Science.gov

Sample records for acute symptomatic hyponatremia

  1. Acute symptomatic hyponatremia in a flight attendant.

    PubMed

    Madero, Magdalena; Monares, Enrique; Domínguez, Aurelio Méndez; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Acute symptomatic hyponatremia after thiazide diuretic initiation is a medical emergency. Here we describe the case of a flight attendant who developed acute hyponatremia during a flight and the potential risk factors for developing this condition. A 57-year-old flight attendant with history of essential hypertension was recently started on a thiazide diuretic. As she did routinely when working, she increased her water intake during a flight from London to Mexico City. She complained of nausea and headache during the flight. Upon arrival, she developed severe disorientation and presented to the hospital emergency room (ER) with a Glasgow scale of 12, hypoxia, and a generalized tonic clonic seizure. Her laboratory results on arrival were consistent with severe hyponatremia (serum Na 116 mEql/L) and severe cerebral edema by CT scan. She was treated with hypertonic saline, with complete resolution of the neurologic symptoms. We describe high water intake and hypoxia related to decreased partial pressure of oxygen in the cabin as the two main risk factors for thiazide-induced acute hyponatremia in this case. PMID:25500297

  2. How quickly can acute symptomatic hyponatremia be corrected?

    PubMed

    Yaprak, Mustafa; Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Tamer, Abdulkerim Furkan; Peker, Nuri; Demirci, Meltem Sezis; Çırpan, Teksin; Aşçı, Gülay

    2013-12-01

    The systemic absorption of the flush liquid, including sorbitol, glycine or mannitol, can lead to complications, such as hyponatremia, volume overload and pulmonary or cerebral edema. Acute hyponatremia is defined as a reduction in the plasma sodium level in less than 48 h. Acute symptomatic hyponatremia should be corrected aggressively because it may cause irreversible neurological damage and death. Rapid correction of hyponatremia causes severe neurologic deficits, such as central pontine myelinolysis; thus, the optimal therapeutic approach has been debated. This article examined acute symptomatic hyponatremia in a patient undergoing transcervical myomectomy for a submucosal myoma. A thirty-seven-year-old patient was evaluated in obstetrics and gynecology clinic because of altered mental status and agitation. There was no history of chronic illness or drug use. It was discovered that during the operation, 12 L of the flush fluid, which contained 5 % mannitol, had been infused, but only 7 L of the flush fluid had been collected. On physical examination, the patient's general condition was moderate, her cooperation was limited, she was agitated, and her blood pressure was 120/70 mmHg. The sodium level was 99 mEq/L. Furosemid and 3 % NaCl solution were given. Her serum sodium returned to normal by increasing 39 mEq/L within 14 h. Her recovery was uneventful, and she was discharged 24 h after her serum sodium returned to normal. In conclusion, if there is a difference between the infused and collected volumes of the mannitol irrigant, severe hyponatremia may develop due to the flush fluid used during transcervical hysteroscopy and myomectomy. In these patients, acute symptomatic hyponatremia may be corrected as rapidly as the sodium level dropped. PMID:23054312

  3. Symptomatic hyponatremia associated with psychosis, medications, and smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Ellinas, P. A.; Rosner, F.; Jaume, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Over a 3-year period, 15 patients with severe hyponatremia were referred to our emergency room from a nearby psychiatric institution. This article reports on 36 episodes of symptomatic hyponatremia in those 15 patients. All but two of the patients were receiving antipsychotic medications; one patient was taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and one patient was taking an oral hypoglycemic agent. Thirteen patients were chronic schizophrenics, one had a bipolar depressive disorder with psychotic features, and one patient had no psychiatric disorder. Patients presented with seizures, change in mental status, and vegetative symptoms (nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea) associated with hyponatremia and water intoxication. Exacerbation of the patients' underlying illness, psychogenic polydipsia, compulsive smoking, alcoholic cirrhosis, drug abuse, and neuroleptic and other medications are thought to be the major causes of acute hyponatremia in these patients. PMID:8095075

  4. Cyclophosphamide-induced symptomatic hyponatremia, a rare but severe side effect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Elazzazy, Shereen; Mohamed, Asmaa Elhassan; Gulied, Amaal

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is commonly used in the treatment of malignant diseases. Symptomatic severe hyponatremia induced by low-dose cyclophosphamide is very uncommon worldwide. We report a case of severe symptomatic hyponatremia that developed in a female breast cancer patient following the first cycle of chemotherapy containing low-dose cyclophosphamide. Her laboratory test showed serum Na of 112 mmol/L. Her hyponatremia was initially treated with sodium bicarbonate. She completely recovered without neurological deficits after slow correction of the serum Na concentration. Although hyponatremia is a rare toxicity it should always be considered during the usage of cyclophosphamide, even if the dosage is low, especially with concurrent use of other medications that impair water excretion, like chlorthalidone. This report describes the first reported case of cyclophosphamide-induced hyponatremia in Qatar. PMID:25336968

  5. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  6. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  7. Case Study: Symptomatic Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia in an Endurance Runner Despite Sodium Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Myers, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is known to be a potential complication from overhydration during exercise, but there remains a general belief that sodium supplementation will prevent EAH. We present a case in which a runner with a prior history of EAH consulted a sports nutritionist who advised him to consume considerable supplemental sodium, which did not prevent him from developing symptomatic EAH during a subsequent long run. Emergency medical services were requested for this runner shortly after he finished a 17-hr, 72-km run and hike in Grand Canyon National Park during which he reported having consumed 9.2-10.6 L of water and >6,500 mg of sodium. First responders determined his serum sodium concentration with point-of-care testing was 122 mEq/L. His hyponatremia was documented to have improved from field treatment with an oral hypertonic solution of 800 mg of sodium in 200 ml of water, and it improved further after significant aquaresis despite in-hospital treatment with isotonic fluids (lactated Ringer's). He was discharged about 5 hr after admission in good condition. This case demonstrates that while oral sodium supplementation does not necessarily prevent symptomatic EAH associated with overhydration, early recognition and field management with oral hypertonic saline in combination with fluid restriction can be effective treatment for mild EAH. There continues to be a lack of universal understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and appropriate hospital management of EAH. PMID:26061675

  8. Hyponatremia: A Review.

    PubMed

    Buffington, Mary Ansley; Abreo, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently occurring electrolyte abnormality and can lead to life-threatening complications. This disorder may be present on admission to the intensive care setting or develop during hospitalization as a result of treatment or multiple comorbidities. Patients with acute hyponatremia or symptomatic chronic hyponatremia will likely require treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediate treatment with hypertonic saline is needed to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic injury. Chronic hyponatremia should be corrected at a rate sufficient to reduce symptoms but not at an excessive rate that would create a risk of osmotic injury. Determination of the etiology of chronic hyponatremia requires analysis of serum osmolality, volume status, and urine osmolality and sodium level. Correct diagnosis points to the appropriate treatment and helps identify risk factors for accelerated correction of the serum sodium level. Management in the ICU facilitates frequent laboratory draws and allows close monitoring of the patient's mentation as well as quantification of urine output. Overly aggressive correction of serum sodium levels can result in neurological injury caused by osmotic demyelination. Therapeutic measures to lower the serum sodium level should be undertaken if the rate increases too rapidly. PMID:25592330

  9. Hyponatremia: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is an important and common clinical problem. The etiology is multifactorial. Hyponatremia may be euvolemic, hypovolemic or hypervolemic. Proper interpretation of the various laboratory tests helps to differentiate the various types of hyponatremia. Treatment varies with the nature of onset -acute or chronic, severity and symptoms. Normal saline forms the mainstay of treatment for hypovolemic hyponatremia while 3% NaCl and fluid restriction are important for euvolemic hyponatremia. Hypervolemic hyponatremia responds well to fluid restriction and diuretics. There have been several recent advances in the last year with revision in the guidelines for treatment and availability of vaptans. Judicious use of vaptans may help in treatment of hyponatremia. PMID:25364669

  10. Neurosurgical Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Mark J.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte imbalance in hospital inpatients. Acute onset hyponatremia is particularly common in patients who have undergone any type of brain insult, including traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain tumors, and is a frequent complication of intracranial procedures. Acute hyponatremia is more clinically dangerous than chronic hyponatremia, as it creates an osmotic gradient between the brain and the plasma, which promotes the movement of water from the plasma into brain cells, causing cerebral edema and neurological compromise. Unless acute hyponatremia is corrected promptly and effectively, cerebral edema may manifest through impaired consciousness level, seizures, elevated intracranial pressure, and, potentially, death due to cerebral herniation. The pathophysiology of hyponatremia in neurotrauma is multifactorial, but most cases appear to be due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Classical treatment of SIADH with fluid restriction is frequently ineffective, and in some circumstances, such as following subarachnoid hemorrhage, contraindicated. However, the recently developed vasopressin receptor antagonist class of drugs provides a very useful tool in the management of neurosurgical SIADH. In this review, we summarize the existing literature on the clinical features, causes, and management of hyponatremia in the neurosurgical patient. PMID:26237593

  11. Neurosurgical Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte imbalance in hospital inpatients. Acute onset hyponatremia is particularly common in patients who have undergone any type of brain insult, including traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain tumors, and is a frequent complication of intracranial procedures. Acute hyponatremia is more clinically dangerous than chronic hyponatremia, as it creates an osmotic gradient between the brain and the plasma, which promotes the movement of water from the plasma into brain cells, causing cerebral edema and neurological compromise. Unless acute hyponatremia is corrected promptly and effectively, cerebral edema may manifest through impaired consciousness level, seizures, elevated intracranial pressure, and, potentially, death due to cerebral herniation. The pathophysiology of hyponatremia in neurotrauma is multifactorial, but most cases appear to be due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Classical treatment of SIADH with fluid restriction is frequently ineffective, and in some circumstances, such as following subarachnoid hemorrhage, contraindicated. However, the recently developed vasopressin receptor antagonist class of drugs provides a very useful tool in the management of neurosurgical SIADH. In this review, we summarize the existing literature on the clinical features, causes, and management of hyponatremia in the neurosurgical patient. PMID:26237593

  12. CSWS Versus SIADH as the Probable Causes of Hyponatremia in Children With Acute CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    SORKHI, Hadi; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Reza; BARARI SAVADKOOHI, Rahim; BAGHDADI, Farkhondeh; NAKHJAVANI, Naeemeh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is a major problem about the incidence, diagnosis, and differentiation of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) in patients with acute central nervous system (CNS) disorders. According to rare reports of these cases, this study was performed in children with acute CNS disorders for diagnosis of CSWS versus SIADH. Materials & Methods This prospective study was done on children with acute CNS disorders. The definition of CSWS was hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine volume output ≥3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020 and urinary sodium concentration ≥100 mEq/L. Also, patients with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤130 mEq/L), urine output < 3 ml/kg/hr, urine specific gravity ≥1020, and urinary sodium concentration >20 mEq/L were considered to have SIADH. Results Out of 102 patients with acute CNS disorders, 62 (60.8%) children were male with mean age of 60.47±42.39 months. Among nine children with hyponatremia (serum sodium ≥130 mEq/L), 4 children had CSWS and 3 patients had SIADH. In 2 cases, the cause of hyponatremia was not determined. The mean day of hyponatremia after admission was 5.11±3.31 days. It was 5.25±2.75 and 5.66±7.23 days in children with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Also, the urine sodium (mEq/L) was 190.5±73.3 and 58.7±43.8 in patients with CSWS and SIADH, respectively. Conclusion According to the results of this study, the incidence of CSWS was more than SIADH in children with acute CNS disorders. So, more attention is needed to differentiate CSWS versus SIADH in order to their different management. PMID:24665304

  13. Acute extracellular ethanol load does not produce hyponatremia by internal osmoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.E.; Tzamaloukas, A.H.; Long, D.A.

    1986-03-05

    Hyponatremia is frequently present in subjects intoxicated with ethanol. To study whether an acute increase in extracellular osmolality by addition of ethanol creates any clinically appreciable osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, they infused over 20 sec 11 mmol/kg of ethanol intravenously into 5 anesthetized dogs (2 with intact renal function, 3 anuric) and measured plasma sodium and ethanol concentrations and osmolality at frequent intervals for 100 min after the end of the infusion. For a range of ethanol concentration between 4 and 120 mmol/l, changes in osmolality were equal to ethanol concentration in plasma water (y = -0.49 + 1.06 x mosm/kg per mmol/l, r = 0.981, p < 0.01). Plasma sodium concentration remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiments, even at 1 min post-infusion, when osmolality was 78 +/- 25 mosm/kg above the baseline. An acute increase in extracellular osmolality created by rapid intravenous infusion of a large dose of ethanol does not create any osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, that can be detected by dilution of extracellular sodium. The mechanism of hyponatremia in ethanol intoxication is not internal osmoregulation, but abnormalities in external balance of body water and/or solute.

  14. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  15. Non-Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency that Developed into Symptomatic Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Sawako; Ookawara, Susumu; Takase, Kaoru; Goto, Mizue; Nakayama, Takahiro; Oyama, Yuhta; Tabei, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency had been under glucocorticoid replacement therapy since the age of 17 years. After several weeks of suffering from gastroenteritis with vomiting, she presented with disturbance of consciousness, hypotension, dehydration, and severe hyponatremia (108 mEq/L) and a markedly increased serum vasopressin concentration (45.5 pg/mL). She regained consciousness after correcting her body-fluid balance with hypertonic saline and intravenous hydrocortisone sodium therapy. Her hyponatremia was likely caused by extra-renal sodium loss and impaired water excretion induced by an increase of serum vasopressin due to volume depletion and glucocorticoid deficiency. PMID:25986269

  16. [Hyponatremia in children: from pathophysiology to therapy].

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    This present review analyzes the etiology, diagnostics and management of conditions associated with hyponatremia. Excess water and/or sodium wasting lead to the development of hyponatremia in children. There are diverse etiologies associated with hyponatremia, correct diagnosis is based on detailed history, physical examination and basic laboratory tests. Symptomatic hyponatremia can be a life threatening emergency and thus requires fast and vigorous management. Inappropriate treatment may cause fatal consequences. PMID:27256147

  17. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE) 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Brynildsen, Jon; Høiseth, Arne Didrik; Følling, Ivar; Brekke, Pål H.; Christensen, Geir; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Omland, Torbjørn; Røsjø, Helge

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is prevalent and associated with mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). The prevalence and prognostic implications of hyponatremia in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary (AECOPD) have not been established. Method We included 313 unselected patients with acute dyspnea who were categorized by etiology of dyspnea according to established guidelines (derivation cohort). Serum Na+ was determined on hospital admission and corrected for hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia was defined as [Na+]<137 mmol/L. Survival was ascertained after a median follow-up of 816 days and outcome was analyzed in acute HF (n = 143) and AECOPD (n = 83) separately. Results were confirmed in an independent AECOPD validation cohort (n = 99). Results In the derivation cohort, median serum Na+ was lower in AECOPD vs. acute HF (138.5 [135.9–140.5] vs. 139.2 [136.7–141.3] mmol/L, p = 0.02), while prevalence of hyponatremia (27% [22/83] vs. 20% [29/143], p = 0.28) and mortality rate (42% [35/83] vs. 46% [66/143], p = 0.56) were similar. By univariate Cox regression analysis, hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality in acute HF (HR 1.85 [95% CI 1.08, 3.16], p = 0.02), but not in AECOPD (HR 1.00 [0.47, 2.15], p = 1.00). Analogous to the results of the derivation cohort, hyponatremia was prevalent also in the AECOPD validation cohort (25% [25/99]), but not associated with mortality. The diverging effect of hyponatremia on outcome between AECOPD and acute HF was statistically significant (p = 0.04). Conclusion Hyponatremia is prevalent in patients with acute HF and AECOPD, but is associated with mortality in patients with acute HF only. PMID:27529844

  18. Role of tolvaptan in the management of hyponatremia in patients with lung and other cancers: current data and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Salahudeen, Abdulla K

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently observed electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice, and its frequency is almost double in hospitalized cancer patients. As a subset of cancer, hyponatremia is quite common in lung cancer patients, and it is often coupled with the diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. The presence of hyponatremia is consequential in that its presence adversely affects cancer patients’ prognosis and outcomes. Limited data suggest that correcting hyponatremia in lung cancer patients can increase response to anticancer treatment, may help reduce length of hospital stay and cost, and reduce morbidity and mortality. The type of treatment for hyponatremia depends on several factors; the key factors are the duration and severity of neurological symptoms of hyponatremia and the status of extracellular volume. When hyponatremia is caused by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, hypertonic saline is indicated for acute symptomatic cases, whereas fluid restriction is recommended in chronic asymptomatic hyponatremia. The latter allows a slower rate of correction, thus avoiding the dreaded complication of osmotic demyelination syndrome. Fluid restriction is, however, insufficient or impractical, and often the use of pharmacological therapy such as antidiuretic hormone receptor antagonists becomes necessary. Availability of these antagonists as an effective treatment in the management of hyponatremia has been a major breakthrough, and furthermore, its clinical or investigational use in cancer-related hyponatremia may offer a potential opportunity to gain further insights into the prognostic impact of hyponatremia correction on cancer patients’ outcomes. Tolvaptan is a prototype of ADH receptor antagonists that acts at renal tubular levels to increase free water excretion without inducing major systemic electrolyte abnormalities such as hypokalemia or alkalosis. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief review

  19. Role of tolvaptan in the management of hyponatremia in patients with lung and other cancers: current data and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Salahudeen, Abdulla K

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently observed electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice, and its frequency is almost double in hospitalized cancer patients. As a subset of cancer, hyponatremia is quite common in lung cancer patients, and it is often coupled with the diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. The presence of hyponatremia is consequential in that its presence adversely affects cancer patients' prognosis and outcomes. Limited data suggest that correcting hyponatremia in lung cancer patients can increase response to anticancer treatment, may help reduce length of hospital stay and cost, and reduce morbidity and mortality. The type of treatment for hyponatremia depends on several factors; the key factors are the duration and severity of neurological symptoms of hyponatremia and the status of extracellular volume. When hyponatremia is caused by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, hypertonic saline is indicated for acute symptomatic cases, whereas fluid restriction is recommended in chronic asymptomatic hyponatremia. The latter allows a slower rate of correction, thus avoiding the dreaded complication of osmotic demyelination syndrome. Fluid restriction is, however, insufficient or impractical, and often the use of pharmacological therapy such as antidiuretic hormone receptor antagonists becomes necessary. Availability of these antagonists as an effective treatment in the management of hyponatremia has been a major breakthrough, and furthermore, its clinical or investigational use in cancer-related hyponatremia may offer a potential opportunity to gain further insights into the prognostic impact of hyponatremia correction on cancer patients' outcomes. Tolvaptan is a prototype of ADH receptor antagonists that acts at renal tubular levels to increase free water excretion without inducing major systemic electrolyte abnormalities such as hypokalemia or alkalosis. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief review

  20. Volume regulatory loss of Na, Cl, and K from rat brain during acute hyponatremia

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.E.; Patlak, C.S.; Pettigrew, K.D.; Cserr, H.F.

    1987-04-01

    This study quantitatively evaluates the contribution of tissue Na, Cl, and K loss to brain volume regulation during acute dilutional hyponatremia (DH) and examines the mechanism of Na loss. DH was produced in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats by intraperitoneal infusion of distilled water and brain water and electrolytes analyzed 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 4 h, or 6 h later. The rate of Na and Cl loss was greatest during the first 30 min of DH. Net loss of Na and Cl was maximal after 3 h of DH. K loss was slower, achieving significance after 3 h. Electrolyte loss was sufficient to account for observed brain volume regulation after three or more hours of DH. Measurements of /sup 22/Na influx and efflux across the blood brain barrier showed that barrier permeability to Na is unchanged during DH. Analysis of results using a two-compartment model of plasma-brain exchange suggests that loss of brain Na during DH does not result solely from a shift of electrolyte across the blood-brain barrier to plasma, and thus provides indirect evidence for an additional pathway for Na loss, presumably via cerebrospinal fluid.

