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Sample records for acute symptomatic hyponatremia

  1. Acute symptomatic hyponatremia in a flight attendant.

    PubMed

    Madero, Magdalena; Monares, Enrique; Domínguez, Aurelio Méndez; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Acute symptomatic hyponatremia after thiazide diuretic initiation is a medical emergency. Here we describe the case of a flight attendant who developed acute hyponatremia during a flight and the potential risk factors for developing this condition. A 57-year-old flight attendant with history of essential hypertension was recently started on a thiazide diuretic. As she did routinely when working, she increased her water intake during a flight from London to Mexico City. She complained of nausea and headache during the flight. Upon arrival, she developed severe disorientation and presented to the hospital emergency room (ER) with a Glasgow scale of 12, hypoxia, and a generalized tonic clonic seizure. Her laboratory results on arrival were consistent with severe hyponatremia (serum Na 116 mEql/L) and severe cerebral edema by CT scan. She was treated with hypertonic saline, with complete resolution of the neurologic symptoms. We describe high water intake and hypoxia related to decreased partial pressure of oxygen in the cabin as the two main risk factors for thiazide-induced acute hyponatremia in this case. PMID:25500297

  2. Symptomatic hyponatremia following lateral medullary infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been reported from patients with severe neurological disease, and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and cerebral salt wasting syndrome are the two main etiologies of hyponatremia after brain injury. Here we describe a patient with a lateral medullary infarction who experienced symptomatic hyponatremia with finding suggestive of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone followed by cerebral salt wasting syndrome. Case presentation A 70-year-old Korean man visited emergency room complaining of sudden onset vertigo and gait disturbance. Neurological exam showed left side ataxia, Horner syndrome, and right side hypesthesia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed acute infarction involving left lateral medulla. His neurological status was stabilized, but he began to complain of non-vertiginous dizziness and general weakness five days after admission. Serum sodium level dropped from 131 mEq/mL to 122 mEq/mL with reduced serum osmolarity of 265 mOsm/L. The diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone was made and we restricted fluid intake, but his symptoms worsened and his mental status became drowsy. Follow up serum sodium level was 108 mEq/L with volume loss, suggesting cerebral salt wasting syndrome. We treated him with hypertonic saline and his consciousness was recovered. Conclusion This case shows symptomatic hyponatremia after lateral medullary infarction, providing insight about distinct pathogenesis of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and cerebral salt wasting syndrome. PMID:24886592

  3. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  4. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  5. Case Study: Symptomatic Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia in an Endurance Runner Despite Sodium Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Myers, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is known to be a potential complication from overhydration during exercise, but there remains a general belief that sodium supplementation will prevent EAH. We present a case in which a runner with a prior history of EAH consulted a sports nutritionist who advised him to consume considerable supplemental sodium, which did not prevent him from developing symptomatic EAH during a subsequent long run. Emergency medical services were requested for this runner shortly after he finished a 17-hr, 72-km run and hike in Grand Canyon National Park during which he reported having consumed 9.2-10.6 L of water and >6,500 mg of sodium. First responders determined his serum sodium concentration with point-of-care testing was 122 mEq/L. His hyponatremia was documented to have improved from field treatment with an oral hypertonic solution of 800 mg of sodium in 200 ml of water, and it improved further after significant aquaresis despite in-hospital treatment with isotonic fluids (lactated Ringer's). He was discharged about 5 hr after admission in good condition. This case demonstrates that while oral sodium supplementation does not necessarily prevent symptomatic EAH associated with overhydration, early recognition and field management with oral hypertonic saline in combination with fluid restriction can be effective treatment for mild EAH. There continues to be a lack of universal understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and appropriate hospital management of EAH. PMID:26061675

  6. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  7. Neurosurgical Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Mark J.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte imbalance in hospital inpatients. Acute onset hyponatremia is particularly common in patients who have undergone any type of brain insult, including traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain tumors, and is a frequent complication of intracranial procedures. Acute hyponatremia is more clinically dangerous than chronic hyponatremia, as it creates an osmotic gradient between the brain and the plasma, which promotes the movement of water from the plasma into brain cells, causing cerebral edema and neurological compromise. Unless acute hyponatremia is corrected promptly and effectively, cerebral edema may manifest through impaired consciousness level, seizures, elevated intracranial pressure, and, potentially, death due to cerebral herniation. The pathophysiology of hyponatremia in neurotrauma is multifactorial, but most cases appear to be due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Classical treatment of SIADH with fluid restriction is frequently ineffective, and in some circumstances, such as following subarachnoid hemorrhage, contraindicated. However, the recently developed vasopressin receptor antagonist class of drugs provides a very useful tool in the management of neurosurgical SIADH. In this review, we summarize the existing literature on the clinical features, causes, and management of hyponatremia in the neurosurgical patient. PMID:26237593

  8. Hyponatremia: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is an important and common clinical problem. The etiology is multifactorial. Hyponatremia may be euvolemic, hypovolemic or hypervolemic. Proper interpretation of the various laboratory tests helps to differentiate the various types of hyponatremia. Treatment varies with the nature of onset -acute or chronic, severity and symptoms. Normal saline forms the mainstay of treatment for hypovolemic hyponatremia while 3% NaCl and fluid restriction are important for euvolemic hyponatremia. Hypervolemic hyponatremia responds well to fluid restriction and diuretics. There have been several recent advances in the last year with revision in the guidelines for treatment and availability of vaptans. Judicious use of vaptans may help in treatment of hyponatremia. PMID:25364669

  9. CSWS Versus SIADH as the Probable Causes of Hyponatremia in Children With Acute CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    SORKHI, Hadi; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Reza; BARARI SAVADKOOHI, Rahim; BAGHDADI, Farkhondeh; NAKHJAVANI, Naeemeh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a major problem about the incidence, diagnosis, and differentiation of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) in patients with acute central nervous system (CNS) disorders. According to rare reports of these cases, this study was performed in children with acute CNS disorders for diagnosis of CSWS versus SIADH. Materials & Methods This prospective study was done on children with acute CNS disorders. The definition of CSWS was hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine volume output ≥3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020 and urinary sodium concentration ≥100 mEq/L. Also, patients with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine output < 3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020, and urinary sodium concentration >20 mEq/L were considered to have SIADH. Results Out of 102 patients with acute CNS disorders, 62 (60.8%) children were male with mean age of 60.47±42.39 months. Among nine children with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≥130 mEq/L), 4 children had CSWS and 3 patients had SIADH. In 2 cases, the cause of hyponatremia was not determined. The mean day of hyponatremia after admission was 5.11±3.31 days. It was 5.25±2.75 and 5.66±7.23 days in children with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Also, the urine sodium (mEq/L) was 190.5±73.3 and 58.7±43.8 in patients with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Conclusion According to the results of this study, the incidence of CSWS was more than SIADH in children with acute CNS disorders. So, more attention is needed to differentiate CSWS versus SIADH in order to their different management. PMID:24665304

  10. Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient with Profound Hyponatremia and Acute Neurological Symptoms: An Effective Treatment with Fludrocortisone

    PubMed Central

    Jaal, Jana; Jõgi, Tõnu; Altraja, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte abnormality in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Being usually asymptomatic, hyponatremia may cause symptoms like nausea, fatigue, disorientation, headache, muscle cramps, or even seizures, particularly if severe and rapid decrease of serum sodium levels occurs. Here we report a case of SCLC patient with severe hyponatremia and acute neurological symptoms that developed 2 days after the first course of second-line chemotherapy, most probably due to the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also known as arginine vasopressin) during lysis of the tumour cells. Initial treatment consisted of continuous administration of hypertonic saline that resulted in improvement of patient's neurological status. However, to obtain a persistent increase in serum sodium level, pharmacological intervention with oral fludrocortisone 0.1 mg twice daily was needed. We can therefore conclude that mineralocorticoids may be used to correct hyponatremia in SCLC patients when appropriate. PMID:26240768

  11. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  12. Acute extracellular ethanol load does not produce hyponatremia by internal osmoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.E.; Tzamaloukas, A.H.; Long, D.A.

    1986-03-05

    Hyponatremia is frequently present in subjects intoxicated with ethanol. To study whether an acute increase in extracellular osmolality by addition of ethanol creates any clinically appreciable osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, they infused over 20 sec 11 mmol/kg of ethanol intravenously into 5 anesthetized dogs (2 with intact renal function, 3 anuric) and measured plasma sodium and ethanol concentrations and osmolality at frequent intervals for 100 min after the end of the infusion. For a range of ethanol concentration between 4 and 120 mmol/l, changes in osmolality were equal to ethanol concentration in plasma water (y = -0.49 + 1.06 x mosm/kg per mmol/l, r = 0.981, p < 0.01). Plasma sodium concentration remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiments, even at 1 min post-infusion, when osmolality was 78 +/- 25 mosm/kg above the baseline. An acute increase in extracellular osmolality created by rapid intravenous infusion of a large dose of ethanol does not create any osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, that can be detected by dilution of extracellular sodium. The mechanism of hyponatremia in ethanol intoxication is not internal osmoregulation, but abnormalities in external balance of body water and/or solute.

  13. Factors that limit brain volume changes in response to acute and sustained hyper- and hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Malcolm A.; Kalayci, M. N.; Harrah, Jean

    1968-01-01

    Rats were made acutely hyper- or hyponatremic by infusion of hypertonic saline or water, respectively. Other rats were maintained in these states from 1 to 7 days to observe the effects of time. Brain tissue water, Na, Cl, and K were compared with serum Na and Cl concentration (NaE and ClE). The following observations are noted: Brain Cl content varies directly with ClE and brain Na content in the Cl space (Nae) varies directly with NaE, indicating little or no restraint on the inward or outward movement of Na or Cl from the Cl space of brain. The intracellular volume of brain fluid (Vi) derived as the difference between total water and Cl space, decreases with hypernatremia and increases with hyponatremia. The changes in Vi in the acute studies are not accompanied by any change in brain K content, or calculated intracellular Na content, and are approximately 0.6 the changes predicted from osmotic behavior of cells, which apply four assumptions: (a) NaE is proportional to osmolality; (b) brain osmolality remains equal to plasma osmolality; (c) Vi is osmotically active; and (d) there is no net gain or loss of solute from Vi. The validity of these assumptions is considered. When changes in osmolality are sustained, Vi is much closer to control values than when in the acute phase. K content increases in hypernatremia and decreases in hyponatremia. The changes in K content can account for some of the adjustment in Vi observed over the extended period of hyper- or hyponatremia. The regression of (Na + K)/v upon NaE describes a slope less than 1.0 and an intercept of (Na + K)/v equal to 40% of the control (Na + K)/v. These characteristics are interpreted to mean that significant quantities of Na and K in brain are osmotically inactive. The brain protects itself from acute volume changes in response to change in NaE by the freedom for Na and Cl to move from the Cl space, by Vi not changing acutely to the degree predicted from osmotic properties of cells in general, and by

  14. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE) 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Brynildsen, Jon; Høiseth, Arne Didrik; Følling, Ivar; Brekke, Pål H.; Christensen, Geir; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Omland, Torbjørn; Røsjø, Helge

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is prevalent and associated with mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). The prevalence and prognostic implications of hyponatremia in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary (AECOPD) have not been established. Method We included 313 unselected patients with acute dyspnea who were categorized by etiology of dyspnea according to established guidelines (derivation cohort). Serum Na+ was determined on hospital admission and corrected for hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia was defined as [Na+]<137 mmol/L. Survival was ascertained after a median follow-up of 816 days and outcome was analyzed in acute HF (n = 143) and AECOPD (n = 83) separately. Results were confirmed in an independent AECOPD validation cohort (n = 99). Results In the derivation cohort, median serum Na+ was lower in AECOPD vs. acute HF (138.5 [135.9–140.5] vs. 139.2 [136.7–141.3] mmol/L, p = 0.02), while prevalence of hyponatremia (27% [22/83] vs. 20% [29/143], p = 0.28) and mortality rate (42% [35/83] vs. 46% [66/143], p = 0.56) were similar. By univariate Cox regression analysis, hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality in acute HF (HR 1.85 [95% CI 1.08, 3.16], p = 0.02), but not in AECOPD (HR 1.00 [0.47, 2.15], p = 1.00). Analogous to the results of the derivation cohort, hyponatremia was prevalent also in the AECOPD validation cohort (25% [25/99]), but not associated with mortality. The diverging effect of hyponatremia on outcome between AECOPD and acute HF was statistically significant (p = 0.04). Conclusion Hyponatremia is prevalent in patients with acute HF and AECOPD, but is associated with mortality in patients with acute HF only. PMID:27529844

  15. Role of tolvaptan in the management of hyponatremia in patients with lung and other cancers: current data and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Salahudeen, Abdulla K

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently observed electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice, and its frequency is almost double in hospitalized cancer patients. As a subset of cancer, hyponatremia is quite common in lung cancer patients, and it is often coupled with the diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. The presence of hyponatremia is consequential in that its presence adversely affects cancer patients' prognosis and outcomes. Limited data suggest that correcting hyponatremia in lung cancer patients can increase response to anticancer treatment, may help reduce length of hospital stay and cost, and reduce morbidity and mortality. The type of treatment for hyponatremia depends on several factors; the key factors are the duration and severity of neurological symptoms of hyponatremia and the status of extracellular volume. When hyponatremia is caused by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, hypertonic saline is indicated for acute symptomatic cases, whereas fluid restriction is recommended in chronic asymptomatic hyponatremia. The latter allows a slower rate of correction, thus avoiding the dreaded complication of osmotic demyelination syndrome. Fluid restriction is, however, insufficient or impractical, and often the use of pharmacological therapy such as antidiuretic hormone receptor antagonists becomes necessary. Availability of these antagonists as an effective treatment in the management of hyponatremia has been a major breakthrough, and furthermore, its clinical or investigational use in cancer-related hyponatremia may offer a potential opportunity to gain further insights into the prognostic impact of hyponatremia correction on cancer patients' outcomes. Tolvaptan is a prototype of ADH receptor antagonists that acts at renal tubular levels to increase free water excretion without inducing major systemic electrolyte abnormalities such as hypokalemia or alkalosis. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief review

  16. Role of tolvaptan in the management of hyponatremia in patients with lung and other cancers: current data and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Salahudeen, Abdulla K

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently observed electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice, and its frequency is almost double in hospitalized cancer patients. As a subset of cancer, hyponatremia is quite common in lung cancer patients, and it is often coupled with the diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. The presence of hyponatremia is consequential in that its presence adversely affects cancer patients’ prognosis and outcomes. Limited data suggest that correcting hyponatremia in lung cancer patients can increase response to anticancer treatment, may help reduce length of hospital stay and cost, and reduce morbidity and mortality. The type of treatment for hyponatremia depends on several factors; the key factors are the duration and severity of neurological symptoms of hyponatremia and the status of extracellular volume. When hyponatremia is caused by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, hypertonic saline is indicated for acute symptomatic cases, whereas fluid restriction is recommended in chronic asymptomatic hyponatremia. The latter allows a slower rate of correction, thus avoiding the dreaded complication of osmotic demyelination syndrome. Fluid restriction is, however, insufficient or impractical, and often the use of pharmacological therapy such as antidiuretic hormone receptor antagonists becomes necessary. Availability of these antagonists as an effective treatment in the management of hyponatremia has been a major breakthrough, and furthermore, its clinical or investigational use in cancer-related hyponatremia may offer a potential opportunity to gain further insights into the prognostic impact of hyponatremia correction on cancer patients’ outcomes. Tolvaptan is a prototype of ADH receptor antagonists that acts at renal tubular levels to increase free water excretion without inducing major systemic electrolyte abnormalities such as hypokalemia or alkalosis. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief review

  17. Volume regulatory loss of Na, Cl, and K from rat brain during acute hyponatremia

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.E.; Patlak, C.S.; Pettigrew, K.D.; Cserr, H.F.

    1987-04-01

    This study quantitatively evaluates the contribution of tissue Na, Cl, and K loss to brain volume regulation during acute dilutional hyponatremia (DH) and examines the mechanism of Na loss. DH was produced in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats by intraperitoneal infusion of distilled water and brain water and electrolytes analyzed 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 4 h, or 6 h later. The rate of Na and Cl loss was greatest during the first 30 min of DH. Net loss of Na and Cl was maximal after 3 h of DH. K loss was slower, achieving significance after 3 h. Electrolyte loss was sufficient to account for observed brain volume regulation after three or more hours of DH. Measurements of /sup 22/Na influx and efflux across the blood brain barrier showed that barrier permeability to Na is unchanged during DH. Analysis of results using a two-compartment model of plasma-brain exchange suggests that loss of brain Na during DH does not result solely from a shift of electrolyte across the blood-brain barrier to plasma, and thus provides indirect evidence for an additional pathway for Na loss, presumably via cerebrospinal fluid.

  18. The Effects of Pre-Existing Hyponatremia and Subsequent-Developing Acute Kidney Injury on In-Hospital Mortality: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin Young; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Both hyponatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common and harmful in hospitalized patients. However, their combined effects on patient mortality have been little studied. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 19191 adult patients who were admitted for 1 year. Pre-existing hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium level < 135 mmol/L on the first measurement of their admission. AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine by ≥ 26.5 μmol/L or ≥ 1.5 times of the baseline value of creatinine during the hospital stay. Results The prevalence of pre-existing hyponatremia was 8.2%. During a median 6.0 days of hospital stay, the incidence rates of AKI and in-hospital patient mortality were 5.1% and 0.9%, respectively. Pre-existing hyponatremia independently predicted AKI development and in-hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.300, P = 0.004; HR 2.481, P = 0.002, respectively). Pre-existing hyponatremia and subsequent development of AKI increased in-hospital mortality by 85 times, compared to the patients with normonatremia and no AKI. In subgroup analysis, the AKI group showed higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than the non-AKI group during the admission. De novo hypernatremia, which might be associated with over-correction of hyponatremia, increased in-hospital mortality (HR 3.297, P <0.001), and patients with AKI showed significantly higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than patients without AKI (16.2% vs. 1.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Pre-existing hyponatremia may be associated with the development of AKI in hospitalized patients, and both hyponatremia and hospital-acquired AKI could have a detrimental effect on short term patient mortality, which might be related to the inappropriate correction of hyponatremia in AKI patients. PMID:27622451

  19. Managing hyponatremia in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, M A

    2014-03-01

    Hyponatremia is common in neurosurgical patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite significant research efforts to date, we still lack a complete understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hyponatremia in this patient setting. The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of our understanding of hyponatremia in neurosurgical patients, the management principles, and the challenges that arise for the physician managing such patients. Challenges to managing these patients include: the fact that the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and cerebral salt wasting (CSW) may actually represent parts of the same clinical spectrum; the difficulty in distinguishing between CSW, SIADH, and the hypovolemic hyponatremia resulting from a normal pressure natriuresis caused by the administration of large fluid volumes; and that hyponatremia can result from therapeutic agents used in these patients. Treatment of the hyponatremia depends on factors such as the underlying neurosurgical pathology, whether the hyponatremia is acute or chronic, and the fluid status of the patient. Hypertonic saline is a common treatment option. Other treatment options include vasopressin 2 receptor antagonists and steroids, but large prospective trials are required to suitably assess their efficacy and safety in the neurosurgical setting. Of all the challenges that hyponatremia in neurosurgical patients present, perhaps the most pressing is the need for a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Only once we begin to better understand this can more efficacious treatments be directed against hyponatremia in this important population.

  20. Hiker Fatality From Severe Hyponatremia in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later. We believe this is the first report of a fatality due to acute hyponatremia associated with hiking in a wilderness setting. This case demonstrates the typical pathophysiology, which includes overconsumption of fluids, and demonstrates the challenges of diagnosis and the importance of appropriate acute management. Current treatment guidelines indicate that symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia should be acutely managed with hypertonic saline and can be done so without concern over central pontine myelinolysis, whereas treatment with high volumes of isotonic fluids may delay recovery and has even resulted in deaths.

  1. Hiker Fatality From Severe Hyponatremia in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later. We believe this is the first report of a fatality due to acute hyponatremia associated with hiking in a wilderness setting. This case demonstrates the typical pathophysiology, which includes overconsumption of fluids, and demonstrates the challenges of diagnosis and the importance of appropriate acute management. Current treatment guidelines indicate that symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia should be acutely managed with hypertonic saline and can be done so without concern over central pontine myelinolysis, whereas treatment with high volumes of isotonic fluids may delay recovery and has even resulted in deaths. PMID:25935312

  2. Does highly symptomatic class membership in the acute phase predict highly symptomatic classification in victims 6 months after traumatic exposure?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    Recently studies have indicated the existence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorder (ASD) subtypes but no studies have investigated their mutual association. Although ASD may not be a precursor of PTSD per se, there are potential benefits associated with early identification of victims at risk of developing PTSD subtypes. The present study investigates ASD and PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) following bank robbery (N=371). Moreover, we assessed if highly symptomatic ASD and selected risk factors increased the probability of highly symptomatic PTSD. The results of LCA revealed a three class solution for ASD and a two class solution for PTSD. Negative cognitions about self (OR=1.08), neuroticism (OR=1.09) and membership of the 'High symptomatic ASD' class (OR=20.41) significantly increased the probability of 'symptomatic PTSD' class membership. Future studies are needed to investigate the existence of ASD and PTSD subtypes and their mutual relationship.

  3. Risk stratification of patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, David; Lobo, Jose Luis; Barrios, Deisy; Prandoni, Paolo; Yusen, Roger D

    2016-02-01

    Patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) who present with arterial hypotension or shock have a high risk of death (high-risk PE), and treatment guidelines recommend strong consideration of thrombolysis in this setting. For normotensive patients diagnosed with PE, risk stratification should aim to differentiate the group of patients deemed as having a low risk for early complications (all-cause mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding) (low-risk PE) from the group of patients at higher risk for PE-related complications (intermediate-high risk PE), so low-risk patients could undergo consideration of early outpatient treatment of PE and intermediate-high risk patients would undergo close observation and consideration of thrombolysis. Clinicians should also use risk stratification and eligibility criteria to identify a third group of patients that should not undergo escalated or home therapy (intermediate-low risk PE). Such patients should initiate standard therapy of PE while in the hospital. Clinical models [e.g., Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), simplified PESI (sPESI)] may accurately identify those at low risk of dying shortly after the diagnosis of PE. For identification of intermediate-high risk patients with acute PE, studies have validated predictive models that use a combination of clinical, laboratory and imaging variables. PMID:26768476

  4. Effects of Hyponatremia on the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Corinna; Peri, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a very common electrolyte disorder, especially in the elderly, and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and disability. In particular, the consequences of acute hyponatremia on the brain may be severe, including permanent disability and death. Also chronic hyponatremia can affect the health status, causing attention deficit, gait instability, increased risk of falls and fractures, and osteoporosis. Furthermore, an overly rapid correction of hyponatremia can be associated with irreversible brain damage, which may be the result of the osmotic demyelination syndrome. This review analyzes the detrimental consequences of acute and chronic hyponatremia and its inappropriate correction on the brain and the underlying physiopathological mechanisms, with a particular attention to the less known in vivo and in vitro effects of chronic hyponatremia. PMID:26237597

  5. Effects of Hyponatremia Normalization on the Short-Term Mortality and Rehospitalizations in Patients with Recent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Di Maio, Marco; Di Biase, Giuseppina; Ariano, Carmelina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that hyponatremia is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and death in patients with heart failure. In these studies, chronic heart failure (CHF) patients with persistent hyponatremia were compared only with CHF patients with a normal sodium level at hospital admission. Aims: In the present retrospective study, conducted in a cohort of patients with recent acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), all with hyponatremia ascertained at the time of hospital admission, we aimed to evaluate the effect of the normalization of serum sodium on the composite endpoint of short-term rehospitalization and mortality. Methods: A retrospective study centered on medical records of patients hospitalized for ADHF in the period April 2013 to April 2016 was performed. Data regarding serum sodium measurements had to be collected from medical records of cardiology wards of two hospitals, and were then processed for statistical analysis. As an inclusion criterion for enrollment, patients had to be suffering from heart failure that had required at least one hospitalization. Moreover, they had to be suffering from a state of hyponatremia (serum sodium < 135 mEq/L) at admission on the occasion of the index hospitalization. Patients with hyponatremia at admission were divided into two groups, one comprising patients with hyponatremia that persisted at the time of discharge (persistent hyponatremia) and a second including patients who had achieved normalization of their serum sodium levels (serum Na+ ≥ 135 mEq/L) during hospitalization until discharge. For both groups, the risk of mortality and rehospitalization during a 30-day follow-up was assessed. Results: One hundred and sixty CHF patients with various degrees of functional impairment were enrolled in the study. Among them, 56 (35%) had persistent hyponatremia over the course of hospitalization. At multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis, the risk of having a 30

  6. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  7. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  8. A comparison of location of acute symptomatic vs. ‘silent’ small vessel lesions

    PubMed Central

    Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Maconick, Lucy C.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Wang, Xin; Wiseman, Stewart; Armitage, Paul A.; Doubal, Fergus N.; Makin, Stephen; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.; Dennis, Martin S.; Deary, Ian J.; Bastin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lacunar ischaemic stroke, white matter hyperintensities, and lacunes are all features of cerebral small vessel disease. It is unclear why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke symptoms, whereas others typically do not. Aim To test if lesion location could be one reason why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke, whereas others accumulate covertly. Methods We identified prospectively patients who presented with acute lacunar stroke symptoms with a recent small subcortical infarct confirmed on magnetic resonance diffusion imaging. We compared the distribution of the acute infarcts with that of white matter hyperintensity and lacunes using computational image mapping methods. Results In 188 patients, mean age 67 ± standard deviation 12 years, the lesions that presented with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke were located in or near the main motor and sensory tracts in (descending order): posterior limb of the internal capsule (probability density 0·2/mm3), centrum semiovale (probability density = 0·15/mm3), medial lentiform nucleus/lateral thalamus (probability density = 0·09/mm3), and pons (probability density = 0·02/mm3). Most lacunes were in the lentiform nucleus (probability density = 0·01–0·04/mm3) or external capsule (probability density = 0·05/mm3). Most white matter hyperintensities were in centrum semiovale (except for the area affected by the acute symptomatic infarcts), external capsules, basal ganglia, and brainstem, with little overlap with the acute symptomatic infarcts (analysis of variance, P < 0·01). Conclusions Lesions that present with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke symptoms may be more likely noticed by the patient through affecting the main motor and sensory tracts, whereas white matter hyperintensity and asymptomatic lacunes mainly affect other areas. Brain location could at least partly explain the symptomatic vs. covert development of small vessel

  9. Bupropion-induced hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep; Kumar, Santhosh; Modi, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Although hyponatremia has been reported with the use of various antidepressants, the association of hyponatremia with bupropion has been limited to two case reports. In this case report, we present the case of a 75-year-old man who developed hyponatremia with the use of bupropion, which improved with stoppage of bupropion.

  10. Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, D; Harrison, P; Mackie, I; Sidhu, P; Purdy, G; Lawrie, A; Watt, H; Machin, S; Brown, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference. Methods: A full blood count was done and whole blood flow cytometry used to measure platelet surface expression of CD62P, CD63, and PAC1 binding and the percentage of leucocyte–platelet complexes in patients with acute (0–21 days, n = 19) and convalescent (79–365 days) symptomatic (n = 16) and asymptomatic (n = 16) severe (⩾70%) carotid stenosis. Most patients were treated with aspirin (37.5–300 mg daily) although alternative antithrombotic regimens were more commonly used in the symptomatic group. Results: The mean platelet count was higher in patients with acute and convalescent symptomatic compared with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. There were no significant differences in the median percentage expression of CD62P and CD63, or PAC1 binding between the acute or convalescent symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The median percentages of neutrophil–platelet (p = 0.004), monocyte–platelet (p = 0.046), and lymphocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.02) were higher in acute symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients. In patients on aspirin monotherapy, the percentages of neutrophil–platelet and monocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.03) were higher in acute symptomatic (n = 11) than asymptomatic patients (n = 14). In the convalescent phase, the median percentages of all leucocyte–platelet complexes in the symptomatic group dropped to levels similar to those found in the asymptomatic group. Conclusion: Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation may contribute to the early excess risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:16107361

  11. Hyponatremia in Patients with Cirrhosis of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Mauro; Ricci, Carmen Serena; Santi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is common in cirrhosis. It mostly occurs in an advanced stage of the disease and is associated with complications and increased mortality. Either hypovolemic or, more commonly, hypervolemic hyponatremia can be seen in cirrhosis. Impaired renal sodium handling due to renal hypoperfusion and increased arginine-vasopressin secretion secondary to reduced effective volemia due to peripheral arterial vasodilation represent the main mechanisms leading to dilutional hyponatremia in this setting. Patients with cirrhosis usually develop slowly progressing hyponatremia. In different clinical contexts, it is associated with neurological manifestations due to increased brain water content, where the intensity is often magnified by concomitant hyperammonemia leading to hepatic encephalopathy. Severe hyponatremia requiring hypertonic saline infusion is rare in cirrhosis. The management of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic hyponatremia mainly rely on the identification and treatment of precipitating factors. However, sustained resolution of hyponatremia is often difficult to achieve. V2 receptor blockade by Vaptans is certainly effective, but their long-term safety, especially when associated to diuretics given to control ascites, has not been established as yet. As in other conditions, a rapid correction of long-standing hyponatremia can lead to irreversible brain damage. The liver transplant setting represents a condition at high risk for the occurrence of such complications. PMID:26237020

  12. Hourly oral sodium chloride for the rapid and predictable treatment of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Eric; Patel, Shweta; Cohen, David M

    2014-12-01

    Hypertonic NaCl is first-line therapy for acute, severe and symptomatic hyponatremia; however, its use is often restricted to the intensive care unit (ICU). A 35-year-old female inpatient with an optic chiasm glioma and ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus developed acute hyponatremia (sodium 122 mEq/l) perhaps coinciding with haloperidol treatment. The sum of her urinary sodium and potassium concentrations was markedly hypertonic vis-à-vis plasma; it was inferred that serum sodium concentration would continue to fall even in the complete absence of fluid intake. Intravenous (i.v.) 3% NaCl was recommended; however, a city-wide public health emergency precluded her transfer to the ICU. She was treated with hourly oral NaCl tablets in a dose calculated to deliver the equivalent of 0.5 ml/kg/h of 3% NaCl with an objective of increasing the serum sodium concentration by 6 mEq/l. She experienced a graded and predictable increase in serum sodium concentration. A slight overshoot to 129 mEq/l was rapidly corrected with 0.25 l of D5W, and she stabilized at 127 mEq/l. We conclude that hourly oral NaCl, in conjunction with careful monitoring of the serum sodium concentration, may provide an attractive alternative to i.v. 3% NaCl for selected patients with severe hyponatremia.

  13. Terlipressin Induced Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Šíma, Martin; Pokorný, Miroslav; Paďour, František; Slanař, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue used for its vasoconstrictor effect in the treatment of variceal bleeding. Despite its good safety profile compared to vasopressin, some adverse reactions may occur during its use - e.g. hyponatremia. We describe a case of a cirrhotic patient with active variceal bleeding treated during two separate hospitalizations with terlipressin. In both drug treatment periods, severe laboratory hyponatremia developed. After terlipressin discontinuation, mineral disbalance corrected rapidly. Positive dechallenge and rechallenge corresponding to the drug administration schedule confirms the causality between terlipressin administration and hyponatremia. Hyponatremia was preceded with substantial fluid retention in both episodes. In this case report we want to highlight the need for fluid balance monitoring immediately after first terlipressin dose, which may individually predict the patient risk for the development of hyponatremia as other risk factors have rather limited predictive value in real clinical settings. PMID:26995205

  14. Hyponatremia in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sheikh; Yousuf, Irfan; Gul, Azhara; Gupta, Satish; Verma, Sawan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder encountered in patients of neurological disorders which is usually either due to inappropriate secretion of Antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). We conducted this study in a tertiary care hospital to determine the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia in patients of stroke admitted in the hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective study done over a period of two years that included established cases of stroke diagnosed on the basis of clinical history, examination and neuroimaging. 1000 stoke patients were evaluated for hyponatremia (serum sodium <130 meq/l). The data was analysed using Chi-square test using SPSS (Statistical package for social science) software. Results: Out of 1000 patients, 353 patients had hyponatremia. Out of this 353 patients, 238 (67%) had SIADH and 115 (33%) had CSWS. SIADH was seen in 83 patients who had ischemic stroke and 155 patients of hemorrhagic stroke. CSWS was found in 38 patients with ischemic stroke and 77 patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Statistical analysis revealed that hyponatremia significantly affects the outcome of stroke especially when it is due to CSWS rather than SIADH. Conclusion: Incidence of hyponatremia in our study population was 35%. In patients of hyponatremia 67% were having SIADH and 33% were having CSWS. Overall hyponatremia affected the outcome of stroke especially when caused by CSWS. Therefore close monitoring of serum sodium must be done in all patients who are admitted with stroke and efforts must be made to determine the cause of hyponatremia, in order to properly manage such patients thereby decreasing the mortality rate. PMID:24753660

  15. Trimethoprim-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Revekka; Terner, Sofia; Chandra, Subani; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Mohan, Sumit

    2013-12-01

    Hyponatremia associated with diuretic use can be clinically difficult to differentiate from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). We report a case of a 28-year-old man with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and Pneumocystis pneumonia who developed hyponatremia while receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). Serum sodium level on admission was 135 mEq/L (with a history of hyponatremia) and decreased to 117 mEq/L by day 7 of TMP/SMX treatment. In the setting of suspected euvolemia and Pneumocystis pneumonia, he was treated initially for SIADH with fluid restriction and tolvaptan without improvement in serum sodium level. A diagnosis of hyponatremia secondary to the diuretic effect of TMP subsequently was confirmed, with clinical hypovolemia and high renin, aldosterone, and urinary sodium levels. Subsequent therapy with sodium chloride stabilized serum sodium levels in the 126- to 129-mEq/L range. After discontinuation of TMP/SMX treatment, serum sodium, renin, and aldosterone levels normalized. TMP/SMX-related hyponatremia likely is underdiagnosed and often mistaken for SIADH. It should be considered for patients on high-dose TMP/SMX treatment and can be differentiated from SIADH by clinical hypovolemia (confirmed by high renin and aldosterone levels). TMP-associated hyponatremia can be treated with sodium supplementation to offset ongoing urinary losses if the TMP/SMX therapy cannot be discontinued. In this Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, a less common cause of hyponatremia is presented, and a stepwise approach to the diagnosis is illustrated.

  16. Diuretic-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Hix, John K; Silver, Stephen; Sterns, Richard H

    2011-11-01

    Soon after their introduction in 1957, thiazide diuretics became a recognized cause of hyponatremia. Thiazides may be the sole cause and they may exacerbate hyponatremia in patients with disorders that cause the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Although thiazides do not inhibit the ability to concentrate the urine, they impair diluting ability in several ways: inhibition of sodium and chloride transport at cortical diluting sites; stimulation of vasopressin release; reduction of glomerular filtration and enhanced proximal water reabsorption, which reduce delivery to the distal diluting sites; and, possibly, a direct effect on water flow in the collecting duct. Water retention caused by impaired water excretion combined with cation depletion may result in severe hyponatremia. Thiazides should be avoided in frail elderly patients with chronically high water intake or in others who depend on the excretion of maximally dilute urine to maintain fluid balance, such as patients with psychogenic polydipsia or heavy beer drinking. Inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia is common in thiazide-induced hyponatremia because the ability to dilute the urine is restored when the diuretic is discontinued and volume deficits are repaired. Hypokalemia, which often is present, increases the susceptibility to osmotic demyelination syndrome and replacement of potassium deficits contributes to the increase in serum sodium concentration. PMID:22099512

  17. SEVERE HYPONATREMIA, EPISTAXIS, AND FLUOXETINE.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Tezcan; Yücel, Murat; Eraslan, Özden; Cinemre, Hakan; Tamer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities and can be life threatening. Fluoxetine is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor and may rarely cause hyponatremia. Furthermore, fluoxetine may rarely increase the risk of bleeding events. We report a 66-year old woman who presented with severe hyponatremia and epistaxis associated with the use of fluoxetine. PMID:27323598

  18. Can trained nurses exclude acute otitis media with tympanometry or acoustic reflectometry in symptomatic children?

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Paula A.; Ruuskanen, Olli; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Ruohola, Aino

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since acute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children, the reliable exclusion of AOM by nurses might save physicians’ time for other duties. The study aim was to determine whether nurses without otoscopic experience can reliably use tympanometry or spectral gradient acoustic reflectometry (SG-AR) to exclude AOM. Design Three nurses were trained, who performed examinations with tympanometry and SG-AR. Pneumatic otoscopy by the study physician served as the diagnostic standard. Setting Study clinic at primary health care level. Patients. 281 children 6–35 months of age. Main outcome measures Predictive values (with 95% confidence interval) for tympanometry and SG-AR, and the clinical usefulness, i.e. the proportion of visits where nurses obtained the exclusive test result from both ears of the child. Results At 459 visits, the negative predictive value of type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) was 94% (91–97%). Based on type A and C1 tympanograms, the nurse could exclude AOM at 94/459 (20%) of visits. The negative predictive value of SG-AR level 1 result (>95°) was 94% (89–97%). Based on the SG-AR level 1 result, the nurse could exclude AOM at 36/459 (8%) of visits. Conclusion Type A and C1 tympanograms and SG-AR level 1 results obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM. However, the clinical usefulness of these test results is limited by their rarity. Type A and C1 tympanograms were obtained by nurses from both ears of the child only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.Key PointsAcute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children. Nurses’ role in excluding AOM is unknown.Type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM.With type A and C1 tympanograms, nurses could exclude AOM only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.The clinical usefulness

  19. New insights into symptomatic or silent atrial fibrillation complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stamboul, Karim; Fauchier, Laurent; Gudjoncik, Aurelie; Buffet, Philippe; Garnier, Fabien; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean Claude; Touzery, Claude; Cottin, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in the general population and contributes not only to a major deterioration in quality of life but also to an increase in cardiovascular morbimortality. The onset of AF in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is a major event that can jeopardize the prognosis of patients in the short-, medium- and long-term, and is a powerful predictor of a poor prognosis after MI. The suspected mechanism underlying the excess mortality is the drop in coronary flow linked to the acceleration and arrhythmic nature of the left ventricular contractions, which reduce the left ventricular ejection fraction. The principal causes of AF-associated death after MI are linked to heart failure. Moreover, the excess risk of death in these heart failure patients has also been associated with the onset of sudden death. Whatever its form, AF has a major negative effect on patient prognosis. In recent studies, symptomatic AF was associated with inhospital mortality of 17.8%, to which can be added mortality at 1year of 18.8%. Surprisingly, silent AF also has a negative effect on the prognosis, as it is associated with an inhospital mortality rate of 10.4%, which remains high at 5.7% at 1year. Moreover, both forms of AF are independent predictors of mortality beyond traditional risk factors. The frequency and seriousness of silent AF in the short- and long-term, which were until recently rarely studied, raises the question of systematically screening for it in the acute phase of MI. Consequently, the use of continuous ECG monitoring could be a simple, effective and inexpensive solution to improve screening for AF, even though studies are still necessary to validate this strategy. Finally, complementary studies also effect of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which seem to play a major role in triggering this rhythm disorder. PMID:26525569

  20. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  1. New insights into symptomatic or silent atrial fibrillation complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stamboul, Karim; Fauchier, Laurent; Gudjoncik, Aurelie; Buffet, Philippe; Garnier, Fabien; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean Claude; Touzery, Claude; Cottin, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in the general population and contributes not only to a major deterioration in quality of life but also to an increase in cardiovascular morbimortality. The onset of AF in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is a major event that can jeopardize the prognosis of patients in the short-, medium- and long-term, and is a powerful predictor of a poor prognosis after MI. The suspected mechanism underlying the excess mortality is the drop in coronary flow linked to the acceleration and arrhythmic nature of the left ventricular contractions, which reduce the left ventricular ejection fraction. The principal causes of AF-associated death after MI are linked to heart failure. Moreover, the excess risk of death in these heart failure patients has also been associated with the onset of sudden death. Whatever its form, AF has a major negative effect on patient prognosis. In recent studies, symptomatic AF was associated with inhospital mortality of 17.8%, to which can be added mortality at 1year of 18.8%. Surprisingly, silent AF also has a negative effect on the prognosis, as it is associated with an inhospital mortality rate of 10.4%, which remains high at 5.7% at 1year. Moreover, both forms of AF are independent predictors of mortality beyond traditional risk factors. The frequency and seriousness of silent AF in the short- and long-term, which were until recently rarely studied, raises the question of systematically screening for it in the acute phase of MI. Consequently, the use of continuous ECG monitoring could be a simple, effective and inexpensive solution to improve screening for AF, even though studies are still necessary to validate this strategy. Finally, complementary studies also effect of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which seem to play a major role in triggering this rhythm disorder.

  2. [Treatment of hyponatremia: role of vaptans].

    PubMed

    Hensen, J

    2010-12-01

    Hyponatremia is encountered quite frequently in everyday clinical practice. The symptomatology mainly includes neurological manifestations. In addition, it has been noted in recent years that uncertain gait, falls, fractures, and osteoporosis are also associated with hyponatremia. Based on clinical and laboratory analyses, hyponatremia can be classified into three categories: hypovolemic (decreased volume), hypervolemic (with venous edema), and euvolemic. The severity of the neurological symptoms related to hyponatremia should serve to guide the therapeutic approach. Severe cerebral symptoms due to acute cerebral edema require a prompt and closely monitored course of action with administration of hypertonic saline solution. Milder and moderate symptoms as well as the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) can now also be managed with controlled use of the ADH antagonist tolvaptan, one of a new class of vaptans. Tolvaptan is a selective antagonist of the antidiuretic effect of vasopressin without primarily affecting blood pressure and depending on the dose leads to increased excretion of free water (aquaresis). Side effects predominantly concern thirst, polyuria, and hypernatremia. Under these conditions, vaptans represent a valuable asset to the therapeutic spectrum in SIADH. Further studies are needed to determine whether falls and fractures can also be beneficially influenced.

  3. Sex-Related Differences Between Patients With Symptomatic Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Maitusong, Buamina; Sun, Hui-Ping; Xielifu, Dilidaer; Mahemuti, Maisumu; Ma, Xiang; Liu, Fen; Xie, Xiang; Azhati, Adila; Zhou, Xin-Rong; Ma, Yi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We designed a retrospective cohort study to assess sex-related differences in clinical manifestations, incidence, and outcomes of patients with symptomatic acute aortic dissection (AAD). We collected clinical data from 2010 to 2015 of 400 patients with AAD. Patients’ clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed as a function of sex. Among 400 patients with AAD, the ratio of men to women was 3.18:1; the incidence of atherosclerosis was higher in women (P = 0.02). Dysphoria (P = 0.01), focal neurological deficits (P = 0.04), and pulse deficits (P = 0.03) were more frequent in men. Imaging findings revealed that pleural effusion (P < 0.01), celiac trunk involvement (P < 0.01), and superior mesenteric artery involvement (P = 0.02) were more frequent in men. Dissection-related pneumonia (P = 0.02), pulmonary atelectasis (P = 0.01), aortic intramural hematoma (P < 0.01), ischemic electrocardiographic changes (P = 0.03), and in-hospital complications such as myocardial ischemia (P = 0.03), hypoxemia (P < 0.01), cardiac tamponade (P = 0.01) occurred more frequently in women. Women with type A dissection had higher in-hospital mortality than men (P < 0.01). The presentation of AAD varies with a patient's sex. Women with AAD had clinical features different from men as follows: higher age of onset, more frequent inpatient complications, and higher in-hospital mortality. These findings may lead to a better understanding of aortic dissection in women that will improve their outcomes. PMID:26986151

  4. Impact of perioperative hyponatremia in children: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Cheme; Afshari, Arash

    2014-01-01

    For more than 50 years, hypotonic fluids (crystalloids) have been the standard for maintenance fluid used in children. In the last decade, several studies have evaluated the risk of hyponatremia associated with the use of hypotonic vs isotonic fluids, which has lead to an intense debate. Children undergoing surgery have several stimuli for release of antidiuretic hormone, which controls renal water handling, including pain, nausea, vomiting, narcotic use and blood loss. The body’s primary defense against the development of hyponatremia is the ability of the kidneys to excrete free water and dilute urine. Increased levels of antidiuretic hormone can result in hyponatremia, defined as a plasma sodium level < 136 mmol/L, which causes cells to draw in excess water and swell. This manifests as central nervous system symptoms such as lethargy, irritability and seizures. The risk for symptomatic hyponatremia is higher in children than in adults. It represents an emergency condition, and early diagnosis, prompt treatment and close monitoring are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. The widespread use of hypotonic fluids in children undergoing surgery is a matter of concern and more focus on this topic is urgently needed. In this paper, we review the literature and describe the impact of perioperative hyponatremia in children. PMID:25374805

  5. Three cases of severe hyponatremia during a river run in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Emily A; Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-06-01

    We present 3 cases of severe hyponatremia occurring on a commercially guided river rafting trip on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. All 3 women appeared to have been overhydrating because of concern about dehydration and required evacuation within 24 hours of each other after the staggered onset of symptoms, which included fatigue and emesis progressing to disorientation or seizure. Each was initially transferred to the nearest hospital and ultimately required intensive care. Imaging and laboratory data indicated all 3 patients had hypervolemic hyponatremia. Unlike the well-documented exercise-associated hyponatremia cases commonly occurring in prolonged endurance athletic events, these 3 unique cases of acute hyponatremia were not associated with significant exercise. The cases illustrate the diagnostic and treatment challenges related to acute hyponatremia in an austere setting, and underscore the importance of preventive measures focused on avoidance of overhydration out of concern for dehydration.

  6. Three cases of severe hyponatremia during a river run in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Emily A; Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-06-01

    We present 3 cases of severe hyponatremia occurring on a commercially guided river rafting trip on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. All 3 women appeared to have been overhydrating because of concern about dehydration and required evacuation within 24 hours of each other after the staggered onset of symptoms, which included fatigue and emesis progressing to disorientation or seizure. Each was initially transferred to the nearest hospital and ultimately required intensive care. Imaging and laboratory data indicated all 3 patients had hypervolemic hyponatremia. Unlike the well-documented exercise-associated hyponatremia cases commonly occurring in prolonged endurance athletic events, these 3 unique cases of acute hyponatremia were not associated with significant exercise. The cases illustrate the diagnostic and treatment challenges related to acute hyponatremia in an austere setting, and underscore the importance of preventive measures focused on avoidance of overhydration out of concern for dehydration. PMID:25736400

  7. Acute Stressors Reduce Neural Inhibition to Food Cues and Increase Eating Among Binge Eating Disorder Symptomatic Women

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Zhenyong; Jackson, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Stressors can trigger binge-eating but researchers have yet to consider their effects on both neural responses to food cues and food consumption among those at risk. In this experiment, we examined the impact of acute stressors on neural activation to food images and subsequent food consumption within binge-eating disorder (BED) and non-eating disordered control groups. Eighteen women meeting DSM-IV BED criteria and 26 women serving as non-eating disordered controls were randomly assigned to unpleasant stressor (painful cold pressor test (CPT) followed by negative performance feedback) or less unpleasant stressor (non-painful sensory discrimination task followed by positive performance feedback) conditions. Subsequently, they were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing food and neutral images. After the scans, participants completed a self-report battery in an environment conducive to snacking. During exposure to food images, BED-symptomatic women in the unpleasant stressor condition reported more liking of high calorie food images and showed less activation in one inhibitory area, the hippocampus, compared to controls in this condition. BED-symptomatic women exposed to unpleasant stressors also consumed more chocolate than any other group during the post-scan questionnaire completion. Crucially, reduced hippocampal activation to high calorie food images predicted more chocolate consumption following fMRI scans within the entire sample. This experiment provides initial evidence suggesting unpleasant acute stressors contribute to reduced inhibitory region responsiveness in relation to external food cues and later food consumption among BED-symptomatic women. PMID:27790097

  8. Alpha-syntrophin deletion removes the perivascular but not endothelial pool of aquaporin-4 at the blood-brain barrier and delays the development of brain edema in an experimental model of acute hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Xue, Rong; Haug, Finn-Mogens; Neely, John D; Bhardwaj, Anish; Agre, Peter; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C; Mori, Susumu; Ottersen, Ole P

    2004-03-01

    The formation of brain edema, commonly occurring as a potentially lethal complication of acute hyponatremia, is delayed following knockout of the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Here we show by high-resolution immunogold analysis of the blood-brain-barrier that AQP4 is expressed in brain endothelial cells as well as in the perivascular membranes of astrocyte endfeet. A selective removal of perivascular AQP4 by alpha-syntrophin deletion delays the buildup of brain edema (assessed by Diffusion-weighted MRI) following water intoxication, despite the presence of a normal complement of endothelial AQP4. This indicates that the perivascular membrane domain, which is peripheral to the endothelial blood-brain barrier, may control the rate of osmotically driven water entry. This study is also the first to demonstrate that the time course of edema development differs among brain regions, probably reflecting differences in aquaporin-4 distribution. The resolution of the molecular basis and subcellular site of osmotically driven brain water uptake should help design new therapies for acute brain edema.

  9. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins acutely reduce soluble brain Aβ levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jérôme; Stukas, Sophie; Button, Emily; Cheng, Wai Hang; Lee, Michael; Fan, Jianjia; Wilkinson, Anna; Kulic, Iva; Wright, Samuel D; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-05-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest a protective role for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein (apo)A-I in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). HDL/apoA-I particles are produced by the liver and intestine and, in addition to removing excess cholesterol from the body, are increasingly recognized to have vasoprotective functions. Here we tested the ability of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) consisting of human apoA-I reconstituted with soy phosphatidylcholine for its ability to lower amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice, a well-characterized preclinical model of amyloidosis. Animals were treated intravenously either with four weekly doses (chronic study) or a single dose of 60mg/kg of rHDL (acute study). The major finding of our acute study is that soluble brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were significantly reduced within 24h of a single dose of rHDL. By contrast, no changes were observed in our chronic study with respect to soluble or deposited Aβ levels in animals assessed 7days after the final weekly dose of rHDL, suggesting that beneficial effects diminish as rHDL is cleared from the body. Further, rHDL-treated animals showed no change in amyloid burden, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ levels, neuroinflammation, or endothelial activation in the chronic study, suggesting that the pathology-modifying effects of rHDL may indeed be acute and may be specific to the soluble Aβ pool. That systemic administration of rHDL can acutely modify brain Aβ levels provides support for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of apoA-I-based agents for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  10. Homeopathic medications as clinical alternatives for symptomatic care of acute otitis media and upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to "first do no harm" in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children.

  11. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  12. Hyponatremia and the Thyroid: Causality or Association?

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, Kevin M.; Hatipoglu, Betul A.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disorders, particularly hypothyroidism, have historically been implicated in the development of serum hyponatremia. However, in more recent years, this paradigm has been challenged, and it has been suggested that the link between hypothyroidism and hyponatremia may merely be an association. This review will focus on the thyroid and its link with serum hyponatremia, and review the available literature on the topic. PMID:26237016

  13. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  14. Preliminary evidence for lymphocyte distribution differences at rest and after acute psychological stress in PTSD-symptomatic women☆

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Dorie A.; Steele, Amber C.; Stuber, Margaret L.; Fahey, John L.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated circulating natural killer (NK), CD4+ and CD8+ cells in response to acute psychological challenge among mothers of child cancer survivors with and without posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Control mothers of healthy children (n = 9) were compared to 17 cancer mothers with (PTSS: n = 9) and without PTSS (No PTSS: n = 7) under conditions of rest, after a generic stressor (MAT: mental arithmetic task) and a personalized stressor (script-driven trauma imagery), and after recovery from each stressor. Results indicate the PTSS group had higher percentage CD4+ and lower CD8+ levels than non-symptomatic women and blunted NK reactivity to generic challenge. Multiple regression analyses indicated PTSS effects were independent of self-reported distress. Contrary to expectations, cancer mothers without PTSS were not significantly different from controls on tonic or phasic immune outcomes. Also unlike predictions, reactivity to challenge was greatest to the non-social MAT stressor compared to the personalized challenge for all groups. Conclusions are constrained by study limitations (e.g., small sample size and potential phase order effects). Nonetheless, results are consistent with an emerging literature on PTSS-associated immune differences and further suggest these effects may be distinct from that associated with subjective distress more generally. PMID:15797313

  15. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated. PMID:27186379

  16. Hyponatremia in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-01-01

    The present review analyses the mechanisms relating heart failure and hyponatremia, describes the association of hyponatremia with the progress of disease and morbidity/mortality in heart failure patients and presents treatment options focusing on the role of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-receptor antagonists. Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in the clinical setting and in hospitalized patients. Patients with hyponatremia may have neurologic symptoms since low sodium concentration produces brain edema, but the rapid correction of hyponatremia is also associated with major neurologic complications. Patients with heart failure often develop hyponatremia owing to the activation of many neurohormonal systems leading to decrease of sodium levels. A large number of clinical studies have associated hyponatremia with increased morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalized for heart failure or outpatients with chronic heart failure. Treatment options for hyponatremia in heart failure, such as water restriction or the use of hypertonic saline with loop diuretics, have limited efficacy. AVP-receptor antagonists increase sodium levels effectively and their use seems promising in patients with hyponatremia. However, the effects of AVP-receptor antagonists on hard outcomes in patients with heart failure and hyponatremia have not been thoroughly examined. PMID:24109495

  17. Incidence, Severity, and Association With Adverse Outcome of Hyponatremia in Children Hospitalized With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Kantor, Paul F; Shaddy, Robert E; Rossano, Joseph W; Goldberg, Jason F; Hagan, Joseph; Humlicek, Timothy J; Cabrera, Antonio G; Jeewa, Aamir; Denfield, Susan W; Dreyer, William J; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse

    2016-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common finding in adults hospitalized with heart failure (HF) and is associated with longer hospital stays and increased mortality. The significance of hyponatremia in children with HF is not known. We sought to determine the incidence of hyponatremia and association with clinical outcome in children hospitalized with HF. Admission and inpatient serum sodium concentrations were analyzed in 141 consecutive children hospitalized with acute decompensated HF. Inclusion criteria include patients (age, birth to 21 years) with biventricular hearts who were hospitalized for HF from January 2007 to December 2012. The primary composite end point was death, cardiac transplantation, or the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) during hospitalization. Data for 141 patients were included in the analysis. The cohort included 48 patients (34%) with preexisting HF. Mean serum sodium at admission was 136 ± 4 mmol/L (range 124 to 150 mmol/L). Hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mmol/L) was present in 45 patients (32%) at admission. Seventy-one patients (75%) with normal serum sodium concentrations at admission subsequently developed acquired hyponatremia during their hospitalization. Hyponatremia persisted at discharge in 17 of 66 patients (26%). Fifty-eight patients (41%) reached the composite end point during hospitalization (death, n = 15; cardiac transplantation, n = 27; MCS, n = 46). Hyponatremia at admission was independently associated with death, cardiac transplantation, or the use of MCS during hospitalization (odds ratio 3.1, p = 0.02). In conclusion, hyponatremia occurs commonly in children hospitalized with acute decompensated HF and is associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality, cardiac transplantation, and need for MCS. PMID:27530824

  18. Incidence, risk factors, and treatment outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in Taiwanese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective cohort study of 245 patients in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lee, Mel S; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yang, Chao-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is a potentially disabling complication encountered in children who receive chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Considering the possible effect of ethnic difference on the clinical features of symptomatic ON in pediatric ALL, we retrospectively evaluated 245 children with ALL who were treated at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, between 2002 and 2011. Six (2.4 %) patients developed symptomatic ON in a total of 17 sites during the follow-up period. Diagnosis of ON was confirmed by X-ray in seven, magnetic resonance imaging in two, and bone scan in three patients. The estimated cumulative incidence of symptomatic ON in newly diagnosed ALL was 3.4 % at 8 years. Four patients received ON-directed surgical interventions, including total hip replacement in three and arthroplasty in one. The incidence of ON was significantly higher among girls (P = 0.03), patients >10 years old (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)), and patients who had received more intensive chemotherapy regimen (P = 0.02). These results indicate that the incidence and risk factors in our institute were similar to those observed in Western countries. Future studies surveying the impact on the quality of life of childhood ALL survivors in Taiwan are warranted.

