H; Amacker, J J

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of interhemispheric subdural empyema following a meningoencephalitis. Ten days after the beginning of his illness a CT scan showed a left interhemispheric subdural empyema with a low density collection, a faintly enhancing rim, multiple very small cortical abscesses and brain edema. The empyema was successfully treated by the direct introduction of a catheter into the left interhemispheric subdural space via a single posterior frontal parasagittal burr hole, irrigation with saline, aspiration of the empyema, and removal of the catheter at the end of operation. PMID:11678024

  13. Prognostic factors in patients with intracerebral haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, C L; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; van Gijn, J

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, the prognostic value of clinical characteristics in 157 consecutive patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage were examined by means of multivariate analysis. Two days after the event 37 (24%) patients had died. Factors independently contributing to the prediction of two day mortality were pineal gland displacement on CT of 3 mm or more (p less than 0.001), blood glucose level on admission of 8.0 mmol/l or more (p = 0.01), eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of eight out of 10 or less (p = 0.022) and haematoma volume of 40 cm3 or more (p = 0.037). Between the third day and one year after the event another 46 of the 120 two day survivors had died; the independent prognostic indicators for death during that period were: age 70 years or more (p less than 0.001) and severe handicap (Rankin grade five) on the third day (p less than 0.001). Functional independence (Rankin grade two or less) at one year was most common not only with the converse features of age less than 70 years (p less than 0.01) and Rankin grade four or less on the third day (p = 0.002), but also with an eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of nine or 10 on the third day (p less than 0.001). The 120 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage who were still alive two days after the event were matched with 120 patients with cerebral infarction, according to age, level of consciousness on the third day after stroke (Glasgow Coma Scale) and handicap (Rankin grade). Survival and handicap after one year did not differ between these two groups. The conclusion drawn is that it is not the cause (intracerebral haemorrhage or cerebral infarction) but the extent of the brain lesion that determines the outcome in patients who survive the first two days. PMID:1527534

  14. Spontaneous iliopsoas haematoma: a complication of hypertensive urgency.

    PubMed

    Yogarajah, Meera; Sivasambu, Bhradeev; Jaffe, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Iliopsoas haematoma is a rare clinical entity which can be life threatening in extreme cases. We are reporting a case of iliopsoas haematoma as a complication of hypertensive urgency. A 67-year old woman presented to emergency room with hypertensive urgency and hip pain. During hospitalisation, her haemoglobin was decreasing and on further evaluation, she did not have any signs of external bleeding and laboratory results were not suggestive of haemolysis. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis revealed a spontaneous iliopsoas haematoma. A likely explanation for this presentation in the absence of coagulopathy and trauma is very high blood pressure. Patient was on low-dose aspirin at home which could have further aggravated her bleeding due to platelet dysfunction. She was managed conservatively with blood transfusions and blood pressure was reduced to target after which she recovered. PMID:25721829

  15. The computed tomographic findings of peritentorial subdural hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, L.S.; Pike, J.W.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in six cases of subdural hemorrhage in the peritentorial region are listed and discussed. The CT appearance of peritentorial subdural hemorrhage sometimes mimicks that of intra-axial lesions, but coronal scanning or reconstruction can be used to resolve this problem. Awareness of this unusual location for subdural hemorrhage is helpful in providing an accurate preoperative diagnosis.

  16. Subdural hygroma after craniosynostosis remodeling surgery.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Praveen; Nagarjuna, Muralidhara; Shetty, Samarth; Salins, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of the cranial sutures and can cause functional impairment or cosmetic deformity. Surgical techniques for the correction of craniosynostosis have changed overtime, as so have the intraoperative and postoperative complications. Extensive surgeries involving fronto-orbital unit repositioning and cranial vault remodeling are associated with various complications. Intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage, venous infarct, air embolism, hydrocephalus, cerebrospinal fluid leak, as well as meningitis are a few complications associated with cranial vault remodeling surgery. Postoperative complications can increase the morbidity and mortality associated with these procedures. Identification of the complications and their timely management should be a part of every craniofacial reconstruction team's training program.In this article, we report a case of subdural hygroma in an infant after cranial vault remodeling procedure. Subdural hygroma is a known complication following head injuries and represents 5% to 20% of posttraumatic intracranial mass lesions. However, subdural hygroma developing after a cranial procedure is rare and has not been reported in the literature. Identification of the complication, close monitoring of the change in subdural fluid volume, and tapping of the fluid through the craniotomy site if indicated form the mainstay of management of subdural hygroma that develops after cranial vault remodeling surgery. PMID:25469899

  17. Simultaneous Cranioplasty and Subdural-Peritoneal Shunting for Contralateral Symptomatic Subdural Hygroma following Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Muh-Shi; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Shuo-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Background. Contralateral subdural hygroma caused by decompressive craniectomy tends to combine with external cerebral herniation, causing neurological deficits. Material and Methods. Nine patients who underwent one-stage, simultaneous cranioplasty and contralateral subdural-peritoneal shunting were included in this study. Clinical outcome was assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale as well as Glasgow Coma Scale, muscle power scoring system, and complications. Results. Postoperative computed tomography scans demonstrated completely resolved subdural hygroma and reversed midline shifts, indicating excellent outcome. Among these 9 patients, 4 patients (44%) had improved GOS following the proposed surgery. Four out of 4 patients with lethargy became alert and orientated following surgical intervention. Muscle strength improved significantly 5 months after surgery in 7 out of 7 patients with weakness. Two out of 9 patients presented with drowsiness due to hydrocephalus at an average time of 65 days after surgery. Double gradient shunting is useful to eliminate the respective hydrocephalus and contralateral subdural hygroma. Conclusion. The described surgical technique is effective in treating symptomatic contralateral subdural hygroma following decompressive craniectomy and is associated with an excellent structural and functional outcome. However, subdural-peritoneal shunting plus cranioplasty thoroughly resolves the subdural hygroma collection, which might deteriorate the cerebrospinal fluid circulation, leading to hydrocephalus. PMID:25879062

  18. Small subdural hemorrhages: is routine intensive care unit admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-03-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of subdural hematoma (SDH) continues to improve. In some cases, the finding is limited to one or 2 images of the CT examination. At our institution, all patients with an SDH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that patients with a small traumatic SDH on their presenting CT examination do not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU and can instead be managed on a hospital unit with a lower level of monitoring. This is a retrospective study of patients evaluated and treated at a level I trauma center for acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage between 2011 and 2014. The clinical and imaging profile of 87 patients with traumatic SDH were studied. Patients with small isolated traumatic subdural hemorrhage (tSDH) (<10cm(3) blood volume) spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurologic and medical stability during hospitalization, and did not require any neurosurgical intervention. It is our recommendation that patients with isolated tSDH (<10cm(3)) do not require ICU monitoring. Patients with small tSDH and additional intracranial hemorrhages overall show low rates of medical decline (4%) and neurologic decline (4%) but may still benefit from ICU observation. Patients with tSDH greater than 10cm(3) overall demonstrated poor clinical courses and outcome and would benefit ICU monitoring. PMID:26795895

  19. Prediction of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Minor Head Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Beom; Song, Shi-Hun; Youm, Jin-Young; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kwon, Hyon-Jo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is relatively common in neurosurgical field. However not all patients develop CSDH after minor head trauma. In this study, we evaluate the risk factors of post-traumatic CSDH. Methods Two-hundred and seventy-seven patients were enrolled and analyzed in this study from January 2012 to December 2013. Of those, 20 participants had minor head trauma developed CSDH afterward. We also included 257 patients with minor head trauma who did not develop CSDH during the same follow-up period as the control group. We investigated the risk factors related to the development of CSDH after minor head trauma. Results Old age (p=0.014), preexisting diabetes mellitus (p=0.010), hypertension (p=0.026), history of cerebral infarction (p=0.035), antiplatelet agents (p=0.000), acute subdural hematoma in the convexity (p=0.000), encephalomalacia (p=0.029), and long distance between skull and brain parenchyma (p=0.000) were significantly correlated with the development of CSDH after trauma. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the maximum distance between the skull and the cerebral parenchyma was the independent risk factor for the occurrence of CSDH (hazard ratio 2.55, p=0.000). Conclusion We should consider the possibility of developing CSDH in the post-traumatic patients with the identified risk factors. PMID:27169043

  20. Anterior horn cell loss from subdural hygroma: a consequence of spontaneous spinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Temenuzhka; Biondo, Andrew; Zak, Imad; Lewis, Richard A

    2011-06-15

    We describe a case of a 50-year-old man with bilateral shoulder girdle weakness caused by anterior subdural hygroma secondary to a previous spontaneous CSF leak. The CSF leak occurred and resolved 16 years prior to presenting with a 6-year progressive painless, asymmetric proximal muscle weakness involving both upper extremities. Current examination reveals remarkably restricted atrophy and weakness in bilateral C5-6 muscles and absent biceps and brachioradialis reflexes. Neuroimaging shows a subdural CSF collection extending from C1 to L2 anteriorly causing thecal sac effacement at the C4 level and secondary Chiari deformity. The clinical picture demonstrates severe weakness in C5-6 muscles with sparing of all other myotomes. The acute clinical features as well as neuroimaging characteristics of spontaneous CSF leak are well known but the late effects are less described. The development of a subdural fluid collection secondary to a spinal fluid leak can cause damage to the anterior spinal cord years after the leak. The underlying pathophysiology of the motor neuron loss remains unclear but there appears to be a pressure effect localized to the C4-5 region. The possibility that intervention to prevent or treat the subdural CSF collection might have avoided the shoulder girdle weakness is considered. PMID:21440260

  1. An unusual presentation of subdural empyema caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Ahmed; Khawchareonporn, Thana; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Suebnukarn, Siriwan

    2013-01-01

    Subdural empyema is an uncommon clinical entity. The first case of Porphyromonas gingivalis subdural empyema is reported. We report a case of 34-year-old male who presented with subdural empyema and sinusitis. Through the utilization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests on subdural pus, we were able to confirm the diagnosis and institute appropriate treatment. Early surgical intervention and intravenous antibiotics meant that the patient recovered fully. Infections caused by P. gingivalis should be considered in differential diagnoses of central nervous system (CNS) abscesses or subdural empyema especially in patients with precedent periodontal diseases and sinusitis. PMID:24339621

  2. Minimally invasive endoscopic surgery for treatment of spontaneous intracerebral haematomas.

    PubMed

    Beynon, Christopher; Schiebel, Patrick; Bösel, Julian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Orakcioglu, Berk

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with a mortality rate of more than 40 % and a high morbidity rate with 10-15 % of survivors remaining fully dependent [11]. The role of surgical treatment of ICH remains a matter of controversy and ongoing investigation. Advances in neurosurgical techniques such as endoscopy and neuronavigation have been established in various fields of neurosurgery. Results of reported case series have suggested that some patients with ICH may benefit from haematoma evacuation through minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. In this article, we focus on the pathophysiologic rationales behind minimally invasive haematoma evacuation through endoscopic surgery and provide an overview of technical developments and reported patient series. In addition, the modalities of the surgical procedure at the authors' institution are described. Controlled clinical trials are needed to evaluate the full potential and limitations of this promising technique. PMID:25687253

  3. [Chronic subdural hematoma--recurrence and prevention].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Tsuzuki, Nobusuke; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is one of the most common disorders observed in routine neurosurgical care. In the vast majority of cases, this disorder is treated by surgical evacuation, which usually yields a good prognosis. However, the recurrence rates after this initial procedure range from approximately 5% to 30%. In this study, we focused on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma and its prevention. We reviewed the risk factors for recurrence, surgical procedures used, perioperative management, timing of operation, and medical treatment. PMID:21228450

  4. Post- Thyroidectomy Haematoma Causing Severe Supraglottic Oedema and Pulmonary Oedema - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Anandaswamy, Tejesh C; Vig, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Large, long standing goiters present multiple challenges to anaesthesiologist. Post thyroidectomy haematoma is a rare but life threatening complication of thyroid surgery leading to airway obstruction. We report a case of huge goiter that underwent near total thyroidectomy and developed post thyroidectomy haematoma. Within no time it resulted in near fatal airway obstruction, pulmonary oedema and cardiac arrest. The haematoma was evacuated immediately and patient was resuscitated successfully. Pulmonary oedema was further worsened by subsequent aggressive fluid resuscitation. She was electively ventilated with PEEP and was extubated after five days. Except for right vocal cord palsy her postoperative stay was uneventful. This is unique case where a post thyoidectomy haematoma has resulted in fatal supraglottic oedema and pulmonary oedema. Early recognition, immediate intubation and evacuation of haematoma are the key to manage this complication. We highlight on the pathophysiology of haematoma and discuss the strategies to prevent similar events in future. PMID:25300409

  5. Spontaneous haematoma of ligamentum flavum. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Albanese, A; Braconi, A; Anile, C; Mannino, S; Sabatino, G; Mangiola, A

    2006-06-01

    Spontaneous infarction of the ligamentum flavum is a very rare cause of mielo-radicular compression. In the literature only four cases are reported, all characterized by a clinical history of slowly progressive mielo-radiculopathy and good outcome after surgical treatment. A 70 year-old female patient presented with a four months clinical history of spontaneous, sub-continuous, progressive lumbar pain with bilateral irradiation to the L4-L5 dermatomers, right leg monoparesis and hypoaesthesia affecting tactile, thermal and pain sensivity, urinary incontinence and constipation. CT scan and MRI evidenced an extradural ovalar lesion in correspondence of the L1-L2 levels, that exerted compression over the dural sac, dislocating it anteriorly. The patient underwent a L1-L2 laminectomy and the lesion was totally resected. Rapid improvement of the patient's symptomatology has been noticed in the postoperative period, with complete recovery during the following month. Histologic examinations demonstrated that the mass was a haematoma of the ligamentum flavum. It's our opinion, that a picture of ligamentum flavum haematoma should be taken into account in differential diagnosis of posterior mielo-radicular compression. The progressive growth of the haematoma may explain the long clinical history of these patients and surgical treatment, even if delayed, permits an excel-lent clinical outcome. PMID:16841030

  6. Spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematoma: a rare complication of warfarin use.

    PubMed

    Buyuklu, Mutlu; Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Topal, Ergun; Ceyhun, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is commonly used for prevention of embolic events. Bleeding is the main side effect of warfarin. Lingual and sublingual haematoma are rare. In the literature, nine cases have so far been reported. We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who developed spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematomas while on warfarin therapy. Spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematoma are rare, but can be potentially life-threatening complications as they cause airway obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of earliest haematoma after warfarin use. PMID:25008335

  7. Spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematoma: a rare complication of warfarin use

    PubMed Central

    Buyuklu, Mutlu; Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Topal, Ergun; Ceyhun, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is commonly used for prevention of embolic events. Bleeding is the main side effect of warfarin. Lingual and sublingual haematoma are rare. In the literature, nine cases have so far been reported. We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who developed spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematomas while on warfarin therapy. Spontaneous lingual and sublingual haematoma are rare, but can be potentially life-threatening complications as they cause airway obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of earliest haematoma after warfarin use. PMID:25008335

  8. [Post-traumatic subdural hygroma: diagnostic conditions and therapeutic attitude in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Ndong-Launay, M

    1989-01-01

    An excessive collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the subdural space is known as subdural hygroma, or hydroma. By far, the most common cause is severe cranial trauma. The diagnosis can be made by angiography or computer tomography and, with certainly, only by trephine or burr hole evacuation. 11 cases of post-traumatic subdural hygromas, mainly diagnosed during operative interventions, from April 1981 to September 1988, are reported. Most patients had acute forms of hygroma requiring acute surgical intervention. The acuteness could broken down as: coma (medium Glasgow coma scale: 6), lateralizing neurologic signs (4 cases) and temporal lobe herniation signs (7 cases). There were difficulties in obtaining angiographic studies. 10 patients underwent burr hole evacuation. Craniectomy was performed in one case. Time between cranial trauma and surgical intervention varied from 24 hours (6 cases) to 34 days. It appears that the prognosis is related to the extent of primary brain damage and not to the pressure exerted by the (usually) small mass lesion. The authors propose a clinical management of this lesion and hope for improvement in the diagnostic technics available. PMID:2808559

  9. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia manifesting as subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Sandeep P; Taylor, Christopher; Robertson, Iain

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing vascular dysplasia. Cerebral abscess formation, secondary to paradoxical septic emboli via HHT-derived pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs) in this context is well documented. Herein, we present the first case of subdural empyema with this aetiology. PMID:26982736

  10. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    PubMed

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists. PMID:24553773

  11. Intramural haematoma of the thoracic aorta: who's to be alerted the cardiologist or the cardiac surgeon?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Apostolakis, Efstratios E; Siminelakis, Stavros N; Papadopoulos, Georgios S; Goudevenos, John

    2009-01-01

    This review article is written so as to present the pathophysiology, the symptomatology and the ways of diagnosis and treatment of a rather rare aortic disease called Intra-Mural Haematoma (IMH). Intramural haematoma is a quite uncommon but potentially lethal aortic disease that can strike as a primary occurrence in hypertensive and atherosclerotic patients to whom there is spontaneous bleeding from vasa vasorum into the aortic wall (media) or less frequently, as the evolution of a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU). IMH displays a typical of dissection progress, and could be considered as a precursor of classic aortic dissection. IMH enfeebles the aortic wall and may progress to either outward rupture of the aorta or inward disruption of the intima layer, which ultimately results in aortic dissection. Chest and back acute penetrating pain is the most commonly noticed symptom at patients with IMH. Apart from a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), a tomographic imaging such as a chest computed tomography (CT), a magnetic resonance (MRI) and most lately a multy detector computed tomography (MDCT) can ensure a quick and accurate diagnosis of IMH. Similar to type A and B aortic dissection, surgery is indicated at patients with type-A IMH, as well as at patients with a persistent and/or recurrent pain. For any other patient (with type-B IMH without an incessant pain and/or without complications), medical treatment is suggested, as applied in the case of aortic dissection. The outcome of IMH in ascending aorta (type A) appears favourable after immediate (emergent or urgent) surgical intervention, but according to international bibliography patients with IMH of the descending aorta (type B) show similar mortality rates to those being subjected to conservative medical or surgical treatment. Endovascular surgery and stent-graft placement is currently indicated in type B IMH. PMID:19793400

  12. [Chronic subdural hematoma presenting visual disturbance: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Manabe, H; Shimizu, T; Itoh, C; Suzuki, S

    2001-03-01

    The authors reported a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma presenting bilateral visual impairment caused by papilledema. A 49-year-old man was admitted to our department due to left blurred vision. On admission, ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity disturbance on the left eye, bilateral nasal visual field defect and papilledema. CT scan and MRI demonstrated bilateral subdural hematoma. No remarkable findings were detected on cerebral angiography. After evacuation of bilateral subdural hematomas, his visual symptoms recovered. In this report, we discuss the mechanism of visual impairment caused by chronic subdural hematoma. PMID:11296405

  13. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  14. In vitro localisation of intracranial haematoma using electrical impedance tomography semi-array.

    PubMed

    Ayati, S Bentolhoda; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Kerr, David

    2015-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography is a non-invasive and portable method that has good potential as an alternative to the conventional modalities for early detection of intracranial haematomas in high risk patients. Early diagnosis can reduce treatment delays and most significantly can impact patient outcomes. Two eight-electrode layouts, a standard ring full array (FA) and a semi-array (SA), were investigated for their ability to detect, localise and quantify simulated intracranial haematomas in vitro on ovine models for the purpose of early diagnosis. SA layout speeds up electrode application and avoids the need to move and lift the patient's head. Haematomas were simulated using gel samples with the same conductivity as blood. Both layouts, FA and SA, could detect the presence of haematomas at any location within the skull. The mean of the relative radial position error with respect to the brain radius was 7% for FA and 6% for SA, for haematomas close to the electrodes, and 11% for SA for haematomas far from the electrodes at the back of the head. Size estimation was not as good; the worst size estimation error for FA being around 30% while the best for SA was 50% for simulated haematomas close to the electrodes. PMID:25455163

  15. Intracranial subdural hygroma after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William L; Lee, Michael; MacIntosh, Robert Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Various intra- and postoperative complications have been well-documented after Le Fort I osteotomies; however, an intracranial subdural hygroma has not yet been reported in oral and maxillofacial studies. We report a unique case of an intracranial subdural hygroma requiring neurosurgical intervention after Le Fort I advancement. PMID:25631863

  16. Umbilical Cord Haematoma Causing Still Birth- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Swati; Gupta, Mayank; Benjamin, Santosh Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Still birth continues to be one of the many challenges that an obstetrician has to face. Still births that occur in the antenatal period are more difficult to explain than that which occurs intrapartum. The latter is most often due to intrapartum asphyxia, medical complications or infections; however a cause for antenatal still birth is difficult to ascertain. A thorough examination of the case along with necessary investigations might not necessarily reveal any cause and this leads to considerable anxiety for both the mother and the treating obstetrician. In the investigation of a case of still birth a detailed examination of the placenta and cord has to be emphasised as a considerable number of still births that are thought to be unexplained may be attributable to placental or cord pathologies. Here we present one such case where an umbilical cord haematoma resulted in intrauterine foetal death. PMID:26816950

  17. Massive dissecting intramural duodenal haematoma following endoscopic haemostasis of a bleeding duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lukman, Mohd Rashid; Jasmi, Ali Yaakub; Niza, S Shahrun

    2006-04-01

    Intramural duodenal haematoma is a rare injury of the duodenum. Most reported cases are secondary to blunt trauma to the abdomen. Such injury following endoscopic intervention is even rarer, and there are no definite guidelines for its management. We report a case where endoscopic haemostasis of a bleeding duodenal ulcer resulted in a massive dissecting intramural duodenal haematoma with gastric outlet obstruction and obstructive jaundice. PMID:16644511

  18. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26296471

  19. A case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Koumtchev, Y; Petkov, S; Gozmanov, G

    1994-01-01

    The interhemispheric subdural hematoma is a rare condition. We present a case of interhemispheric subdural hematoma in a patient aged 65 years. A day prior to admission he was struck with a water-pipe on the head. He went to sleep the same evening complaining of a slight headache. At about two o'clock in the morning the headache increased in intensity. By the morning he lost consciousness. On examination by a neurosurgeon the patient was found to be comatose. The physical examination revealed blue eyelids of the left eye, paraplegia of the right leg, paresis of the left leg and arms. Bilateral Babinski's reflex was present, the abdominal reflexes were absent, the tendon and periosteal reflexes were hyperactive. The pupils were equal in size and slowly reactive to light. The patient exhibited symptoms of meningoradicular irritation. An emergency CT scan revealed high-density area in the interhemispheric sulcus extending frontally to parietally. The patients was operated on in an emergency. At operation, extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus was identified. Later the patient died. The presented case was interesting with the extensive rupture of the sagittal sinus and the relatively long lucid interval until clear manifestation of the clinical picture becomes evident. PMID:7867995

  20. Infantile subdural empyema: The role of brain sonography and percutaneous subdural tapping in a resource-challenged region

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Okezie Obasi; Nnoli, Chinenye; Olowoyeye, Omodele; Ojo, Omotayo; Esezobor, Christopher; Adeyomoye, Adekunle; Bankole, Olufemi; Asoegwu, Chinyere; Temiye, Edamisan

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study explored the outcome of children with patent anterior fontanelles who were treated with trans-fontanelle ultrasound scan (TFUSS), which is more affordable and available than CT scan and MRI in the diagnosis of childhood intracranial pathologies and treatment of subdural empyema, in developing countries. Patients and Methods: Seventeen infants with post-meningitic subdural empyema, diagnosed using trans-fontanelle ultrasound alone and treated with subdural tapping over a 31-months period, were studied. Results: Eleven patients presented with grades II and III Bannister and William grading for level of consciousness in intracranial subdural empyema. Aspirate from 7 (41.2%) patients were sterile. The most common organisms isolated were Streptococcus faecalis 3 (17.6%), Haemophilus Influenza 2 (11.8) and Staphylococcus aureus 2 (11.8), multiple organisms were isolated in three of the patients. Ninety-four percent (94%) of the patients had good outcome. Five subjects developed hydrocephalus, one patient had a recurrence of subdural empyema, four patients had residual hemiparesis, two of the four patients had speech difficulties, while one patient (~6%) died. Conclusion: While CT and MRI remain the gold standard for investigating intracranial lesions, transfontanelle ultrasonography is adequate for diagnosis of infantile subdural empyema in resource-challenged areas. Percutaneous subdural tap is an affordable and effective therapy in such patients with financial challenges. PMID:25288836

  1. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. PMID:27240110

  2. Warfarin-associated fetal intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kana; Aoki, Shigeru; Kurasawa, Kentaro; Okuda, Mika; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a case in which to of fetal subdural hematoma developing despite that the maternal the prothrombin time by international normalized ratio (PT/INR) during pregnancy was within the normal range. PMID:25356261

  3. Traumatic rupture of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, A; Bramhaprasad, V; Purohit, A K

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic. However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression. Presentation as raised intracranial pressure due to cyst rupture into the subdural space is a rare clinical entity. We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure. PMID:22837775

  4. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma infected by propionibacterium acnes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  6. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  7. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients’ haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  8. Subcapsular hepatic haematoma of the right lobe following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Marco Antonio; Aiolfi, Alberto; Antonini, Ilaria; Musolino, Cinzia Domenica; Porta, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Sub capsular hepatic haematoma is a rare complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Exact pathological mechanism is still unclear and few reports are nowadays available in literature. We report the case of a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On the basis of laboratory exams, abdomen ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging she was diagnosed with a common bile duct stone. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy was performed. On the following day the patient complaint severe abdominal pain with rebound and hemodynamic instability. A computed tomography scan reveal a 14 cm × 6 cm × 19 cm sub-capsular hepatic haematoma on the right lobe that was successfully managed via percutaneous embolization. Sub capsular liver haematoma is a rare life threatening complication after ERCP that should be managed according to patients' haemodynamic and clinic. PMID:27158211

  9. Remote spinal epidural haematoma after spinal anaesthesia presenting with a ‘spinal lucid interval’

    PubMed Central

    Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Singh, Manish; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Kumar, V R Roopesh

    2012-01-01

    An obstetric patient who had no significant risk factors developed a spinal epidural haematoma remote from the site of needle puncture (for administration of spinal anaesthesia). The clinical deficits were manifest after recovery from the motor blockade had started a phenomenon that we have termed as a ‘spinal lucid interval’. The patient developed flaccid paraplegia with a sharp sensory level and urinary retention. The patient underwent emergency laminectomy and evacuation of the haematoma. She gradually recovered near normal power and was ambulant independently and had normal sphincter function at follow-up. PMID:23109417

  10. Delayed Onset Intracranial Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Akakin, Akin; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    In this case-based review, the authors analyzed relevant literature with an illustrative patient of theirs about subdural hematoma secondary to dural tear at spinal surgery. Intracranial hypotension is a condition of decreased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure. Even though intracranial hypotension is temporary and can be managed conservatively, it may progress and result in subdural fluid collections, hematoma formations, "brain sagging or slumping" states, syringohydromyelia, encephalopathy, coma, and even death. The authors present an 81-year-old man admitted with subdural hematoma 50 days following previous spinal surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. In his previous spinal surgery he had had dural tear, which had been closed primarily. To the literature, only 21 patients have been reported to develop subdural hematoma following spinal surgery. In patients with subdural hematoma following spinal surgery, the female:male ratio was 3:4 and the median age was 55 years. Surgical diagnoses for previous spinal surgeries were intervertebral disc herniation (5), spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (6), failed back syndrome (2), tethered cord syndrome and myelodysplastic spine (2), spinal cord tumor, spinal epidural hematoma, vertebral dislocation, vertebral fracture, vertebral tumor, and inflammatory spine. Patients presented with signs and symptoms of subdural hematoma within 6 hours to 50 days following the spinal surgery. Source of cerebrospinal fluid leak was most commonly from lumbar region (13 patients, 62%). Ten of 21 (48%) patients were treated conservatively. Late-onset neurological findings should not prevent the evaluation of cranial vault with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal dural tear should be more aggressively treated instead of suture alone approach, when recognized in older patients during the spinal surgery. PMID:27192649

  11. Severe subdural hemorrhage due to minimal prenatal trauma.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Pietrini, Domenico; Massimi, Luca; Caldarelli, Massimo; De Luca, Daniele; Del Lungo, Laura Minguell; De Carolis, Maria Pia; Di Rocco, Concezio; Conti, Giorgio; Zecca, Enrico

    2009-12-01

    The authors report a case of minimal prenatal trauma producing a large subdural hematoma in the fetus, which was diagnosed in utero by MR imaging. The occurrence of such a complication is extremely rare in the absence of significant maternal trauma. Prenatally diagnosed intracranial hemorrhages, particularly those that are subdural in origin, have a poor prognosis in most cases. After birth, brain compression required a complex neurosurgical intervention because simple hematoma evacuation was not possible. The clinical and neurological outcome at 6 months was excellent, as confirmed by the neuroimaging findings. PMID:19951041

  12. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  13. Laparoscopic drainage of an intramural duodenal haematoma: a novel technique and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intramural Duodenal Haematoma (IDH) is an uncommon complication of blunt abdominal trauma. IDH's are most often treated non-operatively. We describe laparoscopic treatment of an IDH after failed conservative management. To our knowledge, successful laparoscopic drainage of an IDH in an adult has not been described previously in the literature. PMID:22185364

  14. [Empyema and subdural effusion after meningitis. 2 cases of unusual location].