  1. [Marked hyponatremia with consciousness disturbance probably caused by linezolid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Ohishi, Kohshi; Ino, Kazuko; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia who developed hyponatremia after linezolid administration. Because induction therapy did not achieve complete remission for this man, we initiated re-induction therapy with enocitabin and daunomycin. Seven days after chemotherapy, the patient experienced a catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) due to methicilin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). When treatment with albekacin and fosfomycin was in effective, linezolid was administrated intravenously and he became afebrile. On day 8 after linezolid administration, however, he reported general fatigue and slight consciousness disturbance. His serum sodium concentration was 119 mEq/L and his urinary sodium excretion rose to 143 mEq/day, although intravenous sodium intake was 98 mEq/day. Because of the sufficiency of urine volume and weight loss, we surmise that inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) syndrome was unlikely. We diagnosed renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS) based on calculation of the amount of sodium intake and the amount of sodium excreted from the kidneys. After linezolid was discontinued and aggressive treatment with sodium supplement begun, his consciousness cleared as his low serum sodium level rose. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case reported on the development of RSWS after linezolid treatment. Although the process remains unclear, our case suggests that linezolid may induce RSWS after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:18306678

  2. Hiker Fatality From Severe Hyponatremia in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a hiker who died of severe hyponatremia at Grand Canyon National Park. The woman collapsed on the rim shortly after finishing a 5-hour hike into the Canyon during which she was reported to have consumed large quantities of water. First responders transported her to the nearest hospital. En route, she became unresponsive, and subsequent treatment included intravenous normal saline. Imaging and laboratory data at the hospital confirmed hypervolemic hyponatremia with encephalopathy. She never regained consciousness and died of severe cerebral edema less than 24 hours later. We believe this is the first report of a fatality due to acute hyponatremia associated with hiking in a wilderness setting. This case demonstrates the typical pathophysiology, which includes overconsumption of fluids, and demonstrates the challenges of diagnosis and the importance of appropriate acute management. Current treatment guidelines indicate that symptomatic exercise-associated hyponatremia should be acutely managed with hypertonic saline and can be done so without concern over central pontine myelinolysis, whereas treatment with high volumes of isotonic fluids may delay recovery and has even resulted in deaths. PMID:25935312

  3. Experience with Tolvaptan for Euvolemic and Hypervolemic Hyponatremia in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gwen; Cremisi, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder and is associated with multiple comorbidities. Management strategies are varied and etiology-dependent. The use of tolvaptan, a vasopressin antagonist, outside of clinical trials has not been well characterized. Objectives: To quantify tolvaptan compliance with institutional guidelines and make recommendations concerning reasonable expectations for its role in hyponatremia management. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study in a 125-bed community hospital. Patients admitted in 2013 who received at least one dose of tolvaptan were included. Results: Thirty-seven patient encounters were evaluated. Tolvaptan was prescribed with 83.7% adherence to the institutional order set. Mean age was 71 ± 16.4 years with 20 (54%) females. Hyponatremia was a contributory cause of admission in 15 (40.5%) patients and offending medications were discontinued in 7 (19%). Causes of hyponatremia included syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), heart failure, and cirrhosis in 78.3%, 8.2%, and 13.5% of participants, respectively. Management included fluid restriction in 19 (51%) and furosemide in 5 (13.5%), with tolvaptan administration on average 3.2 days after admission. Most patients (78.4%) required ≤2 doses. Sodium concentration was elevated 8 mEq/L by the end of hospitalization. Discharge to palliative care or death occurred in 8 (21.6%). Postdischarge review revealed 3 (8%) maintained sodium concentration ≥130 mEq/dL. Conclusion: Tolvaptan was initiated after other interventions and with limited duration per institutional guidelines. This cohort had complicating underlying chronic diseases. These results will be used to refine recommendations with pharmacist input for risk/benefit stratification based on reasonable expectations. PMID:26405324

  4. Edelman's equation is valid in acute hyponatremia in a porcine model: plasma sodium concentration is determined by external balances of water and cations.

    PubMed

    Overgaard-Steensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders; Bluhme, Henrik; Tønnesen, Else; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Ring, Troels

    2010-01-01

    Acute hyponatremia is a serious condition, which poses major challenges. Of particular importance is what determines plasma sodium concentration ([Na(+)]). Edelman introduced an explicit model to describe plasma [Na(+)] in a population as [Na(+)] = alpha.(exchangeable Na(+) + exchangeable K(+))/(total body water) - beta. Evidence for the clinical utility of the model in the individual and in acute hyponatremia is sparse. We, therefore, investigated how the measured plasma [Na(+)] could be predicted in a porcine model of hyponatremia. Plasma [Na(+)] was estimated from in vivo-determined balances of water, Na(+), and K(+), according to Edelman's equation. Acute hyponatremia was induced with desmopressin acetate and infusion of a 2.5% glucose solution in anesthetized pigs. During 480 min, plasma [Na(+)] and osmolality were reduced from 136 (SD 2) to 120 mmol/l (SD 3) and from 284 (SD 4) to 252 mosmol/kgH(2)O (SD 5), respectively. The following interpretations were made. First, Edelman's model, which, besides dilution, takes into account Na(+) and K(+), fits plasma [Na(+)] significantly better than dilution alone. Second, a common value of alpha = 1.33 (SD 0.08) and beta = -13.04 mmol/l (SD 7.68) for all pigs explains well the plasma [Na(+)] in the individual animal. Third, measured exchangeable Na(+) and calculated exchangeable Na(+) + K(+) per weight in the pigs are close to Edelman's findings in humans, whereby the methods are cross-validated. In conclusion, plasma [Na(+)] can be explained in the individual animal by external balances, according to Edelman's construct in acute hyponatremia. PMID:19864338

  5. Hyponatremia in the intensive care unit: How to avoid a Zugzwang situation?

    PubMed

    Rafat, Cédric; Flamant, Martin; Gaudry, Stéphane; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte derangement in the setting of the intensive care unit. Life-threatening neurological complications may arise not only in case of a severe (<120 mmol/L) and acute fall of plasma sodium levels, but may also stem from overly rapid correction of hyponatremia. Additionally, even mild hyponatremia carries a poor short-term and long-term prognosis across a wide range of conditions. Its multifaceted and intricate physiopathology may seem deterring at first glance, yet a careful multi-step diagnostic approach may easily unravel the underlying mechanisms and enable physicians to adopt the adequate measures at the patient's bedside. Unless hyponatremia is associated with obvious extracellular fluid volume increase such as in heart failure or cirrhosis, hypertonic saline therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic of profound or severely symptomatic hyponatremia. When overcorrection of hyponatremia occurs, recent data indicate that re-lowering of plasma sodium levels through the infusion of hypotonic fluids and the cautious use of desmopressin acetate represent a reasonable strategy. New therapeutic options have recently emerged, foremost among these being vaptans, but their use in the setting of the intensive care unit remains to be clarified. PMID:26553121

  6. Does highly symptomatic class membership in the acute phase predict highly symptomatic classification in victims 6 months after traumatic exposure?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    Recently studies have indicated the existence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorder (ASD) subtypes but no studies have investigated their mutual association. Although ASD may not be a precursor of PTSD per se, there are potential benefits associated with early identification of victims at risk of developing PTSD subtypes. The present study investigates ASD and PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) following bank robbery (N=371). Moreover, we assessed if highly symptomatic ASD and selected risk factors increased the probability of highly symptomatic PTSD. The results of LCA revealed a three class solution for ASD and a two class solution for PTSD. Negative cognitions about self (OR=1.08), neuroticism (OR=1.09) and membership of the 'High symptomatic ASD' class (OR=20.41) significantly increased the probability of 'symptomatic PTSD' class membership. Future studies are needed to investigate the existence of ASD and PTSD subtypes and their mutual relationship. PMID:27101400

  7. Bupropion-induced hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep; Kumar, Santhosh; Modi, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Although hyponatremia has been reported with the use of various antidepressants, the association of hyponatremia with bupropion has been limited to two case reports. In this case report, we present the case of a 75-year-old man who developed hyponatremia with the use of bupropion, which improved with stoppage of bupropion. PMID:23764348

  8. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  9. Acute health effects of PM10 pollution on symptomatic and asymptomatic children

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C.A. 3d.; Dockery, D.W. )

    1992-05-01

    This study assessed the association between daily changes in respiratory health and respirable particulate pollution (PM10) in Utah Valley during the winter of 1990-1991. During the study period, 24-h PM10 concentrations ranged from 7 to 251 micrograms/m3. Participants included symptomatic and asymptomatic samples of fifth- and sixth-grade students. Relatively small but statistically significant (p less than 0.01) negative associations between peak expiratory flow (PEF) and PM10 were observed for both the symptomatic and asymptomatic samples. The association was strongest for the symptomatic children. Large associations between the incidence of respiratory symptoms, especially cough, and PM10 pollution were also observed for both samples. Again the association was strongest for the symptomatic sample. Immediate and delayed PM10 effects were observed. Respiratory symptoms and PEF changes were more closely associated with 5-day moving-average PM10 levels than with concurrent-day levels. These associations were also observed at PM10 levels below the 24-h standard of 150 micrograms/m3. This study indicates that both symptomatic and asymptomatic children may suffer acute health effects of respirable particulate pollution, with symptomatic children suffering the most.

  10. A comparison of location of acute symptomatic vs. ‘silent’ small vessel lesions

    PubMed Central

    Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Maconick, Lucy C.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Wang, Xin; Wiseman, Stewart; Armitage, Paul A.; Doubal, Fergus N.; Makin, Stephen; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.; Dennis, Martin S.; Deary, Ian J.; Bastin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lacunar ischaemic stroke, white matter hyperintensities, and lacunes are all features of cerebral small vessel disease. It is unclear why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke symptoms, whereas others typically do not. Aim To test if lesion location could be one reason why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke, whereas others accumulate covertly. Methods We identified prospectively patients who presented with acute lacunar stroke symptoms with a recent small subcortical infarct confirmed on magnetic resonance diffusion imaging. We compared the distribution of the acute infarcts with that of white matter hyperintensity and lacunes using computational image mapping methods. Results In 188 patients, mean age 67 ± standard deviation 12 years, the lesions that presented with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke were located in or near the main motor and sensory tracts in (descending order): posterior limb of the internal capsule (probability density 0·2/mm3), centrum semiovale (probability density = 0·15/mm3), medial lentiform nucleus/lateral thalamus (probability density = 0·09/mm3), and pons (probability density = 0·02/mm3). Most lacunes were in the lentiform nucleus (probability density = 0·01–0·04/mm3) or external capsule (probability density = 0·05/mm3). Most white matter hyperintensities were in centrum semiovale (except for the area affected by the acute symptomatic infarcts), external capsules, basal ganglia, and brainstem, with little overlap with the acute symptomatic infarcts (analysis of variance, P < 0·01). Conclusions Lesions that present with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke symptoms may be more likely noticed by the patient through affecting the main motor and sensory tracts, whereas white matter hyperintensity and asymptomatic lacunes mainly affect other areas. Brain location could at least partly explain the symptomatic vs. covert development of small vessel

  11. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  12. Hyponatremia in Patients with Cirrhosis of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Mauro; Ricci, Carmen Serena; Santi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is common in cirrhosis. It mostly occurs in an advanced stage of the disease and is associated with complications and increased mortality. Either hypovolemic or, more commonly, hypervolemic hyponatremia can be seen in cirrhosis. Impaired renal sodium handling due to renal hypoperfusion and increased arginine-vasopressin secretion secondary to reduced effective volemia due to peripheral arterial vasodilation represent the main mechanisms leading to dilutional hyponatremia in this setting. Patients with cirrhosis usually develop slowly progressing hyponatremia. In different clinical contexts, it is associated with neurological manifestations due to increased brain water content, where the intensity is often magnified by concomitant hyperammonemia leading to hepatic encephalopathy. Severe hyponatremia requiring hypertonic saline infusion is rare in cirrhosis. The management of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic hyponatremia mainly rely on the identification and treatment of precipitating factors. However, sustained resolution of hyponatremia is often difficult to achieve. V2 receptor blockade by Vaptans is certainly effective, but their long-term safety, especially when associated to diuretics given to control ascites, has not been established as yet. As in other conditions, a rapid correction of long-standing hyponatremia can lead to irreversible brain damage. The liver transplant setting represents a condition at high risk for the occurrence of such complications. PMID:26237020

  13. Terlipressin Induced Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Šíma, Martin; Pokorný, Miroslav; Paďour, František; Slanař, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue used for its vasoconstrictor effect in the treatment of variceal bleeding. Despite its good safety profile compared to vasopressin, some adverse reactions may occur during its use - e.g. hyponatremia. We describe a case of a cirrhotic patient with active variceal bleeding treated during two separate hospitalizations with terlipressin. In both drug treatment periods, severe laboratory hyponatremia developed. After terlipressin discontinuation, mineral disbalance corrected rapidly. Positive dechallenge and rechallenge corresponding to the drug administration schedule confirms the causality between terlipressin administration and hyponatremia. Hyponatremia was preceded with substantial fluid retention in both episodes. In this case report we want to highlight the need for fluid balance monitoring immediately after first terlipressin dose, which may individually predict the patient risk for the development of hyponatremia as other risk factors have rather limited predictive value in real clinical settings. PMID:26995205

  14. Recommended and prescribed symptomatic treatment for acute maxillary sinusitis in Finnish primary care.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Johanna; Rautakorpi, Ulla-Maija; Huikko, Solja; Honkanen, Pekka; Klaukkas, Timo; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Palva, Erkki; Roine, Risto; Sarkkinen, Hannu; Huovinen, Pentti; Varonen, Helena

    2007-09-01

    We studied the use of symptomatic medication in the treatment of acute maxillary sinusitis (AMS) in primary care and whether this use is in accordance with national guidelines. The data was collected annually in the Antimicrobial Treatment Strategies (MIKSTRA) Program in 30 primary health care centres throughout Finland during one week in November in the years from 1998 to 2002. Physicians and nurses collected the data about the diagnoses, prescription-only medicines and over the counter medicines prescribed or recommended for all patients with an infection during the study weeks. The MIKSTRA data comprised of 23.002 first consultations for an infection: 2.448 patients were diagnosed as having AMS. Altogether, 41% of them received some symptomatic medicine. Antihistamines with or without sympathomimetics were the most commonly prescribed or recommended symptomatic medicines (23% of the patients). For comparison, systemic antibacterial agents were prescribed for 93% of the AMS patients. We conclude that Finnish physicians recommend or prescribe more symptomatic medication without proven efficacy for AMS than recommended by the national guidelines. Especially, the use of antihistamines with or without sympathomimetics, mostly the combination of acrivastine and pseudoephedrine, was common although antihistamines were recommended only for patients with allergy or nasal polyps. PMID:17956017

  15. Symptomatic vaginal candidiasis after pivmecillinam and norfloxacin treatment of acute uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Menday, A P

    2002-10-01

    The comparative incidence of symptomatic vaginal candidiasis associated with pivmecillinam and norfloxacin treatment in women with acute symptomatic uncomplicated UTI was determined in two randomised, double-blind, clinical trials. Adverse events reported following general enquiry were reviewed. Presence of Candida vaginitis was based upon the specification as such by investigators, the presence of specific symptoms such as genital pruritus and/or the prescription of specific anti Candida therapy. The incidences of Candida vaginitis were as follows; Study 1 pivmecillinam 200 mg tid for 7 days 13 (4.6%), pivmecillinam 200 mg bid for 7 days 7 (2.4%), pivmecillinam 400 mg bid for 3 days 6 (2.1%) and placebo 6 (2.1%), P=0.19. Study 2 pivmecillinam 400 mg bid for 3 days 7 (1.5%), norfloxacin 400 mg bid for 3 days 20 (4.3%), P=0.016. The incidence of Candida vaginitis in women with acute symptomatic uncomplicated UTI given 3 days treatment with pivmecillinam 400 mg bid is similar to that seen with placebo and is significantly less than the incidence with norfloxacin 400 mg bid for 3 days. PMID:12385688

  16. Acute symptomatic calcific discitis in adults: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Botchu, R; Grainger, M F; Davies, A M; James, S L

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic calcific discitis has been reported in the paediatric population but is a rare entity in adults with only eight cases reported in the English literature. We present a case of adult calcific discitis presenting with acute onset back pain. Radiographs and CT demonstrated central T11-T12 disc calcification with diffuse marrow oedema on subsequent MRI. The patient was referred to our spinal oncology unit due to the extensive marrow oedema as a possible underlying primary bone tumour. Review of the CT confirmed an end-plate defect with herniated calcific nucleus pulposus with no underlying bone lesion. Features were in keeping with acute calcific discitis. The patient was treated symptomatically and made an uneventful recovery. We discuss the characteristic imaging features seen on radiograph, CT and MRI and review the current literature. Calcific discitis is a self-limiting pathology requiring symptomatic management only. Radiologists need to be aware of this rare entity as it can occur in adults and may be mistaken for a more sinister pathology such as infective discitis or a bone tumour and lead to further unnecessary imaging or invasive procedures. PMID:26160461

  17. Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, D; Harrison, P; Mackie, I; Sidhu, P; Purdy, G; Lawrie, A; Watt, H; Machin, S; Brown, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference. Methods: A full blood count was done and whole blood flow cytometry used to measure platelet surface expression of CD62P, CD63, and PAC1 binding and the percentage of leucocyte–platelet complexes in patients with acute (0–21 days, n = 19) and convalescent (79–365 days) symptomatic (n = 16) and asymptomatic (n = 16) severe (⩾70%) carotid stenosis. Most patients were treated with aspirin (37.5–300 mg daily) although alternative antithrombotic regimens were more commonly used in the symptomatic group. Results: The mean platelet count was higher in patients with acute and convalescent symptomatic compared with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. There were no significant differences in the median percentage expression of CD62P and CD63, or PAC1 binding between the acute or convalescent symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The median percentages of neutrophil–platelet (p = 0.004), monocyte–platelet (p = 0.046), and lymphocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.02) were higher in acute symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients. In patients on aspirin monotherapy, the percentages of neutrophil–platelet and monocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.03) were higher in acute symptomatic (n = 11) than asymptomatic patients (n = 14). In the convalescent phase, the median percentages of all leucocyte–platelet complexes in the symptomatic group dropped to levels similar to those found in the asymptomatic group. Conclusion: Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation may contribute to the early excess risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:16107361

  18. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2015-01-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25636626

  19. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2016-03-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25653229

  20. [The pitfall "dehydration" and hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W

    2012-02-01

    Hyponatremia represents a very common disturbance in hospitalized eldery. It correlates with delirium, falls, and intrahospital mortality. Often hyponatremia is ignored or missclassified. The represented algorithm is based on only a few parameters: serum and urine osmolality, and sodium. Treatment of the underlying causes of hyponatremia, e.g., cessation of medications and polypharmacy, is essential. The syndrome of inadequate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH; hypotonic isovolemic hyponatremia) is also considered. PMID:22350394

  1. Short Term Efficacy and Safety of Low Dose Tolvaptan in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure with Hyponatremia: A Prospective Observational Pilot Study from a Single Center in South India

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Soumya; Kumar, Basant; Harlalka, Kaushal K.; Jain, Apoorva; Bhanuprakash, H. M.; Sadananda, K. S.; Basappa, Harsha; Santhosh, K.; Rajith, K. S.; Bharathi, K. S.; Manjunath, C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic use, the mainstay therapy for congestion, is associated with electrolyte abnormalities and worsening renal function. Vasopressin mediates fluid retention in heart failure. In contrast to diuretics, the vasopressin antagonist tolvaptan may increase net volume loss in heart failure without adversely affecting electrolytes and renal function. Hyponatremia (serum sodium concentration, <135 mEq/L) is a predictor of death among patients with heart failure. Objective: We prospectively observed the short term efficacy and safety of low dose (15 mg) tolvaptan in admitted patients with hyponatremia and ADHF in Indian population. Methodology: A total of 40 patients with ADHF along with hyponatremia (<125 mEq/L) on standard therapy were treated with 15 mg of tolvaptan at a single oral dose for 7 days. Results: Serum sodium concentrations increased significantly after treatment with tolvaptan from baseline (P < 0.02). There was a significant improvement in symptoms and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class after starting tolvaptan (P ≤ 0.05). Total diuretic dose and mean body weight was reduced non-significantly at 7th day from the baseline. Side-effects associated with tolvaptan included increased thirst, dry mouth and increased urination. Few patients had worsening renal function. However, several patients developed hypernatremia. Conclusion: In this small observational study, tolvaptan initiation in patients with ADHF with hyponatremia in addition to standard therapy may hold promise in improvement in NYHA class and serum sodium. At the same time, we observed that serious adverse events such as renal function deterioration and hypernatremia developed after tolvaptan treatment, which needs to be addressed in future by randomized study with larger sample size. PMID:24949180

  2. Diuretic-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Hix, John K; Silver, Stephen; Sterns, Richard H

    2011-11-01

    Soon after their introduction in 1957, thiazide diuretics became a recognized cause of hyponatremia. Thiazides may be the sole cause and they may exacerbate hyponatremia in patients with disorders that cause the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Although thiazides do not inhibit the ability to concentrate the urine, they impair diluting ability in several ways: inhibition of sodium and chloride transport at cortical diluting sites; stimulation of vasopressin release; reduction of glomerular filtration and enhanced proximal water reabsorption, which reduce delivery to the distal diluting sites; and, possibly, a direct effect on water flow in the collecting duct. Water retention caused by impaired water excretion combined with cation depletion may result in severe hyponatremia. Thiazides should be avoided in frail elderly patients with chronically high water intake or in others who depend on the excretion of maximally dilute urine to maintain fluid balance, such as patients with psychogenic polydipsia or heavy beer drinking. Inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia is common in thiazide-induced hyponatremia because the ability to dilute the urine is restored when the diuretic is discontinued and volume deficits are repaired. Hypokalemia, which often is present, increases the susceptibility to osmotic demyelination syndrome and replacement of potassium deficits contributes to the increase in serum sodium concentration. PMID:22099512

  3. SEVERE HYPONATREMIA, EPISTAXIS, AND FLUOXETINE.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Tezcan; Yücel, Murat; Eraslan, Özden; Cinemre, Hakan; Tamer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities and can be life threatening. Fluoxetine is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor and may rarely cause hyponatremia. Furthermore, fluoxetine may rarely increase the risk of bleeding events. We report a 66-year old woman who presented with severe hyponatremia and epistaxis associated with the use of fluoxetine. PMID:27323598