  19. Gene Expression Profiles in Zebrafish Brain after Acute Exposure to Domoic Acid at Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Doses

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Kathi A.; Tilton, Susan C.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Srinouanprachan, Sengkeo; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Farin, Federico M.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2009-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neuroexcitatory amino acid that is naturally produced by some marine diatom species of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Ingestion of DA-contaminated seafood by humans results in a severe neurotoxic disease known as amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP). Clinical signs of ASP include seizures and neuronal damage from activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. However, the impacts of DA exposure at levels below those known to induce outward signs of neurobehavioral exicitotoxicity have not been well characterized. To further understand the mechanisms of neurotoxic injury associated with DA exposure, we examined the transcriptome of whole brains from zebrafish (Danio rerio) receiving intracoelomic (IC) injection of DA at both symptomatic and asymptomatic doses. A majority of zebrafish exposed to high-dose DA (1.2 μg DA/g) exhibited clinical signs of neuroexcitotoxicity (EC50 of 0.86 μg DA/g) within 5–20 min of IC injection. All zebrafish receiving low-dose DA (0.47 μg DA/g) or vehicle only maintained normal behavior. Microarray analysis of symptomatic and asymptomatic exposures collectively yielded 306 differentially expressed genes (1.5-fold, p ≤ 0.05) predominately represented by signal transduction, ion transport, and transcription factor functional categories. Transcriptional profiles were suggestive of neuronal apoptosis following an overwhelming of protective adaptive pathways. Further, potential molecular biomarkers of neuropathic injury, including the zebrafish homolog of human NDRG4, were identified and may be relevant to DA exposure levels below that causing neurobehavioral injury. In general, DA-modulated gene expression was consistent with other model species thereby validating zebrafish as an appropriate vertebrate model to study mechanisms of DA neurotoxicity. These data provide a basis for identifying pathways of DA-induced injury as well as biomarkers of asymptomatic and symptomatic DA exposure levels. PMID:18936300

  20. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  1. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  2. An unusual cause for hyponatremia with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Kushal; Vivek, G; Dasari, Sowjanya; Manthappa, M; Dias, Lorraine; Acharya, Raviraja

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old Asian Indian female with known hypertension presented with persistent vomiting but no other symptoms of meningism. Clinical examination and basic laboratory parameters were entirely normal except for significant hyponatremia. Further investigation was suggestive of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion. Subsequently, despite steady correction of hyponatremia, the patient developed generalised seizures. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis performed was inconclusive. Screening for a chronic meningitis underlying SIADH, yielded positive blood and CSF titres for venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL), which were confirmed by Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA). The patient was treated for neurosyphilis and made a complete recovery. Hyponatremia resolved and she had no further episodes of seizures. She was tested for HIV infection which was negative. On follow-up, she remained TPHA positive but VDRL titres became negative. PMID:22605698

  3. The Hyponatremia Epidemic: A Frontier Too Far?

    PubMed Central

    Drake-Holland, Angela J.; Noble, Mark I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality and is often neglected, especially in elderly and seemingly terminal patients. Hyponatremia can be asymptomatic or can cause symptoms ranging from nausea and lethargy to convulsions and coma. This condition has become increasingly common over time with a similar time course to the increase in adoption of low salt diets. The popularization of low salt may not be justified in people with normal kidney function in whom the compatible statistically based evidence that salt causes hypertension has been challenged by experimental evidence to the contrary. PMID:27774451

  4. Posttransplant Hyponatremia Predicts Graft Failure and Mortality in Kidney Transplantation Recipients: A Multicenter Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miyeun; Park, Jae Yoon; An, Jung Nam; Park, Seokwoo; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck-Jong; Na, Ki Young; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-01-01

    Although hyponatremia is related to poorer outcomes in several clinical settings, its significance remains unresolved in kidney transplantation. Data on 1,786 patients who received kidney transplantations between January 2000 and December 2011 were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the corrected sodium values for serum glucose 3 months after their transplantations (<135 mmol/L vs. ≥135 mmol/L). Subsequently, the hazard ratios (HRs) for biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft failure, and all-cause mortality were calculated after adjustments for several immunological and non-immunological covariates. 4.0% of patients had hyponatremia. Patients with hyponatremia had higher risks for graft failure and all-cause mortality than did the counterpart normonatremia group; the adjusted HRs for graft failure and mortality were 3.21 (1.47–6.99) and 3.03 (1.21–7.54), respectively. These relationships remained consistent irrespective of heart function. However, hyponatremia was not associated with the risk of acute rejection. The present study addressed the association between hyponatremia and graft and patient outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Based on the study results, our recommendation is to monitor serum sodium levels after kidney transplantations. PMID:27214138

  5. Chronic Hyponatremia Causes Neurologic and Psychologic Impairments.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Haruki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takagi, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Izumida, Hisakazu; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Seiji; Kiyota, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Iwama, Shintaro; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yukio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oiso, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common clinical electrolyte disorder. Once thought to be asymptomatic in response to adaptation by the brain, recent evidence suggests that chronic hyponatremia may be linked to attention deficits, gait disturbances, risk of falls, and cognitive impairments. Such neurologic defects are associated with a reduction in quality of life and may be a significant cause of mortality. However, because underlying diseases such as adrenal insufficiency, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and cancer may also affect brain function, the contribution of hyponatremia alone to neurologic manifestations and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone rat model, we show here that sustained reduction of serum sodium ion concentration induced gait disturbances; facilitated the extinction of a contextual fear memory; caused cognitive impairment in a novel object recognition test; and impaired long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. In vivo microdialysis revealed an elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus of chronically hyponatremic rats. A sustained low extracellular sodium ion concentration also decreased glutamate uptake by primary astrocyte cultures, suggesting an underlying mechanism of impaired long-term potentiation. Furthermore, gait and memory performances of corrected hyponatremic rats were equivalent to those of control rats. Thus, these results suggest chronic hyponatremia in humans may cause gait disturbance and cognitive impairment, but these abnormalities are reversible and careful correction of this condition may improve quality of life and reduce mortality. PMID:26376860

  6. Hyponatremia as the Initial Presentation of Cryptococcal Meningitis After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Saad; Juhardeen, Hamzah; Alnajjar, Asma; Abaalkhail, Faisal; Al-Kattan, Wael; Alsebayel, Mohamed; Al hamoudi, Waleed; Elsiesy, Hussien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Meningoencephalitis is the most common clinical manifestation of cryptococcal infection, as the organism has a propensity to invade the CNS. Patients often present with elevated intracranial pressure, focal motor deficits, altered mentation and internal hydrocephalus. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) has been reported as a notable cause of euvolemic hyponatremia in immunocompromised patients. Case Presentation: A 67-year-old male with liver transplantation due to hepatitis C (HCV) related liver cirrhosis developed severe hyponatremia four months after liver transplantation, which was discovered during routine clinic visit. Patient was referred to the emergency department, treated and discharged with normal serum sodium level. Few days later, he presented with dizziness, confusion, ataxia, abnormal muscle movements and leg pain. Laboratory investigations were consistent with SIADH and revealed a sodium level of 115 mmol/L. Brain MRI showed a leptomeningeal enhancement in the superior cerebellar sulci suspicious for infection. Lumbar puncture was performed and consistent with Cryptococcus neoformans infection; therefore, cryptococcal meningitis was diagnosed. Amphotericin B was started for the patient for six weeks followed by fluconazole for one year. His level of consciousness improved significantly, and his serum sodium level slowly returned to its normal baseline over three weeks after starting amphotericin B. Conclusions: Symptomatic hyponatremia secondary to SIADH remains a rare complication of cryptococcal meningitis. PMID:26504469

  7. Prevalence of Hyponatremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients With Brain Injury in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti Hospital in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chitsazian, Zahra; Zamani, Batool; Mohagheghfar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common disorder in patients with brain injury. It can result in acute and chronic complications providing this electrolytic disorder is not diagnosed and treated in due time. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hyponatremia in 95 brain injury patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) in Kashan Shahid-Veheshti hospital. Patients and Methods This trans-sectional study was conducted on brain injury patients (brain traumas, brain hemorrhage, meningitis and brain tumors) during their six-month stay in the ICU in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital. Data were analyzed after excluding cases of pseudohyponatremia. Results Ninety-five patients with brain injury (69.5% male and 30.5% female ( had a mean age of 42.85 ± 22.59 years, while the hyponatremic patients had a mean age of 48.37 ± 24.03 years. Prevalence and occurrence of hyponatremia were 31.6% and 9.29 ± 6.8 days, respectively. This study revealed no meaningful differences between age, sex, underlying disease and the prevalence of hyponatremia. Conclusions Our study showed an elevated frequency of hyponatremia in patients with brain injuries in ICU which demands the effective approaches for an accurate and timely diagnosis of this electrolyte disorder. PMID:24396801

  8. Symptomatic myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Borg, M

    2006-01-01

    A huge number of neurological disorders are associated with myoclonus. This paper describes these disorders whose diagnosis partly relies on the presence of myoclonus. The diagnostic approach is related to certain clinical features of myoclonus, which, after their integration in the clinical context, help orientate towards diagnosis. Myoclonus is frequent during dementia. Although its presence is well-known to take part in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), myoclonus can also be present to a significant degree in Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia (LBD), which raises a diagnostic issue. Both its clinical and electrophysiological features may help differential diagnosis, given that myoclonus with fast-evolving dementia and focal neurological signs should favor the diagnosis of CJD. Myoclonus in a context of progressive ataxia suggests one clinical form of the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome (progressive myoclonic ataxia, PMA), whose most frequent causes are: coeliac disease, mitochondriopathies, some spino-cerebellar degenerations, and some late metabolic disorders. In addition to ataxia and myoclonus, the presence of opsoclonus directs diagnosis toward the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS), whose origin, in adult, is idiopathic or paraneoplastic. Palatal tremor (myoclonus) with ataxia may represent either a sporadic pattern, which often reflects the evolution of degenerative or lesional disorders, or a familial pattern in some degenerative affections or metabolic diseases. Of more recent knowledge is the association of progressive ataxia, myoclonus, and renal failure, which corresponds to a recessive autosomic disease. In a context of encephalopathy, myoclonus is frequent in metabolic or hydro-electrolytic disorders, and in brain anoxia. One should distinguish these various forms of myoclonus which may occur in the acute post-anoxic phase, from those occurring as sequels at a later stage, i.e. the Lance and Adams syndrome whose clinical aspects are

  9. Neurological counterparts of hyponatremia: pathological mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Faravelli, Irene; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Oldani, Silvia; Fedeli, Carlo; Graziani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mEq/L, represents the most frequent electrolyte disorder in older hospitalized patients. Early recognition of hyponatremia is mandatory, since it represents an independent risk factor that increases hospital mortality by 40 %. Delayed correction of hyponatremia may worsen brain edema, resulting in different degrees of neural damage. However, an overly rapid correction of serum sodium levels can lead to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), a dreadful neurological picture. In recent years, hyponatremia and ODS have received growing attention both in terms of clinical management and pathophysiology, leading to the discovery of new drugs and treatment algorithms. In this review, we recapitulate the pathogenetic background, clinical manifestations, and treatment guidelines of hyponatremia, focusing on the neurological alterations. Neurological symptoms may be neglected when they manifest as early signs of mild hyponatremia, while brain damage can irremediably affect patients' conditions in the context of ODS.

  10. Beer Potomania--An Unusual Cause of Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kujubu, Dean A; Khosraviani, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    The first case of severe hyponatremia, since referred to as beer potomania, in a heavy beer drinker patient was reported in 1972. Excessive consumption of beer in particular, which has a low solute content, may result in severe hyponatremia. We report a case of severe hyponatremia that occurred in a patient who, owing to his underlying colon cancer, was drinking beer and ingesting little food.

  11. Beer Potomania--An Unusual Cause of Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kujubu, Dean A; Khosraviani, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    The first case of severe hyponatremia, since referred to as beer potomania, in a heavy beer drinker patient was reported in 1972. Excessive consumption of beer in particular, which has a low solute content, may result in severe hyponatremia. We report a case of severe hyponatremia that occurred in a patient who, owing to his underlying colon cancer, was drinking beer and ingesting little food. PMID:26176571

  12. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jaime Robenolt; Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Zimmerman, Lisa Hall; Rhoney, Denise H

    2014-11-20

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8-25) vs. 6 (3-9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population.

  13. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Robenolt Gray, Jaime; Morbitzer, Kathryn A.; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Rhoney, Denise H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8–25) vs. 6 (3–9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population. PMID:26237605

  14. Hyponatremia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Il Shin, Jae; Park, Se Jin; Suh, Chang-Hee; Lee, Geum Hwa; Hur, Min Woo; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether decreased serum sodium concentration could be associated with the disease activity in SLE. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the two independent cohorts of children and adults with SLE in two centers. Hyponatremia was associated with serum chloride (p = 0.004), albumin (p = 0.002) and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (p = 0.026) in children with SLE. Serum sodium levels were correlated negatively with ESR (p =0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (p < 0.0001) and C3 (p = 0.008) in children with SLE and those levels were correlated negatively with serum interleukin-6 levels (p = 0.003) in adults with SLE. Independent risk factors for the development of hyponatremia were the decreased serum C3 levels (OR 1.069, p = 0.031), the decreased serum chloride levels (OR 2.054, p = 0.006) and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (OR 1.066, p = 0.03) in children with SLE and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.480, p = 0.023) in combined cohorts with SLE by multiple logistic regression analyses. Our study firstly showed that hyponatremia could reflect a disease activity and severe inflammation of SLE. PMID:27193532

  15. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  16. Hyponatremia with intracranial malignant tumor resection in children

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cydni; Simon, Tamara D.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Object Intracranial neoplasms are the second most common childhood cancer, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hyponatremia is a complication associated with neurosurgical procedures, but children undergoing intracranial tumor resection have not been selectively studied. In this study, the authors aimed to determine the incidence and risk factors associated with hyponatremia among children undergoing intracranial neoplasm resection. Methods A retrospective cohort was compiled using the 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database to identify children younger than 21 years of age who underwent intracranial neoplasm resection. Hyponatremia was ascertained by diagnosis codes. Bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Logistic regression models were developed to evaluate factors associated with hyponatremia in bivariate analyses. Results Hyponatremia occurred in 205 (8.7%) of 2343 annual weighted cases, and was independently associated with tumor location in the deep brain structures and ventricles compared with the cortical area (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.4; 95% CI 1.17–5.3). Hyponatremia was also associated with obstructive hydrocephalus (aOR 2.7; 95% CI 1.7–4.3) and emergency department admission (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.4). Hyponatremia was significantly associated with mechanical ventilation, ventriculostomy placement, ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and sepsis. Hyponatremia was also associated with a significantly longer average length of stay (24.6 vs 10.2 days), higher average charges ($191,000 vs $92,000), and a higher percentage of discharges to intermediate-care facilities. Conclusions Hyponatremia commonly occurs with resection of intracranial malignant tumors, especially for lesions located in the deep brain and in patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. Hyponatremia was associated with higher morbidity. Further research is needed to develop targeted monitoring and intervention strategies to decrease

  17. Clinical and Predictive Significance of Hyponatremia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Vrsajkov, Vladimir; Javanović, Gordana; Stanisavljević, Snežana; Uvelin, Arsen; Vrsajkov, Jelena Panti

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Hyponatremia after SAH was the object of several studies with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to determine a predictive correlation of hyponatremia with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor clinical outcome. Material and Methods: We have used a retrospective hospital chart review of 82 patients with SAH treated from August 2008 to August 2010. Patients were divided into hyponatremia and normonatremia groups. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/l. Information compared and analyzed included demographics, preoperative neurological status, aneurysm characteristics, postoperative intensive care, duration of stay, DCI and clinical outcome at hospital discharge. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Thirty-two patients with SAH (39%) developed hyponatremia. In that group we had a significantly higher WFNS score at admission (p=0.03) and longer duration of stay in intensive care (p=0.001). DCI with transit or definitive deficit included 20 patients (62%) in the hyponatremia group, and 19 patients (38%) in the normonatremia group (p=0.03). Binary enter logistic regression revealed a significant correlation of hyponatremia with DCI (p=0.03) and poor clinical outcome (p=0.001). Conclusion: This result revealed a possible use of hyponatremia as an additional predictor of developing DCI and poor clinical outcome. PMID:25207008

  18. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  19. Prevalence of hyponatremia and association with mortality: Results from NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Sumit; Gu, Sue; Parikh, Amay; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients and is associated with adverse outcomes, but its prevalence and significance in the general U.S. population is unknown. Our aims were to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia and its association with mortality in the population. Methods We performed a population-based cross-sectional study of 14,697 adults aged ≥ 18 years who participated in the nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 1999 – 2004. Using measurements of serum sodium corrected for dilutional effect of hyperglycemia, we determined the association of hyponatremia with patient characteristics, comorbidities, and prescription medications, and performed unadjusted and adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression to find the association of hyponatremia with all-cause mortality. Results We provide the first estimate of the prevalence of hyponatremia in the U.S. population, which in our weighted analysis was 1.72%. Prevalence of hyponatremia was significantly higher in females (2.09%, p=0.004) and increased with age. Hyponatremia was more common in subjects with hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, and psychiatric disorders, and less common with those with no comorbidities (1.04%, p<0.001). There was a significant risk of death associated with hyponatremia in unadjusted (HR 3.61, p<0.001) and adjusted Cox models controlling for demographics, smoking, comorbidities and insurance status (HR 2.43, p<0.001). There was a U-shaped relationship between serum sodium and hazard ratio for mortality. Conclusions Our findings suggest that hyponatremia is a predictor of mortality in the general population independent of age, gender, and comorbid conditions. PMID:24262726

  20. Life-threatening hyponatremia due to cessation of L-thyroxine.

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ramazan; Sevinc, Alper

    2003-01-01

    Electrolyte disorders in hypothyroidism are frequently subtle and rarely observed in clinical practice. A 50-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of nausea, weakness, and lethargy. Her medical history revealed total thyroidectomy two years earlier. She was commenced on L-thyroxine after the surgery. However, the patient stopped the treatment for three months. Thyroid function tests showed free T3 0.80 pg/ml (n: 1.8-4.2), free T4 <0.20 ng/dl (n: 0.8-1.9), TSH 56.84 microU/ml (n: 0.4-4.0). Her biochemical and laboratory investigations were normal, except for a plasma sodium value of 114 mmol/L (n: 135-145). Hypertonic saline treatment with L-thyroxine was immediately started. Symptomatic hyponatremia caused by hypothyroidism was the direct consequence of cessation of L-thyroxine treatment. The patient was followed up for a year and still using L-thyroxine (0.1 mg). In conclusion, it should be kept in mind that life-threatening hyponatremia may occur in patients with total thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism; L-thyroxine should be immediately started if stopped for any reason. PMID:14620714

  1. Dilutional Hyponatremia during Hysteroscpic Surgery: Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ling; Zhang, Yu-Guan; Wang, Jin; Gong, Ya-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Dilutional hyponatremia caused by excess absorption of hypo-osmotic irrigation fluids is one of the severe complications during hysteroscopic surgery. Appropriate delivery system and distending media,proper distending pressure,and reducing destruction of uterine venous sinus may remarkably lower the morbidity. Meanwhile,early detection and timely treatment of moderate and severe hyponatremia to avoid the occurrence of secondary nervous system demyelination are particularly important during the surgery. This review summarizes the risk factors and the prevention and treatment strategies of dilutional hyponatremia during hysteroscopic surgery. PMID:27594163

  2. Miliary tuberculosis presenting with hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D. W.; Donevan, R. E.; Copland, G. M.; Ibbott, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis had moderately severe hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and very severe thrombocytopenia without other hematologic abnormalities. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, prednisone, vincristine and fluid restriction and recovered completely. The SIADH may have been a response by the posterior pituitary to a decrease in intravascular volume resulting from the extensive pulmonary disease or associated hypoxia, or the tuberculous lung may have released ADH or an ADH-like substance. The thrombocytopenia may have resulted from a direct or indirect toxic effect of infection or, less likely, the tuberculosis may have activated latent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:991033

  3. The incidence of hyponatremia in prolonged exercise activity.

    PubMed

    Toy, B J

    1992-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a medical condition characterized by decreased concentration of sodium in the blood, which may occur in participants in endurance and ultraendurance athletic events. Slower competitors and nonacclimatized individuals appear to be at greater risk of becoming hyponatremic, especially if they experience salt depletion as a result of sweating or water intoxication. Clinical signs and symptoms of hyponatremia, which can range from muscle cramps and mental confusion to convulsions and coma, may not manifest themselves until well after the end of the event. Death may occur if hyponatremia is not properly diagnosed and treated. Medical personnel treating this condition should be cautious not to confuse water intoxication with dehydration, which produces similar symptoms. To prevent hyponatremia, participants should acclimatize themselves to race conditions prior to the event. In addition, endurance athletes should be encouraged to ingest low sodium concentrate drinks during events lasting longer than 4 hours.

  4. [Severe Hyponatremia after Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy : Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Mari; Hattori, Yusuke; Kumano, Yohei; Maeda, Yoko; Kondo, Takuya; Mochizuki, Taku; Kawahara, Takashi; Teranishi, Jun-Ichi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yumura, Yasushi; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-07-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the common electrolyte disorders associated with cisplatin (CDDP) administration. We report here two cases of hyponatremia associated with CDDP. Case 1 : A 75-year-old man with urothelial carcinoma of bladder (cT3N1M0) underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CDDP and gemcitabine. He lost consciousness on the eighth day after the chemotherapy. Blood tests showed severe hyponatremia (Na 113 mEq/l), low plasma osmolality and high level of plasma vasopressin. Urine tests showed low osmolality. These findings were consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion (SIADH). His consciousness level was improved after saline infusion and fluid restriction. Case 2 : A 54-year-old man with penile cancer (cT3N2M0) underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CDDP, paclitaxel and fluorouracil. He lost consciousness on the seventh day after the chemotherapy. Blood tests showed hyponatremia(Na 121 mEq/l) with renal dysfunction. We concluded that the hyponatremia is due to the renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS) based on renal dysfunction and high urinary sodium excretion. His consciousness level was improved after saline infusion. Although it is difficult to distinguish between SIADH and RSWS, correct evaluation is necessary for appropriate management of hyponatremia after CDDP administration. PMID:27569354

  5. Oral tolvaptan is safe and effective in chronic hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Berl, Tomas; Quittnat-Pelletier, Friederike; Verbalis, Joseph G; Schrier, Robert W; Bichet, Daniel G; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S

    2010-04-01

    Vasopressin antagonists increase the serum sodium concentration in patients who have euvolemia and hypervolemia with hyponatremia in the short term (Hyponatremia (SALT-1 and SALT-2). In total, 111 patients with hyponatremia received oral tolvaptan for a mean follow-up of 701 days, providing 77,369 patient-days of exposure. All patients had hyponatremia at randomization in SALT-1 and SALT-2, and 85% continued to have hyponatremia at entry in SALTWATER. The most common adverse effects attributed to tolvaptan were pollakiuria, thirst, fatigue, dry mouth, polydipsia, and polyuria. Six drug-related adverse effects led to study discontinuation. The increase in serum sodium exceeded the desired 1 mmol/L per h at initiation in five patients. Hypernatremia (>145 mmol/L) led to discontinuation in one patient. Mean serum sodium increased from 130.8 mmol/L at baseline to >135 mmol/L throughout the observation period (P < 0.001 versus baseline at most points). Responses were comparable between patients with euvolemia and those with heart failure but more modest in patients with cirrhosis. In conclusion, prolonged administration of tolvaptan maintains an increased serum sodium with an acceptable margin of safety.

  6. Oral Tolvaptan Is Safe and Effective in Chronic Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Quittnat-Pelletier, Friederike; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Schrier, Robert W.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S.

    2010-01-01

    Vasopressin antagonists increase the serum sodium concentration in patients who have euvolemia and hypervolemia with hyponatremia in the short term (≤30 days), but their safety and efficacy with longer term administration is unknown. SALTWATER was a multicenter, open-label extension of the Study of Ascending Levels of Tolvaptan in Hyponatremia (SALT-1 and SALT-2). In total, 111 patients with hyponatremia received oral tolvaptan for a mean follow-up of 701 days, providing 77,369 patient-days of exposure. All patients had hyponatremia at randomization in SALT-1 and SALT-2, and 85% continued to have hyponatremia at entry in SALTWATER. The most common adverse effects attributed to tolvaptan were pollakiuria, thirst, fatigue, dry mouth, polydipsia, and polyuria. Six drug-related adverse effects led to study discontinuation. The increase in serum sodium exceeded the desired 1 mmol/L per h at initiation in five patients. Hypernatremia (>145 mmol/L) led to discontinuation in one patient. Mean serum sodium increased from 130.8 mmol/L at baseline to >135 mmol/L throughout the observation period (P < 0.001 versus baseline at most points). Responses were comparable between patients with euvolemia and those with heart failure but more modest in patients with cirrhosis. In conclusion, prolonged administration of tolvaptan maintains an increased serum sodium with an acceptable margin of safety. PMID:20185637

  7. Hyponatremia Due to Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Review of 200 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah; Izadi, Morteza; Sarrafzadeh, Farhad; Heidari, Amir; Ranjbar, Reza; Saburi, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) is one of the common diseases with high prevalence of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Various complications have been reported along with PTB. The subclinical electrolyte imbalances are customary in cases with PTB. Objectives The aim of this study was the evaluation of patients with PTB and hyponatremia. Patients and Methods We evaluated patients with diagnosis of secondary PTB who have been admitted to Baqiyatallah hospital, Tehran, Iran from 2005 till 2010. The diagnosis of PTB was based on the appearance of acid fast bacilli in sputum smears or sputum cultures, without any evidence of miliary TB. Demographic and laboratory characteristics relative to electrolytes were recorded according inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results The mean age was 59.22 ± 20.57 years and 91 (45.5%) patients were male. The mean serum sodium concentration was 134.54 ± 4.95 mmol/L and more than half of subjects (51%) have shown hyponatremia. The mean age difference between hyponatremic and eunatremic groups was statistically significant (61.95 versus 56.02 years) (P = 0.047). No significant relationship was found between hyponatremia and gender, anti-TB medications and co-morbidity conditions. Conclusions In this study, an older age was suggested as an important predisposing factor for hyponatremia in patients with PTB which had been observed as less of a determinant. We recommend further evaluations for hyponatremia in patients presenting with PTB, particularly for those who are older. PMID:23577332

  8. [Hyponatremia and syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)].

    PubMed

    Peri, Alessandro; Parenti, Gabriele; Giuliani, Anna; Scrivano, Jacopo; Pettorini, Laura; Festuccia, Francescaromana; Pirozzi, Nicola; Mene', Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), also termed ''syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD)'', is an often unrecognized cause of hypotonic hyponatremia, arising from ectopic release of ADH in lung cancer or as a side effect of various drugs. In SIADH, hyponatremia results from selectively impaired water excretion by the kidney, whereas the external Na+ balance is normally regulated. Despite the increase in total body water, only a slight reduction of urine output and modest edema are usually seen. Renal function and acid-base balance are generally preserved, while subclinical neurological impairment may occasionally become life-threatening, when hyponatremia has an abrupt onset. The major clinical variants of SIADH are reviewed here, with particular emphasis on causes, iatrogenic complications and hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Effective treatment of SIADH is based on water restriction, hypertonic saline plus loop diuretics, or aquaretics. Worsening of hyponatremia may result from parenteral isotonic fluid administration, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis and careful follow-up of these patients.

  9. Treatment of Severe Hypervolemic Hyponatremia in a Child With Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Teresa; Tenconi, Rossana; Bertolozzi, Giuseppe; Laicini, Emanuela Anna; Tardini, Giacomo; Vianello, Federica; Leva, Ernesto; Milani, Gregorio Paolo; Fossali, Emilio Filippo

    2016-06-01

    A 21-month-old boy came to our attention because of pneumonia. His weight increased before presentation, and his blood test results showed hyponatremia (116 mEq/L), low plasma osmolarity (241 mOsm/L), and high urine osmolarity (435 mOsm/L). He was treated with 0.9% sodium chloride solution and intravenous furosemide, and sodium levels rose up to 135 mEq/L in 36 hours. No standard treatment is available for severe hyponatremia in children. The use of vaptans in pediatric patients is described in literature, but it lacks evidence about safety and effectiveness. We suggest that furosemide administration plus salt replacement is effective in restoring normal values of plasma sodium concentration in severe euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. PMID:27253356

  10. Management of Severe Rhabdomyolysis and Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia in a Female with Anorexia Nervosa and Excessive Compulsive Exercising

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the management of a 49-year-old female with restricting-type anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising associated with rhabdomyolysis, high levels of serum creatine kinase (CK) (3,238 U/L), and marked hyponatremia (Na+: 123 mEq/L) in the absence of purging behaviours or psychogenic polydipsia; it is the first case report to describe exercise-associated hyponatremia in a patient with anorexia nervosa. The patient, who presented with a body mass index (BMI) of 13.4 kg/m2, was successfully treated by means of an adapted inpatient version of an enhanced form of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-E). Within a few days, careful water restriction, solute refeeding, and the specific cognitive behavioural strategies and procedures used to address the patient's excessive compulsive exercising and undereating produced a marked reduction in CK levels, which normalised within one week. Exercise-associated hyponatremia also gradually improved, with serum sodium levels returning to normal within two weeks. The patient thereby avoided severe complications such as cerebral or pulmonary oedema or acute renal failure and was discharged after 20 weeks of treatment with a BMI of 19.0 kg/m2 and improved eating disorder psychopathology. PMID:27721832

  11. Hyponatremia after Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal in a Patient with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyo Jin; Shin, Dong Hyun; Kim, Mi Jeoung; Lee, Sang Jin; Jeon, Dong Ok; Im, Sung Gyu; Jang, Sun Kyung; Choi, Jin Young

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is an electrolyte abnormality commonly found in clinical practice. It is important to diagnose the underlying etiology of the hyponatremia and correct it appropriately because severe hyponatremia can cause serious complications and substantially increase the risk of mortality. Although hypothyroidism is known to be a cause of hyponatremia, it is rare that hyponatremia occurs in relation to hypothyroidism induced by thyroid hormone withdrawal in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We report a case of a 76-year-old woman with papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting with severe hyponatremia related to hypothyroidism induced by thyroid hormone withdrawal for radio-active iodine whole-body scanning, who was treated by thyroid hormone replacement and hydration. Considering that the incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer is rapidly increasing, physicians should be aware that, although uncommon, hyponatremia can occur in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy or diagnostic testing. PMID:24741458

  12. Conivaptan: a step forward in the treatment of hyponatremia?

    PubMed Central

    Hline, Su Su; Pham, Phuong-Truc T; Pham, Phuong-Thu T; Aung, May H; Pham, Phuong-Mai T; Pham, Phuong-Chi T

    2008-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities linked to adverse outcomes and increased mortality in hospitalized patients. While the differential diagnosis for hyponatremia is diverse, most cases stem from arginine vasopressin (AVP) dysregulation, where hypoosmolality fails to suppress AVP synthesis and release. The physiological effects of AVP are currently known to depend on its interaction with any of 3 receptor subtypes V1A, V2, and V1B. Activation of V2 by AVP is the key in renal water regulation and maintenance of total body volume and plasma tonicity. Despite the long-recognized problem with excess AVP in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, traditional therapeutic options have relied on nonspecific and potentially problematic strategies. More recently, a new class of drugs, introduced as “aquaretics,” has gained great attention among clinicians because of its ability to correct hyponatremia via direct competitive inhibition of AVP at V2 receptors to induce renal electrolyte-free water excretion. In this paper, we aim to review available clinical data on the only FDA-approved aquaretic, dual V1A/V2 receptor antagonist conivaptan, discuss its clinical indications, efficacy, safety profile, and comment on its clinical limitations. PMID:18728836

  13. Seizures and hyponatremia after excessive intake of diet coke.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Van Loo, Michel; De Cauwer, Harald G; Merlevede, Karen

    2008-02-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures after a massive intake of diet coke. Apart from the hyponatremia due to water intoxication the convulsions can be potentiated by the high dose of caffeine and aspartame from the diet coke. To our knowledge this is the first report of seizures due to excessive diet coke intake.

  14. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia. A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data. The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54–13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69–0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25–26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia. Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  15. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia.A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data.The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54-13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69-0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25-26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia.Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  16. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  17. Symptomatic cervicogenic headache.

    PubMed

    Delfini, R; Salvati, M; Passacantilli, E; Pacciani, E

    2000-01-01

    Cervicogenic headache is a little-known clinical condition whose true importance has only recently been recognized. A number of causes may lie at the basis of the onset of headache (symptomatic cervicogenic headache). However, despite exhaustive attempts, sometimes it is not possible to identify a clear cause responsible for the onset of the syndrome (primitive cervicogenic headache). The genesis of symptomatic cervicogenic headaches sometimes may be easy to identify as a result of a close, pre-existing, cause-effect relationship (i.e. trauma). On other occasions it may be much more laborious to pinpoint the pathology responsible for headache (some cranio-cervical anomalies, etc.). Clinically, it is necessary to perform a thorough preliminary clinical and anamnestic evaluation which can orient subsequent investigations to achieve a diagnosis in the least time possible with the minimum discomfort to the patient and his relatives, not to mention lower costs for society. PMID:10824284

  18. Duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Miyu; Koide, Tetsuro; Imanishi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Yuriyo; Matsuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a known adverse effect of duloxetine, and it can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Administration of thiazide diuretics also has been the cause of hyponatremia. We report a case of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics. An 86-year-old woman treated with the trichlormethiazide was admitted for vertebral compression fracture with disorientation and nausea on the 6th day of treatment with duloxetine. Laboratory findings revealed hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, concentrated urine, and increased urine sodium. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone was considered, therefore, duloxetine, and trichlormethiazide was discontinued and treated with fluid restriction, furosemide and sodium chloride administered orally. Disorientation and nausea were improved after correction of hyponatremia. Health care practitioners should be aware of the possibility of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia, particularly in patients treated with thiazide diuretics. PMID:25538343

  19. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  1. Thiazide–associated hyponatremia in the elderly: what the clinician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-induced hyponatremia is one of the main causes of decreased sodium levels in elderly individuals. This review presents the current evidence regarding the thiazide-associated hyponatremia. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia is observed mainly in patients with certain risk factors such as those receiving large doses of thiazides, having much comorbidity, such as heart failure, liver disease or malignancy, and taking several medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants. Sodium concentration should be monitored in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia and clinicians should measure promptly serum sodium levels in patients with neurologic signs indicating reduced sodium levels. The clinical and biochemical profile of patients with thiazide-associated hyponatremia may be that of extracellular volume depletion or the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). The investigation of possible thiazide-associated hyponatremia includes the exclusion of other causes of decreased sodium levels and the identification of the characteristics of hyponatremia due to thiazides (extracellular volume depletion-related or SIADH-like). Treatment should be carefully monitored to avoid serious neurologic complications due to overcorrection. Clinicians should discourage prescribing thiazides in patients with a history of diuretic-associated hyponatremia and should prefer low doses of thiazides in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia. PMID:27168745

  2. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia in the elderly: what the clinician needs to know.

    PubMed

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-02-01

    Thiazide-induced hyponatremia is one of the main causes of decreased sodium levels in elderly individuals. This review presents the current evidence regarding the thiazide-associated hyponatremia. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia is observed mainly in patients with certain risk factors such as those receiving large doses of thiazides, having much comorbidity, such as heart failure, liver disease or malignancy, and taking several medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants. Sodium concentration should be monitored in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia and clinicians should measure promptly serum sodium levels in patients with neurologic signs indicating reduced sodium levels. The clinical and biochemical profile of patients with thiazide-associated hyponatremia may be that of extracellular volume depletion or the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). The investigation of possible thiazide-associated hyponatremia includes the exclusion of other causes of decreased sodium levels and the identification of the characteristics of hyponatremia due to thiazides (extracellular volume depletion-related or SIADH-like). Treatment should be carefully monitored to avoid serious neurologic complications due to overcorrection. Clinicians should discourage prescribing thiazides in patients with a history of diuretic-associated hyponatremia and should prefer low doses of thiazides in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia. PMID:27168745

  3. Chronic Severe Hyponatremia and Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Avoiding Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canaday, Susan; Rompala, John; Rowles, John; Fisher, Josh; Holt, David

    2015-12-01

    Serum sodium concentration affects every cell in the body with respect to cellular tonicity. Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered, occurring at clinical admission in 22% of elderly patients. Any rapid correction of chronic severe hyponatremia can result in rapid cellular shrinking due to loss of intracellular free water. This is commonly associated with paralysis and severe brain damage due to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS). ODS occurs because the body has the ability to compensate for cellular fluid shifts due to chronic hyponatremia (by a decrease in brain concentration of several ions, amino acids, and organic osmolytes). Thus, the neurons are often at a functional state of fluid balance despite the sodium imbalance. The initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can introduce between 1 and 2 L of priming solution containing a normal sodium concentration creating a rapid rise in sodium concentration within the extracellular fluid. This abrupt change establishes a situation where intracellular free water can be lost resulting in cellular shrinking and ODS. In presenting this case study, we hope to add to the current literature with a specific isotonic approach to treating the chronically severe hyponatremic patient pre-CPB, during CPB, and post-CPB. PMID:26834285

  4. The "ecstasy" hangover: hyponatremia due to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stephen J; Hoffman, Robert S; Nelson, Lewis S

    2002-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or "ecstasy") has gained an undeserved reputation as a "safe" drug among its users. However, hyperthermia, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, disseminated intravascular coagulation, long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity, and death are all associated with MDMA use. Hyponatremia is also reported, and its manifestations are frequently delayed several hours after the drug is ingested. The etiology of this hyponatremia is unclear; both the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone release (SIADH) and free-water intoxication are advanced as explanations. We describe a 19-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with altered mental status 1 day after using MDMA. Her initial serum sodium was 121 mmol/L, and computerized tomography (CT) of her head demonstrated cerebral edema. She was treated with hypertonic saline and fluid restriction, and her serum sodium increased to 132 mmol/L over the next 24 hours. She regained consciousness completely within 48 hours of presentation and recovered uneventfully. MDMA toxicity, particularly the pathophysiology and treatment of MDMA-induced hyponatremia, are discussed.

  5. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia: a Danish register-based population study

    PubMed Central

    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Torstensson, Maia; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Ødum, Lars; Gislasson, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Holm, Ellen Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between classes of antidepressants and hyponatremia, and between specific antidepressants and hyponatremia. Design Retrospective register-based cohort study using nationwide registers from 1998 to 2012. Setting The North Denmark Region. Participants In total, 638 352 individuals were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Plasma sodium was obtained from the LABKA database. The primary outcome was hyponatremia defined as plasma sodium (p-sodium) below 135 mmol/L and secondary outcome was severe hyponatremia defined as p-sodium below 130 mmol/L. The association between use of specific antidepressants and hyponatremia was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models. Results An event of hyponatremia occurred in 72 509 individuals and 11.36% (n=6476) of these events happened during treatment with antidepressants. Incidence rate ratios and CIs for the association with hyponatremia in the first p-sodium measured after initiation of treatment were for citalopram 7.8 (CI 7.42 to 8.20); clomipramine 4.93 (CI 2.72 to 8.94); duloxetine 2.05 (CI 1.44 to 292); venlafaxine 2.90 (CI 2.43 to 3.46); mirtazapine 2.95 (CI 2.71 to 3.21); and mianserin 0.90 (CI 0.71 to 1.14). Conclusions All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine. PMID:27194321

  6. Bupropion Induced Hyponatremia in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Smolin, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year-old female with a major depressive episode who developed hyponatremia associated with bupropion. In reviewing the literature, there are only a few case reports which pertain to this topic. The clinical symptoms of hyponatremia can be misinterpreted as a worsening of the primary psychiatric illness and can lead to potentially serious consequences if not fully evaluated. We recommend that clinicians should be well aware of this side effect and that sodium levels should be checked within the first 2 weeks after initiating treatment in patients, especially those with additional risk factors for hyponatremia, such as older age, female sex, diuretic use, low BMI, and unexplained mental status changes at any time during treatment with antidepressants. The risk for hyponatremia associated with mirtazapine appears to be low and its use can be helpful in patients who have developed hyponatremia induced by other antidepressants and who experienced symptoms of weight loss and insomnia. PMID:27433364

  7. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients. PMID:21998605

  8. Orthorexia Nervosa with Hyponatremia, Subcutaneous Emphysema, Pneumomediastimum, Pneumothorax, and Pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung

    2011-01-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients. PMID:21998605

  9. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients.

  10. A case of losartan-induced severe hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Das, Saibal; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjib; Ramasamy, Anand; Prabhu, V Vinoth; Pachiappan, Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of losartan-induced severe hyponatremia in a 73-year-old type 2 diabetic patient. The patient was initiated with 50 mg daily oral losartan monotherapy for newly diagnosed moderate hypertension. After 3.5 months of taking the drug, he presented to the emergency department in a drowsy state with severe generalized weakness and occasional palpitations. He was a known diabetic for the last 3 years and well controlled by oral metformin alone. On examination, his serum sodium level was found to be 123 meq/L. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition, except losartan itself. De-challenge was done and he was treated vigorously resulting in reversal of the diseased state. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was "probable" that oral losartan was responsible for the development of severe hyponatremia in this patient. PMID:26816476

  11. Mild hyponatremia is associated with an increased risk of death in an ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Gankam-Kengne, Fabrice; Ayers, Colby; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James; Maalouf, Naim M

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is a common disorder associated with higher mortality in hospitalized patients, but its impact in an ambulatory setting remains unclear. Here we used data from the Dallas Heart Study, a prospective multiethnic cohort study that included ambulatory individuals, to determine the prevalence and determinants of hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mEq/l), and its impact on mortality. The analysis included 3551 individuals with a median age of 43 years followed up over a median of 8.4 years. The sample weight-adjusted prevalence of hyponatremia was 6.9%. Hyponatremia was mild (median serum sodium: 133 mEq/l), and was significantly associated with age, black ethnicity, presence of cirrhosis or congestive heart failure, and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. By the end of the follow-up period, there were 202 deaths including 29 in hyponatremic individuals. The unadjusted hazard ratio for hyponatremia and death was 1.94. Hyponatremia remained significantly associated with mortality after adjustment for age, gender, ethnicity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol use, renal function, plasma C-reactive protein, use of antiepileptic drugs and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and history of congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, and cancer (hazard ratio of 1.75). Thus, mild hyponatremia is associated with an increased risk of death in a young and ethnically diverse community population. PMID:23325088

  12. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Maesaka, John K; Imbriano, Louis; Mattana, Joseph; Gallagher, Dympna; Bade, Naveen; Sharif, Sairah

    2014-12-08

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW), and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate) in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio.

  13. Differentiating SIADH from Cerebral/Renal Salt Wasting: Failure of the Volume Approach and Need for a New Approach to Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Maesaka, John K.; Imbriano, Louis; Mattana, Joseph; Gallagher, Dympna; Bade, Naveen; Sharif, Sairah

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality. Its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are in a state of flux. It is evident that hyponatremic patients are symptomatic with a potential for serious consequences at sodium levels that were once considered trivial. The recommendation to treat virtually all hyponatremics exposes the need to resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma of deciding whether to water restrict a patient with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or administer salt and water to a renal salt waster. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of SIADH and renal salt wasting (RSW), and the difficulty in differentiating SIADH from RSW, and review the origin of the perceived rarity of RSW, as well as the value of determining fractional excretion of urate (FEurate) in differentiating both syndromes, the high prevalence of RSW which highlights the inadequacy of the volume approach to hyponatremia, the importance of changing cerebral salt wasting to RSW, and the proposal to eliminate reset osmostat as a subtype of SIADH, and finally propose a new algorithm to replace the outmoded volume approach by highlighting FEurate. This algorithm eliminates the need to assess the volume status with less reliance on determining urine sodium concentration, plasma renin, aldosterone and atrial/brain natriuretic peptide or the BUN to creatinine ratio. PMID:26237607

  14. Hyponatremia due to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. Combined cerebral and distal tubular lesion.

    PubMed

    Al-Mufti, H; Arieff, A I

    1984-10-01

    A 76-year-old white man was evaluated for a syndrome of hyponatremia, hypotension, and high urinary sodium excretion. There was evidence of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and renal salt wasting in the presence of a normal glomerular filtration rate. He had a distal tubular acidification defect and unresponsiveness to standard doses of mineralocorticoids. The renin aldosterone axis was normal, as were thyroid and adrenal function. The patient could not dilute the urine, nor excrete a standard water load. Renal concentrating ability was normal, but there was no additional response to exogenous vasopressin. With modest salt restitution, the patient continued to lose large quantities of sodium in the urine, resulting in severe postural hypotension. Renal biopsy showed normal glomeruli with distinct degeneration of the distal tubules. There was no evidence of an acute inflammatory interstitial nephritis. The patient did not respond to therapeutic doses of mineralocorticoid (fludrocortisone), but treatment with water restriction, increased salt intake, and large doses of mineralocorticoids resulted in a normal serum sodium level and blood pressure. This case falls in the category of "cerebral salt wasting" syndrome. The cause was a combination of idiopathic secretion of antidiuretic hormone and distal tubular degeneration resulting in pseudohypoaldosteronism.

  15. Vaptans: A new option in the management of hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Aditya, Suruchi; Rattan, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays an important role in water and sodium homeostasis. It acts via three receptor subtypes—V1a, V1b, and V2—distributed widely throughout the body. Vaptans are nonpeptide vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRA). By property of aquaresis, VRAs offer a novel therapy of water retention. Conivaptan is a V1a/V2 nonselective VRA approved for euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. Tolvaptan is the first oral VRA. Other potential uses of this new class of drugs include congestive heart failure (CHF), cirrhosis of liver, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, polycystic kidney disease, and so on. These novel drugs score over diuretics as they are not associated with electrolyte abnormalities. Though much remains to be elucidated before the VRAs are applied clinically, the future holds much promise. PMID:23776817

  16. TURP syndrome and severe hyponatremia under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Ismail; Ozer, Ayse B; Bayar, Mustafa K; Erhan, Omer L

    2012-11-19

    Transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) syndrome is a complication characterised by symptoms changing from an asymptomatic hyponatremic state to convulsions, coma and death due to absorption of irrigation fluid during TURP. The syndrome appears to be related to the amount of fluid that enters the circulation via the blood vessels in the resection area. The first step in the course of action for therapy is to control bleeding and suspend the operation. In the case presented, we aimed to emphasise the importance of an early diagnosis and treatment of TURP syndrome in a patient that developed hyponatremia (90 mmol/l) while under general anaesthesia during a TURP procedure. In addition, multiple cystoscopic applications in the same session may facilitate development of the TURP syndrome.

  17. Inappropriate Arginine Vasopressin Levels and Hyponatremia Associated with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Lange, Aksel; Rittig, Soeren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe two children who presented with attacks of severe cyclic vomiting. The primary case was a 2.5-year-old girl with a history of several admissions with vomiting and altered mental status. She was diagnosed with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). During her attacks she developed significant hyponatremia on several occasions, which prompted us to measure plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels during attacks. We found inappropriately high AVP levels with concomitant hyponatremia. We also measured plasma AVP and plasma sodium in another child with CVS who did not develop manifest hyponatremia but showed inappropriately elevated plasma AVP levels. Since the standard treatment of CVS consists of fluids, high plasma AVP levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of close assessment of electrolyte levels in patients with CVS to avoid water intoxication. PMID:25759635

  18. Epidemiology, pathophysiology and putative genetic basis of carbamazepine- and oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, B; de Haan, G-J; van den Broek, M P H; Sander, J W; Lindhout, D; Koeleman, B P C

    2016-09-01

    The use of carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) as first-line antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of focal epilepsy is limited by hyponatremia, a known adverse effect. Hyponatremia occurs in up to half of people taking CBZ or OXC and, although often assumed to be asymptomatic, it can lead to symptoms ranging from unsteadiness and mild confusion to seizures and coma. Hyponatremia is probably due to the antidiuretic properties of CBZ and OXC that are, at least partly, explained by stimulation of the vasopressin 2 receptor/aquaporin 2 pathway. No known genetic risk variants for CBZ- and OXC-induced hyponatremia exist, but likely candidate genes are part of the vasopressin water reabsorption pathway. PMID:27333872

  19. Hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with heart failure: a condition often overlooked in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Gudina, Esayas Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in patients with heart failure (HF). It is independently associated with increased short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. The main objective of this study was to assess patterns of hyponatremia and its association with discharge outcomes in patients with HF admitted to a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Patients and methods This is a descriptive, prospective, hospital-based cohort study of patients with HF admitted to Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia, between November 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, clinical profile at admission, and outcomes at discharge. Plasma sodium concentration was analyzed at admission for all patients. The relationship between hyponatremia at admission and in-hospital mortality, as well as length of hospital stay, was assessed using both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Of 152 participants admitted with HF, 44 (28.9%) had hyponatremia, which is defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/L. Patients on salt restriction, on chronic diuretic treatment (furosemide and spironolactone), and with impaired renal function at admission were found to be highly affected. Hyponatremia was found to be associated with increased in-hospital mortality (P=0.008) and longer hospital stay (16.6 vs 12 days, P<0.001). Patients with hyponatremia also had lower blood pressure and poor functional status at discharge. Conclusion This study demonstrates that hyponatremia is highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with HF and is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer hospital stay. Thus, great emphasis should be given to identify high-risk patients, and prevention and early detection of hyponatremia to prevent its deleterious effects. Large-scale national studies are also needed to complement our

  20. [Difficulties in the differential diagnosis of hyponatremia presenting with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Tamás; Oláh, Roland; Németh, Attila; Winkler, Gábor

    2013-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent eletrolyte imbalance in hospitalized geriatric patient. The accompanying signs and symptoms can run a wide range and, therefore, these patients are usually admitted to various departments, i.e. neurology and/or traumatology first. Directed laboratory investigations demonstrate severe hyponatremia. Differential diagnosis can be very difficult and complex in the clinical settings. Firstly, spurious forms of hyponatremia have to be excluded, then the underlying cause should elucidated based on the patients hydration status and serum osmolarity. Hyponatremia can be divided into hyper-, hypo- and normovolemic forms. Moreover, it can be further classified as hypo-, iso- and hyperosmolar hyponatremias. The differentiation between renal and extrarenal salt wasting forms is hinged on the urine sodium concentration. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is the most common cause of normovolemic, hypoosmolar forms (named also as Schwartz-Bartter syndrome). The authors aimed to shed light on the often insurmountable difficulties of the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this very frequent electrolyte imbalance by presenting a clinical case report. Their purported aim reflects upon the wide array of ethiopathogenesis of hyponatremia: various endocrine, renal diseases, inappropriateness of antidiuretic hormone secretion as well as the role of different medications (e.g. diuretics). This fine-tuned and intricate physiology of sodium metabolism could fortuitously be overturned by these mechanisms. PMID:23895992

  1. Therapeutic Challenges for Symptomatic Portal Cavernoma Cholangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Cavași, Adriana; Mercea, Voicu; Anton, Ofelia; Puia, Ion Cosmin

    2016-09-01

    Although transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are most frequently used for the management of portal hypertension, the surgical approach is preferred for symptomatic portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. We present the case of a 25-year old female patient with a portal cavernoma secondary to catheterization of the umbilical vein at birth. She had had two episodes of esophageal variceal bleeding, successfully treated by endoscopic banding. and an episode of acute cholangitis secondary to portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Endoscopic sphincterotomy and biliary stenting were performed, and were followed by repeated episodes of biliary stent occlusion. The last biliary drainage procedure triggered a massive hemobilia. Since endoscopic therapy was ineffective, a surgical mesocaval shunt with graft interposition and splenectomy was performed with favorable outcome. In selected cases, the mesocaval shunting plays an essential role in the treatment of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy even in the era of interventional radiology. PMID:27689206

  2. Symptomatic fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Freal, J E; Kraft, G H; Coryell, J K

    1984-03-01

    Symptomatic fatigue has not been investigated previously in a multiple sclerosis population. Potential subjects were the 78% of 656 individuals with multiple sclerosis who indicated in a previous study that they experienced symptomatic fatigue. Three hundred nine subjects (60%) returned a follow-up questionnaire on symptomatic fatigue. Ninety percent described fatigue as "tiredness or the need to rest," but 43% of them indicated that "sleepiness" was part of the symptomatology. In 48% fatigue made other MS symptoms worse. Fatigue tended to occur in the late afternoon and evening. It occurred almost daily for more than 66% of the subjects. In 47% of the subjects fatigue usually subsided within a few hours; in other subjects occurrences were of variable length (40%) or lasted between 6 and 24 hours (8%). Ninety percent said that fatigue was worse at warmer environmental temperatures. Fatigue was worse for 83% after "vigorous exercise" and for 64% after "moderate exercise" although 15% reported that moderate exercise helped to reduce fatigue. Meditation, some drugs, and cooling with water reduced fatigue in a majority of the small proportion of the population trying these techniques. A planned daily schedule of activity and rest seemed to be a partially effective response to symptomatic fatigue for the majority of subjects studied.