    PubMed

    Thauvoy, C; Brucher, J M; Evrard, P; Dechef, G; Plaen, J; Stroobandt, G

    1975-01-01

    A 12-year old child and a 2-month old infant developed, in the wane of a purulent meningitis, the former, an infratentorial subdural empyema, the latter, a large, encapsulated, haemoorhagic, aseptic subdural effusion, in the right parieto-temporo-occipital region. In both cases, signs of intracranial hypertension dominated the clinical picture. Neuroradiological investigations permitted diagnosis and localisation of the expansive processes, whose subdural position was recognized at operation and confirmed by histopathological examination. According to the literature, purulent meningitis is a rare cause of subdural empyema, except in infants; the solely infratentorial location is also unusual. Sterile subdural effusion is a more common complication of purulent meningitis in infancy, but the unilateral posterior supratentorial location is also a peculiar feature. Subdural collections after memingitis may be aseptic and possibly haemorrhagic, or septic and purulent; these different modes of presentation correspond perhaps to different degrees or stages of subdural pathological changes in the neighbourhood of leptomeningeal infection. PMID:1233386

  15. Subdural hygromas in abusive head trauma: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, D; Karger, B; Niederstadt, T; Pfeiffer, H; Hahnemann, M L

    2015-03-01

    Are subdural hygromas the result of abusive head trauma? CT and MR imaging represent important tools for the diagnosis of abusive head trauma in living infants. In addition, in-depth understanding of the pathogenesis of subdural hygromas is increasingly required by neuroradiologists, pediatricians, and forensic physicians. Therefore, the current knowledge on subdural hygromas is summarized and forensic conclusions are drawn. The most important diagnostic pitfalls, benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space, and chronic subdural hematoma, are discussed in detail. Illustrative cases from forensic practice are presented. Literature analysis indicates that subdural hygromas can occur immediately or be delayed. If other infrequent reasons can be excluded, the presence of subdural hygromas strongly suggests a posttraumatic state and should prompt the physician to search for other signs of abuse. To differentiate subdural hygromas from other pathologies, additional MR imaging of the infant's head is indispensable after initial CT scan. PMID:24948499

  16. Mechanism of subdural effusion evolves into chronic subdural hematoma: IL-8 inducing neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Lin, Yingying; Hu, Maotong; Ding, Shenghong; Li, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is still a mysterious disease. Though great success has been has achieved by neuro-surgery treatment, the origin and development of CSDH remains unknown. Tremendous clinical observations have found the correlation of subdural effusion (SDE) and CSDH. However, systematic elucidation of CSDH's origin and progression is lacking while almost all the current hypothesis only explained partial phenomenon. This hypothesis proposes Interleukin (IL)-8 inducing neutrophil respiratory burst is the crucial impact when SDE evolves into CSDH. IL-8 initially secreted by dural border layer cells, accumulates and the concentration of IL-8 rises in the SDE cavity. Accompanied by the formation of neo-membrane under the dura meninges, IL-8 firstly prompts to establish the neo-vasculature in it, and then attracts lymphocytes aggregation in the neo-membrane. Both the newly recruited lymphocytes and endothelial cells assist the further elevation of local IL-8 concentration. When the IL-8 concentration elevated to a particular level, it attracts neutrophils to the inner wall of neo-vessels and primes them to oxidative burst. Lysosomes and superoxide released by these neutrophils make the fragile neo-capillary became leaky, and subsequently the plasma and blood cells run into SDE. However, as long as the erythrocytes come into the cavity, they shall bind large quantity of IL-8 and decrease IL-8 concentration to a lower level relatively that reduce the neutrophils recruit. When this negative feedback is stagnancy, for example, the SDE space is so large in elder man who is experiencing brain atrophy, the neo-vessels have to release more erythrocytes to bind IL-8, the liquid cavity will expand and the high intracranial pressure symptoms appeared. Our hypothesis holds potential for the proper therapeutic intervention of CSDH. IL-8 antagonist and other anti-inflammation drugs like macrolides antibiotics, glucocorticoid and atorvastatin might be optional to resist

  17. Spontaneous Rupture of the Middle Fossa Arachnoid Cyst into the Subdural Space: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Aydın; Yokuş, Adem; Batur, Abdussamet; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Gülşen, İsmail; Özgökçe, Mesut; Arslan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Arachnoid cysts are congenital, benign and intra-arachnoidal lesions. A great majority of arachnoid cysts are congenital. However, to a lesser extent, they are known to develop after head trauma and brain inflammatory diseases. Arachnoid cysts are mostly asymptomatic and they can develop anywhere in the brain along the arachnoid membrane. Case Report Arachnoid cysts form 1% of the non-traumatic lesions which occupy a place and it is thought to be a congenital lesion developed as a result of meningeal development abnormalities or a lesion acquired after trauma and infection. There is a male dominance at a rate of 3/1 in arachnoid cysts which locate mostly in the middle fossa. Our patient was a 2-years-old boy. Conclusions As a conclusion, spontaneous subdural hygroma is a rare complication of the arachnoid cysts. Surgical intervention could be required in acute cases. PMID:26150904

  18. Subdural empyema due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Hiroki; Koyama, Shinya; Haryu, Shinya; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris (L. lactis cremoris) infections are very rare in humans. Only three case reports of brain abscess have been reported and the infectious routes and pathological features are still unknown. We experienced a subdural empyema due to L. lactis cremoris in an immunocompetent adult. A 33-year-old man was admitted with fever, right facial pain, left hemiparesis, and left hemianopsia. Computed tomography demonstrated low density fluid collection in the right falcotentorial subdural space. Magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal lesion on a diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the right paratentorial and parafalcine subdural space, right maxillary sinus, and bilateral ethmoidal sinus. He underwent two sequential open surgeries for removal and drainage of empyema and was treated with antibiotics including meropenem and ampicillin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subdural empyema caused by L. lactis cremoris infection. We report the case and discuss the pathological features with the previous literature. PMID:24257498

  19. Spontaneous Arachnoid Cyst Rupture with Subdural Hygroma in a Child.

    PubMed

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Jeswani, Niranjan Lal; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Al Azri, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the brain is common in children but its association with spontaneous subdural hygroma is rare. A case of a nine-year-old boy, without any preceding history of trauma, is presented here who came to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with complaints of headache, nausea, and vomiting for the last two weeks but more for the last two days. Examination showed a young, fully conscious oriented boy with positive Cushing's reflex and papilledema of left eye. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain showed left temporal extra-axial cystic lesion of 5.40 × 4.10 cm in size, representing arachnoid cyst, with bilateral frontoparietal subdural hygromas. Cyst was partially drained through left temporal craniectomy and subdural hygromas were drained through bilateral frontal burr holes. Postoperatively the child recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. Histopathology proves it to be arachnoid cyst of the brain with subdural CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) collection or hygroma. PMID:26989525

  20. Spontaneous Arachnoid Cyst Rupture with Subdural Hygroma in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Jeswani, Niranjan Lal; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Al Azri, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the brain is common in children but its association with spontaneous subdural hygroma is rare. A case of a nine-year-old boy, without any preceding history of trauma, is presented here who came to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with complaints of headache, nausea, and vomiting for the last two weeks but more for the last two days. Examination showed a young, fully conscious oriented boy with positive Cushing's reflex and papilledema of left eye. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain showed left temporal extra-axial cystic lesion of 5.40 × 4.10 cm in size, representing arachnoid cyst, with bilateral frontoparietal subdural hygromas. Cyst was partially drained through left temporal craniectomy and subdural hygromas were drained through bilateral frontal burr holes. Postoperatively the child recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. Histopathology proves it to be arachnoid cyst of the brain with subdural CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) collection or hygroma. PMID:26989525

  1. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor in dogs with haemangiosarcoma and haematoma.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Meike; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Neumann, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Splenic haemangiosarcomas are frequently seen in dogs. Because of their bad prognosis differentiation from other benign splenic lesions are of prognostic importance. However, because haemangiosarcoma is a tumour of the vascular system, it was hypothesised that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) might play a major role in tumour growth and might thus be increased in the blood of affected dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of differences in serum VEGF concentrations between dogs with splenic haemangiosarcomas and those with non-malignant splenic lesions (haematomas) and healthy subjects using a canine ELISA. Serum VEGF levels were significantly higher in dogs with splenic masses compared with healthy dogs, but did not differ significantly between dogs with haemangiosarcomas and haematomas. VEGF has a potential clinical utility as a diagnostic marker for dogs with splenic lesions but may not be useful to differentiate among the various splenic lesions. PMID:25241388

  2. Torticollis in a haemophilic infant with inhibitor: a case of spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Oymak, Yesim; Muminoglu, Neryal; Ay, Yilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba H; Köker, Sultan A; Töret, Ersin; Ylmaz, Aşiyan K; Gürçnar, Müge; Vergin, Canan

    2016-07-01

    Central nervous system bleeding, which can be a life-threatening complication, is seen in 2.7% of patients with haemophilia. Spinal epidural haematomas represent about one-tenth of such cases. Here, we report on a 10-month-old boy with severe haemophilia A, who presented with torticollis. Although administration of factor VIII at a dose of 50 U/kg, the patient developed flaccid paralysis of the upper extremities. Factor VIII inhibitor screen was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed spinal epidural haematomas, extending from C-1 to the cauda equina. Treatment was continued with recombinant activated factor VIIa without surgery. After 1 month, complete neurological recovery was achieved and fully resolved haematomas were detected on spinal MRI. A prompt radiological evaluation of the cervical spine with MRI should be made in patients with haemophilia presenting with torticollis. In addition, in the case of life-threatening bleeding in patients with haemophilia, the possibility of an inhibitor should be kept in mind. PMID:26650462

  3. Scalp Haematoma in Cerebral Palsy Case due to Unknown Cause - A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Uthamalingam, Murali; Singh, Dharamjit Singh Jitsweer

    2016-06-01

    Incidences of cerebral palsy (CP) in children are not quite common even though it is the most common motor disorder in children. Further quality of life in CP cases is not so good in young adult stages and has to face certain problems. However scalp haematoma formation in CP patient without injury to head is rarely been reported. The case is being reported for the first time from Malaysia. We report on a unique case of scalp haematoma in an 18-year-old girl of known CP patient with unknown cause. No history of trauma or fall with any of the focal neurological signs or symptoms was found. Clinical examination showed soft boggy swelling of 8 x 10 cm size, involving most of scalp and upper face. CT - scan showed scalp haematoma with right orbital extraconal lesion. She underwent incision and drainage of scalp lesion; consequently around 100 ml of clotted blood came out. At follow-up she was doing well. PMID:27504347

  4. A Rare Case of Bilateral Broad Ligament Haematoma in Twin Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bankada, Vijayalakshmi; Purra, Pallavi; Ningappa, Amulya Marikatte; Jirankal, Shankar

    2015-10-01

    We report a rare case of bilateral broad ligament haematoma in twin pregnancy presented as gravida 3 para 2 living 2 (G3P2A0L2), with undelivered second twin with transverse lie with cord and hand prolapse with obstructed labour referred to our hospital from primary health centre after spontaneous vaginal delivery of first live healthy twin baby four hours later. On examination patient was stable, her investigations were within normal limits and patient was taken up for emergency lower segment caesarian section. Intraoperatively features of obstructed labour were present; a dead term baby was extracted with dichorionic diamniotic placenta. Bilateral broad ligament haematomas approximately of 8x8 cm were noted which were increasing in size after extraction of baby. On both sides haematomas were evacuated and drained along with bilateral uterine artery ligation. Three pints of blood were transfused intra and postoperatively. Her postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 14. PMID:26557572

  5. Scalp Haematoma in Cerebral Palsy Case due to Unknown Cause - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharamjit Singh Jitsweer

    2016-01-01

    Incidences of cerebral palsy (CP) in children are not quite common even though it is the most common motor disorder in children. Further quality of life in CP cases is not so good in young adult stages and has to face certain problems. However scalp haematoma formation in CP patient without injury to head is rarely been reported. The case is being reported for the first time from Malaysia. We report on a unique case of scalp haematoma in an 18-year-old girl of known CP patient with unknown cause. No history of trauma or fall with any of the focal neurological signs or symptoms was found. Clinical examination showed soft boggy swelling of 8 x 10 cm size, involving most of scalp and upper face. CT - scan showed scalp haematoma with right orbital extraconal lesion. She underwent incision and drainage of scalp lesion; consequently around 100 ml of clotted blood came out. At follow-up she was doing well. PMID:27504347

  6. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Ik; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits. PMID:26512286

  7. [Chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus: case report].

    PubMed

    Dost, L; Denes, E; Hidri, N; Ploy, M-C; Barraud, O; Moreau, J-J; Caire, F

    2012-02-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic subdural hematoma infected by Campylobacter fetus in a 86-year-old woman. She was admitted for confusion and disorientation in a context of high fever and diarrhoea. After two surgeries, the evolution was finally good with a combination of antibiotics (amoxicillin and clindamycin). Chronic subdural hematoma is a potential site for bacterial infection. Our case suggests that C. fetus infection should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with fever and enteritis. The frequency of such cases may be underestimated, due to the difficult diagnosis of C. fetus. It is also suspected that C. fetus could play a role in the recurrence of hematoma, because of its vessel tropism. PMID:22154423

  8. Spontaneous subdural haemorrhage in a patient with scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Munveer Singh; Hein, Paul; Nicholson, Laura; Carter, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with a history of systemic sclerosis presented with new onset seizures and renal failure. The patient's history, laboratory data and pathology supported the diagnosis of scleroderma renal crisis. The patient was also noted to have a subdural haemorrhage (SDH) in the absence of trauma. This is the first report of scleroderma renal crisis associated with a spontaneous SDH. PMID:25193814

  9. [Cervicodorsal subdural hematoma caused by coumarinic rodenticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Ruel, J H; Ffrench, P; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1990-01-01

    A 59-year old man developed subacute tetraparesis following severe sudden neck pain. MRI showed a subdural cervical hematoma. Prothrombin complex activity was low. An unusual coagulopathy after rodenticides exposure was found. Diphenacoum, an effective antagonist of vitamin K1, was present in the patients plasma. Specific medical management led to a complete recovery. Follow-up MRI seventy days later confirmed the complete disappearance of the hematoma. PMID:2330467

  10. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  11. [Influence of anticoagulants on the appearance of chronic subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Krupa, Mariusz; Moskała, Marek; Składzień, Tomasz; Grzywna, Ewelina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years in the Department of Neurotraumatology in Cracow it has been noticed the frequent connection between appearance of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and treatment by anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study is to draw attention to the problem of insufficient control of anticoagulants consumption, especially by patients treated for cardiovascular system diseases that increases the risk of bleeding and CSDH development. The paper is based on data from questionnaires that was sent to patients with CSDH, cured in the Department of Neurotraumatology form 2004 to 2005. Analyzed was the group of 51 patients with chronic subdural hematoma; 37 individuals (72.5%) confirmed taking acetylsalicylic acid in the period of 3 months before admission to the Department, 9 (17.6%) patients answered that they were taking low-molecular weight heparin. One patient (1.9%) was taking chronically derivative of cumarin. The authors would inform that anticoagulant treatment might favour increase of chronic subdural hematoma incidence. It's especially important, because the average life expectancy has been prolonged in Poland and there are more people taking acetylsalicylic acid. This can be an epidemiological problem in future. PMID:20043584

  12. Real-time two-dimensional asynchronous control of a computer cursor with a single subdural electrode

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Chin, César; Popovic, Milos R.; Sanin, Egor; Chen, Robert; Lozano, Andres M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility of controlling a computer cursor asynchronously in two dimensions using one subdural electrode. Design Proof of concept study. Setting Acute care hospital in Toronto, Canada. Participant A 68-year-old woman with a subdural electrode implanted for the treatment of essential tremor (ET) using direct brain stimulation of the primary motor cortex (MI). Interventions Power changes in the electrocorticography signals were used to implement a “brain switch”. To activate the switch the subject had to decrease the power in the 7–13 Hz frequency range using motor imagery of the left hand. The brain switch was connected to a system for asynchronous control of movement in two dimensions. Each time the user reduced the amplitude in the 7–13 Hz frequency band below an experimentally defined threshold the direction of cursor changed randomly. The new direction was always different from those previously rejected ensuring the convergence of the system on the desired direction. Outcome measures Training time, time and number of switch activations required to reach specific targets, information transfer rate. Results The user was able to control the cursor to specific targets on the screen after only 15 minutes of training. Each target was reached in 51.7 ± 40.2 seconds (mean ± SD) and after 9.4 ± 6.8 switch activations. Information transfer rate of the system was estimated to be 0.11 bit/second. Conclusion A novel brain–machine interface for asynchronous two-dimensional control using one subdural electrode was developed. PMID:23031175

  13. Chronic Subdural Hematomas Associated with Arachnoid Cysts: Significance in Young Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Ken; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; HONDA, Yumie; ISHIZAKA, Hideo; BABA, Tanefumi; OSADA, Takahiro; NISHIYAMA, Jun; INOUE, Go; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are associated with chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), especially in young patients, the detailed features of CSDHs associated with ACs remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between the location of CSDHs and ACs and the significance of ACs in young patients with CSDHs. We retrospectively assessed 605 consecutive patients 7 years of age and older who were diagnosed with a CSDH between 2002 and 2014. Twelve patients (2%) had ACs, and 10 of the 12 patients were 7–40 years of age. Patients with ACs as a complication of CSDHs were significantly younger than those without ACs (p < 0.05). Three different relationships between the location of CSDHs and ACs were found: a CSDH contacting an AC, an ipsilateral CSDH apart from an AC, and a CSDH contralateral to an AC. In 21 patients with CSDHs who were 7–40 years of age, 10 (47.6%) had ACs (AC group) and 7 (33.3%) had no associated illnesses (non-AC group). All 10 young patients with ACs showed ipsilateral CSDHs including a CSDH apart from an AC. All 17 patients in both the AC and non-AC groups showed headache but no paresis at admission. The pathogenesis of CSDHs associated with ACs may be different among the three types of locations. The clinical characteristics of patients with a combination of a CSDH and an AC including headache as a major symptom may be attributed to young age in the majority of patients with ACs. PMID:26345665

  14. Meningoencephalitis with Subdural Empyema Caused by Toxigenic Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Kovari, Helen; Dent, Wolfgang; Hombach, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical case of meningoencephalitis with subdural empyema in an immunocompromised farmer caused by toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A, which was identified by 16S RNA gene analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and subdural empyema. In immunocompromised patients, C. perfringens should be considered a potential pathogen of sepsis. PMID:22895036

  15. Concurrent intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma in a teenage athlete: a case report of this rare entity.

    PubMed

    Treister, Daniel S; Kingston, Sara E; Zada, Gabriel; Singh, Manu; Jones, Jesse G A; Mills, Jena N; Lerner, Alexander; Boyko, Orest B; Law, Meng; Rajamohan, Anandh; Shiroishi, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    A 15-year-old male high school football player presented with episodes of headache and complete body stiffness, especially in the arms, lower back, and thighs, immediately following a football game. This was accompanied by severe nausea and vomiting for several days. Viral meningitis was suspected by the primary clinician, and treatment with corticosteroids was initiated. Over the next several weeks, there was gradual symptom improvement and the patient returned to his baseline clinical status. The patient experienced a severe recurrence of the previous myriad of symptoms following a subsequent football game, without an obvious isolated traumatic episode. In addition, he experienced a new left sided headache, fatigue, and difficulty ambulating. He was admitted and an extensive workup was performed. CT and MRI of the head revealed concurrent intracranial and spinal subdural hematomas (SDH). Clinical workup did not reveal any evidence of coagulopathy or predisposing vascular lesions. Spinal SDH is an uncommon condition whose concurrence with intracranial SDH is an even greater clinical rarity. We suggest that our case represents an acute on chronic intracranial SDH with rebleeding, membrane rupture, and symptomatic redistribution of hematoma to the spinal subdural space. PMID:25349764

  16. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  17. Subdural empyema and unilateral pansinusitis due to a tooth infection.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Sahan, Murat; Hazer, Derya Burcu; Sahan, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Paranasal sinus infections are very common. Dental infections, tumours and anatomical malformations can cause unilateral sinusitis. Most cases can be treated without complications. However, rare life-threatening intracranial complications can occur. Generally, an intracranial complication progresses rapidly and can cause meningismus, focal neurological disorders, loss of consciousness and seizures. In such cases, an emergency craniotomy and concurrent sinus surgery are required. This article presents a 16-year-old patient with pansinusitis and subdural empyema that developed after a dental abscess. PMID:26123452

  18. Retroperitoneal haematoma associated with enoxaparin use in an elderly woman with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Triscott, Jean; Mercer, Susan; Tian, Peter George Jaminal; Dobbs, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with chronic kidney disease was on enoxaparin (1 mg/kg subcutaneously two times a day) for 4 months to manage pulmonary embolism. While admitted for diagnostic evaluation of frequent falls, transient ischaemic attacks and pain management, she developed vomiting, diarrhoea, melena and hypotension. Her estimated glomerular filtration rate decreased from an admission value of 34 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 13 mL/min/1.73 m2. CT scan showed retroperitoneal haematoma. She was placed in intensive care and stabilised with aggressive fluid replacement, blood transfusion, and discontinuation of enoxaparin and concomitant aspirin. We attribute this major bleeding to enoxaparin use in an elderly woman with chronic kidney disease and concomitant aspirin intake. We will review reported cases of enoxaparin-associated retroperitoneal haematoma. We suggest that enoxaparin be used with caution in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease, and stress that treatment monitoring and reversal may not be readily available. PMID:26438680

  19. Recurrent gluteal haematoma: two internal iliac artery-associated bleeding points

    PubMed Central

    Rafique, Bilal; Miranda, Benjamin H.; Gopee, Esha L.; Wigham, Andrew J.; Toft, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Gluteal artery aneurysms are also rare, more commonly affecting the superior gluteal artery in association with penetrating trauma, with those of the inferior gluteal artery usually associated with pelvic fractures. We discuss a diagnostically challenging presentation of recurrent subcutaneous gluteal haematoma due to two separate internal iliac artery-associated bleeding points. A 67-year-old man was referred, from a peripheral hospital, with a right-sided subcutaneous gluteal haematoma. This manifested 28 days following minor non-penetrating, non-fracture-associated trauma. Despite repeat blood transfusions, albeit interspersed with days of haemodynamic stability, and despite exclusion of relevant bleeding sources at endoscopy and two surgical explorations, it was only until contrast CT scanning was requested that both bleeding sources were identified and successfully treated by endovascular coil embolization. This provides an important variant and lesson to supplement current literature and understanding of more diagnostically challenging cases of an extremely rare presentation. PMID:27316622

  20. Recurrent gluteal haematoma: two internal iliac artery-associated bleeding points.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Bilal; Miranda, Benjamin H; Gopee, Esha L; Wigham, Andrew J; Toft, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Gluteal artery aneurysms are also rare, more commonly affecting the superior gluteal artery in association with penetrating trauma, with those of the inferior gluteal artery usually associated with pelvic fractures. We discuss a diagnostically challenging presentation of recurrent subcutaneous gluteal haematoma due to two separate internal iliac artery-associated bleeding points. A 67-year-old man was referred, from a peripheral hospital, with a right-sided subcutaneous gluteal haematoma. This manifested 28 days following minor non-penetrating, non-fracture-associated trauma. Despite repeat blood transfusions, albeit interspersed with days of haemodynamic stability, and despite exclusion of relevant bleeding sources at endoscopy and two surgical explorations, it was only until contrast CT scanning was requested that both bleeding sources were identified and successfully treated by endovascular coil embolization. This provides an important variant and lesson to supplement current literature and understanding of more diagnostically challenging cases of an extremely rare presentation. PMID:27316622

  1. [Management of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa accompanied by subdural effusions].

    PubMed

    Abderrahmen, K; Saadaoui, K; Bouhoula, A; Boubaker, A; Jemel, H

    2012-10-01

    Subdural effusions are uncommon but known complications of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa. They mainly occur after minor head traumas in young patients. Here, we report eight cases of arachnoid cyst of the middle cranial fossa associated with subdural hematoma in five cases and hygroma in three cases. Major symptoms are signs of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan and MRI showed the cyst and the subdural effusion. An excellent therapeutic result was achieved with evacuation of the subdural fluid via burr holes in the five cases of subdural hematoma while in the two cases of hygroma a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary. In the last case, a temporal craniotomy was performed with evacuation of the hygroma and fenestration of the cyst. We suggest treating only the complicating event in the case of a subdural hematoma via burr holes evacuation. Whereas, in the case of hygroma we think that craniotomy with fenestration of the cyst or the use of a subdural shunt are more often needed. PMID:22749080

  2. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  3. Bilateral subdural hygromas following administration of intrathecal methotrexate chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Heledd; Mahdi, Ali Jassem; Rowntree, Clare

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a previously well 58-year-old man who presented with headache and confusion 4 days postadministration of intrathecal methotrexate. He was undergoing intensive chemotherapy (CODOX-M/IVAC, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, ifosfamide, cytarabine) for the treatment of leukaemic phase CD20 negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A CT of the head demonstrated the presence of bilateral subdural hygromas complicated by haemorrhage resulting from coexisting chemotherapy induced thrombocytopenia. Surgical drainage of the hygroma was undertaken but the patient died of overwhelming sepsis. In patients with high-risk lymphoma, directed central nervous system (CNS) therapy is administered either systemically or intrathecally. It is thought that subdural hygromas result from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation in the inner dural layers of the cerebral convexities from CSF leak and reduction in CSF pressure post-lumbar puncture. We describe a rare but potentially fatal complication of intrathecal chemotherapy that haemato-oncologists need to be mindful of. PMID:26002663

  4. Solitary subdural osteoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Hong, Lichuan; Li, Chuzhong; Zhang, Yazhuo; Gui, Songbai

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas attached to the meninges unrelated to bone are extremely rare and their etiology has not been discussed previously in the English literature. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old male patient with a right frontal subdural osteoma. The patient presented with a ~5-month history of intermittent dizziness. Non-contrasted computerized tomography demonstrated a densely calcified mass attached to the inner surface of the right frontal skull. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed this mass could be enhanced by contrast MRI. Intraoperatively, the hard mass was noted to be attached to the inner layer of the dura mater, and not associated with the bone. Histopathological examination revealed lamellated bony trabeculae lined by osteoblasts and the intertrabecular marrow spaces occupied by adipose tissue, which contributed to the MRI enhancement. It was speculated that subdural osteomas arose from ectopic osteoblasts derived from the embryological neural crest cells. The context of intertrabecular bone marrow contributed to the enhancement on MRI. Simple excision is the treatment of choice for symptomatic lesions. PMID:27446388

  5. [Subdural hematoma after dural puncture: fateful complication of epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Schott, M; Gehrke, A; Gaab, M; Jantzen, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Subdural hematoma may occur as rare, although intervention- specific complications of accidental dural puncture by neuroaxial block. Bleeding may be caused by rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss related to traction on fragile intracranial bridging veins. This article reports a case of postdural puncture headache in a 43-year-old woman after accidental dural puncture during attempted placement of an epidural catheter for induction of abortion. Bed rest, analgesics, theophylline and hydration were to no avail and only a blood patch improved the headaches. The patient presented 7 weeks later with headache and left-sided hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a right frontoparietal subdural intracranial hematoma which had to be surgically evacuated. The patient recovered completely. Intracranial hematoma is a rare but serious complication of central neuroaxial block. According to current German jurisdiction this risk must be addressed when informed consent is obtained. Intracranial hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical headache and neurological signs (e.g. focal motor and sensory deficits and seizures) following neuroaxial block and adequate image diagnostics should be carried out without delay. PMID:23558719

  6. Heading injury precipitating subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, A; Nakayama, M; Kadota, K

    1999-03-01

    A 14-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy presented with subdural hematomas as complications of preexisting arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa, manifesting as symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Both had a history of heading the ball in a soccer game about 7 weeks and 2 days before the symptom occurred. There was no other head trauma, so these cases could be described as "heading injury." Arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa are often associated with subdural hematomas. We emphasize that mild trauma such as heading of the ball in a soccer game may cause subdural hematomas in patients with arachnoid cysts. PMID:10344112

  7. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  8. Subdural collections due to non-typhi Salmonella infections in two Malaysian children.