  4. Tumor-Related Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Kio, Ebenezer; Doi, Suhail A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Hyponatremia is an important and common electrolyte disorder in tumor patients and one that has been reported in association with a number of different primary diagnoses. The correct diagnosis of the pathophysiological basis for each patient is important because it significantly alters the treatment approach. In this article, we review the epidemiology and presentation of patients with hyponatremia, the pathophysiologic groups for the disorder with respect to sodium and water balance and the diagnostic measures for determining the correct pathophysiologic groups. We then present the various treatment options based on the pathophysiologic groups including a mathematical approach to the use of hypertonic saline in management. In cancer patients, hyponatremia is a serious comorbidity that requires particular attention as its treatment varies by pathophysiologic groups, and its consequences can have a deleterious effect on the patient’s health. PMID:18086907

  5. [Hyponatremia, cause of reversible dementia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L

    1992-01-01

    There are several states of reversible dementias. Among these, electrolyte imbalance--especially hyponatremia--can determine transitory modification of cognitive functions. The purpose of this study is the evaluation of the relationship between cognitive disorders and serum sodium concentrations in the elderly. In a sample of 70 elderly people, the Authors reported a prevalence of hyponatremia in 28 patients (40%); only 4 (5.7% of total population) had impaired cognitive functions or mood disturbances. In the symptomatic patients hyponatremia was severe and had a fast onset; the symptoms disappeared by means a proper and ready treatment. This observation stresses out the importance of routine serum sodium determination in the elderly in coincidence with the sudden onset of a pattern of dementia. PMID:1474879

  6. Can trained nurses exclude acute otitis media with tympanometry or acoustic reflectometry in symptomatic children?

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Paula A.; Ruuskanen, Olli; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Ruohola, Aino

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since acute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children, the reliable exclusion of AOM by nurses might save physicians’ time for other duties. The study aim was to determine whether nurses without otoscopic experience can reliably use tympanometry or spectral gradient acoustic reflectometry (SG-AR) to exclude AOM. Design Three nurses were trained, who performed examinations with tympanometry and SG-AR. Pneumatic otoscopy by the study physician served as the diagnostic standard. Setting Study clinic at primary health care level. Patients. 281 children 6–35 months of age. Main outcome measures Predictive values (with 95% confidence interval) for tympanometry and SG-AR, and the clinical usefulness, i.e. the proportion of visits where nurses obtained the exclusive test result from both ears of the child. Results At 459 visits, the negative predictive value of type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) was 94% (91–97%). Based on type A and C1 tympanograms, the nurse could exclude AOM at 94/459 (20%) of visits. The negative predictive value of SG-AR level 1 result (>95°) was 94% (89–97%). Based on the SG-AR level 1 result, the nurse could exclude AOM at 36/459 (8%) of visits. Conclusion Type A and C1 tympanograms and SG-AR level 1 results obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM. However, the clinical usefulness of these test results is limited by their rarity. Type A and C1 tympanograms were obtained by nurses from both ears of the child only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.Key PointsAcute otitis media (AOM) is the most prevalent bacterial infection in young children. Nurses’ role in excluding AOM is unknown.Type A and C1 tympanograms (tympanometric peak pressure >–200 daPa) obtained by nurses are reliable test results in excluding AOM.With type A and C1 tympanograms, nurses could exclude AOM only at one-fifth of the symptomatic visits.The clinical usefulness

  7. Impact of perioperative hyponatremia in children: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Cheme; Afshari, Arash

    2014-01-01

    For more than 50 years, hypotonic fluids (crystalloids) have been the standard for maintenance fluid used in children. In the last decade, several studies have evaluated the risk of hyponatremia associated with the use of hypotonic vs isotonic fluids, which has lead to an intense debate. Children undergoing surgery have several stimuli for release of antidiuretic hormone, which controls renal water handling, including pain, nausea, vomiting, narcotic use and blood loss. The body’s primary defense against the development of hyponatremia is the ability of the kidneys to excrete free water and dilute urine. Increased levels of antidiuretic hormone can result in hyponatremia, defined as a plasma sodium level < 136 mmol/L, which causes cells to draw in excess water and swell. This manifests as central nervous system symptoms such as lethargy, irritability and seizures. The risk for symptomatic hyponatremia is higher in children than in adults. It represents an emergency condition, and early diagnosis, prompt treatment and close monitoring are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. The widespread use of hypotonic fluids in children undergoing surgery is a matter of concern and more focus on this topic is urgently needed. In this paper, we review the literature and describe the impact of perioperative hyponatremia in children. PMID:25374805

  8. New insights into symptomatic or silent atrial fibrillation complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stamboul, Karim; Fauchier, Laurent; Gudjoncik, Aurelie; Buffet, Philippe; Garnier, Fabien; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean Claude; Touzery, Claude; Cottin, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in the general population and contributes not only to a major deterioration in quality of life but also to an increase in cardiovascular morbimortality. The onset of AF in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI) is a major event that can jeopardize the prognosis of patients in the short-, medium- and long-term, and is a powerful predictor of a poor prognosis after MI. The suspected mechanism underlying the excess mortality is the drop in coronary flow linked to the acceleration and arrhythmic nature of the left ventricular contractions, which reduce the left ventricular ejection fraction. The principal causes of AF-associated death after MI are linked to heart failure. Moreover, the excess risk of death in these heart failure patients has also been associated with the onset of sudden death. Whatever its form, AF has a major negative effect on patient prognosis. In recent studies, symptomatic AF was associated with inhospital mortality of 17.8%, to which can be added mortality at 1year of 18.8%. Surprisingly, silent AF also has a negative effect on the prognosis, as it is associated with an inhospital mortality rate of 10.4%, which remains high at 5.7% at 1year. Moreover, both forms of AF are independent predictors of mortality beyond traditional risk factors. The frequency and seriousness of silent AF in the short- and long-term, which were until recently rarely studied, raises the question of systematically screening for it in the acute phase of MI. Consequently, the use of continuous ECG monitoring could be a simple, effective and inexpensive solution to improve screening for AF, even though studies are still necessary to validate this strategy. Finally, complementary studies also effect of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, which seem to play a major role in triggering this rhythm disorder. PMID:26525569

  9. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  10. Three cases of severe hyponatremia during a river run in Grand Canyon National Park.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Emily A; Myers, Thomas M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2015-06-01

    We present 3 cases of severe hyponatremia occurring on a commercially guided river rafting trip on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. All 3 women appeared to have been overhydrating because of concern about dehydration and required evacuation within 24 hours of each other after the staggered onset of symptoms, which included fatigue and emesis progressing to disorientation or seizure. Each was initially transferred to the nearest hospital and ultimately required intensive care. Imaging and laboratory data indicated all 3 patients had hypervolemic hyponatremia. Unlike the well-documented exercise-associated hyponatremia cases commonly occurring in prolonged endurance athletic events, these 3 unique cases of acute hyponatremia were not associated with significant exercise. The cases illustrate the diagnostic and treatment challenges related to acute hyponatremia in an austere setting, and underscore the importance of preventive measures focused on avoidance of overhydration out of concern for dehydration. PMID:25736400

  11. Hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for heart failure (from the ATTEND registry).

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Munakata, Ryo; Minami, Yuichiro; Mizuno, Masayuki; Aokage, Toshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakata, Yasushi; Yumino, Dai; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Takano, Teruo

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor in patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF), however not well studied in Japan. The aims of this study were to characterize hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF and to clarify the relations between hyponatremia and detailed in-hospital outcomes in Japan. Among 4,837 hospitalized patients with HF enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality in those with hyponatremia were examined. Hyponatremia (sodium <135 mEq/L) was observed in 11.6% of patients. Patients with hyponatremia were of similar age, included fewer men, and had a higher proportion of previous hospitalizations for HF compared to those with normonatremia. On admission, lower heart rates and blood pressures and higher brain natriuretic peptide levels were observed in patients with hyponatremia. During hospitalization, inotrope levels and mechanical device use were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia. Rates of all-cause and cardiac death were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia, 15.0% and 11.4%, respectively, compared to 5.3% and 3.6%, respectively, in those with normonatremia. In hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF, cardiac death accounted for 76.2% of all-cause death. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in Japan hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with HF is relatively common and is associated with a very high in-hospital mortality. PMID:23312128

  12. Sex-Related Differences Between Patients With Symptomatic Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Maitusong, Buamina; Sun, Hui-Ping; Xielifu, Dilidaer; Mahemuti, Maisumu; Ma, Xiang; Liu, Fen; Xie, Xiang; Azhati, Adila; Zhou, Xin-Rong; Ma, Yi-Tong

    2016-03-01

    We designed a retrospective cohort study to assess sex-related differences in clinical manifestations, incidence, and outcomes of patients with symptomatic acute aortic dissection (AAD). We collected clinical data from 2010 to 2015 of 400 patients with AAD. Patients' clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed as a function of sex. Among 400 patients with AAD, the ratio of men to women was 3.18:1; the incidence of atherosclerosis was higher in women (P = 0.02). Dysphoria (P = 0.01), focal neurological deficits (P = 0.04), and pulse deficits (P = 0.03) were more frequent in men. Imaging findings revealed that pleural effusion (P < 0.01), celiac trunk involvement (P < 0.01), and superior mesenteric artery involvement (P = 0.02) were more frequent in men. Dissection-related pneumonia (P = 0.02), pulmonary atelectasis (P = 0.01), aortic intramural hematoma (P < 0.01), ischemic electrocardiographic changes (P = 0.03), and in-hospital complications such as myocardial ischemia (P = 0.03), hypoxemia (P < 0.01), cardiac tamponade (P = 0.01) occurred more frequently in women. Women with type A dissection had higher in-hospital mortality than men (P < 0.01). The presentation of AAD varies with a patient's sex. Women with AAD had clinical features different from men as follows: higher age of onset, more frequent inpatient complications, and higher in-hospital mortality. These findings may lead to a better understanding of aortic dissection in women that will improve their outcomes. PMID:26986151

  13. Sex-Related Differences Between Patients With Symptomatic Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Maitusong, Buamina; Sun, Hui-Ping; Xielifu, Dilidaer; Mahemuti, Maisumu; Ma, Xiang; Liu, Fen; Xie, Xiang; Azhati, Adila; Zhou, Xin-Rong; Ma, Yi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We designed a retrospective cohort study to assess sex-related differences in clinical manifestations, incidence, and outcomes of patients with symptomatic acute aortic dissection (AAD). We collected clinical data from 2010 to 2015 of 400 patients with AAD. Patients’ clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed as a function of sex. Among 400 patients with AAD, the ratio of men to women was 3.18:1; the incidence of atherosclerosis was higher in women (P = 0.02). Dysphoria (P = 0.01), focal neurological deficits (P = 0.04), and pulse deficits (P = 0.03) were more frequent in men. Imaging findings revealed that pleural effusion (P < 0.01), celiac trunk involvement (P < 0.01), and superior mesenteric artery involvement (P = 0.02) were more frequent in men. Dissection-related pneumonia (P = 0.02), pulmonary atelectasis (P = 0.01), aortic intramural hematoma (P < 0.01), ischemic electrocardiographic changes (P = 0.03), and in-hospital complications such as myocardial ischemia (P = 0.03), hypoxemia (P < 0.01), cardiac tamponade (P = 0.01) occurred more frequently in women. Women with type A dissection had higher in-hospital mortality than men (P < 0.01). The presentation of AAD varies with a patient's sex. Women with AAD had clinical features different from men as follows: higher age of onset, more frequent inpatient complications, and higher in-hospital mortality. These findings may lead to a better understanding of aortic dissection in women that will improve their outcomes. PMID:26986151

  14. Etiology of postoperative hyponatremia following pediatric intracranial tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cydni N; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) cause postoperative hyponatremia in neurosurgery patients, can be difficult to distinguish clinically, and are associated with increased morbidity. The authors aimed to determine risk factors associated with CSW and SIADH among children undergoing surgery for intracranial tumors. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included children 0-19 years of age who underwent a first intracranial tumor surgery with postoperative hyponatremia (sodium ≤ 130 mEq/L). CSW was differentiated from SIADH by urine output and fluid balance, exclusive of other causes of hyponatremia. The CSW and SIADH groups were compared with basic bivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. RESULTS Of 39 hyponatremic patients, 17 (44%) had CSW and 10 (26%) had SIADH. Patients with CSW had significantly greater natriuresis compared with those with SIADH (median urine sodium 211 vs 28 mEq/L, p = 0.01). Age ≤ 7 years and female sex were significant risk factors for CSW (p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Both patient groups had hyponatremia onset within the first postoperative week. Children with CSW had trends toward increased sodium variability and symptomatic hyponatremia compared with those with SIADH. Most received treatment, but inappropriate treatment was noted to worsen hyponatremia. CONCLUSIONS The authors found that CSW was more common following intracranial tumor surgery and was associated with younger age and female sex. Careful assessment of fluid balance and urine output can separate patients with CSW from those who have SIADH, and high urine sodium concentrations (> 100 mEq/L) support a CSW diagnosis. Patients with CSW and SIADH had similar clinical courses, but responded to different interventions, making appropriate diagnosis and treatment imperative to prevent morbidity. PMID:26613271

  15. [The treament of hyponatremia secundary to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Runkle, Isabelle; Villabona, Carles; Navarro, Andrés; Pose, Antonio; Formiga, Francesc; Tejedor, Alberto; Poch, Esteban

    2013-12-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatremia in a hospital setting. However, detailed protocols and algorithms for its management are lacking. Our objective was to develop 2 consensus algorithms for the therapy of hyponatremia due to SIADH in hospitalized patients. A multidisciplinary group made up of 2 endocrinologists, 2 nephrologists, 2 internists, and one hospital pharmacist held meetings over the period of a year. The group worked under the auspices of the European Hyponatremia Network and the corresponding Spanish medical societies. Therapeutic proposals were based on widely-accepted recommendations, expert opinion and consensus guidelines, as well as on the authors' personal experience. Two algorithms were developed. Algorithm 1 addresses acute correction of hyponatremia posing as a medical emergency, and is applicable to both severe euvolemic and hypovolemic hyponatremia. The mainstay of this algorithm is the iv use of 3% hypertonic saline solution. Specific infusion rates are proposed, as are steps to avoid or reverse overcorrection of serum sodium levels. Algorithm 2 is directed to the therapy of SIADH-induced mild or moderate, non-acute hyponatremia. It addresses when and how to use fluid restriction, solute, furosemide, and tolvaptan to achieve eunatremia in patients with SIADH. Two complementary strategies were elaborated to treat SIADH-induced hyponatremia in an attempt to increase awareness of its importance, simplify its therapy, and improve prognosis. PMID:24169317

  16. Effectiveness of intravenous ilomedin infusion and smoking cessation in the treatment of acutely symptomatic Buerger disease.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Kostas; Georgiou, Evangelia; Saleptsis, Vassileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Sakkas, Lazaros; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of iloprost treatment in the management of symptomatic Buerger disease (BD) and assessed smoking cessation compliance, based on a single-center experience. Thirteen patients with BD were treated with sessions of intravenous (IV) Ilomedin infusion. At 1-year follow-up, pain status alteration, number of analgesics required, ankle-brachial index (ABI) change, compliance with supervised smoking cessation, and amputation-free rate were recorded. The pain status improved considerably according to a visual analog scale, the number of analgesics required was significantly reduced, and all patients improved their pain-free walking distance, the ABI, and their self-reported quality of life. Only 2 patients required minor amputations. Combination of IV Ilomedin infusion, supervised smoking cessation, and a specific follow-up protocol may lead to improvement in pain-free walking distance, pain status, quality of life, and substantial reduction in amputation risk. PMID:24366824

  17. Vasopressin and vasopressin antagonists in heart failure and hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2008-06-01

    Increased synthesis of arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a critical role in fluid retention and hyponatremia in patients with heart failure. The AVP receptor antagonists constitute a new class of agents that are promising in the management of hyponatremia and congestion. Three of these agents--conivaptan, tolvaptan, and lixivaptan--have been studied in clinical settings. All are effective in inducing aquaresis (ie, electrolyte-free water excretion) and normalizing serum sodium concentration. They are well tolerated without causing electrolyte disorders, hypotension, or renal impairment. Conivaptan has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for short-term intravenous treatment of euvolemic hyponatremia of variable etiology but has not been adequately studied in heart failure. The addition of tolvaptan to standard therapy in hospitalized patients with heart failure has led to symptomatic improvement and decreased body weight, but there is no long-term clinical benefit. Early data on lixivaptan in heart failure suggest a dose-dependent aquaresis effect, and larger studies are under way. PMID:18765079

  18. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated. PMID:27186379

  19. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins acutely reduce soluble brain Aβ levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jérôme; Stukas, Sophie; Button, Emily; Cheng, Wai Hang; Lee, Michael; Fan, Jianjia; Wilkinson, Anna; Kulic, Iva; Wright, Samuel D; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-05-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest a protective role for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein (apo)A-I in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). HDL/apoA-I particles are produced by the liver and intestine and, in addition to removing excess cholesterol from the body, are increasingly recognized to have vasoprotective functions. Here we tested the ability of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) consisting of human apoA-I reconstituted with soy phosphatidylcholine for its ability to lower amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice, a well-characterized preclinical model of amyloidosis. Animals were treated intravenously either with four weekly doses (chronic study) or a single dose of 60mg/kg of rHDL (acute study). The major finding of our acute study is that soluble brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were significantly reduced within 24h of a single dose of rHDL. By contrast, no changes were observed in our chronic study with respect to soluble or deposited Aβ levels in animals assessed 7days after the final weekly dose of rHDL, suggesting that beneficial effects diminish as rHDL is cleared from the body. Further, rHDL-treated animals showed no change in amyloid burden, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ levels, neuroinflammation, or endothelial activation in the chronic study, suggesting that the pathology-modifying effects of rHDL may indeed be acute and may be specific to the soluble Aβ pool. That systemic administration of rHDL can acutely modify brain Aβ levels provides support for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of apoA-I-based agents for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26454209

  20. Effect of rapid correction of hyponatremia on the blood-brain barrier of rats.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Verbalis, J G; Williams, D

    1995-05-01

    Brain demyelination sometimes follows rapid correction of hyponatremia, especially if the hyponatremia is chronic. During correction brain water decreases and the brain shrinks. The present study examined whether such shrinkage might be sufficient to disrupt the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier. Barrier intactness was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging and intravenous gadolinium contrast administration. Hypertonic saline infusion rapidly increased the plasma sodium concentration and caused barrier disruption more frequently in chronic than in acute hyponatremic rats. Similar increases in plasma sodium concentration did not disrupt the barrier in normonatremic rats. The disruption appeared to be due to altered plasma osmolality since infusion of hypertonic mannitol, which raised plasma osmolality without changing the plasma sodium concentration, disrupted the barrier in hyponatremic but not normonatremic rats. Moreover, the osmotic threshold for barrier disruption was lowest in chronic hyponatremia, intermediate in acute hyponatremia, and highest in normonatremia. The greater susceptibility to osmotic disruption in chronic hyponatremia suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption may play a significant role in causing the demyelination sometimes found following too rapid correction of hyponatremia, possibly through exposure of oligodendrocytes to plasma macromolecules such as complement. PMID:7648255

  1. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  2. An elderly patient with chronic hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Berl, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder. With the aging of the population and the greater propensity of the elderly to develop hyponatremia, this electrolyte disorder is of increasing importance to the practicing nephrologist. In this Attending Rounds, an illustrative patient with hyponatremia is presented. The reasons for the increased incidence and prevalence of hyponatremia in the elderly are discussed, with emphasis on the effects of aging on urinary dilution, the frequently multifactorial nature of hyponatremia in this population, and the absence of a definite cause for inappropriate and persistent vasopressin release in many such patients. The rationale for treating the hyponatremia, even when apparently asymptomatic, is discussed, with attention to cognitive function, gait, and bone structure disturbances that increase the risk for fractures. The various available treatment approaches, including water restriction, demeclocycline, loop diuretics with NaCl supplementation, urea, and vasopressin antagonists are summarized, with emphasis on the efficacy and limitations of each of these therapies. PMID:23037983

  3. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  4. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Their Use in Treatment and Secondary Prevention of Acute Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Granziera, Serena; Hasan, Arjumand; Cohen, Alexander Ander T

    2016-04-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been compared with standard therapy in large phase III studies to assess their safety and efficacy in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism and in the secondary prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Although the mean population age and the gross inclusion and exclusion criteria were similar across these studies, they differed in other aspects such as overall study design and acute treatment strategies. The 4 DOACs examined in phase III trials (apixaban, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran) showed noninferiority compared with standard therapy for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism and for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Furthermore, these DOACs exhibited a similar safety profile to standard therapy, with the risk of major bleeding significantly reduced in some of these studies. Rivaroxaban and apixaban were tested as a single-drug approach, whereas in the dabigatran and edoxaban studies, initial bridging with parenteral agents was employed. The purpose of this review is to compare the phase III studies of DOACs in this indication, to highlight the differences, and to discuss a series of clinically relevant issues, including the management of key patient subgroups (eg, fragile patients, those with cancer or renal impairment), extended treatment, use of comedications, heparin pretreatment versus a single-drug approach, and the bleeding profiles of the DOACs. PMID:26329910