  3. T-type calcium channels contribute to calcium disturbances in brain during hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Odackal, John; Sherpa, Ang D; Patel, Nisha; Colbourn, Robert; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Disturbance of calcium homeostasis is implicated in the normal process of aging and brain pathology prevalent in the elderly such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies demonstrated that applying a hyponatremic iso-osmotic (low-NaCl) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to rodent hippocampus causes extracellular calcium to rapidly decrease. Restoring normonatremia after low-NaCl treatment causes a rapid increase in extracellular calcium that overshoots baseline. This study examined the amplitude, timing, and mechanism of these surprising calcium changes. We also tested whether hyponatremia increased calcium entry into brain cells or calcium binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS), a negatively charged constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that may be occupied by sodium during normonatremia. We report three major findings. First we show that CS does not contribute to extracellular calcium changes during low-NaCl treatments. Second, we show that the time to minimum extracellular calcium during low-NaCl treatment is significantly shorter than the time to maximum extracellular calcium in recovery from low-NaCl treatment. Third, we show that the decrease in extracellular calcium observed during hyponatremia is attenuated by ML 218, a highly selective T-type calcium channel blocker. Together these data suggest that calcium rapidly enters cells at the onset of low-NaCl treatment and is extruded from cells when normonatremia is restored. Calcium binding to CS does not significantly contribute to calcium changes in brain during hyponatremia. Differences in timing suggest that extracellular calcium changes during and in recovery from hyponatremia occur by distinct mechanisms or by a multistep process. Finally, partial block of extracellular calcium influx by ML 218 suggests that T-type channels are involved in calcium entering cells during hyponatremia. Given the high prevalence of hyponatremia among elderly patients and the

  4. Hyponatremia Is Associated With Increased Osteoporosis and Bone Fractures in a Large US Health System Population

    PubMed Central

    Usala, Rachel L.; Fernandez, Stephen J.; Mete, Mihriye; Cowen, Laura; Shara, Nawar M.; Barsony, Julianna

    2015-01-01

    Context: The significance of studies suggesting an increased risk of bone fragility fractures with hyponatremia through mechanisms of induced bone loss and increased falls has not been demonstrated in large patient populations with different types of hyponatremia. Objective: This matched case-control study evaluated the effect of hyponatremia on osteoporosis and fragility fractures in a patient population of more than 2.9 million. Design, Setting, and Participants: Osteoporosis (n = 30 517) and fragility fracture (n = 46 256) cases from the MedStar Health database were matched on age, sex, race, and patient record length with controls without osteoporosis (n = 30 517) and without fragility fractures (n = 46 256), respectively. Cases without matched controls or serum sodium (Na+) data or with Na+ with a same-day blood glucose greater than 200 mg/dL were excluded. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of diagnosis of osteoporosis and fragility fractures of the upper or lower extremity, pelvis, and vertebrae were the outcome measures. Results: Multivariate conditional logistic regression models demonstrated that hyponatremia was associated with osteoporosis and/or fragility fractures, including chronic [osteoporosis: odds ratio (OR) 3.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.59–4.39; fracture: OR 4.61, 95% CI 4.15–5.11], recent (osteoporosis: OR 3.06, 95% CI 2.81–3.33; fracture: OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.83–3.29), and combined chronic and recent hyponatremia (osteoporosis: OR 12.09, 95% CI 9.34–15.66; fracture: OR 11.21, 95% CI 8.81–14.26). Odds of osteoporosis or fragility fracture increased incrementally with categorical decrease in median serum Na+. Conclusions: These analyses support the hypothesis that hyponatremia is a risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether correction of hyponatremia will improve patient outcomes. PMID:26083821

  5. Use of Desmopressin Acetate in Severe Hyponatremia in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Rafat, Cédric; Schortgen, Frédérique; Gaudry, Stéphane; Bertrand, Fabrice; Miguel-Montanes, Romain; Labbé, Vincent; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Hajage, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Excessive correction of chronic and profound hyponatremia may result in central pontine myelinolysis and cause permanent brain damage. In the case of foreseeable or established hyponatremia overcorrection, slowing down the correction rate of sodium plasma levels (PNa) or reinducing mild hyponatremia may prevent this neurologic complication. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This retrospective and observational study was performed with 20 consecutive patients admitted to two intensive care units for severe hyponatremia, defined by PNa <120 mmol/L and/or neurologic complications ascribable to hyponatremia and subsequently treated by desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) during correction of hyponatremia when the rate of correction was overtly or predictably excessive. The primary endpoint was the effectiveness of DDAVP on PNa control. Results DDAVP dramatically decreased the rate of PNa correction (median 0.81 mmol/L per hour [interquartile range, 0.46, 1.48] versus −0.02 mmol/L per hour [−0.16, 0.22] before and after DDAVP, respectively; P<0.001) along with a concurrent decrease in urine output (650 ml/h [214, 1200] versus 93.5 ml/h [43, 143]; P=0.003), and a rise in urine osmolarity (86 mmol/L [66, 180] versus 209 mmol/L [149, 318]; P=0.002). The maximal magnitude of PNa variations was also markedly reduced after DDAVP administration (11.5 mmol/L [8.25, 14.5] versus 5 mmol/L [4, 6.75]; P<0.001). No patient developed seizures after DDAVP or after subsequent relowering of PNa that occurred in 11 patients. Conclusions Desmopressin acetate is effective in curbing the rise of PNa in patients admitted in the intensive care unit for severe hyponatremia, when the initial rate of correction is excessive. PMID:24262506

  6. Significant hyperkalemia and hyponatremia secondary to telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide treatment.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Mehtap

    2010-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has crucial importance in maintaining blood pressure; thus blockade of RAAS is an effective antihypertensive treatment choice. The final step in RAAS stimulation is aldosterone secretion by angiotensin II, which leads to increased renal tubular sodium absorption and potassium secretion. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) allow blockade of RAAS by blocking binding of angiotensin II to the AT(1) receptors. There are several fixed-dose combinations of ARBs with hydrochlorothiazide in the market, providing antihypertensive therapies with complimentary mechanisms of action. With such combinations, while ARB inhibits the vasoconstricting action and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin II, hydrochlorothiazide affects the renal tubular mechanisms of electrolyte reabsorption and directly increases excretion of sodium and chloride in the distal tubule, and promotes water excretion. Also, hypokalemia, which may be triggered by increased urinary potassium loss induced by hydrochlorothiazide, is opposed by ARB use and hence ARB/hydrochlorothiazide combination is known to be safe in terms of potassium imbalance. In this case report, significant hyperkalemia and hyponatremia related to telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide use in a diabetic patient has been presented.

  7. Symptomatic carpal coalition: scaphotrapezial joint.

    PubMed

    Campaigniac, Erin; Eskander, Mark; Jones, Marci

    2013-12-01

    Carpal coalition is an uncommon congenital abnormality that arises from incomplete cavitation of the common cartilaginous precursor that forms the carpal bones. When carpal coalition is discovered, it is typically an asymptomatic incidental radiographic finding, and is often bilateral. We present a case of symptomatic unilateral carpal coalition of the scaphotrapezial joint, which was treated by excising the fibrous coalition and placing an interposition fat graft. This treatment was effective in alleviating the patient's symptoms.

  8. [A Case of Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome in Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Taro; Shirakura, Satoru; Hatanaka, Akio; Okano, Wataru; Tokumaru, Takao; Yamada, Masato; Saito, Yoshihiro; Beppu, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the electrolyte abnormalities frequently encountered in cancer therapy. Cisplatin is a well-known drug which can raise various adverse events, including hyponatremia. A male with advanced oropharyngeal cancer is presented in the present report, who was treated with radiotherapy with concurrent administration of cisplatin and who underwent a total of three episodes of severe hyponatremia in the course of therapy. The first two attacks of hyponatremia following cisplatin administration were accompanied by dehydration and excessive urination, and the patient recovered in one week with rehydration and salt supplementation. Excessive loss of salt in urine confirmed that these events were caused by renal salt wasting syndrome after cisplatin administration. On the other hand, the third attack was due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after surgery for a bone fracture. Estimation of the extracellular fluid volume and salt intake/output balance is always believed to be necessary for the diagnosis and proper management of severe hyponatremia after chemotherapy-based treatment with cisplatin. PMID:26548098

  9. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  10. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  11. The therapeutic use of vaptans for the treatment of dilutional hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Cassagnol, Manouchkathe; Shogbon, Angela O; Saad, Maha

    2011-08-01

    Hyponatremia is a very common electrolyte abnormality. Dilutional hyponatremia is very difficult to treat effectively due to the complications of conventional treatment. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) plays an integral role in circulatory and water homeostasis. AVP is a hormone released in response to increases in plasma tonicity or decreases in plasma volume in an attempt to maintain the plasma osmolality between 284 and 295 mOsm/L. AVP receptor antagonists or "vaptans" are a new class of drugs that allow for the safe and efficacious treatment of dilutional hyponatremia. Conivaptan, a mixed V1a/V2 receptor antagonist, and tolvaptan, a selective V2 receptor antagonist, are the only 2 vaptans approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:21813818

  12. Hyponatremia in the neurocritical care patient: An approach based on current evidence.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Aramendi, I; Langlois, P L; Biestro, A

    2015-05-01

    In the neurocritical care setting, hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disorder, which is associated with significant morbimortality. Cerebral salt wasting and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone have been classically described as the 2 most frequent entities responsible of hyponatremia in neurocritical care patients. Nevertheless, to distinguish between both syndromes is usually difficult and useless as volume status is difficult to be determined, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood, fluid restriction is usually contraindicated in these patients, and the first option in the therapeutic strategy is always the same: 3% hypertonic saline solution. Therefore, we definitively agree with the current concept of "cerebral salt wasting", which means that whatever is the etiology of hyponatremia, initially in neurocritical care patients the treatment will be the same: hypertonic saline solution.

  13. Frequency of hyponatremia and nonosmolar vasopressin release in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vitting, K.E.; Gardenswartz, M.H.; Zabetakis, P.M.; Tapper, M.L.; Gleim, G.W.; Agrawal, M.; Michelis, M.F. )

    1990-02-16

    The frequency and pathophysiology of hyponatremia were studied in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Of 71 hospitalized patients surveyed retrospectively, hyponatremia was observed in 37 (52%). Of 48 patients studied prospectively, 27 (56%) were hyponatremic. In 16 hyponatremic patients, volume status; serum and urine osmolalities; renal, adrenal, and thyroid function; and plasma vasopressin levels were assessed. Urine osmolalities were inappropriately elevated relative to serum osmolalities. Four patients had moderate renal insufficiency. Plasma vasopressin levels, measured by radioimmunoassay, were elevated in 15 patients, with the highest levels seen in patients who died. Hyponatremia of multiple etiologies occurred in a majority of inpatients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, often following the administration of hypotonic fluids, and was associated with a 30% (8/27) short-term mortality.

  14. Creation of a Hyponatremia Registry Supported by an Industry-Derived Quality Control Methodology

    PubMed Central

    D., Giunta; N., Fuentes; V., Pazo; M. L., Posadas-Martínez; H., Michellangelo; G., Waisman; F., González Bernaldo De Quirós

    2010-01-01

    Background A clinical registry encompasses a selective set of rigorously collected and stored clinical data focused on a specific condition. Hyponatremia has multiple, complex underlying causes and is one of the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No systematic registries of hyponatremic patients have been reported in the medical literature. The purpose of this project was to create a registry for hyponatremia in order to obtain epidemiological data that will help to better understand this condition. Objective This paper describes the creation of a registry for hyponatremia within a single institution that employs industry-based approaches for quality management to optimize data accuracy and completeness. Methods A prospective registry of incident hyponatremia cases was created for this study. A formalized statistically based quality control methodology was developed and implemented to analyze and monitor all the process indicators that were developed to ensure data quality. Results Between December 2006 and April 2009, 2443 episodes of hyponatremia were included. Six process indicators that reflect the integrity of the system were evaluated monthly, looking for variation that would suggest systematic problems. The graphical representation of the process measures through control charts allowed us to identify and subsequently address problems with maintaining the registry. Conclusion In this project we have created a novel hyponatremia registry. To ensure the quality of the data in this registry we have implemented a quality control methodology based on industrial principles that allows us to monitor the performance of the registry over time through process indicators in order to detect systematic problems. We postulate that this approach could be reproduced for other registries. PMID:23616856

  15. Impact of hyponatremia on frequency of complications in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ashraf Abd El-Khalik; Metwaly, Amna Ahmed; Nasr, Fatma Mohammad; El-Ghannam, Maged; El-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyponatremia is common in cirrhosis. The relationship between hyponatremia and severity of cirrhosis is evidenced by its close association with the occurrence of complications, the prevalence of hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, refectory ascites, and hepatic hydrothorax. The aim of this study was assess the impact of hyponatremia on the occurrence of both liver-related complications and the hemodynamic cardiovascular dysfunction. Methods This prospective study was conducted in 2015 on 74 patients with liver cirrhosis. The patients were from the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Theodor Bilharz Research Institute in Giza, Egypt. The patients were divided into three groups according to their serum level of sodium. Group 1 included 30 patients with serum sodium >135 meq/L, group 2 included 24 patients with serum sodium between135 and 125 meq/L, and group 3 included 20 patients with serum sodium <125 meq/L. For each of the patients, we conducted aclinical examination, laboratory investigations, chest X-ray, ECG, abdominal sonar, and echocardiography. Results Hyponatremia was found in 59.46% of our cirrhotic patients, and they showed significantly increased Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, MELD-Na score, QTc interval, Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and inferior vena cava (IVC) collapsibility, and decreased SVR and IVC diameter. Also hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, renal failure, infectious complications, and pleural effusion were significantly more common in hyponatremic cirrhotic patients. Conclusion In cirrhosis, hyponatremia is more common in severe cardiovascular dysfunction and associated with increased risk of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, illness severity scores, renal failure, infectious complications, and pleural effusion. We recommend selective oral administration of vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, tolvaptan, which acts to increase the excretion of free water

  16. Pericarditis-Induced Hyponatremia after Cardiac Electronic Implantable Device (CEID) Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshan, Elnaz; Mirabbasi, Seyed Abbas; Khalighi, Bahar; Khalighi, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Female, 87 • Female, 83 Final Diagnosis: Hyponatremia induced by pericardial effusion Symptoms: Shortness of breath Medication: Colchicine Clinical Procedure: Cardiac Electronic Implantable Device (CEID) Specialty: Cardiology • Cardiac Electrophysiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pericardial effusion along with pleural effusion is one of the rare complications of permanent pacemaker placement. Although extremely uncommon, it is more prevalent in elderly patients and may be complicated with hyponatremia. Case Report: We observed development of hyponatremia in association with pericardial effusion and pleural effusion, within one month after pacemaker placement in two women with BMI of <20. Case 1: An 87-year-old woman underwent implantation of a transvenous AV sequential pacemaker because of severe bradycardia and complete heart block. Three weeks later, she complained of progressive left-sided rib cage pain and poor oral intake. Her echocardiography showed a moderately large amount of pericardial ef-fusion, but no evidence of tamponade. She also had hyponatremia (Na=119 mEq/dl). Extensive work-up suggested hyponatremia presumably due to SIADH, caused by pericardial/pleural effusion. Case 2: An 83-year-old woman with history of severe sick sinus syndrome required a transvenous Av sequential pacemaker 3 weeks before. She then presented with generalized weakness, fatigue, and poor oral intake of over one week. There was a small-moderate pericardial effusion echocardiographically, and her serum sodium was 116 mEq/dl. Conclusions: Although extremely uncommon, pericarditis can develop following transvenous pacemaker insertion, which may result in hyponatremia, likely due to SIADH. The most common scenario is an elderly, petite woman with low BMI (<20), usually after using a helical screw/active fixation pacing leads, several weeks post-implant. Early recognition and therapy can significantly improve outcome and morbidity. PMID

  17. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in brain injury patients: a potential cause of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Zafonte, R D; Mann, N R

    1997-05-01

    Hyponatremia is a common neuromedical problem seen in survivors of central nervous system injury. The etiology of this hyponatremia is often diagnosed as syndrome of inappropriate diuretic hormone (SIADH). Fluid restriction is usually the first line of treatment. However, this can exacerbate vasospasm and produce resultant ischemia. Cerebral salt wasting is a syndrome of renal sodium loss that may occur commonly after central nervous system injury, yet remains unrecognized. Treatment of cerebral salt wasting consists of hydration and salt replacement. This article uses a case report to discuss the importance of recognition of this syndrome, and treatment concerns are reviewed.

  18. Severe Hyponatremia with Hypouricemia in a Patient with Medullary Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients and occurs due to various causes. Here we present a case of SIADH who was diagnosed using commonly available biochemical tests. This case report also discusses the interaction of the laboratory physician with the treating clinician and the approach needed to arrive at a correct diagnosis. It highlights the importance of serum uric acid and fractional excretion of urinary uric acid in the diagnosis of SIADH. It also discusses the approach needed to distinguish SIADH from Cerebral Salt wasting syndrome, where the presenting feature is also hyponatremia. PMID:27683402

  19. Severe Hyponatremia with Hypouricemia in a Patient with Medullary Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients and occurs due to various causes. Here we present a case of SIADH who was diagnosed using commonly available biochemical tests. This case report also discusses the interaction of the laboratory physician with the treating clinician and the approach needed to arrive at a correct diagnosis. It highlights the importance of serum uric acid and fractional excretion of urinary uric acid in the diagnosis of SIADH. It also discusses the approach needed to distinguish SIADH from Cerebral Salt wasting syndrome, where the presenting feature is also hyponatremia.

  20. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  1. Incidence, Etiology and Outcomes of Hyponatremia after Transsphenoidal Surgery: Experience with 344 Consecutive Patients at a Single Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sean M.; Liebelt, Brandon D.; Baskin, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is often seen after transsphenoidal surgery and is a source of considerable economic burden and patient-related morbidity and mortality. We performed a retrospective review of 344 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery at our institution between 2006 and 2012. Postoperative hyponatremia was seen in 18.0% of patients at a mean of 3.9 days postoperatively. Hyponatremia was most commonly mild (51.6%) and clinically asymptomatic (93.8%). SIADH was the primary cause of hyponatremia in the majority of cases (n = 44, 71.0%), followed by cerebral salt wasting (n = 15, 24.2%) and desmopressin over-administration (n = 3, 4.8%). The incidence of postoperative hyponatremia was significantly higher in patients with cardiac, renal and/or thyroid disease (p = 0.0034, Objective Risk (OR) = 2.60) and in female patients (p = 0.011, OR = 2.18) or patients undergoing post-operative cerebrospinal fluid drainage (p = 0.0006). Treatment with hypertonic saline (OR = −2.4, p = 0.10) and sodium chloride tablets (OR = −1.57, p = 0.45) was associated with a non-significant trend toward faster resolution of hyponatremia. The use of fluid restriction and diuretics should be de-emphasized in the treatment of post-transsphenoidal hyponatremia, as they have not been shown to significantly alter the time-course to the restoration of sodium balance. PMID:26237599

  2. [Risperidone treatment for polydipsia and severe hyponatremia in a schizophrenic patient].

    PubMed

    Chhoumi, Maha; Mrad, Amel; Mechri, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with undifferentiated schizophrenia since 10 years, who presented a polydipsia and severe hyponatremia. This patient responded well to a combination of an atypical antipsychotic (risperidone 4 mg/day) and a behavioral approach based on fluid restriction.

  3. Impact of hyponatremia on mortality and morbidity in patients with COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Chalela, Roberto; González-García, José Gregorio; Chillarón, Juan José; Valera-Hernández, Leticia; Montoya-Rangel, Carlos; Badenes, Diana; Mojal, Sergi; Gea, Joaquim

    2016-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients, being associated with increased morbidity and mortality in different clinical conditions. However, the prevalence and impact of this electrolytic disorder in patients hospitalized for an exacerbation of COPD still remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to clarify these points. A total of 424 patients hospitalized due to a COPD exacerbation were consecutively included, showing a frequency of hyponatremia of 15.8% (hyposmolar in most cases). Even though patients with and without hyponatremia showed a similar age, comorbidities, lung function impairment, presence of previous exacerbations, hospitalizations, most of the comorbidities and the overall severity index (APACHE II), their clinical outcomes were worse. Indeed, their hospitalization length, mechanical ventilation requirements and deaths (both during admission and within the months following discharge) were higher than those of non-hyponatremic patients. A sodium threshold lower than 129.7 mEq/L exhibited the better discriminatory power for death prediction. We conclude that hyponatremia (especially if severe) is a predictive marker for a bad clinical course in COPD exacerbations and therefore, patients with this electrolyte abnormality should be carefully monitored. PMID:27492537

  4. Azotemia protects the brain from osmotic demyelination on rapid correction of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Dhrolia, Murtaza F; Akhtar, Syed F; Ahmed, Ejaz; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adeeb

    2014-05-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a dreadful, irreversible and well-recognized clinical entity that classically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. However, it has been observed that when hyponatremia is rapidly corrected in azotemic patients by hemodialysis (HD), patients do not necessarily develop ODS. We studied the effect of inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD in patients with azotemia. Fifty-two azotemic patients, who underwent HD at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, having pre-HD serum sodium level <125 mEq/L and post-HD serum sodium levels that increased by ≥12 mEq/L from their pre-dialysis level, were studied. Serum sodium was analyzed before and within 24 h after a HD session. HD was performed using bicarbonate solution, with the sodium concentration being 140 meq/L. The duration of the dialysis session was based on the discretion of the treating nephrologist. Patients were examined for any neurological symptoms or signs before and after HD and for up to two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in required cases. None of the 52 patients with azotemia, despite inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD, developed ODS. This study suggests that patients with azotemia do not develop ODS on rapid correction of hyponatremia by HD, which suggests a possible protective role of azotemia on the brain from osmotic demyelination. However, the mechanism by which azotemia protects the brain from demyelination in humans is largely hypothetical and further studies are needed to answer this question. PMID:24821152

  5. Hyponatremia is a surrogate marker of poor outcome in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is known to be a marker of poor prognosis in many clinical conditions. The association between hyponatremia and clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis (PDRP) has not been studied. We evaluated the association between hyponatremia and clinical parameters of patients with PDRP. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with PDRP admitted to a medical center in the period 2004-2011. Patients with serum Na+ <130 mEq/L and ≥ 130 mEq/L at admission were divided into hyponatremic and normonatremic groups, respectively. The demographic and laboratory characteristics, pathogens of peritonitis, length of hospital stay and mortality rate were analyzed. Results Hyponatremia occurred in 27% (27/99) patients with PDRP. Gram-negative bacilli were the major pathogen responsible for 78% (21/27) PDRP in hyponatremic group while gram-positive cocci were found in 75% (41/55) PDRP in normonatremic groups. There was no significant difference in age, duration of dialysis, PD catheter removal rate and technique failure between two groups. Hyponatremic group had significantly higher serum CRP (p <0.001), lower serum albumin (p < 0.001) and phosphate (p < 0.05). Of note, serum Na+ level was positively correlated with serum albumin (p < 0.001), phosphate (p < 0.04) levels, and subjective global assessment (SGA) score (p < 0.001). Moreover, the length of hospital stay was longer and in-hospital mortality rate was higher in hyponatremic group (p < 0.001). Using a multivariable logistic regression, we showed that hyponatremia at admission is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (OR 76.89 95% CI 3.39-1741.67, p < 0.05) and long hospital stay (OR 5.37, 95% CI 1.58- 18.19, p < 0.05). Conclusions In uremic patients with PDRP, hyponatremia at admission associated with a high frequency of gram negative bacilli infection, low serum albumin and phosphate levels, low SGA

  6. [Acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea, defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day, represents a frequent problem in outpatients as well as inpatients. As most of the patients with acute diarrhea show a self-limiting disease course, the main challenge for the physician is to discriminate patients for whom symptomatic therapy is sufficient from those with severe disease course and threatening complications. This review aims to provide a practical guidance for such decisions.

  7. Urea minimizes brain complications following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia compared with vasopressin antagonist or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Gankam Kengne, Fabrice; Couturier, Bruno S; Soupart, Alain; Decaux, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder that carries significant morbidity and mortality. However, severe chronic hyponatremia should not be corrected rapidly to avoid brain demyelination. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (vaptans) are now being widely used for the treatment of hyponatremia along with other alternatives like hypertonic saline. Previous reports have suggested that, in some cases, urea can also be used to correct hyponatremia. Correction of severe hyponatremia with urea has never been compared to treatment with a vaptan or hypertonic saline with regard to the risk of brain complications in the event of a too rapid rise in serum sodium. Here, we compared the neurological outcome of hyponatremic rats corrected rapidly with urea, lixivaptan, and hypertonic saline. Despite similar increase in serum sodium obtained by the three drugs, treatment with lixivaptan or hypertonic saline resulted in a higher mortality than treatment with urea. Histological analysis showed that treatment with urea resulted in less pathological change of experimental osmotic demyelination than was induced by hypertonic saline or lixivaptan. This included breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, microglial activation, astrocyte demise, and demyelination. Thus, overcorrection of hyponatremia with urea resulted in significantly lower mortality and neurological impairment than the overcorrection caused by lixivaptan or hypertonic saline.

  8. Treatment of Hyponatremia with Tolvaptan in a Patient after Neurosurgical Treatment of a Pituitary Tumor: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Shinya; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Lüdemann, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent complication following pituitary surgery. We report a case with hyponatremia after surgery of a pituitary adenoma that was successfully treated with tolvaptan. A 68-year-old man with a pituitary tumor presented with mild hyponatremia (133 mEq/L) before surgery. The patient developed hyponatremia (125 mEq) 4 days postsurgery, and 10% sodium chloride was infused. Seven 7 days postsurgery, hyponatremia was improved (132 mEq/L), and tolvaptan 15 mg was given orally as a single dose instead of the 10% sodium chloride infusion. His serum sodium remained within normal limits. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) after pituitary surgery most probably led to the hyponatremia, and tolvaptan was effective because it is an oral vasopressin receptor antagonist. PMID:26623242

  9. Who experiences endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease?

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sun-Hyung; Cho, Sungsin; Han, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. But, some patients suffer from retained common bile duct stones after LC. The aim of this study is to analyze the predicting factors associated with subsequent postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) after LC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of every LC performed between July 2006 and September 2012. We classify 28 patients who underwent ERCP within 6 months after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease as the ERCP group and 56 patients who underwent LC for symptomatic gallstone disease during same period paired by sex, age, underlying disease, operation history, and body mass index as the control group. To identify risk factor performing postoperative ERCP after LC, we compared admission route, preoperative biochemical liver function test, number of gall stones, gallstone size, adhesion around GB, wall thickening of GB, and existence of acute cholecystitis between the 2 groups. Results Admission route, preoperative AST, ALT, and ALP, stone size, longer operation time, and acute cholecystitis were identified as risk factors of postoperative ERCP in univariate analyses. But, longer operation time (P = 0.004) and acute cholecystitis (P = 0.048) were identified as independent risk factors of postoperative ERCP in multivariate analyses. Conclusion The patient who underwent ERCP after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease are more likely experienced longer operation time and acute cholecystitis than the patient who did not undergo ERCP after LC. PMID:27274506

  10. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in female than in male open-water ultra-endurance swimmers: the 'Marathon-Swim' in Lake Zurich.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sandra; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in 25 male and 11 female open-water ultra-endurance swimmers participating in the 'Marathon-Swim' in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, covering a distance of 26.4 km. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, urine specific gravity, plasma sodium concentration [Na(+)] and haematocrit were determined. Two males (8%) and four females (36%) developed EAH where one female was symptomatic with plasma sodium [Na(+)] of 127 mmol/L. Body mass and plasma [Na(+)] decreased (p < 0.05). The changes in body mass correlated in both male and female swimmers to post-race plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.67, p = 0.0002 and r = -0.80, p = 0.0034, respectively) and changes in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.68, p = 0.0002 and r = -0.79, p = 0.0039, respectively). Fluid intake was neither associated with changes in body mass, post-race plasma [Na(+)] or the change in plasma [Na(+)]. Sodium intake showed no association with either the changes in plasma [Na(+)] or post-race plasma [Na(+)]. We concluded that the prevalence of EAH was greater in female than in male open-water ultra-endurance swimmers. PMID:21748367

  11. Neurosyphilis manifesting with unilateral visual loss and hyponatremia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Syphilis is called the chameleon of the diseases due to its variety of its clinical presentations, potentially affecting every organ of the body. Incidence of this ancient disease is once again on the increase worldwide. Case presentation We here report an unusual case of neurosyphilis manifesting with unilateral visual loss and hyponatremia. The patient also had primary syphilitic lesions and was concomitantly diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. Treatment with ceftriaxone and prednisolone, completely resolved the hyponatremia and visual acuity was partially restored. Conclusion Awareness of syphilis as a differential diagnosis is important as previously unreported presentations of neurosyphilis can arise, especially in HIV infected patients. PMID:21235811

  12. Severe hyponatremia and MRI point to diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis in the Southwest USA.

    PubMed

    Benson, Stephanie Michelle; Narasimhamurthy, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman presented to the hospital with 3 days of headache, fever, mood disturbance and nausea. She had recently emigrated from India, and was noted to have a positive screening purified protein derivative tuberculosis skin test with normal chest x-ray. Meningeal signs were noted prompting lumbar puncture and initiation of presumptive treatment for bacterial meningitis. While tuberculous meningitis (TM) was entertained at admission, diagnosis was clouded by the rapid onset of symptoms and recent major psychosocial stressors. She developed severe hyponatremia. Brain MRI revealed tuberculomas, and she was started on treatment for TM, a diagnosis confirmed by culture. On review, several lessons were learned: (1) globalisation of society makes uncommon diagnoses present in unlikely locations, (2) hyponatremia is a common complication of TM, (3) MRI can aid in diagnosis of TM and (4) cognitive and mood changes can be prodromal symptoms of TM.

  13. Osmotic demyelination syndrome after correction of severe hyponatremia associated with pituitrin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan Hua; Yuan, Min; Wang, Jian Wen; Hu, Yun Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) may be precipitated by aggressive correction of a hypoosmolar state. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who developed ODS during rapid correction of asymptomatic hyponatremia caused by pituitrin prescribed for hemoptysis. After hyponatremia correction by NaCl supplementation, the patient developed limb weakness, blurred vision, hand and perioral numbness, and lisp. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral signal hyperintensity of the globus pallidus and caudate nucleus, compatible with extra-pontine ODS. These symptoms improved gradually with treatment, and brain MRI ~ 3 months later indicated substantial resolution of ODS. This case serves as a warning to physicians that hypoosmotic correction must be achieved at a controlled rate. PMID:25740269

  14. Hyponatremia after initiation and rechallenge with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole in an older adult

    PubMed Central

    Huntsberry, Ashley M; Linnebur, Sunny A; Vejar, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case report of a patient experiencing hyponatremia from trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP–SMX) upon initial use and subsequent rechallenge. Summary An 82-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status thought to be due to complicated cystitis and was treated with TMP–SMX 160 mg/800 mg orally twice daily for 7 days. Her basic metabolic panel prior to initiation of TMP–SMX was within normal limits, with the exception of her serum sodium of 132 mmol/L (range 133–145 mmol/L). The day after completing her 7-day course of TMP–SMX therapy the patient was evaluated by her primary care provider and another basic metabolic panel revealed a reduction in the serum sodium to 121 mmol/L. The patient’s serum sodium concentrations increased to baseline 7 days after completion of the TMP–SMX therapy, and remained normal until she was treated in the emergency department several months later for another presumed urinary tract infection. She was again started on TMP–SMX therapy empirically, and within several days her serum sodium concentrations decreased from 138 mmol/L to a low of 129 mmol/L. The TMP–SMX therapy was discontinued upon negative urine culture results and her serum sodium increased to 134 mmol/L upon discharge. Based upon the Naranjo probability scale score of 9, TMP–SMX was the probable cause of the patient’s hyponatremia. Conclusion Our patient developed hyponatremia from TMP–SMX therapy upon initial use and rechallenge. Although hyponatremia appears to be rare with TMP–SMX therapy, providers should be aware of this potentially life-threatening adverse event. PMID:26170649

  15. Asymptomatic hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone as the first sign of a small cell lung cancer in an elderly man.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K; Kurokawa, I; Kasai, H; Mizusawa, A; Ebe, T; Sasaki, H; Matuzuki, Y; Seino, Y; Takahashi, M; Togashi, K; Miyamura, H; Sato, Y; Takato, H; Kaneko, H

    1998-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was hospitalized with asymptomatic hyponatremia. Despite hyponatremia, urinary sodium excretion with urine osmolality exceeding plasma osmolality persisted. Plasma vasopressin levels were high and independent of plasma osmolality during hypertonic saline infusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed enlarged mediastinal and right hilar lymph nodes. Microscopically, a specimen of lymph nodes obtained by biopsy represented vasopressin-producing small cell lung carcinoma. Chemotherapy plus irradiation improved the hyponatremia. Thus, careful evaluation is necessary to determine the cause of hyponatremia disorders in elderly patients. PMID:9868958

  16. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  17. Demeclocycline attenuates hyponatremia by reducing aquaporin-2 expression in the renal inner medulla.

    PubMed

    Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; Sinke, Anne P; Hadrup, Niels; Trimpert, Christiane; Wetzels, Jack F M; Fenton, Robert A; Deen, Peter M T

    2013-12-15

    Binding of vasopressin to its type 2 receptor in renal collecting ducts induces cAMP signaling, transcription and translocation of aquaporin (AQP)2 water channels to the plasma membrane, and water reabsorption from the prourine. Demeclocycline is currently used to treat hyponatremia in patients with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Demeclocycline's mechanism of action, which is poorly understood, is studied here. In mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells, which exhibit deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP)-dependent expression of endogenous AQP2, demeclocycline decreased AQP2 abundance and gene transcription but not its protein stability. Demeclocycline did not affect vasopressin type 2 receptor localization but decreased dDAVP-induced cAMP generation and the abundance of adenylate cyclase 3 and 5/6. The addition of exogenous cAMP partially corrected the demeclocycline effect. As in patients, demeclocycline increased urine volume, decreased urine osmolality, and reverted hyponatremia in an SIADH rat model. AQP2 and adenylate cyclase 5/6 abundances were reduced in the inner medulla but increased in the cortex and outer medulla, in the absence of any sign of toxicity. In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo data indicate that demeclocycline mainly attenuates hyponatremia in SIADH by reducing adenylate cyclase 5/6 expression and, consequently, cAMP generation, AQP2 gene transcription, and AQP2 abundance in the renal inner medulla, coinciding with a reduced vasopressin escape response in other collecting duct segments.

  18. Comparison of incidence of hyponatremia between intranasal and oral desmopressin in patients with central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yuko; Nishida, Sachi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI), which is characterized by polyuria and polydipsia, is caused by a deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). While CDI is treated with desmopressin, an analogue of AVP, the intranasal formulation is inconvenient and CDI patients reportedly prefer the oral formulation to the intranasal one. In Japan, intranasal desmopressin had been the only formulation for the treatment of CDI until 2012, when the desmopressin orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) was approved for treatment. In this study we analyzed 26 patients with CDI in whom intranasal desmopressin was switched to desmopressin ODT. The mean daily dose of intranasal desmopressin was 10 ± 8 μg/day, and that of desmopressin ODT was 142 ± 59 μg/day. The mean serum sodium levels were 140 ± 5 mmol/L and 140 ± 3 mmol/L with intranasal desmopressin and desmopressin ODT, respectively, and there were no significant differences between these values. The frequency of hyponatremia (<135 mmol/L) with intranasal desmopressin was 11.7% and that with desmopressin ODT was 7.6%, while the frequency of hyponatremia (<130 mmol/L) with intranasal desmopressin was 4.2% and that with desmopressin ODT was 1.3%. Statistical analyses revealed that incidence of hyponatremia was significantly decreased after the switch to desmopressin ODT. Thus, it is suggested that water balance is better controlled with desmopressin ODT than with intranasal desmopressin in patients with CDI.

  19. Severe Hyponatremia Associated with the Use of Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker/thiazide Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Cho, Joo-Hee; Jang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jin-Sug; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae-Won

    2013-01-01

    There are several widely used combinations of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB)/thiazide. The complimentary mechanism of action for such anti-hypertensive therapies is that, while ARB inhibits the vasoconstricting and aldosterone-secreting effects of angiotensin II, hydrochlorothiazide affects the renal tubular mechanisms of electrolyte reabsorption and increases excretion of sodium and chloride in the distal tubule, consequently promoting water excretion. In addition, hypokalemia, which may be triggered by a hydrochlorothiazide-induced increase in urinary potassium loss, is resisted by the use of ARB. Hence, the ARB/thiazide combination is safe in terms of potassium imbalance. For these reasons, fixed-dose ARB/thiazide combination anti-hypertensive drugs have been widely used for the treatment of hypertension. However, there have not been many studies done regarding cases where patients under such regimens showed severe hyponatremia, even when the amount of thiazide included was low. Here we report two cases in which severe hyponatremia occurred following treatment with the ARB/thiazide combinations. Upon discontinuation of the regimen, both patients showed recovery from hyponatremia. PMID:24627706

  20. Predicting symptomatic distress in emergency services personnel.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D S; Marmar, C R; Metzler, T J; Ronfeldt, H M

    1995-06-01

    This study identified predictors of symptomatic distress in emergency services (EMS) personnel exposed to traumatic critical incidents. A replication was performed in 2 groups: 154 EMS workers involved in the 1989 Interstate 880 freeway collapse during the San Francisco Bay area earthquake, and 213 counterparts from the Bay area and from San Diego. Evaluated predictors included exposure, social support, and psychological traits. Replicated analyses showed that levels of symptomatic distress were positively related to the degree of exposure to the critical incident. Level of adjustment was also related to symptomatic distress. After exposure, adjustment, social support, years of experience on the job, and locus of control were controlled, 2 dissociative variables remained strongly predictive of symptomatic response. The study strengthens the literature linking dissociative tendencies and experiences to distress from exposure to traumatic stressors.

  1. Symptomatic retroperitoneal cyst: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Renzulli, Pietro; Candinas, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Retroperitoneal cystic masses pose an important diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Simple drainage, internal or external, is usually not sufficient. We report a case of a large symptomatic retroperitoneal cyst and its management.

  2. The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the complexities of assigning cause in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-03-01

    The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the difficulties in assigning cause in epilepsy are described. A historical review is given, emphasizing aspects of the history which are relevant today. The historical review is divided into three approximately semicentenial periods (1860-1910, 1910-1960, 1960-present). A definition of symptomatic epilepsy and this is followed by listing of causes of symptomatic epilepsy. The fact that not all the causes of idiopathic epilepsy are genetic is discussed. A category of provoked epilepsy is proposed. The complexities in assigning cause include the following: the multifactorial nature of epilepsy, the distinction between remote and proximate causes, the role of nongenetic factors in idiopathic epilepsy, the role of investigation in determining the range of causes, the fact that not all symptomatic epilepsy is acquired, the nosological position of provoked epilepsy and the view of epilepsy as a process, and the differentiation of new-onset and established epilepsy. The newly proposed ILAE classification of epilepsy and its changes in terminologies and the difficulties in the concept of acute symptomatic epilepsy are discussed, including the inconsistencies and gray areas and the distinction between idiopathic, symptomatic, and provoked epilepsies. Points to be considered in future work are listed.

  3. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  4. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years.

  5. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.

  6. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DOE PAGES

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophagesmore » with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.« less

  7. The Nature of Iron Deposits Differs between Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. The abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin. PMID:26606178

  8. Does uremia protect against the demyelination associated with correction of hyponatremia during hemodialysis? A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oo, Than Naing; Smith, Charles L; Swan, Suzanne K

    2003-01-01

    Rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia is known to cause demyelination syndromes, which are attributed to the rapid shift of water out of the brain. In uremic patients with hyponatremia, depending on the dialysate sodium concentration and delivered Kt/V, serum sodium levels may be rapidly corrected inadvertently during the hemodialysis (HD) session. It is not known whether uremic patients are as susceptible to the development of demyelination as patients with normal renal function. Since urea diffuses slowly across the blood-brain barrier, it can act as an effective osmole between plasma and the brain if levels are changed abruptly. During HD, blood urea levels drop suddenly and significantly and cerebral edema may develop (dialysis disequilibrium syndrome). This effect may counteract the fluid shift out of the brain during correction of hyponatremia. Therefore, theoretically, uremic patients may be less prone to develop demyelination. We present a patient with renal failure whose hyponatremia was corrected rapidly during HD to illustrate the potential problem. The patient tolerated rapid correction of hyponatremia without sustaining any neurologic damage. We performed a literature search looking for similar case reports and reviewed the scientific evidence behind the above hypothesis. PMID:12535304

  9. Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists for the Correction of Hyponatremia in Chronic Heart Failure: An Underutilized Therapeutic Option in Current Clinical Practice?

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cantatrione, Claudio; Mazzei, Damiana; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    In the congestive heart failure (CHF) setting, chronic hyponatremia is very common. The present review aims at addressing topics relevant to the pathophysiology of hyponatremia in the course of CHF as well as its optimal treatment, including the main advantages and the limitations resulting from the use of the available dietary and pharmacological measures approved for the treatment of this electrolytic trouble. A narrative review is carried out in order to represent the main modalities of therapy for chronic hyponatremia that frequently complicates CHF. The limits of usual therapies implemented for CHF-related chronic hyponatremia are outlined, while an original analysis of the main advancements achieved with the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRAs) is also executed. The European regulatory restrictions that currently limit the use of VRAs in the management of CHF are substantially caused by financial concerns, i.e., the high costs of VRA therapy. A thoughtful reworking of current restrictions would be warranted in order to enable VRAs to be usefully associated to loop diuretics for decongestive treatment of CHF patients with hyponatremia. PMID:27706088

  10. Does uremia protect against the demyelination associated with correction of hyponatremia during hemodialysis? A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oo, Than Naing; Smith, Charles L; Swan, Suzanne K

    2003-01-01

    Rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia is known to cause demyelination syndromes, which are attributed to the rapid shift of water out of the brain. In uremic patients with hyponatremia, depending on the dialysate sodium concentration and delivered Kt/V, serum sodium levels may be rapidly corrected inadvertently during the hemodialysis (HD) session. It is not known whether uremic patients are as susceptible to the development of demyelination as patients with normal renal function. Since urea diffuses slowly across the blood-brain barrier, it can act as an effective osmole between plasma and the brain if levels are changed abruptly. During HD, blood urea levels drop suddenly and significantly and cerebral edema may develop (dialysis disequilibrium syndrome). This effect may counteract the fluid shift out of the brain during correction of hyponatremia. Therefore, theoretically, uremic patients may be less prone to develop demyelination. We present a patient with renal failure whose hyponatremia was corrected rapidly during HD to illustrate the potential problem. The patient tolerated rapid correction of hyponatremia without sustaining any neurologic damage. We performed a literature search looking for similar case reports and reviewed the scientific evidence behind the above hypothesis.

  11. Endotherapy in symptomatic pancreas divisum: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Rajan; Samji, N Swetha; Inaganti, Anupama; Komanapalli, Sarah D; Rivera, Ramon; Antillon, Mainor R; Roy, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common congenital variant of the pancreas and has been implicated as a cause of pancreatitis; however, endoscopic treatment is controversial. Our objective was to examine patient response to endotherapy for treatment of symptomatic PD in adult patients in a systematic review of the literature. A systematic review of all case series and case-control studies with ten or more patients undergoing endotherapy for treatment of symptomatic PD indicated by acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), chronic pancreatitis (CP), or chronic abdominal pain (CAP) was performed. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched from inception through February 2013 using [pancreas divisum] AND [endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] OR [endotherapy] OR [endoscopy] as search terms. Importantly, the majority of studies were retrospective in nature, significantly limiting analysis capacity. Main outcomes measures included endotherapy response rate in patients with PD and ARP, CP, or CAP. Twenty-two studies were included in the review, with a total of 838 patients. Response to endoscopy was seen in 528 patients, but response rate varied by clinical presentation. Patients with ARP had a response rate ranging from 43% to 100% (median 76%). Reported response rates were lower in the other two groups, ranging from 21% to 80% (median 42%) for patients with CP and 11%-55% (median 33%) for patients with CAP. Complications reported included perforation, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis, bleeding, and clogged stents. Endotherapy appears to offer an effective treatment option for patients with symptomatic PD, with the best results in patients presenting with ARP.

  12. Endoscopic resection of a symptomatic os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Fadel, Mohie

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our technique and results of arthroscopic resection of a symptomatic os trigonum via two posterior portals in 10 cases. Between 1999 and 2005 we treated 10 patients with endoscopic resection of a symptomatic os trigonum. The age ranged between 19 and 32 years (average 25.9). The average follow-up was 25 months (6-61 months). Time interval between the onset of pain and endoscopic resection of the os trigonum was 20 months. Of the 10 patients, 9 were symptom free for activities of daily living (ADL) within 4 weeks after surgery. They resumed their professional sport activities in a period of 8 weeks. The average AOFAS ankle/hindfoot scale increased from 43 preoperative to 87 postoperatively. We observed no complication in these 10 patients. Endoscopic resection of the symptomatic os trigonum yields good results with minimal surgical morbidity and short recovery time.

  13. Copeptin as a biomarker and a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with polyuria-polydipsia and hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Christ-Crain, M; Morgenthaler, N G; Fenske, W

    2016-03-01

    Copeptin is part of the 164 amino acid precursor protein preprovasopressin together with vasopressin and neurophysin II. During precursor processing, copeptin is released together with vasopressin. Copeptin concentrations respond as rapidly as vasopressin to changes in osmolality, a decrease in blood pressure or stress and there is a close correlation of vasopressin and copeptin concentrations. For these reasons, copeptin is propagated as a surrogate marker for vasopressin in the differential diagnosis of the polyuria-polydipsia syndromes and hyponatremia. Results of prospective studies show that a baseline copeptin level without prior fluid deprivation >20 pmol/L is able to identify patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, whereas osmotically stimulated copeptin levels differentiate between patients with partial central diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia with a high sensitivity and specificity >94%. In hyponatremia, low copeptin levels point to primary polydipsia and high levels to hypovolemic hyponatremia. The copeptin to urinary sodium ratio differentiates accurately between volume-depleted and normovolemic disorders. PMID:27156761

  14. The need for salt: does a relationship exist between cystic fibrosis and exercise-associated hyponatremia?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Douglas P; Hoffman, Martin D; Stuempfle, Kristin J; Owen, Bethan E; Rogers, Ian R; Verbalis, Joseph G; Hew-Butler, Tamara D

    2014-03-01

    Salt replacement is often recommended to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) despite a lack of evidence to support such practice. Exercise-associated hyponatremia is known to be a complex process resulting from the interplay of hydration, arginine vasopressin, and sodium balance. Although evidence suggests overhydration is the dominant pathophysiologic factor in most cases, the contributions of sweat sodium losses remain unclear. A theoretical genetic mechanism producing exuberant sweat sodium loss in athletes is the presence of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene. Individuals with CF develop hypovolemic hyponatremia by sodium loss via sweat through a defective chloride ion transport channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Elevated sweat sodium concentrations in CF single heterozygotes suggest that athletes developing EAH may be CFTR carriers. We targeted the 2010 and 2011 Western States Endurance Run ultramarathon, an event where athletes with EAH regularly present in a hypovolemic state, for a cohort maximizing the potential to document such a relationship. A total of 798 runners started the 2010 (n = 423) and 2011 (n = 375) races. Of the 638 finishers, 373 were screened for EAH by blood draw, 60 (16%) were found to have EAH, and 31 (alpha = 0.05 for n = 9) reported their CF result from a saliva-based genetic testing kit. Neither the 31 EAH-positive athletes nor the 25 EAH-negative comparison cohort athletes tested positive for a CF mutation. This null relationship suggests that CFTR mutations are not associated with the development of EAH and that salt supplementation is unnecessary for such a reason.

  15. The need for salt: does a relationship exist between cystic fibrosis and exercise-associated hyponatremia?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Douglas P; Hoffman, Martin D; Stuempfle, Kristin J; Owen, Bethan E; Rogers, Ian R; Verbalis, Joseph G; Hew-Butler, Tamara D

    2014-03-01

    Salt replacement is often recommended to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) despite a lack of evidence to support such practice. Exercise-associated hyponatremia is known to be a complex process resulting from the interplay of hydration, arginine vasopressin, and sodium balance. Although evidence suggests overhydration is the dominant pathophysiologic factor in most cases, the contributions of sweat sodium losses remain unclear. A theoretical genetic mechanism producing exuberant sweat sodium loss in athletes is the presence of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene. Individuals with CF develop hypovolemic hyponatremia by sodium loss via sweat through a defective chloride ion transport channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Elevated sweat sodium concentrations in CF single heterozygotes suggest that athletes developing EAH may be CFTR carriers. We targeted the 2010 and 2011 Western States Endurance Run ultramarathon, an event where athletes with EAH regularly present in a hypovolemic state, for a cohort maximizing the potential to document such a relationship. A total of 798 runners started the 2010 (n = 423) and 2011 (n = 375) races. Of the 638 finishers, 373 were screened for EAH by blood draw, 60 (16%) were found to have EAH, and 31 (alpha = 0.05 for n = 9) reported their CF result from a saliva-based genetic testing kit. Neither the 31 EAH-positive athletes nor the 25 EAH-negative comparison cohort athletes tested positive for a CF mutation. This null relationship suggests that CFTR mutations are not associated with the development of EAH and that salt supplementation is unnecessary for such a reason. PMID:23897018

  16. All that looks like "Brugada" is not "Brugada": Case series of Brugada phenocopy caused by hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Aggarwal, Sourabh; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-10-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS), a life-threatening channelopathy associated with reduced inward sodium current due to dysfunctional sodium channels, is characterized by ST-segment elevation with downsloping "coved type" (type 1) or "saddle back" (type 2) pattern in V1-V3 precordial chest leads (1, 2). Brugada phenocopy, a term describing conditions inducing Brugada-like pattern of electrocardiogram (EKG) manifestations in patients without true BS, is an emerging condition (3). We describe a case series of Brugada phenocopy with hyponatremia. PMID:27688678

  17. Hyponatremia in traumatic brain injury patients: Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone (SIADH) versus Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome(CSWS)

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Parandoush; Abbasi, Zahra; Mohammadi, Najaf Seid; Bagheri, Seyedreza; Fattahian, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Two common dysfunctions among traumatic brain injury (TBI) are hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS).The present study was aimed to define real incidence and most common cause of this problem. Differentiation between these two syndromes is difficult because of overlapping signs, symptoms and specially laboratory data. Distinction between the two syndromes is based on patient's volume state. The present study aims to develop an alternative diagnosis strategy for defining the type of post-TBI hyponatremia. Methods: This was a single-center retrospective study conducted on TBI diagnosed patients referred to intensive care unit (ICU) of Taleghani Hospital (Kermanshah, Iran). Hyponatremia condition is diagnosed when sodium level reaches the values of less than 135 meq/lit. Basic criterion for diagnosing the hyponatremia type was only urine volume. Urine volume was compared with previous days and fluid intake. If the volume showed a reduction, then the patient was classified in SIADH group, and the prescribed treatment was only fluid intake restriction. In cases of CSWS that have polyuric state and hyponatremia, treatment is sodium and fluid replacement. CBC, Na, K, FBS, BUN, Cr and urine 24-hour volume were measured daily, while during the treatment, it was performed twice or more. Results: A total of 881 patients were referred to ICU during January 2011 to March 2012, of them, 678 patients had head trauma with and/or without other body injury. Out of all patients, 216 (%32) showed hyponatremia. Based on our diagnosis and treatment strategies, all of patient had lower urine output than previous day and were classified in the SIADH group and treated with only fluid restriction. None of patients were classified in CSWS group. All patients well recovered from hyponatremia with simple fluid restriction. In a clinical examination after a follow up period

  18. Constipation, diarrhea, and symptomatic hemorrhoids during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2003-03-01

    Constipation, diarrhea, and symptomatic hemorrhoids are disorders common in the general population, particularly in women. These conditions, if mild, often are self-treated with various home remedies or nonprescription preparations. Few of these patients, moreover, are referred to gastroenterologists, as primary care providers generally are confident managing these conditions, unless they are severe, refractory to conventional management, or require additional diagnostic studies.

  19. Risk Factors for Late-onset Hyponatremia and Its Influence on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sohee; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Ee-Kyung; Kim, Han-Suk; Kim, Beyong Il; Choi, Jung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset hyponatremia (LOH), hyponatremia occurring after two weeks of age with the achievement of full feeding, is the result of a negative sodium balance caused by inadequate salt intake or excessive salt loss due to immature renal or intestinal function in preterm infants. The aims of our study were to identify the risk factors for LOH and its influence on neonatal outcomes. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 161 preterm infants born before 34 weeks of gestation between June 2009 and December 2010 at Seoul National University Hospital. LOH was defined as a sodium level ≤ 132 mEq/L or 133-135 mEq/L with oral sodium supplementation. LOH occurred in 49 (30.4%) of the studied infants. A lower gestational age, a shorter duration of parenteral nutrition, the presence of respiratory distress syndrome, the use of furosemide, and feeding with breast milk were significant risk factors for LOH. In terms of neonatal outcomes, the infants with LOH had longer hospital stays and higher risks of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgery. LOH lasting at least 7 days significantly increased moderate to severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, and extra-uterine growth retardation. LOH is commonly observed in preterm infants; it may be a risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity or a marker of illness severity. PMID:25829814

  20. Hyponatremia in Severe Malaria: Evidence for an Appropriate Anti-diuretic Hormone Response to Hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Josh; Hossain, Amir; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lam, Sophia W. K.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Maude, Richard J.; Yunus, Emran Bin; Haque, Gofranul; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2009-01-01

    Although hyponatremia occurs in most patients with severe malaria, its pathogenesis, prognostic significance, and optimal management have not been established. Clinical and biochemical data were prospectively collected from 171 consecutive Bangladeshi adults with severe malaria. On admission, 57% of patients were hyponatremic. Plasma sodium and Glasgow Coma Score were inversely related (rs = −0.36, P < 0.0001). Plasma antidiuretic hormone concentrations were similar in hyponatremic and normonatremic patients (median, range: 6.1, 2.3–85.3 versus 32.7, 3.0–56.4 pmol/L; P = 0.19). Mortality was lower in hyponatremic than normonatremic patients (31.6% versus 51.4%; odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.44 [0.23–0.82]; P = 0.01 by univariate analysis). Plasma sodium normalized with crystalloid rehydration from (median, range) 127 (123–140) mmol/L on admission to 136 (128–149) mmol/L at 24 hours (P = 0.01). Hyponatremia in adults with severe malaria is common and associated with preserved consciousness and decreased mortality. It likely reflects continued oral hypotonic fluid intake in the setting of hypovolemia and requires no therapy beyond rehydration. PMID:19141852

  1. [A case of severe hyponatremia in a patient suffering from epilepsy and using oxcarbazepine].

    PubMed

    Gumbrevicius, Gintautas; Sveikata, Audrius

    2006-01-01

    A 70-year-old patient treated with oxcarbazepine experienced severe hyponatremia. The patient used oxcarbazepine (600 mg twice a day) concomitantly with diuretics (torasemide 10 mg and indapamide 1.25 mg once per day), perindopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and amlodipine, a Ca(2+) channel blocker. The patient complained of a nausea, malaise, diplopia, drowsiness, apathy, decreased diuresis (creatinine clearance - 41.51 ml/min), and exacerbation of epileptic seizures. Sodium concentration in the plasma was 113 mmol/l. The patient was hospitalized. It was suggested that a decrease in plasma sodium concentration was caused by oxcarbazepine used together with diuretics for six months. Oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia is reported in 22.2-50% of patients, although symptoms are present only in 5.9% of patients. The most common symptoms of central nervous system injury, experienced by patients, are drowsiness, dizziness, decreased cognitive function, coordination impairment, etc. Physicians not always in time pay proper attention to undesirable antiepileptic drug-induced effects, which can be dangerous. PMID:16963831

  2. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240.