    PubMed

    Intan, H I; Zubaidah, C D; Norazah, A; Norlijah, O

    2008-07-01

    Subdural collections caused by Salmonella infection are rarely encountered in children. We present two cases caused by non-typhi Salmonella, one a four-and-a-half-month-old boy presenting with subdural effusion, and the other, a 16-month-old boy with empyema. The diagnosis was confirmed on blood and subdural pus cultures. One patient had status epilepticus following focal fit, and the other had prolonged fever without any localising signs of infection on admission. They responded well to prompt surgical drainage and prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy. Contrary to previous reports, both patients showed favourable outcome in terms of neurological sequelae. PMID:18695854

  9. Multiple Episodes of Hemorrhage Identified in MRI of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Ho; Shim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septa within the hematoma cavity are common, especially in the mixed density chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs). Although CT remains the diagnosis of choice, MRI is superior to detect the membranes in CSHs. We could obtain MRIs in 64 patients with CSH. We examined the value of MRI to understand the history of CSH. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical records and MRIs of 64 consecutive patients. MRI was selected to find any organic causes of neurologic symptoms. We classified the CSHs into septated or non-septated group, since classification of the septa was frequently obscure. Results Septa were identified by MRI in 43 patients (67%). They were more common in the over 70-years-old group. Unknown causes were more common in the septated group, which implies they might suffer from multiple traumas. The signal intensity of the CSH was variable. The methods of treatment were different between two groups. Surgery was more common in the septated group (p=0.021). Surgery was performed in 57 patients (89%). Burr-hole drainage was successful in 55 patients, even in the septated group. Conclusion Septa within the hematoma cavity may be related to the multiple episodes of head trauma. Repeated trauma may cause acute bleedings over the CSHs, which is one of the pathogenic mechanisms of hematoma enlargement. MRI could show the history of CSH. PMID:27169028

  10. Motor Vehicle Crash-Related Subdural Hematoma from Real-World Head Impact Data

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Jillian E.; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Edgerton, Colston A.; Powers, Alexander K.; Maldjian, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 1,700,000 people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year and motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are a leading cause of hospitalization from TBI. Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is a common intracranial injury that occurs in MVCs associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. In this study, SDH volume and midline shift have been analyzed in order to better understand occupant injury by correlating them to crash and occupant parameters. Fifty-seven head computed tomography (CT) scans were selected from the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) level 3+ SDH. Semi-automated methods were used to isolate the intracranial volume. SDH and additional occupant intracranial injuries were segmented across axial CT images, providing a total SDH injury volume. SDH volume was correlated to crash parameters and occupant characteristics. Results show a positive correlation between SDH volume and crash severity in near-side and frontal crashes. Additionally, the location of the resulting hemorrhage varied by crash type. Those with greater SDH volumes had significantly lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores at the crash site in near-side crashes. Age and fracture type were found to be significant contributors to SDH volume. This study is a volumetric analysis of real world brain injuries and known MVC impacts. The results of this study demonstrate a relationship among SDH volume, crash mechanics, and occupant characteristics that provide a better understanding of the injury mechanisms of MVC-associated TBI. PMID:22928543

  11. Motor vehicle crash-related subdural hematoma from real-world head impact data.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jillian E; Whitlow, Christopher T; Edgerton, Colston A; Powers, Alexander K; Maldjian, Joseph A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-12-10

    Abstract Approximately 1,700,000 people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year and motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are a leading cause of hospitalization from TBI. Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is a common intracranial injury that occurs in MVCs associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. In this study, SDH volume and midline shift have been analyzed in order to better understand occupant injury by correlating them to crash and occupant parameters. Fifty-seven head computed tomography (CT) scans were selected from the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) level 3+ SDH. Semi-automated methods were used to isolate the intracranial volume. SDH and additional occupant intracranial injuries were segmented across axial CT images, providing a total SDH injury volume. SDH volume was correlated to crash parameters and occupant characteristics. Results show a positive correlation between SDH volume and crash severity in near-side and frontal crashes. Additionally, the location of the resulting hemorrhage varied by crash type. Those with greater SDH volumes had significantly lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores at the crash site in near-side crashes. Age and fracture type were found to be significant contributors to SDH volume. This study is a volumetric analysis of real world brain injuries and known MVC impacts. The results of this study demonstrate a relationship among SDH volume, crash mechanics, and occupant characteristics that provide a better understanding of the injury mechanisms of MVC-associated TBI. PMID:22928543

  12. [Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome due to Spontaneous Bleeding after Taking Rivaroxaban (Xarelto®)].

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Biber, F; Sauer, H; Franke, J

    2016-06-01

    A 64-year-old man suffered from acute carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand without explainable reason. An emergency operation drained a pronounced haematoma. There is a strong suspicion this was a bleeding complication related to taking rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)). PMID:25970598

  13. Management of infratentorial subdural hygroma complicating foramen magnum decompression: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Anuj; Murphy, Mary; Thomas, Nicholas; Gullan, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Decompression of the foramen magnum for symptomatic Chiari malformation attends a small but significant risk of infratentorial subdural extra-arachnoid hygroma when an arachnoid-sparing procedure is attempted. We present three cases whereby an arachnoid-sparing procedure was carried out and resulted in infratentorial subdural hygroma and hydrocephalus. The complication was managed by re-exploration of the posterior fossa and wide arachnoidotomy. In cases whereby the decision has been made to open the dura, we recommend routine arachnoidotomy in foramen magnum decompression, avoiding the risks of infratentorial subdural hygroma. In cases where arachnoid-sparing procedures have been attempted and subdural hygroma subsequently develops, we advocate re-exploration of the posterior fossa rather than cerebrospinal fluid diversion. PMID:21258949

  14. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  15. Laparoscopic approach in a case of retroperitoneal and mesorectal haematoma following STARR procedure

    PubMed Central

    Cerullo, Guido; Cassini, Diletta; Martellucci, Jacopo; Baldazzi, Gianandrea

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of obstructed defecation syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE We analyzed major bleeding following STARR and exposed our experience regarding its conservative management with particular attention about diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. DISCUSSION A case by case discussion should be carried out and treatments should be driven by the features and the progression of the haematoma with regards to size, inflammatory signs or severe rectal obstruction. CONCLUSION If a second surgical time and exploration is considered, laparoscopy should be an effective choice while laparotomy, stoma or rectal resection should be considered in those cases with strong suspicious of peritonitis and pelvic abscess. PMID:25553530

  16. Rupture of the retrocorporeal artery: a rare cause of spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Alexis; Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Sourour, Nader; Gabrieli, Joseph; Rojas, Patricia; Chiras, Jacques; Peyre, Matthieu; Di Maria, Federico

    2016-06-01

    A 22-year-old man presented with a sudden backache and paraplegia (ASIA = B). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an anterior pan-spinal epidural haematoma. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and ruled out an underlying vascular malformation but showed an active contrast media leakage into the T-4 ventral epidural space with a pattern of pseudo-aneurysm. A rupture of a T-4 retrocorporeal artery was considered as the aetiology, possibly caused by a haemorrhagic sub-adventitial dissection. Treatment consisted in the embolisation of both the pseudo-aneurysm and the parent artery with liquid acrylic glue, followed by neurosurgical decompression in emergency. The patient had totally recovered (ASIA = E) by the 10-month clinical follow-up. PMID:27106842

  17. Late presentation of a subiliacus haematoma after an apophyseal injury of the anterior inferior iliac spine

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Asim; Whitaker, Samuel Richard; Ibrahim, Mazin S; Haddad, Fares S

    2014-01-01

    Apophyseal injuries are particularly common in adolescents when the growth spurt that accompanies puberty places increased strain on developing bones and muscles. Bone growth in particular exceeds that of soft tissues resulting in relatively tight musculature and subsequent excessive strain at these sites of tendon insertion into bone. We describe a case of a young athlete who presented with chronic hip pain after an anterior inferior iliac spine apophyseal injury with subsequent haematoma formation under the iliacus muscle. There was no evidence of a bleeding disorder. In view of the late presentation, he was managed non-operatively. This injury requires a low threshold for early cross-sectional imaging. The delay in management in this case did not lead to any long-term sequelae. PMID:24859544

  18. Microdialysis as Clinical Evaluation of Therapeutic Hypothermia in Rat Subdural Hematoma Model.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shoji; Spurlock, Markus S; Lee, Stephanie W; Gajavelli, Shyam; Bullock, Ross M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis (MD) is a fine laboratory technique which has been established for studying physiological, pharmacological, and pathological changes in the experimental studies of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This technique has also been well translated and widely applied to clinical bedside monitoring to provide pathophysiological analysis in severe TBI patients. The MD technique is thus well suited for straightforward translation from basic science to clinical application.In this chapter, we describe our evaluation of MD method in acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) rat model. With 100 kDa cut-off microdialysis membrane, we could measure several biomarkers such as ubiquitin carboxy hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), a neuronal marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and a glial marker in extracellular fluid. In this experiment, we could detect that the peak of extracellular UCH-L1 in the early hypothermia group was significantly lower than in the normothermia group. Also, in the late phase of reperfusion (>2.5 h after decompression), extracellular GFAP in the early hypothermia group was lower than in the normothermia. These data thus suggested that early, preoperatively induced hypothermia could mediate the reduction of neuronal and glial damage in the reperfusion phase of ischemia/reperfusion brain injury.Microdialysis allows for the direct measurement of extracellular molecules in an attempt to characterize metabolic derangements before they become clinically relevant. Advancements in technology have allowed for the bedside assay of multiple markers of ischemia and metabolic dysfunction, and the applications for traumatic brain injury have been well established. As clinicians become more comfortable with these tools their widespread use and potential for clinical impact with continue to rise. PMID:27604731

  19. The Value of Programmable Shunt Valves for the Management of Subdural Collections in Patients with Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A.; Mihos, Evaggelos; Fotakopoulos, George; Voulgaris, Spyridon

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of electromagnetic programmable shunt valves for the treatment of subdural collections. Methods. Adult patients with hydrocephalus of various causes that were treated with programmable shunt valves during the last ten years were retrospectively studied. In 127 patients, 139 electromagnetic programmable shunt valves were implanted. Results. A nontraumatic subdural fluid collection was detected in 12 patients. The treatment of these patients consisted of reprogramming of the valve's opening pressure. In 5 patients small subdural hematomas were detected; 4 of these patients were treated by raising the opening pressure alone and one patient required surgical drainage and change of the pressure setting. Traumatic chronic subdural hematomas were detected in 6 patients. These patients were treated by surgical drainage and readjustment of the valve's opening pressure. Conclusion. The ability to treat a shunt-related complication, such as a subdural fluid collection, by reprogramming the valve's opening pressure to a higher setting is an advantage over nonprogrammable valves, and it enables the opening pressure to be slowly lowered once the fluid collection is reabsorbed. Based on our results, we believe that programmable shunt valves should be preferred. PMID:24453855

  20. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  1. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  2. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury. PMID:21862340

  3. Endovascular treatment of an intramural aortic haematoma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation for myocardial ischemia with ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kopp, R; Axt, R; Klein, A; Weidenhagen, R; Schmucker, R; Czerner, S; Hartl, W H; Jauch, K W; Sigg, M

    2008-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by manual cardiac compression can restore cardiocirculatory function but can also injure patients. Commonly reported are skeletal fractures of the rips and sternum, while injuries to the large thoracic vessels will frequently be lethal. We report the case of a 57-year-old male patient with sudden cardiac arrest because of myocardial ischemia with ventricular fibrillation, successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, associated with an intramural haematoma (IMH) of the descending thoracic aorta treated by endovascular aortic repair. Secondary coronary angiography revealed a severe three vessel coronary disease with an occlusion of the proximal anterior descending branch and a subtotal stenosis of the first segmental branch of the left coronary artery (LCA) and a high-grade stenosis of the posterolateral segmental branch of the circumflex left coronary artery. Stenotic segments of coronary arteries were treated successfully by implantation of three drug-eluting stents followed by dual antiplatelet therapy. The patients recovered almost completely and was discharged for further rehabilitation after 3 weeks. PMID:18241973

  4. Delayed Occurrence of Escherichia coli Subdural Empyema Following Head Injury in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Munusamy, Thangaraj; Dinesh, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Subdural empyema is a rare but serious intracranial infection that warrants prompt management to reduce morbidity and avoid mortality. However, clinical and radiologic features may be subtle or ambivalent. Thus a diagnosis of subdural empyema should not be discounted, especially in a patient with a history of head trauma. Treatment consists of surgery to establish bacteriologic identification and subsequently guide antibiotic therapy. Here we present a case of delayed Escherichia coli subdural empyema following a head injury in an elderly patient without significant risk factors. Computed tomography imaging was equivocal for subdural empyema. The patient underwent surgery and was treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy. Although initial improvement in the patient's clinical condition was observed, he eventually succumbed to nosocomial pneumonia. In this article, we discuss the presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for subdural empyema with an emphasis on the challenges. The management conundrum that follows prompted us subsequently to review the literature. PMID:26251817

  5. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  6. Subdural effusions and lack of early pontocerebellar hypoplasia in siblings with RARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kastrissianakis, Katherina; Anand, Geetha; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Price, Sue; Prabhakar, Prab; Marinova, Jasmina; Brown, Garry; McShane, Tony

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the recently described RARS2 gene encoding for mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase give rise to a disorder characterised by early onset seizures, progressive microcephaly and developmental delay. The disorder was named pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) based on the corresponding radiological findings observed in the original cases. We report two siblings with the RARS2 mutation who displayed typical clinical features of PCH6, but who had distinct neuroimaging features. Early scans showed marked supratentorial, rather than infratentorial, atrophy, and the pons remained preserved throughout. One sibling also had bilateral subdural effusions at presentation. The deceleration in head growth pointed to an evolving genetic/metabolic process giving rise to cerebral atrophy and secondary subdural effusions. RARS2 mutations should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, subdural effusions, decelerating head growth and evidence of cerebral atrophy even in the absence of pontocerebellar hypoplasia on imaging. PMID:24047924

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension with bilateral subdural hemorrhage: Is conservative management adequate?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohammed Tauqeer; Hameed, Shahul; Lin, Kei Pin; Prakash, Kumar M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension complicated by bilateral subdural hemorrhage that resolved with conservative management. A young male presented with severe orthostatic headache associated with dizziness, neck pain and diplopia. Brain imaging revealed characteristic pachymeningeal enhancement and bilateral subdural hemorrhage. Radionuclide cisternography confirmed the Cerebrospinal fluid leak at the cervical 5 and cervical 6 vertebral level. He had clinical and radiological resolution with bed rest, hydration and analgesics and has remained symptom free since then. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension may be complicated by bilateral subdural hemorrhage. A conservative treatment approach is a viable option, as it may help improve the clinical and radiological outcome, especially when interventional facilities are not available. PMID:23661973

  8. Analysis of pediatric subdural empyema outcome in relation to computerized tomography brain scan.

    PubMed

    Md Ralib, Ahmad Razali; Ariff, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi; Naing, N N; George, P Jain; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to predict the outcome in patients with subdural empyema, using initial and post-treatment CT scan brain parameters. Data collection was done on those children who were diagnosed to have subdural empyema by CT scan of the brain with contrast, who underwent burrhole evacuation, from February 2000 until April 2002. Numerous factors, such as coma or loss of unconsciousness at diagnosis, age, types of antibiotic, microbiology, extension of empyema, associated cerebral infarction and ventriculitis, were analyzed. Poor prognosis was associated with loss of consciousness, and hypodensity by CT scan at presentation (p < 0.005). Patients with an extensive subdural empyema will have a good outcome if they are treated early and aggressively with antibiotics and burrhole evacuation. PMID:15691152

  9. Akinetic mutism and parkinsonism due to subdural and intraventricular tension pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Lütjens, Götz; Capelle, H Holger; Krauss, Joachim K

    2013-12-01

    Pneumocephalus may occur after intracranial surgery and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually associated with posterior fossa surgery. Here, we present a 56-year-old man who developed akinetic mutism and parkinsonism caused by subdural and intraventricular tension pneumocephalus associated with decompression of a chronic subdural hygroma. As an emergency treatment, air was exchanged with saline via the drainage, which then was removed and a subduro-peritoneal shunt was implanted. The condition described here requires immediate attention and appropriate treatment. PMID:23322598

  10. [A heat gelatinized subdural hematoma in a burned cadaver as an indication of a vital accident].

    PubMed

    Ritter, C

    1990-01-01

    The autopsy of a carbonized male cadaver revealed a subdural hematoma which permitted by absence of soot aspiration and carbon monoxid intoxication to think of a crime with following fire setting. This was confirmed later by detective investigations. The most impressive finding of this case was a heat-gelatinized subdural hematoma highly resembling to a postmortem epidural burn hematoma, which could easily lead to an error conclusion. The problems in the diagnosis of the causes of death in carbonized bodies are discussed and the taking into account of crimes is accentuated. PMID:2309533

  11. Subdural hematoma caused by rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Li, Lin; Chen, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm is rare and is usually associated with delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a patient of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm presenting as subacute SDH. The incidence, mechanisms and treatment of this condition are discussed. PMID:27094528

  12. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  13. Recurrent subdural hygromas after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Steele, Louise F; Magdum, Shailendra A

    2014-06-01

    A paediatric case of foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation complicated by recurrent subdural hygromas (SH) and raised intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly is described. SH pathogenesis is discussed, with consideration given to arachnoid fenestration. We summarise possibilities for treatment and avoidance of this unusual consequence of foramen magnum decompression. PMID:23952134

  14. Arachnoid Membrane Suturing for Prevention of Subdural Fluid Collection in Extracranial-intracranial Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun Woo; Kim, Tae Sun; Moon, Hyung Sik; Jang, Jae Won; Seo, Bo Ra; Lee, Jung Kil; Kim, Jae Hyoo; Kim, Soo Han

    2014-01-01

    Objective Water-tight closure of the dura in extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass is impossible because the superficial temporal artery (STA) must run through the dural defect. Consequently, subdural hygroma and subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection frequently occur postoperatively. To reduce these complications, we prospectively performed suturing of the arachnoid membrane after STA-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) and evaluated the clinical usefulness. Materials and Methods Between Mar. 2005 and Oct. 2010, extracranial-intracranial arterial bypass (EIAB) with/without encephalo-myo-synangiosis was performed in 88 cases (male : female = 53 : 35). As a control group, 51 patients (57 sides) underwent conventional bypass surgery without closure of the arachnoid membrane. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan was performed twice in three days and seven days later, respectively, for evaluation of the presence of subdural fluid collection and other mass lesions. Results The surgical result was excellent, with no newly developing ischemic event until recent follow-up. The additional time needed for arachnoid suture was five to ten minutes, when three to eight sutures were required. Post-operative subdural fluid collection was not seen on follow-up computed tomography scans in all patients. Conclusion Arachnoid suturing is simple, safe, and effective for prevention of subdural fluid collection in EC-IC bypass surgery, especially the vulnerable ischemic hemisphere. PMID:25045645

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery. PMID:25969682

  16. Combining stereo-electroencephalography and subdural electrodes in the diagnosis and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Rei; Bulacio, Juan; Najm, Imad; Wyllie, Elaine; So, Norman K; Nair, Dileep R; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) has advantages for exploring deeper epileptic foci. Nevertheless, SEEG can only sample isolated cortical areas and its spatial limitation, with the inability to record contiguous cortical regions, may cause difficulties in interpretation. In light of these limitations, the authors describe the hybrid technique of SEEG and subdural strip electrode placement. The hybrid technique was used for a presurgical evaluation in four patients with intractable epilepsy. Initially, the depth electrodes were inserted with a robotic stereotactic system. Thereafter, a skin incision and a small craniectomy were performed at the entry point of the strip electrode trajectory. The dura was opened and, under live fluoroscopic guidance, strip electrodes were slid into the subdural space. In these patients, the additional subdural strip electrodes provided (1) information regarding the precise description of seizure spread in the cortical surface adjacent to the subdural space, (2) identification of epileptogenic zones located near the crown, (3) more precise definition of functional cortex and (4) a better delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex. This hybrid technique provides additional data compared to either technique alone, offering superior understanding of the dynamics of the epileptic activity and its interaction with functional cortical areas. PMID:24650680

  17. Role of Subdural Electrocorticography in Prediction of Long-Term Seizure Outcome in Epilepsy Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Eishi; Juhasz, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    Since prediction of long-term seizure outcome using preoperative diagnostic modalities remains suboptimal in epilepsy surgery, we evaluated whether interictal spike frequency measures obtained from extraoperative subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording could predict long-term seizure outcome. This study included 61 young patients (age…

  18. Diagnosis of subdural and intraparenchymal intracranial hemorrhage using a microwave-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Riechers, Ronald G., Sr.; Pasala, Krishna M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Rosner, Michael; Day, Keith; Garcia-Pinto, Patricia; Song, Ki-Il; Yun, Catherine; Rawie, Eric; Davis, Jessica; Scott, Joshua; Loh, Yince; Crommett, John W.; Zeidman, Seth M.; Rhee, Peter; Ecklund, James M.; Lockhart, Stephen

    2000-08-01

    A novel method for identifying and localizing brain hemorrhage is presented. The method uses electromagnetic waves in the microwave and RF region and a modified algorithm previously used for the estimation of the angle of arrival of radar signals. Results are presented applying this device for detecting subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhages in anesthetized pig.

  19. Advances in the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes: Role of imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Masi, Filippo; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Aortic diseases include a wide range of pathological conditions: aortic aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, acute aortic syndromes, atherosclerotic and inflammatory conditions, genetic diseases and congenital anomalies. Acute aortic syndromes have acute onset and may be life-threatening. They include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer and traumatic aortic injury. Pain is the common denominator to all acute aortic syndromes. Pain occurs regardless of age, gender and other associated clinical conditions. In this review, we deal with the main findings in the clinical setting and the most recent indications for diagnostic imaging, which are aimed to start an appropriate treatment and improve the short- and long-term prognosis of these patients. PMID:26957573

  20. Subdural hemorrhage – a serious complication post-intrathecal chemotherapy. A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Xiu Xian; Bazargan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We need to have a high index of suspicion for subdural hemorrhage (SDH) post-lumbar puncture in hematological patients given their increased risk and the significant morbidity and mortality associated with SDHs. PMID:25678976

  1. Symptomatic posterior fossa and supratentorial subdural hygromas as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Menon, Girish; Hariharan, Easwer; Sharma, Mridul; Nair, Suresh

    2011-02-01

    Symptomatic subdural hygroma due to foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I is extremely rare. The authors present their experience with 2 patients harboring such lesions and discuss treatment issues. They conclude that the possibility of subdural hygromas should be considered in all patients presenting with increased intracranial tension following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation Type I. Immediate neuroimaging and appropriate surgical intervention provides a good outcome. PMID:20849216

  2. Second-Impact Syndrome and a Small Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Catastrophic Result of Repetitive Head Injury with a Characteristic Imaging Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Gean, Alisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There have been a handful of previously published cases of athletes who were still symptomatic from a prior head injury, and then suffered a second injury in which a thin, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) with unilateral hemisphere vascular engorgement was demonstrated on CT scan. In those cases, the cause of the brain swelling/dysautoregulation was ascribed to the presence of the acute SDH rather than to the acceleration/deceleration forces that caused the SDH. We believe that the brain swelling is due to “second-impact dysautoregulation,” rather than due to the effect of the SDH on the underlying hemisphere. To support our hypothesis, we present 10 additional cases of acute hemispheric swelling in association with small SDHs in athletes who received a second head injury while still symptomatic from a previous head injury. The clinical history and the unique neuroimaging features of this entity on CT are described and illustrated in detail. The CT findings included an engorged cerebral hemisphere with initial preservation of grey-white matter differentiation, and abnormal mass effect and midline shift that appeared disproportionately greater than the size of the SDH. In addition, the imaging similarities between our patients and those with non-accidental head trauma (shaken-baby syndrome) will be discussed. PMID:20536318

  3. Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Eccentric Exercise Using a Vibrating Belt Machine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hey-Ran; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  4. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajendra; You, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are clear, colorless fluid-filled cysts that arise during brain and skull development from the splitting of the arachnoid membrane. Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. Trauma is an important factor in the development of CSDH. Here, we report four patients, previously asymptomatic, revealing CSDH with AC on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. All patients underwent craniotomy with evacuation of hematoma and resection of the cystic membrane that was then connected to the basal cistern under the operating microscope. Postoperatively, all patients were symptom-free. Presentation of an AC with chronic subdural hematoma in the absence of preceding head trauma is considered to be rare in children and young adults. PMID:25685210

  5. Spontaneous Resolution of a Large Chronic Subdural Hematoma Which Required Surgical Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun Seok; Park, Young Seok; Min, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a case of an 87-year-old woman who showed spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma which required surgical decompression. She had suffered from confused mentality and right side weakness of motor grade II for 10 days. The initial brain CT scan showed a 22 mm thick low density lesion located in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region with midline shift (12 mm) which required emergency decompression. However, because she and her family did not want surgery, she was followed up in the outpatient clinic. Five months later, follow up brain CT showed that the CSDH had disappeared and the patient became neurologically normal. The reasons for spontaneous resolution of CSDH remain unclear. We discuss the possible relation between mechanisms of physio-pathogenesis and spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) in an elderly patient. PMID:26539279

  6. Chronic subdural hematoma after eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt machine.

    PubMed

    Park, Hey-Ran; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  7. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  8. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  9. Fatal cerebritis and brain abscesses following a nontraumatic subdural hematoma in a chronic hemodialyzed patient.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Maria; Damry, Nasroolla; Gazagnes, Marie D

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in hemodialysis-dependent patients that can lead to metastatic abscesses with poor outcome. We report a case of a 65-year-old chronic hemodialyzed male patient who developed cerebritis and brain abscesses complicating a spontaneous subdural hematoma, following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia related to infected arteriovenous fistula. In spite of adequate antibiotherapy and several surgical brain drainages, our patient did not survive. Prevention of S. aureus is highly important in hemodialysis patients. PMID:19090864

  10. Pathological and immunohistochemical features of subdural histiocytic sarcomas in 15 dogs.

    PubMed

    Ide, Tetsuya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Subdural histiocytic sarcomas from 15 dogs (mean age 7.8 years) were histopathologically examined. Among the 15 dogs, there was a marked breed predominance (toward Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs, 47%), but no gender predilection. Focal solitary subdural masses were detected in the cerebrum (12 cases) and spinal cord (1 case), whereas diffuse infiltrative lesions were observed in the cerebral leptomeninges in 2 cases. All neoplastic lesions had common histological features characterized by the proliferation of pleomorphic histiocytic cells combined with various inflammatory reactions. Multinucleated giant cells, phagocytosis, and atypical mitotic figures in the neoplastic cells were commonly observed. Most of the pleomorphic neoplastic cells in the present cases were immunopositive for monocytic, histiocytic, or both markers, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1), cluster of differentiation (CD)163, and CD204, except for the neoplastic cells in 2 focal and 2 diffuse histiocytic sarcomas. The findings suggest that differences in cell origin, molecular expression, or both patterns are responsible for the distribution patterns of canine subdural histiocytic sarcomas. PMID:21217043

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with old organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Ohta, Masaru; Ohshima, Koichi; Niino, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Okada, Yosuke; Nakashima, Shinji

    2012-06-01

    This report describes a case of an immunocompetent 77-year-old male with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with calcified chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). On the day prior to consultation in our outpatient clinic, the patient fell from his bed, striking his frontal head on the floor. Magnetic resonance imaging showed ill-defined lesions in the right frontal-temporal subdural regions. At surgery, a hard and thickened outer membrane of a CSH and muddy organized subdural hematoma were observed. However, macroscopic neoplastic lesions were not apparent. Histologically, there were atypical lymphoid cells scattered or conglomerated in some areas of the thick outer membrane of the CSH. They were composed of occasional large atypical lymphoid cells. The lesions were accompanied by necrosis. Atypical lymphoid cells were immunopositive for B-cell markers but not for T-cell markers. EBNA2 was seen in the nuclei of tumor cells. Atypical lymphoid cells showed positive signals for EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) on in situ hybridization. These findings were consistent with EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with CSH. These results also suggested that EBV and the inflammatory reaction found in the CSH could be the etiological factors in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:22612510

  12. Use of Subperiosteal Drain Versus Subdural Drain in Chronic Subdural Hematomas Treated With Burr-Hole Trepanation: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Katharina; Schaedelin, Sabine; Mariani, Luigi; Fandino, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most frequent neurosurgical conditions affecting elderly people and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. The use of a subdural drain (SDD) after burr-hole trepanation for cSDH was proven to reduce recurrence and mortality at 6 months. To date in neurosurgery practice, evidence-based guidelines on whether an SDD or subperiosteal drain (SPD) should be used do not exist. Currently both methods are being practiced depending on the institute and/or the practicing neurosurgeon. Objective The aim of this study is to compare the reoperation rates after burr-hole trepanation and insertion of an SPD or SDD in patients with cSDH. Methods This is a prospective, noninferiority, multicenter, randomized controlled trial designed to include 220 patients over the age of 18 years presenting with a symptomatic cSDH verified on cranial computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging who are to undergo surgical evacuation with burr-hole trepanation. After informed consent is obtained, patients are randomly allocated to an SPD or SDD group. The primary endpoint is recurrence indicating a reoperation within 12 months. Results This research is investigator-initiated and has received ethics approval. Patient recruitment started in April 2013, and we expect all study-related activities to be completed by the end of 2016 or beginning of 2017. Conclusions To date, evidence-based recommendations concerning the operative treatment of cSDH are sparse. Results of this research are expected to have applications in evidence-based practice for the increasing number of patients suffering from cSDH and possibly lead to more efficient treatment of this disease with fewer postoperative complications. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01869855; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01869855 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fNK4Jlxk) PMID:27059872

  13. Post-operative spinal subdural extra-arachnoid hygroma causing cauda equina compression: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Singleton, William G B; Ramnarine, Devindra; Patel, Nitin; Wigfield, Crispin

    2012-06-01

    We present two cases of symptomatic, post-lumbar surgery cauda equina compression due to formation of a dissecting subdural extra-arachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection (hygroma) under tension. In both cases, a small inadvertent durotomy was sustained during the initial surgery. Surgical re-exploration confirmed a tension subdural extra-arachnoid hygroma due to one-way flow of CSF through a pinhole puncture in the arachnoid. The mechanism and clinico-radiological features of this rare post-operative complication are discussed. PMID:22085250