  5. Hyponatremia: Special Considerations in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soiza, Roy L.; Cumming, Kirsten; Clarke, Jennifer M.; Wood, Karen M.; Myint, Phyo K.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is especially common in older people. Recent evidence highlights that even mild, chronic hyponatremia can lead to cognitive impairment, falls and fractures, the latter being in part due to bone demineralization and reduced bone quality. Hyponatremia is therefore of special significance in frail older people. Management of hyponatremia in elderly individuals is particularly challenging. The underlying cause is often multi-factorial, a clear history may be difficult to obtain and clinical examination is unreliable. Established treatment modalities are often ineffective and carry considerable risks, especially if the diagnosis of underlying causes is incorrect. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that correction of hyponatremia can improve cognitive performance and postural balance, potentially minimizing the risk of falls and fractures. Oral vasopressin receptor antagonists (vaptans) are a promising innovation, but evidence of their safety and effect on important clinical outcomes in frail elderly individuals is limited. PMID:26237487

  6. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zmily, Hammam D; Daifallah, Suleiman; Ghali, Jalal K

    2011-01-01

    Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Tolvaptan inhibits the binding of arginine vasopressin to the V2 receptors on the collecting ducts of the kidneys resulting in aquaresis, the electrolytes sparing excretion of water. This article reviews the accumulated experience with tolvaptan and all the major clinical trials that were conducted to study its safety and efficacy and concludes by summarizing clinicians’ views of its current application in clinical practice. PMID:21694950

  7. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Respiratory Viral Infections in the First Year of Life: Association With Acute Otitis Media Development

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Alvarez-Fernandez, Pedro; Jennings, Kristofer; Trujillo, Rocio; Marom, Tal; Loeffelholz, Michael J.; Miller, Aaron L.; McCormick, David P.; Patel, Janak A.; Pyles, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sensitive diagnostic assays have increased the detection of viruses in asymptomatic individuals. The clinical significance of asymptomatic respiratory viral infection in infants is unknown. Methods. High-throughput, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect 13 common respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal specimens collected during 2028 visits from 362 infants followed from near birth up to 12 months of age. Specimens were collected at monthly interval (months 1–6 and month 9) and during upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) episodes. Subjects were followed closely for acute otitis media (AOM) development. Results. Viruses were detected in 76% of 394 URTI specimens and 27% of asymptomatic monthly specimens. Rhinovirus was detected most often; multiple viruses were detected in 29% of the specimens. Generalized mixed-model analyses associated symptoms with increasing age and female sex; detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, rhinovirus, metapneumovirus, and adenovirus was highly associated with symptoms. Increasing age was also associated with multiple virus detection. Overall, 403 asymptomatic viral infections in 237 infants were identified. Viral load was significantly higher in URTI specimens than asymptomatic specimens but did not differentiate cases of URTI with and without AOM complication. The rate of AOM complicating URTI was 27%; no AOM occurred following asymptomatic viral infections. AOM development was associated with increasing age and infection with RSV, rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, and bocavirus. Conclusions. Compared to symptomatic infection, asymptomatic viral infection in infants is associated with young age, male sex, low viral load, specific viruses, and single virus detection. Asymptomatic viral infection did not result in AOM. PMID:25205769

  8. Hyponatremia in Neurotrauma: The Role of Vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Andrea; Hannon, Mark J; Buchfelder, Michael; Verbalis, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    Hyponatremia is frequent in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or following intracranial procedures, with approximately 20% having a decreased serum sodium concentration to <125 mmol/L. The pathophysiology of hyponatremia in neurotrauma is not completely understood, but in large part is explained by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). The abnormal water and/or sodium handling creates an osmotic gradient promoting the shift of water into brain cells, thereby worsening cerebral edema and precipitating neurological deterioration. Unless hyponatremia is corrected promptly and effectively, morbidity and mortality increases through seizures, elevations in intracranial pressure, and/or herniation. The excess mortality in patients with severe hyponatremia (<125 mmol/L) extends beyond the time frame of hospital admission, with a reported mortality of 20% in hospital and 45% within 6 months of follow-up. Current options for the management of hyponatremia include fluid restriction, hypertonic saline, mineralocorticoids, and osmotic diuretics. However, the recent development of vasopressin receptor antagonists provides a more physiological tool for the management of excess water retention and consequent hyponatremia, such as occurs in SIADH. This review summarizes the existing literature on the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of hyponatremia in the setting of neurotrauma. PMID:26472056

  9. Hyponatremia due to Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency Successfully Treated by Dexamethasone with Sodium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Itsuro; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Hyponatremia due to secondary adrenal insufficiency Symptoms: prolonged general fatigue and anorexia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Successfully treated by dexamethasone with sodium chloride Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Patients who were surgically treated for Cushing’s syndrome postoperatively surrender to “primary” adrenal insufficiency. However, the preoperative over-secretion of cortisol or the postoperative administration of excessive glucocorticoids can cause “secondary” adrenal insufficiency, in which the prevalence of hyponatremia is usually lower than that of primary adrenal insufficiency. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with a past medical history of Cushing’s syndrome developed hyponatremia with symptoms of acute glucocorticoid deficiency, such as prolonged general fatigue and anorexia, after upper respiratory tract infection. A decrease in the serum cortisol level and the lack of increase in the ACTH level, despite the increased demand for cortisol, enabled a diagnosis of “secondary” adrenal insufficiency. Although the initial fluid replacement therapy was not effective, co-administration of dexamethasone and sodium chloride quickly resolved her symptoms and ameliorated the refractory hyponatremia. Conclusions: In this case, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of the patient was thought to have become suppressed long after the surgical treatment for Cushing’s syndrome. This case suggested a mechanism of refractory hyponatremia caused by secondary adrenal insufficiency, for which the administration of dexamethasone and sodium chloride exerted additional therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26319655

  10. Incidence, risk factors, and treatment outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in Taiwanese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective cohort study of 245 patients in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lee, Mel S; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yang, Chao-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is a potentially disabling complication encountered in children who receive chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Considering the possible effect of ethnic difference on the clinical features of symptomatic ON in pediatric ALL, we retrospectively evaluated 245 children with ALL who were treated at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, between 2002 and 2011. Six (2.4 %) patients developed symptomatic ON in a total of 17 sites during the follow-up period. Diagnosis of ON was confirmed by X-ray in seven, magnetic resonance imaging in two, and bone scan in three patients. The estimated cumulative incidence of symptomatic ON in newly diagnosed ALL was 3.4 % at 8 years. Four patients received ON-directed surgical interventions, including total hip replacement in three and arthroplasty in one. The incidence of ON was significantly higher among girls (P = 0.03), patients >10 years old (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)), and patients who had received more intensive chemotherapy regimen (P = 0.02). These results indicate that the incidence and risk factors in our institute were similar to those observed in Western countries. Future studies surveying the impact on the quality of life of childhood ALL survivors in Taiwan are warranted. PMID:25840770

  11. [Use of "Vaptans" in treatment of hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Tanındı, Aslı; Töre, Hasan Fehmi

    2015-04-01

    Hyponatremia is the most prevalent electrolyte imbalance, and may be present in up to 30% of hospitalized patients. It is an important predictor of in-hospital mortality. Irrespective of the reason underlying hyponatremia, water metabolism plays an important role. Arginine-vasopressin, which has cardiovascular effects and plays a role in water metabolism, is released from the posterior hypothalamus in response to an increase in plasma osmolality or a drop in the blood pressure, which are detected by osmoreceptors and baroreceptors respectively. Arginine-vasopressin has receptors located on vascular smooth muscle cells, the heart (V1a), the collecting ducts of the renal medulla (V2), the anterior pituitary gland (V1b) and many other organs. Arginine-vasopressin antagonists, known as "vaptans", have recently attracted attention for the treatment of chronic hypotonic hyponatremia. In this review, we focus on the diagnosis and classification of hyponatremia, current trends in its treatment in the light of guidelines, and the rationale of using vaptans in treating hyponatremia. We also briefly review cornerstone studies in the literature regarding vaptans, and the correct indications, contraindications and cautions in the use of "tolvaptan" and "conivaptan", two approved vaptans for this indication. PMID:25906004

  12. Posttransplant Hyponatremia Predicts Graft Failure and Mortality in Kidney Transplantation Recipients: A Multicenter Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miyeun; Park, Jae Yoon; An, Jung Nam; Park, Seokwoo; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck-Jong; Na, Ki Young; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-01-01

    Although hyponatremia is related to poorer outcomes in several clinical settings, its significance remains unresolved in kidney transplantation. Data on 1,786 patients who received kidney transplantations between January 2000 and December 2011 were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the corrected sodium values for serum glucose 3 months after their transplantations (<135 mmol/L vs. ≥135 mmol/L). Subsequently, the hazard ratios (HRs) for biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft failure, and all-cause mortality were calculated after adjustments for several immunological and non-immunological covariates. 4.0% of patients had hyponatremia. Patients with hyponatremia had higher risks for graft failure and all-cause mortality than did the counterpart normonatremia group; the adjusted HRs for graft failure and mortality were 3.21 (1.47–6.99) and 3.03 (1.21–7.54), respectively. These relationships remained consistent irrespective of heart function. However, hyponatremia was not associated with the risk of acute rejection. The present study addressed the association between hyponatremia and graft and patient outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Based on the study results, our recommendation is to monitor serum sodium levels after kidney transplantations. PMID:27214138

  13. Total Aortic Repair for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Complicated by Malperfusion or Symptomatic Branch Vessel Malalignment.

    PubMed

    Perera, Nisal K; Galvin, Sean D; Brooks, Mark; Seevanayagam, Siven; Matalanis, George

    2016-06-01

    Malperfusion or persistent perfusion of the false lumen with acute type A aortic dissections is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We describe our experience with total aortic repair in patients with acute type A dissection with recurrent or ongoing branch ischemia, true lumen collapse, or rapid dilatation of a false lumen after initial surgical repair. PMID:27211962

  14. Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia caused brain death in a 10-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, A Ra; Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia can cause severe neurologic complications due to cerebral edema. A 10-year-and-4-month-old boy with a psychiatric history of intellectual disability and behavioral disorders who presented with chief complaints of seizure and mental change showed severe hypotonic hyponatremia with low urine osmolality (serum sodium, 101 mmol/L; serum osmolality, 215 mOsm/kg; urine osmolality, 108 mOsm/kg). The patient had been polydipsic for a few months prior, and this had been worse in the previous few days. A diagnosis of hypotonic hyponatremia caused by primary polydipsia was made. The patient was in a coma, and developed respiratory arrest and became brain death shortly after admission, despite the treatment. The initial brain magnetic resonance imaging showed severe brain swelling with tonsillar and uncal herniation, and the patient was declared as brain death. It has been reported that antidiuretic hormone suppression is inadequate in patients with chronic polydipsia, and that this inadequate suppression of antidiuretic hormone is aggravated in patients with acute psychosis. Therefore, hyponatremia by primary polydipsia, although it is rare, can cause serious and life-threatening neurologic complications. PMID:26512354

  15. Case Report: Hyponatremia in a Marathoner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Paul B; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first reported case of hyponatremia from participation in endurance running of marathon distance is discussed. Nine earlier cases occurring in subjects who endured greater distances are summarized. Symptoms and treatment of the 21-year-old subject of this case report are presented and preventive measures recommended for endurance-event…

  16. Chronic Hyponatremia Causes Neurologic and Psychologic Impairments.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Haruki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takagi, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Izumida, Hisakazu; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Seiji; Kiyota, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Iwama, Shintaro; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yukio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oiso, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common clinical electrolyte disorder. Once thought to be asymptomatic in response to adaptation by the brain, recent evidence suggests that chronic hyponatremia may be linked to attention deficits, gait disturbances, risk of falls, and cognitive impairments. Such neurologic defects are associated with a reduction in quality of life and may be a significant cause of mortality. However, because underlying diseases such as adrenal insufficiency, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and cancer may also affect brain function, the contribution of hyponatremia alone to neurologic manifestations and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone rat model, we show here that sustained reduction of serum sodium ion concentration induced gait disturbances; facilitated the extinction of a contextual fear memory; caused cognitive impairment in a novel object recognition test; and impaired long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. In vivo microdialysis revealed an elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus of chronically hyponatremic rats. A sustained low extracellular sodium ion concentration also decreased glutamate uptake by primary astrocyte cultures, suggesting an underlying mechanism of impaired long-term potentiation. Furthermore, gait and memory performances of corrected hyponatremic rats were equivalent to those of control rats. Thus, these results suggest chronic hyponatremia in humans may cause gait disturbance and cognitive impairment, but these abnormalities are reversible and careful correction of this condition may improve quality of life and reduce mortality. PMID:26376860

  17. A Rare Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in Overcorrection of Hyponatremia with Total Parenteral Nutrition in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Janga, Kalyana C; Khan, Tazleem; Khorolsky, Ciril; Greenberg, Sheldon; Persaud, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old high risk pregnant female presented with hyponatremia from multiple causes and was treated with total parenteral nutrition. She developed acute hypernatremia due to the stage of pregnancy and other comorbidities. All the mechanisms of hyponatremia and hypernatremia were summarized here in our case report. This case has picture (graph) representation of parameters that led to changes in serum sodium and radiological findings of central pontine myelinolysis on MRI. In conclusion we present a complicated case serum sodium changes during pregnancy and pathophysiological effects on serum sodium changes during pregnancy. PMID:26798530

  18. A Rare Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis in Overcorrection of Hyponatremia with Total Parenteral Nutrition in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Janga, Kalyana C.; Khan, Tazleem; Khorolsky, Ciril; Greenberg, Sheldon; Persaud, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old high risk pregnant female presented with hyponatremia from multiple causes and was treated with total parenteral nutrition. She developed acute hypernatremia due to the stage of pregnancy and other comorbidities. All the mechanisms of hyponatremia and hypernatremia were summarized here in our case report. This case has picture (graph) representation of parameters that led to changes in serum sodium and radiological findings of central pontine myelinolysis on MRI. In conclusion we present a complicated case serum sodium changes during pregnancy and pathophysiological effects on serum sodium changes during pregnancy. PMID:26798530

  19. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  20. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  1. Neurological counterparts of hyponatremia: pathological mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Faravelli, Irene; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Oldani, Silvia; Fedeli, Carlo; Graziani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mEq/L, represents the most frequent electrolyte disorder in older hospitalized patients. Early recognition of hyponatremia is mandatory, since it represents an independent risk factor that increases hospital mortality by 40 %. Delayed correction of hyponatremia may worsen brain edema, resulting in different degrees of neural damage. However, an overly rapid correction of serum sodium levels can lead to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), a dreadful neurological picture. In recent years, hyponatremia and ODS have received growing attention both in terms of clinical management and pathophysiology, leading to the discovery of new drugs and treatment algorithms. In this review, we recapitulate the pathogenetic background, clinical manifestations, and treatment guidelines of hyponatremia, focusing on the neurological alterations. Neurological symptoms may be neglected when they manifest as early signs of mild hyponatremia, while brain damage can irremediably affect patients' conditions in the context of ODS. PMID:25724319

  2. Beer Potomania--An Unusual Cause of Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Kujubu, Dean A; Khosraviani, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    The first case of severe hyponatremia, since referred to as beer potomania, in a heavy beer drinker patient was reported in 1972. Excessive consumption of beer in particular, which has a low solute content, may result in severe hyponatremia. We report a case of severe hyponatremia that occurred in a patient who, owing to his underlying colon cancer, was drinking beer and ingesting little food. PMID:26176571

  3. Hyponatremia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Il Shin, Jae; Park, Se Jin; Suh, Chang-Hee; Lee, Geum Hwa; Hur, Min Woo; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether decreased serum sodium concentration could be associated with the disease activity in SLE. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the two independent cohorts of children and adults with SLE in two centers. Hyponatremia was associated with serum chloride (p = 0.004), albumin (p = 0.002) and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (p = 0.026) in children with SLE. Serum sodium levels were correlated negatively with ESR (p =0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (p < 0.0001) and C3 (p = 0.008) in children with SLE and those levels were correlated negatively with serum interleukin-6 levels (p = 0.003) in adults with SLE. Independent risk factors for the development of hyponatremia were the decreased serum C3 levels (OR 1.069, p = 0.031), the decreased serum chloride levels (OR 2.054, p = 0.006) and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (OR 1.066, p = 0.03) in children with SLE and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.480, p = 0.023) in combined cohorts with SLE by multiple logistic regression analyses. Our study firstly showed that hyponatremia could reflect a disease activity and severe inflammation of SLE. PMID:27193532

  4. Hyponatremia in cancer patients: Time for a new approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Rinaldi, Silvia; Caramanti, Miriam; Grohè, Christian; Santoni, Matteo; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Fiordoliva, Ilaria; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder in cancer patients. It may be related to cancer, to anti-cancer therapy or to other concomitant treatments. In this setting hyponatremia is often caused by the syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion, which is due to the ectopic production of antidiuretic hormone (vasopressin), to extracellular fluid depletion, to renal toxicity caused by chemotherapy or to other underlying conditions. Recent studies suggested that hyponatremia might be considered a negative prognostic factor for cancer patients therefore its early detection, monitoring and management might improve the patient's outcome. Treatment of hyponatremia depends on patient's symptoms severity, onset timing and extracellular volume status. In this review we summarize the main causes of hyponatremia in cancer patients and its management, including the available treatment options. PMID:27066939

  5. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  6. Hyponatremia due to Severe Primary Hypothyroidism in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Agathis, Nickolas T.; Libman, Ingrid M.; Moritz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia has been reported in the elderly with hypothyroidism and myxedema, but this has not been a universal finding in clinical studies and there have been only a few reports in children. We report a case of an infant who developed hyponatremia due to severe primary hypothyroidism. A 4-month-old ex-preterm male, who had been euthyroid on the newborn screen, developed unexplained hospital-acquired hyponatremia (serum Na 124 mEq/L) while on full oral feeds. He was euvolemic, appeared well and was without myxedema. An evaluation of hyponatremia was negative with the exception of severe primary hypothyroidism (TSH 315.4 IU/mL, repeat 540 IU/mL). The hyponatremia resolved with thyroxine supplementation. This case demonstrates that severe hypothyroidism can result in hyponatremia in infants. It is critical to consider hypothyroidism in the evaluation of an infant with unexplained hyponatremia as untreated hypothyroidism can lead to profound developmental delays. PMID:26618147

  7. Dilutional Hyponatremia during Hysteroscpic Surgery: Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ling; Zhang, Yu-Guan; Wang, Jin; Gong, Ya-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Dilutional hyponatremia caused by excess absorption of hypo-osmotic irrigation fluids is one of the severe complications during hysteroscopic surgery. Appropriate delivery system and distending media,proper distending pressure,and reducing destruction of uterine venous sinus may remarkably lower the morbidity. Meanwhile,early detection and timely treatment of moderate and severe hyponatremia to avoid the occurrence of secondary nervous system demyelination are particularly important during the surgery. This review summarizes the risk factors and the prevention and treatment strategies of dilutional hyponatremia during hysteroscopic surgery. PMID:27594163

  8. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  9. Miliary tuberculosis presenting with hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D. W.; Donevan, R. E.; Copland, G. M.; Ibbott, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis had moderately severe hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and very severe thrombocytopenia without other hematologic abnormalities. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, prednisone, vincristine and fluid restriction and recovered completely. The SIADH may have been a response by the posterior pituitary to a decrease in intravascular volume resulting from the extensive pulmonary disease or associated hypoxia, or the tuberculous lung may have released ADH or an ADH-like substance. The thrombocytopenia may have resulted from a direct or indirect toxic effect of infection or, less likely, the tuberculosis may have activated latent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:991033

  10. Zolpidem induced hyponatremia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Priya S, Shanmuga; Dl, Britto; T, Saravanan

    2014-09-01

    Zolpidem is a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic that acts by binding to (GABAA) receptor. This is a case report of a patient with chronic insomnia for which he had initially been receiving benzodiazepine hypnotic alprazolam and for the past three years, he had switched himself to non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, zolpidem and had progressively increased the dose to 20 mg. The patient presented with history of drowsiness, nausea and vomiting of short duration. Investigations revealed that the patient had hyponatremia. Decreased serum sodium, elevated urine sodium with normal urine osmolarity was detected. Therefore, we report this as a case of drug induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) as other likely causes were ruled out by appropriate investigations. The causality assessment was done according to the WHO scale and found to be "Probable". PMID:25386461

  11. Hyponatremia of non-small cell lung cancer: Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Dey, Subhashis; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is a hazardous complication of lung cancer and its treatment. It is seen at presentation in approximately 15% of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 1% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Platinum compounds used as first-line agents along with taxols frequently cause hyponatremia. Till date there is no data on its prevalence in patients with advanced lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent. Aim: This study was undertaken to find out its incidence before and after institution of chemotherapy and to observe the results of treatment of hyponatremia in a group of lung cancer patient. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with advanced lung cancer (25 patients with stage III disease and 15 with stage IV disease) were included in the study. Variables looked at included, but were not limited to, serum sodium, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and hemoglobin. These variables were measured as per the standard clinical laboratory procedure. No ethics approval was required as these parameters are routinely measured in such patients. Results: In the chemo-naïve state, one out of five cases with SCLC (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation; among the 35 cases of NSCLC, 7 patients (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation, which is in sharp contrast to earlier reports of 1% prevalence of hyponatremia in this group. Among the 27 cases who died within 6 months, 11 had hyponatremia; this finding was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: In India, NSCLC patients are at high risk of having hyponatremia at presentation and this is significantly associated with a worse outcome. PMID:22557779