  3. Physiopathological, Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Caterina; Brucculeri, Salvatore; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is dilutional hyponatremia, a variant of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), characterized by a plasma concentration of sodium lower than 135 mEq/L. The prevalence of EAH is common in endurance (<6 hours) and ultra-endurance events (>6 hours in duration), in which both athletes and medical providers need to be aware of risk factors, symptom presentation, and management. The development of EAH is a combination of excessive water intake, inadequate suppression of the secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (due to non osmotic stimuli), long race duration, and very high or very low ambient temperatures. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Signs and symptoms of EAH include nausea, vomiting, confusion, headache and seizures; it may result in severe clinical conditions associated with pulmonary and cerebral edema, respiratory failure and death. A rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment with a hypertonic saline solution is essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. PMID:26237602

  4. Hyponatremia at autopsy: an analysis of etiologic mechanisms and their possible significance.

    PubMed

    Byramji, Angela; Cains, Glenda; Gilbert, John D; Byard, Roger W

    2008-01-01

    While electrolyte measurements after death may be confounded by a number of variables, vitreous humor sodium tends to remain stable for some time, enabling correlation between ante- and postmortem levels. Review of natural and unnatural causes of reduced vitreous humor sodium levels at autopsy was undertaken to demonstrate the range of diseases that may result in this finding. Natural diseases affecting the vasopressin-renin-angiotensin axis may cause reduction in sodium levels with associated hypovolemia, euvolemia, and hypervolemia. Low sodium measurements may also occur with redistribution of water, and artefactually when there are underlying lipid and protein disorders. Unnatural causes of hyponatremia at autopsy include water intoxication from psychogenic polydipsia, environmental polydipsia, ingestion of dilute infant formulas, beer potomania, endurance exercise, fresh water immersion (including water births) and iatrogenic causes including drug and parenteral fluid administration, and surgical irrigation. A knowledge of the range of conditions that may result in lowered postmortem sodium levels will help to exclude or confirm certain diseases at autopsy. In addition, significant vitreous hyponatremia may be a useful finding to help clarify mechanisms of unnatural deaths. PMID:19291452

  5. Neuropsychological impairment in patients with schizophrenia and evidence of hyponatremia and polydipsia.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ivan J; Keedy, Sarah; Marlow-O'Connor, Megan; Beenken, Beth; Goldman, Morris B

    2009-05-01

    Patients with schizophrenia and water imbalance may represent a subset of patients with distinct pathophysiological abnormalities and susceptibility to cognitive impairment. Specifically, patients with polydipsia and hyponatremia have been shown to have smaller anterior hippocampal volumes, which are also associated with various impairments in neuroendocrine function. To determine whether abnormalities in patients with water imbalance extend to the cognitive realm, the present study evaluated neuropsychological functioning in three groups of patients with schizophrenia: polydipsic hyponatremic, polydipsic normonatremic, and nonpolydipsic normonatremic. Participants were administered cognitive tests assessing intelligence, attention, learning/memory (verbal, nonverbal, emotional), and facial discrimination. Hyponatremic patients showed poorer overall neuropsychological functioning relative to all other patients, and polydipsic normonatremic patients performed intermediate to the other two groups. Results indicate that patients with schizophrenia and polydipsia, and particularly those with hyponatremia, show prominent cognitive deficits relative to patients without water imbalance. The clinical, neuroendocrine, and cognitive abnormalities in these patients may arise from pathology within the anterior hippocampus and associated prefrontal/limbic brain regions. PMID:19413445

  6. Strong Association Between Endometriosis and Symptomatic Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Nezhat, Camran; Li, Anjie; Abed, Sozdar; Balassiano, Erika; Soliemannjad, Rose; Nezhat, Ceana H.; Nezhat, Farr

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The relationship between leiomyoma and endometriosis is poorly understood. Both contribute to considerable pain and may cause subfertility or infertility in women. We conducted this retrospective study to assess the rate of coexistence of endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma. The primary outcome measured was the coexistence of histology-proven endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma. Methods: This is a retrospective review of a data-based collection of medical records of 244 patients treated at a tertiary medical center, who were evaluated for symptomatic leiomyoma from March 2011 through December 2015. Of those, 208 patients underwent laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted myomectomy or hysterectomy. All patients provided consent for possible concomitant diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis. The remaining 36 patients underwent medical therapy and were excluded from the study. All patients who had myomectomy or supracervical hysterectomy underwent minilaparotomy for extracorporeal morcellation and specimen removal beginning in April 2012. Results: Of the 208 patients with the presenting chief concern of symptomatic leiomyoma and who underwent surgical therapy, 181 had concomitant diagnoses of leiomyoma and endometriosis, whereas 27 had leiomyoma. Of the 27 patients, 9 also had adenomyosis. Patients with only fibroid tumors were, on average, 4.0 years older than those with endometriosis and fibroids (mean age, 44 vs 40 ± SD). Patients with both pathologies were also more likely to present with pelvic pain and nulliparity than those with fibroid tumors alone. Conclusions: In our patient population, 87.1% of patients with a chief concern of symptomatic fibroids also had a diagnosis of histology-proven endometriosis, which affirms the need for concomitant diagnosis and intraoperative treatment of both conditions. Overlooking the coexistence of endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma may lead to suboptimal

  7. Strong Association Between Endometriosis and Symptomatic Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Nezhat, Camran; Li, Anjie; Abed, Sozdar; Balassiano, Erika; Soliemannjad, Rose; Nezhat, Ceana H.; Nezhat, Farr

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The relationship between leiomyoma and endometriosis is poorly understood. Both contribute to considerable pain and may cause subfertility or infertility in women. We conducted this retrospective study to assess the rate of coexistence of endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma. The primary outcome measured was the coexistence of histology-proven endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma. Methods: This is a retrospective review of a data-based collection of medical records of 244 patients treated at a tertiary medical center, who were evaluated for symptomatic leiomyoma from March 2011 through December 2015. Of those, 208 patients underwent laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted myomectomy or hysterectomy. All patients provided consent for possible concomitant diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis. The remaining 36 patients underwent medical therapy and were excluded from the study. All patients who had myomectomy or supracervical hysterectomy underwent minilaparotomy for extracorporeal morcellation and specimen removal beginning in April 2012. Results: Of the 208 patients with the presenting chief concern of symptomatic leiomyoma and who underwent surgical therapy, 181 had concomitant diagnoses of leiomyoma and endometriosis, whereas 27 had leiomyoma. Of the 27 patients, 9 also had adenomyosis. Patients with only fibroid tumors were, on average, 4.0 years older than those with endometriosis and fibroids (mean age, 44 vs 40 ± SD). Patients with both pathologies were also more likely to present with pelvic pain and nulliparity than those with fibroid tumors alone. Conclusions: In our patient population, 87.1% of patients with a chief concern of symptomatic fibroids also had a diagnosis of histology-proven endometriosis, which affirms the need for concomitant diagnosis and intraoperative treatment of both conditions. Overlooking the coexistence of endometriosis in women with symptomatic leiomyoma may lead to suboptimal

  8. Patient With Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Adrenal Insufficiency Due to Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Lobe and Miscommunication Between Hypothalamus and Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Grammatiki, Maria; Rapti, Eleni; Mousiolis, Athanasios C.; Yavropoulou, Maria; Karras, Spyridon; Tsona, Afroditi; Daniilidis, Michalis; Yovos, John; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hyponatremia may be one of the clinical manifestations of adrenal insufficiency (AI) and during the diagnostic workup of hyponatremic patients investigation of AI should be included. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient who was admitted to our hospital with clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of hyponatremia. Following the diagnostic algorithm of hyponatremia we reached the diagnosis of AI. Clinician's attention must focus on the underlying cause of AI which in this case was hidden in a miscommunication between hypothalamus and pituitary due to an ectopic posterior pituitary lobe and became apparent by a pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Treatment with oral hydrocortisone resulted in full clinical recovery and electrolyte balance, which was maintained after 7 months of follow-up. Secondary AI is related with hyponatremia through increased ADH secretion. Although a hyponatremic episode may be the first presentation of AI, clinical suspicion is of high importance in order to place the right diagnosis. Disruption of communication between hypothalamus and pituitary is a rare but considerable cause of AI. PMID:26962783

  9. [Oxytocin and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic neonatal hormone. Case report of early severe hyponatremia and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aldana-Valenzuela, Carlos; Prieto-Pantoja, José Alfredo; Hernández-Acevedo, Angélica

    2010-12-01

    This is a clinical case presentation of a full term newborn infant who suffered severe hyponatremia and early seizures, associated with maternal fluid overload with electrolyte free solutions and high doses of oxytocin for labor augmentation. Although this condition has been recognized since the 1960's with isolated reports, this particular case has features that needs further investigation, not only for the unsually severe hyponatremia, but most importantly we think, for the prominent signs of fluid retention, the infant had, that suggest excessive antidiuretic activity probably due to oxytocin. These findings are consistent with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Although until now there is no proof that oxytocin by itself produces this syndrome. We think the association is possible in certain clinical circumstances, such as those found in this case. We also, briefly discussed the pathophysiology of perinatal hyponatremia, the neonatal treatment of this condition and the current guidelines for the women in labor. Hyponatremia should not be considered a benign condition, since in the neonate, it may affect brain function. PMID:21961376

  10. An autopsy case of macroglobulinemia complicated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) like hyponatremia, hypopituitarism and AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chika; Yoneda, Chihiro; Ogino, Jun; Fukushima, Sayaka; Kodama, Shoko; Asano, Chihiro; Masuda, Michihiko; Horie-Tajima, Kanako; Toyonaga, Aiko; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Kawamura, Shunji; Hashimoto, Naotake

    2014-01-01

    An 88-year-old male patient with macroglobulinemia was admitted to our hospital because of severe hyponatremia and unconsciousness. Laboratory findings showed decreased inhibition of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and he was diagnosed with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). Hyponatremia improved with only limitation of water intake and the patient was followed up on a continuing outpatient basis. However, soon after discharge from hospital, his legs started swelling with edema and hyponatremia worsened. He was re-admitted due to a fall at home. Hyponatremia was observed at re-admission. A CRH challenge test showed partial dysfunction of ACTH secretion. Corticosteroid therapy was performed, but the patient subsequently died from pneumonia. Pathological findings at autopsy revealed invasion of plasma cells and amyloid depositions in multiple organs, including the pituitary, adrenal cortex, heart, liver, kidney, lymph nodes and bone marrow. Consistent with these results, fibrosis was observed in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, suggesting that the autopsy findings were related to the clinical observations and diagnosis. This is the first reported case of macroglobulinemia complicated with multiple hormone dysfunction.

  11. High plasma exposure to pemetrexed leads to severe hyponatremia in patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gota, Vikram; Kavathiya, Krunal; Doshi, Kartik; Gurjar, Murari; Damodaran, Solai E; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Pemetrexed-platinum doublet therapy is a standard treatment for stage IIIb/IV nonsquamous non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While the regimen is associated with several grade ≥3 toxicities, hyponatremia is not a commonly reported adverse effect. Here we report an unusually high incidence of grade ≥3 hyponatremia in Indian patients receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet, and the pharmacological basis for this phenomenon. Methods Forty-six patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled for a bioequivalence study of two pemetrexed formulations. All patients received the pemetrexed-platinum doublet for six cycles followed by single-agent pemetrexed maintenance until progression. Pharmacokinetic blood samples were collected at predefined time points during the first cycle and the concentration-time profile of pemetrexed was investigated by noncompartmental analysis. Hyponatremic episodes were investigated with serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urinary sodium, and urine osmolality. Results Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) had at least one episode of grade ≥3 hyponatremia. Twenty-four episodes of grade ≥3 hyponatremia were observed in 200 cycles of doublet chemotherapy. Plasma exposure to pemetrexed was significantly higher in patients with high-grade hyponatremia than in those with low-grade or no hyponatremia (P=0.063 and P=0.001, respectively). Pemetrexed clearance in high-grade hyponatremia was quite low compared with normal and low-grade hyponatremia (P=0.001 and P=0.055, respectively). Median pemetrexed exposure in this cohort was much higher than that reported in the literature from Western studies. Conclusion Higher exposure to pemetrexed is associated with grade ≥3 hyponatremia. The pharmacogenetic basis for higher exposure to pemetrexed in Indian patients needs further investigation. PMID:24940080

  12. Changes in Copeptin and Bioactive Vasopressin in Runners With and Without Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D.; Stuempfle, Kristin J.; Rogers, Ian R.; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in both the N-terminal (arginine vasopressin; AVP) and C-terminal (copeptin) fragments of the vasopressin prohormone before, during, and after an ultramarathon race and to assess vasopressin and copeptin concentrations in runners with and without hyponatremia. Design Observational study. Setting Three trials (2 sodium balance and 1 hyponatremia treatment) in 2 separate approximately 160-km footraces [Western States Endurance Run (WSER) and Javelina Jundred Mile Race (JJ100)]. Participants Six hyponatremic and 20 normonatremic runners; 19 finishers with 7 completing 100 km. Main Outcome Measures Plasma AVP ([AVP]p), copeptin ([copeptin]p), sodium ([Na+]p), and protein (%plasma volume change; %PV) concentrations. Results In the WSER Sodium Trial, a 3-fold prerace to postrace increase in both [AVP]p (0.7 ± 0.4 to 2.7 ± 1.9 pg/mL; P < 0.05) and [copeptin]p (10.3 ± 12.5 to 28.2 ± 16.3 pmol/L; nonsignificant) occurred, despite a 2 mEq/L decrease in [Na+]p (138.7 ± 2.3 to 136.7 ± 1.6 mEq/L; NS). A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p postrace (r = 0.82; P < 0.05). In the WSER Treatment Trial, despite the presence of hyponatremia pre-treatment versus posttreatment ([Na+]p = 130.3 vs 133.5 mEq/L, respectively), both [AVP]p (3.2 vs 2.1 pg/mL) and [copeptin]p (22.5 vs 24.9 pmol/L) were well above the detectable levels. A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p 60 minutes after treatment (r = 0.94; P < 0.05). In the JJ100 Sodium Trial, significant correlations were found between [copeptin]p change and %PV change (r = −0.34; P < 0.05) and between [AVP]p change and [Na+]p change (r = 0.39; P < 0.05) but not vice-versa. Conclusions [Copeptin]p seems to be a reliable surrogate of stimulated [AVP]p during exercise. Nonosmotic vasopressin stimulation occurs during ultradistance running. [Copeptin]p may better reflect chronic (%PV) vasopressin secretion under conditions of endurance exercise

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists for Euvolemic or Hypervolemic Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyun; Zhao, Mingyi; Du, Wei; Zu, Dongni; Sun, Yingwei; Xiang, Rongwu; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hyponatremia, defined as a nonartifactual serum sodium level <135 mmol/L, is the most common fluid and electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Traditional managements (fluid restriction, hypertonic saline and loop diuretics, etc.) are difficult to maintain or ineffective. Recently, vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRAs) have shown promise for the treatment of hyponatremia. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of VRAs in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia. We searched Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Springer, etc. (latest search on June 4, 2015) for English publications with randomized controlled trials. Two authors independently screened the citations and extracted data. We calculated pooled relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD), weighted mean difference (WMD) or standard mean difference (SMD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by using random and fixed effect models. We collected data from 18 trials involving 1806 patients. Both random and fixed effect meta-analyses showed that VRAs significantly increased the net change of serum sodium concentration (WMDrandom = 4.89 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.35–5.43 and WMDfixed = 4.70 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.45–4.95), response rate (RRrandom = 2.77, 95%CIs = 2.29–3.36 and RRfixed = 2.95, 95%CIs = 2.56–3.41), and 24-hour urine output (SMDrandom = 0.82, 95%CIs = 0.65–1.00 and SMDfixed = 0.79, 95%CIs = 0.66–0.93) compared to placebo. Furthermore, VRAs significantly decreased body weight (WMDrandom = −0.87 kg, 95%CIs = −1.24 to −0.49 and WMDfixed = −0.91 kg, 95%CIs = −1.22 to −0.59). In terms of safety, rates of drug-related adverse events (AEs), rapid sodium level correction, constipation, dry mouth, thirst, and phlebitis in the VRA-treated group were greater than those in control group. However, there was no difference in the total number of AEs, discontinuations

  14. Human herpesvirus 6 is associated with status epilepticus and hyponatremia after umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Souza Franceschi, Fernanda Leite; Green, Jaime; Cayci, Zuzan; Mariash, Evan; Ezzeddine, Mustapha; Bachanova, Veronika; Ustun, Celalettin

    2014-05-01

    Status epilepticus after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is rare. The authors report a case involving a 65-year-old man with nonconvulsive status epilepticus 34 days after umbilical cord blood transplantion for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum were positive for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed symmetric T2 hyper-intensity bilaterally in the mesial temporal lobes, and T2 hyperintensi-ties and restricted diffusion of bilateral putamina. Despite aggressive anticonvulsive therapy, his seizures only abated with initiation of ganciclovir therapy. The patient completed six weeks of combination antiviral therapy (ganciclovir and foscarnet). His cognitive function gradually improved and, after prolonged rehabilitation, the patient was discharged home with residual intermittent memory loss but otherwise functional. HHV6 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nonconvulsive status epilepticus after alloHCT, especially in patients with hyponatremia. Empirical antiviral therapy targeting HHV6 should be administered to these patients.

  15. A 36-year-old man with vomiting, pain abdomen, significant weight loss, hyponatremia, and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Sivasami, Kartik; Tewari, Vanmalini; Nandi, Bhaskar; Nair, G Lakhsmi; Patil, Sunita D

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can be a challenge. The key to a timely diagnosis is to have a high index of suspicion. We present a rare case of a 36-year-old human immunodeficiency virus negative male patient, who was on multidrug therapy for lepromatous leprosy and was treated for type 2 lepra reactions with steroids in the past. The patient presented with vomiting and pain abdomen, persistent hyponatremia, and terminal hypoglycemia. He had features of malnutrition and had a rapid downhill course following admission. A diagnosis of S. stercoralis hyperinfection with sepsis and multiorgan failure, adrenal hemorrhage, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion was established on a postmortem examination. PMID:26549076

  16. [Acute intermittent porphyria and inappropriate ADH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tébar, M T; Aguilera, L

    2010-05-01

    A 44-year-old woman complained of abdominal pain of 4 days' duration accompanied by vomiting and painful urination. The admitting physician noted neurologic signs consistent with axonal polyneuropathy and hyponatremia. In the absence of other explanations for the syndrome, SIADH was diagnosed. Because of the nonspecific nature of the observations, the patient was assessed by various specialists and admitted to the anesthetic recovery unit due to worsening of neurologic signs and suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. The diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory findings of elevated d-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen levels and normal stool porphyrins. The patient improved with intravenous hematin infused over 4 days.

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Symptomatic Carpal Bossing

    PubMed Central

    Radmer, Sebastian; Fresow, Robert; Tabibzada, Arash Mehdi; Kamusella, Peter; Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2015-01-01

    Context Carpal bossing is an osseous formation at the dorsal portion of the quadrangular joint, which rarely becomes symptomatic. However, in some patients it causes pain, restricted mobility and can lead to complications like tendon rupture, inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. Aim In this article, we present our experiences with this rare disorder in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings. Settings Design This is a multicenter and interdisciplinary observation made by orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists in the years 2010 to 2015. Retrospective observational study. The follow up period was 2 years. Materials and Methods In the observed time period, eight patients were diagnosed with symptomatic carpal bossing. Symptoms were pain at palmar flexion and limited mobility of the wrist in combination with a palpable protuberance over the quadrangular joint. All patients underwent X-ray, CT and MRI examinations. A conservative treatment strategy was initiated for 6 weeks in all patients, followed by a wedge resection when symptoms were persisting and disabling. Results After the conservative treatment schedule, five patients were asymptomatic. Three patients had persisting pain and were thus recommended for surgery. In the postoperative course, two patients were asymptomatic. One patient developed a type 1 complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the first postoperative year, which was successfully treated with pain-adapted physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy with analgesics and calcitonin, and a triple CT-guided thoracic sympathetic nerve blockade. Conclusion Carpal bossing is a mostly asymptomatic entity, which in our experience gets symptomatic due to direct trauma or repetitive stress, especially in competitive racket sports players. It can be diagnosed by thorough clinical examination and multimodal diagnostic imaging. Conservative treatment comprises an excellent prognosis, however surgery, either wedge resection or arthrodesis, must be

  18. Symptomatic Hardware Removal After First Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Thompson, John

    2016-01-01

    Severe hallux valgus deformity with proximal instability creates pain and deformity in the forefoot. First tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis is performed to reduce the intermetatarsal angle and stabilize the joint. Dorsomedial locking plate fixation with adjunctive lag screw fixation is used because of its superior construct strength and healing rate. Despite this, questions remain regarding whether this hardware is more prominent and more likely to need removal. The purpose of the present study was to determine the incidence of symptomatic hardware at the first tarsometatarsal joint and to determine the incidence of hardware removal resulting from prominence and/or discomfort. A review of 165 medical records of consecutive patients who had undergone first tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis with plate fixation was conducted. The outcome of interest was the incidence of symptomatic hardware removal in patients with clinical union. The mean age was 55 (range 18.4 to 78.8) years. The mean follow-up duration was 65.9 ± 34.0 (range 7.0 to 369.0) weeks. In our cohort, 25 patients (15.2%) had undergone hardware removed because of pain and irritation. Of these patients, 18 (72.0%) had a locking plate and lag screw removed, and 7 (28.0%) had crossing lag screws removed. The fixation of a first tarsometatarsal joint fusion poses a difficult situation owing to minimal soft tissue coverage and the inherent need for robust fixation to promote fusion. Hardware can become prominent postoperatively and can become painful and/or induce cutaneous compromise. The results of the present observational investigation imply that surgeons can reasonably inform patients that the incidence of symptomatic hardware removal after first tarsometatarsal arthrodesis is approximately 15% within a median duration of 9.0 months after surgery.

  19. Hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH): therapeutic decision-making in real-life cases

    PubMed Central

    Laville, Maurice; Burst, Volker; Peri, Alessandro; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most common electrolyte disturbance encountered in clinical practice, the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatremia (defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/L) remains far from optimal. This is extremely troubling because not only is hyponatremia associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay and hospital resource use, but it has also been shown to be associated with increased mortality. The reasons for this poor management may partly lie in the heterogeneous nature of the disorder; hyponatremia presents with a variety of possible etiologies, differing symptomology and fluid volume status, thereby making its diagnosis potentially complex. In addition, a general lack of awareness of the clinical impact of the disorder, a fear of adverse outcomes through overcorrection of sodium levels, and a lack of effective targeted treatments until recent years, may all have contributed to a reticence to actively treat cases of hyponatremia. There is therefore a clear unmet need to further educate physicians on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of this important condition. Through the use of a variety of real-world cases of patients with hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone—a condition that accounts for approximately one-third of all cases of hyponatremia—this supplement aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the challenges faced in diagnosing and managing hyponatremia. These cases will also help to illustrate how some of the limitations of traditional therapies may be overcome with the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:26069838

  20. Symptomatic Epilepsies due to Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dakaj, Nazim; Shatri, Nexhat; Isaku, Enver; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebro-vascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsies. This study aims to investigate: a) Frequency of epilepsy in patients with CVD; b) Correlation of epilepsy with the type of CVD (ischemic and hemorrhage) and with age. Methodology: It is analyzed medical documentation of 816 hospitalized patients with CVD in the clinic of Neurology in University Clinical Center (UCC) during the period January - December 2010. The study included data on patients presenting with epileptic seizures after CVD, and those with previously diagnosed epilepsy, are not included in the study. The diagnosis of CVD, are established in clinical neurological examination and the brain imaging (computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). The diagnosis of epilepsy is established by the criteria of ILAE (International League against Epilepsy) 1983, and epileptic seizures are classified according to the ILAE classification, of 1981. Results: Out of 816 patients with CVD, 692 were with ischemic stroke and 124 with hemorrhage. From 816 patients, epileptic seizures had 81 (10%), of which 9 patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy earlier and they are not included in the study. From 72 (99%) patients with seizures after CVD 25 (33%) have been with ischemia, whereas 47 (67%) with hemorrhage. Conclusion: CVD present fairly frequent cause of symptomatic epilepsies among patients treated in the clinic of Neurology at UCC (about 10%). The biggest number of patients with epilepsy after CVD was with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25685086

  1. Symptomatic thrower's exostosis. Arthroscopic evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Meister, K; Andrews, J R; Batts, J; Wilk, K; Baumgarten, T; Baumgartner, T

    1999-01-01

    A long-term follow-up was performed on 22 patients treated for a posterior glenoid osteophyte and symptomatic posterior shoulder pain during either the late cocking, acceleration, or follow-through phases of throwing. Arthroscopic evaluation of these patients revealed undersurface tearing of the rotator cuff in all but one. Fifteen patients also had tearing of the posterior labrum. Anterior labral fraying was noted in four patients. Treatment consisted of debridement of the rotator cuff and labral tears. The posterior glenoid osteophyte was removed arthroscopically in 11 patients. Eighteen of 22 throwers treated were available for long-term follow-up at a mean of 6.3 years (range, 1 to 12). Only 10 of 18 (55%) throwers evaluated had returned to their premorbid level of throwing. All 10 were asymptomatic and had maintained a high level of performance for a mean of 3.6 years (range, 1 to 8). At the time of latest follow-up, five players were still participating at the major league level and five had retired. One patient had recurrence of the exostosis 8 years after surgery. Among our patients a trend existed toward a poorer result and failure of return to activity with a posterior osteophyte greater than 100 mm2. A posterior glenoid exostosis, when identified in the symptomatic shoulder of the throwing athlete, can be considered a definite marker of internal impingement.

  2. Chemical sensitivity in symptomatic Cambodia veterans.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Erik W M A; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; De Vries, Maaike; Scheepers, Paul T I; Bleijenberg, Gijs; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2003-12-01

    Following their participation in a United Nations peacekeeping operation in Cambodia (1992-1993), Dutch veterans complained of symptoms similar to those reported by Gulf War veterans. The authors conducted a matched case-control study to evaluate 76 symptomatic and 32 matched asymptomatic Cambodia veterans on the basis of data collected by postal questionnaire. The number of symptomatic veterans who reported having used insect repellants that contained N,N,-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) during the mission in Cambodia was significantly higher, compared with asymptomatic veterans. The percentage of veterans who reported feeling ill following brief exposures to chemicals such as paint or pesticides was equal in both groups, but the percentage was low compared with the results of other studies of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The current study was limited by self-report and time delay (potential recall bias) between deployment to Cambodia and the time of survey. Nevertheless, the study results did not support the hypothesis that symptoms in the total group of Cambodia veterans could be related to Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. PMID:15859508

  3. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival.

  4. Prevalence of Hyponatremia in Hypothyroid Patients during Radioactive 131I Ablation for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cunanan, Elaine C.; Kho, Sjoberg A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia developing in hypothyroid patients has been encountered in clinical practice; however, its prevalence has not been well established. Methods Thirty patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer, rendered hypothyroid after surgery and levothyroxine withdrawal, and who are for radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation were included. Serum sodium concentrations were measured twice, at the time of admission for RAI ablation, and before discharge after increased oral fluid intake. The outcome measures were to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia among hypothyroid patients prior to RAI ablation and after oral hydration post-RAI, and to correlate the serum sodium levels pre-RAI and post-RAI with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration and age. Results Thirty patients were included, with ages from 23 to 65 years old (median, 40). Two patients (6.7%) were hyponatremic prior to RAI ablation, and eight patients (26.7%) had mild hyponatremia (130 to 134 mEq/L) after RAI and hydration. There was no significant correlation between TSH levels and serum sodium levels prior to or after RAI. There was also no significant correlation between pre- and post-RAI sodium concentration and age. Conclusions The prevalence of hyponatremia pre-RAI was 6.7%, and 26.7% post-RAI. No significant correlation was noted between TSH concentration and age on pre- or post-RAI sodium concentrations. Routine measurement of serum sodium post-RAI/isolation is still not advised. Measurement of sodium post-RAI may be considered in patients who are elderly, with comorbid conditions or on medications. PMID:27546873

  5. Symptomatic Therapy and Rehabilitation in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and a major cause of chronic neurological disability in young adults. Primary progressive MS (PPMS) constitutes about 10% of cases, and is characterized by a steady decline in function with no acute attacks. The rate of deterioration from disease onset is more rapid than relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS types. Multiple system involvement at onset and rapid early progression have a worse prognosis. PPMS can cause significant disability and impact on quality of life. Recent studies are biased in favour of relapsing remitting patients as treatment is now available for them and they are more likely to be seen at MS clinics. Since prognosis for PPMS is worse than other types of MS, the focus of rehabilitation is on managing disability and enhancing participation, and application of a “neuropalliative” approach as the disease progresses. This chapter presents the symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation for persons with MS, including PPMS. A multidisciplinary approach optimizes the intermediate and long-term medical, psychological and social outcomes in this population. Restoration and maintenance of functional independence and societal reintegration, and issues relating to quality of life are addressed in rehabilitation processes. PMID:22013521

  6. A sign of symptomatic chronic cholecystitis on biliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Barkin, J.S.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    Five hundred patients with acute right-upper-quadrant pain underwent biliary scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc paraisopropyliminodiacetic acid. One hundred and thirty-four studies were reported normal (both gallbladder and activity in bowel are noted in 1 hr). Of the 134 studies reported as normal, 32 showed intestinal activity before gallbladder visualization during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography revealed that 24 patients had gallstones, and eight patients had no demonstrable pathology in the biliary system. Of the 134 studies, 102 showed visualization of the gallbladder before intestinal activity during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography showed that 73 patients had normal biliary system. The remaining 29 patients had gallstones. The overall sensitivity of this finding is 45%, the specificity is 90%, and the accuracy is 73%. In this group of symptomatic patients, the appearance of intestinal activity before gallbladder activity on biliary scintigraphy warrants further evaluation of these patients by sonography and/or oral cholecystography.

  7. Symptomatic flexible flatfoot in adults: subtalar arthroereisis

    PubMed Central

    Ozan, Fırat; Doğar, Fatih; Gençer, Kürşat; Koyuncu, Şemmi; Vatansever, Fatih; Duygulu, Fuat; Altay, Taşkın

    2015-01-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common deformity in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the functional and radiographic results of subtalar arthroereisis in adult patients with symptomatic flexible flatfoot. We included 26 feet in 16 patients who underwent subtalar arthroereisis for symptomatic flexible flatfoot. Radiographic examination included calcaneal inclination angle, lateral talocalcaneal angle, Meary’s angle, anteroposterior talonavicular angle, and Kite’s angle. The clinical assessment was based on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scale and a visual analog scale (VAS). The mean follow-up was 15.1±4.7 months. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 53±6.6, while the mean AOFAS score at the last follow-up visit was 75±11.2 (P<0.05). The mean visual analog scale score was 6.9±0.6 preoperatively and 4.1±1.4 at the last follow-up visit (P<0.05). The mean preoperative and postoperative values measured were 13.4°±3.3° and 14.6°±2.7° for calcaneal inclination angles (P<0.05); 35.7°±6.9° and 33.2°±5.3° for lateral talocalcaneal angles (P>0.05); 8°±5.3° and 3.3±3 for Meary’s angles (P<0.05); 5.6°±3.5° and 2.6°±1.5° for anteroposterior talonavicular angles (P<0.05); and 23.7°±6.1° and 17.7°±5° for Kite’s angles, respectively (P<0.05). Implants were removed in three feet (11.5%). Subtalar arthroereisis is a minimally invasive procedure that can be used in the surgical treatment of adults with symptomatic flexible flatfoot. This procedure provided radiological and functional recovery in our series of patients. PMID:26527876

  8. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis.

  9. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:21479984

  10. Microsurgical technique of symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Fu; Hsu, Sanford P C; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2015-07-01

    Symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm is rare. Cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus are subjected to the mass effect of an expanding aneurysm. Microsurgical clipping is the treatment of choice to relieve compressive cranial neuropathy. In this video, the authors present a case of intracavernous aneurysm causing diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness. The patient was operated on via a pretemporal transclinoid-transcavernous approach. The aneurysm was completely obliterated through direct clipping. There were no new-onset neurologic deficits and complications after the operation. Complete recovery of the diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness was observed at the 6-month postoperative follow up. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4w5QUoNIAQM. PMID:26132609

  11. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  12. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  13. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-09-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians.

  14. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: Hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  15. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms.

  16. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  17. Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lanteri, Marion C; O'Brien, Katie M; Purtha, Whitney E; Cameron, Mark J; Lund, Jennifer M; Owen, Rachel E; Heitman, John W; Custer, Brian; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Tobler, Leslie H; Kiely, Nancy; Prince, Harry E; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Kamel, Hany T; Kelvin, David J; Busch, Michael P; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Diamond, Michael S; Norris, Philip J

    2009-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes asymptomatic infection in most humans, but for undefined reasons, approximately 20% of immunocompetent individuals develop West Nile fever, a potentially debilitating febrile illness, and approximately 1% develop neuroinvasive disease syndromes. Notably, since its emergence in 1999, WNV has become the leading cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in North America. We hypothesized that CD4+ Tregs might be differentially regulated in subjects with symptomatic compared with those with asymptomatic WNV infection. Here, we show that in 32 blood donors with acute WNV infection, Tregs expanded significantly in the 3 months after index (RNA+) donations in all subjects. Symptomatic donors exhibited lower Treg frequencies from 2 weeks through 1 year after index donation yet did not show differences in systemic T cell or generalized inflammatory responses. In parallel prospective experimental studies, symptomatic WNV-infected mice also developed lower Treg frequencies compared with asymptomatic mice at 2 weeks after infection. Moreover, Treg-deficient mice developed lethal WNV infection at a higher rate than controls. Together, these results suggest that higher levels of peripheral Tregs after infection protect against severe WNV disease in immunocompetent animals and humans.

  18. Facial affect recognition in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yalcin-Siedentopf, Nursen; Hoertnagl, Christine M; Biedermann, Falko; Baumgartner, Susanne; Deisenhammer, Eberhard A; Hausmann, Armand; Kaufmann, Alexandra; Kemmler, Georg; Mühlbacher, Moritz; Rauch, Anna-Sophia; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Hofer, Alex

    2014-02-01

    Both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) have consistently been associated with deficits in facial affect recognition (FAR). These impairments have been related to various aspects of social competence and functioning and are relatively stable over time. However, individuals in remission may outperform patients experiencing an acute phase of the disorders. The present study directly contrasted FAR in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia or BD and healthy volunteers and investigated its relationship with patients' outcomes. Compared to healthy control subjects, schizophrenia patients were impaired in the recognition of angry, disgusted, sad and happy facial expressions, while BD patients showed deficits only in the recognition of disgusted and happy facial expressions. When directly comparing the two patient groups individuals suffering from BD outperformed those with schizophrenia in the recognition of expressions depicting anger. There was no significant association between affect recognition abilities and symptomatic or psychosocial outcomes in schizophrenia patients. Among BD patients, relatively higher depression scores were associated with impairments in both the identification of happy faces and psychosocial functioning. Overall, our findings indicate that during periods of symptomatic remission the recognition of facial affect may be less impaired in patients with BD than in those suffering from schizophrenia. However, in the psychosocial context BD patients seem to be more sensitive to residual symptomatology.

  19. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Following Symptomatic Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Yu; Shen, Cheng-Che; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Wen, Chun-Hsien; Chiang, Yung-Yen; Lu, Ti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal transition is highly symptomatic in at least 20% of women. A higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms, including depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, has been shown in women with symptomatic menopausal transition. However, a clear correlation between symptomatic menopausal transition and psychiatric disorders has not been established. We explored the association between symptomatic menopausal transition and subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia as well as bipolar, depressive, anxiety, and sleep disorders. We investigated women who were diagnosed with symptomatic menopausal transition by an obstetrician-gynecologist according to the data in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprised age-matched women without symptomatic menopausal transition. The incidence rate and the hazard ratios of subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders were evaluated in both cohorts, based on the diagnoses of psychiatrists. The symptomatic menopausal transition and control cohorts each consisted of 19,028 women. The incidences of bipolar disorders (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–2.80), depressive disorders (HR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.93–2.45), anxiety disorders (HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.84–2.41), and sleep disorders (HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.73–2.34) were higher among the symptomatic menopausal transition women than in the comparison cohort. After stratifying for follow-up duration, the incidence of newly diagnosed bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders following a diagnosis of symptomatic menopausal transition remained significantly increased in the longer follow-up groups (1–5 and ≥ 5 years). Symptomatic menopausal transition might increase the risk of subsequent newly onset bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders. A prospective study

  20. Laparoscopic ablation of symptomatic renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, S C; Hulbert, J C; Pharand, D; Schuessler, W W; Vancaillie, T G; Kavoussi, L R

    1993-10-01

    We report a laparoscopic approach to the drainage and ablation of symptomatic simple renal cysts. Ten patients with chronic pain, 6 of whom failed primary aspiration, underwent laparoscopic cyst ablation: 6 had solitary renal cysts, 3 had multiple cysts and 1 had a peripelvic cyst. The approach was transabdominal in 9 patients and extraperitoneal in 1. Intraoperatively, cyst fluid was obtained for cytological examination, and cyst walls were excised and sent for pathological examination. When possible, the remaining inner cyst walls were fulgurated to prevent recurrence. Mean total operating room time was 2 hours 27 minutes and blood loss was minimal. The sole complication was a postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma, which was managed conservatively. Malignancy was diagnosed in 2 patients, each of whom had a negative preoperative aspiration. These patients subsequently underwent radical nephrectomy. All remaining patients were asymptomatic at a mean followup of 10 months. Laparoscopic ablation of renal cysts is a safe and effective alternative to open surgery in patients who have failed conservative measures. Preoperative and intraoperative evaluation for malignancy should be performed.

  1. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  2. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  3. Prevalence of Symptomatic Lumbar Spondylolysis in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Akihiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Goda, Yuichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakamaki, Tadanori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis, is prevalent in adolescent athletes. Recent advances in diagnostic tools and techniques enable early diagnosis before these fractures progress to complete fractures through the pars. However, because patients often consult family physicians for primary care of low back pain and these physicians may not have access to diagnostic modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, stress fractures can be missed. This study surveyed the prevalence of symptomatic spondylolysis in pediatric patients who consulted an orthopedic clinic for primary care and investigated whether such acute stress fractures may be overlooked without MRI. The prospective study investigated 264 patients who were younger than 19 years and had low back pain. Of the 153 patients (58.0%) with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks, 136 who agreed to undergo MRI were included in the study. This group included 11 elementary school students, 71 junior high school students, and 54 high school students. The overall prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was 39.7% (54 of 136) and was 9.3% in elementary school students (5 of 11, 45.5%), 59.3% in junior high school students (32 of 71, 45.1%), and 31.5% in high school students (17 of 54, 31.5%). All 54 patients with spondylolysis had a history of athletic activity. Primary care physicians should recognize that approximately 40% of pediatric patients presenting with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks may have spondylolysis and should consider MRI in those with a history of athletic activity. Because the spine is immature in this age group, almost half of affected elementary school and junior high school students may have lumbar spondylolysis. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e434-e437.]. PMID:27064777

  4. A Quick Screening Model for Symptomatic Bacterascites in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long-Chuan; Xu, Long; He, Wen-Hua; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhosis can be made when a patient has an ascites polymorphonuclear leukocyte count ≥250/mm3. However, symptomatic bacterascites, which is a variant of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis with signs of infection but an ascites polymorphonuclear leukocyte count <250/mm3, cannot be confirmed until the time-consuming ascites culture becomes positive. Currently, early indicators for symptomatic bacterascites remain undetermined. Aims: To develop a quick screening model for early detection of symptomatic bacterascites in cirrhosis. Materials and Methods: Data on patients with cirrhotic ascites from two hospitals (from 2010 to 2014) were collected retrospectively. Patients with symptomatic bacterascites were enrolled in the case group and compared with patients without any infection in the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to build a model for screening symptomatic bacterascites, and a receiver operating characteristics curve was used to assess the model. Results: In total, 103 patients were enrolled in the case group and 204 patients were enrolled in the control group. A screening model was constructed based on body temperature, abdominal tenderness, blood neutrophil percentage, blood total bilirubin, prothrombin time, and ascites nucleated leukocyte count. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.939; a screening score of 0.328 was the best cutoff value. Conclusion: Patients with suspected symptomatic bacterascites can be quickly screened according to the developed model, and a screening score ≥0.328 indicates symptomatic bacterascites. PMID:27488322

  5. Differential Impact of Hyponatremia and Hepatic Encephalopathy on Health-Related Quality of Life and Brain Metabolite Abnormalities in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Wade, James B; Thacker, Leroy; Kraft, Kenneth A; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R Todd; Fuchs, Michael; Bouneva, Iliana; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Sanyal, Arun J; Gilles, HoChong; Heuman, Douglas M; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia (HN) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) together can impair health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) and cognition in cirrhosis. Aim To study effect of hyponatremia on cognition, HRQOL and brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) independent of HE. Methods Four cirrhotic groups(no HE/HN, HE alone, HN alone (sodium<130mEq/L),HE+HN) underwent cognitive testing, HRQOL using Sickness Impact Profile (SIP: higher score is worse; has psycho-social and physical sub-scores) and brain MRS (myoinositol(mI) and glutamate+glutamine(Glx)), which were compared across groups. A subset underwent HRQOL testing before/after diuretic withdrawal. Results 82 cirrhotics (30 no HE/HN, 25 HE, 17 HE+HN and 10 HN, MELD 12, 63% Hepatitis C) were included. Cirrhotics with HN alone and without HE/HN had better cognition compared to HE groups (median abnormal tests no-HE/HN:3, HN:3.5, HE:6.5,HE+HN:7, p=0.008). Despite better cognition, HN only patients had worse HRQOL in total and psychosocial SIP while both HN groups (with/without HE) had a significantly worse physical SIP(p<0.0001, all comparisons). Brain MRS showed lowest Glx in HN and highest in HE groups (p<0.02). mI levels were comparably decreased in the three affected (HE,HE+HN and HN) groups compared to no HE/HN and were associated with poor HRQOL. Six HE+HN cirrhotics underwent diuretic withdrawal which improved serum sodium and total/psycho-social SIP scores. Conclusions Hyponatremic cirrhotics without HE have poor HRQOL despite better cognition than those with concomitant HE. Glx levels were lowest in HN without HE but mI was similar across affected groups. HRQOL improved after diuretic withdrawal. Hyponatremia has a complex, non-linear relationship with brain Glx and mI, cognition and HRQOL. PMID:23665182

  6. Fatal hyponatremia in a 7-year-old girl with cloacal exstrophy after cystoscopy for a bladder stone.

    PubMed

    Walker, Marc R; Fuhr, Peter G; Koyle, Martin A

    2008-06-01

    A case of fatal hyponatremia in a 7-year-old girl following a percutaneous cystolithotomy is presented. Stone removal by percutaneous cystolithotomy is considered a safe and effective procedure, but this may depend on the type of solution used for irrigation. In this case less than 2L of sterile water was used as irrigation in an augmented bladder causing a drop in sodium to 120 mmol/L in 30 min. The result was a massive shift of water into the cerebral tissue, cerebral edema and death. PMID:18631933

  7. Symptomatic therapy and neurorehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kesselring, Jürg; Beer, Serafin

    2005-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with a variety of symptoms and functional deficits that result in a range of progressive impairments and handicap. Symptoms that contribute to loss of independence and restrictions in social activities lead to continuing decline in quality of life. Our aim is to give an updated overview on the management of symptoms and rehabilitation measures in MS. Appropriate use of these treatment options might help to reduce long-term consequences of MS in daily life. First, we review treatment of the main symptoms of MS: fatigue, bladder and bowel disturbances, sexual dysfunction, cognitive and affective disorders, and spasticity. Even though these symptomatic therapies have benefits, their use is limited by possible side-effects. Moreover, many common disabling symptoms, such as weakness, are not amenable to drug treatment. However, neurorehabilitation has been shown to ease the burden of these symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Second, we discuss comprehensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation and specific treatment options. Even though rehabilitation has no direct influence on disease progression, studies to date have shown that this type of intervention improves personal activities and ability to participate in social activities, thereby improving quality of life. Treatment should be adapted depending on: the individual patient's needs, demands of their surrounding environment, type and degree of disability, and treatment goals. Improvement commonly persists for several months beyond the treatment period, mostly as a result of reconditioning and adaptation and appropriate use of medical and social support at home. These findings suggest that quality of life is determined by disability and handicap more than by functional deficits and disease progression. PMID:16168933

  8. Laparoscopic evacuation of a subcapsular renal hematoma causing symptomatic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Graham, C W; Lynch, S C; Muskat, P C; Mokulis, J A

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a subcapsular hematoma following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy which presented as symptomatic hypertension. When medical therapy proved ineffective, laparoscopic decompression of the hematoma corrected the hypertension.

  9. Surgical treatment of the symptomatic os trigonum in children.

    PubMed

    de Landevoisin, E Soucanye; Jacopin, S; Glard, Y; Launay, F; Jouve, J-L; Bollini, G

    2009-04-01

    Symptomatic os trigonum is a rare condition, well described in adults, that causes chronic ankle pain. To date there are no reported cases of successfully managed symptomatic os trigonum in the children population. We retrospectively reviewed four paediatric patients (11-17 years of age) successfully operated for a symptomatic os trigonum using an open excision through a posteromedial approach. One case was bilateral. Postoperative pain relief was obtained in all cases. All of the patients were able to return to unrestricted physical activities after three months. The average follow-up was 12 months. Symptomatic os trigonum may be held responsible for chronic ankle pain in children and adolescents as well as in adults. The surgical treatment is effective in children.

  10. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  11. Prolonged and symptomatic bradycardia following a single dose of fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Faber, Hans; Fischer, Hans-Jörg; Weber, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Fingolimod-related bradycardia is usually asymptomatic, reaches its nadir within 6 hours post-dose and recovers spontaneously. Here we report the case of a 30-year-old MS patient with vagotonia who developed symptomatic bradycardia with 33 beats per minute at nadir 39 hours after a single dose of fingolimod. Bradycardia was responsive to atropine, but returned within 2 hours. Overall, it took a week until the patient recovered. Extended monitoring is advised in patients with symptomatic bradycardia.

  12. Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    From 2000 through 2015, there were 1,542 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Annual incidence rates rose sharply from 2008 through 2010 but then decreased by more than 50% from 2010 through 2013. In 2015, the number of cases (n=116) increased by approximately 20% from the previous year. The recent increase in rates overall reflects increased rates in the Army and the Marine Corps. Relative to their respective counterparts, crude incidence rates of exertional hyponatremia for the entire 16-year surveillance period were higher among females, those in the youngest age group, Marines, and recruit trainees. Service members (particularly recruit trainees) and their supervisors must be vigilant for early signs of heat-related illnesses and must be knowledgeable of the dangers of excessive water consumption and the prescribed limits for water intake during prolonged physical activity (e.g., field training exercises, personal fitness training, recreational activities) in hot, humid weather. PMID:27030930

  13. Special medical conditions associated with catatonia in the internal medicine setting: hyponatremia-inducing psychosis and subsequent catatonia.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases.There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia.

  14. Special Medical Conditions Associated with Catatonia in the Internal Medicine Setting: Hyponatremia-Inducing Psychosis and Subsequent Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases. There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

  15. Rationale and design of the treatment of hyponatremia based on lixivaptan in NYHA class III/IV cardiac patient evaluation (THE BALANCE) study.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Aranda, Juan M; Boehmer, John P; Elkayam, Uri; Gilbert, Edward M; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Kukin, Marrick; Lowes, Brian D; O'Connell, John B; Tavazzi, Luigi; Feldman, Arthur M; Ticho, Barry; Orlandi, Cesare

    2010-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder in patients with heart failure (HF) associated with cognitive dysfunction and increased mortality and rehospitalization rates. Loop diuretics worsen renal function, produce neurohormonal activation, and induce electrolyte imbalances. Lixivaptan is a selective, oral vasopressin V(2) -receptor antagonist that improves hyponatremia by promoting electrolyte-free aquaresis without significant side effects. The Treatment of Hyponatremia Based on Lixivaptan in NYHA Class III/IV Cardiac Patient Evaluation (BALANCE) study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial designed to evaluate the effects of lixivaptan on serum sodium in patients hospitalized with worsening heart failure (target N= 650), signs of congestion and serum sodium concentrations <135 mEq/L. Other endpoints include assessment of dyspnea, body weight, cognitive function, and days of hospital-free survival. Patients are randomized 1:1 to lixivaptan or matching placebo for 60 days, with a 30-day safety follow-up. Doses of lixivaptan or placebo are adjusted based on serum sodium and volume status. Lixivaptan was shown to increase serum sodium and reduce body weight, without renal dysfunction or hypokalemia. BALANCE seeks to address unmet questions regarding the use of vasopressin antagonists including their effects on cognitive function and clinical outcomes in patients with hyponatremia and worsening heart failure. PMID:20973922

  16. Rationale and design of the treatment of hyponatremia based on lixivaptan in NYHA class III/IV cardiac patient evaluation (THE BALANCE) study.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Aranda, Juan M; Boehmer, John P; Elkayam, Uri; Gilbert, Edward M; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Kukin, Marrick; Lowes, Brian D; O'Connell, John B; Tavazzi, Luigi; Feldman, Arthur M; Ticho, Barry; Orlandi, Cesare

    2010-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder in patients with heart failure (HF) associated with cognitive dysfunction and increased mortality and rehospitalization rates. Loop diuretics worsen renal function, produce neurohormonal activation, and induce electrolyte imbalances. Lixivaptan is a selective, oral vasopressin V(2) -receptor antagonist that improves hyponatremia by promoting electrolyte-free aquaresis without significant side effects. The Treatment of Hyponatremia Based on Lixivaptan in NYHA Class III/IV Cardiac Patient Evaluation (BALANCE) study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial designed to evaluate the effects of lixivaptan on serum sodium in patients hospitalized with worsening heart failure (target N= 650), signs of congestion and serum sodium concentrations <135 mEq/L. Other endpoints include assessment of dyspnea, body weight, cognitive function, and days of hospital-free survival. Patients are randomized 1:1 to lixivaptan or matching placebo for 60 days, with a 30-day safety follow-up. Doses of lixivaptan or placebo are adjusted based on serum sodium and volume status. Lixivaptan was shown to increase serum sodium and reduce body weight, without renal dysfunction or hypokalemia. BALANCE seeks to address unmet questions regarding the use of vasopressin antagonists including their effects on cognitive function and clinical outcomes in patients with hyponatremia and worsening heart failure.

  17. A case of symptomatic primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Segawa, Satoko; Kawashima, Makoto; Itoda, Ichiro; Shima, Takako; Imai, Mitsunobu

    2005-02-01

    A 30-year-old homosexual Japanese man had fourteen days of fever, malaise, appetite loss, sore throat, and four days of diarrhea and slightly congested eyes before he developed a skin eruption. He presented with measles-like exanthems on his face, trunk, and extremities. Deep red enanthems were seen on his left buccal mucosa opposite the premolar teeth, and whitish enanthems were seen on the buccal and gingival mucosa. HIV RNA was detected at the high concentration of 5.8 x 10(6) copies /ml in his serum. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed aseptic meningitis with 5,488 copies /ml of HIV RNA. Anti-HIV 1 antibodies against Gp160 and p24 tested by Western blot assay showed seroconversion on day 5 of his admission, seven days after he developed the skin eruptions. The fever lasted for three weeks from the initial onset, and the skin eruptions lasted for twelve days. Histopathologically, a mononuclear cell infiltration was seen mainly in the upper dermis surrounding small vessels and sweat ducts, with CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes predominant. Additionally, CD1a+ putative interdigitating dendritic cells had also infiltrated perivascularly, and were surrounded by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. In situ hybridization study failed to detect HIV products in skin biopsy specimens. Our findings suggested that CD8+ T cells and their interaction with CD1a+ dendritic cells in the skin may be important in inducing skin manifestations in acute HIV infections. PMID:15906546

  18. Prevalence of Hyponatremia, Renal Dysfunction, and Other Electrolyte Abnormalities Among Runners Before and After Completing a Marathon or Half Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Michael; Silvers, Scott; McNeil, Rebecca; Diehl, Nancy; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Taylor, Walt; Shapiro, Shane; Roth, Jennifer; Mahoney, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prior reports on metabolic derangements observed in distance running frequently have small sample sizes, lack prerace laboratory measures, and report sodium as the sole measure. Hypothesis: Metabolic abnormalities—hyponatremia, hypokalemia, renal dysfunction, hemoconcentration—are frequent after completing a full or half marathon. Clinically significant changes occur in these laboratory values after race completion. Study Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Methods: Consenting marathon and half marathon racers completed a survey as well as finger stick blood sampling on race day of the National Marathon to Fight Breast Cancer (Jacksonville, Florida, February 2008). Parallel blood measures were obtained before and after race completion (prerace, n = 161; postrace, n = 195). Results: The prevalence of prerace and postrace hyponatremia was 8 of 161 (5.0%) and 16 of 195 (8.2%), respectively. Hypokalemia was not present prerace but was present in 1 runner postrace (1 of 195). Renal dysfunction occurred prerace in 14 of 161 (8.7%) and postrace in 83 of 195 (42.6%). Among those with postrace renal dysfunction, 45.8% (38 of 83) were classified as moderate or severe. Hemoconcentration was present in 2 of 161 (1.2%) prerace and 6 of 195 (3.1%) postrace. The mean changes in laboratory values were (postrace minus prerace): sodium, 1.6 mmol/L; potassium, −0.2 mmol/L; blood urea nitrogen, 2.8 mg/dL; creatinine, 0.2 mg/dL; and hemoglobin, 0.3 g/dL for 149 pairs (except blood urea nitrogen, n = 147 pairs). Changes were significant for all comparisons (P < 0.01) except potassium (P = 0.08) and hemoglobin (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Metabolic abnormalities are common among endurance racers, and they may be present prerace, including hyponatremia. The clinical significance of these findings is unknown. Clinical relevance: It is unclear which runners are at risk for developing clinically important metabolic derangements. Participating in prolonged endurance

  19. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  20. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  1. Selection, management, and early outcome of 113 patients with symptomatic gall stones treated by percutaneous cholecystolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Donald, J J; Lake, S P; Ainley, C A; Hatfield, A R; Lees, W R

    1992-09-01

    Between January 1988 and December 1990, 283 patients with symptomatic gall stones were referred for non-operative treatment. After ultrasound scanning including a functional assessment, 220 (78%) patients were found to be suitable for percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Of these, 113 underwent the procedure including 10 in whom extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or methyl tert-butyl ether therapy had failed. Forty four patients underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, methyl tert-butyl ether therapy or rotary lithotripsy, 46 chose laparoscopic cholecystectomy or minicholecystectomy and 27 declined treatment. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy was successfully performed in 100 patients. Thirty four patients were a high operative risk and 14 presented with an acute complication of gall stone disease. Complications developed in 15 patients, all of whom were managed conservatively and most occurred during development of the technique. Outcome has been assessed clinically and by ultrasound scanning in 92 patients with a median follow up period of 14 months (six to 37 months). Seventy nine per cent were completely cured of their symptoms. Ninety three per cent of gall bladders were shown to be functioning and nine (9.8%) contained stones, although five of these are believed to have developed from residual fragments. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy is a safe, non-operative treatment for symptomatic gall stones and enabled the patient to fully recover within two to three weeks; it has a definite role in the management of the elderly and high risk patient but its use for the treatment of other groups is likely to remain controversial.