  14. Subacute subdural hygroma and presyrinx formation after foramen magnum decompression with duraplasty for Chiari type 1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Fumio; Kitagawa, Tadashi; Takagi, Kenji; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl developed a rare case of subdural hygroma after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari type 1 malformation manifesting as rapid symptom deterioration around 10 days after uncomplicated operation with uneventful immediate postoperative course. Progressive enlargement of the subdural hygroma in both supra- and infratentorial spaces was followed by the development of hydrocephalus. Syringomyelia improved shortly after the first operation but then deteriorated with massive presyrinx formation. Reoperation with wide opening of the arachnoid membrane lead to a rapid resolution of the hydrocephalus and the presyrinx. The present case shows that wide opening of the arachnoid membrane is an effective therapeutic option. PMID:21613769

  15. Subdural porous and notched mini-grid electrodes for wireless intracranial electroencephalographic recordings

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Gélinas, Sébastien; Desgent, Sébastien; Duss, Sandra; Bernier Turmel, Félix; Carmant, Lionel; Sawan, Mohamad; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2014-01-01

    Background Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) studies are widely used in the presurgical evaluation of drug-refractory patients with partial epilepsy. Because chronic implantation of intracranial electrodes carries a risk of infection, hemorrhage, and edema, it is best to limit the number of electrodes used without compromising the ability to localize the epileptogenic zone (EZ). There is always a risk that an intracranial study may fail to identify the EZ because of suboptimal coverage. We present a new subdural electrode design that will allow better sampling of suspected areas of epileptogenicity with lower risk to patients. Method Impedance of the proposed electrodes was characterized in vitro using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The appearance of the novel electrodes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was tested by placing the electrodes into a gel solution (0.9% NaCl with 14 g gelatin). In vivo neural recordings were performed in male Sprague Dawley rats. Performance comparisons were made using microelectrode recordings from rat cortex and subdural/depth recordings from epileptic patients. Histological examinations of rat brain after 3-week icEEG intracerebral electroencephalography (icEEG) recordings were performed. Results The in vitro results showed minimum impedances for optimum choice of pure gold materials for electrode contacts and wire. Different attributes of the new electrodes were identified on MRI. The results of in vivo recordings demonstrated signal stability, 50% noise reduction, and up to 6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement as compared to commercial electrodes. The wireless icEEG recording system demonstrated on average a 2% normalized root-mean-square (RMS) deviation. Following the long-term icEEG recording, brain histological results showed no abnormal tissue reaction in the underlying cortex. Conclusion The proposed subdural electrode system features attributes that could potentially translate into better ic

  16. Effect of Inner Membrane Tearing in the Treatment of Adult Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    KAYACI, Selim; KANAT, Ayhan; KOKSAL, Vaner; OZDEMIR, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    The postoperative results of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) procedures using catheterization and tearing of inner membrane (CTIM) technique have not previously been discussed in the literature. This article compares the effects of CTIM technique on brain re-expansion and re-accumulation with cases operated on with a burr-hole craniotomy and outer membrane incision (BCOMI) technique. The study involved operations on 144 patients (Group 1) using the CTIM technique and 108 patients (Group 2) using the BCOMI technique. In the operations using the CTIM technique in Group 1, the mean effusion measured in the subdural space (SDS) was 10.0 ± 0.2 mm, and for Group 2, 14.3 ± 0.6 mm in the postoperative period on the first and third days and this difference was found to be significant (p < 0.05). The means were 6.6 ± 0.2 mm for Group 1 and 10.3 ± 0.5 mm for Group 2 on the seventh day (p < 0.05). Recurrence rate was 8.3% in Group 2 and 0 in Group 1. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0001). The length of hospital stay was 7.0 ± 0.1 days for the Group 1 and 8.8 ± 0.2 days for Group 2 and this difference was significant (p < 0.05). These results indicate that the CTIM technique is preferable because it results in earlier re-expansion, lower recurrence, less subdural effusion and pneumocephalus, and shorter hospital stays. PMID:24477064

  17. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine. PMID:27317202

  18. Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Findings of Subdural Osteoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Hyun, Dong Keun; Park, Hyeonseon; Oh, Se Yang; Yoon, Seung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a subdural osteoma. A 29-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of headaches. Computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneous high-density lesion isolated from the inner table of the frontal bone (a lucent dural line) in the right frontal convexity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extra-axial lesion with a broad base without dural tail sign and punctate enhancement pattern characteristic of abundant adipose tissue. Upon surgical excision, we found a hard bony mass clearly demarcated from the dura. The mass displayed characteristics of an osteoma upon histological examination. The symptom was relieved after operation. PMID:27195262

  19. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  20. Psychiatric manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma: the unfolding of mystery in a homeless patient.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Paramjeet; Upadhyay, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma is not limited to neurological deficits or cognitive impairment. It may present with behavioral abnormalities. When the behavioral abnormalities present without obvious neurological deficits and in the absence of trauma, it leads to misdiagnosis. A trivial trauma may cause intracranial bleed that is either missed or ignored in the clinical history. This case report highlights the clinical picture of a homeless patient who presented with withdrawn and disorganized behavior, apathy and poverty of speech in the absence of any neurological deficit. His clinical presentation led to a possibility of psychosis and he was started on antipsychotics. He had developed extrapyramidal side effects in low dose of antipsychotic without any clinical benefit in his clinical picture. Neuroimaging done to rule out any possible organicity-revealed bilateral subdural hematoma, which was later evacuated by neurosurgical intervention in multiple settings and the patient had improved. This case report unfolds the mystery behind the psychotic presentation in a homeless adult. PMID:25969617

  1. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    PubMed

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70% [1]. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases [2]. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999 [3]. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated. PMID:27154449

  2. Subdural Effusion in Dengue Patient as A Late Neurological Complication: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most common and widespread arthropod borne arboviral infection in the world today. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue fever is changing with neurological manifestations being reported more frequently. A 50-year-old male patient was admitted with fever and thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed as dengue fever with positive IgM dengue serology. Patient was managed medically in the ward for seven days and observed for any complications. Fever subsided since third day of admission and platelet count started to improve; he had no complication of dengue fever and was discharged in stable condition. However, patient again came back to emergency with two episodes of generalized tonic clonic seizures followed by altered sensorium. Emergency NCCT head and later MRI brain revealed bilateral subdural effusion. Patient was managed with antiepileptic drugs and anti-oedema measures were taken. Patient showed improvement in sensorium after 48 hours of admission. Later after six weeks NCCT and MRI brain revealed complete resolution of subdural effusion. PMID:26393157

  3. Spinal subdural hematoma revealing hemophilia A in a child: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Bakhtiari, Abbas; Mostajabi, Pardis

    2003-01-01

    Background Intraspinal bleeding especially in the form of subdural hematoma is rare in hemophiliacs. In the present case, we report a neglected hemophilic A child with such a problem and discuss its management options. Case Presentation A 9-year old hemophilic A boy presented with quadriparesis, confusion and meningismus after a fall 4 days previously. There was no sign of direct trauma to his back. His CT Scan and MRI showed spinal extramedullary hematoma extended from C5 to L2. We corrected the factor VIII level, but two days later, the patient's lower limbs weakened to 1/5 proximally as well as distally. We performed a laminectomy from T11 to L2, according to the level of the maximal neurological deficit and recent deterioration course. The subdural hematoma was evacuated. The hematoma in other spinal levels was managed conservatively. In the week following the operation, the patient's neurological status approached normal. Conclusion This case calls attention to the clinical manifestation, radiological features and management options of the rarely reported intraspinal hematoma in hemophilic children. Although this case has been managed operatively for its hematoma in the thoracolumbar region, at the same time it can be considered a successful case of conservative management of intraspinal hematoma in the cervicothoracic region. Both conservative and surgical management could be an option in managing these patients considering their neurological course. PMID:12904268

  4. Spinal subdural hematoma revealing hemophilia A in a child: A case report.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Bakhtiari, Abbas; Mostajabi, Pardis

    2003-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraspinal bleeding especially in the form of subdural hematoma is rare in hemophiliacs. In the present case, we report a neglected hemophilic A child with such a problem and discuss its management options. CASE PRESENTATION: A 9-year old hemophilic A boy presented with quadriparesis, confusion and meningismus after a fall 4 days previously. There was no sign of direct trauma to his back. His CT Scan and MRI showed spinal extramedullary hematoma extended from C5 to L2. We corrected the factor VIII level, but two days later, the patient's lower limbs weakened to 1/5 proximally as well as distally. We performed a laminectomy from T11 to L2, according to the level of the maximal neurological deficit and recent deterioration course. The subdural hematoma was evacuated. The hematoma in other spinal levels was managed conservatively. In the week following the operation, the patient's neurological status approached normal. CONCLUSION: This case calls attention to the clinical manifestation, radiological features and management options of the rarely reported intraspinal hematoma in hemophilic children. Although this case has been managed operatively for its hematoma in the thoracolumbar region, at the same time it can be considered a successful case of conservative management of intraspinal hematoma in the cervicothoracic region. Both conservative and surgical management could be an option in managing these patients considering their neurological course. PMID:12904268

  5. Comparison of Irrigation versus No Irrigation during Burr Hole Evacuation of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Muzna; Siddiqui, Usman Tariq; Rauf, Mohammad Yaseen; Malik, Ali Osama; Javed, Gohar

    2016-09-01

    Objective To compare the results of the use of irrigation versus no irrigation during burr hole evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methodology The study was a retrospective chart review of those patients who underwent burr hole evacuation of CSDH during a period of 5 years. Cases were divided into two groups based on the use of irrigation during surgery. A subdural drain was placed in all patients (i.e., in both the irrigation and no-irrigation groups) and removed 24 to 48 hours postoperatively. Results The total sample size was 56, of which 34 patients were in the irrigation group and 22 in the no-irrigation group. Recurrence rate was 17.6% in the irrigation group and 9.1% in the no-irrigation group (p = 0.46). Systemic complications were predominantly cardiac related in the no-irrigation group compared with respiratory complications in the irrigation group. The irrigation group had a mortality rate of 5.9% compared with 4.5% in the no-irrigation group (p = 0.66). Conclusion No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of recurrence or mortality. PMID:27123748

  6. A Motion Simulator Ride Associated With Headache and Subdural Hematoma: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Robert A; Evans, Randolph W; Baskin, David S

    2016-02-01

    We report the first case report of symptomatic bilateral subdural hematomas (SDH) associated with riding a centrifugal motion simulator ride. A previously healthy 55-year-old male developed new onset daily headaches 1 week after going on the ride that were due to symptomatic bilateral SDH requiring operative intervention with a full recovery. There was no history of other trauma or other systemic or intracranial abnormality to account for the development of the SDH. We review the headaches and other clinical features associated with chronic SDH. Twelve cases of roller coaster headaches due to SDH associated with riding roller coasters have been reported. The pathophysiology is reviewed, which we believe is the same mechanism that may be responsible in this case. Although it is possible that this neurovascular injury is truly rare, it is also possible that this injury is underreported as patients and physicians may not make the association or physicians have not reported additional cases. The risk of this injury likely increases with age, as the size of the subdural space increases, and may support the maxim that "roller coasters and simulators are for kids." PMID:26581189

  7. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  8. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon; Lee, Seung Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  9. Dipole source analyses of early median nerve SEP components obtained from subdural grid recordings.

    PubMed

    Baumgärtner, Ulf; Vogel, Hagen; Ohara, Shinji; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Lenz, Fred A

    2010-12-01

    The median nerve N20 and P22 SEP components constitute the initial response of the primary somatosensory cortex to somatosensory stimulation of the upper extremity. Knowledge of the underlying generators is important both for basic understanding of the initial sequence of cortical activation and to identify landmarks for eloquent areas to spare in resection planning of cortex in epilepsy surgery. We now set out to localize the N20 and P22 using subdural grid recording with special emphasis on the question of the origin of P22: Brodmann area 4 versus area 1. Electroencephalographic dipole source analysis of the N20 and P22 responses obtained from subdural grids over the primary somatosensory cortex after median nerve stimulation was performed in four patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Based on anatomical landmarks, equivalent current dipoles of N20 and P22 were localized posterior to (n = 2) or on the central sulcus (n = 2). In three patients, the P22 dipole was located posterior to the N20 dipole, whereas in one patient, the P22 dipole was located on the same coordinate in anterior-posterior direction. On average, P22 sources were found to be 6.6 mm posterior [and 1 mm more superficial] compared with the N20 sources. These data strongly suggest a postcentral origin of the P22 SEP component in Brodmann area 1 and render a major precentral contribution to the earliest stages of processing from the primary motor cortex less likely. PMID:20861430

  10. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  11. Not All Acute Abdomen Cases in Early Pregnancy Are Ectopic; Expect the Unexpected: Renal Angiomyolipoma Causing Massive Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rana, Muhammad Asim; Mady, Ahmed F; Jakaraddi, Nagesh; Mumtaz, Shahzad A; Ahmad, Habib; Naser, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal haemorrhage (or retroperitoneal haematoma) refers to an accumulation of blood found in the retroperitoneal space. It is a rare clinical entity with variable aetiology including anticoagulation, ruptured aortic aneurysm, acute pancreatitis, malignancy, and bleeding from renal aneurysm. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal bleed is sometimes missed or delayed as presentation is often nonspecific. Multislice CT and arteriography are important for diagnosis. There is no consensus about the best management plan for patients with retroperitoneal haematoma. Stable patients can be managed with fluid resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy if any, and blood transfusion. Endovascular options involving selective intra-arterial embolisation or stent-grafts are clearly getting more and more popularity. Open repair is usually reserved for cases when there is failure of conservative or endovascular measures to control the bleeding or expertise is unavailable and in cases where the patient is unstable. Mortality of patients with retroperitoneal haematoma remains high if appropriate and timely measures are not taken. Haemorrhage from a benign renal tumour is a rarer entity which is described in this case report which emphasizes that physicians should have a wide index of suspicion when dealing with patients presenting with significant groin, flank, abdominal, or back pain, or haemodynamic instability of unclear cause. Our patient presented with features of acute abdomen and, being pregnant, was thought of having a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27429809

  12. Not All Acute Abdomen Cases in Early Pregnancy Are Ectopic; Expect the Unexpected: Renal Angiomyolipoma Causing Massive Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Ahmed F.; Jakaraddi, Nagesh; Naser, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal haemorrhage (or retroperitoneal haematoma) refers to an accumulation of blood found in the retroperitoneal space. It is a rare clinical entity with variable aetiology including anticoagulation, ruptured aortic aneurysm, acute pancreatitis, malignancy, and bleeding from renal aneurysm. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal bleed is sometimes missed or delayed as presentation is often nonspecific. Multislice CT and arteriography are important for diagnosis. There is no consensus about the best management plan for patients with retroperitoneal haematoma. Stable patients can be managed with fluid resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy if any, and blood transfusion. Endovascular options involving selective intra-arterial embolisation or stent-grafts are clearly getting more and more popularity. Open repair is usually reserved for cases when there is failure of conservative or endovascular measures to control the bleeding or expertise is unavailable and in cases where the patient is unstable. Mortality of patients with retroperitoneal haematoma remains high if appropriate and timely measures are not taken. Haemorrhage from a benign renal tumour is a rarer entity which is described in this case report which emphasizes that physicians should have a wide index of suspicion when dealing with patients presenting with significant groin, flank, abdominal, or back pain, or haemodynamic instability of unclear cause. Our patient presented with features of acute abdomen and, being pregnant, was thought of having a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27429809

  13. Early surgery versus initial conservative treatment in patients with spontaneous supratentorial lobar intracerebral haematomas (STICH II): a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendelow, A David; Gregson, Barbara A; Rowan, Elise N; Murray, Gordon D; Gholkar, Anil; Mitchell, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The balance of risk and benefit from early neurosurgical intervention for conscious patients with superficial lobar intracerebral haemorrhage of 10–100 mL and no intraventricular haemorrhage admitted within 48 h of ictus is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that early surgery compared with initial conservative treatment could improve outcome in these patients. Methods In this international, parallel-group trial undertaken in 78 centres in 27 countries, we compared early surgical haematoma evacuation within 12 h of randomisation plus medical treatment with initial medical treatment alone (later evacuation was allowed if judged necessary). An automatic telephone and internet-based randomisation service was used to assign patients to surgery and initial conservative treatment in a 1:1 ratio. The trial was not masked. The primary outcome was a prognosis-based dichotomised (favourable or unfavourable) outcome of the 8 point Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) obtained by questionnaires posted to patients at 6 months. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN22153967. Findings 307 of 601 patients were randomly assigned to early surgery and 294 to initial conservative treatment; 298 and 291 were followed up at 6 months, respectively; and 297 and 286 were included in the analysis, respectively. 174 (59%) of 297 patients in the early surgery group had an unfavourable outcome versus 178 (62%) of 286 patients in the initial conservative treatment group (absolute difference 3·7% [95% CI −4·3 to 11·6], odds ratio 0·86 [0·62 to 1·20]; p=0·367). Interpretation The STICH II results confirm that early surgery does not increase the rate of death or disability at 6 months and might have a small but clinically relevant survival advantage for patients with spontaneous superficial intracerebral haemorrhage without intraventricular haemorrhage. Funding UK Medical Research Council. PMID:23726393

  14. Post meningitis subdural hygroma: Anatomical and functional evaluation with (99m)Tc-ehylene cysteine dimer single photon emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Mishra, Ajiv; Arora, Geetanjali; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Subdural hygroma is the collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the subdural space. Most often these resolve spontaneously. However, in cases with neurological complications surgical drainage may be needed. We here, present the case of an 8-year-old boy with post meningitis subdural hygroma. (99m)Tc-ehylene cysteine dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) hybrid single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) carried out in this patient, demonstrated the subdural hygroma as well as the associated cerebral hypoperfusion. If (99m)Tc-ECD SPECT/CT is integrated into management of these patients, it can help in decision making with respect to conservative versus surgical management. PMID:24019670

  15. Cerebral atrophy and subdural haemorrhage after cerebellar and cerebral infarcts in an 8-month-old child after having been stung by a scorpion

    PubMed Central

    Sığırcı, Ahmet; Öztürk, Mehmet; Yakıncı, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    A scorpion sting causing cerebellar and cerebral infarctions with corpus callosum involvement and bilateral cerebral atrophy with subdural haemorrhage in an 8-month-old girl, has not been previously described to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24962491

  16. Cavernous hemangioma of the skull presenting with subdural hematoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Oren N; Gluf, Wayne M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2004-10-15

    Cavernous hemangioma of the calvaria is a very rare disease, and patients usually present with headaches or a visible skull deformity. Few reports of patients presenting with intradiploic or epidural hemorrhages are found in the literature. No case of an intradural hemorrhage from a cavernous hemangioma of the skull has been reported to date. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old man in whom a symptomatic subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from a cavernous hemangioma of the calvaria had hemorrhaged and eroded through the inner table of the skull and dura mater. The patient underwent surgery for evacuation of the SDH and resection of the calvarial lesion. Postoperatively, the patient experienced immediate relief of his symptoms and had no clinical or radiological recurrence. Calvarial cavernous hemangiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic SDHs. Additionally, skull lesions that present with intracranial hemorrhages must be identified and resected at the time of hematoma evacuation to prevent recurrences. PMID:15633993

  17. Incidental diagnosis of two intracranial aneurysms following surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Joe M.; Rajmohan, B. P.; Sharmad, M. S.; Peethambaran, Anilkumar

    2015-01-01

    The development of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a very rare phenomenon. SAH in this context occurring secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture is still rare. We report a case of an elderly lady who presented with right hemiplegia and altered sensorium. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed a left fronto-temporoparietal CSDH with midline shift, which was promptly evacuated surgically via a single burr-hole. Postoperatively, her level of consciousness deteriorated and there was increased the amount of drain. Emergency CT of the brain revealed diffuse SAH. CT cerebral angiogram revealed one aneurysm each in the right internal carotid artery and anterior communicating artery. Meanwhile, her consciousness level improved on conservative management. The relatives were not keen for further follow-up. PMID:25972954

  18. Incidental diagnosis of two intracranial aneurysms following surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Joe M; Rajmohan, B P; Sharmad, M S; Peethambaran, Anilkumar

    2015-01-01

    The development of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a very rare phenomenon. SAH in this context occurring secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture is still rare. We report a case of an elderly lady who presented with right hemiplegia and altered sensorium. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed a left fronto-temporoparietal CSDH with midline shift, which was promptly evacuated surgically via a single burr-hole. Postoperatively, her level of consciousness deteriorated and there was increased the amount of drain. Emergency CT of the brain revealed diffuse SAH. CT cerebral angiogram revealed one aneurysm each in the right internal carotid artery and anterior communicating artery. Meanwhile, her consciousness level improved on conservative management. The relatives were not keen for further follow-up. PMID:25972954

  19. Challenging pyogenic cerebral abscess complicated by subdural empyema. A case report.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M P; Moon, A

    2012-12-20

    Brain abscesses develop in response to a parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria, beginning as a localized area of cerebritis and evolving into a suppurative lesion surrounded by a well-vascularized fibrotic capsule. The leading etiologic agents of brain abscess are the streptococcal strains and S. aureus. Abscesses may also be secondary to fungal or parasitic organisms. Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, accounting for one in every 10,000 hospital admissions in the United States, and remains a serious situation despite recent advances made in detection and therapy. These lesions often produce complex clinical and radiologic findings and require prompt recognition and treatment to avoid a fatal neurologic outcome. Subdural empyema represents an important type of intracranial suppurative infectious-inflammatory disorder. Clinically, these patients initially have signs and symptoms of meningitis, but this course might be complicated later by the development of seizures and focal neurologic signs. PMID:24029180

  20. Bilateral posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma treated with craniectomy: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Yushin; Matsumoto, Jun; Ohta, Kazutaka; Hasegawa, Shu; Miura, Masaki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior chronic subdural hematomas (pCSHs) are rare. Their diagnosis and treatment are difficult. Description: A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with nausea, headache, and mild consciousness disturbance. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral pCSH. To prevent further neurological deterioration, we performed surgery under general anesthesia by midline suboccipital craniectomy. Unexpected bleeding from a developed circuitous occipital sinus was stopped with hemoclips. After hematoma removal, she recovered and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. By the 19th postoperative day, she had developed no neurologic deficits. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates the risk of blind surgical therapy in patients with pCSH. In such patients, posterior fossa craniectomy may be preferable in terms of diagnosis and safe treatment. PMID:27213111

  1. Analysis of Epileptic Discharges from Implanted Subdural Electrodes in Patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective Almost two-thirds of patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) have epilepsy, and half of them require surgery for it. However, it is well known that scalp electroencephalography (EEG) does not demonstrate unequivocal epileptic discharges in patients with SWS. Therefore, we analyzed interictal and ictal discharges from intracranial subdural EEG recordings in patients treated surgically for SWS to elucidate epileptogenicity in this disorder. Methods Five intractable epileptic patients with SWS who were implanted with subdural electrodes for presurgical evaluation were enrolled in this study. We examined the following seizure parameters: seizure onset zone (SOZ), propagation speed of seizure discharges, and seizure duration by visual inspection. Additionally, power spectrogram analysis on some frequency bands at SOZ was performed from 60 s before the visually detected seizure onset using the EEG Complex Demodulation Method (CDM). Results We obtained 21 seizures from five patients for evaluation, and all seizures initiated from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma. Most of the patients presented with motionless staring and respiratory distress as seizure symptoms. The average seizure propagation speed and duration were 3.1 ± 3.6 cm/min and 19.4 ± 33.6 min, respectively. Significant power spectrogram changes at the SOZ were detected at 10–30 Hz from 15 s before seizure onset, and at 30–80 Hz from 5 s before seizure onset. Significance In patients with SWS, seizures initiate from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma, and seizure propagation is slow and persists for a longer period. CDM indicated beta to low gamma-ranged seizure discharges starting from shortly before the visually detected seizure onset. Our ECoG findings indicate that ischemia is a principal mechanism underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis in SWS. PMID:27054715

  2. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Abigail N; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2–5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function. PMID:24654267

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma: Surgical management and outcome in 986 cases: A classification and regression tree approach

    PubMed Central

    Rovlias, Aristedis; Theodoropoulos, Spyridon; Papoutsakis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities in daily neurosurgical practice which carries a most favorable prognosis. However, because of the advanced age and medical problems of patients, surgical therapy is frequently associated with various complications. This study evaluated the clinical features, radiological findings, and neurological outcome in a large series of patients with CSDH. Methods: A classification and regression tree (CART) technique was employed in the analysis of data from 986 patients who were operated at Asclepeion General Hospital of Athens from January 1986 to December 2011. Burr holes evacuation with closed system drainage has been the operative technique of first choice at our institution for 29 consecutive years. A total of 27 prognostic factors were examined to predict the outcome at 3-month postoperatively. Results: Our results indicated that neurological status on admission was the best predictor of outcome. With regard to the other data, age, brain atrophy, thickness and density of hematoma, subdural accumulation of air, and antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy were found to correlate significantly with prognosis. The overall cross-validated predictive accuracy of CART model was 85.34%, with a cross-validated relative error of 0.326. Conclusions: Methodologically, CART technique is quite different from the more commonly used methods, with the primary benefit of illustrating the important prognostic variables as related to outcome. Since, the ideal therapy for the treatment of CSDH is still under debate, this technique may prove useful in developing new therapeutic strategies and approaches for patients with CSDH. PMID:26257985

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging of traumatic subdural hematoma in the subacute stage.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Seikou; Fukuoka, Masaaki; Koan, Yoko; Miyake, Hirohisa; Ono, Yuko; Moriki, Akihito; Mori, Koreaki; Mokudai, Toshihiko; Uchida, Yasufumi; Kumano, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic subdural hematomas in the subacute stage (from 7 to 20 days after head injury) were treated in one male and four females, aged from 63 to 82 years, with evacuation via craniotomy in three and aspiration via burr hole surgery in two. All hematomas were evaluated by T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Diffusion-weighted imaging showed the hematoma as a crescent high intensity area with a low intensity rim close to the brain surface (two-layered structure) in four cases and as high intensity with low intensity components in one case. The high intensity areas under the dura mater on diffusion-weighted imaging appeared as homogeneous high intensity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging in four cases, and inhomogeneous high intensity on T1- and isointensity on T2-weighted imaging in one case. The mean ADC value of the high intensity areas was 0.58 +/- 0.23 (mean +/- standard deviation) x 10(-3) mm2/sec. The operative findings revealed the high intensity areas as solid clots. The low intensity areas on diffusion-weighted imaging appeared as homogeneous high intensity in four cases and inhomogeneous isointensity with high intensity components in one case on T1- and T2-weighted imaging. The mean ADC value of the low intensity areas was 2.03 +/- 0.27 x 10(-3) mm2/sec. The operative findings revealed the low intensity areas as mixtures of resolved clot and cerebrospinal fluid. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed the characteristic two-layered structure in traumatic subdural hematomas in the subacute stage, and analysis of the ADC values was useful for differentiating solid from liquid hematoma and for selection of the surgical procedure. PMID:16195646

  5. Baboon Model of Generalized Epilepsy: Continuous Intracranial Video-EEG Monitoring with Subdural Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Salinas, Felipe S.; Leland, M. Michelle; Caron, Jean-Louis; Hanes, Martha A.; Knape, Koyle D.; Xie, Dongbin; Williams, Jeff T.