  12. [Severe Hyponatremia after Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy : Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Mari; Hattori, Yusuke; Kumano, Yohei; Maeda, Yoko; Kondo, Takuya; Mochizuki, Taku; Kawahara, Takashi; Teranishi, Jun-Ichi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yumura, Yasushi; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-07-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the common electrolyte disorders associated with cisplatin (CDDP) administration. We report here two cases of hyponatremia associated with CDDP. Case 1 : A 75-year-old man with urothelial carcinoma of bladder (cT3N1M0) underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CDDP and gemcitabine. He lost consciousness on the eighth day after the chemotherapy. Blood tests showed severe hyponatremia (Na 113 mEq/l), low plasma osmolality and high level of plasma vasopressin. Urine tests showed low osmolality. These findings were consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion (SIADH). His consciousness level was improved after saline infusion and fluid restriction. Case 2 : A 54-year-old man with penile cancer (cT3N2M0) underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CDDP, paclitaxel and fluorouracil. He lost consciousness on the seventh day after the chemotherapy. Blood tests showed hyponatremia(Na 121 mEq/l) with renal dysfunction. We concluded that the hyponatremia is due to the renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS) based on renal dysfunction and high urinary sodium excretion. His consciousness level was improved after saline infusion. Although it is difficult to distinguish between SIADH and RSWS, correct evaluation is necessary for appropriate management of hyponatremia after CDDP administration. PMID:27569354

  13. A Rare Mechanism of Hyponatremia in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Hector; Kumar, Aswini; Khanna, Apurv

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Corticosteroid reistance Symptoms: Weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Diagnosis Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyponatremia is the most common disorder of body fluid and electrolyte balance in clinical practice. It is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. Little is known about the relationship between hyponatremia and HIV disease. It is thought that hyponatremia in HIV is associated with a syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), volume depletion, and adrenal insufficiency. Another common association is with Pneumocystis jirovecii (PCP). In early 1990s, there were several reports linking hyponatremia and HIV disease. It was found that these patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had abnormal adrenal cortical function. Additionally, these patients showed an abnormally elevated baseline cortisol level and a blunted response to cosyntropin. Case Report: Here, we present the case of an HIV patient presenting with hyponatremia and a physical examination suggestive of hypovolemia. Laboratory tests revealed urinary loss of sodium in the setting of normal serum cortisol level. The patient responded well to the administration of a mineralocorticoid hormone. Conclusions: Glucocorticoid resistance is an unusual cause of hyponatremia, and needs to be identified and treated accordingly. PMID:26436215

  14. Management of Severe Hyponatremia: Infusion of Hypertonic Saline and Desmopressin or Infusion of Vasopressin Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Raj, Dominic S.; Murata, Glen H.; Glew, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Rapid correction of severe hyponatremia carries the risk of osmotic demyelination. Two recently introduced methods of correction of hyponatremia have diametrically opposite effects on aquaresis. Inhibitors of vasopressin V2 receptor (vaptans) lead to the production of dilute urine, whereas infusion of desmopressin causes urinary concentration. Identification of the category of hyponatremia that will benefit from one or the other treatment is critical. In general, vaptans are effective in hyponatremias presenting with concentrated urine and, with the exception of hypovolemic hyponatremia, can be used as their primary treatment. Desmopressin is effective in hyponatremias presenting with dilute urine or developing urinary dilution after saline infusion. In this setting, desmopressin infusion helps prevent overcorrection of the hyponatremia. Monitoring of the changes in serum sodium concentration as a guide to treatment changes is imperative regardless of the initial treatment of severe hyponatremia. PMID:25247759

  15. [Hyponatremias: From pathophysiology to treatments. Review for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Braconnier, Antoine; Vrigneaud, Laurence; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Hyponatremia could be defined as a public health topic: too many patients are concerned in both hospitalized and general populations; hyponatremia induces lots of clinical outcomes and a great economic burden. Its pathophysiology involves thirst regulation (hypotonic water intakes) and losses regulation (through the kidney under vasopressin control). Diagnostic approach should insure that hyponatremia reflects hypo-osmolality and hypotonicity: first, a false hyponatremia should be ruled out, then a non-hypotonic one. Next step is clinic: extracellular status should be evaluated. When increased, any edematous status should be evoked: heart failure, liver cirrhosis or nephrotic syndrome. When decreased, any cause of extracellular dehydration should be evoked: natriuresis could help distinguishing between renal (adrenal insufficiency, diuretics use or salt-losing nephropathy) or extrarenal (digestive mostly) etiologies. When clinically normal, a secretion of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) should be evoked, once hypothyroidism or hypoadrenocorticism have been ruled out. Therapy depends on the severity of the clinical impact. From extracellular rehydration, through fluid restriction, the paraneoplastic and heart failure-induced SIADH benefit from a new class of drug, available among the therapeutic strategies: aquaretics act through antidiuretic hormone receptor antagonism (vaptans). Their long-term benefits still have to be proven but it is a significant step forward in the treatment of hyponatremias. PMID:26095871

  16. A near-fatal case of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Severac, Mathilde; Orban, Jean-Christophe; Leplatois, Thibaut; Ichai, Carole

    2014-07-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with headache, nausea, and confusion after completing an Ironman triathlon. She performed the race at a slow pace, in hot and dry weather. The first medical examination reported confusion with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13. A few minutes later, she presented with seizures. A cerebral computed tomographic (CT) scan showed major cerebral edema. Blood analysis showed severe acute hyponatremia (123 mEq/L) with hypotonicity (255 mEq/L). Her clinical condition quickly worsened, leading to a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 with fixed dilated pupils. After intubation and mechanical ventilation, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. A transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) showed intracranial hypertension signs motivating emergency osmotherapy by infusion of 20% mannitol over 15 minutes. To guide the therapeutics, an intracranial pressure monitoring was inserted, showing a value of 30 mm Hg. A few minutes later, intracranial pressure (ICP) increased to 68 mm Hg with a low cerebral perfusion pressure. Concomitantly, another TCD reported critical flows with poor cerebral perfusion. A second infusion of mannitol led to an ICP lowering and a decrease in pupil size after 10 minutes. During the next hours, the patient stayed stable without further intervention. Sixteen hours later, natremia was normal, mainly due to hyperdiuresis. On day 2, the tracheal tube was removed. A cerebral CT scan showed disappearance of cerebral edema. One month later, the patient had good recovery apart from some residual memory problems. Six months later, she was able to come back to work. PMID:24461937

  17. Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Overlooked Cause of Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Jessani, Naureen; Jehangir, Waqas; Behman, Daisy; Yousif, Abdalla; Spiler, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Failure to thrive in an elderly patient is often attributed to depression, especially when a patient does not have any chronic diseases or if there is no apparent medical reason to justify poor appetite, cachexia and generalized weakness. Hyponatremia often occurs in such patients and a thorough evaluation as to its etiology should be sought before committing to a premature diagnosis, which at the time may seem more plausible. We report a patient who presented with depression, weight loss and persistent hyponatremia, evaluation of which revealed the cause to be due to secondary adrenal insufficiency, which when treated, resulted in resolution of the symptom complex. Therefore, in our case report, we elucidate the importance of pursuing further evaluation to rule out adrenal insufficiency as a medical cause of depression, especially in the presence of hyponatremia, which is often overlooked and is generally attributed to dehydration in the setting of failure to thrive or SIADH in patients who are on psychotropic medications. PMID:25699130

  18. Secondary adrenal insufficiency: an overlooked cause of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Jessani, Naureen; Jehangir, Waqas; Behman, Daisy; Yousif, Abdalla; Spiler, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    Failure to thrive in an elderly patient is often attributed to depression, especially when a patient does not have any chronic diseases or if there is no apparent medical reason to justify poor appetite, cachexia and generalized weakness. Hyponatremia often occurs in such patients and a thorough evaluation as to its etiology should be sought before committing to a premature diagnosis, which at the time may seem more plausible. We report a patient who presented with depression, weight loss and persistent hyponatremia, evaluation of which revealed the cause to be due to secondary adrenal insufficiency, which when treated, resulted in resolution of the symptom complex. Therefore, in our case report, we elucidate the importance of pursuing further evaluation to rule out adrenal insufficiency as a medical cause of depression, especially in the presence of hyponatremia, which is often overlooked and is generally attributed to dehydration in the setting of failure to thrive or SIADH in patients who are on psychotropic medications. PMID:25699130

  19. [Electrolyte disturbances in geriatric patients with focus on hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, F

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances of water and electrolyte balance are commonly encountered in older patients due to a multitude of physiological changes and preexisting morbidities with hyponatremia being the most common disorder. Even mild chronic hyponatremia can lead to cognitive deficits and gait instability and is associated with an increased rate of falls and fractures. Additionally, experimental and epidemiological data suggest that hyponatremia promotes bone resorption and therefore increases the risk of osteoporosis. Furthermore, osteoporosis and sarcopenia can be stimulated by hypomagnesemia. Hypernatremia often only results in unspecific symptoms but the condition is associated with a clearly increased mortality. As electrolyte disturbances have a high prevalence in the geriatric population and can contribute to geriatric syndromes and frailty, relevant electrolyte alterations should be excluded in all geriatric patients, in particular after a change in medication schedules. PMID:27464739

  20. Treatment of Severe Hypervolemic Hyponatremia in a Child With Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Teresa; Tenconi, Rossana; Bertolozzi, Giuseppe; Laicini, Emanuela Anna; Tardini, Giacomo; Vianello, Federica; Leva, Ernesto; Milani, Gregorio Paolo; Fossali, Emilio Filippo

    2016-06-01

    A 21-month-old boy came to our attention because of pneumonia. His weight increased before presentation, and his blood test results showed hyponatremia (116 mEq/L), low plasma osmolarity (241 mOsm/L), and high urine osmolarity (435 mOsm/L). He was treated with 0.9% sodium chloride solution and intravenous furosemide, and sodium levels rose up to 135 mEq/L in 36 hours. No standard treatment is available for severe hyponatremia in children. The use of vaptans in pediatric patients is described in literature, but it lacks evidence about safety and effectiveness. We suggest that furosemide administration plus salt replacement is effective in restoring normal values of plasma sodium concentration in severe euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. PMID:27253356

  1. Carbamazepine-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Ted; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study of 40 patients with mental retardation receiving carbamazepine found hyponatremia in only 5 percent of these patients and found a statistically, but not clinically, significant decrease in serum sodium levels in patients receiving anticonvulsant polytherapy. Results support the use of this drug with patients with mental retardation and…

  2. Conivaptan: a step forward in the treatment of hyponatremia?

    PubMed Central

    Hline, Su Su; Pham, Phuong-Truc T; Pham, Phuong-Thu T; Aung, May H; Pham, Phuong-Mai T; Pham, Phuong-Chi T

    2008-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities linked to adverse outcomes and increased mortality in hospitalized patients. While the differential diagnosis for hyponatremia is diverse, most cases stem from arginine vasopressin (AVP) dysregulation, where hypoosmolality fails to suppress AVP synthesis and release. The physiological effects of AVP are currently known to depend on its interaction with any of 3 receptor subtypes V1A, V2, and V1B. Activation of V2 by AVP is the key in renal water regulation and maintenance of total body volume and plasma tonicity. Despite the long-recognized problem with excess AVP in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, traditional therapeutic options have relied on nonspecific and potentially problematic strategies. More recently, a new class of drugs, introduced as “aquaretics,” has gained great attention among clinicians because of its ability to correct hyponatremia via direct competitive inhibition of AVP at V2 receptors to induce renal electrolyte-free water excretion. In this paper, we aim to review available clinical data on the only FDA-approved aquaretic, dual V1A/V2 receptor antagonist conivaptan, discuss its clinical indications, efficacy, safety profile, and comment on its clinical limitations. PMID:18728836

  3. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia. A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data. The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54–13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69–0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25–26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia. Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  4. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia.A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data.The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54-13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69-0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25-26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia.Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  5. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  7. Management of Symptomatic Venous Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  8. Management of symptomatic venous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Siani, Andrea; Irace, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Venous aneurysms (VAs) have been described in quite of all the major veins. They represent uncommon events but often life-threatening because of pulmonary or paradoxical embolism. We describe our twelve patients' series with acute pulmonary emboli due to venous aneurysm thrombosis. Our experience underlines the importance of a multilevel case-by-case approach and the immediate venous lower limbs duplex scan evaluation in pulmonary embolism events. Our data confirm that anticoagulant alone is not effective in preventing pulmonary embolism. We believe that all the VAs of the deep venous system of the extremities should be treated with surgery as well as symptomatic superficial venous aneurysm. A simple excision can significantly improve symptoms and prevent pulmonary embolism. PMID:22566766

  9. Thiazide–associated hyponatremia in the elderly: what the clinician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-induced hyponatremia is one of the main causes of decreased sodium levels in elderly individuals. This review presents the current evidence regarding the thiazide-associated hyponatremia. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia is observed mainly in patients with certain risk factors such as those receiving large doses of thiazides, having much comorbidity, such as heart failure, liver disease or malignancy, and taking several medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants. Sodium concentration should be monitored in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia and clinicians should measure promptly serum sodium levels in patients with neurologic signs indicating reduced sodium levels. The clinical and biochemical profile of patients with thiazide-associated hyponatremia may be that of extracellular volume depletion or the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). The investigation of possible thiazide-associated hyponatremia includes the exclusion of other causes of decreased sodium levels and the identification of the characteristics of hyponatremia due to thiazides (extracellular volume depletion-related or SIADH-like). Treatment should be carefully monitored to avoid serious neurologic complications due to overcorrection. Clinicians should discourage prescribing thiazides in patients with a history of diuretic-associated hyponatremia and should prefer low doses of thiazides in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia. PMID:27168745

  10. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia in the elderly: what the clinician needs to know.

    PubMed

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-02-01

    Thiazide-induced hyponatremia is one of the main causes of decreased sodium levels in elderly individuals. This review presents the current evidence regarding the thiazide-associated hyponatremia. Thiazide-associated hyponatremia is observed mainly in patients with certain risk factors such as those receiving large doses of thiazides, having much comorbidity, such as heart failure, liver disease or malignancy, and taking several medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants. Sodium concentration should be monitored in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia and clinicians should measure promptly serum sodium levels in patients with neurologic signs indicating reduced sodium levels. The clinical and biochemical profile of patients with thiazide-associated hyponatremia may be that of extracellular volume depletion or the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). The investigation of possible thiazide-associated hyponatremia includes the exclusion of other causes of decreased sodium levels and the identification of the characteristics of hyponatremia due to thiazides (extracellular volume depletion-related or SIADH-like). Treatment should be carefully monitored to avoid serious neurologic complications due to overcorrection. Clinicians should discourage prescribing thiazides in patients with a history of diuretic-associated hyponatremia and should prefer low doses of thiazides in patients with risk factors for developing thiazide-associated hyponatremia. PMID:27168745

  11. [Symptomatic and concurrent depressions].

    PubMed

    Terra, J L

    1999-04-01

    The symptomatic and concurrent depressions description need to resort to comorbidity and symptomatic co-occurrence concepts. Patients with depressive symptoms or in a major depressive episode may also be suffering from another nonmood psychiatric disorders as alcoholism, anxiety or eating disorders. Many general medical conditions which are link with depression are illustrated with the examples of cancer, coronary artery disease, endocrinologic diseases, dementia, stroke and chronic fatigue syndrome. When depression and another psychiatric or medical conditions occur together, it is important to provide to the practitioner guidelines for the decision to treat one of the two disorders. This paper contains an example of decisional algorithm. PMID:10337217

  12. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  13. Down with the Flu: Hyponatremia in a patient with influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ranjan; Khanal, Ashish; Poudel, Dilli Ram; Karmacharya, Paras

    2015-01-01

    Context: Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is a common cause of hyponatremia. Although it has been associated with different pulmonary infections, there have been only few case reports describing the association of SIADH with influenza. Case Report: We report a case of SIADH in a patient with influenza who was successfully treated with fluid restriction. Conclusion: It is essential for clinicians to be aware of the association between influenza and SIADH. PMID:26110135

  14. Chronic Severe Hyponatremia and Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Avoiding Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canaday, Susan; Rompala, John; Rowles, John; Fisher, Josh; Holt, David

    2015-12-01

    Serum sodium concentration affects every cell in the body with respect to cellular tonicity. Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered, occurring at clinical admission in 22% of elderly patients. Any rapid correction of chronic severe hyponatremia can result in rapid cellular shrinking due to loss of intracellular free water. This is commonly associated with paralysis and severe brain damage due to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS). ODS occurs because the body has the ability to compensate for cellular fluid shifts due to chronic hyponatremia (by a decrease in brain concentration of several ions, amino acids, and organic osmolytes). Thus, the neurons are often at a functional state of fluid balance despite the sodium imbalance. The initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can introduce between 1 and 2 L of priming solution containing a normal sodium concentration creating a rapid rise in sodium concentration within the extracellular fluid. This abrupt change establishes a situation where intracellular free water can be lost resulting in cellular shrinking and ODS. In presenting this case study, we hope to add to the current literature with a specific isotonic approach to treating the chronically severe hyponatremic patient pre-CPB, during CPB, and post-CPB. PMID:26834285

  15. Is chronic hyponatremia a novel risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Carlos Ayus, Juan; Negri, Armando Luis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moritz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a serious health risk in the elderly, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. There is now an emerging literature that suggests that chronic hyponatremia increases the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for both falls and fractures in the elderly. Hyponatremia appears to contribute to falls and fractures by two mechanisms: (i) it produces mild cognitive impairment resulting in unsteady gait and falls and (ii) it directly contributes to osteoporosis and increased bone fragility by inducing increased bone resorption to mobilize sodium. There is debate over the effect of hyponatremia on the production of osteoporosis, as one study found decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and another did not. Should we be screening for low serum sodium in patients with osteoporosis or assessing BMD in patients with hyponatremia? The final answer is yet to come from prospective studies that allocate elderly individuals with mild hyponatremia to receive active treatment or not for hyponatremia and see if this intervention prevents gait disturbances and changes in BMD reducing fracture risk. In the meantime, physicians caring for elderly patients must be aware of the association between hyponatremia and bone problems. As serum sodium is a readily available, simple and affordable biochemical measurement, clinicians should look for hyponatremia in elderly patients who take medications that can cause hyponatremia. Also, elderly patients with unsteady gait and/or confusion should be checked for the presence of mild hyponatremia and if present it should not be ignored. Finally, elderly patients presenting with an orthopedic injury should have serum sodium checked and corrected if hyponatremia is present. PMID:23114899

  16. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia: a Danish register-based population study

    PubMed Central

    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Torstensson, Maia; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Ødum, Lars; Gislasson, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Holm, Ellen Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between classes of antidepressants and hyponatremia, and between specific antidepressants and hyponatremia. Design Retrospective register-based cohort study using nationwide registers from 1998 to 2012. Setting The North Denmark Region. Participants In total, 638 352 individuals were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Plasma sodium was obtained from the LABKA database. The primary outcome was hyponatremia defined as plasma sodium (p-sodium) below 135 mmol/L and secondary outcome was severe hyponatremia defined as p-sodium below 130 mmol/L. The association between use of specific antidepressants and hyponatremia was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models. Results An event of hyponatremia occurred in 72 509 individuals and 11.36% (n=6476) of these events happened during treatment with antidepressants. Incidence rate ratios and CIs for the association with hyponatremia in the first p-sodium measured after initiation of treatment were for citalopram 7.8 (CI 7.42 to 8.20); clomipramine 4.93 (CI 2.72 to 8.94); duloxetine 2.05 (CI 1.44 to 292); venlafaxine 2.90 (CI 2.43 to 3.46); mirtazapine 2.95 (CI 2.71 to 3.21); and mianserin 0.90 (CI 0.71 to 1.14). Conclusions All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine. PMID:27194321

  17. Lithium and symptomatic hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Dubin, S E

    1983-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism with or without adenoma has occasionally been reported in association with lithium treatment, and in symptomatic patients depression, psychosis and an exacerbation of existing psychopathology may occur. Three lithium-treated patients with hyperparathyroidism are reported, in whom discontinuation of lithium in one and removal of parathyroid adenomata in two led to both a reduction in plasma calcium levels and an improvement in their psychopathology. PMID:6423822

  18. Bupropion Induced Hyponatremia in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Smolin, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year-old female with a major depressive episode who developed hyponatremia associated with bupropion. In reviewing the literature, there are only a few case reports which pertain to this topic. The clinical symptoms of hyponatremia can be misinterpreted as a worsening of the primary psychiatric illness and can lead to potentially serious consequences if not fully evaluated. We recommend that clinicians should be well aware of this side effect and that sodium levels should be checked within the first 2 weeks after initiating treatment in patients, especially those with additional risk factors for hyponatremia, such as older age, female sex, diuretic use, low BMI, and unexplained mental status changes at any time during treatment with antidepressants. The risk for hyponatremia associated with mirtazapine appears to be low and its use can be helpful in patients who have developed hyponatremia induced by other antidepressants and who experienced symptoms of weight loss and insomnia. PMID:27433364