  2. Symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular block in an obese man.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John M; Louis, Dean S; Naughton, Norah N

    2009-05-01

    Regional anesthesia has an expanding role in upper extremity surgery. Brachial plexus blocks offer several advantages including providing effective analgesia, reducing narcotic requirements, and facilitating ambulatory care surgery. Despite the popularity of nerve blocks, the surgeon must not forget the complications associated with regional anesthesia. This article describes a case of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block in an obese man. A 46-year-old obese man underwent a left-sided supraclavicular block in preparation for decompression of Guyon's canal for ulnar mononeuropathy at the wrist. The patient experienced acute-onset dyspnea, chest discomfort, and anxiety, and physical examination demonstrated reduced breath sounds in the left hemithorax. Chest radiographs documented elevation of the left hemidiaphragm consistent with an iatrogenic phrenic nerve palsy. The patient was admitted for 23-hour observation and underwent an uncomplicated ulnar nerve decompression under Bier block anesthesia 1 week later. No long-term sequelae have been identified; however, there was a delay in surgical care, admission to the hospital, and transient pulmonary symptoms. We attribute this complication to significant abdominal obesity causing compromised pulmonary reserve and poor tolerance of transient hemidiaphragmatic paresis. In recent studies, waist circumference and abdominal height were inversely related to pulmonary function. We suspect that the incidence of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy associated with brachial plexus blocks will increase as the prevalence of obesity increases in this country. PMID:19472948

  3. Hyponatremia in the postoperative craniofacial pediatric patient population: a connection to cerebral salt wasting syndrome and management of the disorder.

    PubMed

    Levine, J P; Stelnicki, E; Weiner, H L; Bradley, J P; McCarthy, J G

    2001-11-01

    Hyponatremia after cranial vault remodeling has been noted in a pediatric patient population. If left untreated, the patients may develop a clinical hypoosmotic condition that can lead to cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, and eventually, to central nervous system and circulatory compromise. The hyponatremia has traditionally been attributed to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH); however, in our patients the treatment has been resuscitation with normal saline as opposed to fluid restriction (the accepted treatment of SIADH), thus placing the diagnosis of SIADH in question. Patients who developed hyponatremia after intracranial injury or surgery were, until recently, grouped together as having SIADH. However, there are diagnosis and treatment differences between SIADH and another distinct but poorly understood disorder that is designated cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW). CSW is associated with increased urine output and increased urine sodium concentration and volume contraction, and it is frequently seen after a central nervous system trauma. We therefore developed a prospective study to evaluate the cause of the sodium imbalance.Ten consecutive pediatric patients who underwent intracranial surgery for various craniosynostotic disorders were postoperatively monitored in the pediatric intensive care unit for hemodynamic, respiratory, and fluid management. The first four patients were evaluated for electrolyte changes and overall fluid balance to determine the consistency with which these changes occurred. The remaining six patients had daily (including preoperative) measurement of serum electrolytes, urine electrolytes, urine osmolarity, serum antidiuretic hormone (ADH), aldosterone, and atrial natriuretic hormone (ANH). All patients received normal saline intravenous replacement fluid in the postoperative period. All of the patients developed a transient hyponatremia postoperatively, despite normal saline

  4. Symptomatic ecchordosis physaliphora mimicking as an intracranial arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-06-01

    Ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) is a rare, benign tumor derived from the notochordal remnants. Usually slow growing with an indolent course, most cases are incidental findings on autopsy. Limited data exists on symptomatic patients with EP. Diagnosis mainly relies on correlating histopathologic findings confirming the notochordal elements with MRI. We herein present a middle aged woman with symptomatic EP in the pre-pontine cistern that mimicked an arachnoid cyst on preoperative scans. Additionally, we emphasize the pathological and radiological characteristics of EP that could aid in prompt diagnosis of the lesion with emphasis on considering EP as a differential for mass lesions localized in the pre-pontine cistern.

  5. Risperidone in idiopathic and symptomatic dystonia: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Marini, P; Sorbi, S

    2000-04-01

    Risperidone is a heterocyclic neuroleptic with prominent antiserotoninergic (5HT2) as well as antidopaminergic (D2) activity. We studied the efficacy of risperidone in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic dystonias in seven patients using the Fahn and Marsden rating scale for torsion dystonia before and after four weeks of treatment (2-6 mg/day). The twisting and involuntary movements with abnormal postures decreased in all the patients treated, with a statistically significant mean improvement (41%; p = 0.009, CI 95%). Our results suggest that risperidone is useful in idiopathic and symptomatic dystonia. PMID:10938193

  6. Symptomatic hip plica: MR arthrographic and arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lee D; Haims, Andrew; Medvecky, Michael; McCallum, John

    2010-12-01

    Two cases of unilateral hip pain are reported in which MR arthrography demonstrated a prominent band medial to the ligamentum teres, running in the AP direction, consistent with a hip plica. Both patients underwent hip arthroscopy with resection of the band. No labral tear or additional intra-articular pathological features was identified in either case. Both patients became asymptomatic following surgery and have remained such. The pathology report demonstrated the specimens to be a synovial band with fibroconnective tissue. This is the first MR arthrographic report of the identification and resection of a symptomatic hip plica. The symptomatic plica may represent an alternative diagnosis for mechanical hip pain.

  7. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    PubMed

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. PMID:27266642

  8. Vomiting and Hyponatremia Are Risk Factors for Worse Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Hospitalized Due to Nonsurgical Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Idan; Israel, Ariel; Carmel-neiderman, Narin n.; Kliers, Iris; Gringauz, Irina; Dagan, Amir; Lavi, Bruno; Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After initial evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), many patients complaining of abdominal pain are classified as suffering from nonsurgical abdominal pain (NSAP). Clinical characteristics and risk factors for worse prognosis were not published elsewhere. Characterizing the clinical profile of patients hospitalized due to NSAP and identifying predictor variables for worse clinical outcomes. We made a retrospective cohort analysis of patients hospitalized due to NSAP compared to matched control patients (for age, gender, and Charlson comorbidity index) hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons in a ratio of 1 to 10. We further performed in-group analysis of patients admitted due to NSAP in order to appreciate variables (clinical and laboratory parameters) potentially associated with worse clinical outcomes. Overall 23,584 patients were included, of which 2144 were admitted due to NSAP and 21,440 were matched controls. Patients admitted due to NSAP had overall better clinical outcomes: they had lower rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality (2.8% vs 5.5% and 7.9% vs 10.4% respectively, P < 0.001 for both comparisons). They also had a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (3.9 vs 6.2 days, P < 0.001). Rates of re-hospitalization within 30-days were not significantly different between study groups. Among patients hospitalized due to NSAP, we found that vomiting or hyponatremia at presentation or during hospital stay were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Compared to patients hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons, the overall prognosis of patients admitted due to NSAP is favorable. The combination of NSAP with vomiting and hyponatremia is associated with worse clinical outcomes. PMID:27057886

  9. LigaSure Hemorrhoidectomy for Symptomatic Hemorrhoids: First Pediatric Experience.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Ole; Soccorso, Giampiero; Murthi, Govind

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhoids are uncommon in children. Third and fourth degree symptomatic hemorrhoids may be surgically excised. We describe the first experience of using LigaSure (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts, United States) to perform hemorrhoidectomies in children. LigaSure hemorrhoidectomy has been well described in adults and is found to be superior in patient tolerance as compared with conventional hemorrhoidectomy.

  10. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  12. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  13. The ROKS nomogram for predicting a second symptomatic stone episode.

    PubMed

    Rule, Andrew D; Lieske, John C; Li, Xujian; Melton, L Joseph; Krambeck, Amy E; Bergstralh, Eric J

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with first-time kidney stones undergo limited evaluations, and few receive preventive therapy. A prediction tool for the risk of a second kidney stone episode is needed to optimize treatment strategies. We identified adult first-time symptomatic stone formers residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1984 to 2003 and manually reviewed their linked comprehensive medical records through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Clinical characteristics in the medical record before or up to 90 days after the first stone episode were evaluated as predictors for symptomatic recurrence. A nomogram was developed from a multivariable model based on these characteristics. There were 2239 first-time adult kidney stone formers with evidence of a passed, obstructing, or infected stone causing pain or gross hematuria. Symptomatic recurrence occurred in 707 of these stone formers through 2012 (recurrence rates at 2, 5, 10, and 15 years were 11%, 20%, 31%, and 39%, respectively). A parsimonious model had the following risk factors for recurrence: younger age, male sex, white race, family history of stones, prior asymptomatic stone on imaging, prior suspected stone episode, gross hematuria, nonobstructing (asymptomatic) stone on imaging, symptomatic renal pelvic or lower-pole stone on imaging, no ureterovesicular junction stone on imaging, and uric acid stone composition. Ten-year recurrence rates varied from 12% to 56% between the first and fifth quintiles of nomogram score. The Recurrence of Kidney Stone nomogram identifies kidney stone formers at greatest risk for a second symptomatic episode. Such individuals may benefit from medical intervention and be good candidates for prevention trials.

  14. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst. PMID:20205727

  15. Symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma successfully treated with enucleation.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Avdyl-Selmon; Hoxha, Faton-Tatil; Bicaj, Besnik-Xhafer; Hashani, Shemsedin-Isuf; Hasimja, Shpresa-Mehmet; Kelmendi, Sadik-Mal; Gashi-Luci, Lumturije-Hasan

    2008-10-14

    Gastric lipomas are rare tumors, accounting for 2%-3% of all benign gastric tumors. They are of submucosal or extremely rare subserosal origin. Although most gastric lipomas are usually detected incidentally, they can cause abdominal pain, dyspeptic disorders, obstruction, invagination, and hemorrhages. Subserosal gastric lipomas are rarely symptomatic. There is no report on treatment of subserosal gastric lipomas in the English literature. We present a case of a 50-year-old male with symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma which was successfully managed with removal, enucleation of lipoma, explorative gastrotomy and edge resection for histology check of gastric wall. The incidence of gastric lipoma, advanced diagnostic possibilities and their role in treatment modalities are discussed.

  16. [Symptomatic treatments (pain management excluded) for adults in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Laval, Guillemette; Béziaud, Nicolas; Villard, Marie-Laure

    2009-06-20

    Patients with evolutive and terminal desease often present 4 to 5 annoying symptoms, linked to the desease and implying a rigorous assessment as well as a treatment of the cause whenever possible. When all etiologic treatments have been used, the symptomatic treatments often allow to relieve the patient. This demands allying care and medication as well as mastering the available therapeutics so as to adapt the prescriptions at best. The present work essentially approaches the etiologies and symptomatic treatments of nausea and vomiting, hiccup, constipation, bowel obstruction, dyspnoea, congestion and death rattle and neuropsychic disfunctionning, in particular anxiety, depression and delirium. For the situations where the oral, transdermic and intravenous routes become difficult or impossible, medication to be administrated through subcutaneous routes are listed, with prudence, for not regulated. PMID:19642434

  17. Symptomatic atherosclerosis is associated with an altered gut metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik H.; Fåk, Frida; Nookaew, Intawat; Tremaroli, Valentina; Fagerberg, Björn; Petranovic, Dina; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have implicated the gut microbiota as a contributor of metabolic diseases through the modulation of host metabolism and inflammation. Atherosclerosis is associated with lipid accumulation and inflammation in the arterial wall, and bacteria have been suggested as a causative agent of this disease. Here we use shotgun sequencing of the gut metagenome to demonstrate that the genus Collinsella was enriched in patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis, defined as stenotic atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery leading to cerebrovascular events, whereas Roseburia and Eubacterium were enriched in healthy controls. Further characterization of the functional capacity of the metagenomes revealed that patient gut metagenomes were enriched in genes encoding peptidoglycan synthesis and depleted in phytoene dehydrogenase; patients also had reduced serum levels of β-carotene. Our findings suggest that the gut metagenome is associated with the inflammatory status of the host and patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis harbor characteristic changes in the gut metagenome. PMID:23212374

  18. Acute rhinosinusitis in adults: an update on current management

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Ajmal; Moumoulidis, Ioannis; Panesar, Jaan

    2007-01-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common disease with worldwide prevalence. It is a significant burden on the health services. It is most commonly caused by viruses and is self‐limiting in nature. The diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis is clinical and sinus radiography is not indicated routinely. Most cases of acute rhinosinusitis are treated symptomatically. However, symptoms may persist beyond 10 days when secondary bacterial infection prevails. Antibiotics are reserved for moderate or severe cases or when there is development of complications of acute rhinosinusitis. This paper provides an update on the current management of acute rhinosinusitis. PMID:17551072

  19. Symptomatic Mullerian Duct Cyst in a Male Infant.

    PubMed

    Chinya, Abhishek; Raj, Prince; Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic Mullerian duct cyst is a rare entity in children. A 9-month-old male infant presented with bowel and urinary obstructive symptoms. Imaging investigations revealed a cystic mass in the rectovesical pouch compressing bladder neck and rectum. At laparotomy, a Mullerian duct cyst was found. Most of the cyst was excised and the remaining cyst mucosa was cauterized. The child improved thereafter. PMID:27672581

  20. Symptomatic Mullerian Duct Cyst in a Male Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chinya, Abhishek; Raj, Prince; Sinha, Shandip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic Mullerian duct cyst is a rare entity in children. A 9-month-old male infant presented with bowel and urinary obstructive symptoms. Imaging investigations revealed a cystic mass in the rectovesical pouch compressing bladder neck and rectum. At laparotomy, a Mullerian duct cyst was found. Most of the cyst was excised and the remaining cyst mucosa was cauterized. The child improved thereafter. PMID:27672581

  1. Endoscopic fenestration of a symptomatic cyst of the septum pellucidum.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Manrique, M; De Prado, F

    2000-12-01

    We present the case of a 25-year-old woman suffering from chronic severe headaches and syncope associated with an expanding cyst of the septum pellucidum. After a simple endoscopic fenestration of the cyst the symptoms resolved, resulting in an excellent clinical outcome. This case shows that simple endoscopic fenestration may produce a rapid and maintained symptomatic improvement in patients with an expanding cyst of the septum pellucidum. PMID:11272036

  2. [Symptomatic heterotopic splenic tissue in the adrenal gland area].

    PubMed

    Heider, J; Winter, P; Kreft, B

    1998-05-01

    We report on a 33-year-old man with symptomatic heterotopic suprarenal splenic tissue. Heterotopic splenic tissue can often be found after posttraumatic splenectomy. It is a result of autotransplantation induced by trauma (splenosis). Additionally it can grow during embryogenic development. Such an accessory spleen is found in 10-44% of all autopsies. In this case report the patient was treated by resection due to increasing flank pain and suspected neoplasm.

  3. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  4. Outcome of pulmonary endarterectomy in symptomatic chronic thromboembolic disease.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Dolores; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jenkins, David P; Berman, Marius; Treacy, Carmen M; Cannon, John E; Toshner, Mark; Dunning, John J; Ng, Choo; Tsui, Steven S; Sheares, Karen K

    2014-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic disease is characterised by persistent pulmonary thromboembolic occlusions without pulmonary hypertension. Early surgical treatment with pulmonary endarterectomy may improve symptoms and prevent disease progression. We sought to assess the outcome of pulmonary endarterectomy in symptomatic patients with chronic thromboembolic disease. Patients with symptomatic chronic thromboembolic disease and a mean pulmonary artery pressure <25 mmHg at baseline with right heart catheterisation and treated with pulmonary endarterectomy between January 2000 and July 2013 were identified. Patients were reassessed at 6 months and at 1 year following surgery. A total of 42 patients underwent surgery and the median length of stay in hospital was 11 days. There was no in-hospital mortality but complications occurred in 40% of patients. At 1 year, following surgery, 95% of the patients remained alive. There was a significant symptomatic improvement with 95% of patients in the New York Heart Association functional classes I or II at 6 months. There was a significant improvement in quality of life assessed by the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review questionnaire. In this carefully selected cohort of chronic thromboembolic disease patients, pulmonary endarterectomy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life. Appropriate patient selection is paramount given the known surgical morbidity and mortality, and surgery should only be performed in expert centres.

  5. Symptomatic treatment of migraine: from scientific evidence to patient management.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, P

    2014-05-01

    All migraine patients need symptomatic treatment to stop individual attacks or, at least, significantly relieve pain. When attacks are very frequent (more than 3 days of headache per month on average), they will also need preventive treatment. The first physician the patient must address to for preventive treatment is the general practitioner (GP). If the medication prescribed by the GP is not effective or there is overuse of symptomatic drugs, the patient will have to be referred to a neurologist or a headache clinic. The drugs to be used as symptomatic treatment are triptans and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Combination therapy with antiemetics is also important. While specialists will base their therapeutic decisions on guidelines in the literature and on their personal experience, GPs do not yet have any easy-to-use tools to support them. To fill this gap, an algorithm is proposed here that can be easily used by GPs to make decisions during their patients' migraine attacks.

  6. Human giardiasis in Serbia: asymptomatic vs symptomatic infection*

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, A.; Klun, I.; Bobić, B.; Ivović, V.; Vujanić, M.; Živković, T.; Djurković-Djaković, O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of giardiasis in all of Europe, reliable data on the incidence and prevalence in Western Balkan Countries (Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and FYR Macedonia) are scarce, and the relative contribution of waterborne and food-borne, or person-to-person and/or animalto- person, transmission of human giardiasis is not yet clear. To provide baseline data for the estimation of the public health risk caused by Giardia, we here review the information available on the epidemiological characteristics of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection in Serbia. Although asymptomatic cases of Giardia represent a major proportion of the total cases of infection, high rates of Giardia infection were found in both asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. No waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis have been reported, and it thus seems that giardiasis mostly occurs sporadically in our milieu. Under such circumstances, control measures to reduce the high prevalence of giardiasis in Serbia have focused on person-to-person transmission, encouraging proper hygiene, but for more targeted intervention measures, studies to identify other risk factors for asymptomatic and symptomatic infections are needed. PMID:21678797

  7. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-06-30

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  8. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations

    PubMed Central

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  9. Arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic type D medial plica.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Mustafa; Asik, Mehmet; Akpinar, Sercan; Ciftci, Feyyaz; Cesur, Necip; Tandogan, Reha N

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to review the results of subtotal arthroscopic resection of symptomatic type D medial plica. We retrospectively evaluated 23 knees with symptomatic type D medial plica in 22 patients without other intra-articular pathology. All patients complained of chronic knee pain that had not been alleviated by medical treatment or physical therapy. In only three (13%) of the patients studied was the plica diagnosed pre-operatively with magnetic resonance imaging. The type D medial plicae in our series were classified as fenestrated (14 knees), torn (5 knees), or reduplicated (4 knees). Fibrotic changes in the plicae and degenerative changes on the medial femoral condyle were found in 16 knees Patellofemoral chondromalacia was present in three knees Arthroscopic partial resection was performed in all patients. Comparative Lysholm Knee Scale scores before and after surgery revealed a significant clinical improvement (pre-operative status, 67.19 +/- 8.05 vs. post-operative status, 90.57 +/- 9.80; P < 0.001). Type D medial plica should be considered as a possible cause of chronic knee pain. Arthroscopic partial resection of the plicae in symptomatic patients gives satisfactory results.

  10. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  11. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  12. Symptomatic intravenous antipyretic therapy: efficacy of metamizol, diclofenac, and propacetamol.

    PubMed

    Oborilová, Andrea; Mayer, Jirí; Pospísil, Zdenek; Korístek, Zdenek

    2002-12-01

    Fever is a common symptom in cancer patients. The most frequent causes of fever are infections, malignancy itself, various medications, transfusions, and allergy. Although it is necessary to treat the cause of fever, if possible, symptomatic fever management is also important. Surprisingly, little attention is paid to this topic in the medical literature, despite the fact that it is a very frequent problem. In order to support symptomatic fever therapy, we wanted to study the patients' discomfort accompanying fever and the beneficial effects of the symptomatic fever management. To the best of our knowledge, there is an absence of studies in this area, despite the fever discomfort can be an important reason for the antipyretic treatment, mainly in cancer patients. In this non-randomized open label pilot study, three intravenous antipyretics were tested in five groups of patients: diclofenac (75 mg, brief intravenous [IV] infusion) vs. metamizol (2500 mg or 1000 mg, brief IV infusion) vs. propacetamol (2000 mg or 1000 mg, slow IV injection or brief IV infusion). The study included 254 febrile episodes mainly in hemato-oncological patients with axillary temperature at least 38 degrees C. The main study endpoints were: changes in axillary temperature, improvement in patient comfort, and number and nature of adverse events. To support justification for symptomatic fever management in febrile patients, we asked the first 45 study subjects to fill in a questionnaire concerning their opinions about fever, fever-associated discomfort, and relief upon antipyretic therapy. All study medications had a significant antipyretic effect. However, metamizol at the dose 2500 mg was considered as the most effective, while propacetamol at the dose 1000 mg showed the lowest antipyretic efficacy. Concerning tolerability and adverse events, there were significant differences among the treatment groups. Diclofenac and metamizol (both 2500 mg and 1000 mg) were tolerated at best. All tested

  13. Demographic Differences in Catheter Ablation After Hospital Presentation With Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Bhave, Prashant D; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Okin, Peter M; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is increasingly used for rhythm control in symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing this procedure are unclear. Methods and Results We used data on all admissions at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York to identify patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011. Our primary outcome was readmission for catheter ablation of AF, identified using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Cox regression models were used to assess relationships between demographic characteristics and catheter ablation, adjusting for Elixhauser comorbidities. We identified 397 612 eligible patients. Of these, 16 717 (4.20%, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.43) underwent ablation. These patients were significantly younger, more often male, more often white, and more often privately insured, with higher household incomes and lower rates of medical comorbidity. In Cox regression models, the likelihood of ablation was lower in women than men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.86) despite higher rates of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.24). Compared to whites, the likelihood of ablation was lower in Hispanics (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.64) and blacks (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.73), even though blacks had only a slightly lower likelihood of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.99) and a higher likelihood of all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 1.39). Essentially the same pattern existed in Hispanics. Conclusions We found differences in use of catheter ablation for symptomatic AF according to sex and race despite adjustment for available data on demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities. PMID:26396201

  14. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  15. Symptomatic hemangioma of oral cavity treated with CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Coutinho, Adriana A.; Nicola, Jorge H.; Gusmao, Reinaldo J.

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 laser has been used by our group as a secure and efficient tool for the treatment of symptomatic oral cavity hemangiomas which can be responsible for disturbance for swallowing, phonation and in hygienic, besides discomfort and bleeding to patients. During the last four years, twelve patients with symptomatic oral cavity hemangioma were treated at the Laser Unit of our University. The treatment consisted in the application of CO2 laser at medium to low intensity according to characteristics and location of the lesions. For hemangiomas located at sites of easy surgical access such as anterior 1/3 of the tongue, lips, bucal vestibule we use 10 to 37 J/mm2 over the surface of the lesion. When the hemangioma was located at difficult surgical access sites, such as, tonsils, posterior 1/3 of tongue, or at pharyngeal wall we used 3.0 to 4.0 J/mm2 encircling the whole hemangioma. This causes reduction in the size of the lesion throughout sclerosis of nutrition vessels. After this initial procedure we applied 0.8 to 1.0 J/mm2 over the whole extent of the lesion. For both procedures we observed no significant bleeding or inflammatory reaction. The patients referred minimal post-operative discomfort with good cicatricial evolution. The evident reduction in the vascularization and size could be confirmed by photographic documentation. The good results described above, with disappearance of symptoms lead to the conclusion that CO2 laser is an efficient and secure method of treatment for symptomatic hemangioma of the oral cavity.

  16. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28%) presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy could bring clear advantages

  17. Treatment of symptomatic intraosseous pneumatocyst using intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Formby, Peter M; Kang, Daniel G; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Intraosseous pneumatocysts are benign air-containing lesions that are most often found in the spine and pelvis and are nearly always treated nonoperatively. Although rarely clinically symptomatic, studies have shown pneumatocysts to be present in up to 10% of computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis and spine. Radiographic characteristics of these lesions include a localized collection of gas with a thin sclerotic rim, no bony destruction, no soft tissue masses, and no medullary abnormalities. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice, with Hounsfield units ranging from -580 to -950, showing a gas-containing lesion. Few studies have described the management of symptomatic pneumatocysts, and all reported cases concern underwater divers, presumably because of greater pressure cycling and barotrauma encountered while underwater diving. The goal of this report is to describe the intraoperative CT-guided navigation and percutaneous injection of calcium sulfate-calcium phosphate composite bone graft substitute material for the treatment of a symptomatic pneumatocyst in the ilium of a Navy dive instructor. The patient reported a 1-year history of increasing buttock pain with increased depth of diving, consistently reproduced by diving past a depth of 20 to 30 feet. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description in the English literature of the operative treatment of an intraosseous pneumatocyst of the ilium. The use of intraoperative CT guidance permitted accurate percutaneous localization, decompression, and filling of the lesion with synthetic bone graft substitute, with complete early relief of symptoms. At 6-month follow up, the patient had reached diving depths of 170 feet without pain. PMID:25760515

  18. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved.

  19. Polyarteritis with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms at initial presentation.

    PubMed

    Munn, E J; Alloway, J A; Diffin, D C; Arroyo, R A

    1998-10-01

    Polyarteritis rarely involves the cerebral vasculature, and has not been reported to have an initial presentation with intracerebral aneurysms. We describe the first case of polyarteritis presenting with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms. A literature review from 1966 to 1997 identified 5 additional cases with evidence of intracerebral aneurysms and polyarteritis. The cases reviewed all had evidence of longstanding systemic symptoms suggestive of polyarteritis prior to diagnosis. Polyarteritis with intracerebral aneurysms is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and therefore must be recognized and treated early.

  20. Symptomatic stenosis of left subclavian artery from Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Batheeb, Nabil A; Habbab, Louay M; Qattan, Nabil M

    2015-11-01

    Patients with a right aortic arch frequently develop an aneurysm at the origin of the left subclavian artery, called Kommerell's diverticulum; it is a remnant of the left fourth aortic arch. These variants may occur in combination with congenital heart defects or they may be isolated. We report an extremely rare case of symptomatic stenotic origin of an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum in a 39-year-old man with right-sided aortic arch who had left upper limb pain and numbness on exercise. He was successfully treated by percutaneous angioplasty and primary stent implantation.

  1. Desmopression is an effective adjunct treatment for reversing excessive hyponatremia overcorrection

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Kamel A; Craig, Matthew J; Koch, Christian A; Lerant, Anna A; Fülöp, Tibor; Csongrádi, Éva

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 50-year-old malnourished African American male with hiccups, nausea and vomiting who was brought to the Emergency Department after repeated seizures at home. Laboratory evaluations revealed sodium (Na+) 107 mmol/L, unmeasurably low potassium, chloride < 60 mmol/L, bicarbonate of 38 mmol/L and serum osmolality 217 mOsm/kg. Seizures were controlled with 3% saline IV. Once nausea was controlled with iv antiemetics, he developed large volume free water diuresis with 6 L of dilute urine in 8 h (urine osmolality 40-60 mOsm/kg) and serum sodium rapidly rose to 126 mmol/L in 12 h. Both intravenous desmopressin and 5% dextrose in water was given to achieve a concentrated urine and to temporarily reverse the acute rise of sodium, respectively. Serum Na+ was gradually re-corrected in 2-3 mmol/L daily increments from 118 mmol/L until 130 mmol/L. Hypokalemia was slowly corrected with resultant auto-correction of metabolic alkalosis. The patient discharged home with no neurologic sequaele on the 11th hospital day. In euvolemic hyponatremic patients, controlling nausea may contribute to unpredictable free water diuresis. The addition of an antidiuretic hormone analog, such as desmopressin can limit urine output and prevent an unpredictable rise of the serum sodium. PMID:24303490

  2. Is the circulating plasma volume sufficiently maintained? Fluid management of an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuro; Katayama, Yoichi; Igarashi, Takahiro; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Jun; Hirayama, Teruyasu

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known cause of mortality and morbidity following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Prevention of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm is the basic management after SAH. Numerous pharmaceutical therapies and endovascular treatments are available against cerebral vasospasm, but none of them have so far proven to improve the outcome. We have focused on maintaining the circulation volume in order to prevent cerebral vasospasm. But to maintain the central venous pressure, huge infusion volume was required, and hyponatremia was frequently observed due to natriuresis and osmotic diuresis. Excessive natriuresis and diuresis cannot be managed through sodium and water replacement, since sodium replacement induces further natriuresis and diuresis (desalination), and water replacement induces hyponatremia. We therefore administered fludrocortisone and hydrocortisone to inhibit excessive natriuresis and diuresis. The efficacy of sodium reabsorption therapy is extremely high to maintain the circulation volume that might have a therapeutic effect to prevent cerebral vasospasm. In this article, we review our institution's experience regarding the management of patients with aneurysmal SAH and also discuss the importance of water and sodium balance when managing such patients.

  3. The relationship between arginine vasopressin levels and hyponatremia following a percutaneous renal biopsy in children receiving hypotonic or isotonic intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Kyoko; Nozu, Kandai; Kaito, Hiroshi; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nakanishi, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Hashimura, Yuya; Matsuo, Masafumi; Moritz, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Post-operative hyponatremia is a common complication in children which results from hypotonic fluid administration in the presence of arginine vasopressin (AVP) excess. We evaluated the relationship between the change in serum sodium and AVP levels following percutaneous renal biopsy in children receiving either hypotonic or isotonic fluids. This study was prompted after we encountered a patient who developed near-fatal hyponatremic encephalopathy following a renal biopsy while receiving hypotonic fluids. The relationship between the change in serum sodium and AVP levels was evaluated prior to (T0) and at 5 h (T5) following a percutaneous renal biopsy in 60 children receiving either hypotonic (0.6% NaCl, 90 mEq/L) or isotonic fluids (0.9% NaCl, 154 mEq/L). The proportion of patients with elevated AVP levels post-procedure was similar between those receiving 0.6 or 0.9% NaCl (30 vs. 26%). Patients receiving 0.6% NaCl with elevated AVP levels experienced a fall in serum sodium of 1.9 ± 1.5 mEq/L, whereas those receiving 0.9% NaCl had a rise in serum sodium of 0.85 ± 0.34 mEq/L with no patients developing hyponatremia. There were no significant changes in serum sodium levels in patients with normal AVP concentrations post-procedure in either group. In conclusion, elevated AVP levels were common among our patients following a percutaneous renal biopsy. Isotonic fluids prevented a fall in serum sodium and hyponatremia, while hypotonic fluids did not.

  4. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in triple iron ultra-triathletes than reported for ironman triathletes.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    "In a recent study of male and female ultra-marathoners in a 161-km ultra-marathon, the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was higher than reported for marathoners. Regarding triathletes, the prevalence of EAH has been investigated in Ironman triathletes, but not in Triple Iron ultra-triathletes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in male ultra-triathletes competing in a Triple Iron ultra-triathlon over 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma volume, plasma sodium concentration ([Na ⁺ ]) and urine specific gravity were determined in 31 male athletes with (means ± standard deviation) 42.1 ± 8.1 years of age, 77.0 ± 7.0 kg body mass, 1.78 ± 0.06 m body height and a BMI of 24.3 ± 1.7 kg/m² in the 'Triple Iron Triathlon Germany'. Of the 31 finishers, eight athletes (26%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and haematocrit decreased, plasma volume increased ( P < 0.05), plasma [Na ⁺], total body water and urine specific gravity remained stable. The decrease in body mass was related to both the decrease in fat mass and skeletal muscle mass ( P < 0.05), but was not related to overall race time, the change in plasma [Na ⁺ ], post-race plasma [Na ⁺ ], or urine specific gravity. The prevalence of EAH was higher in these Triple Iron ultra-triathletes compared to existing reports on Ironman triathletes. Body fluid homeostasis remained stable in these ultra-triathletes although body mass decreased." PMID:22784278

  5. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in triple iron ultra-triathletes than reported for ironman triathletes.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    "In a recent study of male and female ultra-marathoners in a 161-km ultra-marathon, the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was higher than reported for marathoners. Regarding triathletes, the prevalence of EAH has been investigated in Ironman triathletes, but not in Triple Iron ultra-triathletes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in male ultra-triathletes competing in a Triple Iron ultra-triathlon over 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma volume, plasma sodium concentration ([Na ⁺ ]) and urine specific gravity were determined in 31 male athletes with (means ± standard deviation) 42.1 ± 8.1 years of age, 77.0 ± 7.0 kg body mass, 1.78 ± 0.06 m body height and a BMI of 24.3 ± 1.7 kg/m² in the 'Triple Iron Triathlon Germany'. Of the 31 finishers, eight athletes (26%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and haematocrit decreased, plasma volume increased ( P < 0.05), plasma [Na ⁺], total body water and urine specific gravity remained stable. The decrease in body mass was related to both the decrease in fat mass and skeletal muscle mass ( P < 0.05), but was not related to overall race time, the change in plasma [Na ⁺ ], post-race plasma [Na ⁺ ], or urine specific gravity. The prevalence of EAH was higher in these Triple Iron ultra-triathletes compared to existing reports on Ironman triathletes. Body fluid homeostasis remained stable in these ultra-triathletes although body mass decreased."

  6. Primary symptomatic adrenal insufficiency induced by megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Delitala, A P; Fanciulli, G; Maioli, M; Piga, G; Delitala, G

    2013-01-01

    Megestrol acetate (MA) is a progestational agent for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and endometrial cancer. MA has also been used to promote weight gain in malnourished elderly patients, in patients with immunodeficiency virus and in cancer-induced cachexia. In addition to thromboembolic disease, MA may induce hyperglycaemia, osteoporosis, suppression of the gonadal axis, and Cushing's syndrome. MA has also been shown to cause symptomatic suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis owing to its intrinsic glucocorticoid-like effect. Three additional patients are presented who developed symptomatic adrenal insufficiency while they were receiving 160-320 mg MA daily. The patients were treated with cortisone acetate supplements, had clear evidence of HPA-axis suppression but recovered fully after MA was discontinued. Patients receiving MA might have an inadequate adrenal response during stressful conditions, possibly because 160-320 mg MA daily may not provide adequate protection to prevent the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The adverse MA effect on the HPA axis is probably not well recognised in clinical practice, and clinicians need an increased awareness of the endocrine complications secondary to MA treatment.

  7. Association of MICA and MICB alleles with symptomatic dengue infection.

    PubMed

    García, Gissel; del Puerto, Florencia; Pérez, Ana B; Sierra, Beatriz; Aguirre, Eglys; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Sánchez, Lizet; Hirayama, Kenji; Guzmán, María G

    2011-10-01

    Dengue viruses (DV) are one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseases in the developing world. DV can cause syndromes that are either self-limiting or severe. Allelic variants of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have been demonstrated to be associated with disease susceptibility. Here we report the association of nonclassical HLA class I MICA-MICB genes with disease outcome during DV infection. A sequencing-based typing method and genotyping of MICA and MICB in a well-characterized group of Cuban individuals with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), dengue fever (DF), or asymptomatic dengue infection (ADI) was performed. Statistical analysis revealed a tendency for MICA*008 and MICB*008 to associate with susceptibility to illness when symptomatic versus asymptomatic cases (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, p(v) = 0.03, and OR = 10.4, p = 0.0096, respectively) were compared. Surprisingly, a stronger association of both allelic forms was observed for the DF patients compared with the ADI group (MICA*008, OR = 5.2, p = 0.0001; and MICB*008, OR = 13.2, p = 0.0025) rather than the severe cases. Major histocompatibility class I-related gene-related natural killer cells and/or γδ and αβ T-cell activation might regulate the development of symptomatic DF and DHF.

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  9. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, paediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of AOM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'AOM', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take-home message? AOM is a very common problem affecting the majority of children at least once and places a large burden on health care systems throughout the world. Although symptomatic relief is often enough for most children, more severe and protracted cases require treatment with antibiotics, especially in younger children. PMID:25913598

  10. Cerebral hemodynamics after contralateral carotid endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid occlusion: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Baracchini, Claudio; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Manara, Renzo; Ermani, Mario; Ballotta, Enzo

    2006-07-01

    We sought to investigate whether carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can achieve long-term cerebral hemodynamic improvement and reduce recurrence of cerebral ischemic events in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with severe (>70%) carotid artery stenosis contralateral to carotid occlusion (CO). Thirty-nine patients with severe carotid lesion contralateral to CO were studied before (1 day) and after CEA (at 7 days, 1, 3 and 6 months, and then yearly thereafter). Collateral flow and cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR) were assessed by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). A total of 32 unoperated patients with severe carotid lesion contralateral to CO, who were comparable with respect to age and sex, served as a control group. The average period of TCD follow-up was 10 years and was obtained in all patients; during this period, major clinical events (stroke, acute myocardial infarction and death) were also recorded. The proportion of patients with collateral flow via the anterior communicating artery increased significantly from 61.5% before to 89.7% after CEA (P = 0.01). Cerebral VMR ipsilateral to CO improved in 85.7% of patients (30 of 35) within 30 days of CEA, and in all patients within 90 days. No significant spontaneous VMR recovery was recorded in the control group. After the initial recovery, no significant change in VMR was observed in the surgical group or the control group during the follow-up. In conclusion, in patients with severe carotid stenosis, CEA contralateral to symptomatic and asymptomatic CO determines a durable cerebral hemodynamic improvement not only on the side of the CEA but also on the contralateral side, with no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients.

  11. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare cause of acute renal failure and hypokalemia not to be overlooked.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Cucchiari, David; Merizzoli, Elisa; Elmore, Ugo; Angelini, Claudio; Badalamenti, Salvatore

    2014-06-01

    McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome is a rare disorder in which a colorectal tumor (usually a villous adenoma) determines secretory mucous diarrhea, which in turn leads to prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. Even though the outcome is usually favorable with complete recovery after surgery, the diagnosis is often delayed, making the patient susceptible to life-threatening complications, mainly severe acidosis and hypokalemia. We present two paradigmatic cases with extreme electrolytes imbalance and complete recovery following the appropriate treatment. The pathogenesis of this degenerative condition is discussed in detail.

  12. Transient hyperkalemia and hypoaldosteronism in a patient with acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Opastirakul, Sauwalak; Chartapisak, Wattana

    2002-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old boy with acute glomerulonephritis, who developed acute renal failure in the early course of his disease. While the renal function and other clinical manifestations gradually improved, hyperkalemia occurred unexpectedly, and returned to normal level spontaneously after a short period of symptomatic treatment. With the result of a low transtubular potassium gradient (TTKG) level, it was concluded that hypoaldosteronism was the major cause of hyperkalemia in this patient.

  13. Association Between Hematological Indices and Coronary Calcification in Symptomatic Patients without History of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Kassi, Mahwash; Alchalabi, Sama; Bala, Sayf Khaleel; Adigun, Rosalyn; Botero, Sharleen; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has long been shown to involve chronic low-grade subclinical inflammation. However, whether there is association between hematological indices assessed by complete blood count (CBC) and coronary atherosclerotic burden has not been well studied. Materials and Methods: Consecutive 868 patients without known CAD who presented with acute chest pain to emergency department and underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring evaluation by multi-detector cardiac computed tomography were included in our study. Clinical characteristics and CBC indices were compared among different CAC groups. Results: The cohort comprised 60% male with a mean age of 61 (SD = 14) years. Median Framingham risk of CAD was 4% (range 1-16%). Median CAC score was 0 (IQR 0-43). Higher CAC groups had significantly higher Framingham risk of CAD than lower CAC groups (P < 0.001). Among different CAC categories, there was no statistically significant difference in hemoglobin level (p 0.45), mean corpuscular volume (p 0.43), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p 0.28), mean corpuscular hemoglobin volume (p 0.36), red cell distribution width (0.42), total white blood cell counts (p 0.291), neutrophil counts (p 0.352), lymphocyte counts (p 0.92), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (p 0.68), monocyte count (p 0.48), and platelet counts (p 0.25). Conclusion: Our study did not detect significant association between hematological indices assessed with CBC and coronary calcification in symptomatic patients without known CAD. PMID:25317386

  14. Stent-assisted coil embolization of a symptomatic middle cerebral artery aneurysm in an infant.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis E; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O; Pandey, Aditya S

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  15. The effect of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. Results This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. Conclusions This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on

  16. Angioplasty and Stenting of Symptomatic Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, R.; Sharifipour, E.; Mansourizadeh, R.; Sohrabi, B.; Nayebi, A.R; Haririan, S.; Farhoudi, M.; Charsouei, S.; Najmi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has recently become a noteworthy treatment option for significant stenosis involving the vertebral artery (VA) in selected patients. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy, safety and mid-term follow up results of 206 cases received PTA with or without stent implant to treat their symptomatic atherosclerotic VA stenosis in all segments (V1-V4). In a prospective mono-arm trial from October 2008 to July 2012 in a single center, 239 lesions affecting the intra or extracranial VA (171 in V1, 17 in V2, 14 in V3, 21 in V4 and 16 in combined segments) were treated by PTA with or without stent implant. Non-disabling stroke patients who had failed conservative medical treatment and had angiographic evidence of >50% stenosis in the dominant VA with clinical signs and symptoms of VB stenosis were included in this study. They were mean followed for 13.15±5.24 months after treatment. Overall, 206 patients underwent the procedure. A stent was implemented in 199 patients (96.6%). The periprocedural complication rate was 7.2%. The procedural (technical) success rate was 97.6%. Of the total 239 lesions, 223 were treated with stent implant. Clinical success was achieved in all 206 symptomatic patients after the procedure. Restenosis occurred in 15.9% after a mean 10.8 (6-24) months. Of those, 63.1% and 34.2% had mild and moderate stenosis that was treated medically, whereas one case (2.6%) with severe restenosis underwent balloon angioplasty. No deaths occurred during the follow-up period. The follow-up complication rate was 6.3%. TIA occurred in 4.4%, a minor stroke in 1.4% and a major stroke in one patient. The overall patient event-free survival was 92.4%. These results demonstrate the safety and feasibility of PTA with or without stent implant, with a high technical success rate, a low complication rate, a low restenosis rate and durable clinical success in patients with symptomatic VA stenosis. This

  17. Early psychotherapy process and cluster B and C personality pathology: similarities and differences in interactions with symptomatic and interpersonal distress.

    PubMed

    Kolden, Gregory G; Klein, Marjorie H; Strauman, Timothy J; Chisholm-Stockard, Sarah; Heerey, Erin; Schneider, Kristin L; Smith, Tracey L

    2005-07-01

    Abstract In a prior study (Kolden & Klein, 1996), the authors found that the relationships between global personality pathology and early psychotherapy change processes (as defined by the Generic Model of Psychotherapy) were moderated by the extent of the patient's acute symptomatic and interpersonal distress. In the current study, the authors reanalyzed the same data to examine similarities and differences between personality disorder Clusters B (dramatic, emotional, or erratic) and C (anxious or fearful) in therapy process. In general, we found that more distressed patients reported greater defensiveness. There were no significant interactions between symptomatic distress and personality pathology in the prediction of any of the process variables. However, interpersonal distress moderated relationships between Clusters B and C and some therapy processes. Patients high in Cluster B felt more open and involved in the session when they were less distressed by their interpersonal problems at the start of therapy. In contrast, openness and insight were impeded among patients high in Cluster C when they were less distressed interpersonally. Therapists generally used more direct interventions and exploration of past experiences when working with patients higher in Cluster C pathology. However, therapists used direct interventions more specifically when patients with more severe Cluster B pathology were also higher in interpersonal distress. The discussion considers implications for the facilitation of productive early therapy process in patients suffering from Cluster B or C personality pathology.

  18. Initial clinical results of laser prostatectomy procedure for symptomatic BPH using a new 50-watt diode laser (wavelength 1000 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Krishna M.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers have been used for symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in both contact and non-contact modes with reported success rates equivalent to that of Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP). A new high power diode laser (Phototome), capable of delivering up to 50 watts of 1000 nm wavelength laser power via a 1 mm quartz fiber, was used to treat 15 patients with symptomatic BPH. Five patients had acute retention, 3 had long term catheter (7 - 48 months), and 8 had severe prostatism. Spinal anesthesia was used in 11 patients, and 4 patients had local anesthesia and intravenous sedation. Four quadrant coagulation with an angle firing probe delivering 50 watts of laser power for 60 seconds in one quadrant was used as the core of the treatment in 11 patients, contact vaporization of BPH tissue was performed in one patient using a 4.5 mm ball tip was used in one patient and three patients with bladder neck stenosis had bladder neck incision performed using a 1 mm quartz fiber delivering 30 watts of laser power. A foley catheter was left indwelling and removed after 5 - 7 days. All patients except one were catheter free after a mean of 8 days. One patient continued to have severe prostatism and had a TURP performed with good results after 3 months of his laser prostatectomy procedure. AUA symptom scores available in 11 patients was found to be 4 after 1 - 3 months of the initial procedure.

  19. Association between megestrol acetate treatment and symptomatic adrenal insufficiency with hypogonadism in male patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Dev, Rony; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Bruera, Eduardo

    2007-09-15

    Patients with advanced cancer may develop cachexia, which is often treated with megestrol acetate (MA). In addition to thromboembolic disease, MA may cause symptomatic suppression of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis. In male patients with cancer, treatment with MA may also suppress the gonadal axis, resulting in symptomatic androgen deficiency. Three cases are presented to highlight the symptomatic burden of adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Clinicians need an increased awareness of the complication of adrenal insufficiency secondary to MA treatment and a low threshold to test for adrenal and gonadal dysfunction in symptomatic male patients with advanced cancer.

  20. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  1. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Md Shahnawaz; Nasreen, Farah; Bano, Shahjahan; Amir, Syed Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind. PMID:21655029

  2. Incidence of Symptomatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Hierholzer, Johannes Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin; Baumann, Clemens; Slotosch, Christine; Schulz, Rudolf

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of secondary symptomatic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) in patients previously treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty (VTP). Three hundred sixteen patients with 486 treated VCFs were included in the study according to the inclusion criteria. Patients were kept in regular follow-up using a standardized questionairre before, 1 day, 7 days, 6 months, and 1 year after, and, further on, on a yearly basis after VTP. The incidence of secondary symptomatic VCF was calculated, and anatomical distribution with respect to previous fractures characterized. Mean follow-up was 8 months (6-56 months) after VTP. Fifty-two of 316 (16.4 %) patients (45 female, 7 male) returned for treatment of 69 secondary VCFs adjacent to (35/69; 51%) or distant from (34/69; 49%) previously treated levels. Adjacent secondary VCF occurred significantly more often compared to distant secondary VCF. Of the total 69 secondary VCFs, 35 of 69 occurred below and 27 of 69 above pretreated VCFs. Of the 65 sandwich levels generated, in 7 of 65 (11%) secondary VCFs were observed. Secondary VCF below pretreated VCF occurred significantly earlier in time compared to VCF above and compared to sandwich body fractures. No major complication occurred during initial or follow-up intervention. We conclude that secondary VCFs do occur in individuals after VTP but the rate found in our study remains below the level expected from epidemiologic studies. Adjacent fractures occur more often and follow the cluster distribution of VCF as expected from the natural history of the underlying osteoporosis. No increased rate of secondary VCF after VTP was observed in this retrospective analysis. In accordance with the pertinent literature, short-term and also midterm clinical results are encouraging and provide further support for the usefulness and the low complication rate of this procedure as an adjunct to the spectrum of pain management in patients with severe

  3. Symptomatic Exposures Among California Inmates 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Michael; Al-Abri, Suad; Huntington, Serena; Carlson, Terry; Geller, Richard J; Olson, Kent R

    2015-09-01

    Prisoners have a high prevalence of substance misuse and abuse, but few studies have examined symptomatic exposures among incarcerated populations. We sought to further characterize the nature of these exposures among this population using the California Poison Control System data. Keyword searches identified inmate cases in 2011-2013 for patients 20+ years old exposed to a single substance and taken to hospital from jail, prison, or police custody. Comparisons were made with non-inmate cases during the same period, using similar limitations. Body stuffers and body packers were analyzed as a subgroup. Seven hundred four inmate cases were compared to 106,260 non-inmate cases. Inmates were more likely to be younger, male, and to have engaged in drug misuse or abuse. They most commonly ingested methamphetamine, heroin, acetaminophen, and anticonvulsants. Inmates were more likely to receive activated charcoal (OR 9.87, 8.20-11.88), whole bowel irrigation (OR 44.50, 33.83-58.54), undergo endotracheal intubation (OR 4.09, 2.91-5.73), and to experience a major clinical outcome or death (OR 1.41, 1.05-1.89). When body stuffers and packers were removed, clinical findings were similar, though the odds of a major outcome or death became statistically non-significant. Body stuffers and body packers primarily used methamphetamine and heroin, and compared with other inmates had significantly higher odds of both adverse clinical effects and poor outcome. This large series provides a profile of symptomatic exposures among inmates, a little-studied population. The potential for high morbidity among body stuffers and packers suggests that a high index of suspicion of such ingestions be maintained when evaluating patients prior to incarceration.

  4. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms.

  5. Dose comparison of conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia – efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F; Rock, Amy D; Woodward, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of 20 and 40 mg/day conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with hypervolemic or euvolemic hyponatremia. Methods Hyponatremic patients – serum sodium (sNa) ≤130 mEq/L – received either 20 or 40 mg/day of conivaptan for 4 days, following an initial 20 mg loading dose. Efficacy was evaluated by the magnitude and extent of change in sNa. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events, changes in vital signs and laboratory parameters, rate of sNa correction, and frequency of infusion-site reactions. Pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results A total of 37 patients received 20 mg/day and 214 patients received 40 mg/day conivaptan. Baseline-adjusted sNa-area under the concentration–time curve increased by an average of 753.8±499.9 mEq·hr/L (20 mg/day) and 689.2±417.3 mEq·hr/L (40 mg/day) over the course of the 4-day treatment period. The majority of patients in both treatment groups achieved a 4 mEq/L increase in sNa over baseline in ~24 hours (82.5%). Average increase in sNa after 4 days was ~10 mEq/L, varying with dosage level and baseline volume status. Treatment success (normal sNa or increase of ≥6 mEq/L) was attained by 70.3% of patients in the 20 mg/day group and 72.0% in the 40 mg/day group. Conclusion Both 20 and 40 mg/day doses of conivaptan are efficacious in increasing sNa over 4 days of treatment with no observed increase in the frequency of adverse events or specific infusion-site reactions using the higher dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both doses were similar to what has been reported previously, exhibiting greater-than-dose-proportional plasma concentrations. PMID:26848258

  6. [Endoscopic gallbladder stenting for acute cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Satoshi; Nomura, Ryosuke; Murase, Takayuki; Ann, Yasuyoshi; Oeholm, Masayuki; Harada, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    Acute cholecystitis is an inflammatory disease of the gallbladder. Inflammation often remains in the gallbladder, but some patients may take a fatal course with exacerbation of inflammation. Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy is recommended for moderate and severe acute cystitis, sometimes cholecystectomy is impossible in elder patients. Because many elder patients have bad general conditions, cholecystectomy should not be performed. Such patients are generally treated by percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD), but PTGBD has the risk of intra-abdominal bleeding. In previous reports, endoscopic gallbladder stenting (EGBS) has been shown to be an effective strategy in cirrhosis patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis as a bridge to transplantation. Recent studies on EGBS have demonstrated an effective long-term management of acute cholecystitis in elderly patients who are poor surgical candidates. Here, we reviewed EGBS for the management of acute cholecystitis.

  7. Recurrence Risk after a First Remote Symptomatic Unprovoked Seizure in Childhood: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Lizana, J.; Aguirre-Rodriguez, J.; Aguilera-Lopez, P.; Cassinello-Garcia, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess recurrence risk after a first remote symptomatic unprovoked seizure in childhood. All consecutive patients younger than 14 years with a first remote symptomatic unprovoked seizure who were seen at our hospital between 1994 and 2006 were included in the study and prospectively followed. Only two patients received…

  8. Vaginal epithelial cell anti-Candida albicans activity is associated with protection against symptomatic vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Barousse, Melissa M; Espinosa, Terri; Dunlap, Kathleen; Fidel, Paul L

    2005-11-01

    Vaginal epithelial cell (VEC) anti-Candida albicans activity, despite being measured in vitro, is considered an innate host defense mechanism. This was supported further by the fact that women protected from symptomatic infection following a live intravaginal Candida challenge had increased VEC anti-Candida activity compared to those who acquired a symptomatic infection.