    2012-01-01

    The baboon provides a natural non-human primate model for photosensitive, generalized epilepsy. This study describes an implantation procedure for the placement of subdural grid and strip electrodes for continuous video-EEG monitoring in the epileptic baboon to evaluate the generation and propagation of ictal and interictal epileptic discharges. Subdural grid, strip and depth electrodes were implanted in six baboons, targeting brain regions that were activated in functional neuroimaging studies during photoparoxysmal responses. The baboons were monitored with continuous video-EEG monitoring for 2–21 (mean 9) days. Although the animals were tethered, the EEG signal was transmitted wirelessly to optimize their mobility. Spontaneous seizures, interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs), and responses to intermittent light stimulation (ILS) were assessed. Due to cortical injuries related to the electrode implantation and their displacement, the procedure was modified. Habitual myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures were recorded in three baboons, all associated with a generalized ictal discharge, but were triggered multiregionally, in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices. IEDs were similarly expressed multiregionally, and responsible for triggering most generalized spike-and-wave discharges. Generalized photoparoxysmal responses were activated only in one baboon, while driving responses recorded in all three photosensitive baboons were 2.5 times the stimulus rate. In contrast to previous intracranial investigations in this model, generalized ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were triggered by parietal and occipital, in addition to the frontocentral cortices. Furthermore, targeted visual areas responded differently to ILS in photosensitive than nonphotosensitive baboons, but further studies are required before mechanisms can be implicated for ILS-induced activation of the epileptic networks. PMID:22480914

  6. Clinical Utility of Interictal High-Frequency Oscillations Recorded with Subdural Macroelectrodes in Partial Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jounhong Ryan; Joo, Eun Yeon; Koo, Dae Lim; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is growing interest in high-frequency oscillations (HFO) as electrophysiological biomarkers of the epileptic brain. We evaluated the clinical utility of interictal HFO events, especially their occurrence rates, by comparing the spatial distribution with a clinically determined epileptogenic zone by using subdural macroelectrodes. Methods We obtained intracranial electroencephalogram data with a high temporal resolution (2000 Hz sampling rate, 0.05-500 Hz band-pass filter) from seven patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Three epochs of 5-minute, artifact-free data were selected randomly from the interictal period. HFO candidates were first detected by an automated algorithm and subsequently screened to discard false detections. Validated events were further categorized as fast ripple (FR) and ripple (R) according to their spectral profiles. The occurrence rate of HFOs was calculated for each electrode contact. An HFO events distribution map (EDM) was constructed for each patient to allow visualization of the spatial distribution of their HFO events. Results The subdural macroelectrodes were capable of detecting both R and FR events from the epileptic neocortex. The occurrence rate of HFO events, both FR and R, was significantly higher in the seizure onset zone (SOZ) than in other brain regions. Patient-specific HFO EDMs can facilitate the identification of the location of HFO-generating tissue, and comparison with findings from ictal recordings can provide additional useful information regarding the epileptogenic zone. Conclusions The distribution of interictal HFOs was reasonably consistent with the SOZ. The detection of HFO events and construction of spatial distribution maps appears to be useful for the presurgical mapping of the epileptogenic zone. PMID:22523510

  7. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  9. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of muscle rupture with haematoma: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zapata, Ma José; Orozco, Lluís; Balius, Ramon; Soler, Robert; Bosch, Alba; Rodas, Gil; Til, Lluís; Peirau, Xavier; Urrútia, Gerard; Gich, Ignasi; Bonfill, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background The goals of the treatment of muscle injuries are to shorten the time of healing and to avoid relapses. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the healing of muscle injuries. Materials and methods A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 71 patients (81.8% males) aged 45.6 (SD=10.0) years with muscle tears in the legs and haematoma. The haematoma was evacuated in all patients. Thirty-three patients were randomised to a single dose of autologous PRP and 38 patients to simulation of PRP administration. The primary end-point was time to complete recovery of muscle injury. Secondary end-points were pain, relapses, ultrasound parameters, and adverse events. The total follow-up per patient was 12 months. Results Time to complete recovery after the treatment was 31.63 days (SD=15.38) in the PRP group, and 38.43 days (SD=18.58) in the control group (p=0.261). Pain decreased over time in both groups without statistical differences between them. Eight patients relapsed (seven in the control group, and one in the PRP group). There were no adverse effects related to the interventions. Discussion Autologous PRP did not significantly improve the time to healing compared to that in the control group. PMID:26509827

  10. Hair Today; Scalped Tomorrow: Massive Subgaleal Haematoma Following Sudden Hair Pulling in an Adolescent in the Absence of Haematological Abnormality or Skull Fracture.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Sarah-Jayne; Ramman, Saif; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Bisarya, Kamal; Fu, Brian; Ong, Juling; Akhavani, Mo

    2016-07-01

    Subgaleal haematoma (SH) is a rare condition, most frequently observed in neonates as a complication of Ventouse-assisted delivery. There have been few patients reported beyond this period. Those that are present within the literature have typically resulted from significant blunt scalp trauma, with or without associated skull fracture. Those resulting secondary to relatively minor trauma, such as hair braiding or hair pulling, are rare but have been reported and are often associated with underlying haematological abnormalities or nonaccidental injury patients. Most patients resolve spontaneously and without complication. The authors report a rare patient of a delayed presentation of a massive SH in an adolescent following a seemingly innocuous episode of hair pulling whilst play-fighting, in the absence of any underlying haematological or anatomical abnormality. Due to the size of the SH and the appearance of large areas of calcification within the haematoma, early liaison with senior neuroradiologists and haematologists, to rule out underlying anatomical and haematological abnormalities, respectively, was essential to guide appropriate management. Our patient highlights the need for an awareness of the possible aetiologies of SH and the necessity of early active multidisciplinary team involvement in the management of such patients, which is critical to ensure optimum patient outcomes. PMID:27258718

  11. A case of complete clearance of chronic subdural hematoma accompanied by recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after administration of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiko; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Ogiwara, Masakazu; Sato, Hiroki; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as an adjuvant therapy against various malignant tumors was recently established. Its pharmacological effects in malignant tumors, including gliomas, were speculated to involve neovascularization inhibition and vascular permeability. Recently, it has been reported that the outer membrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) contains high levels of VEGF, which were implicated in neovascularization of the outer membrane. Furthermore, studies suggested that VEGF has the etiology in CSDH development, although its involvement is not fully understood. Here, we report the first case of chronic subdural hematoma that was improved by bevacizumab administration for recurrent glioblastoma. The present case could contribute to the hypothesis that VEGF may be associated with CSDH. We also discuss the pathogenesis and mechanism of CSDH recurrence from the viewpoint of VEGF function. PMID:26919835

  12. Etizolam, an anti-anxiety agent, attenuates recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma--evaluation by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kuwayama, Naoya; Hamada, Hideo; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Endo, Shunro

    2002-02-01

    Etizolam, an anti-anxiety agent which is an antagonist of platelet-activating factor receptors, was administered to patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) after hematoma removal to assess the effectiveness for preventing recurrence compared with control patients not given the drug after surgery. The remaining volumes of subdural hematomas on brain computed tomography were measured approximately 1 month after removal. Volume in the etizolam group (15 patients) was significantly smaller than in the control group (24 patients). Hematoma recurrence was not detected in the etizolam group 3 months after surgery, but occurred in the control group. The difference was significant. Etizolam administration may be useful for the prevention of recurrence of CSH. PMID:11944589

  13. A case of chronic subdural hematoma following lumbar drainage for the management of iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: pitfalls and lessons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Vincent Eng-Soon; Liew, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma as a complication of lumbar drain placement for the management of iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak has not been previously documented in the literature. We describe such a case in a 69-year-old man who presented with right nasal obstruction secondary to an inverted papilloma involving the paranasal sinuses. The patient underwent endoscopic sinus surgery, which included a medial maxillectomy. Surgery was complicated by a small CSF leak, which was repaired intraoperatively. Five days later, the patient experienced CSF rhinorrhea, and a lumbar drain was inserted. He developed overdrainage symptoms but was well when he was discharged. However, 22 days later he returned with right hemiparesis. Computed tomography of the brain showed a left frontoparietal subdural hematoma with a mass effect. The neurosurgical team performed an emergency drainage procedure, and the patient experienced a complete neurologic recovery. We discuss the pitfalls of lumbar drainage, the possible pathophysiology of overdrainage, and the lessons learned from this case. PMID:24170465

  14. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  15. An in vivo model of anti-inflammatory activity of subdural dexamethasone following the spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kwiecien, Jacek M; Jarosz, Bozena; Oakden, Wendy; Klapec, Michal; Stanisz, Greg J; Delaney, Kathleen H; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Janik, Rafal; Rola, Radoslaw; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies to limit the neural tissue destruction following the spinal cord injury are not effective. Our recent studies indicate that the injury to the white matter of the spinal cord results in a severe inflammatory response where macrophages phagocytize damaged myelin and the fluid-filled cavity of injury extends in size with concurrent and irreversible destruction of the surrounding neural tissue over several months. We previously established that a high dose of 4mg/rat of dexamethasone administered for 1 week via subdural infusion remarkably lowers the numbers of infiltrating macrophages leaving large amounts of un-phagocytized myelin debris and therefore inhibits the severity of inflammation and related tissue destruction. But this dose was potently toxic to the rats. In the present study the lower doses of dexamethasone, 0.125-2.0mg, were administered via the subdural infusion for 2 weeks after an epidural balloon crush of the mid-thoracic spinal cord. The spinal cord cross-sections were analyzed histologically. Levels of dexamethasone used in the current study had no systemic toxic effect and limited phagocytosis of myelin debris by macrophages in the lesion cavity. The subdural infusion with 0.125-2.0mg dexamethasone over 2 week period did not eliminate the inflammatory process indicating the need for a longer period of infusion to do so. However, this treatment has probably lead to inhibition of the tissue destruction by the severe, prolonged inflammatory process. PMID:26851684

  16. Co-presentation of a subdural empyema and an infected ventriculoperitoneal shunt in an adult patient: A rare complication with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Mueller, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of a subdural empyema as a complication of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection is rare. Only three articles have been published on this topic. Moreover, the available literature only involves pediatric patients. Case Description: The authors present a 38-year-old male with a preexisting right frontal subdural hygroma that developed into a subdural empyema in the presence of an infected right occipital VP shunt. A brief literature review is provided, and the pathogenesis is discussed. Conclusion: This is the first known report regarding an adult patient with a subdural empyema and a VP shunt infection. Although a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain is not typically ordered during diagnosis of a shunt infection, the authors advocate a low threshold to employ MRI brain to evaluate for other sources of infection, especially in an immunocompromised patient or in a patient with a history of a subdural hematoma or hygroma that can be easily overlook as being stable on computed tomography of head. PMID:26539321

  17. The Surgical Treatment of Three Young Chronic Subdural Hematoma Patients with Different Causes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Kun; Li, Chen G; Zhang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), which rarely happens in the young, is thought to be a disease of the elderly. Whereas unspecific symptoms and insidious onset in juveniles and young adults, as a result of its relative low morbidity, CSDH is usually neglected even undertreated in the young. Through the three cases and review of the current literature on this subject, we tried to illustrate the clinical and etiopathological characteristics of this entity and find out the most appropriate treatment strategy. We report three young CSDH patients with different but similar symptoms. The present histories, tests and examinations revealed different predisposing factors accounting for the genesis of CSDH. Their preoperative symptoms were all resolved with burr hole and drainage operation. Juveniles and young adults suffering from CSDH differ from that of their elderly counterparts in their clinical and etiopathological characteristics. Although trauma is the most important risk factor in young and old CSDH patients, some other predisposing factors may exist. Burr hole and drainage surgery could resolve the problem most of the time. But further tests and examinations even specific management should be made in some cases. PMID:25024828

  18. Influence of Gender on Occurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma; Is It an Effect of Cranial Asymmetry?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a condition mostly present in older people. Men are more commonly affected than women. Several theories about male predominance could not enough to explain the reason for male predominance on CSDH. The purpose of this study is to find out whether there were any differences in the anatomy of cranium, which may contribute the pathogenesis or risk factors of CSDH. Methods The study population was consisted of 87 patients with CSDH and 100 patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) from 2006 to 2013. We classified into four groups; group A (CSDH male 47), group B (CSDH female 40), group C (TIA male 50), and group D (TIA female 50). We measured the size of the cranium in the computed tomography scans, retrospectively. We define the difference of cranium (Dc), which is difference between the right and left radiuses. Results The Dc was significantly higher in patients with CSDH (group A and B)(p=0.03). The mean Dc was 3.49 mm in CSDH group (group A and B) and 2.14 mm in TIA group (group C and D). The mean Dc of CSDH group was significantly larger than that of TIA group (by t-test, p<0.01). Conclusion Size and asymmetry of the cranium may be a risk factor of CSDH. Gender differences in the anatomy of cranium may contribute pathogenesis of CSDH. PMID:27169039

  19. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Park, Ki-Su

    2015-08-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  20. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Mima, Tatsuo; Akiba, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation. PMID:26489406

  1. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  2. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Koichi; MIMA, Tatsuo; AKIBA, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation. PMID:26489406

  3. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Gabriel Núncio; Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  4. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5) that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information. PMID:26057524

  5. The role of subgaleal suction drain placement in chronic subdural hematoma evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Chourasia, Ishwar D.; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is lack of uniformity about the preferred surgical treatment, role of drain, and type of drain among various surgeons in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study is aimed to evaluate role of subgaleal drain. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of 260 patients of CSDH treated surgically. Burr-hole irrigation with and without suction drain was done in 140 and 120 patients, respectively. Out of 120 patients without suction drain 60 each were managed by single and two burr holes. Pre- and postoperative GCS was recorded. Recurrent hematomas, CSDH secondary to tumor, due to intracranial hypotension, coagulopathy, children below 18 years, and patients treated by twist drill craniostomy or craniotomy were excluded. Subgaleal closed-system drainage with low negative pressure was used. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 18 to 75 years with mean age of 57 years. There were 9, 47, 204 patients in GCS of 3-8, 9-12, and 13-15, respectively. Both the groups were comparable in terms of age, etiology, gender, and neurological status. There was no difference in the mortality in both the group. The recurrence and postoperative pneumocephalus was significantly less in suction drain group as compared to without drain group. There was no infection or any other complication related to suction drainage. Conclusion: Subgaleal closed suction drainage was safe, simple, and effective in the management of CSDH. Recurrence rate was low in the suction drain group. PMID:27366247

  6. Bilateral Chronic Subdural Hematoma is Associated with Rapid Progression and Poor Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    AGAWA, Yuji; MINEHARU, Yohei; TANI, Shoichi; ADACHI, Hidemitsu; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has been recognized as a benign disease, but its clinical outcome is not well documented. This study aims to expand the knowledge base regarding the outcome of CSDH. We retrospectively reviewed clinical characteristics of CSDH operated in the Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital between June 2005 and June 2012. Variants included age at onset, sex, laterality, presence of headache, consciousness level, and risk factors for hemorrhage such as malignancy or intake of anticoagulants. A total of 368 cases were analyzed. Six patients (1.4%) had a poor outcome, defined as any morbidity or mortality at 7 days postoperatively. Bilateral hematoma was significantly associated with a poor outcome (p = 0.041). Warfarin use and malignancy, albeit statistically not significant, were more frequently observed in patients with a poor outcome. Bilateral CSDH was observed in 53 patients (14.4%). Age at onset, sex, history of malignancy, anticoagulant use, and antiplatelet use did not differ between bilateral and unilateral CSDH. Recurrence rate was not different between bilateral and unilateral CSDH (14.2% vs. 11.3%), but poor outcome as a result of brain herniation was significantly higher in bilateral than in unilateral hematomas (5.7% vs. 0.3%, p = 0.01). Bilateral CSDH was associated with rapid progression and showed worse outcome as a result of brain herniation in comparison with unilateral CSDH. Urgent trephination surgery for decompression of hematoma pressure may be recommended for bilateral CSDH. PMID:26923835

  7. Tranexamic Acid for Recurring Subdural Hematomas Following Surgical Evacuation: A Clinical Case Series.

    PubMed

    Stary, Joel M; Hutchins, Leslie; Vega, Rafael A

    2016-09-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematomas (SDHs) are commonly encountered in neurosurgery. Optimal management of SDHs remains a significant challenge. Current treatment options generally include supportive care or surgical intervention. A significant proportion of patients have surgery; however, the reoperation rate is considered high. There are also cases in which additional surgical procedures would carry significant morbidity, and as a result, there is a need for nonsurgical medical therapies. We describe the use of tranexamic acid (TXA) as a nonsurgical option for the treatment of recurrent SDHs following surgery. Methods Patients were identified as candidates for potential TXA therapy and followed prospectively. The decision to administer TXA was made on the basis of history, presentation, and prognosis after further surgical intervention. Data collected included patient imaging, treatment administered, and both radiologic and clinical outcomes. Results Three patients underwent surgical evacuation of a chronic SDH (two via burr hole washout and one via craniotomy). All patients had recurrence identified on subsequent imaging. Two patients had poorer predicted outcomes if additional surgical intervention was necessary, and one refused additional surgical intervention. TXA was administered, in the same dosing and scheduled course, to all patients. Complete resolution was observed on imaging, and in the case of the patient who was symptomatic, clinical improvement was also noted. Conclusion TXA may be considered for the treatment of recurrent SDHs following surgical evacuation in patients for whom additional surgery would add significant morbidity. PMID:27300772

  8. Platinum microwire for subdural electrocorticography over human neocortex: millimeter-scale spatiotemporal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Spencer; Greger, Bradley; Hanrahan, Sara; House, Paul; Brown, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum microwires, terminated at regular intervals to form a grid of contacts, were used to record electric potentials at the surface of the cerebral cortex in human subjects. The microwire grids were manufactured commercially with 75 μm platinum wire and 1 mm grid spacing, and are FDA approved. Because of their small size and spacing, these grids could be used to explore the scale of spatiotemporal dynamics in cortical surface potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to characterize their recording properties and develop a frequency-dependent electrical model of the micro-electrodes. Data recorded from multiple sites in human cortex were analyzed to explore the relationship between linear correlation and separation distance. A model was developed to explore the impact of cerebrospinal fluid on signal spread among electrodes. Spatial variation in the per-electrode performance decoding articulated speech from face-motor and Wernicke's areas of cortex was explored to understand the scale of information processing at the cortex. We conclude that there are important dynamics at the millimeter scale in human subdural electrocorticography which may be important in maximizing the performance of neural prosthetic applications. PMID:22255402

  9. Bedside Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Using Radiographic Characteristics to Revisit the Twist Drill.

    PubMed

    Garber, Sarah; McCaffrey, Jamie; Quigley, Edward P; MacDonald, Joel D

    2016-05-01

    Background and Study Aims Conventional treatment strategies for the management of symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) in the elderly include observation, operative burr holes or craniotomy, and bedside twist drill drainage. The decision on which technique to use should be determined by weighing the comorbidities and symptoms of the patient with the potential risks and benefits. The goal of this study was to identify radiographic characteristics on computed tomography scan that might be used to guide surgical decision making in terms of operative versus bedside removal of cSDH. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiographic features in patients who underwent bedside twist drill evacuation of a cSDH and those for a cohort of patients who underwent operative intervention via burr holes. Results We did not identify any clinical features or preoperative imaging characteristics to suggest an advantage of one procedure over the other. Additionally, complete radiographic resolution of cSDH on postoperative imaging is not required to relieve patient symptoms. Conclusion Although bedside twist drill evacuation may avoid operating room costs and anesthetic complications in an elderly patient population and allow earlier resumption of anticoagulation treatment if necessary, there is also a risk of morbidity if uncontrolled bleeding is encountered or the patient is unable to tolerate the bedside procedure. However, bedside twist drill craniostomy is a reasonable and effective option for the treatment of subacute/chronic SDH in patients who may not be optimal surgical candidates. PMID:26807616

  10. Giant frontal mucocele complicated by subdural empyema: treatment of a rare association.

    PubMed

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria; Doglietto, Francesco; Nucci, Carlotta Ginevra; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Montano, Nicola

    2012-03-01

    Giant frontal mucocele (GFM) is an extremely rare cause of frontal lobe syndrome. Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon complication of paranasal sinisutis, for which craniotomy and decompressive craniotomy are the most effective surgical procedures. A 54-year-old man was brought unconscious to the emergency room where recurrent generalized seizures occurred. Heroine abuse, HCV-related hepatitis, prolonged antibiotic therapy for treatment of purulent rhinorrhea, along with recent personality changes were reported. High white blood cell count, pansinusitis, GFM, SDE and cerebritis were documented. The patient underwent bifrontal craniotomy in emergency, extensive drilling of the inner aspect of the frontal bone, surgical toilet of the enlarged frontal sinus and its "cranialization". Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum were isolated and antibiotic therapy was started intravenously and then continued orally for 3 months. 2 years later the patient has recovered, though minor signs of frontal lobe syndrome persist. To the authors knowledge, this is the first case of GFM with SDE reported in the literature. Although decompressive craniectomy is advocated in extreme conditions, as in this case, "internal decompressive craniectomy", obtained with craniotomy and cranialization of the frontal sinuses, is strongly advocated in cases of SDE associated with megasinuses. PMID:22427297

  11. Two surgical methods used in 90 patients with intracranial subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Mat Nayan, S A; Mohd Haspani, M S; Abd Latiff, A Z; Abdullah, J M; Abdullah, S

    2009-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of two surgical methods used for the treatment of intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) at our centre. A cross-sectional study (1999-2005) of 90 patients with non-traumatic supratentorial ISDE revealed that the two surgical methods used for empyema removal were burr hole/s and drainage (50 patients, 55.6%) and a cranial bone opening procedure (CBOP) (40 patients, 44.4%). Patients in the CBOP group had a better result in terms of clinical improvement (chi-squared analysis, p=0.006) and clearance of empyema on brain CT scan (chi-squared analysis, p<0.001). Reoperation was more frequent among patients who had undergone burr hole surgery (multiple logistic regression, p<0.001). The outcome and morbidity of ISDE survivors were not related to the surgical method used (p>0.05). The only factor that significantly affected the morbidity of ISDE was level of consciousness at the time of surgery (multiple logistic regression, p<0.001). We conclude that CBOP and evacuation of the empyema is a better surgical method for ISDE than burr hole/s and drainage. Wide cranial opening and empyema evacuation improves neurological status, gives better clearance of the empyema and reduces the need for reoperation. Level of consciousness at the time of presentation is a predictor of the morbidity of ISDE. Thus, aggressive surgical treatment should occur as early as possible, before the patient deteriorates. PMID:19793660

  12. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  13. Spontaneous Subdural Empyema Following a High-Parasitemia Falciparum Infection in a 58-Year-Old Female From a Malaria-Endemic Region

    PubMed Central

    Pallangyo, Pedro; Lyimo, Frederick; Nicholaus, Paulina; Kain, Ulimbakisya; Janabi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health problem of the tropical world. Falciparum malaria is most prevalent in the sub-Saharan African region, which harbors about 90% of all malaria cases and fatalities globally. Infection by the falciparum species often manifests with a spectrum of multi-organ complications (eg, cerebral malaria), some of which are life-threatening. Spontaneous subdural empyema is a very rare complication of cerebral malaria that portends a very poor prognosis unless diagnosed and treated promptly. We report a case of spontaneous subdural empyema in a 58-year-old woman from Tanzania who presented with high-grade fever, decreased urine output, and altered sensorium.

  14. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID:27402228

  15. Prolonged Subdural Infusion of Kynurenic Acid Is Associated with Dose-Dependent Myelin Damage in the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kwiecien, Jacek M.; Rola, Radoslaw; Klapec, Michal; Stanisz, Greg J.; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Oakden, Wendy; Janik, Rafal; Coote, Margaret; Frey, Benicio N.; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is the end stage metabolite of tryptophan produced mainly by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). It has neuroprotective activities but can be elevated in the neuropsychiatric disorders. Toxic effects of KYNA in the CNS are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the subdural KYNA infusion on the spinal cord in adult rats. Methods A total of 42 healthy adult rats were randomly assigned into six groups and were infused for 7 days with PBS (control) or 0.0002 pmol/min, 0.01 nmol/min, 0.1 nmol/min, 1 nmol/min, and 10 nmol/min of KYNA per 7 days. The effect of KYNA on spinal cord was determined using histological and electron microscopy examination. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was measured in the blood serum to assess a degree of myelin damage. Result In all rats continuous long-lasting subdural KYNA infusion was associated with myelin damage and myelin loss that was increasingly widespread in a dose-depended fashion in peripheral, sub-pial areas. Damage to myelin sheaths was uniquely related to the separation of lamellae at the intraperiod line. The damaged myelin sheaths and areas with complete loss of myelin were associated with limited loss of scattered axons while vast majority of axons in affected areas were morphologically intact. The myelin loss-causing effect of KYNA occurred with no necrosis of oligodendrocytes, with locally severe astrogliosis and no cellular inflammatory response. Additionally, subdural KYNA infusion increased blood MOG concentration. Moreover, the rats infused with the highest doses of KYNA (1 and 10 nmol/min) demonstrated adverse neurological signs including weakness and quadriplegia. Conclusions We suggest, that subdural infusion of high dose of KYNA can be used as an experimental tool for the study of mechanisms of myelin damage and regeneration. On the other hand, the administration of low, physiologically relevant doses of KYNA may help to discover the role

  16. Enlargement of the middle meningeal artery on MR angiography in chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Ken; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Ishizaka, Hideo; Osada, Takahiro; Srivatanakul, Kittipong; Momose, Hiroaki; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The middle meningeal artery (MMA) is suspected to play an important role in the development of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The aim of this study was to clarify whether the MMA was enlarged in patients with CSDHs. METHODS The authors retrospectively assessed 55 patients in whom CSDH was diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 and who underwent MR angiography (MRA) after the onset of CSDH. The authors compared MMA diameters between hemispheres with and without CSDHs on MR angiograms. A case-control study was also performed with 55 sex- and age-matched patients with incidental unruptured aneurysms as controls. RESULTS In 55 patients with CSDHs, the diameters of the 79 MMAs on the CSDH side were significantly larger than the diameters of the 31 MMAs on the non-CSDH side (p < 0.05). In 24 patients with bilateral CSDHs, no significant difference was found between the MMA diameters on the larger hematoma side and those on the smaller hematoma side. In 13 patients who underwent MRA before the onset of the CSDH, the MMAs on MR angiograms acquired after onset of the CSDH were significantly larger than those on MR angiograms acquired before the CSDH onset (p < 0.05). The diameters of the MMAs in 55 patients with CSDHs were significantly larger than those of the MMAs in the 55 control patients (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The MMA is enlarged with development of a CSDH. Information about the MMA observed on MRA in patients with CSDHs may be useful in developing a strategy for future treatment of CSDHs. PMID:26517775

  17. Parkinsonism and dementia are negative prognostic factors for the outcome of subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Arca, Roberta; Ricchi, Valeria; Murgia, Daniela; Melis, Marta; Floris, Francesco; Mereu, Alessandra; Contu, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Melis, Maurizio; Cossu, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    To determine, among a population with subdural hematoma (SH), whether patients affected by neurodegenerative disorders (parkinsonism and dementia) have a worse clinical outcome. We reviewed the data of patients diagnosed with fall-related SH discharged from the Departments of Neurology/Stroke unit, Neurosurgery, Intensive Care Unit at Brotzu General Hospital (Cagliari, Italy) between January 2010 and December 2013. Patients with severe traumatisms, evidence of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding or aged less than 50 were excluded. 332 patients were selected: 69 with a neurodegenerative parkinsonism or dementia (N-group), 217 with history of chronic non-neurological medical conditions with significant disability, previous falls and/or balance problems (NND-group) and 46 with a history of "minor" chronic non-neurological disorder. (NN-group). The clinical status at admission and discharge was assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The time-span between trauma and hospital admission was also calculated. At hospital admission we found a significantly longer delay in SH's diagnosis (χ (2) test p < 0.001) and a worse mRS score (Kruskal Wallis p < 0.001) in the N-group compared to both NN and NND-groups. During hospital stay we observed the lack of significant variation in mRS score in N-group (Wilcoxon test p = 0.86), in contrast with NN and NND-groups who significantly improved (Wilcoxon test p < 0.001). Our results demonstrate that the consequences of SH are more severe in the N-group compared to NN and NND-groups. The longer interval between trauma and hospital admittance plays a critical role in worsening the outcome of patients with parkinsonism and dementia compared to subjects without neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27120071

  18. The Risk Factors for Hydrocephalus and Subdural Hygroma after Decompressive Craniectomy in Head Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Hee Jong; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yi, Jin-Seok; Yang, Ji-Ho; Lee, Il-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aims to investigate 1) the risk factors for hydrocephalus and subdural hygroma (SDG) occurring after decompressive craniectomy (DC), and 2) the association between the type of SDG and hydrocephalus. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological features of 92 patients who underwent DC procedures after severe head injuries. The risk factors for developing post-traumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) and SDG were analyzed. Types of SDGs were classified according to location and their relationship with hydrocephalus was investigated. Results Ultimately, 26.09% (24/92) of these patients developed PTH. In the univariate analyses, hydrocephalus was statically associated with large bone flap diameter, large craniectomy area, bilateral craniectomy, intraventricular hemorrhage, contralateral or interhemisheric SDGs, and delayed cranioplasty. However, in the multivariate analysis, only large craniectomy area (adjusted OR=4.66; p=0.0239) and contralateral SDG (adjusted OR=6.62; p=0.0105) were significant independent risk factors for developing hydrocephalus after DC. The incidence of overall SDGs after DC was 55.43% (51/92). Subgroup analysis results were separated by SDG types. Statistically significant associations between hydrocephalus were found in multivariate analysis in the contralateral (adjusted OR=5.58; p=0.0074) and interhemispheric (adjusted OR=17.63; p=0.0113) types. Conclusion For patients who are subjected to DC following severe head trauma, hydrocephalus is associated with a large craniectomy area and contralateral SDG. For SDGs after DC that occur on the interhemispherical or controlateral side of the craniectomy, careful follow-up monitoring for the potential progression into hydrocephalus is needed. PMID:26539270

  19. Congenital Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Unique Translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.3)

    PubMed Central

    Bandt, S. Kathleen; Hurth, Kyle; Wambach, Jennifer A; Rao, Rakesh; Kulkarni, Shashikant; White, Francis V; Frater, John L; Leonard, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital leukemia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, even in tertiary children's hospitals. Leukemia may cause significant coagulopathy, putting the patient at risk of intracranial hemorrhage. In this case, the authors present a female infant with a unique mixed phenotypic congenital acute myeloid leukemia showing mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) rearrangement and severe coagulopathy resulting in a large subdural hematoma. Despite the fatal outcome in this case, neurosurgical treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia should be considered if coagulopathy and the clinical scenario allow. PMID:26244121

  20. Orbital mass secondary to infantile acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ibtesham Tausif; Moosajee, Mariya; Abou-Rayyah, Yassir; Pavasovic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    An 8-month-old Asian infant girl was referred with a 1-week history of left periorbital swelling on a background of a narrowed left palpebral aperture over the preceding 8 weeks. There was no history of chronic illness, fever or other systemic features. Examination revealed a tender and fluctuant medial canthal swelling with associated periorbital haematoma. There were no other ophthalmic findings and neurological examination was normal. A MRI scan of the brain and orbit demonstrated abnormal soft tissue with features of an aggressive tumour in the left orbital region with no globe invasion. Peripheral blood smear revealed blast cells, confirmed by bone marrow aspirate. A diagnosis of infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was made. The patient was started on risk-stratified chemotherapy according to the Interfant-06 Protocol The periorbital swelling resolved by day eight following a course of prednisolone, the patient continues on chemotherapy and is currently in molecular remission. PMID:27143162

  1. "Rabbit Ear" scalp deformity caused by massive subdural effusion in infant following bilateral burr-hole drainage.