  19. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients. PMID:21998605

  20. Orthorexia Nervosa with Hyponatremia, Subcutaneous Emphysema, Pneumomediastimum, Pneumothorax, and Pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung

    2011-01-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients. PMID:21998605

  1. Carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is time-dependent, with the best outcomes resulting from the earliest interventions. However, for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, despite maximal medical treatment, an effective intervention to improve their neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. There are two major concerns: first, cerebral revascularization in the acute stage remains challenging because of the possibility that hemorrhagic infarction or hyperperfusion syndrome will occur after revascularization; second, alarms about carotid artery stenting in patients with acute symptoms are related to the fact that, while with carotid endarterectomy the plaque is completely removed, after stenting it is only remodelled and its stabilization is essential to avoid embolic events during the procedure and in the post-operative period. Although level 1 evidence seems clearly in favor of carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients, carotid stenting has been proposed as a possible alternative in selected cases if the procedure is performed in high-volume center with documented low perioperative stroke and death rates. This review summarizes indications and results for carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients. PMID:23296417

  2. A case of losartan-induced severe hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saibal; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjib; Ramasamy, Anand; Prabhu, V. Vinoth; Pachiappan, Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    This case report outlines a very rare case of losartan-induced severe hyponatremia in a 73-year-old type 2 diabetic patient. The patient was initiated with 50 mg daily oral losartan monotherapy for newly diagnosed moderate hypertension. After 3.5 months of taking the drug, he presented to the emergency department in a drowsy state with severe generalized weakness and occasional palpitations. He was a known diabetic for the last 3 years and well controlled by oral metformin alone. On examination, his serum sodium level was found to be 123 meq/L. There were no evidences of any other possible metabolic, infective, organic or other pathologic causes giving rise to that condition, except losartan itself. De-challenge was done and he was treated vigorously resulting in reversal of the diseased state. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale suggested that it was “probable” that oral losartan was responsible for the development of severe hyponatremia in this patient. PMID:26816476

  3. Mild hyponatremia is associated with an increased risk of death in an ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Gankam-Kengne, Fabrice; Ayers, Colby; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James; Maalouf, Naim M

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is a common disorder associated with higher mortality in hospitalized patients, but its impact in an ambulatory setting remains unclear. Here we used data from the Dallas Heart Study, a prospective multiethnic cohort study that included ambulatory individuals, to determine the prevalence and determinants of hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mEq/l), and its impact on mortality. The analysis included 3551 individuals with a median age of 43 years followed up over a median of 8.4 years. The sample weight-adjusted prevalence of hyponatremia was 6.9%. Hyponatremia was mild (median serum sodium: 133 mEq/l), and was significantly associated with age, black ethnicity, presence of cirrhosis or congestive heart failure, and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. By the end of the follow-up period, there were 202 deaths including 29 in hyponatremic individuals. The unadjusted hazard ratio for hyponatremia and death was 1.94. Hyponatremia remained significantly associated with mortality after adjustment for age, gender, ethnicity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol use, renal function, plasma C-reactive protein, use of antiepileptic drugs and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and history of congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, and cancer (hazard ratio of 1.75). Thus, mild hyponatremia is associated with an increased risk of death in a young and ethnically diverse community population. PMID:23325088

  4. Epidemiology, pathophysiology and putative genetic basis of carbamazepine- and oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, B; de Haan, G-J; van den Broek, M P H; Sander, J W; Lindhout, D; Koeleman, B P C

    2016-09-01

    The use of carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) as first-line antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of focal epilepsy is limited by hyponatremia, a known adverse effect. Hyponatremia occurs in up to half of people taking CBZ or OXC and, although often assumed to be asymptomatic, it can lead to symptoms ranging from unsteadiness and mild confusion to seizures and coma. Hyponatremia is probably due to the antidiuretic properties of CBZ and OXC that are, at least partly, explained by stimulation of the vasopressin 2 receptor/aquaporin 2 pathway. No known genetic risk variants for CBZ- and OXC-induced hyponatremia exist, but likely candidate genes are part of the vasopressin water reabsorption pathway. PMID:27333872

  5. Central Pontine Myelinolysis with Minimal Hyponatremia in the Setting of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Joseph M.; Sanchez, Galo; Berkeley, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is classically attributed to overly rapid correction of profound hyponatremia. However, there are case reports of this disease in the setting of normal serum sodium or minimal hyponatremia. These cases have been hypothesized to be secondary to other metabolic disturbances such as hyperglycemia or hypophosphatemia. Eunatremic CPM has also been described in patients with advanced acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The mortality risk in this special population is significantly higher than those with hyponatremia-associated CPM, but the mechanisms are unclear. We discuss a case of a man with AIDS who developed CPM with minimal hyponatremia and no other metabolic disturbances. Common variables within this population, such as hypoalbuminemia and lymphoma, are discussed as potential factors contributing to the pathophysiology. Reporting these atypical cases is crucial to our understanding of how to prevent future cases. PMID:26605097

  6. Vaptans: A new option in the management of hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Aditya, Suruchi; Rattan, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays an important role in water and sodium homeostasis. It acts via three receptor subtypes—V1a, V1b, and V2—distributed widely throughout the body. Vaptans are nonpeptide vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRA). By property of aquaresis, VRAs offer a novel therapy of water retention. Conivaptan is a V1a/V2 nonselective VRA approved for euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. Tolvaptan is the first oral VRA. Other potential uses of this new class of drugs include congestive heart failure (CHF), cirrhosis of liver, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, polycystic kidney disease, and so on. These novel drugs score over diuretics as they are not associated with electrolyte abnormalities. Though much remains to be elucidated before the VRAs are applied clinically, the future holds much promise. PMID:23776817

  7. Exercise-Associated Collapse: Is Hyponatremia in Our Head?

    PubMed

    Krabak, Brian J; Parker, Kelsey M; DiGirolamo, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is one of the most common causes of exercise-associated collapse. The primary pathogenesis of EAH is largely the result of excessive fluid intake but is influenced by other factors, including hormonal abnormalities (ie, inappropriate arginine vasopressin secretion), renal abnormalities, and mobilization of sodium stores. Early recognition of EAH is crucial to appropriate treatment, because symptoms are varied and may be confused with other causes of exercise-associated collapse. Onsite testing of [Na+] will confirm the diagnosis but is not always available. Rapid treatment of EAH will depend upon the type and severity of symptoms. Treatment protocols range from fluid restriction or oral hypertonic fluids for mild symptoms to intravenous hypertonic fluids for more severe symptoms. Preventative strategies should emphasize fluid consumption based on thirst and athlete/coach/staff education regarding proper hydration practices. PMID:26972268

  8. Hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with heart failure: a condition often overlooked in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Gudina, Esayas Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in patients with heart failure (HF). It is independently associated with increased short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. The main objective of this study was to assess patterns of hyponatremia and its association with discharge outcomes in patients with HF admitted to a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Patients and methods This is a descriptive, prospective, hospital-based cohort study of patients with HF admitted to Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia, between November 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, clinical profile at admission, and outcomes at discharge. Plasma sodium concentration was analyzed at admission for all patients. The relationship between hyponatremia at admission and in-hospital mortality, as well as length of hospital stay, was assessed using both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Of 152 participants admitted with HF, 44 (28.9%) had hyponatremia, which is defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/L. Patients on salt restriction, on chronic diuretic treatment (furosemide and spironolactone), and with impaired renal function at admission were found to be highly affected. Hyponatremia was found to be associated with increased in-hospital mortality (P=0.008) and longer hospital stay (16.6 vs 12 days, P<0.001). Patients with hyponatremia also had lower blood pressure and poor functional status at discharge. Conclusion This study demonstrates that hyponatremia is highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with HF and is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer hospital stay. Thus, great emphasis should be given to identify high-risk patients, and prevention and early detection of hyponatremia to prevent its deleterious effects. Large-scale national studies are also needed to complement our

  9. [Difficulties in the differential diagnosis of hyponatremia presenting with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Tamás; Oláh, Roland; Németh, Attila; Winkler, Gábor

    2013-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent eletrolyte imbalance in hospitalized geriatric patient. The accompanying signs and symptoms can run a wide range and, therefore, these patients are usually admitted to various departments, i.e. neurology and/or traumatology first. Directed laboratory investigations demonstrate severe hyponatremia. Differential diagnosis can be very difficult and complex in the clinical settings. Firstly, spurious forms of hyponatremia have to be excluded, then the underlying cause should elucidated based on the patients hydration status and serum osmolarity. Hyponatremia can be divided into hyper-, hypo- and normovolemic forms. Moreover, it can be further classified as hypo-, iso- and hyperosmolar hyponatremias. The differentiation between renal and extrarenal salt wasting forms is hinged on the urine sodium concentration. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is the most common cause of normovolemic, hypoosmolar forms (named also as Schwartz-Bartter syndrome). The authors aimed to shed light on the often insurmountable difficulties of the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this very frequent electrolyte imbalance by presenting a clinical case report. Their purported aim reflects upon the wide array of ethiopathogenesis of hyponatremia: various endocrine, renal diseases, inappropriateness of antidiuretic hormone secretion as well as the role of different medications (e.g. diuretics). This fine-tuned and intricate physiology of sodium metabolism could fortuitously be overturned by these mechanisms. PMID:23895992

  10. Rapid-Onset Hyponatremia Induced by Duloxetine in a Middle-Aged Male with Depression and Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Hae Woo; Lee, Jun Young

    2012-01-01

    Duloxetine is a relatively balanced selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. We report a case of hyponatremia induced by duloxetine developed rapidly after starting the medication in a middle-aged male with multiple somatic symptoms and depression. Two days after discontinuation of duloxetine and management with hypertonic saline as well as fluid restriction, the serum sodium level normalized. The patient had two risk factors for developing hyponatremia, such as severe body weight loss and pneumonia. Therefore, when treating patients with depression and somatic symptoms, especially with risk factors for developing hyponatremia, close monitoring for clinical and laboratory evidence of hyponatremia may be essential. PMID:22396690

  11. Rapid-onset hyponatremia induced by duloxetine in a middle-aged male with depression and somatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Hae Woo; Lee, Jun Young; Jung, Hee Yeon

    2012-03-01

    Duloxetine is a relatively balanced selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. We report a case of hyponatremia induced by duloxetine developed rapidly after starting the medication in a middle-aged male with multiple somatic symptoms and depression. Two days after discontinuation of duloxetine and management with hypertonic saline as well as fluid restriction, the serum sodium level normalized. The patient had two risk factors for developing hyponatremia, such as severe body weight loss and pneumonia. Therefore, when treating patients with depression and somatic symptoms, especially with risk factors for developing hyponatremia, close monitoring for clinical and laboratory evidence of hyponatremia may be essential. PMID:22396690

  12. Hyponatremia Is Associated With Increased Osteoporosis and Bone Fractures in a Large US Health System Population

    PubMed Central

    Usala, Rachel L.; Fernandez, Stephen J.; Mete, Mihriye; Cowen, Laura; Shara, Nawar M.; Barsony, Julianna

    2015-01-01

    Context: The significance of studies suggesting an increased risk of bone fragility fractures with hyponatremia through mechanisms of induced bone loss and increased falls has not been demonstrated in large patient populations with different types of hyponatremia. Objective: This matched case-control study evaluated the effect of hyponatremia on osteoporosis and fragility fractures in a patient population of more than 2.9 million. Design, Setting, and Participants: Osteoporosis (n = 30 517) and fragility fracture (n = 46 256) cases from the MedStar Health database were matched on age, sex, race, and patient record length with controls without osteoporosis (n = 30 517) and without fragility fractures (n = 46 256), respectively. Cases without matched controls or serum sodium (Na+) data or with Na+ with a same-day blood glucose greater than 200 mg/dL were excluded. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of diagnosis of osteoporosis and fragility fractures of the upper or lower extremity, pelvis, and vertebrae were the outcome measures. Results: Multivariate conditional logistic regression models demonstrated that hyponatremia was associated with osteoporosis and/or fragility fractures, including chronic [osteoporosis: odds ratio (OR) 3.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.59–4.39; fracture: OR 4.61, 95% CI 4.15–5.11], recent (osteoporosis: OR 3.06, 95% CI 2.81–3.33; fracture: OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.83–3.29), and combined chronic and recent hyponatremia (osteoporosis: OR 12.09, 95% CI 9.34–15.66; fracture: OR 11.21, 95% CI 8.81–14.26). Odds of osteoporosis or fragility fracture increased incrementally with categorical decrease in median serum Na+. Conclusions: These analyses support the hypothesis that hyponatremia is a risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether correction of hyponatremia will improve patient outcomes. PMID:26083821

  13. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  14. [A Case of Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome in Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Taro; Shirakura, Satoru; Hatanaka, Akio; Okano, Wataru; Tokumaru, Takao; Yamada, Masato; Saito, Yoshihiro; Beppu, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the electrolyte abnormalities frequently encountered in cancer therapy. Cisplatin is a well-known drug which can raise various adverse events, including hyponatremia. A male with advanced oropharyngeal cancer is presented in the present report, who was treated with radiotherapy with concurrent administration of cisplatin and who underwent a total of three episodes of severe hyponatremia in the course of therapy. The first two attacks of hyponatremia following cisplatin administration were accompanied by dehydration and excessive urination, and the patient recovered in one week with rehydration and salt supplementation. Excessive loss of salt in urine confirmed that these events were caused by renal salt wasting syndrome after cisplatin administration. On the other hand, the third attack was due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after surgery for a bone fracture. Estimation of the extracellular fluid volume and salt intake/output balance is always believed to be necessary for the diagnosis and proper management of severe hyponatremia after chemotherapy-based treatment with cisplatin. PMID:26548098

  15. The therapeutic use of vaptans for the treatment of dilutional hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Cassagnol, Manouchkathe; Shogbon, Angela O; Saad, Maha

    2011-08-01

    Hyponatremia is a very common electrolyte abnormality. Dilutional hyponatremia is very difficult to treat effectively due to the complications of conventional treatment. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) plays an integral role in circulatory and water homeostasis. AVP is a hormone released in response to increases in plasma tonicity or decreases in plasma volume in an attempt to maintain the plasma osmolality between 284 and 295 mOsm/L. AVP receptor antagonists or "vaptans" are a new class of drugs that allow for the safe and efficacious treatment of dilutional hyponatremia. Conivaptan, a mixed V1a/V2 receptor antagonist, and tolvaptan, a selective V2 receptor antagonist, are the only 2 vaptans approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:21813818

  16. Hyponatremia in the neurocritical care patient: An approach based on current evidence.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, W; Aramendi, I; Langlois, P L; Biestro, A

    2015-05-01

    In the neurocritical care setting, hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disorder, which is associated with significant morbimortality. Cerebral salt wasting and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone have been classically described as the 2 most frequent entities responsible of hyponatremia in neurocritical care patients. Nevertheless, to distinguish between both syndromes is usually difficult and useless as volume status is difficult to be determined, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood, fluid restriction is usually contraindicated in these patients, and the first option in the therapeutic strategy is always the same: 3% hypertonic saline solution. Therefore, we definitively agree with the current concept of "cerebral salt wasting", which means that whatever is the etiology of hyponatremia, initially in neurocritical care patients the treatment will be the same: hypertonic saline solution. PMID:25593019

  17. Frequency of hyponatremia and nonosmolar vasopressin release in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vitting, K.E.; Gardenswartz, M.H.; Zabetakis, P.M.; Tapper, M.L.; Gleim, G.W.; Agrawal, M.; Michelis, M.F. )

    1990-02-16

    The frequency and pathophysiology of hyponatremia were studied in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Of 71 hospitalized patients surveyed retrospectively, hyponatremia was observed in 37 (52%). Of 48 patients studied prospectively, 27 (56%) were hyponatremic. In 16 hyponatremic patients, volume status; serum and urine osmolalities; renal, adrenal, and thyroid function; and plasma vasopressin levels were assessed. Urine osmolalities were inappropriately elevated relative to serum osmolalities. Four patients had moderate renal insufficiency. Plasma vasopressin levels, measured by radioimmunoassay, were elevated in 15 patients, with the highest levels seen in patients who died. Hyponatremia of multiple etiologies occurred in a majority of inpatients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, often following the administration of hypotonic fluids, and was associated with a 30% (8/27) short-term mortality.

  18. Symptomatic animal models for dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bethany K.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic animal models have clinical features consistent with human disorders and are often used to identify the anatomical and physiological processes involved in the expression of symptoms and to experimentally demonstrate causality where it would be infeasible in the patient population. Rodent and primate models of dystonia have identified basal ganglia abnormalities, including alterations in striatal GABAergic and dopaminergic transmission. Symptomatic animal models have also established the critical role of the cerebellum in dystonia, particularly abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant Purkinje cell activity. Further, experiments suggest that the basal ganglia and cerebellum are nodes in an integrated network that is dysfunctional in dystonia. The knowledge gained from experiments in symptomatic animal models may serve as the foundation for the development of novel therapeutic interventions to treat dystonia. PMID:23893454

  19. Creation of a Hyponatremia Registry Supported by an Industry-Derived Quality Control Methodology

    PubMed Central

    D., Giunta; N., Fuentes; V., Pazo; M. L., Posadas-Martínez; H., Michellangelo; G., Waisman; F., González Bernaldo De Quirós

    2010-01-01

    Background A clinical registry encompasses a selective set of rigorously collected and stored clinical data focused on a specific condition. Hyponatremia has multiple, complex underlying causes and is one of the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No systematic registries of hyponatremic patients have been reported in the medical literature. The purpose of this project was to create a registry for hyponatremia in order to obtain epidemiological data that will help to better understand this condition. Objective This paper describes the creation of a registry for hyponatremia within a single institution that employs industry-based approaches for quality management to optimize data accuracy and completeness. Methods A prospective registry of incident hyponatremia cases was created for this study. A formalized statistically based quality control methodology was developed and implemented to analyze and monitor all the process indicators that were developed to ensure data quality. Results Between December 2006 and April 2009, 2443 episodes of hyponatremia were included. Six process indicators that reflect the integrity of the system were evaluated monthly, looking for variation that would suggest systematic problems. The graphical representation of the process measures through control charts allowed us to identify and subsequently address problems with maintaining the registry. Conclusion In this project we have created a novel hyponatremia registry. To ensure the quality of the data in this registry we have implemented a quality control methodology based on industrial principles that allows us to monitor the performance of the registry over time through process indicators in order to detect systematic problems. We postulate that this approach could be reproduced for other registries. PMID:23616856

  20. Impact of hyponatremia on frequency of complications in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ashraf Abd El-Khalik; Metwaly, Amna Ahmed; Nasr, Fatma Mohammad; El-Ghannam, Maged; El-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyponatremia is common in cirrhosis. The relationship between hyponatremia and severity of cirrhosis is evidenced by its close association with the occurrence of complications, the prevalence of hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, refectory ascites, and hepatic hydrothorax. The aim of this study was assess the impact of hyponatremia on the occurrence of both liver-related complications and the hemodynamic cardiovascular dysfunction. Methods This prospective study was conducted in 2015 on 74 patients with liver cirrhosis. The patients were from the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Theodor Bilharz Research Institute in Giza, Egypt. The patients were divided into three groups according to their serum level of sodium. Group 1 included 30 patients with serum sodium >135 meq/L, group 2 included 24 patients with serum sodium between135 and 125 meq/L, and group 3 included 20 patients with serum sodium <125 meq/L. For each of the patients, we conducted aclinical examination, laboratory investigations, chest X-ray, ECG, abdominal sonar, and echocardiography. Results Hyponatremia was found in 59.46% of our cirrhotic patients, and they showed significantly increased Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, MELD-Na score, QTc interval, Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and inferior vena cava (IVC) collapsibility, and decreased SVR and IVC diameter. Also hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, renal failure, infectious complications, and pleural effusion were significantly more common in hyponatremic cirrhotic patients. Conclusion In cirrhosis, hyponatremia is more common in severe cardiovascular dysfunction and associated with increased risk of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, illness severity scores, renal failure, infectious complications, and pleural effusion. We recommend selective oral administration of vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, tolvaptan, which acts to increase the excretion of free water

  1. Cisplatin-induced hyponatremia in malignancy: comparison between brand-name and generic formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Yamane, Hiromichi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Fujii, Hiromi; Isozaki, Hideko; Honda, Yoshihiro; Yamagishi, Tomoko; Kubo, Toshio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Widespread use of generic drugs is considered to be indispensable if reductions in total health care costs are to be achieved, but the market share of such drugs remains low. In general, generic drugs have the same active ingredients as brand-name drugs, but this is not always the case. Thus, toxicity profiles may vary when brand-name and generic drugs are compared. We retrospectively investigated the incidence of hyponatremia in patients receiving brand-name cisplatin (CDDP) and a generic counterpart thereof. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients treated with brand-name CDDP (n=53) and a generic formulation (n=26), and compared the incidences of hyponatremia and renal toxicity. Toxicities were graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Differences between groups were evaluated using the Student’s t-test, and the odds ratio for hyponatremia was estimated via logistic regression analysis. Results Serum creatinine levels after chemotherapy increased significantly in both the brand-name and generic CDDP groups; no significant difference was evident between the two groups. Hyponatremia of grade 3 or above developed in 30.7% of the generic CDDP group compared to 15.1% of the brand-name CDDP group (P=0.011). Multivariate analysis showed that the use of generic CDDP increased the incidence of hyponatremia (odds ratio =5.661, 95% confidence interval =1.403–22.839; P=0.015). Conclusion Oncologists should be aware that use of a generic CDDP might be associated with more hyponatremia than would use of brand-name CDDP. PMID:25584019

  2. [Essential and symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R; Corredera, E; Aldrey, J M; Suárez, C; Castillo, J; Noya, M

    1994-05-01

    We present the principal differential characteristics of neuralgia of symptomatic and idiopathic trigeminus. Out of 39 consecutive patients with neuralgia of trigeminus evaluated clinically and with neuroimage study, we find recognizable pathology in 10 (3 arterio-venous malformations, 1 dolichoestasia of basilar artery, 3 tumors, 3 multiple sclerosis). Symptomatic neuralgia occurs in patients with lower average age and is accompanied by atypical symptoms or abnormal neurological signs and is no different from idiopathy as a response to pain from medical treatment. Painful affectation of the trigeminus requires the realization of complementary explorations aiming to dismiss associated neurological pathology. PMID:8059031

  3. Severe Hyponatremia and Immune Nephritis Following an Initial Infusion of Nivolumab.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jeremy W; Singer, Zachary; Harshberger, Cara

    2016-08-01

    Anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibodies pembrolizumab and nivolumab are becoming increasingly important in the treatment of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. These agents are known to induce many immune-related adverse events, but rapid-onset nephritis and immune-related hyponatremia have not been described to date. We describe the case of an adult patient who developed severe hyponatremia and rapid-onset nephritis following the first infusion of nivolumab for metastatic melanoma. PMID:26940583

  4. Prognostic significance of hyponatremia among ambulatory patients with heart failure and preserved and reduced ejection fractions.