  9. Laser bladder perforation from photoselective vaporization of prostate resulting in rhabdomyolysis induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Farag, E; Baccala, A A; Doutt, R F; Ulchaker, J; O'Hara, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia and its related comorbidities remain a concern after traditional transurethral resection of the prostrate (TURP). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) laser coagulation therapy is a new, relatively bloodless procedure for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Perceived benefits with PVP laser TURP include excellent visualization of the operative field during urethral prostatic tissue vaporization and the reduced incidence of laser penetration through the prostatic capsular fibers once the capsule is reached. Theoretically, this would provide a low risk method of perforation during laser TURP. After literature review, we report this as the first case of laser bladder perforation as a complication arising from PVP therapy. This case report discusses the management of acute hyponatremic induced rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure (ARF) and the recommendation to use sodium chloride vs. sterile water for bladder irrigation during PVP TURP procedures. PMID:18327155

  10. Cavum Septi Pellucidi in Symptomatic Former Professional Football Players.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Muehlmann, Marc; Tripodis, Yorghos; Stamm, Julie M; Pasternak, Ofer; Giwerc, Michelle Y; Coleman, Michael J; Baugh, Christine M; Fritts, Nathan G; Heinen, Florian; Lin, Alexander; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-02-15

    Post-mortem studies reveal a high rate of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). It remains, however, to be determined whether or not the presence of CSP may be a potential in vivo imaging marker in populations at high risk to develop CTE. The aim of this study was to evaluate CSP in former professional American football players presenting with cognitive and behavioral symptoms compared with noncontact sports athletes. Seventy-two symptomatic former professional football players (mean age 54.53 years, standard deviation [SD] 7.97) as well as 14 former professional noncontact sports athletes (mean age 57.14 years, SD 7.35) underwent high-resolution structural 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Two raters independently evaluated the CSP, and interrater reliability was calculated. Within National Football League players, an association of CSP measures with cognitive and behavioral functioning was evaluated using a multivariate mixed effects model. The measurements of the two raters were highly correlated (CSP length: rho = 0.98; Intraclass Correlation Coefficient [ICC] 0.99; p < 0.0001; septum length: rho = 0.93; ICC 0.96; p < 0.0001). For presence versus absence of CSP, there was high agreement (Cohen kappa = 0.83, p < 0.0001). A higher rate of CSP, a greater length of CSP, as well as a greater ratio of CSP length to septum length was found in symptomatic former professional football players compared with athlete controls. In addition, a greater length of CSP was associated with decreased performance on a list learning task (Neuropsychological Assessment Battery List A Immediate Recall, p = 0.04) and decreased test scores on a measure of estimate verbal intelligence (Wide Range Achievement Test Fourth Edition Reading Test, p = 0.02). Given the high prevalence of CSP in neuropathologically confirmed CTE in addition to the results of this study, CSP may serve as a potential early in vivo imaging marker to identify those at high risk for CTE

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome: a mild disorder; purely symptomatic treatment.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) Patients frequently complain of occasional bowel movement disorders, associated with abdominal pain or discomfort, but they are rarely due to an underlying organ involvement. Even when patients have recurrent symptoms, serious disorders are no more frequent in these patients than in the general population, unless other manifestations, anaemia, or an inflammatory syndrome is also present; (2) There is currently no way of radically modifying the natural course of recurrent irritable bowel syndrome; (3) The effects of antispasmodics on abdominal pain have been tested in about 20 randomised controlled trials. Pinaverium and peppermint essential oil have the best-documented efficacy and only moderate adverse effects. Antispasmodics with marked atropinic effects do not have a favourable risk-benefit balance; (4) Tricylic antidepressants seem to have only modest analgesic effects in this setting. In contrast, their adverse effects are frequent and they have somewhat negative risk-benefit balances. Nor has the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) been demonstrated; (5) Alosetron and tegaserod carry a risk of potentially life-threatening adverse effects and therefore have negative risk-benefit balances; (6) Seeds of plants such as psyllium and ispaghul, as well as raw apples and pears, have a limited impact on constipation and pain. Osmotic laxatives are effective on constipation. Symptomatic treatments for constipation can sometimes aggravate abdominal discomfort; (7) Loperamide has been poorly assessed in patients with recurrent irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea. It modestly slows bowel movement but does not relieve pain or abdominal discomfort; (8) Dietary measures have not been tested in comparative trials. Some patients are convinced that certain foods provoke a recurrence of irritable bowel syndrome, but restrictive diets carry a risk of nutritional deficiencies; (9) Various techniques intended to control emotional and

  12. Management of acute sunburn.

    PubMed

    Han, Amy; Maibach, Howard I

    2004-01-01

    Current literature documents the use of many pharmacologic agents in the management of acute sunburn. While numerous studies have been undertaken, there is no consensus on an algorithm for such treatment. We review the literature for an evidence-based approach to the management of sunburn. A MEDLINE search was conducted whereby all published articles related to sunburn or ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema from 1966-2001 were evaluated. Studies and reviews were excluded if they were not conducted in human beings. The results of these studies are varying and often conflicting in terms of clinical effectiveness or feasibility. A total of 40 studies were reviewed. Fourteen out of the 40 studies addressed the actual treatment of sunburn (i.e. the application of a substance after the development of signs or symptoms). The majority concluded that either corticosteroids, NSAIDs, antioxidants, antihistamines or emollients were ineffective at decreasing recovery time. The remaining studies showed mild improvement with such treatments, but study designs or methods were flawed. Furthermore, regardless of the treatment modality, the damage to epidermal cells is the same. Given the lack of convincing data and consensus of opinion regarding sunburn management, the most effective and practical approach to acute sunburn is symptomatic treatment of UV light-induced symptoms, including erythema, pain and pruritus.

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Montagnese, Sara; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy in a hospitalized cirrhotic patient is associated with a high mortality rate and its presence adds further to the mortality of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of HE in this group of patients are unclear but hyperammonemia, systemic inflammation (including sepsis, bacterial translocation, and insulin resistance) and oxidative stress, modulated by glutaminase gene alteration, remain as key factors. Moreover, alcohol misuse, hyponatremia, renal insufficiency, and microbiota are actively explored. HE diagnosis requires exclusion of other causes of neurological, metabolic and psychiatric dysfunction. Hospitalization in the ICU should be considered in every patient with overt HE, but particularly if this is associated with ACLF. Precipitating factors should be identified and treated as required. Evidence-based specific management options are limited to bowel cleansing and non-absorbable antibiotics. Ammonia lowering drugs, such as glycerol phenylbutyrate and ornithine phenylacetate show promise but are still in clinical trials. Albumin dialysis may be useful in refractory cases. Antibiotics, prebiotics, and treatment of diabetes reduce systemic inflammation. Where possible and not contraindicated, large portal-systemic shunts may be embolized but liver transplantation is the most definitive step in the management of HE in this setting. HE in patients with ACLF appears to be clinically and pathophysiologically distinct from that of acute decompensation and requires further studies and characterization.

  14. Unusual symptomatic inclusion cysts in a newborn: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dental lamina cysts are cysts that occur as white or pink small nodules, often multiple, approximately 1 to 3mm in diameter. They are typically located on the midpalatine raphe and less frequently on the maxillary and mandibular alveolar mucosa; in the latter case these can be appear to be neonatal teeth. On microscopic examination, these lesions show a stratified squamous epithelium (two to three cell layers); it is possible to find protein, keratin and/or exfoliated epithelial cells in the lumen of the lesions. Neonatal cysts usually show no particular symptoms. They are associated with an excellent prognosis because they regress spontaneously within a few weeks and are not associated to any complications. However, if pain, bleeding or other symptoms occur, a surgical excision is required. Case presentation In this paper, we present an anomalous case of symptomatic dental lamina cyst which affected a 60-day-old male Caucasian newborn. The surgical treatment was elective in this case and 6-month follow-ups were mandatory. Conclusions We can underline the successful predictability of the surgical approach; however, we consider that the treatment choice should take place in the light of medical history and clinical considerations, and always be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Further studies and reviews in this field should be performed in order to suggest guidelines for clinicians, although these cases are rare. PMID:25241967

  15. Outcome after endoscopically assisted surgical retrieval of symptomatic parotid stones.

    PubMed

    Overton, A; Combes, J; McGurk, M

    2012-02-01

    10% of symptomatic parotid stones cannot be removed by minimally invasive radiological or endoscopic techniques alone. In these cases endoscopically assisted surgical parotid sialolithectomy can be performed via an extraoral approach, reconstituting the duct and preserving functioning glandular tissue. Between 2003 and 2010, 55 consecutive patients underwent endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones from 57 glands, two having bilateral procedures. Outcome was assessed using a structured questionnaire. 39/55 patients (71%) patients were successfully contacted (40 procedures; one bilateral case). At median follow-up of 3.1 years 28 glands (70%) were symptomless, whilst 11 (28%) were much improved but causing mild or occasional residual symptoms. One patient required postoperative lithotripsy and basket retrieval of a retained stone, but was subsequently symptom free. A further patient was initially symptom free then relapsed, did not respond to lithotripsy and is awaiting further assessment. In 10% of cases a short-lived sialocoele developed postoperatively. No individual reported facial weakness and one had a scar of concern. 37/39 (95%) patients were pleased to have had the operation and would have the procedure contralaterally in similar circumstances. Endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones is a successful technique with low morbidity that is well received by patients. PMID:22018956

  16. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in symptomatic hemangioma versus osteoporotic compression fracture

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim G; Akhlaghi, Saeed; Golhasani-Keshtan, Farideh; Toosi, Katayoun Z

    2013-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is more commonly used for osteoporotic compression fractures (OCFs) and osteolytic vertebral body tumors. This study aimed to study the differences between OCFs and vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) treated with PVP. Materials and Methods: Between September 2007 and January 2010, we prospectively treated 28 consecutive patients of OCFs (43 recently symptomatic OCFs) and 24 cases of VHs (26 VHs). We used visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) to evaluate the patients. The followup period in group 1 and 2 were 25.1 months (range 12 - 31 months) and 21.3 months (range 14 - 28 months), respectively. Comparison of means was carried out with the Chi Square Tests, t-test, and N Par-Test for multiple comparisons, whenever appropriate. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Following PVP the VAS score decreased to 4.57 and 4.17 in group 1 and 2, respectively. The ODI scores were 32.5% and 30%, respectively. This decrease in ODI scores lasted throughout the followup period. Conclusions: Although the preoperative scores were significantly different between group 1 and 2, there was no significant difference between two groups following the PVP. PMID:23798752

  17. [Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed

    Karvar, S; Breidert, M; Nagel, M; Kirsch, C; Pinkert, J; Ehninger, G

    2001-01-01

    Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma. HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 39-year-old woman was admitted to our department of gastroenterology with recurrent epigastrical pain. Ten years previously the diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-syndrome has been established. Two years before a germ line mutation in exon 3 of the VHL-tumour suppressor gene has been detected. The patient has a healthy son with a normal VHL-gene and four healthy siblings who had refused a genetic blood test. INVESTIGATIONS: At abdominal ultrasound at the head of the pancreas three 4 2 cm large cysts and in the region of the left adrenal gland a 2,9 2,7 cm large tumor were visible. MRI of the abdomen revealed in addition a 2,2 1,5 cm large tumour of the right adrenal gland. An asymptomatic biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was detected by elevated urine catecholamines and 123I-MIBG-scintigraphy. TREATMENT AND COURSE: The cysts of the pancreas were punctured under endosonographical control and analysis of the cyst fluid was not suspicious of a malignant cystic tumour. The patient had no further abdominal complaints. After oral treatment with the alpha-blocker phentolamine the biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was treated by retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery in an organ-sparing fashion. Postoperatively ACTH-stimulating test revealed a normal cortisol response. CONCLUSION: Adrenocortical function can be preserved by la-paroscopic adrenal-sparing surgery in bilateral phaeochromocytoma.

  18. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  19. Management of Vertebral Stenosis Complicated by Presence of Acute Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Sahin, Gurdal; Turkbey, Baris; Elibol, Bulent

    2007-04-15

    A 44-year-old male presented with multiple punctate acute infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation and a computed tomographic angiogram showing stenosis of the right vertebral origin. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a new intraluminal filling defect at the origin of the stenotic vertebral artery where antegrade flow was maintained. This filling defect was accepted to be an acute thrombus of the vertebral origin, most likely due to rupture of a vulnerable plaque. The patient was treated with intravenous heparin. A control angiogram revealed dissolution of the acute thrombus under anticoagulation and the patient was treated with stenting with distal protection. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no additional acute ischemic lesions. We were unable to find a similar report in the English literature documenting successful management of an acute vertebral ostial thrombus with anticoagulation. Anticoagulation might be considered prior to endovascular treatment of symptomatic vertebral stenoses complicated by the presence of acute thrombus.

  20. Radioembolization of Symptomatic, Unresectable Neuroendocrine Hepatic Metastases Using Yttrium-90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Hoffmann, Ralf-T.; Haug, Alexander; Sommer, Wieland H.; Raessler, Franziska; Trumm, Christoph G.; Schmidt, Gerwin P.; Ashoori, Nima; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Jakobs, Tobias F.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate safety, efficacy, and symptom-control of radioembolization in patients with unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETLMs). Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age of 62 years) with treatment-refractory NETLMs underwent radioembolization using yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres. Posttreatment tumor response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and tumor-marker levels. Laboratory and clinical toxicities and clinical symptoms were monitored. Results: The median activity delivered was 1.63 GBq (range 0.63-2.36). Imaging follow-up using RECIST at 3-month follow-up demonstrated partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease in 22.5, 75.0, and 2.5% of patients, respectively. In 97.5% of patients, the liver lesions appeared hypovascular or partially necrotic. The mean follow-up was 16.2 months with 40 patients (95.2%) remaining alive. The median decrease in tumor-marker levels at 3 months was 54.8% (chromogranin A) and 37.3% (serotonin), respectively. There were no acute or delayed toxicities greater than grade 2 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE (v3.0)]. No radiation-induced liver disease was noted. Improvement of clinical symptoms 3 months after treatment was observed in 36 of 38 symptomatic patients. Conclusion: Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-microspheres is a safe and effective treatment option in patients with otherwise treatment-refractory NETLMs. Antitumoral effect is supported by good local tumor control, decreased tumor-marker levels, and improved clinical symptoms. Further investigation is warranted to define the role of radioembolization in the treatment paradigm for NETLMs.

  1. Impact of symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections on insulin absorption and action of Technosphere inhaled insulin

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Philip A; Heinemann, Lutz; Boss, Anders; Rosenblit, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncomplicated, acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) occur in patients with diabetes at a similar frequency to the general population. This study (NCT00642681) investigated the effect of URTIs on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of Technosphere inhaled insulin (TI) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods This was a phase 2 study conducted in patients who developed a URTI while being treated with TI in a phase 3 study (N=20, mean age 50 years, 60% men). Patients underwent two 4-hour meal challenges, during which blood samples were drawn to measure serum fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP; the excipient representing an essential part of TI), serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose. The primary outcome was the ratio of serum FDKP area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC0–240 min) during URTI and after clinical resolution of URTI symptoms (≥15 to ≤45 days). Results No significant differences in PK parameters were seen during URTI versus post-URTI for FDKP. The ratio of serum FDKP AUC0–240 min during URTI and post-URTI was 1.1 (SD 0.6), p=0.4462. Plasma glucose concentrations during each 4-hour meal challenge were similar, showing small non-significant differences. No adverse events, including hypoglycemia, occurred during meal challenge visits. Conclusions Development of an active, symptomatic URTI during treatment with TI had no significant impact on the PK/PD properties of TI, suggesting that no adjustment in prandial insulin dosing is needed. However, if patients are unable to conduct proper inhalation, they should administer their prandial insulin subcutaneously. Trial registration number NCT00642681; Results.

  2. Impact of symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections on insulin absorption and action of Technosphere inhaled insulin

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Philip A; Heinemann, Lutz; Boss, Anders; Rosenblit, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncomplicated, acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) occur in patients with diabetes at a similar frequency to the general population. This study (NCT00642681) investigated the effect of URTIs on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of Technosphere inhaled insulin (TI) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods This was a phase 2 study conducted in patients who developed a URTI while being treated with TI in a phase 3 study (N=20, mean age 50 years, 60% men). Patients underwent two 4-hour meal challenges, during which blood samples were drawn to measure serum fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP; the excipient representing an essential part of TI), serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose. The primary outcome was the ratio of serum FDKP area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC0–240 min) during URTI and after clinical resolution of URTI symptoms (≥15 to ≤45 days). Results No significant differences in PK parameters were seen during URTI versus post-URTI for FDKP. The ratio of serum FDKP AUC0–240 min during URTI and post-URTI was 1.1 (SD 0.6), p=0.4462. Plasma glucose concentrations during each 4-hour meal challenge were similar, showing small non-significant differences. No adverse events, including hypoglycemia, occurred during meal challenge visits. Conclusions Development of an active, symptomatic URTI during treatment with TI had no significant impact on the PK/PD properties of TI, suggesting that no adjustment in prandial insulin dosing is needed. However, if patients are unable to conduct proper inhalation, they should administer their prandial insulin subcutaneously. Trial registration number NCT00642681; Results. PMID:27648286

  3. Prompt efficacy of tolvaptan in treating hyponatremia of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) closely associated with rupture of a gastric artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masashi; Yamada, Hodaka; Asano, Tomoko; Aoki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Aki; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Kakei, Masafumi; Ishikawa, San-e

    2014-01-01

    A 78-year-old man with abdominal pain was diagnosed with a rupture of a gastric artery aneurysm. The serum Na level promptly decreased from 135 to 110 mmol/L within several days. Brain magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe vasoconstriction of the cerebral basilar artery and anterior cerebral artery. There was neither dehydration nor edema. The plasma arginine vasopressin level was 3.3 pg/mL, despite hypoosmolality. These findings indicated a diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) derived from severe vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. The administration of 7.5 mg of tolvaptan rapidly increased the serum Na level from 123 to 138 mmol/L within the first 24 hours, thereafter continuously maintaining a normal level. Treatment with tolvaptan corrected the patient's dilutional hyponatremia.

  4. Rivaroxaban for the treatment of symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in Chinese patients: a subgroup analysis of the EINSTEIN DVT and PE studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The worldwide EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE studies randomized 8282 patients with acute symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) and, for the first time in trials in this setting, included patients in China. This analysis evaluates the results of these studies in this subgroup of patients. Methods A total of 439 Chinese patients who had acute symptomatic DVT (n=211), or PE with or without DVT (n=228), were randomized to receive rivaroxaban (15 mg twice daily for 21 days, followed by 20 mg once daily) or standard therapy of enoxaparin overlapping with and followed by an adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist, for 3, 6, or 12 months. The primary efficacy outcome was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism. The principal safety outcome was major or non-major clinically relevant bleeding. Results The primary efficacy outcome occurred in seven (3.2%) of the 220 patients in the rivaroxaban group and in seven (3.2%) of the 219 patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval 0.36–3.0; p=0.94). The principal safety outcome occurred in 13 (5.9%) patients in the rivaroxaban group and in 20 (9.2%) patients in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval 0.31–1.26; p=0.19). Major bleeding was observed in no patients in the rivaroxaban group and in five (2.3%) patients in the standard-therapy group. In fragile patients (defined as age >75 years, creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, and/or body weight ≤50 kg), the principal safety outcome occurred in four (8.9%) of the 45 patients who received rivaroxaban compared with seven (15.2%) of the 46 patients who received standard therapy. Conclusions In Chinese patients with acute symptomatic DVT and/or PE, rivaroxaban was as efficacious as enoxaparin followed by vitamin K antagonist therapy, with a similar safety profile. The relative efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with enoxaparin/vitamin K antagonist were

  5. Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease and Decreased Risk of Cancer-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; de la Aleja, Jesús González; Martínez-Salio, Antonio; Louis, Elan D.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The few studies that have assessed the association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer have had conflicting results. In addition, these studies ascertained participants either from treatment settings (ie, service-based studies) or by using a records linkage system (ie, medical records of patients evaluated at clinics or hospitals) and, therefore, were prone to selection bias. Our purpose was to estimate the risk of cancer mortality in a large population-based sample of elderly people, comparing participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (atherosclerotic stroke and coronary disease) to their counterparts without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (ie, controls) in the same population. In this population-based, prospective study (Neurological Disorders of Central Spain, NEDICES), 5262 elderly community-dwelling participants with and without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for a median of 12.1 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were reviewed. A total of 2701 (53.3%) of 5262 participants died, including 314 (68.6%) of 458 participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and 2387 (49.7%) of 4804 controls. Cancer mortality was reported significantly less often in those with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (15.6%) than in controls (25.6%) (P < 0.001). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of cancer-specific mortality was decreased in participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (HR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55−0.98, P = 0.04) vs. those without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (reference group). In an adjusted Cox model, HR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38−0.89; P = 0.01. This population-based, prospective study suggests that there is an inverse association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer mortality. PMID:26266364

  6. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A Pubmed search using the specific key words “LSTV,” “lumbosacral transitional vertebrae,” and “Bertolotti's Syndrome” was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. Results LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a “false joint” susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Conclusions Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential

  7. Pre-symptomatic diagnosis and treatment of filovirus diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Ward, Michael D.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses are virulent human pathogens which cause severe illness with high case fatality rates and for which there are no available FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics. Diagnostic tools including antibody- and molecular-based assays, mass spectrometry, and next-generation sequencing are continually under development. Assays using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have become the mainstay for the detection of filoviruses in outbreak settings. In many cases, real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR allows for the detection of filoviruses to be carried out with minimal manipulation and equipment and can provide results in less than 2 h. In cases of novel, highly diverse filoviruses, random-primed pyrosequencing approaches have proved useful. Ideally, diagnostic tests would allow for diagnosis of filovirus infection as early as possible after infection, either before symptoms begin, in the event of a known exposure or epidemiologic outbreak, or post-symptomatically. If tests could provide an early definitive diagnosis, then this information may be used to inform the choice of possible therapeutics. Several exciting new candidate therapeutics have been described recently; molecules that have therapeutic activity when administered to animal models of infection several days post-exposure, once signs of disease have begun. The latest data for candidate nucleoside analogs, small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, phosphorodiamidate (PMO) molecules, as well as antibody and blood-product therapeutics and therapeutic vaccines are discussed. For filovirus researchers and government agencies interested in making treatments available for a nation’s defense as well as its general public, having the right diagnostic tools to identify filovirus infections, as well as a panel of available therapeutics for treatment when needed, is a high priority. Additional research in both areas is required for ultimate success, but significant progress is being made to reach these goals. PMID

  8. Mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in symptomatic smokers without COPD.

    PubMed

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Guenette, Jordan A; Faisal, Azmy; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Webb, Katherine A; Jensen, Dennis; Ramsook, Andrew H; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2016-09-01

    Dyspnoea and activity limitation can occur in smokers who do not meet spirometric criteria for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the underlying mechanisms are unknown.Detailed pulmonary function tests and sensory-mechanical relationships during incremental exercise with respiratory pressure measurements and diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi) were compared in 20 smokers without spirometric COPD and 20 age-matched healthy controls.Smokers (mean±sd post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity 75±4%, mean±sd FEV1 104±14% predicted) had greater activity-related dyspnoea, poorer health status and lower physical activity than controls. Smokers had peripheral airway dysfunction: higher phase-III nitrogen slopes (3.8±1.8 versus 2.6±1.1%·L(-1)) and airway resistance (difference between airway resistance measured at 5 Hz and 20 Hz 19±11 versus 12±7% at 5 Hz) than controls (p<0.05). Smokers had significantly (p<0.05) lower peak oxygen uptake (78±40 versus 107±45% predicted) and ventilation (61±26 versus 97±29 L·min(-1)). Exercise ventilatory requirements, operating lung volumes and cardio-circulatory responses were similar. However, submaximal dyspnoea ratings, resistive and total work of breathing were increased in smokers compared with controls (p<0.05); diaphragmatic effort (transdiaphragmatic pressure/maximumal transdiaphragmatic pressure) and fractional inspiratory neural drive to the diaphragm (EMGdi/maximal EMGdi) were also increased (p<0.05) mainly reflecting the reduced denominator.Symptomatic smokers at risk for COPD had greater exertional dyspnoea and lower exercise tolerance compared with healthy controls in association with greater airways resistance, contractile diaphragmatic effort and fractional inspiratory neural drive to the diaphragm. PMID:27492828

  9. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute and acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Aron, Jonathan; Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients developing liver failure; acute on chronic liver failure and acute liver failure continues to increase, along with the demand for donor livers for transplantation. As such there is a clinical need to develop effective extracorporeal devices to support patients with acute liver failure or acute-on-chronic liver failure to allow time for hepatocyte regeneration, and so avoiding the need for liver transplantation, or to bridge the patient to liver transplantation, and also potentially to provide symptomatic relief for patients with cirrhosis not suitable for transplantation. Currently devices can be divided into those designed to remove toxins, including plasma exchange, high permeability dialyzers and adsorption columns or membranes, coupled with replacement of plasma proteins; albumin dialysis systems; and bioartificial devices which may provide some of the biological functions of the liver. In the future we expect combinations of these devices in clinical practice, due to the developments in bioartificial scaffolds.

  10. Invasive evaluation of plaque morphology of symptomatic superficial femoral artery stenoses using combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Sibin K; Safian, Robert D; Madder, Ryan D; Hanson, Ivan D; Pica, Mark C; Smith, James L; Goldstein, James A; Abbas, Amr E

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the plaque morphology of severe stenoses in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) employing combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS). Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Plaque composition of SFA stenoses has been characterized as primarily fibrous or fibrocalcific by non-invasive and autopsy studies. NIRS has been validated to detect lipid-core plaque (LCP) in the coronary circulation. We imaged severe SFA stenoses with NIRS-IVUS prior to revascularization in 31 patients (46 stenoses) with Rutherford claudication ⩾ class 3. Angiographic parameters included lesion location and stenosis severity. IVUS parameters included plaque burden and presence of calcium. NIRS images were analyzed for LCP and maximum lipid-core burden index in a 4-mm length of artery (maxLCBI4mm). By angiography, 38 (82.6%) lesions were calcified and 9 (19.6%) were chronic total occlusions. Baseline stenosis severity and lesion length were 86.0 ± 11.0% and 36.5 ± 46.5 mm, respectively. NIRS-IVUS identified calcium in 45 (97.8%) lesions and LCP in 17 (37.0%) lesions. MaxLCBI4mm was 433 ± 244. All lesions with LCP also contained calcium; there were no non-calcified lesions with LCP. In conclusion, this is the first study of combined NIRS-IVUS in patients with PAD. NIRS-IVUS demonstrates that nearly all patients with symptomatic severe SFA disease have fibrocalcific plaque, and one-third of such lesions contain LCP. These findings contrast with those in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and may have implications regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in different vascular beds.

  11. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection.

  12. Epicardial Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator In A Child With Symptomatic Bugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moltedo, Jose M; Abello, Mauricio; Gustavo, Sivori; Javier, Celada; Delucis, Pablo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    An 18 month old 14 kg male with symptomatic Brugada syndrome underwent placement of an epicardial automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator using a single coil transvenous lead sutured to the anterolateral aspect of the left ventricle. PMID:21760684

  13. Antibody isotypes in urethral swabs of symptomatic and asymptomatic men infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Naglaa F A; Eassa, Ahmed H A; Shoeib, Eman Y S; Abo-Raia, Gamal Y S

    2007-12-01

    Trichomoniasis may be asymptomatic or symptomatic in both sexes. The outcome of infection depends on the virulence factors of T. vaginalis, but these factors remain unclear. Genetic variability of the isolates and the host's immune response are likely to be key factors in that respect. Symptomatic and asymptomatic males infected with T. vaginalis were compared regarding the differences in antibody subclasses response in the urethral samples. In symptomatic cases there was a significant elevation in IgM, IgG1 & IgG2b levels in urethral samples, and a little, non-significant rise in IgG2a levels. However, there were no statistically significant differences between levels of IgA, IgG3 & IgG4. The results showed that specific IgG1 & IgM and to a lesser extent IgG2 may be involved in established symptomatic trichomoniasis in men, compared to asymptomatic ones. PMID:18383797

  14. Cortical dopamine dysfunction in symptomatic and premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Nicola; Politis, Marios; Tai, Yen F; Barker, Roger A; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Mason, Sarah L; Brooks, David J; Piccini, Paola

    2010-02-01

    We used (11)C-raclopride PET, a marker of D(2) dopamine receptor binding, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to localise cortical D(2) receptor dysfunction in individual Huntington's disease (HD) gene carriers (16 symptomatic and 11 premanifest subjects) and assess its clinical significance. 62.5% of symptomatic HD patients and 54.5% of premanifest carriers showed cortical reductions in D(2) binding. The most frequent decreases in cortical binding in individual HD subjects were seen in temporal and frontal areas. Symptomatic HD subjects with decreased cortical D(2) binding had worse scores on neuropsychological tests assessing attention and executive functions than subjects without cortical dopamine dysfunction, notwithstanding comparable reduction in striatal D(2) binding and motor disability. Our results indicate that cortical dopaminergic dysfunction is common in both symptomatic and premanifest HD gene carriers. It is an early event in HD pathophysiology and could contribute to the impairment in neuropsychological performance in these patients.

  15. A Case of Symptomatic Tracheal Diverticulum and Surgical Resection as a Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Young; Joo, Seok; Lee, Geun Dong; Ham, Seok Jin; Park, Chul Hwan; Lee, Sungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal diverticulum is often diagnosed incidentally and, due to its rarity, there is no standard treatment. It is a benign entity, but has the potential to cause specific symptoms, such as chronic upper respiratory infection and chronic cough. Symptomatic tracheal diverticulum can be medically treated, but likelihood of recurrence is high. We report a case of surgical resection of symptomatic tracheal diverticulum to prevent recurrence. PMID:27734005

  16. Symptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis infection in the setting of severe nitroimidazole allergy: successful treatment with boric acid.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina; Barnes, Arti; Mena, Leandro

    2012-09-01

    This report describes a patient with symptomatic Trichomonas vaginalis infection who was unable to tolerate nitroimidazole drugs because of severe hypersensitivity, for which desensitisation was not possible. Use of intravaginal clotrimazole, intravaginal paromomycin, intravaginal furazolidone, povidone-iodine douches, and oral nitazoxanide were unsuccessful in eradicating the patient's T. vaginalis infection. A 2-month course of intravaginal topical boric acid subsequently achieved a complete symptomatic cure and the patient remained T. vaginalis wet prep- and culture-negative 60 days after treatment.

  17. Long-term incidence of symptomatic urolithiasis post-bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nicholas; Scheffler, Patrick; Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Court, Olivier; Christou, Nicolas V.; Andersen, Ross E.; Andonian, Sero

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of urolithiasis post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is higher when compared to the general population. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is routinely prescribed to these patients, yet compliance with these supplements is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of symptomatic de novo urolithiasis post-RYGB and compliance with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Methods: A standardized telephone questionnaire was administered to patients who underwent RYGB between 1996 and 2011. Personal and medical histories were obtained with emphasis on episodes of symptomatic urolithiasis and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Results: The response rate was 48% with 478 patients completing the telephone questionnaire. After a mean follow-up of 7.0 years (range: 1–15), the incidence of post-RYGB symptomatic urolithiasis was 7.3%, while the rate of de novo symptomatic urolithiasis was 5%. The overall median time to present with symptomatic urolithiasis was 3.1 years, with 3.3 years for de novo stone-formers, and 2.0 years for recurrent stone-formers (p = 0.38). In de novo stone-formers, 33% presented with symptomatic urolithiasis 4 to 14 years postoperatively. Compliance with calcium and vitamin D supplementation was 56% and 51%, respectively. Conclusions: Despite recall bias and lack of confirmatory imaging studies, a high postoperative incidence of symptomatic urolithiasis was found in a large sample of post-RYGB patients. A third of patients with de novo stones, presented with symptomatic urolithiasis 4 to 14 years postoperatively. Compliance with postoperative calcium and vitamin D supplementation was poor and needs improvement. PMID:25408808

  18. Successful treatment of a large symptomatic lymphocyst with percutaneus drainage and repeated iodopovidone sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stukan, M; Dudziak, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the case report was to present an easy and safe method for treatment of a large, persistent lymphocyst, through a procedure performed in an ambulatory setting. The patient diagnosed with large (1,800 mi), symptomatic (pains, renal insufficiency) lymphocyst after lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer, was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage (using vascular drains) and five sessions of sclerotherapy with 10% iodopovidone, performed in ambulatory settings. The method was minimally invasive, safe, and effective in management of symptomatic lymphocyst.

  19. Peak CSF Velocities in Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K.D.; Haughton, V.M.; Hetzel, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PCMR is used to evaluate the Chiari I malformation. We compared quantitative PCMR in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. MATERIALS AND METHODS PCMR image data in an axial section near the foramen magnum in a consecutive series of patients with Chiari I malformations were evaluated. Patients were classified as symptomatic for a Chiari I if they had apnea spells and/or exertional headaches and as asymptomatic if they had symptoms not considered specific for a Chiari I malformation. The PCMR CSF flow study was obtained with the same protocol for all patients and with the neck in neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Images were inspected for CSF flow jets and synchronous bidirectional flow. Peak CSF flow velocities were calculated with commercial software. Differences between the 2 groups were tested with mixed-effects ANOVA and Wilcoxon rank sum or Fisher exact probability tests with significance set at the .05 level. RESULTS Twenty-six patients with Chiari I were classified as symptomatic, and 24, as asymptomatic. Abnormal flow jets tended to occur more often in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (P = .054). Peak CSF velocities ranged from 2 to 20 cm/s in the symptomatic and the asymptomatic groups and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups or with neck position. CONCLUSIONS Peak CSF flow velocities near the foramen magnum did not differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. PMID:20884747

  20. [Treatment of acute porphyrias. The importance of follow-up of patients and carriers].

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gyöngyi; Bor, Márta; Pusztai, Agnes

    2003-05-11

    Acute porphyrias are caused by the inherited decreased activity of the enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the affected enzyme there are 4 types of them: acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria variegata, coproporphyria and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficient porphyria, listed in order of their frequency. Basically the clinical picture is the same in the four types of acute porphyria. The most frequent complaints and symptoms are: cramping abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness of the limbs then, in the advanced phase, there is a red-colored urine, hyponatremia, subileus, acute psychosis and Landry-type paralysis. Without proper treatment death is caused by respiratory paralysis or serious arrhythmia. In case of suspicion of acute porphyria it is mandatory to identify the type of the acute porphyria and the actual status of the patient. The later indicates what kind of treatment should be used. In the acute phase the early therapy with heme arginate is the treatment of choice. Since the clinical symptoms are precipitated by endogenous or exogenous inducing factors--most often by drugs-, the drugs negatively affecting the heme biosynthesis should be omitted at once even in the suspicion of acute porphyria. The role of the inducing factors in the manifestation of the clinical symptoms makes possible the prevention. It is possible to avoid the inducing factors and this way to prevent the acute attack if the acute porphyrias are recognized in time and the patients and the carriers are under regular control. The patients receive special identification card and the up-to-date list of safe drugs. They can use only these drugs in any kind of illness. Other drugs should be considered as porphyrinogenic since it is impossible to predict based on their chemical structure if they negatively affect the heme biosynthesis.

  1. Acute Oral Poisoning Due to Chloracetanilide Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO3 ¯ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure. PMID:22323855

  2. Acute oral poisoning due to chloracetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO₃⁻ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure.

  3. The effect of acute discontinuation of total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wagman, L D; Newsome, H H; Miller, K B; Thomas, R B; Weir, G C

    1986-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute discontinuation (AD) of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on serum glucose, insulin, and glucagon levels and on the generation of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Fifty studies were performed in 48 patients. In none of the 30 studies of 1 hour duration nor in the 20 studies of 8 hours duration was there a single episode of symptomatic hypoglycemia. One patient had a glucose below normal (60 mg/dl) during the first hour after AD. Glucose and insulin concentrations were elevated at the start of TPN discontinuation but returned to normal values within 60 minutes and remained there during the successive 7 hours of study. Although glucagon levels were slightly elevated at zero time, no significant decrease occurred. There was no evidence for counter-regulation based on the patterns of glucose and hormone levels. With some restrictions, acute discontinuation is a safe, rapid method of ending a prolonged TPN infusion. PMID:3094465

  4. Symptomatic Peripheral Mycotic Aneurysms Due to Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    González, Isabel; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; San Román, Alberto; Olmos, Carmen; Sáez, Carmen; Revilla, Ana; Hernández, Miguel; Caniego, Jose Luis; Fernández, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral mycotic aneurysms (PMAs) are a relatively rare but serious complication of infective endocarditis (IE). We conducted the current study to describe and compare the current epidemiologic, microbiologic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics of patients with symptomatic PMAs (SPMAs). A descriptive, comparative, retrospective observational study was performed in 3 tertiary hospitals, which are reference centers for cardiac surgery. From 922 definite IE episodes collected from 1996 to 2011, 18 patients (1.9%) had SPMAs. Because all SPMAs developed in left-sided IE, we performed a comparative study between 719 episodes of left-sided IE without SPMAs and 18 episodes with SPMAs. We found a higher frequency of intravenous drug abuse, native valve IE, intracranial bleeding, septic emboli, multiple embolisms, and IE diagnostic delay >30 days in patients with SPMAs than in patients without SPMAs. The causal microorganisms were gram-positive cocci (n =10), gram-negative bacilli (n = 2), gram-positive bacilli (n = 3), Bartonella henselae (n = 1), Candida albicans (n = 1), and negative culture (n = 1). The median IE diagnosis delay was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 13–33 d) in the case of high-virulence microorganisms versus 45 days (IQR, 30–240 d) in the case of low- to medium-virulence microorganisms. Twelve SPMAs were intracranial and 6 were extracranial. In 10 cases (8 intracranial and 2 extracranial), SPMAs were the initial presentation of IE; the remaining cases developed symptoms during or after finishing parenteral antibiotic treatment. The initial diagnosis of intracranial SPMAs was made by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging in 6 unruptured aneurysms and by angiography in 6 ruptured aneurysms. The initial test in extracranial SPMAs was Doppler ultrasonography in limbs, CT in liver, and coronary angiography in heart. Four (3 intracranial, 1 extracranial) of 7 (6 intracranial, 1 extracranial

  5. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tobillo, E T; Schwartz, S M

    1998-10-01

    Diarrhea can result from damage to the intestinal lining caused by viruses or bacteria, malabsorption, inflammatory processes, bile salt and pancreatic enzyme deficiency, abnormal motility, or the presence of osmotically active solutes in the gut. While it is important to elicit information to determine the possible cause of diarrhea, be sure to check circulatory status first. Some patients may need rehydration therapy more urgently than they need a diagnosis. The main goals of treatment are to prevent dehydration and correct electrolyte imbalance, to provide supportive and symptomatic therapy, and to treat underlying disease. In most cases, a specific diagnosis is not necessary to guide initial treatment.

  6. The interaction between aggrecan gene VNTR polymorphism and obesity in predicting incident symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Zhu, Yue; Pang, Hao; Guanjun, T U

    2014-01-01

    An association between aggrecan gene variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism (VNTR) and symptomatic lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has been reported in Chinese Han of Northern China, and obesity had previously been suspected of causing severe LDH. However, the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH has not been well studied. To examine the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in the susceptibility of symptomatic LDH, 259 participants participated in this study and donated a blood sample. The disease group comprised 61 patients already diagnosed with symptomatic LDH. The control group consisted of 198 healthy blood donors without symptoms of LDH who were not diagnosed with LDH. The aggrecan gene VNTR region was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. The data indicated that between the two groups, participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were non-obese people showed a 1.057-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.895, changing the number of repeat alleles to <25 repeats alone did not demonstrably change the risk of LDH), and participants carrying two alleles >25 repeats who were obese people showed an 1.061-fold higher risk (p = 0.885, adding obesity to the mix alone did not demonstrably increase the risk of LDH), while participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were obese people showed a 4.667-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.0003, adding obesity plus changing the repeat allele number significantly increased the risk of LDH by 4.667). Overall, the findings suggest an underlying interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH.

  7. Asymptomatic HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment increases risk for symptomatic decline

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Donald R.; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven P.; Vaida, Florin; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Atkinson, J.H.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; McCutchan, John A.; Abramson, Ian; Gamst, Anthony; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Smith, Davey M.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: While HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent despite combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), the clinical relevance of asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI), the most common HAND diagnosis, remains unclear. We investigated whether HIV-infected persons with ANI were more likely than those who were neurocognitively normal (NCN) to experience a decline in everyday functioning (symptomatic decline). Methods: A total of 347 human participants from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort were NCN (n = 226) or had ANI (n = 121) at baseline. Neurocognitive assessments occurred approximately every 6 months, with median (interquartile range) follow-up of 45.2 (28.7–63.7) months. Symptomatic decline was based on self-report (SR) or objective, performance-based (PB) problems in everyday functioning. Proportional hazards modeling was used to generate risk ratios for progression to symptomatic HAND after adjusting for baseline and time-dependent covariates, including CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4), virologic suppression, CART, and mood. Results: The ANI group had a shorter time to symptomatic HAND than the NCN after adjusting for baseline predictors: adjusted risk ratios for symptomatic HAND were 2.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.1–3.6; p = 0.02) for SR, 5.8 (CI 3.2–10.7; p < 0.0001) for PB, and 3.2 (CI 2.0–5.0; p < 0.0001) for either SR or PB. Current CD4 and depression were significant time-dependent covariates, but antiretroviral regimen, virologic suppression, and substance abuse or dependence were not. Conclusions: This longitudinal study demonstrates that ANI conveys a 2-fold to 6-fold increase in risk for earlier development of symptomatic HAND, supporting the prognostic value of the ANI diagnosis in clinical settings. Identifying those at highest risk for symptomatic decline may offer an opportunity to modify treatment to delay progression. PMID:24814848

  8. [Acute pulmonary edema from inhalation of the bite-block after anesthesia with a laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Banchereau, F; Marié, S; Pez, H; Boully-Balihaut, A; Tueux, O

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of acute pulmonary oedema, consecutive to upper airway obstruction due to the inhalation of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) bite block during recovery. The LMA was used for general anaesthesia with the bite-block provided in France. No trouble occurred during LMA insertion and anaesthesia. Symptomatic treatment provided complete resolution within a few days. PMID:11803848

  9. Siltuximab (Sylvant). Castleman's disease: good symptomatic efficacy in some patients.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by disseminated lymphadenopathy. Symptoms and outcomes differ widely from one patient to another. The median survival time is about 2.5 years. There is no consensus on treatment. Siltuximab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonises interleukin-6, has been authorised in the European Union for patients with multicentric Castleman's disease who are not infected with HIV or HHV-8. In a randomised, double-blind trial in 79 patients, most of whom had mild or moderate symptoms, the estimated one-year survival rate was 100% in the siltuximab group versus 92% in the placebo group after a median follow-up of 60 weeks. However, half of the patients in the placebo group received siltuximab after disease progression. Symptoms disappeared for at least 18 weeks in one-quarter of patients in the siltuximab group versus none of those in the placebo group; the median symptom-free period in the siltuximab group was about 16 months. The known adverse effects of siltuximab are related to its immunosuppressive effect. They include frequent infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Reactions can occur during the infusion, and mouth sores have been reported. Other adverse events that appear to be more frequent with siltuximab include cutaneous disorders, oedema, renal and cardiac disorders, and peripheral neuropathy. Cases of gastrointestinal perforation have been reported in trials in other clinical settings. Siltuximab can mask the signs and symptoms of acute inflammation, in particular by suppressing fever and acute-phase markers such as C-reactive protein. Interleukin-6 is a cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Siltuximab activates its isoenzymes and can thus reduce the effectiveness of the numerous drugs that are substrates of this enzyme system. This risk of interactions is likely to persist up to several weeks after siltuximab withdrawal, because of its long plasma elimination half-life (about 16 days

  10. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  11. Endovascular treatment of a symptomatic vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Inaraja Pérez, Gabriel Cristian; Rodríguez Morata, Alejandro; Reyes Ortega, Juan Pedro; Gómez Medialdea, Rafael; Cabezudo García, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    A 35-year-old patient was brought to the emergency department referring dysarthria, left ear tinnitus for 5 min, and short-lasting blindness, with headache in the 45 min before the clinical presentation. In the magnetic resonance imaging, an acute-subacute lesion in the cerebellum right-anterior lobe (in the territory of the cerebellum anterior artery) and a dilatation near the ostium of the right vertebral artery were seen. For a better assessment, an Angio-CT was done, showing a 9-mm saccular pseudoaneurysm of the right vertebral artery close to the origin of the vessel, without being able to determine if it had been caused because of a dissection. The rest of the study (cerebral vessels and supra-aortic vessels) showed no disorders. He was operated under local anesthesia and sedation a week after the onset of the symptoms. Through a 0.014 wire, a Biotronik PK Papyrus balloon-expandable covered cobalt-chromium stent was deployed covering the hole in the artery. Antiplatelet drugs were prescribed, and the patient was discharged 24 hr after surgery. He has remained symptom free since then. PMID:25770383

  12. Nitric oxide radicals in leucocytes and vaginal washes of Trichomonas vaginalis -infected symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Dubey, M L; Gupta, I; Malla, N

    2006-03-01

    The clinical spectrum of Trichomonas vaginalis infection varies from asymptomatic to mild, moderate or severe vaginitis. Nitric oxide and other reactive nitrogen radicals produced by immune effector cells are important cytotoxic and cytostatic mediators against several microorganisms including parasites. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were determined in leucocyte cultures (stimulated with T. vaginalis in vitro) and vaginal washes (VWs) of 22 symptomatic and 20 asymptomatic T. vaginalis-infected and 20 healthy women by immunoblotting and Griess method respectively. The iNOS protein was detected in leucocytes and VWs of all the symptomatic and asymptomatic women, but was not detected in any of the samples from healthy women. Mean iNOS protein band intensity was significantly higher in leucocytes as compared to VWs (P<0.001) of both symptomatic and asymptomatic women and was also higher in leucocytes of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women (P<0.05). Mean RNI concentration was also significantly higher in leucocytes (P<0.01) and VWs (P<0.05) of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women, and was also higher in samples of infected as compared to healthy women (P<0.001). These results suggest that reactive nitrogen radicals may have a role in limiting T. vaginalis infection in asymptomatic women. PMID:16529664

  13. Retrospective clinical comparison of idiopathic versus symptomatic epilepsy in 240 dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Pákozdy, Akos; Leschnik, Michael; Tichy, Alexander G; Thalhammer, Johann G

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, 240 cases of dogs with seizures were analysed retrospectively. The aim was to examine the underlying aetiology and to compare primary or idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with symptomatic epilepsy (SE) concerning signalment, history, ictal pattern, clinical and neurological findings. The diagnosis of symptomatic epilepsy was based on confirmed pathological changes in haematology, serum biochemistry, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and morphological changes of the brain by CT/MRI or histopathological examination. Seizure aetiologies were classified as idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 115) and symptomatic epilepsy (SE, n = 125). Symptomatic epilepsy was mainly caused by intracranial neoplasia (39) and encephalitis (23). The following variables showed significant difference between the IE and SE group: age, body weight, presence of partial seizures, cluster seizures, status epilepticus, ictal vocalisation and neurological deficits. In 48% of the cases, seizures were found to be due to IE, while 16% were due to intracranial neoplasia and 10% to encephalitis. Status epilepticus, cluster seizures, partial seizures, vocalisation during seizure and impaired neurological status were more readily seen with symptomatic epilepsy. If the first seizure occurred between one and five years of age or the seizures occurred during resting condition, the diagnosis was more likely IE than SE.

  14. Deconstructing major depression: a validation study of the DSM-IV symptomatic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lux, V.; Kendler, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The DSM-IV symptomatic criteria for major depression (MD) derive primarily from clinical experience with modest empirical support. Method The sample studied included 1015 (518 males, 497 females) Caucasian twins from a population-based registry who met criteria for MD in the year prior to the interview. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare the associations of: (1) single symptomatic criterion, (2) two groups of criteria reflecting cognitive and neurovegetative symptoms, with a wide range of potential validators including demographic factors, risk for future episodes, risk of MD in the co-twin, characteristics of the depressive episode, the pattern of co-morbidity and personality traits. Results The individual symptomatic criteria showed widely varying associations with the pattern of co-morbidity, personality traits, features of the depressive episode and demographic characteristics. When examined separately, these two criteria groups showed robust differences in their patterns of association, with the validators with the cognitive criteria generally producing stronger associations than the neurovegetative. Conclusions Among depressed individuals, individual DSM-IV symptomatic criteria differ substantially in their predictive relationship with a range of clinical validators. These results challenge the equivalence assumption for the symptomatic criteria for MD and suggest a more than expected degree of ‘ covert ’ heterogeneity among these criteria. Part of this heterogeneity is captured by the distinction between cognitive versus neurovegetative symptoms, with cognitive symptoms being more strongly associated with most clinically relevant characteristics. Detailed psychometric evaluation of DSM-IV criteria is overdue. PMID:20059797

  15. Complete clinical recovery of a central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis delayed onset in a child with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, D; Karapinar, B; Balkan, C; Ay, Y; Kavakli, K

    2011-02-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with the demyelination of extrapontine areas of the central nervous system. It typically occurs 0.5-7 days after a rapid increment in serum Na level in hyponatremic patients and may lead to death. A 2.5-year-old child with a diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia developed febril neutropenia, diarrhea, gastrointestinal hemorrhage followed by pulmonary aspergillosis. He could not tolerate enteral nutrition. He was given broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal treatment. Laboratory tests showed electrolyte abnormalities including hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia in a chronic course. Twenty three days after a rapid correction of hyponatremia (16 mEq/L/24 h) he revealed flask quadriparesis, disphagia, mutism, irregular respiratory pattern and loss of cough and gag reflex. Cranial magnetic resonance showed central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. He required mechanical ventilation and then he regained his neurologic functions. He completed chemotherapy protocol and underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. After 2.5 years of the occurrence of CPM he is in completely normal physical and neurological status. CPM is a very severe but rare disorder in children with underlying disease. In the presence of multiple etiologic factors it may reveal a delayed onset and optimum outcome can be seen even in the severe clinical presentation with adequate intensive support.

  16. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  17. Management of acute hydronephrosis in pregnancy by ureteral stenting.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, T; Lindenmeir, T; Wullich, B

    1996-01-01

    Acute hydronephrosis during pregnancy that fails to respond to conservative treatment can be managed by ureteral stenting or in special cases by application of a percutaneous nephrostomy tube. We report the outcome in 116 pregnant women with symptomatic hydronephrosis. In 30 cases ureteric stents were passed under local anesthesia. In 2 cases (pyeloureteral stenosis, impacted ureteric stone) percutaneous nephrostomy was necessary. Overall each course of pregnancy and disease was individually decided. In case of persisting symptoms due to acute hydronephrosis, ureteral stenting was preferred, since it is a simple, safe and effective method of internal upper urinary tract drainage.

  18. [From symptomatic stability to functional recovery in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and unipolar depression].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the chronic course of schizophrenia and unipolar depresion. It is aimed to answer three questions: does it cure these diseases? Does it exert any significant effect on the symptomatic presentation of the disorders? Which is its action on the social dysfunction provoked by schizophrenia or depression? A conceptual analysis of available bibliography was performed. It could be concluded that antypsychotics improve the symptomatic course of schizophrenia, although their efficacy is limited, and that these drugs does not act on the social dysfunction provoked by the disease. With respect to depression, it could be concluded that a significant proportion of patients remain symptomatic despite receiveng adequate treatments. No data about efficacy of pharmacotherapy on the dysfunction resultant from unipolar depression is available.

  19. Cognitive dysfunction at baseline predicts symptomatic 1-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Lambert, M; Perro, C; Ganzer, S; Naber, D

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the consequences of cognitive disturbances on symptomatic outcome. Fifty-three first-episode schizophrenics were reassessed (n = 32) 1 year after admission. Simple regression analyses revealed that several self-perceived cognitive deficits at baseline as measured with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire significantly predicted increased Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale global scores at follow-up (p = 0.05 to p = 0.005). A stepwise regression analysis proved memory dysfunction to be the strongest predictor of symptomatic worsening (p = 0.005). It is suggested that the exploration and treatment of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia is of great clinical importance with regard to its impact on both functional and symptomatic outcome in schizophrenia.

  20. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  1. Cognitive dysfunction at baseline predicts symptomatic 1-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Lambert, M; Perro, C; Ganzer, S; Naber, D

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the consequences of cognitive disturbances on symptomatic outcome. Fifty-three first-episode schizophrenics were reassessed (n = 32) 1 year after admission. Simple regression analyses revealed that several self-perceived cognitive deficits at baseline as measured with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire significantly predicted increased Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale global scores at follow-up (p = 0.05 to p = 0.005). A stepwise regression analysis proved memory dysfunction to be the strongest predictor of symptomatic worsening (p = 0.005). It is suggested that the exploration and treatment of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia is of great clinical importance with regard to its impact on both functional and symptomatic outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:10601828

  2. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Huanglongbing-Asymptomatic and -Symptomatic Citrus Trees.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Deisy dos Santos; Carlos, Eduardo Fermino; Gil, Márcia Cristina Soares de Souza; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2015-09-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most severe diseases that affects citrus trees worldwide and is associated with the yet uncultured bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp. To assess the metabolomic differences between HLB-asymptomatic and -symptomatic tissues, extracts from leaf and root samples taken from a uniform 6-year-old commercial orchard of Valencia trees were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics. The results show that the symptomatic trees had higher sucrose content in their leaves and no variation in their roots. In addition, proline betaine and malate were detected in smaller amounts in the HLB-affected symptomatic leaves. The changes in metabolic processes of the plant in response to HLB are corroborated by the relationship between the bacterial levels and the metabolic profiles.

  3. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient. PMID:27656305

  4. [From symptomatic stability to functional recovery in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and unipolar depression].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the chronic course of schizophrenia and unipolar depresion. It is aimed to answer three questions: does it cure these diseases? Does it exert any significant effect on the symptomatic presentation of the disorders? Which is its action on the social dysfunction provoked by schizophrenia or depression? A conceptual analysis of available bibliography was performed. It could be concluded that antypsychotics improve the symptomatic course of schizophrenia, although their efficacy is limited, and that these drugs does not act on the social dysfunction provoked by the disease. With respect to depression, it could be concluded that a significant proportion of patients remain symptomatic despite receiveng adequate treatments. No data about efficacy of pharmacotherapy on the dysfunction resultant from unipolar depression is available. PMID:20038986

  5. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient.