    PubMed

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Pankaj, Dawar; Sharma, B S

    2013-09-01

    Subdural effusion (SDE) in an infant is a rare clinical scenario, which may be secondary to a variety of etiologies. Massive SDE is an extremely rare complication of head injury. It usually runs a self-limiting course. Though neurosurgical intervention is occasionally needed, different methods of surgical procedure for management includes burr-hole alone, burr-holes with subdural drain placement, twist drill craniotomy with drain and even craniotomy. The authors report a rare case of progressive massive SDE, which despite bilateral burr-hole placement and drainage failed and presented with visual deterioration and massive bulge of scalp at burr-hole sites producing rabbit ear sign in a 10 month old infant. Ultimately cystoperitoneal shunt was carried out in a desperate attempt to prevent impending rupture of scalp sutures at sites of previous burr-hole placement. Astonishingly not only complete resolution of hygroma, but visual recovery also took place. Patient is doing well at 6 months following shunt with regaining normal vision and appropriate developmental milestones. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of brain at last follow-up revealed mild ventriculomegaly with subduro-peritoneal shunt in situ and rest of brain was unremarkable. Such cases have not been reported in literature until date. PMID:24470822

  2. Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the middle meningeal artery presenting with a temporal lobe hematoma and a contralateral subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Eric; Laws, Lindsay Hilken; Coppens, Jeroen Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) are rare, associated with skull fractures, and have a high mortality rate. When they rupture, MMA pseudoaneurysms frequently cause epidural hematomas and occasionally ipsilateral subdural or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage has also been reported. Case Description: A 54-year-old female who suffered a loss of consciousness resulting in a fall presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 7t. Imaging demonstrated a right subdural hematoma (SDH) with midline shift, left skull fracture overlying the left MMA, and left temporal lobe intraparenchymal hematoma extending to the surface. The patient underwent a right craniectomy with evacuation of the SDH, and the preoperative computed tomographic angiography revealed abnormal dilation of the left MMA consistent with a pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with endovascular treatment, and the intraparenchymal hematoma was treated conservatively. Her recovery was uneventful, and she received a cranioplasty 3 months after the decompression. Conclusions: The presence of a fracture over the MMA and intraparenchymal hematoma should prompt suspicion for a traumatic pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysms of the MMA can cause catastrophic bleeding, and prompt treatment is necessary. Endovascular embolization is an effective method that decreases the hemorrhage risk of MMA pseudoaneurysms. PMID:26862457

  3. Extra-Axial Hematoma and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Induced Aplastic Anemia: The Role of Hematological Diseases in Subdural and Epidural Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Richard P.; Dossani, Rimal H.; Thakur, Jai Deep; Farokhi, Frank; Morrow, Kevin; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Objective and Importance. To illustrate the development of spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to aplastic anemia resulting from the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. This is the first report of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole potentiating coagulopathy leading to any form of intracranial hematoma. Clinical Presentation. A 62-year-old female developed a bone marrow biopsy confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia secondary to administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole following a canine bite. She then developed a course of waxing and waning mental status combined with headache and balance related falls. CT imaging of the head illustrated a 3.7 cm × 6.6 mm left frontal subdural hematoma combined with a 7.0 mm × 1.7 cm left temporal epidural hematoma. Conclusion. Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Thrombocytopenia, regardless of cause, is a risk factor for the development of spontaneous subdural hematoma. Given the lack of a significant traumatic mechanism, this subset of subdural hematoma is more suitable to conservative management. PMID:26199768

  4. Acquired haemophilia complicated with gastrointestinal bleeding and spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma in a woman with chronic C hepatitis under treatment with pegylated IFN alpha 2a and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Boţianu, Ana-Maria; Demian, Smaranda; Macarie, Ioan; Georgescu, Dan; Oltean, Galafteon; Băţagă, Simona

    2012-03-01

    Acquired haemophilia A is a very rare (1-2 cases per million people) but often life-threatening haemorrhagic disorder characterized by antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII. We report the case of a 55-year old woman under treatment with Pegylated alpha 2a interferon (IFN) and Ribavirin for chronic viral C hepatitis, who developed a progressive severe haemorrhagic syndrome diagnosed as acquired haemophilia based on supplementary laboratory data (prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, extremely low factor VIII level - 1%, high titre of factor VIII inhibitor - 30 Bethesda U/ml).The onset was insidious, about three months before presenting to our unit. Antiviral therapy had been stopped three weeks before current admission. Emergency intensive treatment included: haemostatic agents - rFVII (Novoseven), FEIBA (Factor VIII Inhibitor Bypassing Activity), vitamin K, adrenostazin, cryoprecipitate, fresh frozen plasma, as well as immunosuppressive therapy (high dose corticotherapy and cyclophoshamide), immunoglobulins (Humaglobin), prophylactic PPI and antibiotics. The evolution was slowly favourable with the remission of the haemorrhagic syndrome and regression of the iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Clinicians should be aware that acquired forms of haemophilia do exist, representing a rare diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of acquired haemophilia in Romania, in a patient with chronic viral C hepatitis under antiviral treatment. PMID:22457865

  5. Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: Incidence, imaging and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Harreld, Julie H; Mohammed, Noryati; Goldsberry, Grant; Li, Xingyu; Li, Yimei; Boop, Frederick; Patay, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections (PISC) in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MRI or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors and time course of PISC after posterior fossa tumor resection. Materials and Methods Retrospective IRB-approved review of post-operative spine MRIs in 243 children (5.5±4.6 years) from our clinical database post-resection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994-August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0±4.8 years old) PISC+ subjects. Extent and signal properties of PISC were recorded for post-operative (37/37), pre-operative (15/37) and follow-up spine MRIs (35/37). Risk factors were compared to age-matched internal controls (n=37, 5.9±4.5 years). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation and post-operative intracranial subdural collections with PISC were assessed by Fisher’s exact test or Chi-square test. Association between pre-operative tumor volume and PISC was assessed by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results The overall incidence of PISC was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days post-operatively (36%). 97% of PISC were seen 0–41 days post-operatively (12.9±11.0 days). PISC were T2 hyper-intense, iso-intense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced and resolved on follow-up MRI (35/35). None were symptomatic. PISC were associated with intracranial subdural collections (p=0.0011) and pre-operative tonsillar herniation (p=0.0228). Conclusion PISC are infrequent, clinically silent and resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Pre-operative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MRI by 4 weeks documented improvement or resolution of PISC in 88%. PMID:25614472

  6. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy In A Patient Of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mehtani, Anil K; Jha, Ashutosh; Kataria, Himanshu; Jangira, Vivek; Shukla, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms PMID:27298902

  7. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis Misdiagnosed as Acute Subtentorial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ik-Seong; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Eun Yong

    2010-01-01

    A case of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) misdiagnosed as an acute subdural hematoma is reported. A 37-year-old male patient presented with headache following head trauma 2 weeks earlier. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse high-density lesion along the left tentorium and falx cerebri. Initial chest X-rays revealed a small mass in the right upper lobe with right lower pleural thickening, which suggested lung cancer, such as an adenoma or mediastinal metastasis. During conservative treatment under the diagnosis of a subdural hematoma, left cranial nerve palsies were developed (3rd and 6th), followed by scleritis and uveitis involving both eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an unusual tentorium-falx enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Non-specific chronic inflammation of the pachymeninges was noticed on histopathologic examination following an open biopsy. Systemic steroid treatment was initiated, resulting in dramatic improvement of symptoms. A follow-up brain MRI showed total resolution of the lesion 2 months after steroid treatment. IHCP should be included in the differential diagnosis of subtentorial-enhancing lesions. PMID:20856672

  8. Inter-hemispheric scissure, a rare location for a traumatic subdural hematoma, case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rapanà, A; Lamaida, E; Pizza, V; Lepore, P; Caputi, F; Graziussi, G

    1997-05-01

    Subdural interhemispheric hematomas (ISH), though not really rare, are quite an uncommon complication of head traumas. This condition is more frequent in childhood, where it is generally considered as a part of a more complex syndrome, called 'Shaken Children Syndrome', usually pointing out child abuse. Although a head injury is very often considered the cause (in about 80-90% of the cases), possible predisposing factors such as coagulopathies, alcohol abuse or anticoagulant therapy can also be considered. Furthermore, as the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm has also occasionally pinpointed as a possible cause, this event should be kept in mind in order to be able to address exactly both the diagnostic and therapeutical procedures. A new conservatively managed case is thereby described. A review of the literature with particular attention drawn to the diagnosis and the different therapeutical possibilities is also elaborated. PMID:9213057

  9. Risk factors for chronic subdural hematoma after a minor head injury in the elderly: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jen-Ho; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Lin, Wen-Hsiung; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the major comorbidities in elderly resulting in disability and death. Early recognition of CSDH is important for early management. However, manifestations of CSDH are nonspecific and subtle. Therefore, identification of risk factors of CSDH can offer clinical follow-up strategies for patients after episodes of head injury. The purpose of the study aimed at identifying risk factors of CSDH of Taiwanese. Analysis of data from the National Health Insurance provides important information on predictive factors influencing the early diagnosis of CSDH in elderly patients following minor head injuries. The current study is the first nationwide population-based study in Taiwan, showing that old age (≥75 years), male gender, and coexisting hydrocephalus are significantly predictive factors, irrespective to their medical comorbidities. PMID:25295251

  10. Extended Pneumocephalus after Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Hypotension : Case Report with Pathophysiologic Consideration.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Sup; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ko, Hak Cheol; Koh, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) is a well-known disease entity and is traditionally managed with surgery. However, when associated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), the treatment strategy ought to be modified, as classical treatment could lead to unwanted consequences. A 59-year-old man presented with a case of SIH that manifested as a bilateral chronic SDH. He developed fatal extensive pneumocephalus and SDH re-accumulation as a complication of burr-hole drainage. Despite application of an epidural blood patch, the spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak continued, which required open spinal surgery. Chronic SDH management should not be overlooked, especially if the exact cause has not been determined. When chronic SDH assumed to be associated with SIH, the neurosurgeon should determine the exact cause of SIH in order to effectively correct the cause. PMID:26885290

  11. Focal extra-axial hemorrahagic mass with subdural hemorrhage secondare to extramedullary hematopoiesis in idiopathic myelodysplastic sindrome.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, A; Di Lieva, A; Aimar, E; Tancioni, F; Levi, D; Debernardi, A; Pisano, P; Rahal, D; Nozza, A; Magagnoli, M; Gaetani, P

    2007-03-01

    Idiopathic myelodysplastic syndrome is a disease characterized by a clonal stem cell disorder in which megacaryocitic and granulocytic lineages are mainly involved; extramedullary myeloid metaplasia is due to abnormal location of myeloid tissue in other organs than bone marrow. Rarely the central nervous system is involved. When it happens, it is typical to find masses around the brain and pachymeningeal thickening, but it is very rare to find it associated with subdural haemorrhage, as in the case we describe in the present article. Considering our case and the literature we can suggest that radiological images associated with the clinical history of the patient suggestive for extramedullary hematopoiesis can be sufficient for a correct diagnosis and for a radiotherapy treatment, demanding surgery in the case of diagnostic doubts, massive hemorrahages or neurological decifits caused by the focal lesions. PMID:17369789

  12. Extended Pneumocephalus after Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Hypotension : Case Report with Pathophysiologic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Sup; Ko, Hak Cheol; Koh, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) is a well-known disease entity and is traditionally managed with surgery. However, when associated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), the treatment strategy ought to be modified, as classical treatment could lead to unwanted consequences. A 59-year-old man presented with a case of SIH that manifested as a bilateral chronic SDH. He developed fatal extensive pneumocephalus and SDH re-accumulation as a complication of burr-hole drainage. Despite application of an epidural blood patch, the spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak continued, which required open spinal surgery. Chronic SDH management should not be overlooked, especially if the exact cause has not been determined. When chronic SDH assumed to be associated with SIH, the neurosurgeon should determine the exact cause of SIH in order to effectively correct the cause. PMID:26885290

  13. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Elderly Patient with EDTA-dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia Recently Treated with Aspirin and Warfarin: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TOSA, Masato; FUJITA, Hiroshi; ISHIHAMA, Yumiko; NISHIMURA, Shigeko; IDE, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    A 78-year-old man who had a history of myocardial and cerebral infarction and who was treated with aspirin and warfarin, presented with left chronic subdural hematoma. Cerebral computed tomography showed severe brain compression of hematoma with midline shift, indicating the need for emergent surgery. The hematology and clotting tests upon admission revealed severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 1.3 × 104/μL) with normal clotting activity. Because platelet aggregation was evident in the smear, we re-examined the patient for hematology using tubes that contained heparin, showing also low platelet count (2.3 × 104/μL). The day on admission, we performed irrigation and drainage of the chronic subdural hematoma through single burr-hole craniostomy. During surgery, we used 10 units of platelet concentrates (PCs) for the reason that the patient was taking aspirin and coagulopathy derived from low platelet count could not be excluded. After surgery, we re-evaluated the hematology of the blood stored in tubes that contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with or without kanamycin (KM). Treatment with KM dissociated EDTA-induced platelet aggregation and revealed platelet counts with highest accuracy (no KM treatment, 1.3 × 104/μL; KM treatment, 15.2 × 104/μL). This phenomenon is called EDTA-Dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) defined as falsely low platelet counts reported by automated hematology analyzers due to platelet aggretgation. Awareness of the phenomenon will enable neurosurgeons to manage patients with PTCP appropriately and clinical laboratory especially in emergency hospital is recommended to prepare for the hematological tubes being added KM in routine analysis, resulting in preventing mistaken diagnosis. PMID:24477063

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma in elderly patient with EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia recently treated with aspirin and warfarin: case report.

    PubMed

    Tosa, Masato; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Yumiko; Nishimura, Shigeko; Ide, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    A 78-year-old man who had a history of myocardial and cerebral infarction and who was treated with aspirin and warfarin, presented with left chronic subdural hematoma. Cerebral computed tomography showed severe brain compression of hematoma with midline shift, indicating the need for emergent surgery. The hematology and clotting tests upon admission revealed severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 1.3 × 10(4)/μL) with normal clotting activity. Because platelet aggregation was evident in the smear, we re-examined the patient for hematology using tubes that contained heparin, showing also low platelet count (2.3 × 10(4)/μL). The day on admission, we performed irrigation and drainage of the chronic subdural hematoma through single burr-hole craniostomy. During surgery, we used 10 units of platelet concentrates (PCs) for the reason that the patient was taking aspirin and coagulopathy derived from low platelet count could not be excluded. After surgery, we re-evaluated the hematology of the blood stored in tubes that contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with or without kanamycin (KM). Treatment with KM dissociated EDTA-induced platelet aggregation and revealed platelet counts with highest accuracy (no KM treatment, 1.3 × 10(4)/μL; KM treatment, 15.2 × 10(4)/μL). This phenomenon is called EDTA-Dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) defined as falsely low platelet counts reported by automated hematology analyzers due to platelet aggretgation. Awareness of the phenomenon will enable neurosurgeons to manage patients with PTCP appropriately and clinical laboratory especially in emergency hospital is recommended to prepare for the hematological tubes being added KM in routine analysis, resulting in preventing mistaken diagnosis. PMID:24477063

  15. Evolving Management of Symptomatic Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Experience of a Single Institution and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Balser, David; Rodgers, Shaun D.; Johnson, Blair; Shi, Chen; Tabak, Esteban; Samadani, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma has an increasing incidence and results in high morbidity and mortality. We review here the ten-year experience of a single institution and the literature regarding the treatment and major associations of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all cSDHs surgically treated from 2000 to 2010 at our institution to evaluate duration from admission to treatment, type of treatment, length of stay in critical care, length of stay in the hospital and recurrence. The literature was reviewed with regards to incidence, associations and treatment of cSDH. Results From 2000–2008, 44 patients were treated with burr holes. From 2008 to 2010, 29 patients were treated with twist drill evacuation (SEPS). 4 patients from each group were readmitted for reoperation (9% vs. 14%; p=.53). The average time to intervention for SEPS (11.2±15.3 hrs) was faster than for burr holes (40.3±69.1 hrs) (p=.02). The total hospital LOS was shorter for SEPS (9.3±6.8 days) versus burr holes (13.4±10.2 days) (p=.04); both were significantly longer than for a brain tumor patient undergoing craniotomy (7.0±0.5 days, n=94, P<.01). Conclusion Despite decreasing lengths of stay over time as treatment for cSDH evolved from burr holes to SEPS, the length of stay for a cSDH is still greater than that of a patient undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor. We noted 11% recurrence in our series of patients, which included individuals who recurred as late as 3 years after initial diagnosis. PMID:23485050

  16. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  17. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  18. Syndrome of transtentorial herniation: is vertical displacement necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Ropper, A H

    1993-01-01

    MRI from a comatose patient with a massive acute subdural haematoma showed most of the features of transtentorial herniation described in the classic pathology literature. In addition to encroachment on the perimesencephalic cisterns, infarction in the anterior and posterior cerebral artery territories, ischaemic change in the lower diencephalon, and ventricular enlargement were visualised. Despite the clinical syndrome and these secondary changes due to compression, there was only approximately 2 mm of downward displacement of the upper brainstem compared with 13 mm horizontal displacement. Although tissue shifts adjacent to the tentorial aperture cause brainstem and vascular compression, these changes may occur with minimal downward herniation. Images PMID:8350117

  19. US in the assessment of acute scrotum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute scrotum is a medical emergency . The acute scrotum is defined as scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Scrotal abnormalities can be divided into three groups , which are extra-testicular lesion, intra-testicular lesion and trauma. This is a retrospective analysis of 164 ultrasound examination performed in patient arriving in the emergency room for scrotal pain. The objective of this article is to familiarize the reader with the US features of the most common and some of the least common scrotal lesions. Methods Between January 2008 and January 2010, 164 patients aged few month and older with scrotal symptoms, who underwent scrotal ultrasonography (US), were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical presentation, outcome, and US results were analyzed. The presentation symptoms including scrotal pain, painless scrotal mass or swelling, and trauma. Results Of 164 patients, 125 (76%) presented with scrotal pain, 31 (19%) had painless scrotal mass or swelling and 8 (5%) had trauma. Of the 125 patients with scrotal pain, 72 had infection,10 had testicular torsion, 8 had testicular trauma, 18 had varicocele, 20 had hydrocele, 5 had cryptorchidism, 5 had scrotal sac and groin metastases, and 2 had unremarkable results. In the 8 patients who had history of scrotal trauma, US detected testicular rupture in 1 patients, scrotal haematomas in 2 patients . Of the 19 patients who presented with painless scrotal mass or swelling, 1 6 had extra-testicular lesions and 3 had intra-testicular lesions. All the extra-testicular lesions were benign. Of the 3 intra-testicular lesions, one was due to tuberculosis epididymo-orchitis, one was non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and one was metastasis from liposarcoma Conclusions US provides excellent anatomic detail; when color Doppler and Power Doppler imaging are added, testicular perfusion can be assessed PMID:23902859

  20. An implantable triple-function device for local drug delivery, cerebrospinal fluid removal and EEG recording in the cranial subdural/subarachnoid space of primates.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, Nandor; Medveczky, Geza; Rizzolo, Richard; Tang, Hai M; Baptiste, Shirn L; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Carlson, Chad; French, Jacqueline A; Kral, John G; Charchaflieh, Jean; Kuzniecky, Ruben I

    2012-01-30

    Transmeningeal pharmacotherapy for cerebral cortical disorders requires drug delivery through the subdural/subarachnoid space, ideally with a feedback controlled mechanism. We have developed a device suitable for this function. The first novel component of the apparatus is a silicone rubber strip equipped with (a) fluid-exchange ports for both drug delivery and local cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal, and (b) EEG recording electrode contacts. This strip can be positioned between the dura and pia maters. The second novel component is an implantable dual minipump that directs fluid movement to and from the silicone strip and is accessible for refilling and emptying the drug and CSF reservoirs, respectively. This minipump is regulated by a battery-powered microcontroller integrating a bi-directional radiofrequency (RF) communication module. The entire apparatus was implanted in 5 macaque monkeys, with the subdural strip positioned over the frontal cortex and the minipump assembly secured to the cranium under a protective cap. The system was successfully tested for up to 8 months for (1) transmeningeal drug delivery using acetylcholine (ACh) and muscimol as test compounds, (2) RF-transmission of neocortical EEG data to assess the efficacy of drug delivery, and (3) local CSF removal for subsequent diagnostic analyses. The device can be used for (a) monitoring neocortical electrophysiology and neurochemistry in freely behaving nonhuman primates for more than 6 months, (b) determining the neurobiological impact of subdural/subarachnoid drug delivery interfaces, (c) obtaining novel neuropharmacological data on the effects of central nervous system (CNS) drugs, and (d) performing translational studies to develop subdural pharmacotherapy devices. PMID:22027491

  1. A wakeboarding injury presented as acute carpal syndrome and median nerve contusion after wrist strangulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We present a case of combined median nerve contusion with immediate loss of sensation after the strangulation with a wakeboarding rope and prolonged referral to our department 72 hours after the injury accompanied by an acute carpal tunnel syndrome with immediate relief of numbness of a significant proportion of the median nerve following surgical decompression. Case presentation The palmar branch of the median nerve was surrounded by a significant haematoma in addition to the strangulation damage caused by its more superficial location in contrast to the median nerve. Conclusion In case of acute median neuropathy, urgent surgical intervention with exploration, decompression of both, the median nerve and the superficial branch of the median nerve, accompanied by compartment measurements of the forearm should be performed to regain or re-establish neurological integrity. PMID:19178709

  2. An open-source, automated platform for visualizing subdural electrodes using 3D CT-MRI coregistration

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Allison; Krish, Veena T.; Wagenaar, Joost; Chen, Weixuan; Zheng, Yuanjie; Wang, Hongzhi; Lucas, Timothy H.; Gee, James C.; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Visualizing implanted subdural electrodes in 3D space can greatly aid planning, executing, and validating resection in epilepsy surgery. Coregistration software is available, but cost, complexity, insufficient accuracy or validation limit adoption. We present a fully automated open-source application, based upon a novel method using post-implant CT and post-implant MR images, for accurately visualizing intracranial electrodes in 3D space. Methods CT-MR rigid brain coregistration, MR non-rigid registration, and prior-based segmentation were carried out on 7 subjects. Post-implant CT, post-implant MR, and an external labeled atlas were then aligned in the same space. The coregistration algorithm was validated by manually marking identical anatomical landmarks on the post-implant CT and post-implant MR images. Following coregistration, distances between the center of the landmark masks on the post-implant MR and the coregistered CT images were calculated for all subjects. Algorithms were implemented in open-source software and translated into a “drag and drop” desktop application for Apple Mac OS X. Results Despite post-operative brain deformation, the method was able to automatically align intra-subject multi-modal images and segment cortical subregions so that all electrodes could be visualized on the parcellated brain. Manual marking of anatomical landmarks validated the coregistration algorithm with a mean misalignment distance of 2.87 ± 0.58 mm between the landmarks. Software was easily used by operators without prior image processing experience. Significance We demonstrate an easy to use, novel platform for accurately visualizing subdural electrodes in 3D space on a parcellated brain. We rigorously validated this method using quantitative measures. The method is unique because it involves no pre-processing, is fully automated, and freely available worldwide. A desktop application, as well as the source code, are both available for download on the

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  4. Neuroprotective effect of preoperatively induced mild hypothermia as determined by biomarkers and histopathological estimation in a rat subdural hematoma decompression model

    PubMed Central

    Yokobori, Shoji; Gajavelli, Shyam; Mondello, Stefania; Mo-Seaney, Jixiang; Hayes, Ronald L; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Object In traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, hypothermia therapy has not shown efficacy in multicenter clinical trials. With the post-hoc data from the latest clinical trial (NABIS:H II), we hypothesized that hypothermia may be beneficial in the rat acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) model by blunting the effects of ischemic/ reperfusional (I/R) injury. The major aim of our study was to test the efficacy of temperature management in reducing brain damage after ASDH. Methods Rats were induced with ASDH and placed into (1) Normothermia group (37°C) (2) Early hypothermia group; head and body temperature reduced to 33°C at 30 minutes prior to craniotomy (3) Late hypothermia group; temperature was lowered to 33°C at 30 minutes after decompression (4) Sham group; no ASDH and underwent only craniotomy with normothermia. To assess of neuronal and glial cell damage, we analyzed microdialysate (MD ; using 100kD probe) concentrations of: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1). Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) positive neurons and injury volume with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining were also measured. Results In the early phase of reperfusion (30min- 2.5 hrs after decompression), extracellular UCH-L1 in the early hypothermia group was significantly lower than in the normothermia. (Early; 4.9±1.0 ng/dl, Late; 35.2±12.1 ng/dl, Normo; 50.20± 28.3 ng/dl, Sham; 3.1±1.3 ng/dl, Early vs Normo; p < 0.01, Sham vs Normo; p < 0.01, analyzed with ANOVA followed by a post-hoc Bonferroni’s test ). In the late phase of reperfusion (> 2.5hrs after decompression), extracellular GFAP in the early hypothermia group was also lower than in the normothermia and late hypothermia groups (Early; 5.5±2.9 ng/dl, Late; 7.4±3.4 ng/dl, Normo; 15.3±8.4 ng/dl, Sham; 3.3±1.0 ng/dl, Normo vs Sham; p < 0.01). The number of FJB positive cells in early hypothermia group was significantly smaller than in normothermia group (Normo vs Early: 774

  5. Comparison of Two Algorithms for Analysis of Perfusion Computed Tomography Data for Evaluation of Cerebral Microcirculation in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Yuriev, Michail; Agarkova, Darya; Trofimova, Svetlana; Bragin, Denis E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was comparison of two algorithms of perfusion computed tomography (PCT) data analysis for evaluation of cerebral microcirculation in the perifocal zone of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Twenty patients with CSDH after polytrauma were included in the study. The same PCT data were assessed quantitatively in cortical brain region beneath the CSDH (zone 1), and in the corresponding contralateral brain hemisphere (zone 2) without and with the use of perfusion calculation mode excluding vascular pixel 'Remote Vessels' (RV); 1st and 2nd analysis method, respectively. Comparison with normal values for perfusion indices in the zone 1 in the 1st analysis method showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in CBV and CBF, and no significant increase in MTT and TTP. Use of the RV mode (2nd analysis method) showed no statistically reliable change of perfusion parameters in the microcirculatory blood flow of the 2nd zone. Maintenance of microcirculatory blood flow perfusion reflects the preservation of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with CSDH. PMID:27526170

  6. Preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor usage in patients with chronic subdural hematoma: Associations with initial presentation and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Schmidt, Tobias; Mitova, Tatyana; Fierstra, Jorn; Bellut, David; Regli, Luca; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association of preoperative usage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with the initial presentation and clinical outcome of patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Patients treated for cSDH between 2009 and 2013 at our institution were included in this retrospective case-control study. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Out of 203 patients (58 females, mean age 73.2years), 53 (26%) patients were on ACE inhibitors before their presentation with cSDH. Median initial hematoma volume in individuals with ACE inhibitors (179.2±standard error of the mean [SEM] 13.0ml) was significantly higher compared to patients without ACE inhibitors (140.4±SEM 6.2ml; p=0.007). There was an increased probability of surgical reintervention in the ACE inhibitor group (12/53, 23% versus 19/153, 12%; p=0.079), especially in patients older than 80years (6/23, 26% versus 3/45, 7%; p=0.026). ACE inhibitors are associated with higher hematoma volume in patients with cSDH and with a higher frequency of recurrences requiring surgery (especially in the very old). We hypothesize that these effects are due to ACE inhibitor induced bradykinin elevation causing increased vascular permeability of the highly vascularized neomembranes in cSDH. PMID:26898577

  7. Subdural hematoma in a patient taking imatinib for GIST: a case report and discussion of risk with other chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Theodotou, Christian B; Shah, Ashish H; Ivan, Michael E; Komotar, Ricardo J

    2016-03-01

    Although anticancer drugs have existed for over 50 years, targeted drugs have only recently been marketed, and their side effects may not be completely understood. The patient is a 56-year-old woman with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor who presented with headache, nausea, and vomiting lasting 2 weeks. An MRI to rule out brain metastasis found a large right-hemispheric subdural hematoma without metastases. She denied trauma, seizures, or alcohol abuse. Laboratory test results were normal. Eight months prior, she had begun a dose escalation of imatinib, which became the suspected cause of her hemorrhage. The literature was reviewed for reports of intracranial hemorrhage with targeted chemotherapeutics excluding metastases, anticoagulation, and trauma. Multiple events have been documented but only one for imatinib with gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Imatinib is believed to cause platelet dysfunction (missed by standard testing), leading to intracranial hemorrhage. Intracranial hemorrhage risk may be under-reported and neurosurgical consultation for immediate treatment and oncology for reinitiation of chemotherapy are recommended. PMID:26628484

  8. First long term in vivo study on subdurally implanted micro-ECoG electrodes, manufactured with a novel laser technology.