    PubMed

    Bavishi, Chirag; Ather, Sameer; Bambhroliya, Arvind; Jneid, Hani; Virani, Salim S; Bozkurt, Biykem; Deswal, Anita

    2014-06-01

    Hyponatremia in heart failure (HF) is an established predictor of adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF). However, there is a paucity of data in ambulatory patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We examined the prevalence, risk factors, and long-term outcomes of hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤135 mEq/L) in ambulatory HFpEF and HF with reduced EF (HFrEF) in a national cohort of 8,862 veterans treated in Veterans Affairs clinics. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with hyponatremia, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used for analysis of outcomes. The cohort consisted of 6,185 patients with HFrEF and 2,704 patients with HFpEF with a 2-year follow-up. Hyponatremia was present in 13.8% and 12.9% patients in HFrEF and HFpEF, respectively. Hyponatremia was independently associated with younger age, diabetes, lower systolic blood pressure, anemia, body mass index <30 kg/m(2), and spironolactone use, whereas African-American race and statins were inversely associated. In multivariate analysis, hyponatremia remained a significant predictor of all-cause mortality in both HFrEF (hazards ratio [HR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11 to 1.44, p <0.001) and HFpEF (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.75, p = 0.004) and a significant predictor of all-cause hospitalization in patients with HFrEF (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.31, p = 0.001) but not in HFpEF (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.27, p = 0.33). In conclusion, hyponatremia is prevalent at a similar frequency of over 10% in ambulatory patients with HFpEF and HFrEF. Hyponatremia is an independent prognostic marker of mortality across the spectrum of patients with HFpEF and HFrEF. In contrast, it is an independent predictor for hospitalization in patients with HFrEF but not in patients with HFpEF. PMID:24837261

  5. Current treatment practice and outcomes. Report of the hyponatremia registry.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Arthur; Verbalis, Joseph G; Amin, Alpesh N; Burst, Volker R; Chiodo, Joseph A; Chiong, Jun R; Dasta, Joseph F; Friend, Keith E; Hauptman, Paul J; Peri, Alessandro; Sigal, Samuel H

    2015-07-01

    Current management practices for hyponatremia (HN) are incompletely understood. The HN Registry has recorded diagnostic measures, utilization, efficacy, and outcomes of therapy for eu- or hypervolemic HN. To better understand current practices, we analyzed data from 3087 adjudicated adult patients in the registry with serum sodium concentration of 130 mEq/l or less from 225 sites in the United States and European Union. Common initial monotherapy treatments were fluid restriction (35%), administration of isotonic (15%) or hypertonic saline (2%), and tolvaptan (5%); 17% received no active agent. Median (interquartile range) mEq/l serum sodium increases during the first day were as follows: no treatment, 1.0 (0.0-4.0); fluid restriction, 2.0 (0.0-4.0); isotonic saline, 3.0 (0.0-5.0); hypertonic saline, 5.0 (1.0-9.0); and tolvaptan, 4.0 (2.0-9.0). Adjusting for initial serum sodium concentration with logistic regression, the relative likelihoods for correction by 5 mEq/l or more (referent, fluid restriction) were 1.60 for hypertonic saline and 2.55 for tolvaptan. At discharge, serum sodium concentration was under 135 mEq/l in 78% of patients and 130 mEq/l or less in 49%. Overly rapid correction occurred in 7.9%. Thus, initial HN treatment often uses maneuvers of limited efficacy. Despite an association with poor outcomes and availability of effective therapy, most patients with HN are discharged from hospital still hyponatremic. Studies to assess short- and long-term benefits of correction of HN with effective therapies are needed. PMID:25671764

  6. Recurrent acute kidney injury associated with metastatic bronchial carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn; Bertoli, Luigi F

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare complication of carcinoid syndrome. A 61-year-old man developed carcinoid syndrome 51 months after pneumonectomy for bronchial carcinoid, and 8 episodes of AKI 101 to 118 months after pneumonectomy. Serum chromogranin A and urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were elevated for more than 1 year before AKI occurred. Each episode was characterized by flushing, facial edema, mild diarrhea, necrosis of hepatic metastatic nodules, mild oliguria, hyponatremia, acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hyperphosphatemia. He did not have elevated urine sodium levels or osmolality, hypotension or hypertension. Plasma levels of dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, measured during a single episode, were markedly elevated. Serum creatinine levels returned to normal after most episodes. Hyponatremia persisted but was more severe during AKI. Elevated plasma levels of vasoactive substances other than 5-hydroxytryptamine, perhaps dopamine or other catecholamines, could explain recurrent AKI. The natriuretic effect of elevated plasma dopamine levels could explain chronic hyponatremia. PMID:22008780

  7. Impact of hyponatremia on mortality and morbidity in patients with COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Chalela, Roberto; González-García, José Gregorio; Chillarón, Juan José; Valera-Hernández, Leticia; Montoya-Rangel, Carlos; Badenes, Diana; Mojal, Sergi; Gea, Joaquim

    2016-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients, being associated with increased morbidity and mortality in different clinical conditions. However, the prevalence and impact of this electrolytic disorder in patients hospitalized for an exacerbation of COPD still remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to clarify these points. A total of 424 patients hospitalized due to a COPD exacerbation were consecutively included, showing a frequency of hyponatremia of 15.8% (hyposmolar in most cases). Even though patients with and without hyponatremia showed a similar age, comorbidities, lung function impairment, presence of previous exacerbations, hospitalizations, most of the comorbidities and the overall severity index (APACHE II), their clinical outcomes were worse. Indeed, their hospitalization length, mechanical ventilation requirements and deaths (both during admission and within the months following discharge) were higher than those of non-hyponatremic patients. A sodium threshold lower than 129.7 mEq/L exhibited the better discriminatory power for death prediction. We conclude that hyponatremia (especially if severe) is a predictive marker for a bad clinical course in COPD exacerbations and therefore, patients with this electrolyte abnormality should be carefully monitored. PMID:27492537

  8. Central and extrapontine myelinolysis in a patient in spite of a careful correction of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Leens, C; Mukendi, R; Forêt, F; Hacourt, A; Devuyst, O; Colin, I M

    2001-03-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old alcoholic female patient who was hospitalized for neurologic alterations along with a severe hyponatremia (plasma Na+: 97 mEq/l). She suffered from potomania and was given, a few days before admission, a thiazide diuretic for hypertension. A careful correction of plasma Na+ levels was initiated over a 48-hour period (rate of correction < 10 mEq/l/24h) in order to avoid brain demyelination. After a 2-day period of clinical improvement, her neurologic condition started to deteriorate. By the 5th day of admission, she became tetraplegic, presented pseudobulbar palsy, ataxia, strabism, extrapyramidal stiffness and clouding of consciousness. Scintigraphic and MRI investigations demonstrated pontine and extrapontine lesions associated with Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy. After correction of ionic disorders (hyponatremia, hypokaliemia) and vitamin B (thiamine) deficiency, the patient almost completely recovered without notable disabilities. This case illustrates that profound hyponatremia, in a paradigm of slow onset, can be compatible with life. It also demonstrates that demyelinating lesions, usually considered as a consequence of a too fast correction of hyponatremia, may occur despite the strict observance of recent guidelines. There is increasing evidence to suggest that pontine swelling and dysfunction may sometimes occur in alcoholic patients even in absence of disturbance in plasma Na+ levels. It is therefore of importance, while managing a hyponatremic alcoholic patient, to identify additional risk factors (hypokaliemia, hypophosphoremia, seizure-induced hypoxemia, malnutrition with vitamin B deficiency) for brain demyelination and to correct them appropriately. PMID:11316247

  9. Exogenous Vasopressin-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients With Vasodilatory Shock: Two Case Reports and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Miguel; Hu, Bee Bee; Vazquez, Joyce; Wintz, Ruth L; Varon, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Vasopressin has gained wide support as an adjunct vasopressor in patients with septic shock. This agent exerts its vasoconstriction effects through smooth muscle V1 receptors and also has antidiuretic activity via renal V2 receptors. This interaction with the renal V2 receptors results in the integration of aquaporin 2 channels in the apical membrane of the renal collecting duct leading to free water reabsorption. Thus, water intoxication with subsequent hyponatremia, although rare, is a potentially serious side effect of exogenous vasopressin administration. We present 2 patients who developed hyponatremia within hours of initiation of vasopressin infusion. Extensive diuresis followed its discontinuation with subsequent normalization of serum sodium. One of the patients required the use of hypertonic saline for more rapid normalization of serum sodium due to concerns for potential seizure activity. A review of the literature relevant to the incidence of vasopressin-induced hyponatremia is provided as well as discussion on additional factors relevant to septic shock that should be considered when determining the relative risk of hyponatremia in patients receiving vasopressin. PMID:24106070

  10. [Hyponatremia caused by SIADH following endoscopic third ventriculostomy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Shigeeda, Ryota; Endo, Hidenori; Fujimura, Miki; Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-04-01

    A 25-year-old man complained of disorientation and gait disturbance during the past 2 weeks. The patient had been treated for cerebellar astrocytoma by open surgery thrice, at ages 3, 5, and 11. Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was performed for postoperative hydrocephalus at the age of 11. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed enlargement of both lateral ventricles, ballooning of the third ventricle, and obstruction of the aqueduct of Sylvius. The patient was diagnosed with recurrent hydrocephalus due to shunt malfunction, and treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy(ETV)using a flexible endoscopic system. He was relieved of the symptoms immediately after surgery, and postoperative MRI showed reduced hydrocephalus. However, the symptoms reoccurred 6 days after surgery. Computed tomography did not show recurrence of hydrocephalus. Laboratory tests revealed hyponatremia(117mEq/L)and low serum osmolality(240mOsm/kg). The patient gained 2.4 kg over the preoperative body weight. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone(SIADH)was considered to be the cause of the hyponatremia, which was successfully treated with 3 days of fluid restriction. The patient was discharged 24 days after surgery. Hyponatremia is a relatively rare complication of ETV. When a patient shows recurrence of hydrocephalus-related symptoms during the early postoperative period after ETV, hyponatremia caused by SIADH should be considered. PMID:24698894

  11. Azotemia protects the brain from osmotic demyelination on rapid correction of hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Dhrolia, Murtaza F; Akhtar, Syed F; Ahmed, Ejaz; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adeeb

    2014-05-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a dreadful, irreversible and well-recognized clinical entity that classically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. However, it has been observed that when hyponatremia is rapidly corrected in azotemic patients by hemodialysis (HD), patients do not necessarily develop ODS. We studied the effect of inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD in patients with azotemia. Fifty-two azotemic patients, who underwent HD at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, having pre-HD serum sodium level <125 mEq/L and post-HD serum sodium levels that increased by ≥12 mEq/L from their pre-dialysis level, were studied. Serum sodium was analyzed before and within 24 h after a HD session. HD was performed using bicarbonate solution, with the sodium concentration being 140 meq/L. The duration of the dialysis session was based on the discretion of the treating nephrologist. Patients were examined for any neurological symptoms or signs before and after HD and for up to two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in required cases. None of the 52 patients with azotemia, despite inadvertent rapid correction of hyponatremia with HD, developed ODS. This study suggests that patients with azotemia do not develop ODS on rapid correction of hyponatremia by HD, which suggests a possible protective role of azotemia on the brain from osmotic demyelination. However, the mechanism by which azotemia protects the brain from demyelination in humans is largely hypothetical and further studies are needed to answer this question. PMID:24821152

  12. Fatal Toxicity from Symptomatic Hyperlactataemia

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Liza; Wilson, Douglas; Manini, Alex F.

    2016-01-01

    Background In many Sub-Saharan African countries, first-line therapy for HIV may include a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). Long-term NRTI use is associated with symptomatic hyperlactataemia due to inhibition of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ, a potentially fatal complication. Objective The purpose of the study was to evaluate the factors associated with inhospital fatality for HIV inpatients prescribed NRTIs long term who presented with symptomatic hyperlactataemia. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study at a 900-bed university hospital in South Africa over 4 years (2005–2008). We included HIV inpatients prescribed NRTIs long term who presented with symptomatic hyperlactataemia (long-term NRTI use; lactate >4.0 mmol/L; absence of infectious source; symptoms requiring admission). Data included demographics, medical history, NRTI duration, blood pressure, symptom duration and relevant laboratory data. Results Of 79 patients who met inclusion criteria (mean age 38.2 ± 10.5 years, 97% female) there were 46 fatalities (58%). Factors significantly associated with fatality were presence of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.04), lactate ≥10 mmol/L (p = 0.003), pH <7.2 (p = 0.002), creatinine ≥200 μmol/L (p = 0.03) and altered mental status (p = 0.03). Conclusions In this study, NRTI-related symptomatic hyperlactataemia occurred predominantly in females. Mortality was associated with severely elevated lactate (≥10 mmol/L), the degree of acidosis, elevated creatinine, history of diabetes and altered mental status on presentation. PMID:21488705

  13. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  14. Comparison of hyponatremia and SIADH frequency in patients with tick borne encephalitis and meningitis of other origin.

    PubMed

    Czupryna, Piotr; Moniuszko, Anna; Garkowski, Adam; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Aim The aim of the study was the evaluation of frequency and origin of hyponatremia in tick borne encephalitis (TBE) in comparison to non-TBE viral meningitis and bacterial meningitis. Methods A total of 124 patients aged 18-80 years, with TBE were included to the study. The mild form of TBE was diagnosed in 59 patients, while the severe form was diagnosed in 65 patients. The first control group (VMG) consisted of 72 patients with viral meningitis, but excluded TBE. The second control group (BMG) consisted of 16 patients diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Results Hyponatremia was diagnosed in 55 (44.4%) patients with TBE. In 12 (9.7%) patients (mean age 56.6 ± 19.9 years; 9 men, 3 women) syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) was diagnosed. In VMG hyponatremia was diagnosed in 7 (9.7%) patients. In the age group <35 years and in the age group of 50-64 years the frequency of hyponatremia and SIADH was higher in TBE than in VMG (p < 0.05). In BMG hyponatremia was diagnosed in 6 (37.5%) patients. No statistically significant differences in frequency of hyponatremia between BMG and TBE groups were observed. Conclusions (1) Hyponatremia is a common disorder in TBE and is more frequent than in other viral types of meningitis, especially in young patients (< 35 years). (2) The most common cause of hyponatremia in TBE patients is dehydration and fluid supplementation should be a treatment of choice. (3) Overall, 16.9% of the patients with the severe form of TBE develop SIADH syndrome and they required treatment based on fluid restriction and hypertonic saline infusion. PMID:26785285

  15. Hyponatremia and Fractures: Findings from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Sophie A; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Harrison, Stephanie Litwack; Bucur, Roxana C; Ensrud, Kristine; Orwoll, Eric S; Bauer, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia may be a risk factor for fracture. To determine the relationship between hyponatremia and fracture we conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses using data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS). The MrOS study enrolled 5122 community dwelling men aged ≥ 65 years from six centers across the United States. We excluded men taking bisphosphonates, those with unknown medication history, those without serum sodium measures, or those with out of range assays for serum sodium. Serum sodium was measured at study entry. Subjects were followed for fractures (nonspine (including hip), hip, and incident and prevalent morphometric) for up to 9 years. We used cox proportional hazards models to analyze the association between serum sodium levels (<135mmol/L versus ≥135mmol/L) and risk of nonspine and hip fractures, with results presented as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We examined the association between morphometric vertebral fractures and serum sodium using logistic regression models, presented as odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI. Hyponatremia was observed in 64 men (1.2% of the cohort). After adjusting for age, BMI, study center, and other covariates, we found that, compared to men with serum sodium ≥ 135mmol/L, those with serum sodium <135mmol/L, had an increased risk hip fracture (HR=3.04; 95% CI: 1.37 to 6.75), prevalent (OR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.22 to 4.95) and incident (OR=3.53; 95% CI: 1.35 to 9.19) morphometric spine fractures but not nonspine fractures (OR=1.44; 95% CI: 0.85 to 2.44). Adjusting for bone mineral density did not change our findings. Our data demonstrate that hyponatremia is associated with up to a doubling in the risk of hip and morphometric spine fractures, independent of BMD. Further studies, to determine how hyponatremia causes fractures and if correction of hyponatremia decreases fractures, are needed. PMID:25294595

  16. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  17. Symptomatic treatment of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Adam, Octavian R; Jankovic, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive heredoneurodegenerative disease manifested by chorea and other hyperkinetic (dystonia, myoclonus, tics) and hypokinetic (parkinsonism) movement disorders. In addition, a variety of psychiatric and behavioral symptoms, along with cognitive decline, contribute significantly to the patient's disability. Because there are no effective neuroprotective therapies that delay the progression of the disease, symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone of medical management. Several classes of medications have been used to ameliorate the various symptoms of HD, including typical and atypical neuroleptics, dopamine depleters, antidepressants, antiglutamatergic drugs, GABA agonists, antiepileptic medications, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and botulinum toxin. Recently, surgical approaches including pallidotomy, deep brain stimulation, and fetal cell transplants have been used for the symptomatic treatment of HD. The selected therapy must be customized to the needs of each patient, minimizing the potential adverse effects. The primary aim of this article is to review the role of the different therapies, both available and investigational, for the treatment of the motor, psychiatric, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms of HD, and to examine their impact on the patient's functionality and quality of life. PMID:18394562

  18. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in female than in male open-water ultra-endurance swimmers: the 'Marathon-Swim' in Lake Zurich.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sandra; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in 25 male and 11 female open-water ultra-endurance swimmers participating in the 'Marathon-Swim' in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, covering a distance of 26.4 km. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, urine specific gravity, plasma sodium concentration [Na(+)] and haematocrit were determined. Two males (8%) and four females (36%) developed EAH where one female was symptomatic with plasma sodium [Na(+)] of 127 mmol/L. Body mass and plasma [Na(+)] decreased (p < 0.05). The changes in body mass correlated in both male and female swimmers to post-race plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.67, p = 0.0002 and r = -0.80, p = 0.0034, respectively) and changes in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.68, p = 0.0002 and r = -0.79, p = 0.0039, respectively). Fluid intake was neither associated with changes in body mass, post-race plasma [Na(+)] or the change in plasma [Na(+)]. Sodium intake showed no association with either the changes in plasma [Na(+)] or post-race plasma [Na(+)]. We concluded that the prevalence of EAH was greater in female than in male open-water ultra-endurance swimmers. PMID:21748367

  19. Osmotic demyelination syndrome after correction of severe hyponatremia associated with pituitrin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan Hua; Yuan, Min; Wang, Jian Wen; Hu, Yun Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) may be precipitated by aggressive correction of a hypoosmolar state. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who developed ODS during rapid correction of asymptomatic hyponatremia caused by pituitrin prescribed for hemoptysis. After hyponatremia correction by NaCl supplementation, the patient developed limb weakness, blurred vision, hand and perioral numbness, and lisp. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral signal hyperintensity of the globus pallidus and caudate nucleus, compatible with extra-pontine ODS. These symptoms improved gradually with treatment, and brain MRI ~ 3 months later indicated substantial resolution of ODS. This case serves as a warning to physicians that hypoosmotic correction must be achieved at a controlled rate. PMID:25740269

  20. Hyponatremia after initiation and rechallenge with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole in an older adult