  6. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  7. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  8. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  10. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  11. Neutralizing antibody titers against dengue virus correlate with protection from symptomatic infection in a longitudinal cohort

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1–4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that infect ∼390 million people annually; up to 100 million infections are symptomatic, and 500,000 cases progress to severe disease. Exposure to a heterologous DENV serotype, the specific infecting DENV strains, and the interval of time between infections, as well as age, ethnicity, genetic polymorphisms, and comorbidities of the host, are all risk factors for severe dengue. In contrast, neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are thought to provide long-lived protection against symptomatic infection and severe dengue. The objective of dengue vaccines is to provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes simultaneously. However, the association between homotypic and heterotypic NAb titers and protection against symptomatic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the titer of preinfection cross-reactive NAbs correlates with reduced likelihood of symptomatic secondary infection in a longitudinal pediatric dengue cohort in Nicaragua. The protective effect of NAb titers on infection outcome remained significant when controlled for age, number of years between infections, and epidemic force, as well as with relaxed or more stringent criteria for defining inapparent DENV infections. Further, individuals with higher NAb titers immediately after primary infection had delayed symptomatic infections compared with those with lower titers. However, overall NAb titers increased modestly in magnitude and remained serotype cross-reactive in the years between infections, possibly due to reexposure. These findings establish that anti-DENV NAb titers correlate with reduced probability of symptomatic DENV infection and provide insights into longitudinal characteristics of antibody-mediated immunity to DENV in an endemic setting. PMID:26729879

  12. Symptomatic Management of Multiple Sclerosis–Associated Tremor Among Participants in the NARCOMS Registry

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Amber R.; Rinker, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tremor affects 25% to 58% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is associated with poor prognosis and increased disability. MS-related tremor is difficult to treat, and data regarding patient-reported characterization and response to treatment are limited. We describe the symptomatic treatment of tremor in 508 enrollees in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry who self-reported tremor. Methods: From 777 surveys sent to NARCOMS participants who indicated mild or greater tremor using the Tremor and Coordination Scale, we compiled data regarding disability, tremor severity, symptomatic medication use, and reported response to medications. Results: Symptomatic medications reported to reduce tremor were used by 238 respondents (46.9%). Symptomatic medication use was associated with increased rates of unemployment and disability, and many other characteristics were similar between groups. Symptomatic drug use was more likely in participants reporting moderate (53.9%) or severe (51.3%) tremor than in those with mild (36.6%) or totally disabling (35.0%) tremor. This disparity held true across multiple tremor severity scores. The most commonly used drug classes were anticonvulsants (50.8%) and benzodiazepines (46.2%), with gabapentin and clonazepam used most often in their respective classes. Conclusions: Tremor in MS remains poorly treated; less than half of the participants reported benefit from symptomatic medications. Patients with moderate-to-severe tremor are more likely to report tremor benefit than are those with mild or disabling tremor. γ-Aminobutyric acid–active medications were most commonly reported as beneficial. PMID:27252602

  13. Transurethral holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy for large symptomatic prostatic calculi: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic prostatic calculi are a rare clinical entity with wide range of management options, however, there is no agreement about the preferred method for treating these symptomatic calculi. In this study we describe our experience of transurethral management of symptomatic prostatic calculi using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy. Patients with large, symptomatic prostatic stones managed by transurethral lithotripsy using holmium-YAG laser over 3-year duration were included in this retrospective study. Patients were evaluated for any underlying pathological condition and calculus load was determined by preoperative X-ray KUB film/CT scan. Urethrocystoscopy was performed using 30° cystoscope in lithotomy position under spinal anesthesia, followed by transurethral lithotripsy of prostatic calculi using a 550 μm laser fiber. Stone fragments were disintegrated using 100 W laser generators (VersaPulse PowerSuite 100 W, LUMENIS Surgical, CA). Larger stone fragments were retreived using Ellik's evacuator while smaller fragments got flushed under continuous irrigation. Five patients (median age 42 years) with large symptomatic prostatic calculi were operated using the described technique. Three patients had idiopathic stones while rest two had bulbar urethral stricture and neurogenic bladder, respectively. Median operative time was 62 min. All the patients were stone free at the end of procedure. Median duration of catheterization was 2 days. Significant improvement was observed in symptoms score and peak urinary flow and none of the patient had any complication. Transurethral management using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy is a safe and highly effective, minimally invasive technique for managing symptomatic prostatic calculi of all sizes with no associated morbidity.

  14. Neutralizing antibody titers against dengue virus correlate with protection from symptomatic infection in a longitudinal cohort.

    PubMed

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-19

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that infect ∼ 390 million people annually; up to 100 million infections are symptomatic, and 500,000 cases progress to severe disease. Exposure to a heterologous DENV serotype, the specific infecting DENV strains, and the interval of time between infections, as well as age, ethnicity, genetic polymorphisms, and comorbidities of the host, are all risk factors for severe dengue. In contrast, neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are thought to provide long-lived protection against symptomatic infection and severe dengue. The objective of dengue vaccines is to provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes simultaneously. However, the association between homotypic and heterotypic NAb titers and protection against symptomatic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the titer of preinfection cross-reactive NAbs correlates with reduced likelihood of symptomatic secondary infection in a longitudinal pediatric dengue cohort in Nicaragua. The protective effect of NAb titers on infection outcome remained significant when controlled for age, number of years between infections, and epidemic force, as well as with relaxed or more stringent criteria for defining inapparent DENV infections. Further, individuals with higher NAb titers immediately after primary infection had delayed symptomatic infections compared with those with lower titers. However, overall NAb titers increased modestly in magnitude and remained serotype cross-reactive in the years between infections, possibly due to reexposure. These findings establish that anti-DENV NAb titers correlate with reduced probability of symptomatic DENV infection and provide insights into longitudinal characteristics of antibody-mediated immunity to DENV in an endemic setting.

  15. Neutralizing antibody titers against dengue virus correlate with protection from symptomatic infection in a longitudinal cohort.

    PubMed

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-19

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that infect ∼ 390 million people annually; up to 100 million infections are symptomatic, and 500,000 cases progress to severe disease. Exposure to a heterologous DENV serotype, the specific infecting DENV strains, and the interval of time between infections, as well as age, ethnicity, genetic polymorphisms, and comorbidities of the host, are all risk factors for severe dengue. In contrast, neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are thought to provide long-lived protection against symptomatic infection and severe dengue. The objective of dengue vaccines is to provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes simultaneously. However, the association between homotypic and heterotypic NAb titers and protection against symptomatic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the titer of preinfection cross-reactive NAbs correlates with reduced likelihood of symptomatic secondary infection in a longitudinal pediatric dengue cohort in Nicaragua. The protective effect of NAb titers on infection outcome remained significant when controlled for age, number of years between infections, and epidemic force, as well as with relaxed or more stringent criteria for defining inapparent DENV infections. Further, individuals with higher NAb titers immediately after primary infection had delayed symptomatic infections compared with those with lower titers. However, overall NAb titers increased modestly in magnitude and remained serotype cross-reactive in the years between infections, possibly due to reexposure. These findings establish that anti-DENV NAb titers correlate with reduced probability of symptomatic DENV infection and provide insights into longitudinal characteristics of antibody-mediated immunity to DENV in an endemic setting. PMID:26729879

  16. Sexual behaviour and condom use among individuals with a history of symptomatic genital herpes

    PubMed Central

    Rana, R K; Pimenta, J M; Rosenberg, D M; Warren, T; Sekhin, S; Cook, S F; Robinson, N J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This study describes the differences in sexual behaviour in individuals with genital herpes (GH) during “symptomatic” and “asymptomatic” periods of the disease. Methods A cross sectional questionnaire was undertaken by 1193 individuals attending clinics between 1998 and 2001. All participants in this analysis were in heterosexual, monogamous partnerships, self identified with a history of symptomatic GH and with confirmed HSV‐2 infection. Results Sexual activity reported during asymptomatic v symptomatic periods of GH was 98% v 40% (p<0.001), 76% v 29% (p<0.001), and 25% v 11% (p<0.001) for vaginal, oral, and anal intercourse, respectively, while “always” condom use during asymptomatic and symptomatic periods was 20% v 35% (p<0.001), 2% v 7% (p<0.001), and 10% v 15% (p = 0.131), respectively. The proportion of individuals who either abstained from vaginal intercourse or “always” used condoms was 21% v 74% (p<0.001), for asymptomatic v symptomatic periods. Multivariable analyses indicated that factors associated with engaging in intercourse during symptomatic periods of GH included current intrauterine device use (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.46 to 6.02); living in Latin America (aOR = 2.16, CI = 1.19 to 3.91) or Europe (aOR = 1.67, CI = 1.21 to 2.28), compared with North America; previous sexually transmitted disease (aOR = 1.42, CI = 1.08 to 1.89); a higher number of sexual acts per month (aOR = 1.09, CI = 1.06 to 1.11); and a higher number of GH recurrences per year (aOR = 1.08, CI = 1.03 to 1.12). Conclusions These data indicate that the majority of people with GH either abstained from intercourse or “always” used condoms during symptomatic periods of GH. However, condom use was relatively low during asymptomatic periods in comparison with symptomatic periods. These results highlight that further education on GH prevention is warranted

  17. Differences in Acetabular Rim Thickness in Patients with Unilateral Symptomatic Pincer-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Kuhns, Benjamin; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Inoue, Nozomu; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the location and magnitude of difference in acetabular rim morphology between the symptomatic and asymptomatic acetabula in a cohort of patients with symptomatic unilateral pincer-type FAI. Methods: After IRB approval, computed tomography (CT) scans of 43 patients (22 males, 21 females) diagnosed with unilateral pincer-type FAI were obtained. CT images of both hips were imported in DICOM format and segmented into 3-dimensional (3D) hemi-pelvises using 3D reconstruction software (Mimics, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The point-cloud data of the asymptomatic hemi-pelvis was mirrored onto the symptomatic side. Protrusion of the symptomatic side was recorded as a positive value and appeared as red on the color map (Figure 1). Data was collected in 3° intervals and analyzed by quadrant using the clock face method; reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions. Results: The symptomatic acetabular rim was on average 0.39 ± 0.36 mm thicker than the corresponding location on the asymptomatic rim. When the acetabular clock face was broken up into quadrants, reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions, the 12-3 o’clock position demonstrated the greatest difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (Table 1). The 12-3 o’clock quadrant demonstrated significantly greater difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (0.53±0.22 mm) as compared to the 3-6 o’clock position (0.39±0.27 mm; p=0.006), the 6-9 o’clock position (0.34±0.05 mm; p<0.001), and the 9-12 o’clock position (0.33±0.03; p<0.001). There was no correlation between gender and magnitude of difference at any location. Conclusion: Small changes in acetabular rim morphology, on the order of 0.5 mm or less can be the difference between symptomatic pincer-type FAI and the asymptomatic state. Knowledge of the healthy, unaffected side in unilateral FAI may provide a better template for rim recession rather

  18. Symptomatic and asymptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: Molecular differentiation by using microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Kulkarni; Pirozzi, Gregorio; Elashoff, Michael; Munger, William; Waga, Iwao; Dhir, Rajiv; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2002-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a disease of unknown etiology that significantly affects the quality of life in aging men. Histologic BPH may present itself either as symptomatic or asymptomatic in nature. To elucidate the molecular differences underlying BPH, gene expression profiles from the prostate transition zone tissue have been analyzed by using microarrays. A set of 511 differentially expressed genes distinguished symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. This genetic signature separates BPH from normal tissue but does not seem to change with age. These data could provide novel approaches for alleviating symptoms and hyperplasia in BPH.

  19. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Hepatic Encephalopathy in Hepatitis B Virus-related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhao-Ni; Zuo, Yong-Qing; Hu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important neuropsychiatry complication of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). PPI therapy may increase the intestinal bacterial overgrowth and infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess whether PPI use in ACLF is associated with HE. Patients and Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Fifty five admitted patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related ACLF complicated by Stage II-IV HE developed after admission between January 2008 and December 2012 were matched (by sex, age, and MELD score) with comparable HBV-related ACLF patients (n = 110) who did not develop this complication during hospitalization. We excluded combined HE upon admission and other neurological disorders in patients with ACLF. Univariate and multivariate analyses of 30 variables (laboratory examination, predisposition, treatment, etc.) before the occurrence of HE were carried out to identify the factors predictive of HE. Results: In univariate analysis, patients with HE in ACLF had a significantly higher rate of PPI use (89.1%) compared with non-HE (63.6%, P = 0.001). In addition, clinical and standard laboratory variables were significantly different between the two groups regarding the infection rate, hyponatremia, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Arginine Hydrochloride use and Lactulose use. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the combined effects of the variables with HE as the outcome. HE in ACLF was associated with hyponatremia (odds ratio (OR) = 6. 318, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2. 803-14.241; P = 0. 000), PPI use was independently associated with HE (OR = 4. 392, CI = 1. 604-12.031; P = 0. 004), and lactulose use was protective (OR = 0. 294, CI = 0. 136-0.675; P = 0. 003). Conclusions: The occurrence of HE is associated with hyponatremia and PPI use in patients with ACLF. PMID:24748895

  20. Acute toxicity from baking soda ingestion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S H; Stone, C K

    1994-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is an extremely well-known agent that historically has been used for a variety of medical conditions. Despite the widespread use of oral bicarbonate, little documented toxicity has occurred, and the emergency medicine literature contains no reports of toxicity caused by the ingestion of baking soda. Risks of acute and chronic oral bicarbonate ingestion include metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypertension, gastric rupture, hyporeninemia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, intravascular volume depletion, and urinary alkalinization. Abrupt cessation of chronic excessive bicarbonate ingestion may result in hyperkalemia, hypoaldosteronism, volume contraction, and disruption of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. The case of a patient with three hospital admissions in 4 months, all the result of excessive oral intake of bicarbonate for symptomatic relief of dyspepsia is reported. Evaluation and treatment of patients with acute bicarbonate ingestion is discussed.

  1. Loop diuretics in acute heart failure: beyond the decongestive relief for the kidney.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ruocco, Gaetano; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A

    2015-09-03

    Current goals in the acute treatment of heart failure are focused on pulmonary and systemic decongestion with loop diuretics as the cornerstone of therapy. Despite rapid relief of symptoms in patients with acute decompensated heart failure, after intravenous use of loop diuretics, the use of these agents has been consistently associated with adverse events, including hypokalemia, azotemia, hypotension, and increased mortality. Two recent randomized trials have shown that continuous infusions of loop diuretics did not offer benefit but were associated with adverse events, including hyponatremia, prolonged hospital stay, and increased rate of readmissions. This is probably due to the limitations of congestion evaluation as well as to the deleterious effects linked to drug administration, particularly at higher dosage. The impaired renal function often associated with this treatment is not extensively explored and could deserve more specific studies. Several questions remain to be answered about the best diuretic modality administration, global clinical impact during acute and post-discharge period, and the role of renal function deterioration during treatment. Thus, if loop diuretics are a necessary part of the treatment for acute heart failure, then there must be an approach that allows personalization of therapy for optimal benefit and avoidance of adverse events.

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species. PMID:25632680

  4. Acute cooling of the body surface and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Eccles, R

    2002-09-01

    There is a widely held belief that acute viral respiratory infections are the result of a "chill" and that the onset of a respiratory infection such as the common cold is often associated with acute cooling of the body surface, especially as the result of wet clothes and hair. However, experiments involving inoculation of common cold viruses into the nose, and periods of cold exposure, have failed to demonstrate any effect of cold exposure on susceptibility to infection with common cold viruses. Present scientific opinion dismisses any cause-and-effect relationship between acute cooling of the body surface and common cold. This review proposes a hypothesis; that acute cooling of the body surface causes reflex vasoconstriction in the nose and upper airways, and that this vasoconstrictor response may inhibit respiratory defence and cause the onset of common cold symptoms by converting an asymptomatic subclinical viral infection into a symptomatic clinical infection.

  5. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy.

  6. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  7. Magnetic resonance venography to assess thrombus resolution with edoxaban monotherapy versus parenteral anticoagulation/warfarin for symptomatic deep vein thrombosis: A multicenter feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Mani, Venkatesh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Grosso, Michael A; Mercuri, Michele; Lanz, Hans J; Schussler, Steven; Hsu, Ching; Chinigo, Amy; Ritchie, Bruce; Nadar, Venkatesh; Cannon, Kevin; Pullman, John; Concha, Mauricio; Schul, Marlin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for measuring change in thrombus volume with a novel anticoagulation regimen versus standard anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been assessed. Our aim was to study the feasibility of MRV to measure change in thrombus volume in patients with acute symptomatic objectively confirmed proximal DVT in an open-label multicenter trial (edoxaban Thrombus Reduction Imaging Study, eTRIS). We randomized patients in a 2:1 allocation ratio to edoxaban 90 mg/day for 10 days followed by 60 mg/day versus parenteral anticoagulation bridging to warfarin for 3 months. The primary efficacy outcome was a surrogate end point of the relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21. A total of 85 eligible patients from 26 study sites were randomized to edoxaban monotherapy (n=56) versus parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (n=29). The mean relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21 was similar in patients treated with edoxaban and parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (−50.1% vs −58.9%; 95% confidence interval of treatment difference, −12.7%, 30.2%). However, thrombus extension was observed in eight patients in the edoxaban monotherapy group and in none in the warfarin group. Rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism (3.6% vs 3.6%, p=0.45) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.34) were also similar. No major bleeds occurred in either on-treatment group during the study period. In conclusion, MRV can assess change in thrombus volume in patients with acute DVT randomized to two different anticoagulant regimens. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01662908 Investigational New Drug (IND) Application: Edoxaban IND # 63266 PMID:27165711

  8. Functional Compensation of Motor Function in Pre-Symptomatic Huntington's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Weiller, Cornelius; Frackowiak, Richard S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine the compensatory mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon of…

  9. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence as a result of jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thénint, Marie-Aude; Barbier, Charlotte; Hitier, Martin; Patron, Vincent; Saleme, Suzana; Courthéoux, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A new endovascular treatment consisting of stent-assisted coil implantation is described for jugular bulb abnormalities causing symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence. Three patients presenting with vertigo associated with pulsatile tinnitus or hearing loss were treated. This technique cured the vertigo and pulsatile tinnitus in all patients and preserved normal cerebral venous drainage with no side effects.

  10. Coloured Filters Improve Exclusion of Perceptual Noise in Visually Symptomatic Dyslexics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northway, Nadia; Manahilov, Velitchko; Simpson, William

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of visually symptomatic dyslexics have found that their contrast thresholds for pattern discrimination are the same as non-dyslexics. However, when noise is added to the stimuli, contrast thresholds rise markedly in dyslexics compared with non-dyslexics. This result could be due to impaired noise exclusion in dyslexics. Some…

  11. Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Vertebral Hemangiomas: Results of a Multicenter Study and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Rades, Dirk; Winkler, Cornelia; Eich, Hans T.; Bruns, Frank; Gosheger, Georg; Willich, Normann; Micke, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The current study analyzes the potential role of radiotherapy (RT) in symptomatic vertebral hemangioma (SVH). Methods and Materials: Seven cooperating German institutions collected clinical information, treatment plans, and outcome data for all patients with SVH referred for local RT. Results: From 1969 to 2008, a total of 84 patients with 96 symptomatic lesions were irradiated for SVH. The primary indication for radiotherapy was pain (97.6%), and 28.6% of patients had additional neurological symptoms. RT was performed at a median total dose of 34 Gy, with a median single dose of 2.0 Gy. After receiving a median follow-up of 68 months, the overall patient response rate was 90.5%. Complete symptom remission occurred in 61.9% of patients, 28.6% of patients had partial pain relief, and 9.5% of patients had no pain relief. In 26.2% of patients, radiological signs of reossification were observed in long-term follow-up but not significantly correlated with pain relief. Most importantly, total doses of >=34 Gy resulted in significantly greater symptomatic relief and control rate than total doses of <34 Gy. Conclusions: This study consists of the largest database of cases reported so far using RT for SVH. RT is easy, safe, and effective for pain relief treatment for SVH. Total doses of at least 34 Gy give the best symptomatic response.

  12. Symptomatic retention of the patency capsule: a multicenter real life case series

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Uri; Nemeth, Artur; Cebrian, Alba; Wurm Johansson, Gabriele; Thorlacius, Henrik; Fernandez-Urien Sainz, Ignacio; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Eliakim, Rami; Toth, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The patency capsule is designed to evaluate the patency of the small bowel before administration of small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) in patients at high risk of retention. The utilization of a patency capsule may be associated with a risk of symptomatic retention, but very few cases have been reported to date. The aim of our study was to describe our experience with this rare complication of a patency capsule. Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective case series. The medical records of patients who underwent a patency capsule test were scanned and all cases of symptomatic retention were collected. Results: In total, 20 symptomatic cases of retention out of 1615 (1.2 %) patency capsule tests were identified; in one patient, the patency capsule was retained in the esophagus, in the rest, the capsule was detected in the small bowel resulting in abdominal pain or small-bowel obstruction. One patient (5 %) required surgery; all other patients resolved spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. Conclusions: Symptomatic patency capsule retention is a very rare complication with a favorable prognosis. It should be recognized but its use in patients with suspected small-bowel stenosis should not be discouraged.

  13. [The symptomatic psychosis of Friedrich Nietzsche, made evident by his last attempt at an autobiography].

    PubMed

    Peters, U H

    1990-01-01

    Nietzsche's autobiography gestates neither conflicts, nor life problems, nor matter suppressed from his subconscious, nor are the speech distortions of the schizophrenic patient to be found. In all, analysis allows with certainty the conclusion that is was written by a sick person suffering from a psycho-organic disorder of the kind Bonhoeffer referred to by the general term "symptomatic psychosis".

  14. Dysgeusia in symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: think of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishith K; Hayes, Shelbi; Hahs, Seth; Varney, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with marked dysgeusia to all food and symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is described. She eventually turned out to have metastatic small cell lung cancer. The case study explores the interesting constellation of dysgeusia, SIADH and lung cancer. PMID:21686989

  15. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in symptomatic patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Inverso, G; Brustowicz, K A; Katz, E; Padwa, B L

    2016-02-01

    The reported prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) varies due to inconsistent definitions of OSA, lack of uniform diagnostic testing, and different mixes of syndromic diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients with SCS, and to determine whether this differs by phenotypic diagnosis. A retrospective cohort study of children with SCS was conducted. The primary outcome was presence of OSA diagnosed by polysomnography. The prevalence of OSA was calculated and stratified by diagnosis to compare differences in prevalence and severity (mild, moderate, or severe). The prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients was 74.2%. Patients with Apert syndrome had the highest prevalence (80.6%), followed by Pfeiffer, Crouzon with acanthosis nigricans, and Crouzon syndromes (72.7%, 66.7%, and 64.7%, respectively). Severe OSA was most common in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome (45.5%), while patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes were more likely to have moderate OSA (29.0% and 23.5%, respectively). Given that 56.4% of patients with SCS are symptomatic and that 74.2% of these symptomatic patients have OSA, it is recommended that a screening level I polysomnography be part of the clinical care for all patients with SCS. PMID:26602951

  16. Exportations of Symptomatic Cases of MERS-CoV Infection to Countries outside the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Justin J.; Jewett, Amy; Gambhir, Manoj; Cohen, Nicole J.; Haber, Yoni; Pesik, Nicki; Swerdlow, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, an outbreak of infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), was detected in the Arabian Peninsula. Modeling can produce estimates of the expected annual number of symptomatic cases of MERS-CoV infection exported and the likelihood of exportation from source countries in the Middle East to countries outside the region. PMID:27358972

  17. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphism with Susceptibility to Symptomatic Pertussis.

    PubMed

    Han, Wanda G H; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Poelen, Martien M C; Helm, Kina; Janssen, Riny; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis, caused by infection with the gram negative B. pertussis bacterium, is a serious respiratory illness that can last for months. While B. pertussis infection rates are estimated between 1-10% in the general population, notifications of symptomatic pertussis only comprise 0.01-0.1% indicating that most individuals clear B. pertussis infections without developing (severe) clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated whether genetic risk factors are involved in the development of symptomatic pertussis upon B. pertussis infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes, MBL2, IL17A, TNFα, VDR, and IL10 were genotyped in a unique Dutch cohort of symptomatic clinically confirmed (ex-)pertussis patients and in a Dutch population cohort. Of the seven investigated SNPs in five genes, a polymorphism in the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene (rs10735810) was associated with pertussis. The VDR major allele and its homozygous genotype were more present in the symptomatic pertussis patient cohort compared to the control population cohort. Interestingly, the VDR major allele correlated also with the duration of reported pertussis symptoms. Vitamin D3 (VD3) and VDR are important regulators of immune activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that polymorphisms in the VDR gene may affect immune activation and the clinical outcome of B. pertussis infection. PMID:26894582

  18. Symptomatic retention of the patency capsule: a multicenter real life case series

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Uri; Nemeth, Artur; Cebrian, Alba; Wurm Johansson, Gabriele; Thorlacius, Henrik; Fernandez-Urien Sainz, Ignacio; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Eliakim, Rami; Toth, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The patency capsule is designed to evaluate the patency of the small bowel before administration of small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) in patients at high risk of retention. The utilization of a patency capsule may be associated with a risk of symptomatic retention, but very few cases have been reported to date. The aim of our study was to describe our experience with this rare complication of a patency capsule. Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective case series. The medical records of patients who underwent a patency capsule test were scanned and all cases of symptomatic retention were collected. Results: In total, 20 symptomatic cases of retention out of 1615 (1.2 %) patency capsule tests were identified; in one patient, the patency capsule was retained in the esophagus, in the rest, the capsule was detected in the small bowel resulting in abdominal pain or small-bowel obstruction. One patient (5 %) required surgery; all other patients resolved spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. Conclusions: Symptomatic patency capsule retention is a very rare complication with a favorable prognosis. It should be recognized but its use in patients with suspected small-bowel stenosis should not be discouraged. PMID:27652302

  19. Use of the Crawford tube for symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nyu-Xia; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Jin, Xiu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of the Crawford tube in treating symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction. METHODS A protocol was adopted for the management of symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction. Patients who suffered symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction in both eyes were included in the study. One eye was treated with Crawford tube intubation and the other eye was treated with medication therapy. Degree of watering, patient satisfaction, and symptomatic improvement were carefully evaluated by one of the authors at the end of the follow-up period, after Crawford tube removal, to ascertain functional results. RESULTS Thirty-seven adult patients (37 eyes) underwent Crawford tube intubation for functional epiphora. The mean follow-up time after removal of the tube was 14.8±4.8mo. The procedure was an overall success in 28 eyes (75.7%), with symptoms improving significantly. Two eyes (5.4%) were relieved of indoor epiphora, two (5.4%) had minimal epiphora outdoors, but only with wind or cold, and five (13.5%) continued to experience tearing both indoors and outdoors. Thirty of the patients (81%) expressed satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSION Crawford tube insertion is an effective, safe, simple, and relatively noninvasive treatment strategy for functional lacrimal system obstruction. PMID:26949652

  20. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphism with Susceptibility to Symptomatic Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wanda G. H.; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Poelen, Martien M. C.; Helm, Kina; Janssen, Riny; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis, caused by infection with the gram negative B. pertussis bacterium, is a serious respiratory illness that can last for months. While B. pertussis infection rates are estimated between 1–10% in the general population, notifications of symptomatic pertussis only comprise 0.01–0.1% indicating that most individuals clear B. pertussis infections without developing (severe) clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated whether genetic risk factors are involved in the development of symptomatic pertussis upon B. pertussis infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes, MBL2, IL17A, TNFα, VDR, and IL10 were genotyped in a unique Dutch cohort of symptomatic clinically confirmed (ex-)pertussis patients and in a Dutch population cohort. Of the seven investigated SNPs in five genes, a polymorphism in the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene (rs10735810) was associated with pertussis. The VDR major allele and its homozygous genotype were more present in the symptomatic pertussis patient cohort compared to the control population cohort. Interestingly, the VDR major allele correlated also with the duration of reported pertussis symptoms. Vitamin D3 (VD3) and VDR are important regulators of immune activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that polymorphisms in the VDR gene may affect immune activation and the clinical outcome of B. pertussis infection. PMID:26894582

  1. Uterine artery embolization for treatment of symptomatic fibroids; a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Laios, A; Baharuddin, N; Iliou, K; Gubara, E; O'Sullivan, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uterine fibroids are the most common reproductive tract tumours in females. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a fertility-sparing procedure for treatment of symptomatic fibroids. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of UAE in the treatment of 118 patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids in a single Academic Centre in the West of Ireland to determine whether fibroid and uterine size affect clinical outcomes and complications. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort of 118 patients who underwent UAE for treatment of symptomatic fibroids between November 2006 and August 2011. Diagnosis of fibroids in symptomatic patients was established by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or transabdominal ultrasonography (US). Three different embolic agents were used. All patients had at least one follow-up using MRI, at three and/or 12 months. A non-validated questionnaire was used to report patient satisfaction with regards to symptoms improvement on a yes-or-no basis. Results: Mean fibroid volume, uterine size and dominant fibroid size were significantly reduced at three months and one year follow-up (p = 0.00) and that was tallied with symptoms improvement (p < 0.05). Overall patient satisfaction at three months was 84% falling to 75.9% by 12 months (all p < 0.05). Few complications were reported (2.5%). No significant difference was observed in safety or efficacy for different embolic agents. Conclusion: The study confirms the safety and efficacy of UAE in the treatment of symptomatic fibroids. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 258-261. PMID:25694762

  2. Role of serum sodium in assessing hospital mortality in cancer patients with spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome inducing acute uric acid nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-H; Chen, Y-C; Tian, Y-C; Chan, Y-L; Kuo, M-C; Tang, C-C; Fang, J-T; Lee, S-Y; Yang, C-W

    2009-05-01

    Spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome (STLS) inducing acute uric acid nephropathy, a rare and neglected disease, presents more insidiously than conventional post-treatment tumour lysis syndrome. Although STLS is a serious and potentially fatal complication in patients with neoplastic disorders, few investigations have addressed the relevance of clinical and laboratory features in assessing prognosis. A retrospective study was conducted, reviewing the records of all patients who developed acute renal failure (ARF) at Chang Gung memorial hospital between 1 July 1999 and 30 June 2003. STLS-induced acute uric acid nephropathy was identified in 12 of 1072 ARF patients (1.1%) during the study period. All patients had advanced stage tumours with large tumour burden, and 66.7% of cases had abdominal organ involvement. All 12 hyperuricemic patients became oliguric despite conservative therapy, and remained hyperuricemic (21.6 +/- 5.2 mg/dl) before dialysis therapy. Diuresis developed in eight patients (66.7%), with associated resolution of hyperuricemia, azotemia and metabolic derangements following dialysis initiation. Overall hospital mortality was 58.3%. Death in most patients was related to hyponatremia and hypoalbuminemia on admission. The serum sodium was found to have the best Youden index (0.86) and highest overall prediction accuracy (93%). Moreover, serum sodium and serum albumin for individual patients were significantly and positively correlated (r = 0.617, p = 0.032). This investigation confirms a grave prognosis for cancer patients with STLS inducing acute uric acid nephropathy. Hyponatremia and hypoalbuminemia on the first day of admission indicate poor prognosis in such patients.

  3. Dehydration and hyponatremia in professional rugby union players: a cohort study observing english premiership rugby union players during match play, field, and gym training in cool environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benjamin L; OʼHara, John P; Till, Kevin; King, Roderick F G J

    2015-01-01

    Fluid and sodium balance is important for performance and health; however, limited data in rugby union players exist. The purpose of the study was to evaluate body mass (BM) change (dehydration) and blood[Na] change during exercise. Data were collected from 10 premiership rugby union players, over a 4-week period. Observations included match play (23 subject observations), field (45 subject observations), and gym (33 subject observations) training sessions. Arrival urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, and samples during exercise were analyzed for [Na]. Body mass and blood[Na] were determined pre- and postexercise. Sweat[Na] was analyzed from sweat patches worn during exercise, and fluid intake was measured during exercise. Calculations of fluid and Na loss were made. Mean arrival urine osmolality was 423 ± 157 mOsm·kg, suggesting players were adequately hydrated. After match play, field, and gym training, BM loss was 1.0 ± 0.7, 0.3 ± 0.6, and 0.1 ± 0.6%, respectively. Fluid loss was significantly greater during match play (1.404 ± 0.977 kg) than field (1.008 ± 0.447 kg, p = 0.021) and gym training (0.639 ± 0.536 kg, p < 0.001). Fluid intake was 0.955 ± 0.562, 1.224 ± 0.601, and 0.987 ± 0.503 kg during match play, field, and gym training, respectively. On 43% of observations, players were hyponatremic when BM increased, 57% when BM was maintained, and 35% when there was a BM loss of 0.1-0.9%. Blood[Na] was the representative of normonatremia when BM loss was >1.0%. The findings demonstrate that rugby union players are adequately hydrated on arrival, fluid intake is excessive compared with fluid loss, and some players are at risk of developing hyponatremia.

  4. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment. PMID:23486343

  5. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child.

    PubMed

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-03-12

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment.

  6. Acute functional reactivation of the language network during awake intraoperative brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Costi, Emanuele; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Migliorati, Karol; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain plasticity during resection of central lesions has been recently described. In the cases reported, perilesional latent networks, useful to preserve the neurological functions, were detected in asymptomatic patients. In this paper, we presented a case of acute functional reactivation (AFR) of the language network in a symptomatic patient. Tumor resection allowed to acutely restore the neurological deficit. Intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) and functional neuroimaging showed new epicentres of activation of the language network after tumor excision. DCS in awake surgery is mandatory to reveal AFR needful to improve the extent of resection preserving the quality of life.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  8. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  9. Acute symptomatic hematoma with defined etiology seven years after breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K; Kim, John YS

    2010-01-01

    Augmentation mammaplasty with implants can be complicated by hematoma formation. The majority of hematomas occur in the immediate postoperative period. There are, however, some reports of hematomas with a delayed presentation. These hematomas in the late postoperative period are rare, and many of these cases do not have a definitive mechanism of injury or develop symptoms immediately after the triggering event. A case of late capsular hematoma seven years after breast reconstruction with a saline implant following mastectomy is presented. In contrast to the majority of published cases, the patient presented with both a known and traceable cause of her bleed and with symptoms that developed immediately after the initial event. Furthermore, the mechanism of her injury was consistent with a bleeding capsular tear that was observed intraoperatively. The present case emphasizes the importance of thorough evaluation and management of patients with a history of breast reconstruction. PMID:21629619

  10. [Acute interstitial pneumonia: diagnostic approach and management].

    PubMed

    Feuillet, S; Tazi, A

    2011-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) encompasses a spectrum of pulmonary disorders characterized by involvement of the lung interstitium and distal airways (bronchioles and alveoli). The onset of respiratory symptoms is acute, most often within two weeks. Most AIP take place de novo, but sometimes represent an acute exacerbation of chronic lung disease. The clinical presentation of AIP comprises rapidly progressive dyspnoea, associated sometimes with cough, fever, myalgia and asthenia. Chest radiography shows diffuse pulmonary opacities. The associated hypoxemia may be severe enough to cause acute respiratory failure. Underlying aetiologies are numerous and variable, particularly in relation to the underlying immune status of the host. Various histopathological entities may be responsible for AIP although diffuse alveolar damage is the predominant pattern. The diagnostic approach to a patient presenting with AIP is to try to determine the most likely underlying histopathological pattern and to search for a precise aetiology. It relies mainly on a meticulous clinical evaluation and accurate biological investigation, essentially guided by the results of bronchoalveolar lavage performed in an area identified by abnormalities on high resolution computed tomography of the lungs. Initial therapeutic management includes symptomatic measures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment adapted to the clinical context, frequently combined with systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  11. Low risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events during growth factor administration for PBSC mobilization.

    PubMed

    Naina, H V; Pruthi, R K; Inwards, D J; Dingli, D; Litzow, M R; Ansell, S M; William, H J; Dispenzieri, A; Buadi, F K; Elliott, M A; Gastineau, D A; Gertz, M A; Hayman, S R; Johnston, P B; Lacy, M Q; Micallef, I N; Porrata, L F; Kumar, S

    2011-02-01

    The use of erythropoietic agents has been associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs), especially in patients with underlying malignancies. However, it is not known whether there is an increased risk of VTE associated with granulocyte growth factors. We reviewed 621 patients undergoing PBSC mobilization using granulocyte growth factors, alone or in combination with CY. Patients with a diagnosis of AL amyloidosis (AL: 114; 18%), multiple myeloma (MM: 278; 44%) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL: 20; 3%) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL: 209; 33%) were included. Symptomatic VTE occurred in six (0.97%) patients: two AL, two MM and two NHL. Of the six patients, two had pulmonary embolism, one developed deep vein thrombosis and three developed symptomatic catheter related thrombosis. Two patients with AL had heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. We found a low incidence of VTE among patients undergoing PBSC mobilization.

  12. Relationship between Cumulative BMI and Symptomatic, Psychosocial, and Medical Outcomes in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frankenburg, Frances R.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship between cumulative body mass index (BMI) and symptomatic, psychosocial, and medical outcomes in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Two hundred female borderline patients were weighed and measured during their index admission. They were subsequently interviewed at six, eight, and 10 years intervals. Over 10 years of prospective follow-up, increases in cumulative BMI were significantly associated with self-mutilation and dissociation (but not suicide attempts). Increases in cumulative BMI were also significantly associated with having no life partner, a poor work or school history, being on disability, being rated with a GAF score in the fair or poor range, and having a low income. In addition, increases in BMI were related to having two or more obesity-related medical conditions and using costly forms of health care. Increases in cumulative BMI may be a marker for adverse symptomatic, functional, and medical outcomes in patients with BPD. PMID:21838559

  13. Discourses of the body in euthanasia: symptomatic, dependent, shameful and temporal.

    PubMed

    Street, A F; Kissane, D W

    2001-09-01

    This theoretical paper is derived from a discourse analysis of the textual material from a study of the seven deaths associated with legalised euthanasia in the Northern Territory, Australia. The textual analysis utilises evidence from interviews, letters written by people seeking euthanasia, medical reports, coroner's records and media reports concerning the social experiment of legalised euthanasia in Australia. The paper does not discuss the euthanasia debate. It argues that the body is a neglected concern in the debates and offers a construction of the discourses of the body as symptomatic, dependent, shameful and temporal. Medical discourses frame the body as symptomatic but these people were also concerned with the loss of autonomy associated with dependence, with shame connected with loss of bodily functions and the embodied experience of determining a 'time to die'.

  14. [Nootropics and antioxidants in the complex therapy of symptomatic posttraumatic epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Savenkov, A A; Badalian, O L; Avakian, G N

    2013-01-01

    To study the possibility of application of nootropics and antioxidants in the complex antiepileptic therapy, we examined 75 patients with symptomatic focal posttraumatic epilepsy. A statistically significant reduction in the number of epileptic seizures, improvement of cognitive function and quality of life of the patients as well as a decrease in the severity of depression and epileptic changes in the EEG were identified. The potentiation of antiepileptic activity of basic drugs, normalization of brain's electrical activity and reduction in EEG epileptiform activity, in particular coherent indicators of slow-wave activity, were noted after treatment with the antioxidant mexidol. A trend towards the improvement of neuropsychological performance and quality of life was observed. There was a lack of seizure aggravation typical of many nootropic drugs. Thus, phenotropil and mexidol can be recommended for complex treatment of symptomatic posttraumatic epilepsy.

  15. Occurrence of symptomatic knee osteoarthrosis in rural Finland: a prospective follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Kannus, P; Järvinen, M; Kontiala, H; Bergius, L; Hyssy, E; Salminen, E; Tuomi, A; Unkila, T; Valtanen, I

    1987-01-01

    All visits to physicians in the Orivesi Region Federation of Municipalities for Public Health Work in Finland paid due to symptomatic osteoarthrosis of the knee joint were prospectively recorded over a period of one year. Two hundred and thirty four visits were made, accounting for 0.63% of all visits. The prevalence of knee osteoarthrosis was 1.11% (men 0.45%, women 1.72%), and the incidence was 0.60%. The disease occurred almost twice as often in the right knee than in the left. The study provides basic information about patients needing medical help because of symptomatic knee osteoarthrosis. The results can be used as an aid to the planning of examination and treatment resources and in assessment of the need for such services. PMID:3426287

  16. The Optimal Approach to Symptomatic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair: Important Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Jessica A; Lidor, Anne O

    2016-10-01

    While the asymptomatic paraesophageal hernia (PEH) can be observed safely, surgery is indicated for symptomatic hernias. Laparoscopic repair is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality; however, it is associated with a higher rate of radiologic recurrence when compared with the open approach. Though a majority of patients experience good symptomatic relief from laparoscopic repair, strict adherence to good technique is critical to minimize recurrence. The fundamental steps of laparoscopic PEH repair include adequate mediastinal mobilization of the esophagus, tension-free approximation of the diaphragmatic crura, and gastric fundoplication. Collis gastroplasty, mesh reinforcement, use of relaxing incisions, and anterior gastropexy are just a few adjuncts to basic principles that can be utilized and have been widely studied in recent years. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of literature addressing key aspects and controversies regarding the optimal approach to repairing paraesophageal hernias laparoscopically. PMID:27595155

  17. Chronically symptomatic patients with undetectable gall bladder on ultrasonography could benefit from early cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen D; Blackburn, Simon C; Adewole, Victoria A; Mahomed, Anies A

    2013-01-01

    90 percent of symptomatic patients undergoing cholecystectomy have cholelithiasis with 10% categorized as asymptomatic cholecystitis. In both instances, the gallbladder is evident on ultrasonography. In children with symptomatic biliary dyspepsia, the decision to proceed to cholecystectomy is made difficult if choleliths are not seen on ultrasonography. This decision is made even more difficult if the gallbladder itself is not seen on repeated imaging. In a cohort of 54 cholecystectomies, 3 cases, with recurrent right upper quadrant pain and undetectable gallbladders on repeat ultrasonography, were identified. After prolonged observation all underwent successful cholecystectomy. Histology demonstrated a markedly fibrotic and thickened gallbladder in all. Given this experience, we suggest that nonvisibility of the gallbladder, in fact, maybe be a feature of a chronic acalculous cholecystitis. We advise consideration of cholecystectomy for chronic biliary dyspepsia where repeat ultrasonography fails to demonstrate a gallbladder. PMID:23401761

  18. Prevalence of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Moyen Chari district, south of Chad.

    PubMed

    Bregani, Enrico Rino; Balzarini, Laura; Mbaïdoum, Narassem; Rovellini, Angelo

    2007-07-01

    Filarial parasites infect an estimated 140 million people worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans are responsible for most filarial infections in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Goundi Sanitary district:167 patients were enrolled (99 men, 68 women). M. perstans microfilariae were isolated in peripheral blood in 164 cases, while Loa loa and Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis were diagnosed in only six and three cases, respectively. The most frequent filariasis observed in our study were due to M. perstans and L. loa, while the few cases of W. bancrofti filariasis seem to have been acquired abroad. No cases of O. volvulus were observed. Microfilarial burden was not related to symptoms, but a correlation between eosinophilia and pruritus was evident. No relationship was observed between eosinophils and symptoms. The prevalence observed in symptomatic patients could reflect the real prevalence of filariasis. PMID:17716512

  19. Preliminary report on the Jones, Ellison, Slocum (JES) repair for symptomatic anterior cruciate deficient knees.

    PubMed

    Ritter, M A; Leaming, E S; McCarroll, J R

    1983-01-01

    A modified Jones intraarticular anterior cruciate reconstruction was combined with a distal iliotibial band transfer (Ellison) and a pes anserinus transfer (Slocum) for patients with symptomatic anterior cruciate deficient knees. The procedure was performed on 15 young (average age, 22.5 years) athletes, in a single operation through a long, straight, anterior, midline incision. Preoperatively, all 15 patients (15 knees) had symptomatic instability and all but one had a positive pivot shift. At follow up (averaging 39 month range 24-60 months) 13 (93%) had the pivot shift eliminated and only one, with 36 months followup, had instability on return to sports. Postoperatively, patients were immobilized 3 weeks and then were started on a physical therapy program which ended in return to sports at 1 year.

  20. Cartilage degeneration at symptomatic persistent olecranon physis in adolescent baseball players.

    PubMed

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease.

  1. A Critical Protection Level Derived from Dengue Infection Mathematical Model Considering Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Supriatna, A. K.; Soewono, E.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we formulate a model of dengue fever transmission by considering the presence of asymptomatic and symptomatic compartments. The model takes the form as a system of differential equations representing a host-vector SIR (Susceptible - Infective -Recovered) disease transmission. It is assumed that both host and vector populations are constant. It is also assumed that reinfection of recovered hosts by the disease is possible due to a wanning immunity in human body. We analyze the model to determine the qualitative behavior of the model solution and use the concept of effective basic reproduction number (fraktur Rp) as a control criteria of the disease transmission. The effect of mosquito biting protection (e.g. by using insect repellent) is also considered. We compute the long-term ratio of the asymptomatic and symptomatic classes and show a condition for which the iceberg phenomenon could appear.

  2. Symptomatic Lymphocele Formation After Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Early Stage Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Garagozova, Nigar; Pfiffer, Tatiana; Beier, Anna; Köhler, Christhardt; Favero, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In early stage cervical cancer, nodal status is the most important prognostic factor, and execution of retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy is currently an integral part of surgical therapy. Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been progressively incorporated with surgical therapy and could reduce morbidity. However, the current incidence of complications exclusively related to the procedure is unknown. We report on a 29-year-old woman affected by cervical cancer (Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique Stage 1b1), who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy in combination with radical vaginal trachelectomy, and who later developed a symptomatic pelvic lymphocele that required surgical therapy. Conservative procedures in the pelvic lymph nodes are not free of complications, especially with regard to the formation of symptomatic lymphoceles. This report brings to light an important discussion about the exact magnitude of the complications associated with the procedure.

  3. Diagnosis and perioperative management of ruptured AAA mimicking symptomatic groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Holger Jan; Becker, Daniel; Rancic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) can infrequently present as symptomatic groin hernia. This misleading form of presentation often leads to erroneous preoperative management resulting in poor survival. Case presentation Two patients with RAAA mimicking symptomatic groin hernia underwent different preoperative managements pointing out the importance of the principles of hypotensive haemostasis in the scope of this emergency scenario. Conclusion Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) remains the recommended diagnostic tool—for both safe diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm and precise preoperative planning. Endovascular aortic repair of the RAAA—if feasible—is the treatment of choice. This rare form of RAAA manifestation should call physicians attention—especially in patients with known abdominal aortic aneurysms in their preceding medical history. PMID:26656148

  4. Cartilage Degeneration at Symptomatic Persistent Olecranon Physis in Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Elbow overuse injuries are common in adolescent baseball players, but symptomatic persistent olecranon physis is rare, and its pathogenesis remains unclear. Purpose. To examine the histopathological and imaging findings of advanced persistent olecranon physis. Methods. The olecranon physes of 2 baseball pitchers, aged 14 and 15 years, were examined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical specimens were examined histologically. Results. T2-weighted MRI revealed alterations in the intrachondral signal intensity possibly related to collagen degeneration and increased free water content. Histological findings of specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin showed complete disorganization of the cartilage structure, hypocellularity, chondrocyte cluster formation, and moderately reduced staining. All these findings are hallmarks of osteoarthritis and are suggestive of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion. Growth plate degeneration was evident in advanced cases of symptomatic persistent olecranon physis. These findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25580304

  5. Symptomatic versus inapparent outcome in repeat dengue virus infections is influenced by the time interval between infections and study year.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Mercado, Juan Carlos; Williams, Katherine L; Vargas, Maria José; Gutierrez, Gamaliel; Kuan, Guillermina; Gordon, Aubree; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) circulate globally, causing more human illness than any other arthropod-borne virus. Dengue can present as a range of clinical manifestations from undifferentiated fever to Dengue Fever to severe, life-threatening syndromes. However, most DENV infections are inapparent. Yet, little is known about determinants of inapparent versus symptomatic DENV infection outcome. Here, we analyzed over 2,000 DENV infections from 2004 to 2011 in a prospective pediatric cohort study in Managua, Nicaragua. Symptomatic cases were captured at the study health center, and paired healthy annual samples were examined on a yearly basis using serological methods to identify inapparent DENV infections. Overall, inapparent and symptomatic DENV infections were equally distributed by sex. The mean age of infection was 1.2 years higher for symptomatic DENV infections as compared to inapparent infections. Although inapparent versus symptomatic outcome did not differ by infection number (first, second or third/post-second DENV infections), substantial variation in the proportion of symptomatic DENV infections among all DENV infections was observed across study years. In participants with repeat DENV infections, the time interval between a first inapparent DENV infection and a second inapparent infection was significantly shorter than the interval between a first inapparent and a second symptomatic infection. This difference was not observed in subsequent infections. This result was confirmed using two different serological techniques that measure total anti-DENV antibodies and serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, respectively. Taken together, these findings show that, in this study, age, study year and time interval between consecutive DENV infections influence inapparent versus symptomatic infection outcome, while sex and infection number had no significant effect. Moreover, these results suggest that the window of cross-protection induced by a first

  6. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  7. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  8. Symptomatic knee osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lidan; Wu, Xiuhua; Wu, Honghua; Su, Jinmei; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    To explore the associated risk factors of symptomatic knee osteonecrosis (KON) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features between SLE patients with and without symptomatic KON matched by age and gender. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate possible associated risk factors. Twenty (one male, nineteen females) out of 3941 lupus patients were identified as symptomatic KON, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age at KON onset was 34.4 (range 12-67) years, and the median course of lupus at KON onset was 72.5 (range 8-123) months. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that the prevalence of cutaneous vasculitis (OR 5.23; 95 % CI 1.11-24.70), hyperfibrinogenemia (OR 4.75; 95 % CI 1.08-20.85), and elevated IgG levels (OR 6.05; 95 % CI 1.58-23.16) were statistically higher in KON group, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) usage was statistically lower in KON group (OR 0.27; 95 % CI 0.07-0.97). Glucocorticoid usage, in terms of maximal dose, duration of treatment, and the percentage of receiving methylprednisolone pulse therapy, did not show statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Symptomatic KON is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis, hyperfibrinogenemia, and elevated IgG levels are possible risk factors, whereas HCQ may provide a protective effect. Our results suggest that lupus activity as well as hypercoagulation status may play a role in the pathogenesis of KON in lupus. PMID:27230994

  9. Dynamic Computational Model of Symptomatic Bacteremia to Inform Bacterial Separation Treatment Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sinead E.; Bell, Charleson S.; Cover, Timothy L.; Giorgio, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    The rise of multi-drug resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics, which has led to increased mortality rates associated with symptomatic bacteremia, or bacterial sepsis. To combat decreasing antibiotic effectiveness, extracorporeal bacterial separation approaches have been proposed to capture and separate bacteria from blood. However, bacteremia is dynamic and involves host-pathogen interactions across various anatomical sites. We developed a mathematical model that quantitatively describes the kinetics of pathogenesis and progression of symptomatic bacteremia under various conditions, including bacterial separation therapy, to better understand disease mechanisms and quantitatively assess the biological impact of bacterial separation therapy. Model validity was tested against experimental data from published studies. This is the first multi-compartment model of symptomatic bacteremia in mammals that includes extracorporeal bacterial separation and antibiotic treatment, separately and in combination. The addition of an extracorporeal bacterial separation circuit reduced the predicted time of total bacteria clearance from the blood of an immunocompromised rodent by 49%, compared to antibiotic treatment alone. Implementation of bacterial separation therapy resulted in predicted multi-drug resistant bacterial clearance from the blood of a human in 97% less time than antibiotic treatment alone. The model also proposes a quantitative correlation between time-dependent bacterial load among tissues and bacteremia severity, analogous to the well-known ‘area under the curve’ for characterization of drug efficacy. The engineering-based mathematical model developed may be useful for informing the design of extracorporeal bacterial separation devices. This work enables the quantitative identification of the characteristics required of an extracorporeal bacteria separation device to provide biological benefit. These devices will potentially decrease the

  10. Identification of Symptomatic Fetuses Infected with Cytomegalovirus Using Amniotic Fluid Peptide Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Lacroix, Chrystelle; Breuil, Benjamin; Froment, Carine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P.; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, and is a major cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurological disabilities. Evaluating the risk for a CMV infected fetus to develop severe clinical symptoms after birth is crucial to provide appropriate guidance to pregnant women who might have to consider termination of pregnancy or experimental prenatal medical therapies. However, establishing the prognosis before birth remains a challenge. This evaluation is currently based upon fetal imaging and fetal biological parameters, but the positive and negative predictive values of these parameters are not optimal, leaving room for the development of new prognostic factors. Here, we compared the amniotic fluid peptidome between asymptomatic fetuses who were born as asymptomatic neonates and symptomatic fetuses who were either terminated in view of severe cerebral lesions or born as severely symptomatic neonates. This comparison allowed us to identify a 34-peptide classifier in a discovery cohort of 13 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic neonates. This classifier further yielded 89% sensitivity, 75% specificity and an area under the curve of 0.90 to segregate 9 severely symptomatic from 12 asymptomatic neonates in a validation cohort, showing an overall better performance than that of classical fetal laboratory parameters. Pathway analysis of the 34 peptides underlined the role of viral entry in fetuses with severe brain disease as well as the potential importance of both beta-2-microglobulin and adiponectin to protect the injured fetal brain infected with CMV. The results also suggested the mechanistic implication of the T calcium channel alpha-1G (CACNA1G) protein in the development of seizures in severely CMV infected children. These results open a new field for potential therapeutic options. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that amniotic fluid peptidome analysis can effectively predict the severity of congenital CMV infection. This

  11. Utility of Microbiological Profile of Symptomatic Vaginal Discharge in Rural Women of Reproductive Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaya; Gupta, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Symptomatic vaginal discharge is the most frequent symptom in women of reproductive age group. Owing to social stigma majority of affected women hesitate to seek medical consultation. Therefore the actual incidence of vaginal discharge is much more than what is reported. The aim of the study is to determine the microbiological profile of symptomatic vaginal discharge in rural area and its utility in the management of genital tract infection. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive type of observational study, conducted in sexually active women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) attending the OPD/IPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of National Institute of Medical Sciences, Shobhanagar, Jaipur (Rajasthan), over a period of 18 months from June 2012 to December 2013. Hundred sexually active non pregnant women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) were included in the study. After taking consent general physical examination along with pelvic examination was performed. Two high vaginal swabs and blood sample were collected for various tests. Hanging drop preparation was immediately made. This was followed by gram staining and culture. Chlamydia trachomatis IgM antibody was detected by ELISA method. Results: Out of 100 women with symptomatic vaginal discharge, specific diagnosis was obtained in 89% of cases whereas no specific aetiology was found in 11% cases. Mean age was 32.60 years. Fifty-three percent patient had Bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis was found in 14% cases, 16% had Chlamydia trachomatis infection while Trichomonas vaginalis infection was detected in 6% cases. Homogenous discharge was most prevalent (52%), followed by mucopurulant discharge in 23% of women. Conclusion: Patient with symptomatic vaginal discharge need to be actively managed with appropriate antimicrobial agents. Judicious management may be helpful in prevention of HIV, HPV, CIN and post infection sequelae. PMID:25954668

  12. Transurethral Unroofing of a Symptomatic Imperforate Cowper's Syringocele in an Adult Male

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Catherine R.; Gaither, Thomas W.; Osterberg, E. Charles

    2016-01-01

    Cystic dilatation of bulbourethral gland ducts (Cowper's gland syringocele) is a rare abnormality. The condition has been described among pediatric populations, but it is uncommon in adults. It can be asymptomatic or present with obstructive and irritative urinary symptoms. We report a case of a symptomatic imperforate Cowper's syringocele in a young patient that was successfully managed with transurethral unroofing of the cyst. PMID:27119039

  13. Complications of cerebral angiography in patients with symptomatic carotid territory ischaemia screened by carotid ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K N; Humphrey, P R

    1993-01-01

    After nearly 40 years, carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be of benefit to patients with symptomatic carotid territory ischaemia and greater than 70% stenosis of the relevant internal carotid artery. Cerebral angiography is performed before surgery and is not without risk. These risks must be added to those of surgery before recommending the procedure to patients. The study evaluated the local, systemic and neurological complications following digital subtraction angiography with selective catheterisation of the carotid arteries in 200 patients presenting to a cerebrovascular clinic for assessment of cerebral ischaemia. All patients had carotid ultrasound screening before angiography to screen out those with normal arteries or mild disease (less than 30% stenosis of symptomatic internal carotid artery). Complications occurred in 28 patients. There were six (3%) local, two (1%) systemic and 20 (10%) neurological complications. Seventeen neurological complications occurred within 24 hours and there were three late complications (24-72 hours). Neurological complications occurred more frequently when angiography was performed by a trainee rather than a consultant neuroradiologist (p < 0.01). The neurological complications were transient (resolved within 24 hours) in 10/200 (5%), reversible (resolved within seven days) in two (1%) and permanent in 8/200 (4%). Two patients died after a stroke and two other patients suffered a disabling stroke. At 24 hours post angiography the permanent (persisting beyond seven days) neurological complication rate was 2.5%. The incidence of total neurological complications and post angiographic strokes was higher in patients with greater than 90% stenosis of the symptomatic internal carotid artery (p < 0.001). The increased use of non-invasive Doppler duplex screening will reduced the absolute number of patients put at risk of angiography, yet the rate of post angiographic complications is likely to increase as patients with severe

  14. Progesterone for Symptomatic Perimenopause Treatment - Progesterone politics, physiology and potential for perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Prior, J C

    2011-01-01

    Perimenopause, women's normal midlife reproductive transition, is highly symptomatic for about 20% of women who are currently inaccurately counseled and inappropriately treated with oral contraceptives, menopausal hormone therapy or hysterectomy. About 80% of perimenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS), 25% have menorrhagia, and about 10% experience mastalgia. The majority of women describe varying intensities of sleep, -coping or mood difficulties. Women are more symptomatic because common knowledge inaccurately says that estradiol (E2) levels are dropping/deficient. Evidence shows that with disturbed brain-ovary feedbacks, E2 levels average 26% higher and soar erratically - some women describe feeling pregnant! Also, ovulation and progesterone (P4) levels become insufficient or absent. The most symptomatic women have higher E2 and lower P4 levels. Because P4 and E2 complement/counterbalance each other's tissue effects, oral micronized P4 (OMP4 300 mg at -bedtime) is a physiological therapy for treatment-seeking, symptomatic perimenopausal women. Given cyclically (cycle d 14-27, or 14 on/off) in menstruating midlife women, OMP4 decreases cyclic VMS, improves sleep and premenstrual mastalgia. Menorrhagia is treated with ibuprofen 200mg/6h plus OMP4 cycle d 4-28. For insulin resistance, metformin plus cyclic or daily OMP4 decreases insulin resistance and weight gain. Non-responsive migraines need daily OMP4 plus usual therapies. VMS and insomnia in late perimenopause respond to daily OMP4. In summary, OMP4 is a physiology-based therapy that improves sleep, treats VMS, does not increase breast proliferation or cancer risk, increases bone formation and has beneficial cardiovascular effects. A controlled trial is testing OMP4 for perimenopausal VMS - more evidence-based data are needed. PMID:24753856

  15. Progesterone for Symptomatic Perimenopause Treatment – Progesterone politics, physiology and potential for perimenopause

    PubMed Central

    Prior, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Perimenopause, women’s normal midlife reproductive transition, is highly symptomatic for about 20% of women who are currently inaccurately counseled and inappropriately treated with oral contraceptives, menopausal hormone therapy or hysterectomy. About 80% of perimenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS), 25% have menorrhagia, and about 10% experience mastalgia. The majority of women describe varying intensities of sleep, coping or mood difficulties. Women are more symptomatic because common knowledge inaccurately says that estradiol (E2) levels are dropping/deficient. Evidence shows that with disturbed brain-ovary feedbacks, E2 levels average 26% higher and soar erratically – some women describe feeling pregnant! Also, ovulation and progesterone (P4) levels become insufficient or absent. The most symptomatic women have higher E2 and lower P4 levels. Because P4 and E2 complement/counterbalance each other’s tissue effects, oral micronized P4 (OMP4 300 mg at bedtime) is a physiological therapy for treatment-seeking, symptomatic perimenopausal women. Given cyclically (cycle d 14-27, or 14 on/off) in menstruating midlife women, OMP4 decreases cyclic VMS, improves sleep and premenstrual mastalgia. Menorrhagia is treated with ibuprofen 200mg/6h plus OMP4 cycle d 4-28. For insulin resistance, metformin plus cyclic or daily OMP4 decreases insulin resistance and weight gain. Non-responsive migraines need daily OMP4 plus usual therapies. VMS and insomnia in late perimenopause respond to daily OMP4. In summary, OMP4 is a physiology-based therapy that improves sleep, treats VMS, does not increase breast proliferation or cancer risk, increases bone formation and has beneficial cardiovascular effects. A controlled trial is testing OMP4 for perimenopausal VMS – more evidence-based data are needed. PMID:24753856

  16. Hip joint biomechanics during gait in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Laura E; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S; O'Donnell, John; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a morphological hip condition that can cause hip/groin pain and impaired function in younger active adults, and may lead to stiffness, muscle weakness, structural damage, and hip osteoarthritis. Understanding the impairments associated with FAI is crucial to guide treatment and rehabilitation strategies. Evidence is limited and conflicting about whether hip biomechanics are impaired during walking in people with symptomatic FAI. The objective of this study was to determine whether kinematics and kinetics during gait differ between people with symptomatic FAI and control participants. Fifteen participants diagnosed with symptomatic cam-type or combined (cam plus pincer) FAI who were scheduled for arthroscopic surgery and 14 age-, and sex-matched disease-free controls underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Tri-planar hip kinematics and kinetics were compared between the two groups. There were limited significant between-group differences with respect to spatiotemporal variables. Participants with FAI walked with less range of motion in the sagittal plane during a gait cycle, but did not exhibit any significant kinematic differences in the frontal or transverse planes. There were no systematic differences in kinetics between the groups in any plane. Findings suggest that individuals with symptomatic FAI have minimal impairments in gait biomechanics. Although these individuals demonstrate reduced hip joint motion in the sagittal plane, the size of the difference is small and its significance for symptoms and function is unclear. More pronounced deficits in hip kinetics and kinematics may be evident during functional tasks that challenge the hip towards the position of impingement.