    PubMed

    Henle, C; Raab, M; Cordeiro, J G; Doostkam, S; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Stieglitz, T; Rickert, J

    2011-02-01

    A novel computer aided manufacturing (CAM) method for electrocorticography (ECoG) microelectrodes was developed to be able to manufacture small, high density microelectrode arrays based on laser-structuring medical grade silicone rubber and high purity platinum. With this manufacturing process, we plan to target clinical applications, such as presurgical epilepsy monitoring, functional imaging during cerebral tumor resections and brain-computer interface control in paralysed patients, in the near future. This paper describes the manufacturing, implantation and long-term behaviour of such an electrode array. In detail, we implanted 8-channel electrode arrays subdurally over rat cerebral cortex over a period of up to 25 weeks. Our primary objective was to ascertain the electrode's stability over time, and to analyse the host response in vivo. For this purpose, impedance measurements were carried out at regular intervals over the first 18 weeks of the implantation period. The impedances changed between day 4 and day 7 after implantation, and then remained stable until the end of the implantation period, in accordance with typical behaviour of chronically implanted microelectrodes. A post-mortem histological examination was made to assess the tissue reaction due to the implantation. A mild, chronically granulated inflammation was found in the area of the implant, which was essentially restricted to the leptomeninges. Overall, these findings suggest that the concept of the presented ECoG-electrodes is promising for use in long-term implantations. PMID:20838900

  9. [A Case of Organizing Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Endoscopic Burr-Hole Surgery Using a Curettage and Suction Technique].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Oshiro, Shinya; Koga, Takaomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-09-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital because of difficulty with discrete movement of the right upper limb and dysarthria. Computed tomography(CT)of the head revealed a chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH)on the left side. The patient underwent single burr-hole irrigation and drainage on the same day. In addition to the burr hole, a cross-shaped dural incision was made which revealed a thick outer membrane and solidified hematoma. We removed as much of the clotted hematoma as possible using a curved suction tube under neuroendoscopy. The postoperative CT revealed that the hematoma was partially removed and the mass effect was reduced. As a result, the patient's neurological deficits improved. We reached a diagnosis of organizing CSDH following histologic examination of the removed hematoma that showed inflammatory cell infiltration and multiplication of fibroblasts. Neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation via a burr hole is minimally invasive and may be a useful procedure in the treatment of some cases of organizing CSDH. PMID:27605476

  10. Burr-hole Irrigation with Closed-system Drainage for the Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    XU, Chen; CHEN, Shiwen; YUAN, Lutao; JING, Yao

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy among neurosurgeons regarding whether irrigation or drainage is necessary for achieving a lower revision rate for the treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) using burr-hole craniostomy (BHC). Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of all available published reports. Multiple electronic health databases were searched to identify all studies published between 1989 and June 2012 that compared irrigation and drainage. Data were processed by using Review Manager 5.1.6. Effect sizes are expressed as pooled odds ratio (OR) estimates. Due to heterogeneity between studies, we used the random effect of the inverse variance weighted method to perform the meta-analysis. Thirteen published reports were selected for this meta-analysis. The comprehensive results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in mortality or complication rates between drainage and no drainage (P > 0.05). Additionally, there were no differences in recurrence between irrigation and no irrigation (P > 0.05). However, the difference between drainage and no drainage in recurrence rate reached statistical significance (P < 0.01). The results from this meta-analysis suggest that burr-hole surgery with closed-system drainage can reduce the recurrence of CSDH; however, irrigation is not necessary for every patient. PMID:26377830

  11. Correlation of the Beta-Trace Protein and Inflammatory Cytokines with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Chronic Subdural Hematomas : A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Su; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo; Kim, Chaekyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) detects various patterns, which can be attributed to many factors. The purpose of this study was to measure the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and highly specific protein [beta-trace protein (βTP)] for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in CSDHs, and correlate the levels of these markers with the MRI findings. Methods Thirty one patients, treated surgically for CSDH, were divided on the basis of MRI findings into hyperintense and non-hyperintense groups. The concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and βTP in the subdural fluid and serum were measured. The βTP was considered to indicate an admixture of CSF to the subdural fluid if βTP in the subdural fluid (βTPSF)/βTP in the serum (βTPSER)>2. Results The mean concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 of the hyperintense group (n=17) of T1-WI MRI were 3975.1±1040.8 pg/mL and 6873.2±6365.4 pg/mL, whereas them of the non-hyperintense group (n=14) were 2173.5±1042.1 pg/mL and 2851.2±6267.5 pg/mL (p<0.001 and p=0.004). The mean concentrations of βTPSF and the ratio of βTPSF/βTPSER of the hyperintense group (n=13) of T2-WI MRI were 7.3±2.9 mg/L and 12.6±5.4, whereas them of the non-hyperintense group (n=18) were 4.3±2.3 mg/L and 7.5±3.9 (p=0.011 and p=0.011). Conclusion The hyperintense group on T1-WI MRI of CSDHs exhibited higher concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 than non-hyperintense group. And, the hyperintese group on T2-WI MRI exhibited higher concentrations of βTPSF and the ratio of βTPSF/βTPSER than non-hyperintense group. These findings appear to be associated with rebleeding and CSF admixture in the CSDHs. PMID:25932289

  12. Subacute subdural hematoma in a 45-year-old woman with no significant past medical history after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kim A; Kouloumberis, Pelagia; Engelhard, Herbert H

    2009-05-01

    Amusement park ride injuries have been newsworthy events for many years. The multitude and severity of these injuries has been reported many times over the past 20 years and includes spinal cord and vertebral injuries, subarachnoid hemorrhage, internal and vertebral artery dissections, and even a few cases of subdural hematoma (SDH). There has also been as many theories to explain these injuries as there have been injuries themselves including how G forces and rotational acceleration can cause both neuroparenchymal and neurovascular injury. PMID:19555640

  13. Tiger hide appearance: Impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes after evacuation of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Manish; Gandhi, Ashok; Purohit, Devendra; Mittal, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Burr hole evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) with or without drainage system is the most common surgical method among various techniques. There are various complications of burr hole drainage evacuation of chronic SDH, but there is no case report regarding impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr hole as a complication. Herewith, we are reporting a case of bilateral chronic SDH with prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed a characteristic look and we named it “Tiger hide appearance”. We failed to find such characteristic appearance in MRI brain on reviewing the available literature. PMID:27366284

  14. Tiger hide appearance: Impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes after evacuation of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Gandhi, Ashok; Purohit, Devendra; Mittal, R S

    2016-01-01

    Burr hole evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) with or without drainage system is the most common surgical method among various techniques. There are various complications of burr hole drainage evacuation of chronic SDH, but there is no case report regarding impaction and prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr hole as a complication. Herewith, we are reporting a case of bilateral chronic SDH with prolapse of brain parenchyma through burr holes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed a characteristic look and we named it "Tiger hide appearance". We failed to find such characteristic appearance in MRI brain on reviewing the available literature. PMID:27366284

  15. Lemierre syndrome complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis, the development of subdural empyemas, and internal carotid artery narrowing without cerebral infarction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Westhout, Franklin; Hasso, Anton; Jalili, Mehrdad; Afghani, Behnoosh; Armstrong, William; Nwagwu, Chiedozie; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare complication of mild-to-moderate pharyngeal infections. The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. Neuroimaging also demonstrated right jugular vein thrombosis. Cultures of samples from the blood proved positive for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum. The patient underwent unilateral tonsillectomy, drainage of the peritonsillar abscess, and a myringotomy on the right side. Postoperatively the patient was treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy resulting in an excellent outcome. PMID:17233314

  16. Traumatic panhypopituitarism resulting in acute adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Phillip Benson; Cunningham, Aaron Joseph; Mentzer, Caleb James; Ahmad, Anbar; Young, Lester S; Abuzeid, Adel M

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary function plays an integral role in the physiologic response to traumatic injury. A significant proportion of trauma patients develop partial pituitary insufficiency. While isolated deficiencies of individual pituitary hormones are common, there are few reports in the literature of traumatic pan-pituitary failure with deficiency of all major pituitary hormones. We present a case of a patient involved in a motorcycle accident who sustained a sella turcica fracture, epidural hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage, optic nerve palsy, and bilateral abducens nerve palsies. Three days after the accident, the patient became hypotensive and progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. He was resuscitated and had spontaneous return of circulation. Despite adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor support, he remained profoundly hypotensive. Following administration of hydrocortisone, his blood pressures dramatically improved. He was found to have laboratory abnormalities, suggesting deficiencies of corticotropins, somatotropins, thyrotropins, gonadotropins, prolactin, and antidiuretic hormone. This is the first reported case of a patient with traumatic total panhypopituitarism complicated by acute adrenal crises during initial postinjury hospitalization. A review of the literature with comparison with other studies of trauma patients with deficiencies in five or more axes is presented. A high level of suspicion for central adrenal insufficiency and prompt administration of corticosteroids in the setting of symptomatic pituitary trauma can result in favorable outcomes. Screening for and treating posttraumatic hypopituitarism can result in improved rehabilitation and increased quality of life for trauma patients. PMID:26307884

  17. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C; Broughton, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G

    2016-07-01

    The plethora of studies in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has not resulted in the development of an evidence-based treatment strategy, largely due to heterogeneous outcome measures that preclude cross-study comparisons and guideline development. This study aimed to identify and quantify the heterogeneity of outcome measures reported in the CSDH literature and to build a case for the development of a consensus-based core outcome set. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English language studies with >10 patients (prospective) or >100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. There were 14 (13.7%) randomized controlled trials, one single arm trial (1.0%), 25 (24.5%) cohort comparison studies, and 62 (60.8%) prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Outcome domains reported by the studies included mortality (63.8% of included studies), recurrence (94.1%), complications (48.0%), functional outcomes (40.2%), and radiological (38.2%) outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity in the definitions of the outcome measures, as evidenced by the seven different definitions of the term "recurrence," with no definition given in 19 studies. The time-points of assessment for all the outcome domains varied greatly from inpatient/hospital discharge to 18 months. This study establishes and quantifies the heterogeneity of outcome measure reporting in CSDH and builds the case for the development of a robust consensus-based core outcome set for future studies to adhere to as part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project. PMID:26295586

  18. Risk Factors in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Comparison of Irrigation with Artificial Cerebrospinal Fluid and Normal Saline in a Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Akihiko; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Fujikawa, Atsushi; Machida, Toshio; Sueyoshi, Shigeo; Harigaya, Kenichi; Ono, Junichi; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is known to have a substantial recurrence rate. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACF) is an effective irrigation solution in general open craniotomy and endoneurosurgery, but no evidence of its use in burr-hole surgery exists. Objective To identify the potential of ACF irrigation to prevent CSDH recurrence. More specifically, to investigate the perioperative and intraoperative prognostic factors, and to identify controllable ones. Methods To examine various prognostic factors, 120 consecutive patients with unilateral CSDH treated with burr-hole drainage between September 2007 and March 2013 were analyzed. Intraoperative irrigation was performed with one of two irrigation solutions: normal saline (NS; n = 60) or ACF (n = 60). All patients were followed-up for at least 6 months postoperatively. We also examined the morphological alternations of the hematoma outer membranes after incubation with different solutions. Results Eleven patients (9.2%) had recurrence. Nine patients (15%) required additional surgery in the NS group, whereas only 2 patients (3.3%) in the ACF group required additional surgery. Among preoperative and intraoperative data, age (<80 years old, P = .044), thrombocyte (>22.0, P = .037), laterality (right, P = .03), and irrigation solution (ACF, P = .027) were related to smaller recurrence rates by log-rank tests. Only the type of irrigation solution used significantly correlated with recurrence in favor of ACF in both Cox proportional hazards (relative hazard: 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04–0.99; P = .049) and logistic regression models (odds ratio, 0.17, 95% CI: 0.03–0.92; P = .04) using these factors. Histological examinations of the hematoma membranes showed that the membranes incubated with NS were loose and infiltrated by inflammatory cells compared with those incubated with ACF. Conclusion Irrigation with ACF decreased the rate of CSDH recurrence. PMID

  19. Subdural Pressure and Brain Condition During Propofol Vs Isoflurane - Nitrous Oxide Anaesthesia in Patients Undergoing Elective Supratentorial Tumour Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Sankari; Das, Bibhukalyani

    2009-01-01

    Summary Total intravenous anaesthesia has received much importance than inhalational anaesthesia in neuroanaesthetic practice. In an effort to determine whether any important clinical differences occur, studies concerning intracranial pressure (ICP), degree of dural tension and degree of brain swelling during intravenous and inhalational based anaesthesia are warranted like the present one. A total of 68 patients were assigned randomly to one of two groups. In Group-I(n=34), anaesthesia was induced with propofol (1-3mg.kg−1) and maintained with propofol (6-10mg.kg−1.hr−1) and fentanyl (2-3mcg.kg−1.hr−1). In Group-II (n=34), anaesthesia was induced with propofol (1-3mg.kg−1) but maintained with isoflurane, nitrous oxide and fentanyl (2-3mcg.kg−1.hr−1). Moderate hypocapnia was applied to maintain arterial carbon dioxide around 30mmHg. Mean arterial blood pressure was stabilized with phenylephrine whenever necessary. Subdural intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure were monitored before and after 10min period of hyperventilation. Furthermore, the tension of dura before and after of hyperventilation and the degree of brain swelling after opening of dura were also estimated by the neurosurgeon. No differences were found between the groups with regards to demographics, neuroradiologic diagnosis, position of head and time of ICP measurement. Before hyperventilation, both ICP and dural tension were significantly lower in Group I compared with Group-II (P<0.05). But after hyperventilation there was no significant difference of ICP and dural tension in between groups. The degree of brain swelling after opening of dura was similar in both groups. There was a positive correlation between measured ICP and brain swelling score. PMID:20640077

  20. Computational Study on Subdural Cortical Stimulation - The Influence of the Head Geometry, Anisotropic Conductivity, and Electrode Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyeon; Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is a method used to inject electrical current through electrodes beneath the dura mater, and is known to be useful in treating brain disorders. However, precisely how SuCS must be applied to yield the most effective results has rarely been investigated. For this purpose, we developed a three-dimensional computational model that represents an anatomically realistic brain model including an upper chest. With this computational model, we investigated the influence of stimulation amplitudes, electrode configurations (single or paddle-array), and white matter conductivities (isotropy or anisotropy). Further, the effects of stimulation were compared with two other computational models, including an anatomically realistic brain-only model and the simplified extruded slab model representing the precentral gyrus area. The results of voltage stimulation suggested that there was a synergistic effect with the paddle-array due to the use of multiple electrodes; however, a single electrode was more efficient with current stimulation. The conventional model (simplified extruded slab) far overestimated the effects of stimulation with both voltage and current by comparison to our proposed realistic upper body model. However, the realistic upper body and full brain-only models demonstrated similar stimulation effects. In our investigation of the influence of anisotropic conductivity, model with a fixed ratio (1∶10) anisotropic conductivity yielded deeper penetration depths and larger extents of stimulation than others. However, isotropic and anisotropic models with fixed ratios (1∶2, 1∶5) yielded similar stimulation effects. Lastly, whether the reference electrode was located on the right or left chest had no substantial effects on stimulation. PMID:25229673

  1. Dipole source analyses of laser evoked potentials obtained from subdural grid recordings from primary somatic sensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Baumgärtner, Ulf; Vogel, Hagen; Ohara, Shinji; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Lenz, Fred

    2011-08-01

    The cortical potentials evoked by cutaneous application of a laser stimulus (laser evoked potentials, LEP) often include potentials in the primary somatic sensory cortex (S1), which may be located within the subdivisions of S1 including Brodmann areas 3A, 3B, 1, and 2. The precise location of the LEP generator may clarify the pattern of activation of human S1 by painful stimuli. We now test the hypothesis that the generators of the LEP are located in human Brodmann area 1 or 3A within S1. Local field potential (LFP) source analysis of the LEP was obtained from subdural grids over sensorimotor cortex in two patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. The relationship of LEP dipoles was compared with dipoles for somatic sensory potentials evoked by median nerve stimulation (SEP) and recorded in area 3B (see Baumgärtner U, Vogel H, Ohara S, Treede RD, Lenz FA. J Neurophysiol 104: 3029-3041, 2010). Both patients had an early radial dipole in S1. The LEP dipole was located medial, anterior, and deep to the SEP dipole, which suggests a nociceptive dipole in area 3A. One patient had a later tangential dipole with positivity posterior, which is opposite to the orientation of the SEP dipole in area 3B. The reversal of orientations between modalities is consistent with the cortical surface negative orientation resulting from superficial termination of thalamocortical neurons that receive inputs from the spinothalamic tract. Therefore, the present results suggest that the LEP may result in a radial dipole consistent with a generator in area 3A and a putative later tangential generator in area 3B. PMID:21593389

  2. Intraoperative Ultrasonography during Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematomas: A Technique to Release Isolated Deep-seated Hematomas—Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, Satoru; MOCHIZUKI, Takahiro; OSAWA, Shigeyuki; KUMABE, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    After the drainage of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), residual isolated deep-seated hematomas (IDHs) may recur. We introduce intraoperative ultrasonography to detect and remove such IDHs. Intra-operative ultrasonography is performed with fine transducers introduced via burr holes. Images obtained before dural opening show the CSDHs, hyper- and/or hypoechoic content, and mono- or multilayers. Images are also acquired after irrigation of the hematoma under the dura. Floating hyperechoic spots (cavitations) on the brain cortex created by irrigation confirm the release of all hematoma layers; areas without spots represent IDHs. Their overlying thin membranes are fenestrated with a dural hook for irrigation. Ultrasonographs were evaluated in 43 CSDHs (37 patients); 9 (21%) required IDH fenestration. On computed tomography scans, 17 were homogeneous-, 6 were laminar-, 16 were separated-, and 4 were trabecular type lesions. Of these, 2 (11.8%), 3 (50%), 4 (25%), and 0, respectively, manifested IDHs requiring fenestration. There were no technique-related complications. Patients subjected to IDH fenestration had lower recurrence rates (11.1% vs. 50%, p = 0.095) and required significantly less time for brain re-expansion (mean 3.78 ± 1.62 vs. 18 ± 5.54 weeks, p = 0.0009) than did 6 patients whose IDHs remained after 48 conventional irrigation and drainage procedures. Intraoperative ultrasonography in patients with CSDHs facilitates the safe release of hidden IDHs. It can be expected to reduce the risk of postoperative hematoma recurrence and to shorten the brain re-expansion time. PMID:26345671

  3. Recurrence of the Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Burr-Hole Drainage with or without Intraoperative Saline Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hwan Soo; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Han, In Ho; Cho, Won Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although standard method has not been established for the chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), burr-hole trephination and closed system drainage with or without irrigation has been widely accepted as the treatment of choice. The aim of this study is to analysis the post-operative recurrence rates after burr-hole trephination of the CSDH according to the conduction of irrigation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 184 patients with CSDH who underwent surgical treatment between January 2009 and December 2013. And 152 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria as follows: 1) CSDH diagnosed on computed tomography (CT), 2) unilateral hematoma, 3) burr-hole trephination with closed system drainage, and 4) follow-up CT for at least 3 months. Those patients were divided into two groups. Group A (n=38) underwent burr-hole trephination without irrigation, and Group B (n=114), burr-hole trephination with saline irrigation. Results The overall post-operative recurrence rate was 19.1% (n=29) in this study. The majority of recurrence showed in Group B. Twenty-eight patients (24.6%) of Group B had recurrence and only 1 patient (2.6%) of Group A showed recurrence. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in Group B compared with Group A (p=0.003). Another affecting factor for the recurrence was the amount of postoperative pneumocephalus (p=0.02). No catastrophic complications were found in postoperative course. Conclusion Although there was no difference of clinical outcome in both groups, the recurrence rate was higher in saline irrigation group compared with no irrigation group. We suggest that saline irrigation procedure be reserved only for selected cases in CSDH burr-hole surgery. PMID:27169042

  4. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  5. Unusual presentation of left sided acute appendicitis in elderly male with asymptomatic midgut malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Rajaratnam, Joshua; Singla, Apresh A.; Wiltshire, Stephanie; Kwik, Charlotte; Smigelski, Michelle; Morgan, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in the setting of midgut malrotation is uncommon. Midgut malrotation commonly presents within the first month of life. A minority remain asymptomatic and may present with concomitant abdominal pathology making diagnosis difficult. Presentation of case This paper reports a rare case of a 73-year-old male diagnosed with acute appendicitis and asymptomatic MM .The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy, but had an unplanned return to theatre for washout of post-operative intra-abdominal haematoma. Discussion Midgut malrotation is commonly described by the stringer classification and type 1a is the most common in adults. There have only been a handful of documented cases of acute appendicitis with midgut malrotation occurring in the adult population. Previous delay in diagnosis has led to a delay in definitive management. Both laparoscopic and open surgery has been used in the past. Conclusion Acute appendicitis with malrotation should be considered in elderly patients presenting with atypical signs and symptoms. Imaging offers significant advantage for timely and definitive management. PMID:26520036

  6. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  7. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  8. Patient factors associated with 30-day morbidity, mortality, and length of stay after surgery for subdural hematoma: a study of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Grant, Ryan A; Basques, Bryce A; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Surgery for subdural hematoma (SDH) is a commonly performed neurosurgical procedure. This study identifies patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes and prolonged length of stay (LOS) in patients who underwent surgical treatment for SDH. METHODS All patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) who were treated via craniotomy or craniectomy for SDH between 2005 and 2012 were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and 30-day outcomes were described. Multivariate regression was used to identify predictors of adverse events. RESULTS A total of 746 surgical procedures performed for SDH were identified and analyzed. Patients undergoing this procedure were 64% male with an average age (± SD) of 70.9 ± 14.1 years. The most common individual adverse events were death (17%) and intubation for more than 48 hours (19%). In total, 34% experienced a serious adverse event other than death, 8% of patients returned to the operating room (OR), and the average hospital LOS was 9.8 ± 9.9 days. In multivariate analysis, reduced mortality was associated with age less than 60 years (relative risk [RR] = 0.47, p = 0.017). Increased mortality was associated with gangrene (RR = 3.5, p = 0.044), ascites (RR = 3.00, p = 0.006), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class 4 or higher (RR = 2.34, p = 0.002), coma (RR = 2.25, p < 0.001), and bleeding disorders (RR = 1.87, p = 0.003). Return to the OR was associated with pneumonia (RR = 3.86, p = 0.044), male sex (RR = 1.85, p = 0.015), and delirium (RR = 1.75, p = 0.016). Serious adverse events were associated with ventilator dependence preoperatively (RR = 1.86, p < 0.001), dialysis (RR = 1.44, p = 0.028), delirium (RR = 1.40, p = 0.005), ASA Class 4 or higher (RR = 1.36, p = 0.035), and male sex (RR = 1.29, p = 0.037). Similarly, LOS was increased in ventilator dependent patients by 1.56-fold (p = 0.002), in patients with ASA Class 4 or higher by

  9. An uncommon cause of headache after headbanging at a party.

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Van Giel, Roel; Mortelmans, Luc; van den Hauwe, Luc

    2009-08-01

    Subdural haematomas can result from bridging vein rupture. Rotational acceleration in the sagittal plane and in a forward direction, as in falls, is very likely the 'mechanical' cause of subdural haematoma, as shown in cadaveric studies. Some recreational activities, for example roller-coaster rides and bungee jumping, have been associated with subdural haematoma, owing to acceleration/deceleration or repetitive head movements. We report a case of chronic subdural haemorrhage in a male teenager without precipitating factors and no history of head trauma. This case shows the value of good history-taking in medical diagnosis and that one should be aware of the risks of violent sports or dancing and the minimal clinical signs encountered. PMID:19398915

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  11. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  12. Infant acute life-threatening event--dysphagic choking versus nonaccidental injury.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Patrick D; Galaznik, John; Gardner, Horace; Shuman, Mark

    2010-03-01

    A 4-month-old male infant presented to the emergency room with a history of choking while bottle feeding at home, and was found by emergency medical services (EMS) to be apneic and pulseless. He subsequently developed disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and died. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed subdural hemorrhages (SDHs), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and retinal hemorrhages (RHs), along with findings of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The caretaker account appeared to be inconsistent with the clinical and imaging features, and a diagnosis of nonaccidental injury with "shaken baby syndrome" was made. The autopsy revealed diffuse anoxic central nervous system (CNS) changes with marked edema, SAH, and SDH, but no evidence of "CNS trauma." Although NAI could not be ruled out, the autopsy findings provided further evidence that the child's injury could result from a dysphagic choking type of acute life threatening event (ALTE) as consistently described by the caretaker. PMID:20434683

  13. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematomas in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with normal platelet count and no appreciable brain atrophy: Two case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jokonya, Luxwell; Musara, Aaron; Cakana, Andrew; Kalangu, Kazadi K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) usually occur in elderly patients following minor head trauma. Their occurrence is usually linked to cerebral atrophy secondary to alcohol, old age, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Spontaneous CSDHs have also been documented but are rare. They are usually caused by coagulopathies and various pathologies resulting in intracranial hypotension. Cases: We have observed a number of spontaneous CSDHs in HIV patients with normal platelet counts and no appreciable cerebral atrophy possibly caused by platelet dysfunction, hence we report about two such cases. To the best of our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in literature before. Conclusion: It is important to include CSDHs in the differential diagnosis of HIV patients presenting with neurological deficits even without a history of trauma. PMID:27308093

  14. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Ling GSF. Traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 406. Stippler M. Trauma of ...

  16. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  17. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  18. Predictive value of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in the diagnosis and outcomes of acute aortic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    AlMahameed, Soufian T; Novaro, Gian M; Asher, Craig R; Hougthaling, Penny L; Lago, Rodrigo M; Bhatt, Deepak L; AlMahameed, Amjad T; Topol, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels differ among patients with acute aortic syndromes (AAS) and if hsCRP could predict their long-term outcomes. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting Cleveland Clinic Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. Patients 115 consecutive patients with AAS admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit. Interventions HsCRP and other laboratory data were measured within 24 h of admission. Demographic, imaging and laboratory data were obtained at the time of presentation. For the long-term survival analysis, the social security death index was used to determine all-cause mortality. Main outcome measures HsCRP levels among AAS patients. Results Hospital mortality was 4.3% for AAS patients. HsCRP levels differed significantly among AAS; the median hsCRP was higher in the aortic dissection group (49 mg/l) than in those with penetrating aortic ulcer (28 mg/l), symptomatic aortic aneurysm (14 mg/l), and intramural haematoma (10 mg/l); (p=0.02). In multivariable analysis, aortic dissection patients had higher hsCRP levels than intramural haematoma (p=0.03) and symptomatic aortic aneurysm (p=0.04) patients, after adjusting for age and gender. Multivariable Cox regression analyses showed that elevated hsCRP levels at presentation were associated with a higher long-term mortality (p=0.007). Conclusions Among patients with AAS, those with aortic dissection have the highest hsCRP levels at presentation. Elevated hsCRP independently predicted a higher long-term mortality in AAS patients. PMID:27325965

  19. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: a neglected cause of acute myocardial ischaemia and sudden death.

    PubMed Central

    Basso, C.; Morgagni, G. L.; Thiene, G.