  17. Endometrial pathology in postmenopausal tamoxifen treatment: comparison between gynaecologically symptomatic and asymptomatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I; Perel, E; Flex, D; Tepper, R; Altaras, M M; Cordoba, M; Beyth, Y

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate whether endometrial pathology is more likely to be diagnosed in gynaecologically symptomatic rather than in gynaecologically asymptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment; and to evaluate the possible influence of various clinical factors on the incidence of endometrial pathology. METHODS: Endometrial histological findings, transvaginal ultrasonographic endometrial thickness, demographic characteristics, health habits, and risk factors for endometrial cancer were compared between 14 gynaecologically symptomatic (group I) and 224 gynaecologically asymptomatic (group II) postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment. RESULTS: Overall, 28.6% of the study population had endometrial pathology. The incidence of overall positive endometrial histological findings was significantly higher in group I than in group II (92.9% v 24.6%, p < 0.0001). Atrophic endometrium was more common in group II than in group I (75.3% v 7.1%, p < 0.0001). Most other endometrial pathology was significantly more common in group I than in group II (endometrial hyperplasia, 35.7% v 5.6%, p < 0.0001; endometrial polyps, 35.7% v 13.4%, p < 0.0111; endometrial carcinoma, 21.5% v 0.9%, p < 0.0001). Endometrial pathology appeared considerably later in the gynaecologically asymptomatic patients than in gynaecologically symptomatic patients (p = 0.0002). Vaginal bleeding or spotting occurred exclusively in group I. The incidence of endometrial pathology in the entire study population was consistent with that reported elsewhere, and higher than that reported for healthy postmenopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial pathology is more likely to be diagnosed in gynaecologically symptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment, and after a shorter duration of time, than in gynaecologically asymptomatic patients. PMID:10474520

  18. Efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vidyalaxmi; Shah, Maitri C.; Patel, Sangita V.; Marfatia, Yogesh S.; Zalavadiya, Dhara

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of a few shortcomings such as over diagnosis and over treatment, syndromic management is a recommended practice in India for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This study tries to find out the efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Objective: The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of syndromic management in terms of symptomatic improvement among females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted in Gynecology Department of Tertiary Care Hospital including 180 symptomatic females having vaginal discharge syndrome. Demographic profile, presenting complaints, menstrual history, obstetric history, partner history, and contraceptive history were noted. This was followed by clinical examination and specimen collection for laboratory tests and blood tests to find out type of STI including viral STI such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Treatment was given according to syndromic management on the same day. All the participants were asked to come for follow-up after 15 days and their improvement in symptoms was noted as complete improvement, some improvement or no improvement on a five point scale. Results: 63.9% cases showed complete improvement, while 36.1% showed some improvement. None of the patients was without any improvement. Vaginal discharge syndrome was most common between 20 and 30 years (43.4%), and 67.8% of symptomatic females with vaginal discharge syndrome belonged to the lower socioeconomic group. HSV infection was the most common (15%) associated viral infection with vaginal discharge syndrome, while hepatitis B infection was the least common (0.5%). HIV was reactive in 2.8% cases only. Conclusion: Syndromic management was found to be effective in relieving symptoms in most of the cases of vaginal discharge syndrome

  19. Symptomatic Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Causing Dysphagia: Case Report, Imaging, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kwang; Tharin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are found in 20-30% of elderly patients. Rarely, severe osteophytes can cause dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. Here, we illustrate a case of severe dysphagia caused by a large post-traumatic osteophyte with oropharyngeal swallow study showing a significant mass effect on the pharynx and resolution following osteophytectomy. We also review the literature regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophytes.  PMID:27004150

  20. Developing Multivariable Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model to Predict the Incidence of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liyun; Ting, Hui-Min; Huang, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (SRP), which decreases quality of life (QoL), is the most common pulmonary complication in patients receiving breast irradiation. If it occurs, acute SRP usually develops 4–12 weeks after completion of radiotherapy and presents as a dry cough, dyspnea and low-grade fever. If the incidence of SRP is reduced, not only the QoL but also the compliance of breast cancer patients may be improved. Therefore, we investigated the incidence SRP in breast cancer patients after hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to find the risk factors, which may have important effects on the risk of radiation-induced complications. Methods In total, 93 patients with breast cancer were evaluated. The final endpoint for acute SRP was defined as those who had density changes together with symptoms, as measured using computed tomography. The risk factors for a multivariate normal tissue complication probability model of SRP were determined using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique. Results Five risk factors were selected using LASSO: the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume that received more than 20-Gy (IV20), energy, age, body mass index (BMI) and T stage. Positive associations were demonstrated among the incidence of SRP, IV20, and patient age. Energy, BMI and T stage showed a negative association with the incidence of SRP. Our analyses indicate that the risk of SPR following hybrid IMRT in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients is increased once the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20-Gy is controlled below a limitation. Conclusions We suggest to define a dose-volume percentage constraint of IV20< 37% (or AIV20< 310cc) for the irradiated ipsilateral lung in radiation therapy treatment planning to maintain the incidence of SPR below 20%, and pay attention to the sequelae especially in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients. (AIV20: the absolute ipsilateral lung

  1. The acute hepatic porphyrias: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Siegesmund, Marko; van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne-Moniek; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; Frank, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    The porphyrias are predominantly inherited metabolic disorders, which result from a specific deficiency of one of the eight enzymes along the pathway of haem biosynthesis. Historically, they have been classified into hepatic and erythropoietic forms, based on the primary site of expression of the prevailing dysfunctional enzyme. From a clinical point of view, however, it is more convenient to subdivide them into acute and non-acute porphyrias, thereby primarily considering the potential occurrence of life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Unrecognised or untreated, such an acute porphyric attack is associated with a significant mortality of up to 10%. The acute hepatic porphyrias comprise acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Making a precise diagnosis may be difficult because the different types of porphyrias may show overlapping clinical and biochemical characteristics. To date, the therapeutic possibilities are limited and mainly symptomatic. In this overview we report on what is currently known about pathogenesis, clinic, diagnostics, and therapy of the acute hepatic porphyrias. We further point out actual and future challenges in the management of these diseases.

  2. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  3. [Acute bronchiolitis and chest physiotherapy: the end of a reign].

    PubMed

    Sterling, B; Bosdure, E; Stremler-Le Bel, N; Chabrol, B; Dubus, J-C

    2015-01-01

    Every winter, numerous infants are hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis. The severity criteria and symptomatic treatment are well known, with chest physiotherapy codified in 2000 by the French Health Authority (HAS) consensus conference (with techniques varying from one country to another) and becoming nearly systematic for the treatment of bronchial obstruction in infants. However, is this treatment really effective and legitimate for acute bronchiolitis? The objective of this study was to review the main studies on this subject. Few studies are available and most have a low level of evidence. However, they all tend to agree that chest physiotherapy does not change the natural history of the disease and most particularly the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, it does not seem that the prescription of chest physiotherapy in infant acute bronchiolitis is recommended.

  4. Recent advances in the management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Ravaglia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is characterized by acute wheezing in infants or children and is associated with signs or symptoms of respiratory infection; it is rarely symptomatic in adults and the most common etiologic agent is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Usually it does not require investigation, treatment is merely supportive and a conservative approach seems adequate in the majority of children, especially for the youngest ones (<3 months); however, clinical scoring systems have been proposed and admission in hospital should be arranged in case of severe disease or a very young age or important comorbidities. Apnea is a very important aspect of the management of young infants with bronchiolitis. This review focuses on the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics, as well as the recent advances in management of acute bronchiolitis. PMID:25580257

  5. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shruti; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Viswanathan, Prakash; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  6. Increase number of mitochondrion-like organelle in symptomatic Blastocystis subtype 3 due to metronidazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Raman, Kalyani; Kumar, Suresh; Chye, Tan Tian

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis sp., an intestinal organism is known to cause diarrhea with metronidazole regarded as the first line of treatment despite reports of its resistance. The conflicting reports of variation in drug treatment have been ascribed to subtype differences. The present study evaluated in vitro responses due to metronidazole on ST3 isolated from three symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, respectively. Symptomatic isolates were obtained from clinical patients who showed symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal bloating. Asymptomatic isolates from a stool survey carried out in a rural area. These patients had no other pathogens other than Blastocystis. Ultrastructural studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed drug-treated ST3 from symptomatic patients were irregular and amoebic with surface showing high-convoluted folding when treated with metronidazole. These organisms had higher number of mitochondrion-like organelle (MLO) with prominent cristae. However, the drug-treated ST3 from asymptomatic persons remained spherical in shape. Asymptomatic ST3 showed increase in the size of its central body with the MLO located at the periphery.

  7. Increase number of mitochondrion-like organelle in symptomatic Blastocystis subtype 3 due to metronidazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Raman, Kalyani; Kumar, Suresh; Chye, Tan Tian

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis sp., an intestinal organism is known to cause diarrhea with metronidazole regarded as the first line of treatment despite reports of its resistance. The conflicting reports of variation in drug treatment have been ascribed to subtype differences. The present study evaluated in vitro responses due to metronidazole on ST3 isolated from three symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, respectively. Symptomatic isolates were obtained from clinical patients who showed symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal bloating. Asymptomatic isolates from a stool survey carried out in a rural area. These patients had no other pathogens other than Blastocystis. Ultrastructural studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed drug-treated ST3 from symptomatic patients were irregular and amoebic with surface showing high-convoluted folding when treated with metronidazole. These organisms had higher number of mitochondrion-like organelle (MLO) with prominent cristae. However, the drug-treated ST3 from asymptomatic persons remained spherical in shape. Asymptomatic ST3 showed increase in the size of its central body with the MLO located at the periphery. PMID:26481491

  8. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  9. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity to a sad film predicts depression symptom improvement and symptomatic trajectory.

    PubMed

    Panaite, Vanessa; Hindash, Alexandra Cowden; Bylsma, Lauren M; Small, Brent J; Salomon, Kristen; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity, an index of cardiac vagal tone, has been linked to self-regulation and the severity and course of depression (Rottenberg, 2007). Although initial data supports the proposition that RSA withdrawal during a sad film is a specific predictor of depression course (Fraguas, 2007; Rottenberg, 2005), the robustness and specificity of this finding are unclear. To provide a stronger test, RSA reactivity to three emotion films (happy, sad, fear) and to a more robust stressor, a speech task, were examined in currently depressed individuals (n=37), who were assessed for their degree of symptomatic improvement over 30weeks. Robust RSA reactivity to the sad film uniquely predicted overall symptom improvement over 30weeks. RSA reactivity to both sad and stressful stimuli predicted the speed and maintenance of symptomatic improvement. The current analyses provide the most robust support to date that RSA withdrawal to sad stimuli (but not stressful) has specificity in predicting the overall symptomatic improvement. In contrast, RSA reactivity to negative stimuli (both sad and stressful) predicted the trajectory of depression course. Patients' engagement with sad stimuli may be an important sign to attend to in therapeutic settings. PMID:26681648

  10. Symptomatic Infratentorial Thrombosed Developmental Venous Anomaly: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amuluru, Krishna; Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Hannaford, Stephen; Singh, Inder Paul; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are variations of normal transmedullary veins draining white and gray matter. In the vast majority of cases, DVAs are diagnosed incidentally and should be considered as benign entities. In extremely rare circumstances, DVAs may become symptomatic due to mechanical or flow-related etiologies. Thrombosis of the collector vein of a DVA is a rare type of a flow-related complication with only 29 cases reported in the literature, the majority of which are supratentorial. Infratentorial thrombosed DVAs are thus extremely rare and the few cases reported have typically caused symptoms due to venous ischemic infarctions. Summary We report a case of an infratentorial DVA with a thrombosed drainage vein in a patient with nonhemorrhagic, noninfarcted venous congestive edema, which was successfully treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and short-term anticoagulation. We review the pertinent venous anatomy of the posterior fossa as well as the literature of symptomatic infratentorial thrombosed DVAs. Key Message The presented case of an infratentorial thrombosed DVA with cerebellar and pontine venous congestive edema is extremely rare. A working knowledge of posterior fossa venous anatomy and possible pathomechanisms responsible for the rarely symptomatic lesion will aid in the timely and efficacious treatment of such lesions. PMID:27051409

  11. Modeling methodology for the accurate and prompt prediction of symptomatic events in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; Risco-Martín, José L; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of symptomatic crises in chronic diseases allows to take decisions before the symptoms occur, such as the intake of drugs to avoid the symptoms or the activation of medical alarms. The prediction horizon is in this case an important parameter in order to fulfill the pharmacokinetics of medications, or the time response of medical services. This paper presents a study about the prediction limits of a chronic disease with symptomatic crises: the migraine. For that purpose, this work develops a methodology to build predictive migraine models and to improve these predictions beyond the limits of the initial models. The maximum prediction horizon is analyzed, and its dependency on the selected features is studied. A strategy for model selection is proposed to tackle the trade off between conservative but robust predictive models, with respect to less accurate predictions with higher horizons. The obtained results show a prediction horizon close to 40min, which is in the time range of the drug pharmacokinetics. Experiments have been performed in a realistic scenario where input data have been acquired in an ambulatory clinical study by the deployment of a non-intrusive Wireless Body Sensor Network. Our results provide an effective methodology for the selection of the future horizon in the development of prediction algorithms for diseases experiencing symptomatic crises. PMID:27260782

  12. Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Nathan, B; Appiah, J; Saunders, P; Heron, D; Nichols, T; Brum, R; Alexander, S; Baraitser, P; Ison, C

    2015-03-01

    In the UK, despite its low sensitivity, wet mount microscopy is often the only method of detecting Trichomonas vaginalis infection. A study was conducted in symptomatic women to compare the performance of five methods for detecting T. vaginalis: an in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR); Aptima T. vaginalis kit; OSOM ®Trichomonas Rapid Test; culture and microscopy. Symptomatic women underwent routine testing; microscopy and further swabs were taken for molecular testing, OSOM and culture. A true positive was defined as a sample that was positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Two hundred and forty-six women were recruited: 24 patients were positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Of these 24 patients, 21 patients were detected by real-time PCR (sensitivity 88%); 22 patients were detected by the Aptima T. vaginalis kit (sensitivity 92%); 22 patients were detected by OSOM (sensitivity 92%); nine were detected by wet mount microscopy (sensitivity 38%); and 21 were detected by culture (sensitivity 88%). Two patients were positive by just one method and were not considered true positives. All the other detection methods had a sensitivity to detect T. vaginalis that was significantly greater than wet mount microscopy, highlighting the number of cases that are routinely missed even in symptomatic women if microscopy is the only diagnostic method available.

  13. Symptomatic female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): genetic and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Giliberto, Florencia; Radic, Claudia Pamela; Luce, Leonela; Ferreiro, Verónica; de Brasi, Carlos; Szijan, Irene

    2014-01-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene and is characterized by muscle degeneration and death. DMD affects males; females being asymptomatic carriers of mutations. However, some of them manifest symptoms due to a translocation between X chromosome and an autosome or to a heterozygous mutation leading to inactivation of most of their normal X chromosome. Six symptomatic female carriers and two asymptomatic were analyzed by: I) Segregation of STRs-(CA)n and MLPA assays to detect a hemizygous alteration, and II) X chromosome inactivation pattern to uncover the reason for symptoms in these females. The symptomatic females shared mild but progressive muscular weakness and increased serum creatin kinase (CK) levels. Levels of dystrophin protein were below normal or absent in many fibers. Segregation of STRs-(CA)n revealed hemizygous patterns in three patients, which were confirmed by MLPA. In addition, this analysis showed a duplication in another patient. X chromosome inactivation assay revealed a skewed X inactivation pattern in the symptomatic females and a random inactivation pattern in the asymptomatic ones. Our results support the hypothesis that the DMD phenotype in female carriers of a dystrophin mutation has a direct correlation with a skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern.

  14. Symptomatic Patients with Intraluminal Carotid Thrombus: Outcome with a Strategy of Initial Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vellimana, Ananth K.; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Rich, Keith M.; Cross, Dewitte T.; Moran, Christopher J.; Zazulia, Allyson R.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Zipfel, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal treatment for patients with symptomatic intraluminal carotid thrombus (ICT) remains poorly defined. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients presenting to our institution between 2001 and 2011 with symptomatic ICT. Results Twenty-four patients (16 males, 8 females) with ICT presented with ischemic stroke (n=18) or TIA (n=6). All were treated initially with anticoagulation ± antiplatelet drugs. Eight of these patients had no or mild carotid stenosis on initial angiography and were treated with medical management alone. The remaining 16 patients had moderate or severe carotid stenosis on initial angiography. Of these, 10 underwent delayed revascularization (endarterectomy, n=8; angioplasty and stenting, n=2), 2 refused revascularization, and 4 were treated with medical therapy alone. One patient had multiple TIAs despite medical therapy and eventually underwent CEA; the remaining 23 patients had no TIAs. No patient suffered ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke while on anticoagulation, during the perioperative period or in long-term follow up; one patient died of an unrelated condition (mean follow-up = 16.4 months). Conclusion Our results suggest that initial anticoagulation of symptomatic ICT results in a low rate of recurrent ischemic events and that carotid revascularization, if indicated, can be safely performed in a delayed manner. PMID:23061393

  15. Clopidogrel plus Aspirin for Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kass-Hout, Tareq; Winningham, Melanie; Kass-Hout, Omar; Henriquez, Laura; Tong, Frank; Dion, Jacques; Cawley, Michael; Belagaje, Samir; Frankel, Michael; Anderson, Aaron; Nahab, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are limited data on the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy for secondary stroke prevention in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with high-grade (70–99%) symptomatic intracranial stenosis from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2013, and evaluated within 30 days of the index event were eligible for this analysis. All patients underwent treatment with aspirin plus clopidogrel for a target duration of 12 months along with aggressive medical management based on the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) protocol; all patients were given gastrointestinal prophylaxis for the duration of their aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Clinical and safety outcomes of our cohort were compared with the medical arm of the SAMMPRIS trial cohort (n = 227). Results Our cohort included 25 patients that met the inclusion criteria. Achievement of blood pressure and LDL cholesterol targets were similar between our cohort and the SAMMPRIS cohort. At 1 year, the rates of stroke, myocardial infarction or vascular death were 0% in our cohort and 16% in the SAMMPRIS cohort (p = 0.03). At 1 year, major bleeding rates were similar between our cohort and the SAMMPRIS cohort (4 vs. 2.2%, p = 1.0). Conclusion A prolonged course of dual antiplatelet therapy for symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease may be associated with less vascular events with no increase in hemorrhagic complications. PMID:27781044

  16. [CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HYPERTROPHIC GINGIVITIS: CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Shinkevich, V; Udaltsova, K; Pisarenko, E; Kolomiets, S; Khmil, T

    2015-12-01

    Gingivitis in traditional national dentistry referred to independent diseases or symptomatic condition in periodontitis and classified morphologically. The diagnostic features of the diseases are characteristic, but the clinical presentation of symptomatic gingivitis and patterns of bone destructions may vary between patients. Successful treatment of the disease depends from proper diagnosis and advanced disease stages, but for symptomatic gingivitis that accompanying chronic periodontitis, protocols include surgical excision. Despite of the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis, its active treatment often start in severe destruction and bone loss (2-3 stage severity). Today etiotropic antimicrobial therapy is real way to control microbial biofilm and has solid evidence base. Applying of etiotropic antimicrobial therapy as systemic azithromycin with timely treatment of mild to moderate periodontal and bone destruction may reduce severe periodontitis incidence of and treatment-related complications in the future. This paper attempts to describe the clinical diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of chronic generalized periodontitis and hypertrophic gingivitis patient with case reports and a brief review. PMID:26719550

  17. Possible overlap between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and symptomatic vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Forget, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; van de Wyngaert, Françoise; Raftopoulos, Christian; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a previous history of severe headache ("thunderclap") was admitted with a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient developed symptomatic vasospasm on day 5 that resolved rapidly after having increased arterial blood pressure. She experienced also short-lasting excruciating headache. On day 12, while velocities had normalised, as revealed by transcranial Doppler (TCD), for more than 48 h, she developed aphasia and right hemiplegia associated with diffuse segmental vasospasm on the left middle cerebral artery. Intra-arterial infusion of vasodilatory agents was required. Recurrence of symptomatic vasospasm was noted on day 25, with a great number of territories involved as shown in the cerebral angiogram. A second intra-arterial treatment was needed. The patient complained of multiple episodes of extremely severe headache ("thunderclap"), with also transient dysarthria and hemiparesia on day 30. She was discharged on day 38 after full recovery. The clinical and TCD/radiological findings were consistent with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome overlapping SAH related symptomatic vasospasm. PMID:19381433

  18. Higher Caspase-like activity in symptomatic isolates of Blastocystis spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biochemical evidence of a caspase-like execution pathway has been demonstrated in a variety of protozoan parasites, including Blastocystis spp. The distinct differences in the phenotypic characterization reported previously have prompted us to compare the rate of apoptosis in Blastocystis spp. isolated from individuals who were symptomatic and asymptomatic. In the current study, we analysed the caspase activation involved in PCD mediated by a cytotoxic drug, (metronidazole) in both symptomatic & asymptomatic isolates. Methods Apoptosis was induced in Blastocystis spp. by treating cultures of symptomatic and asymptomatic isolates of 3 sub-types namely 1, 3 and 5 with two different concentrations, 0.1 and 0.0001 mg/ml of metronidazole (with and without pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk). The experiment was repeated to assess the number of apoptotic cells in all the isolates of both conditions. Results Symptomatic isolates of subtype 3 (without pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk) showed high fluorescence intensity for active caspase-like proteases [0.0001 mg/ml, 88% (p < 0.001) at 0.1 mg/ml, 70% (p < 0.001)] at the 72nd hour in vitro culture in comparison with asymptomatic isolates [0.0001 mg/ml, 65%, at 0.1 mg/ml, 55%]. The number of apoptotic cells was higher [0.0001 mg/ml, 89% (p < 0.001) and at 0.1 mg/ml, 70% (p < 0.001)] at the 72nd hour of in vitro culture in comparison with asymptomatic isolates [0.0001 mg/ml, 66% (p < 0.001) and at 0.1 mg/ml, 45% (p < 0.01)]. Cells treated with metronidazole in the presence of zVAD.fmk showed less than 10% caspase activation. Conclusion The high number of symptomatic cells expressing active caspase-like proteases and becoming apoptotic compared to asymptomatic cells clearly demonstrates that the response to metronidazole treatment is isolate dependent. Hence this justifies the conflicting reports on the curative success rates when treated with

  19. Randomized trial of intensive bisphosphonate treatment versus symptomatic management in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Langston, Anne L; Campbell, Marion K; Fraser, William D; MacLennan, Graeme S; Selby, Peter L; Ralston, Stuart H

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely regarded as the treatment of choice for Paget's disease of bone (PDB) because of their potent inhibitory effects on bone turnover, but the effects of bisphosphonate therapy on symptoms and complications of PDB have been little studied. Here we report the results of a randomized trial that compared the effects of symptomatic treatment with intensive bisphosphonate therapy in a cohort of 1324 patients with PDB who were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 2 to 5 years). The symptomatic treatment group was treated only if they had pagetic bone pain, for which they were first given analgesics or anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by bisphosphonates if they did not respond. The intensive group received repeat courses of bisphosphonates irrespective of symptoms with the aim of reducing and maintaining serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels within the normal range. The endpoints were fracture, orthopedic surgery, quality of life, bone pain, and hearing thresholds. Serum ALP levels were significantly lower in the intensive treatment group than in with the symptomatic treatment group within 4 months of commencing treatment and remained lower throughout the study (p < .001). There was no difference between the groups in quality of life (as assessed by the SF36 questionnaire), in overall bodily pain, or in pagetic bone pain. Hearing thresholds, as assessed by audiometry did not change significantly and did not differ between the treatment groups. Clinical fractures occurred in 46 of 661 patients (7.0%) in the intensive treatment group compared with 49 of 663 patients (7.4%) in the symptomatic treatment group, and orthopedic surgery was required in 50 of 661 patients (7.3%) in the intensive treatment group and in 55 of 663 patients (8.3%) in the symptomatic treatment group. These differences were not significant. Subgroup analyses of patients with elevated ALP levels at baseline and those who did or did not receive bisphosphonates during the

  20. Treating symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in women with schizophrenia: presentation of the ongoing DAAMSEL clinical trial (Dopamine partial Agonist, Aripiprazole, for the Management of Symptomatic ELevated prolactin)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevations occur in people treated with antipsychotic medications and are often much higher in women than in men. Hyperprolactinemia is known to cause amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, galactorrhea and gynecomastia in females and is also associated with sexual dysfunction and bone loss. These side effects increase risk of antipsychotic nonadherence and suicide and pose significant problems in the long term management of women with schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we review the literature on prolactin; its physiology, plasma levels, side effects and strategies for treatment. We also present the rationale and protocol for an ongoing clinical trial to treat symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in premenopausal women with schizophrenia. More attention and focus are needed to address these significant side effects and help the field better personalize the treatment of women with schizophrenia. PMID:23968123

  1. Multicenter Cohort Study to Assess the Impact of a Silver-Alloy and Hydrogel-Coated Urinary Catheter on Symptomatic Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, James W.; Jarvis, William R.; Thomas, Lendon

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a silver-alloy hydrogel catheter on symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). DESIGN: Multicenter before-after non-randomized cohort study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Seven acute care hospitals ranging in size from 124 to 607 beds participated in this study. The study population included adult patients with a positive urine culture 2 or more days after admission, who underwent Foley catheterization. METHODS: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection surveillance was conducted at each hospital for at least 3 months during the use of a standard catheter and 3 months during the use of the silver-alloy hydrogel catheter. Both the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance and a clinical definition of CAUTI were used for rate calculation. RESULTS: A 47% relative reduction in the CAUTI rate was observed with the silver-alloy hydrogel catheter compared to the standard catheter when both infection definitions were used (0.945/1000 patient days vs 0.498/1000 patient days) (odds ratio = 0.53; P < .0001; 95% CI: 0.45–0.62). When only NHSN-defined CAUTIs were considered, a 58% relative reduction occurred in the silver-alloy hydrogel period (0.60/1000 patient days vs 0.25/1000 patient days) (odds ratio = 0.42; P < .0001; 95% CI: 0.34–0.53). Antimicrobial days for CAUTIs decreased from 1165 (standard catheter period) to 406 (silver-alloy hydrogel period). CONCLUSIONS: Use of a silver-alloy hydrogel urinary catheter reduced symptomatic CAUTI occurrences as defined by both NHSN and clinical criteria. PMID:24922561

  2. Activity of Monoamine Oxidase in the Nigrostriatal System at Presymptomatic and Early Symptomatic Stages of Parkinsonism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Khakimova, G R; Kozina, E A; Buneeva, O A; Aksenova, L N; Medvedev, A E; Ugryumov, M V

    2015-08-01

    Activities of monoamine oxidases A and B were examined on the models of presymptomatic and early symptomatic stages of Parkinson's disease developed in mice treated with MPTP, a specific neurotoxin affecting dopaminergic neurons. Activity of monoamine oxidases A, the key enzyme of dopamine degradation, is increased in neuronal somas during the symptomatic stage, and it is augmented in the axons during both stages. Neuronal activity of monoamine oxidases A is higher during the symptomatic stage than that during the presymptomatic stage, which can explain depletion of intercellular dopamine and appearance of motor disturbances. Activity of monoamine oxidase B in the striatum is reduced during the presymptomatic stage, but returns to the control level during the symptomatic stage. Variation in monoamine oxidase activity seems to reflect the compensatory mechanisms triggered in degrading nigrostriatal dopaminergic system.

  3. Acute otitis media: a simple diagnosis, a simple treatment.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S S

    2014-09-01

    To assess the symptoms and signs of acute otitis media and efficiency of simple antibiotics like amoxicillin in its treatment in the primary health care setup. This is a prospective longitudinal study including 204 patients from different institutions. Patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute otitis media when presented with earache, fever, fullness and or otorrhea. Patients were divided into two equal groups on basis of the treatment they received, Group A received only symptomatic treatment while Group B were given Amoxicillin (40 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Acute otitis media was common in children under 15 years (64.7%). Patients presented with earache (100%), aural fullness (90.68%), fever (76.47%) associated with recent onset of upper respiratory tract infections (88.23%). In group A, improvement was noticed in 28.43% in 3 days while 35.29% in 7 days. In group B, improvement was noticed in 48.03% in day 3 while 86.27% in day 7. In countries where medical care is scarce, patients lost to follow up, it is wise to treat with simple antibiotics like amoxicillin in adequate dose than to treat only symptomatically. It prevents chronicity, early hearing impairments and reduces antibiotic resistance.

  4. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  5. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  6. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Langevin, Stanley; O'Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G; Kirby, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  7. Observation option toolkit for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, R M

    2001-04-01

    The observation option for acute otitis media (AOM) refers to deferring antibiotic treatment of selected children for up to 3 days, during which time management is limited to analgesics and symptomatic relief. With appropriate follow-up complications are not increased, and clinical outcomes compare favorably with routine initial antibiotic therapy. Although used commonly in the Netherlands and certain Scandinavian countries, this approach has not gained wide acceptance in Europe and the United States. This article describes an evidence-based toolkit developed by the New York Region Otitis Project for judicious use of the observation option. The toolkit is not intended to endorse the observation option as a preferred method of management, nor is it intended as a rigid practice guideline to supplant clinician judgement. Rather, it presents busy clinicians with the tools needed to implement the observation option in everyday patient care should they so desire.

  8. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  9. Acute lymphocytic leukemia with superimposed invasive aspergillosis and pneumopericardium successfully treated with voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Alviar, Carlos L; Doherty, Bryan; Vaduganathan, Muthiah

    2014-07-01

    We present a 47-year-old man with acute lymphocytic leukemia with a pericardial friction rub heralding pericardial aspergillosis. The clinical course was complicated by pneumopericardium, likely secondary to a direct connection between the lung parenchyma and the pericardial space. Bronchoalveolar lavage cultures returned positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger. Combination voriconazole and vancomycin resulted in symptomatic improvement within 2 weeks of hospitalization.

  10. Predictors of Pain and Function in Patients With Symptomatic, Atraumatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Pedroza, Angela; Jones, Grant L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears increases with age, many patients are asymptomatic and may not require surgical repair. The factors associated with pain and loss of function in patients with rotator cuff tears are not well defined. Purpose To determine which factors correlate with pain and loss of function in patients with symptomatic, atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears who are enrolled in a structured physical therapy program. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A multicenter group enrolled patients with symptomatic, atraumatic rotator cuff tears in a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study evaluating the effects of a structured physical therapy program. Time-zero patient data were reviewed to test which factors correlated with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Results A total of 389 patients were enrolled. Mean ASES score was 53.9; mean WORC score was 46.9. The following variables were associated with higher WORC and ASES scores: female sex (P = .001), education level (higher education, higher score; P <.001), active abduction (degrees; P = .021), and strength in forward elevation (P = .002) and abduction (P = .007). The following variables were associated with lower WORC and ASES scores: male sex (P = .001), atrophy of the supraspinatus (P = .04) and infraspinatus (P = .003), and presence of scapulothoracic dyskinesia (P < .001). Tear size was not a significant predictor (WORC) unless comparing isolated supraspinatus tears to supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears (P = .004). Age, tear retraction, duration of symptoms, and humeral head migration were not statistically significant. Conclusion Nonsurgically modifiable factors, such as scapulothoracic dyskinesia, active abduction, and strength in forward elevation and abduction, were identified that could be addressed nonoperatively with therapy. Therefore

  11. Etiology and clinical characteristics of symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis: A review of 174 cases.

    PubMed

    Troeltzsch, Matthias; Pache, Christoph; Troeltzsch, Markus; Kaeppler, Gabriele; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven; Probst, Florian

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the causative pathology associated with symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis requiring surgical treatment. A retrospective review of all patients that have been treated surgically for unilateral symptomatic maxillary sinusitis between 2006 and 2013 at a single institution was performed. Demographic, anamnesis, clinical, radiological, microbiological and histological data were gathered and analyzed. The patients were allocated into groups depending on the underlying cause of the disease. Descriptive and inferential statistics were computed (level of significance: p ≤ 0.05). The study sample was composed of 174 patients (72 female; 102 male) with a mean age of 52.7 years (SD 16.9). Most cases (130; 75%) were triggered by odontogenic pathology following dentoalveolar surgical interventions (83/130 patients; 64%). Other etiological factors for odontogenic unilateral sinusitis were periapical (23/130 cases; 18%) and periodontal pathology (13/130 cases; 10%). Rhinogenic factors for sinusitis were detected in 13 patients (7.5%) and dental implant-associated unilateral maxillary sinusitis was diagnosed in nine patients (5.2%). Four patients (2.3%) had undergone previous sinus augmentation surgery. A leading cause for the sinus infection could not be identified in 18 patients (10%) who all had a history of midfacial surgery. Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (8) and squamous cell carcinoma (2) were incidental findings. There were no differences in the clinical appearance of the disease with respect to its etiology. Odontogenic causes for maxillary sinusitis must be considered especially in unilateral cases. Maxillary dental implants may induce symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis. PMID:26319958

  12. Endophytic bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of Amazon Paullinia cupana associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Ferreira, Almir José; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes colonize an ecological niche similar to that of phytopathogens, which make them candidate for disease suppression. Anthracnose is a disease caused by Colletotrichum spp., a phytopathogen that can infect guarana (Paullinia cupana), an important commercial crop in the Brazilian Amazon. We investigated the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose guarana plants. The PCR-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed differences in the structure of the evaluated communities. Detailed analysis of endophytic bacteria composition using culture-dependent and 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria phyla. Firmicutes comprised the majority of isolates in asymptomatic plants (2.40E(-4)). However, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed differences at the genus level for Neisseria (1.4E(-4)), Haemophilus (2.1E(-3)) and Arsenophonus (3.6E(-5)) in asymptomatic plants, Aquicella (3.5E(-3)) in symptomatic anthracnose plants, and Pseudomonas (1.1E(-3)), which was mainly identified in asymptomatic plants. In cross-comparisons of the endophytic bacterial communities as a whole, symptomatic anthracnose plants contained higher diversity, as reflected in the Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices estimation (P < 0.05). Similarly, comparisons using LIBSHUFF and heatmap analysis for the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed differences between endophytic bacterial communities. These data are in agreement with the NMSD and ANOSIM analysis of DGGE profiles. Our results suggest that anthracnose can restructure endophytic bacterial communities by selecting certain strains in the phyllosphere of P. cupana. The understanding of these interactions is important for the development of strategies of biocontrol for Colletotrichum. PMID:26090305

  13. Etiology and clinical characteristics of symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis: A review of 174 cases.

    PubMed

    Troeltzsch, Matthias; Pache, Christoph; Troeltzsch, Markus; Kaeppler, Gabriele; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven; Probst, Florian

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the causative pathology associated with symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis requiring surgical treatment. A retrospective review of all patients that have been treated surgically for unilateral symptomatic maxillary sinusitis between 2006 and 2013 at a single institution was performed. Demographic, anamnesis, clinical, radiological, microbiological and histological data were gathered and analyzed. The patients were allocated into groups depending on the underlying cause of the disease. Descriptive and inferential statistics were computed (level of significance: p ≤ 0.05). The study sample was composed of 174 patients (72 female; 102 male) with a mean age of 52.7 years (SD 16.9). Most cases (130; 75%) were triggered by odontogenic pathology following dentoalveolar surgical interventions (83/130 patients; 64%). Other etiological factors for odontogenic unilateral sinusitis were periapical (23/130 cases; 18%) and periodontal pathology (13/130 cases; 10%). Rhinogenic factors for sinusitis were detected in 13 patients (7.5%) and dental implant-associated unilateral maxillary sinusitis was diagnosed in nine patients (5.2%). Four patients (2.3%) had undergone previous sinus augmentation surgery. A leading cause for the sinus infection could not be identified in 18 patients (10%) who all had a history of midfacial surgery. Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (8) and squamous cell carcinoma (2) were incidental findings. There were no differences in the clinical appearance of the disease with respect to its etiology. Odontogenic causes for maxillary sinusitis must be considered especially in unilateral cases. Maxillary dental implants may induce symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis.

  14. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T. Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L’Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2–14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14’s active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  15. Differential evolution of peripheral cytokine levels in symptomatic and asymptomatic responses to experimental influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    McClain, M T; Henao, R; Williams, J; Nicholson, B; Veldman, T; Hudson, L; Tsalik, E L; Lambkin-Williams, R; Gilbert, A; Mann, A; Ginsburg, G S; Woods, C W

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to influenza virus triggers a complex cascade of events in the human host. In order to understand more clearly the evolution of this intricate response over time, human volunteers were inoculated with influenza A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2), and then had serial peripheral blood samples drawn and tested for the presence of 25 major human cytokines. Nine of 17 (53%) inoculated subjects developed symptomatic influenza infection. Individuals who will go on to become symptomatic demonstrate increased circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-15, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and interferon (IFN) gamma-induced protein (IP)-10 as early as 12-29 h post-inoculation (during the presymptomatic phase), whereas challenged patients who remain asymptomatic do not. Overall, the immunological pathways of leucocyte recruitment, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-signalling, innate anti-viral immunity and fever production are all over-represented in symptomatic individuals very early in disease, but are also dynamic and evolve continuously over time. Comparison with simultaneous peripheral blood genomics demonstrates that some inflammatory mediators (MCP-1, IP-10, IL-15) are being expressed actively in circulating cells, while others (IL-6, IL-8, IFN-α and IFN-γ) are probable effectors produced locally at the site of infection. Interestingly, asymptomatic exposed subjects are not quiescent either immunologically or genomically, but instead exhibit early and persistent down-regulation of important inflammatory mediators in the periphery. The host inflammatory response to influenza infection is variable but robust, and evolves over time. These results offer critical insight into pathways driving influenza-related symptomatology and offer the potential to contribute to early detection and differentiation of infected hosts.

  16. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions.

  17. Endophytic bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of Amazon Paullinia cupana associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Ferreira, Almir José; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes colonize an ecological niche similar to that of phytopathogens, which make them candidate for disease suppression. Anthracnose is a disease caused by Colletotrichum spp., a phytopathogen that can infect guarana (Paullinia cupana), an important commercial crop in the Brazilian Amazon. We investigated the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose guarana plants. The PCR-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed differences in the structure of the evaluated communities. Detailed analysis of endophytic bacteria composition using culture-dependent and 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria phyla. Firmicutes comprised the majority of isolates in asymptomatic plants (2.40E(-4)). However, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed differences at the genus level for Neisseria (1.4E(-4)), Haemophilus (2.1E(-3)) and Arsenophonus (3.6E(-5)) in asymptomatic plants, Aquicella (3.5E(-3)) in symptomatic anthracnose plants, and Pseudomonas (1.1E(-3)), which was mainly identified in asymptomatic plants. In cross-comparisons of the endophytic bacterial communities as a whole, symptomatic anthracnose plants contained higher diversity, as reflected in the Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices estimation (P < 0.05). Similarly, comparisons using LIBSHUFF and heatmap analysis for the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed differences between endophytic bacterial communities. These data are in agreement with the NMSD and ANOSIM analysis of DGGE profiles. Our results suggest that anthracnose can restructure endophytic bacterial communities by selecting certain strains in the phyllosphere of P. cupana. The understanding of these interactions is important for the development of strategies of biocontrol for Colletotrichum.

  18. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  19. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Neurological Complications of Infective Endocarditis: Impact on Surgical Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye, François; Tattevin, Pierre; Federspiel, Claire; Le Moing, Vincent; Chirouze, Catherine; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Bernard, Yvette; Chocron, Sidney; Obadia, Jean-François; Alla, François; Hoen, Bruno; Duval, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Symptomatic neurological complications (NC) are a major cause of mortality in infective endocarditis (IE) but the impact of asymptomatic complications is unknown. We aimed to assess the impact of asymptomatic NC (AsNC) on the management and prognosis of IE. Methods From the database of cases collected for a population-based study on IE, we selected 283 patients with definite left-sided IE who had undergone at least one neuroimaging procedure (cerebral CT scan and/or MRI) performed as part of initial evaluation. Results Among those 283 patients, 100 had symptomatic neurological complications (SNC) prior to the investigation, 35 had an asymptomatic neurological complications (AsNC), and 148 had a normal cerebral imaging (NoNC). The rate of valve surgery was 43% in the 100 patients with SNC, 77% in the 35 with AsNC, and 54% in the 148 with NoNC (p<0.001). In-hospital mortality was 42% in patients with SNC, 8.6% in patients with AsNC, and 16.9% in patients with NoNC (p<0.001). Among the 135 patients with NC, 95 had an indication for valve surgery (71%), which was performed in 70 of them (mortality 20%) and not performed in 25 (mortality 68%). In a multivariate adjusted analysis of the 135 patients with NC, age, renal failure, septic shock, and IE caused by S. aureus were independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality. In addition SNC was an independent predictor of 1-year mortality. Conclusions The presence of NC was associated with a poorer prognosis when symptomatic. Patients with AsNC had the highest rate of valve surgery and the lowest mortality rate, which suggests a protective role of surgery guided by systematic neuroimaging results. PMID:27400273

  20. Passive tobacco exposure may impair symptomatic improvement in patients with chronic angina undergoing enhanced external counterpulsation

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, Stilianos; Kennard, Elizabeth D; Kelsey, Sheryl F; Michaels, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Background The adverse effects of tobacco abuse on cardiovascular outcomes are well-known. However, the impact of passive smoke exposure on angina status and therapeutic response is less well-established. We examined the impact of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure on symptomatic improvement in patients with chronic ischemic coronary disease undergoing enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP). Methods This observational study included 1,026 non-smokers (108 exposed and 918 not-exposed to SHS) from the Second International EECP Patient Registry. We also assessed angina response in 363 current smokers. Patient demographics, symptomatic improvement and quality of life assessment were determined by self-report prior and after EECP treatment. Results Non-smoking SHS subjects had a lower prevalence of prior revascularization (85% vs 90%), and had an increased prevalence of stroke (13% vs 7%) and prior smoking (72% vs 61%; all p < 0.05) compared to non-smokers without SHS exposure. Despite comparable degrees of coronary disease, baseline angina class, medical regimens and side effects during EECP, fewer SHS non-smokers completed a full 35-hour treatment course (77% vs 85%, p = 0.020) compared to non-smokers without SHS. Compared to non-smokers without SHS, non-smoking SHS subjects had less angina relief after EECP (angina class decreased ≥ 1 class: 68% vs 79%; p = 0.0082), both higher than that achieved in current smokers (66%). By multivariable logistic regression, SHS exposure was an independent predictor of failure to symptomatic improvement after EECP among non-smokers (OR 1.81, 95% confidence intervals 1.16–2.83). Conclusion Non-smokers with SHS exposure had an attenuated improvement in anginal symptoms compared to those without SHS following EECP. PMID:18798998

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  2. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  3. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic fibroids: the University of Malaya Medical Centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, RN; Vijayananthan, A; Omar, SZ; Nawawi, O; Abdullah, BJJ

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for the treatment of symptomatic fibroids has been performed in several centres in the United States, Western Europe and Asia with promising results. This study reports the authors' experience with UAE at the University Malaya Medical Centre. Method: Fifty women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who declined surgery were treated by transcatheter UAE. The uterine arteries were selectively catheterised and embolised with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Post-procedure analgesia was administered via patient-controlled analgesic pump. The patients were followed up at an interval of 6/12 clinically and with MRI. Results: Transcatheter UAE was performed on all 50 patients with no major complications. 49 patients had both uterine arteries embolised while 1 patient had only the right uterine artery embolised on account of hypoplasia of the left uterine artery due to previous myomectomy. The mean hospital stay was 3.5 days (range, 2 to 7). At a mean follow-up of 24/52, all patients reported improvements in their presenting symptoms. Objective improvement in terms of reduction of uterine and fibroid sizes was determined on MRI. One patient, who initially responded with a decrease in uterine and dominant fibroid size, became symptomatic (menorrhagia) after 6 months and subsequent endometrial sampling revealed cystic glandular hyperplasia for which total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. Two other patients had no change in symptoms and after hysterectomy, the pathology revealed concurrent adenomyosis. Another 2 patients with cervical fibroids were treated with hysterectomy as there was no gross reduction in the size of fibroid following UAE. Overall, 90% of the patients had dramatic improvement of anaemia and symptoms at 1 year follow-up. Conclusion: Out of the 50 patients, 17 patients had total disappearance of their fibroids and 28 patients had more than 50% reduction in the size of fibroids after 1 year. 5 patients

  4. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  5. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  6. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  7. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of symptomatic and recovered leaves of geminivirus-infected pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are a large and important family of plant viruses that infect a wide range of crops throughout the world. The Begomovirus genus contains species that are transmitted by whiteflies and are distributed worldwide causing disease on an array of horticultural crops. Symptom remission, in which newly developed leaves of systemically infected plants exhibit a reduction in symptom severity (recovery), has been observed on pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants infected with Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV). Previous studies have shown that transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms are involved in the reduction of viral nucleic acid concentration in recovered tissue. In this study, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods to assess transcriptional variation in healthy (mock), symptomatic, and recovered pepper leaves following PepGMV infection. Results Differential expression analyses of the pepper leaf transcriptome from symptomatic and recovered stages revealed a total of 309 differentially expressed genes between healthy (mock) and symptomatic or recovered tissues. Computational prediction of differential expression was validated using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR confirming the robustness of our bioinformatic methods. Within the set of differentially expressed genes associated with the recovery process were genes involved in defense responses including pathogenesis-related proteins, reactive oxygen species, systemic acquired resistance, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and ethylene signaling. No major differences were found when compared the differentially expressed genes in symptomatic and recovered tissues. On the other hand, a set of genes with novel roles in defense responses was identified including genes involved in histone modification. This latter result suggested that post-transcriptional and transcriptional gene silencing may be one of the major mechanisms involved in the recovery process. Genes

  9. Therapy decisions for the symptomatic patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Mark C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer continues to kill approximately 30,000 men per year. Since 2010, five new therapeutic agents have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). With the increasing number of therapies available to clinicians, the most effective sequence in which to implement these treatments remains unknown. The presence or absence of symptoms (i.e., bony pain, visceral crisis) is a key parameter that informs the decision-making process regarding therapy. Treatment algorithms based on: 1) asymptomatic/minimal symptoms, 2) moderate symptoms or chemotherapy ineligible or 3) symptomatic disease need to be developed. PMID:25865849

  10. A Rare Case of Symptomatic Double Optic Disc Pit without Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Nabi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc pits are an uncommon congenital abnormality. Patients remain asymptomatic unless they develop maculopathy. We present a rare case of a double optic disc pit of which only three others have been reported worldwide. A 51-year-old gentleman presented with blurred vision. Fundoscopy revealed a right double optic disc pit. Though he was symptomatic there was no evidence of maculopathy. OCT of macula and disc was otherwise unremarkable. Visual field demonstrated a paracentral defect. Although optic disc pits are rare they are still an important clinical entity. Prompt identification and treatment of complications are required to prevent a poor visual prognosis. PMID:27648324

  11. A Rare Case of Symptomatic Double Optic Disc Pit without Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zaria; Abdul-Nabi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc pits are an uncommon congenital abnormality. Patients remain asymptomatic unless they develop maculopathy. We present a rare case of a double optic disc pit of which only three others have been reported worldwide. A 51-year-old gentleman presented with blurred vision. Fundoscopy revealed a right double optic disc pit. Though he was symptomatic there was no evidence of maculopathy. OCT of macula and disc was otherwise unremarkable. Visual field demonstrated a paracentral defect. Although optic disc pits are rare they are still an important clinical entity. Prompt identification and treatment of complications are required to prevent a poor visual prognosis. PMID:27648324

  12. Transmission of calicivirus by a foodhandler in the pre-symptomatic phase of illness.

    PubMed

    Gaulin, C; Frigon, M; Poirier, D; Fournier, C

    1999-12-01

    After a Christmas party in a restaurant, 48 (68%) of the 82 guests contracted calicivirus gastroenteritis. The epidemiological investigation showed that salad was strongly associated with the disease episode (RR = 2.43, P = 0.0005). Similar symptoms occurred among other customers who had had a meal at the same restaurant on the same evening. A foodhandler who had only prepared salad and appetizers became sick about 30 min after the end of his shift. He had been free of symptoms while preparing food. Few outbreak investigations have shown calicivirus transmission by foodhandlers some hours before becoming symptomatic.

  13. [Symptomatic adrenal myelolipoma: apropos of 2 cases. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Nova Sánchez, E; López López, C; Fernández Puentes, J C; Llorens Martínez, F J; García López, F

    1989-01-01

    We present two symptomatic cases of adrenal myelolipoma with good evolution 24 and 14 months after surgery. We discuss the clinical characteristics of these tumours and diagnostic methods, of which CAT seems to be the most effective. In therapy we single out the need for surgery in those that are of large size and without accompanying symptomatology owing to the risk of spontaneous hemorrhaging or subsequent to traumatism, as well as in those displaying clinical symptoms. In small asymptomatic ones, discovered incidentally, we will carry out periodic observation with controls by CAT and/or echography. PMID:2688368

  14. Acute sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Brent; Dion, Gregory R; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Sinusitis is a common patient complaint that carries with it a large economic burden. It is one of the most common reasons patients visit their primary care physician. Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) can be distinguished from other forms of rhinosinusitis based on symptom duration of <4 weeks in a patient with purulent rhinorrhea associated with facial pain or pressure. Native upper aerodigestive tract bacteria are the most common etiologic agents. Treatment of ABRS is targeted primarily at symptom improvement. Amoxicillin can be use