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute myocardial ischaemia. Eight consecutive fatal cases which occurred in women aged 34-54 years (mean 43) are described. The dissection involved the left anterior descending coronary artery in four, the left main trunk in two, the right coronary artery in one, and both left anterior descending and circumflex arteries in one. The clinical presentation was sudden death in six cases, and acute myocardial infarction in two. Diagnosis was made at necropsy in every case but one, in which coronary dissection was diagnosed during life by selective coronary angiography. The only ascertained risk factor was hypertension in one patient; none of the women was in the puerperium, and Marfan syndrome was excluded in all. Histology showed a haematoma between the coronary tunica media and adventitia, that flattened and occluded the lumen; a coronary intimal tear was detected in only two cases. Unusual histological findings were cystic medial necrosis in one case, eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrates in four, and angiomatosis of the tunica adventitia in one. Patients dying of spontaneous coronary dissection are usually middle aged women, with no coronary atherosclerosis and apparently no risk factors. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is unpredictable, and sudden death is the usual mode of clinical presentation. Prompt diagnosis and life saving treatment is far from being achieved. Images PMID:8665336

  20. Histopathological study of the outer membrane of the dura mater in chronic sub dural hematoma: Its clinical and radiological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bokka, Sriharsha; Trivedi, Adarsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic subdural hematoma is an old clot of blood on the surface of the brain between dura and arachnoid membranes. These liquefied clots most often occur in patients aged 60 and older with brain atrophy. When the brain shrinks inside the skull over time, minor head trauma can cause tearing of blood vessels over the brain surface, resulting in a slow accumulation of blood over several days to weeks. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the role of membrane in hematoma evaluation and to correlate its histopathology with clinic-radiological aspects of the condition and overall prognosis of patients. Material and Methods: The study incorporated all cases of chronic SDH admitted to the Neurosurgery department of JLN Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, between November 2011 and November 2013. All such cases were analyzed clinically, radiologically like site, size, thickness in computed tomography, the attenuation value, midline shift and histopathological features were recorded. Criteria for Inclusion: All cases of chronic subdural haematoma irrespective of age and sex were incorporated into the study. Criteria for Exclusion: All cases of acute subdural haematoma and cases of chronic sub dural hematoma which were managed conservatively irrespective of age and sex were excluded from the study Results: In our series of cases, the most common histopathological type of membrane was the inflammatory membrane (Type II) seen in 42.30% of cases followed by hemorrhagic inflammatory membrane (Type III) seen in 34.62% of cases while scar inflammatory type of membrane (Type IV) was seen in 23.08% of cases. No case with noninflammatory type (Type I) was encountered. PMID:26889276

  1. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  2. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  3. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  4. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  5. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  6. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  7. Direct Exploration of the Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobe in Semantic Memory: Cortical Stimulation and Local Field Potential Evidence From Subdural Grid Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueno, Taiji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Saito, Satoru; Hoffman, Paul; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Semantic memory is a crucial higher cortical function that codes the meaning of objects and words, and when impaired after neurological damage, patients are left with significant disability. Investigations of semantic dementia have implicated the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, in general, as crucial for multimodal semantic memory. The potentially crucial role of the ventral ATL subregion has been emphasized by recent functional neuroimaging studies, but the necessity of this precise area has not been selectively tested. The implantation of subdural electrode grids over this subregion, for the presurgical assessment of patients with partial epilepsy or brain tumor, offers the dual yet rare opportunities to record cortical local field potentials while participants complete semantic tasks and to stimulate the functionally identified regions in the same participants to evaluate the necessity of these areas in semantic processing. Across 6 patients, and utilizing a variety of semantic assessments, we evaluated and confirmed that the anterior fusiform/inferior temporal gyrus is crucial in multimodal, receptive, and expressive, semantic processing. PMID:25491206

  8. Direct Exploration of the Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobe in Semantic Memory: Cortical Stimulation and Local Field Potential Evidence From Subdural Grid Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Riki; Ueno, Taiji; Kunieda, Takeharu; Saito, Satoru; Hoffman, Paul; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic memory is a crucial higher cortical function that codes the meaning of objects and words, and when impaired after neurological damage, patients are left with significant disability. Investigations of semantic dementia have implicated the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) region, in general, as crucial for multimodal semantic memory. The potentially crucial role of the ventral ATL subregion has been emphasized by recent functional neuroimaging studies, but the necessity of this precise area has not been selectively tested. The implantation of subdural electrode grids over this subregion, for the presurgical assessment of patients with partial epilepsy or brain tumor, offers the dual yet rare opportunities to record cortical local field potentials while participants complete semantic tasks and to stimulate the functionally identified regions in the same participants to evaluate the necessity of these areas in semantic processing. Across 6 patients, and utilizing a variety of semantic assessments, we evaluated and confirmed that the anterior fusiform/inferior temporal gyrus is crucial in multimodal, receptive, and expressive, semantic processing. PMID:25491206

  9. The efficacy of dexamethasone on reduction in the reoperation rate of chronic subdural hematoma – the DRESH study: straightforward study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a common neurosurgical disease. It is often considered to be a rather benign entity. In spite of well established surgical procedures cSDH is complicated by a recurrence rate up to 30%. Since glucocorticoids have been used for treatment of cSDH in 1962 their role is still discussed controversially in lack of evident data. On the basis of the ascertained inflammation cycle in cSDH dexamethasone will be an ideal substance for a short lasting, concomitant treatment protocol. Objective: to test the efficacy of dexamethasone on reduction inthe reoperation rate of cSDH. Methods/Design The study is designed as a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial 820 patients who are operated for cSDH and from the age of 25 years are included after obtaining informed consent. They are randomized for administration of dexamethasone (16-16-12-12-8-4 mg/d) or placebo (maltodextrin) during the first 48 hours after surgery. The type I error is 5% and the type II error is 20%. The primary endpoint is the reoperation within 12 weeks postoperative. Discussion This study tests whether dexamethasone administered over 6 days is a safe and potent agent in relapse prevention for evacuated cSDH. Trial registration EudraCT 201100354442 PMID:24393328

  10. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  11. Effect of platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, on resolution of chronic subdural hematoma--a prospective study to investigate use as conservative therapy.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Masanori; Nagai, Shoichi; Hori, Emiko; Origasa, Hideki; Endo, Shunro

    2005-12-01

    Inflammatory reaction is very important for formation of the neomembrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study evaluated medical treatment with the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, etizolam, for the resolution of CSDH, and the factors indicating surgery or conservative therapy. Alternate patients were assigned to the etizolam group or control group without medical treatment. Patients in the etizolam group received 3.0 mg etizolam per day for 14 days. A total of 53 patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Univariate analysis of differences in demographic characteristics, clinical findings, and initial computed tomography (CT) findings, and multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between etizolam treatment and requirement for surgery using age, sex, low density of hematoma on CT, and paresis as confounders were performed. Etizolam treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.156, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.024-0.999, p = 0.049) was negatively correlated with requirement for surgery. Low density of hematoma (adjusted OR 0.125, 95% CI 0.019-0.846, p = 0.033) was found to be an independent negative predictor, and paresis as an initial symptom (adjusted OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.04-38.7, p = 0.045) was an independent positive predictor of requirement for surgery. Etizolam administration can promote the resolution of CSDH, especially at the stage of hygroma appearing as low density on CT. Surgery is recommended if the patient presents with paresis. PMID:16377949

  12. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation-A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  13. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  14. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  15. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  16. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  17. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-03-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  18. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  19. Creatine-kinase-BB after severe head-injury as an index of prognosis in relation to nature of trauma and patients age.

    PubMed

    Niedeggen, A; Adelt, D; Berndt, R; Hopf, T

    1989-01-01

    Creatine-Kinase-BB (CK-BB) is a brain specific enzyme, with a prognostic value for the patient's outcome after head-injury. We have investigated 76 brain injured patients and attempted to show a correlation of the concentrations of CK-BB and the Glasgow-Outcome-Scale (GOS). Patients with a CK-BB concentration of more than 50 ng/ml died. Patients, who had a CK-BB concentration less than 25 ng/ml showed only minimal neurological deficits. Intracerebral contusions and acute subdural haematomas showed the highest CK-BB concentration, indicating a high degree of braintissue-damage. CK-BB seems to have no correlation with the age of patients. Normalisation of elevated CK-BB levels do not correlate with recovery from neurological deficit. PMID:2618815

  20. Multi-detector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Anil, Gopinathan

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a spectrum of conditions, which may ultimately progress to potentially life-threatening aortic rupture. This syndrome encompasses aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable thoracic aortic aneurysms. Multi-detector CT (MDCT) is crucial for the diagnosis of AAS, especially in the emergency setting due to its speed, accuracy and ready availability. This review attends to the value of appropriate imaging protocols in obtaining good quality images that can permit a confident diagnosis of AAS. AD is the most commonly encountered AAS and also the one with maximum potential to cause catastrophic outcome if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Hence, this review briefly addresses certain relevant clinical perspectives on this condition. Differentiating the false from the true lumen in AD is often essential; a spectrum of CT findings, e.g., “beak sign”, aortic “cobwebs” that allows such differentiation have been described with explicit illustrations. The value of non enhanced CT scans, especially useful in the diagnosis of an intramural hematoma has also been illustrated. Overlap in the clinical and imaging features of the various conditions presenting as AAS is not unusual. However, on most instances MDCT enables the right diagnosis. On select occasions MRI or trans-esophageal echocardiography may be required as a problem solving tool. PMID:24976936

  1. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008–2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3%) were males and 31 (22.7%) females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%). The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%), while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%). One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%). The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety. PMID:25883478

  2. Comparison of the Outcomes and Recurrence with Three Surgical Techniques for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Single, Double Burr Hole, and Double Burr Hole Drainage with Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung-Min; Hwang, Sung-Nam; Park, Yong-Sook; Nam, Taek-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a disease commonly encountered by neurosurgeons, is treated by burr hole drainage (BHD). However, the optimal surgical technique among the three types of BHD has not been determined. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on BHD performed on 93 patients who were diagnosed with CSDH. The subjects were divided into three groups based on the surgical technique performed: single BHD without irrigation (Group A, n=31), double BHD without irrigation (Group B, n=32), and double BHD with irrigation (Group C, n=30). The clinical factors, radiological factors and recurrences were compared between the three groups. Moreover, independent factors affecting the recurrence were analyzed. Results The change in hematoma thickness was 29.77±7.94%, 49.73±12.87%, and 75.29±4.32% for Group A, B, and C, respectively, while the change in midline shift was 40.81±15.47%, 51.78±10.94%, and 56.16±16.16%, respectively. Thus, Group C showed the most effective for resolution of hematoma and midline shift (p<0.05). Group A, B, and C had 12 cases (38.7%), 8 cases (25.0%), and 3 cases (10.0%) of recurrences, respectively. Group C had a statistically significantly fewer recurrence rate than Group A (p<0.05). Double burr hole, irrigation, and coagulopathy were each identified as independent factors that reduce recurrence (p<0.05). Conclusion Among the three techniques, the double BHD with saline irrigation resulted in the fewest recurrences. It is probably the most effective technique for preventing the recurrence of CSDH. PMID:27169069

  3. Fatal acute alcohol intoxication in an ALDH2 heterozygote: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Tanegashima, A; Hosoe, H; Fukunaga, T

    2000-08-14

    On an evening in November, a 25-year-old man was found dead in his bedroom. There were many empty snap-out sheets for flunitrazepam tablets in the trash at his bedside. He had been beaten by a gang of young people earlier in the morning of the same day. At the medico-legal autopsy, although there were many bruises and/or abrasions on the whole body, only slight subdural hemorrhage was observed, and none of them was thought to be the cause of death. Flunitrazepam and its metabolites were not detected in his body fluid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Marked lung edema and a severe congestion of organs were observed. His blood alcohol concentration from the femoral vein was 2.00 mg/ml. Fatal cases of acute alcohol intoxication usually have shown higher alcohol concentration (2.25-6.23 mg/ml). Although the genotype of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) has not previously been mentioned as a contributing factor in determining the cause of death, in this case the genotype of ALDH2 was ALDH2*1/2 and thus is important. Those who possess the ALDH2*2 gene show high concentrations of acetaldehyde (AcH) at even comparatively lower alcohol levels. Consequently, the cause of death was considered to be acute alcohol intoxication including AcH poisoning. PMID:10940605

  4. High-resolution cranial ultrasound in the shaken-baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Huang, C C; Zimmerman, R A; Yuh, Y S; Chen, S J; Chin, S C; Lee, C C; Lee, K W

    2001-08-01

    With limited near-field resolution and accessible acoustic windows, sonography has not been advocated for assessing central nervous system injuries in the shaken-baby syndrome. Our purpose was to correlate high-resolution ultrasonographic characteristics of central nervous system injuries in whiplash injuries and the shaken-baby-syndrome with MRI and CT. Ultrasonographic images of 13 infants, aged 2-12 months, with whiplash or shaking cranial trauma were reviewed and compared with MRI in 10 and CT in 10. Five patients had serial ultrasonography and MRI or CT follow-up from 1 to 4 months after the initial injury. With ultrasonography we identified 20 subdural haematomas. MRI and CT in 15 of these showed that four were hyperechoic in the acute stage, three were mildly echogenic in the subacute stage, and that one subacute and seven chronic lesions were echo-free. Five patients had acute focal or diffuse echogenic cortical oedema which evolved into subacute subcortical hyperechoic haemorrhage in four, and well-defined chronic sonolucent cystic or noncystic encephalomalacia was seen at follow-up in two. Using ultrasonography we were unable to detect two posterior cranial fossa subdural haematomas or subarachnoid haemorrhage in the basal cisterns in three cases, but did show blood in the interhemispheric cistern and convexity sulci in two. U1-trasonography has limitations in demonstrating abnormalities remote from the high cerebral convexities but may be a useful adjunct to CT and MRI in monitoring the progression of central nervous system injuries in infants receiving intensive care. PMID:11548174

  5. Primary Intracerebral Haematoma Evacuation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is one of the most devastating types of stroke, leading to disability and high mortality rate. Besides blood pressure reduction and intensive medical and surgical treatment, immediate coagulopathy reversal is vital. On the other hand, the haemostatic disturbances may contribute to improve the recovery. We describe the evacuation of intracerebral hemorrhage with the insertion of external ventricular drainage in a patient suffering from deep hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage and haematocephalus. PMID:27066398

  6. Bilateral total deafness due to pontine haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C A; Davies, L; Halmagyi, G M

    1996-01-01

    A 64 year old woman with a predominantly midline pontine tegmental haemorrhage presented with bilateral total deafness. One week later reasonable pure-tone thresholds appeared but she still had total bilateral loss of speech discrimination. At that time contralateral acoustic reflexes were bilaterally absent, whereas ipsilateral acoustic reflexes and waves IV and V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential were bilaterally preserved. It is proposed that this patient's hearing deficit was due to inactivation of the ventral acoustic striae decussating in the trapezoid body. This case supports the contention that in humans the ventral pontine acoustic decussation carries most of the neural signals required for hearing and perhaps all the neural signals required for speech perception. Images PMID:8971114

  7. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  8. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  9. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  10. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  11. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Baseline and Peri-Operative Care Data Elements.

    PubMed

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C; Edlmann, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is an increasingly common subtype of head injury, especially in the elderly population. The optimization of treatment strategies has been hampered by the collection of heterogeneous outcome measures and data elements, precluding cross-study comparisons. This study aimed to quantify the heterogeneity of data elements in the pre-operative, operative, and post-operative phases of care, and build the basis for the development of a set of common data elements (CDEs) for CSDH. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English studies with more than 10 patients (prospective) or more than 100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. Only 40 studies (39.2%) reported the main presenting symptom/feature and 24 (23.5%) reported additional symptoms/features. Admitting neurological/functional status was classified by the Glasgow Coma Scale (25 studies; 24.5%), the Markwalder Score (26 studies; 25.5%) and the modified Rankin Scale (three studies; 2.9%). Fifty-four studies (52.9%) made some mention of patient comorbidities and 58 studies (56.9%) reported the proportion or excluded patients on anticoagulant medication. Eighteen studies (17.6%) reported baseline coagulation status. Sixty-four studies (62.7%) stratified or assessed severity based on radiological findings, although the methods used varied widely. There was variable reporting of surgical technique and post-operative care; 32 studies (31.4%) made no mention of whether the operations were performed under general or local anesthetic. This study, a part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project, confirms and quantifies the heterogeneity of data elements collected and

  12. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  13. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  14. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  16. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  17. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  18. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  19. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies. PMID:27253358

  20. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  1. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  2. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  3. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented. PMID:10982942

  4. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  5. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  7. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  8. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  10. Acute Flaccid Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, ... from a variety of causes including viral infections. AFM is characterized by a sudden weakness in one ...

  11. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  12. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  13. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Rania; Idowu, Modupe; Brown, Gregory S.; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Person, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP. PMID:25525547

  14. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  15. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Acute Liver Failure: Institutional Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick R; Mallory, Grant W; Atkinson, John L D; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) has been associated with cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), which may be managed utilizing an ICP monitor. The most feared complication of placement is catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of severe coagulopathy. Previous studies reported hemorrhage rates between 3.8-22 % among various devices, with epidural catheters having lower hemorrhage rates and precision relative to subdural bolts and intraparenchymal catheters. We sought to identify institutional hemorrhagic rates of ICP monitoring in ALF and its associated factors in a modern series guided by protocol implantation. Patient records treated for ALF with ICP monitoring at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN from 1995 to 2014 were reviewed. Protocalized since 1995, epidural (EP) ICP monitors were first used followed by intraparenchymal (IP) for stage III-IV hepatic encephalopathy. The following variables and outcomes were collected: patient demographics, ICPs and treatment methods, laboratory data, imaging studies, number of days for ICP monitoring, radiographic and symptomatic hemorrhage rates, orthotopic liver transplantation rates, and death. A total of 20 ICP monitors were placed for ALF, 7 EP, and 13 IP. International normalized ratio (INR) at placement of an EP monitor was 2.4 (1.7-3.2) with maximum of 2.7 (2.0-3.6) over the following 2.3 (1-3) days. Mean EP ICP at placement was 36.3 (11-55) and maximum of 43.1 (20-70) mm Hg. INR at placement of an IP monitor was 1.3 (<0.8-3.0) with maximum value of 2.9 (1.6-5.4) over the following 4.2 (2-6) days. Mean IP ICP at placement was 9.9 (2-19) and maximum was 39.8 (11-100) mm Hg. There was one asymptomatic hemorrhage in the EP group (14.3 % hemorrhage rate) and two hemorrhages in the IP group (hemorrhage rate was 15.4 %), both of which were fatal. Overall mortality rate in the EP group was 71.4 % (5/7) with two patients receiving transplantation, and one death in the transplant group. Overall mortality

  16. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  18. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  19. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  20. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  1. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  2. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  3. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  4. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  5. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  6. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  7. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  8. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  9. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  10. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  11. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  12. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  13. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  14. Acute hepatitis E complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiorgan dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Khan, Zohaib; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna; Rao, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    We report this rare case of a 27-year-old man who presented with acute hepatitis E and went on to develop acute epigastric pain. He was diagnosed to have acute severe pancreatitis with shock and acute renal failure due to hepatitis E. Such a phenomenon has rarely been reported in the literature, with patients following a benign course and complete recovery after conservative management and analgesia. Awareness of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially in young men from endemic areas with acute hepatitis E presenting with abdomen pain has been highlighted. PMID:24899005

  15. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  16. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  17. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  18. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  19. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  20. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  1. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  2. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  3. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  4. Comparison of non-sedated brain MRI and CT for the detection of acute traumatic injury in children 6 years of age or less.

    PubMed

    Young, Joseph Yeen; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Caruso, Paul Albert; Rincon, Sandra Patricia

    2016-08-01

    CT is considered the first-line study for acute intracranial injury in children because of its availability, detection of acute hemorrhage, and lack of sedation. An MRI study with rapidly acquired sequences can obviate the need for sedation and radiation. We compared the detection rate of rapid non-sedated brain MRI to CT for traumatic head injury in young children. We reviewed a series of children 6 years of age or less who presented to our ED during a 5-year period with head trauma and received a non-sedated brain MRI and CT within 24 h of injury. Most MRI studies were limited to triplane T2 and susceptibility sequences. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the MRIs and CTs and assessed the following findings: fracture, epidural hematoma (EDH)/subdural hematoma (SDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and parenchymal injury. Thirty of 33 patients had radiologically identified traumatic injuries. There was an overall agreement of 82 % between the two modalities. Skull fracture was the only injury subtype which had a statistically significant difference in detection between CT and MRI (p = 0.0001), with MRI missing 14 of 21 fractures detected on CT. While not statistically significant, MRI had a higher detection rate of EDH/SDH (p = 0.34), SAH (p = 0.07), and parenchymal injuries (p = 0.50). Non-sedated MRI has similar detection rates to CT for intracranial injury in young children presenting with acute head trauma and may be an alternative to CT in select patients. PMID:27166965

  5. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  6. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  7. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  8. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  9. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  10. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  11. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  12. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  13. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  14. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  15. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Berman, D.S.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a relatively rare but potentially lethal condition if not treated promptly. Since stones are not present, diagnostic procedures such as ultrasound or other radiological procedures are frequently not helpful. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid scan results were analyzed in 11 proven cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis. All had positive tests with nonvisualization of the gallbladder giving a sensitivity of 100%. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy is a highly reliable test and is easily performed even in acutely ill patients and should be the test of choice in all patients predisposed to and suspected of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  17. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  18. [Acute toxic pneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R

    1998-06-15

    The nature and extent of the acute injury due to toxic inhalants depend on the inhalant's solubility in water pH and chemical reactivity, on the aerodynamic diameter of particles (when the inhalant is an aerosol), and on the degree of exposure. Initial signs and symptoms indicate upper airways and bronchial irritation. Laryngeal oedema and (or) severe bronchospasm may be rapidly lethal. After cessation of exposure a transient improvement is generally observed; however a delayed pulmonary oedema may occur within the first 48 hours. On the following days, bacterial surinfection is a common complication. Possible long-term sequelae are reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:9781191

  19. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  20. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  1. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. PMID:27373613

  2. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Angelos G; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Pickard, John D; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Murray, Gordon D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  3. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Kolias, Angelos G.; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A.; Pickard, John D.; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Murray, Gordon D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of “opening the skull” in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  4. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  5. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  6. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  7. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  8. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  9. Acute pyelonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Morello, William; La Scola, Claudio; Alberici, Irene; Montini, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is one of the most serious bacterial illnesses during childhood. Escherichia coli is responsible in most cases, however other organisms including Klebsiella, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Proteus, and Pseudomonas species are being more frequently isolated. In infants, who are at major risk of complications such as sepsis and meningitis, symptoms are ambiguous and fever is not always useful in identifying those at high risk. A diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is initially made on the basis of urinalysis; dipstick tests for nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase are the most accurate indicators of infection. Collecting a viable urine sample for urine culture using clean voided methods is feasible, even in young children. No gold standard antibiotic treatment exists. In children appearing well, oral therapy and outpatient care is possible. New guidelines suggest less aggressive imaging strategies after a first infection, reducing radiation exposure and costs. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing recurrence is still a matter of debate and the risk of antibiotic resistance is a warning against its widespread use. Well-performed randomized controlled trials are required in order to better define both the imaging strategies and medical options aimed at preserving long-term renal function. PMID:26238274

  10. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  11. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration. PMID:54584

  12. Acute recurrent appendicitis with appendicolith.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Bernstein, M A; Kottamasu, S R; Sirr, S A

    1988-11-01

    Appendiceal disease can be acute, acute recurrent, or chronic. Acute appendicitis is the most common form. Acute recurrent appendicitis is more common than chronic appendicitis. In children the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are variable. Patients who have an appendicolith usually develop appendicitis, often with perforation. A case is presented of 3-year follow-up of a patient with an appendicolith and acute recurrent appendicitis. The literature about appendicoliths is reviewed. In the appropriate clinical setting, a history of prior episodes of similar right lower quadrant pain does not preclude the diagnosis of appendiceal disease. Awareness of the less common forms of appendicitis is important so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:3052484

  13. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  14. Acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Sagar, Pallavi; Mueller, Peter R; Novelline, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis most commonly manifests with acute lower quadrant pain. Its clinical features are similar to those of acute diverticulitis or, less commonly, acute appendicitis. The conditions that may mimic acute epiploic appendagitis at computed tomography (CT) include acute omental infarction, mesenteric panniculitis, fat-containing tumor, and primary and secondary acute inflammatory processes in the large bowel (eg, diverticulitis and appendicitis). Whereas the location of acute epiploic appendagitis is most commonly adjacent to the sigmoid colon, acute omental infarction is typically located in the right lower quadrant and often is mistaken for acute appendicitis. It is important to correctly diagnose acute epiploic appendagitis and acute omental infarction on CT images because these conditions may be mistaken for acute abdomen, and the mistake may lead to unnecessary surgery. The CT features of acute epiploic appendagitis include an oval lesion 1.5-3.5 cm in diameter, with attenuation similar to that of fat and with surrounding inflammatory changes, that abuts the anterior sigmoid colon wall. The CT features of acute omental infarction include a well-circumscribed triangular or oval heterogeneous fatty mass with a whorled pattern of concentric linear fat stranding between the anterior abdominal wall and the transverse or ascending colon. As CT increasingly is used for the evaluation of acute abdomen, radiologists are likely to see acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics more often. Recognition of these conditions on CT images will allow appropriate management of acute abdominal pain and may help to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:16284132

  15. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  17. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  19. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  20. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  1. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  2. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  3. [Acute epiglottitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Castillo, A

    1992-09-01

    The author presents the clinical history of 14 patients, from 21 to 48 years of age, 10 men and 4 women, with a final diagnosis of acute epiglottitis who were hospitalized at Gorgas Army Hospital or at the San Fernando Clinic. All the patients had pharyngitis and dysphagia, a few with nasal voice, stridor and difficulty breathing, as the chief complaint. All the patients were initially intubated orally for diagnostic purposes and immediately after nasotracheal intubation was done until the patient improved in 2 or 3 days (one patient remained intubated for 5 days). All patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit and were treated with Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol IV and lately with a second generation cephalosporin (Cefamandole). The patients allergic to Penicillin were treated with Clindamycin and Chloramphenicol. Corticosteroids were not used in any of the patients. There were no sequelae and none of the patients expired. PMID:1439005

  4. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  5. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  6. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  7. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  8. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  9. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  10. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  11. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  12. The shaken baby syndrome: review of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee; So; Fong; Luk

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of the shaken baby syndrome from 10 cases in Hong Kong. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Regional public hospital, Hong Kong. PATIENTS: Six boys and four girls (mean age, 0.54 years; range, 0.18-1.42 years) in whom the shaken baby syndrome was diagnosed between January 1994 and June 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical features at presentation, radiological findings, management, and outcome. RESULTS: All 10 patients presented with coma: the mean score on the Glasgow coma scale was 4.8 (range, 3-10). In all 10 cases, the history provided by the carers were incompatible with the patient's presentation. Nine patients presented with seizures. Retinal haemorrhages were detected in all patients, but peripheral signs of bruising were observed in only three. Acute subdural haematoma was found in eight patients; one of the remaining two children had subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhages, whereas the other had subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhages. Skeletal fractures were detected in two patients. The suspected abusers included either or both parents (n=3), childminders (n=3), and maids (n=2); the identity of the abusers were unknown in two cases. Prosecution by the police was initiated in three cases and two abusers were found to be guilty. Three children died of the abuse; the seven survivors had significant neurological handicaps. CONCLUSION: Medical practitioners should be alert to the occurrence of abusive head injury in children. Peripheral signs are uncommon and a high degree of suspicion is needed for the management to be successful. PMID:10870159

  13. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  14. Acute Legionella pneumophila infection masquerading as acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jonathan Michael; Chan, Julian; Reid, Angeline Louise; Tan, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged man had deteriorated rapidly in hospital after being misdiagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. Acute Legionnaires disease (Legionellosis) was subsequently diagnosed on rapid antigen urinary testing and further confirmed serologically. This led to appropriate antibiotic treatment and complete clinical resolution. Physicians caring for patients with alcohol-related liver disease should consider Legionella pneumophila in their differential diagnosis even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:23355576

  15. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  16. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  17. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  18. Pipazethate--acute childhood poisoning.

    PubMed

    da Silva, O A; Lopez, M

    1977-01-01

    A previously healthy child who who had accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of 20-mg tablets of pipazethate developed severe acute poisoning with neurologic, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. She recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy. PMID:589958

  19. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  20. Ultrasonography in acute gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Soiva, M; Pamilo, M; Päivänsalo, M; Taavitsainen, M; Suramo, I

    1988-01-01

    The files of patients with acute cholecystitis from two large university hospitals from the years 1978-1985 were employed to find the cases with acute gallbladder perforation for this study. Only those patients (n = 9) were selected for the analysis of sonographic signs of acute gallbladder perforation who had less than 48 hours of symptoms before sonography, and were operated upon within 24 hours of the sonography. Patients (n = 10) with non-complicated acute cholecystitis and identical in regard to the duration of the symptoms and the timing of the sonography and the operation formed a control group. The sonographic findings in patients with gallbladder perforation were pericholecystic fluid collections, free peritoneal fluid, disappearance of the gallbladder wall echoes, focal highly echogenic areas with acoustic shadows in the gallbladder, and an inhomogeneous, generally echo-poor gallbladder wall. PMID:2964842

  1. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  2. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make headaches worse (or lead to decreased responsiveness to other drug therapies) Patient preference Goals of ... Reduce frequency, severity, and duration of attacks Improve responsiveness to treatment of acute attacks Reduce level of ...

  3. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  4. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  5. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  6. Acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Asim; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Gale, Rosemary E; Levine, Ross L; Jordan, Craig T; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bloomfield, Clara D; Estey, Eli; Burnett, Alan; Cornelissen, Jan J; Scheinberg, David A; Bouscary, Didier; Linch, David C

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a disorder characterized by a clonal proliferation derived from primitive haematopoietic stem cells or progenitor cells. Abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells results in a high level of immature malignant cells and fewer differentiated red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. The disease occurs at all ages, but predominantly occurs in older people (>60 years of age). AML typically presents with a rapid onset of symptoms that are attributable to bone marrow failure and may be fatal within weeks or months when left untreated. The genomic landscape of AML has been determined and genetic instability is infrequent with a relatively small number of driver mutations. Mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation are common and are early events in leukaemogenesis. The subclassification of AML has been dependent on the morphology and cytogenetics of blood and bone marrow cells, but specific mutational analysis is now being incorporated. Improvements in treatment in younger patients over the past 35 years has largely been due to dose escalation and better supportive care. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be used to consolidate remission in those patients who are deemed to be at high risk of relapse. A plethora of new agents - including those targeted at specific biochemical pathways and immunotherapeutic approaches - are now in trial based on improved understanding of disease pathophysiology. These advances provide good grounds for optimism, although mortality remains high especially in older patients. PMID:27159408

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  8. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  9. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  10. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  11. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  12. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD. PMID:26946776

  13. Uveitis (acute anterior)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anterior uveitis is rare, with an annual incidence of 12/100,000 population, although it is more common in Finland (annual incidence of 23/100,000), probably because of genetic factors, such as high frequency of HLA–B27 in the population. It is often self-limiting, but can, in some cases, lead to complications such as posterior synechiae, cataract, glaucoma, and chronic uveitis. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of anti-inflammatory eye drops on acute anterior uveitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, mydriatics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops. PMID:21736765

  14. Acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Galetta, Steven L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Levin, Netta; Shindler, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Parr, Edward; Cadavid, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) most commonly presents as acute unilateral vision loss and eye pain and is frequently associated with multiple sclerosis. Although emphasis is often placed on the good recovery of high-contrast visual acuity, persistent deficits are frequently observed in other aspects of vision, including contrast sensitivity, visual field testing, color vision, motion perception, and vision-related quality of life. Persistent and profound structural and functional changes are often revealed by imaging and electrophysiologic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, and nonconventional MRI. These abnormalities can impair patients' abilities to perform daily activities (e.g., driving, working) so they have important implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, we review the sequelae from ON, including clinical, structural, and functional changes and their interrelationships. The unmet needs in each of these areas are considered and the progress made toward meeting those needs is examined. Finally, we provide an overview of past and present investigational approaches for disease modification in ON. PMID:26236761

  15. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  16. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  17. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  18. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  19. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  20. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823