    PubMed Central

    Huntsberry, Ashley M; Linnebur, Sunny A; Vejar, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case report of a patient experiencing hyponatremia from trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP–SMX) upon initial use and subsequent rechallenge. Summary An 82-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status thought to be due to complicated cystitis and was treated with TMP–SMX 160 mg/800 mg orally twice daily for 7 days. Her basic metabolic panel prior to initiation of TMP–SMX was within normal limits, with the exception of her serum sodium of 132 mmol/L (range 133–145 mmol/L). The day after completing her 7-day course of TMP–SMX therapy the patient was evaluated by her primary care provider and another basic metabolic panel revealed a reduction in the serum sodium to 121 mmol/L. The patient’s serum sodium concentrations increased to baseline 7 days after completion of the TMP–SMX therapy, and remained normal until she was treated in the emergency department several months later for another presumed urinary tract infection. She was again started on TMP–SMX therapy empirically, and within several days her serum sodium concentrations decreased from 138 mmol/L to a low of 129 mmol/L. The TMP–SMX therapy was discontinued upon negative urine culture results and her serum sodium increased to 134 mmol/L upon discharge. Based upon the Naranjo probability scale score of 9, TMP–SMX was the probable cause of the patient’s hyponatremia. Conclusion Our patient developed hyponatremia from TMP–SMX therapy upon initial use and rechallenge. Although hyponatremia appears to be rare with TMP–SMX therapy, providers should be aware of this potentially life-threatening adverse event. PMID:26170649

  1. Exercise-associated hyponatremia in marathon runners: a two-year experience.

    PubMed

    Davis, D P; Videen, J S; Marino, A; Vilke, G M; Dunford, J V; Van Camp, S P; Maharam, L G

    2001-07-01

    This study was conducted to better define the pathophysiology, risk factors, and therapeutic approach to exercise-associated hyponatremia. Medical records from all participants in the 1998 Suzuki Rock 'N' Roll Marathon who presented to 14 Emergency Departments (EDs) were retrospectively reviewed to identify risk factors for the development of hyponatremia. Hyponatremic patients were compared to other runners with regard to race time and to other marathon participants seen in the ED with regard to gender, clinical signs of dehydration, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). An original treatment algorithm incorporating the early use of hypertonic saline (HTS) was evaluated prospectively in our own ED for participants in the 1999 marathon to evaluate improvements in sodium correction rate and incidence of complications. A total of 26 patients from the 1998 and 1999 marathons were hyponatremic [serum sodium (SNa) < or =135 mEq/L] including 15 with severe hyponatremia (SNa < or = 125 mEq/L). Three developed seizures and required intubation and admission to an intensive care unit. Hyponatremic patients were more likely to be female, use NSAIDS, and have slower finishing times. Hyponatremic runners reported drinking "as much as possible" during and after the race and were less likely to have clinical signs of dehydration. An inverse relationship between initial SNa and time of presentation was observed, with late presentation predicting lower SNa values. The use of HTS in selected 1999 patients resulted in faster SNa correction times and fewer complications than observed for 1998 patients. It is concluded that the development of exercise-associated hyponatremia is associated with excessive fluid consumption during and after extreme athletic events. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and NSAID use. The use of HTS in selected patients seems to be safe and efficacious. PMID:11399389

  2. Inflammasome activation by cell volume regulation and inflammation-associated hyponatremia: A vicious cycle.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Park, J H; Eisenhut, M; Yu, J W; Shin, J I

    2016-08-01

    Inflammasomes are caspase-1-activating molecular platforms that produce active interleukin (IL)-1β and are implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) diseases. These multi-protein complexes can be activated by exposure of cells to low osmolality. The inflammasome nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) is hereby the main sensor of cellular osmolality. IL-1β was found to stimulate the secretion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) from the posterior pituitary gland either by action of prostaglandins or indirectly by causing the release of IL-6. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the hyponatremia caused by a wide range of CNS diseases is able to induce significant cell swelling with induction of a hyposmotic intracellular environment, which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, causing the release of IL-1β and induced by IL-1β, IL-6, which increases the production of ADH that leads to more profound hyponatremia. Supportive evidence for this hypothesis is the finding that IL-1 injection can induce ADH release and hyposmotic effect of ADH induced hyponatremia can, via the mechanical effect of cell swelling, activate transient receptor potential channels, which via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 activate NLRP3. Implications of this hypothesis, if confirmed, would include that hyponatremia can be exacerbated through this vicious cycle but also that the inflammasomes are key mediators of this process. Confirmation of this hypothesis would have implications for prevention and clinical management of changes in patients sodium levels related to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) with interventions targeting inflammatory mediator production and function of inflammasomes with the potential of prevention of permanent brain damage in a wide range of CNS diseases. PMID:27372869

  3. Clinical utility of tolvaptan in the management of hyponatremia in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Nodari, Savina; Jao, Geoffrey T; Chiong, Jun R

    2010-01-01

    Hyponatremia is an electrolyte disorder frequently observed in several clinical settings and common in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure (HF). It is caused by deregulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) homeostasis associated with water retention in hypervolemic or in euvolemic states. While hypervolemic hypotonic hyponatremia is also seen in advanced liver cirrhosis, renal failure, and nephrotic syndrome, the bulk of evidence associating this electrolyte disorder to increasing morbidity and mortality can be found in the HF literature. Hospitalized HF patients with low serum sodium concentration have lower short-term and long-term survival, longer hospital stay and increased readmission rates. Conventional therapeutic approaches, ie, restriction of fluid intake, saline and diuretics, can be effective, but often the results are unpredictable. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of nonpeptide AVP receptor antagonists (vaptans) in the treatment of hyponatremia. The vaptans induce aquaresis, an electrolyte-sparing excretion of free water resulting in the correction of serum sodium concentrations and plasma osmolality, without activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) or changes in renal function and blood pressure. Further prospective studies in a selected congestive HF population with hyponatremia, using clinical-status titrated dose of tolvaptan, are needed to determine whether serum sodium normalization will be translated into a better long-term prognosis. This review will focus on recent clinical trials with tolvaptan, an oral V2 receptor antagonist, in HF patients. The ability of tolvaptan to safely increase serum sodium concentration without activating the RAAS or compromising renal function and electrolyte balance makes it an attractive agent for treating hyponatremic HF patients. PMID:21694929

  4. [Hyponatremia as a risk factor of death in patients with community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Barcia, Ricardo E; Castiglia, Nora I; Villaverde, Marcelo E; Lanosa, Gustavo A; Ujeda Mantello, Carlos J; Aguirre, Marina; Borello, Gustavo J; Caisson, Alejandro M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether hyponatremia is a risk factor of death in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and estimated the relative risk of death by CAP of other risk factors. The design was prospective multicentre cohort study. In 5 centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we studied adults hospitalized with CAP between March 21, 2000 and December 21, 2000. Using stepwise logistic regression, we analyzed risk factors that showed a univariate association with mortality; alpha significance level was 0.05. During a 9-month period, 238 patients were admitted with CAP: 150 (63%) male and 88 (36%) female, mean age 52.99 (+/-20.35) and 55.06 (+/-20.94), respectively. Mortality was 10.5% (25/238). By multivariate analysis, the following variables were statistically associated with evolution: cerebrovascular disease (CD) (B: 2.614, p < 0.001, RRE: 13.6, IC 95%: 3.7-49.6); hyponatremia at admission or during hospitalization (B: 1.994, p<0.001, RRE: 7.3, IC 95%: 2.5-20.8); and elevated blood urea (B: 0.016, p= 0.003, RRE: 1.016, IC 95%: 1.005-1.02). We developed a formula to predict mortality by CAP: P (death) = 1/1 + exp - (-4.03 + 2.61 x l + 1.99 x 2 + 0.016x3), where: x1=CD (yes = 1/ no=0); x2= hyponatremia (yes = 1/ no=0); x3 = blood urea (mg/dl). The predictability was 91.1%. The mortality risk by CAP was statistically higher in patients with CD, hyponatremia and elevated blood urea. PMID:17240620

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  6. Absence status associated with focal activity and polydipsia-induced hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Hideki; Akechi, Tatsuo; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of de novo absence status associated with focal discharge and polydipsia-induced hyponatremia. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is classified as absence status or complex partial status. Absence status is characterized by bilateral synchronized spike and wave complex bursts and a variety of conscious disturbances. Possible precipitating factors for NCSE include benzodiazepine withdrawal, excessive use of psychotropic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances. Hyponatremia is a rare precipitating factor. In this case, the patient was 59 years old and had suffered from primary insomnia but had no history of epilepsy. NCSE improved by means of saline infusion. However after recovery from NCSE EEG revealed some spikes in the left frontal area. Absence seizures can also show generalized spike and slow waves, and cases of focal lesion-associated absence seizures have been reported. Although absence seizures and absence status are two distinct conditions, they should not be considered together. We assumed that hyponatremia induced by polydipsia precipitated epileptogenicity in the left frontal area, and then focal activity secondarily generalized and resulted in absence status. PMID:18728738

  7. Pipazethate--acute childhood poisoning.

    PubMed

    da Silva, O A; Lopez, M

    1977-01-01

    A previously healthy child who who had accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of 20-mg tablets of pipazethate developed severe acute poisoning with neurologic, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. She recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy. PMID:589958

  8. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  9. Does uremia protect against the demyelination associated with correction of hyponatremia during hemodialysis? A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oo, Than Naing; Smith, Charles L; Swan, Suzanne K

    2003-01-01

    Rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia is known to cause demyelination syndromes, which are attributed to the rapid shift of water out of the brain. In uremic patients with hyponatremia, depending on the dialysate sodium concentration and delivered Kt/V, serum sodium levels may be rapidly corrected inadvertently during the hemodialysis (HD) session. It is not known whether uremic patients are as susceptible to the development of demyelination as patients with normal renal function. Since urea diffuses slowly across the blood-brain barrier, it can act as an effective osmole between plasma and the brain if levels are changed abruptly. During HD, blood urea levels drop suddenly and significantly and cerebral edema may develop (dialysis disequilibrium syndrome). This effect may counteract the fluid shift out of the brain during correction of hyponatremia. Therefore, theoretically, uremic patients may be less prone to develop demyelination. We present a patient with renal failure whose hyponatremia was corrected rapidly during HD to illustrate the potential problem. The patient tolerated rapid correction of hyponatremia without sustaining any neurologic damage. We performed a literature search looking for similar case reports and reviewed the scientific evidence behind the above hypothesis. PMID:12535304

  10. Who experiences endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease?

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sun-Hyung; Cho, Sungsin; Han, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. But, some patients suffer from retained common bile duct stones after LC. The aim of this study is to analyze the predicting factors associated with subsequent postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) after LC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of every LC performed between July 2006 and September 2012. We classify 28 patients who underwent ERCP within 6 months after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease as the ERCP group and 56 patients who underwent LC for symptomatic gallstone disease during same period paired by sex, age, underlying disease, operation history, and body mass index as the control group. To identify risk factor performing postoperative ERCP after LC, we compared admission route, preoperative biochemical liver function test, number of gall stones, gallstone size, adhesion around GB, wall thickening of GB, and existence of acute cholecystitis between the 2 groups. Results Admission route, preoperative AST, ALT, and ALP, stone size, longer operation time, and acute cholecystitis were identified as risk factors of postoperative ERCP in univariate analyses. But, longer operation time (P = 0.004) and acute cholecystitis (P = 0.048) were identified as independent risk factors of postoperative ERCP in multivariate analyses. Conclusion The patient who underwent ERCP after LC for symptomatic gallstone disease are more likely experienced longer operation time and acute cholecystitis than the patient who did not undergo ERCP after LC. PMID:27274506

  11. [What helps in back pain? Guideline for symptomatic therapy].

    PubMed

    Pongratz, D; Späth, M

    2001-05-01

    Both in acute and chronic, unspecific back pain, the myofascial pain syndrome resulting in muscular dysbalance is a major factor. For the differential diagnosis, however, consideration must always be given to concomitant symptoms (neurological deficits, general symptoms, signs of osteopathy). Pathophysiologically, the active trigger point corresponds to a contraction in the muscle fibers that forms in the region of the a neuromuscular endplate, and leads, via biochemical processes, to the stimulation of mesochymal nociceptors. Symptomatic treatment of acute and chronic back pain may be broken down into a) physical measures, b) local therapeutic regimens, c) systemic pharmacotherapy. As medication, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics, opioid analgesics, muscle relaxants and antidepressives are available, and are dose-matched to the severity and stage of the condition. The spectrum of therapeutic options is outlined. PMID:11387701

  12. Copeptin as a biomarker and a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with polyuria-polydipsia and hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Christ-Crain, M; Morgenthaler, N G; Fenske, W

    2016-03-01

    Copeptin is part of the 164 amino acid precursor protein preprovasopressin together with vasopressin and neurophysin II. During precursor processing, copeptin is released together with vasopressin. Copeptin concentrations respond as rapidly as vasopressin to changes in osmolality, a decrease in blood pressure or stress and there is a close correlation of vasopressin and copeptin concentrations. For these reasons, copeptin is propagated as a surrogate marker for vasopressin in the differential diagnosis of the polyuria-polydipsia syndromes and hyponatremia. Results of prospective studies show that a baseline copeptin level without prior fluid deprivation >20 pmol/L is able to identify patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, whereas osmotically stimulated copeptin levels differentiate between patients with partial central diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia with a high sensitivity and specificity >94%. In hyponatremia, low copeptin levels point to primary polydipsia and high levels to hypovolemic hyponatremia. The copeptin to urinary sodium ratio differentiates accurately between volume-depleted and normovolemic disorders. PMID:27156761

  13. The need for salt: does a relationship exist between cystic fibrosis and exercise-associated hyponatremia?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Douglas P; Hoffman, Martin D; Stuempfle, Kristin J; Owen, Bethan E; Rogers, Ian R; Verbalis, Joseph G; Hew-Butler, Tamara D

    2014-03-01

    Salt replacement is often recommended to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) despite a lack of evidence to support such practice. Exercise-associated hyponatremia is known to be a complex process resulting from the interplay of hydration, arginine vasopressin, and sodium balance. Although evidence suggests overhydration is the dominant pathophysiologic factor in most cases, the contributions of sweat sodium losses remain unclear. A theoretical genetic mechanism producing exuberant sweat sodium loss in athletes is the presence of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene. Individuals with CF develop hypovolemic hyponatremia by sodium loss via sweat through a defective chloride ion transport channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Elevated sweat sodium concentrations in CF single heterozygotes suggest that athletes developing EAH may be CFTR carriers. We targeted the 2010 and 2011 Western States Endurance Run ultramarathon, an event where athletes with EAH regularly present in a hypovolemic state, for a cohort maximizing the potential to document such a relationship. A total of 798 runners started the 2010 (n = 423) and 2011 (n = 375) races. Of the 638 finishers, 373 were screened for EAH by blood draw, 60 (16%) were found to have EAH, and 31 (alpha = 0.05 for n = 9) reported their CF result from a saliva-based genetic testing kit. Neither the 31 EAH-positive athletes nor the 25 EAH-negative comparison cohort athletes tested positive for a CF mutation. This null relationship suggests that CFTR mutations are not associated with the development of EAH and that salt supplementation is unnecessary for such a reason. PMID:23897018

  14. A Case Report of Late Onset Mania Caused by Hyponatremia in a Patient With Empty Sella Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Hao; Lin, Yu-Chen; Chou, Po-Han; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Chan, Chin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent manic-like episodes can be induced by hyponatremia possibly due to empty sella syndrome. In the present case, the patient was proven to have syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion with manic symptoms that resolved after the normalization of the plasma sodium level. To our knowledge, this is the first case of hyponatremia-induced manic symptoms in a patient with empty sella syndrome. More attention should be paid to late-onset mania, because it may be the sign of a more serious medical problem. PMID:26871784

  15. The Nature of Iron Deposits Differs between Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. The abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin. PMID:26606178

  16. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophagesmore » with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.« less

  17. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.

  18. [Tarlov cyst and symptomatic bladder disfuction].

    PubMed

    Ruibal Moldes, M; Sánchez Rodríguez-Losada, J; López García, D; Casas Agudo, V; Janeiro País, J M; González Martín, M

    2008-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or perineural cyst are lesions of the nerve roots located at the sacral level and uncertain aetiology. Most of these cysts remain asymptomatic with no clinical relevance. The symptomatic cysts are uncommon and the usual symptoms are pain or radiculopathy. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman witha symptomatic cyst (with a history of frequency and urgency syndrom), that disappears after surgery. PMID:19143297

  19. Severe Hyponatremia Associated with Use of Black Cohosh during Prolonged Labor and Unsuccessful Home Birth

    PubMed Central

    Blitz, Matthew J.; Smith-Levitin, Michelle; Rochelson, Burton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There has been an increase in the use of herbal supplements during pregnancy, which are frequently of unproven efficacy and safety. We present a case of severe hyponatremia and altered mental status associated with the use of black cohosh during prolonged labor. Case A 39-year-old primigravida at 385/7 weeks of gestational age presented to the emergency department after she became disoriented and lethargic while laboring at home with a midwife. She had consumed several doses of black cohosh to induce and augment labor. On presentation, she was nonverbal and unable to follow commands. Her serum sodium was 114 mmol/L (range, 132–145 mmol/L), serum osmolality was 253 mOsm/kg (range, 275–300 mOsm/kg), urine osmolality was 190 mOsm/kg (range, 300–900 mOsm/kg), and urine sodium was <10 mmol/L. The patient soon became uncooperative and combative and a cesarean section was performed. Postoperatively, she was transferred to the intensive care unit for monitoring and correction of her sodium. Her mental status returned to baseline and she was subsequently discharged home without further complication. Discussion Clinically significant hyponatremia associated with pregnancy is rare. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of black cohosh and other commonly used herbal supplements during pregnancy and labor. PMID:26989565

  20. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  1. Severe Hyponatremia Associated with Use of Black Cohosh during Prolonged Labor and Unsuccessful Home Birth.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Matthew J; Smith-Levitin, Michelle; Rochelson, Burton

    2016-03-01

    Introduction There has been an increase in the use of herbal supplements during pregnancy, which are frequently of unproven efficacy and safety. We present a case of severe hyponatremia and altered mental status associated with the use of black cohosh during prolonged labor. Case A 39-year-old primigravida at 38(5/7) weeks of gestational age presented to the emergency department after she became disoriented and lethargic while laboring at home with a midwife. She had consumed several doses of black cohosh to induce and augment labor. On presentation, she was nonverbal and unable to follow commands. Her serum sodium was 114 mmol/L (range, 132-145 mmol/L), serum osmolality was 253 mOsm/kg (range, 275-300 mOsm/kg), urine osmolality was 190 mOsm/kg (range, 300-900 mOsm/kg), and urine sodium was <10 mmol/L. The patient soon became uncooperative and combative and a cesarean section was performed. Postoperatively, she was transferred to the intensive care unit for monitoring and correction of her sodium. Her mental status returned to baseline and she was subsequently discharged home without further complication. Discussion Clinically significant hyponatremia associated with pregnancy is rare. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of black cohosh and other commonly used herbal supplements during pregnancy and labor. PMID:26989565

  2. Pathophysiology and management of hepatic encephalopathy 2014 update: Ammonia toxicity and hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Motoh; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    Hyperammonemia is a major factor involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Ammonia elicits astrocyte swelling and causes brain edema. In addition, hyponatremia, a condition frequently observed in hepatic cirrhosis, also exacerbates brain edema, potentially becoming a factor that exacerbates HE. Therefore, as a treatment strategy for HE, alleviating ammonia toxicity is essential. In addition to restricting protein intake, synthetic disaccharides such as lactulose and lactitol, probiotics that improve gut flora, and rifaximin, an antibiotic with poor bioavailability, are also administrated. Additionally, branched-chain amino acids and carnitine have also been administrated. Moreover, we investigated the current trend in the concomitant use of drugs with different mechanisms of action. In Japan, the V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan can be administrated to hepatic cirrhosis patients with fluid retention. This drug is also useful as a countermeasure for hyponatremia in hepatic cirrhosis, and elucidating its effects in HE patients may therefore become an agenda in the future. These observations indicate that ammonia toxicity, gut flora control and low sodium control are major focuses in HE improvement and long-term prognosis. PMID:25604571

  3. Physiopathological, Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Urso, Caterina; Brucculeri, Salvatore; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is dilutional hyponatremia, a variant of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), characterized by a plasma concentration of sodium lower than 135 mEq/L. The prevalence of EAH is common in endurance (<6 hours) and ultra-endurance events (>6 hours in duration), in which both athletes and medical providers need to be aware of risk factors, symptom presentation, and management. The development of EAH is a combination of excessive water intake, inadequate suppression of the secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (due to non osmotic stimuli), long race duration, and very high or very low ambient temperatures. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Signs and symptoms of EAH include nausea, vomiting, confusion, headache and seizures; it may result in severe clinical conditions associated with pulmonary and cerebral edema, respiratory failure and death. A rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment with a hypertonic saline solution is essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. PMID:26237602

  4. Physiopathological, Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Urso, Caterina; Brucculeri, Salvatore; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is dilutional hyponatremia, a variant of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), characterized by a plasma concentration of sodium lower than 135 mEq/L. The prevalence of EAH is common in endurance (<6 hours) and ultra-endurance events (>6 hours in duration), in which both athletes and medical providers need to be aware of risk factors, symptom presentation, and management. The development of EAH is a combination of excessive water intake, inadequate suppression of the secretion of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) (due to non osmotic stimuli), long race duration, and very high or very low ambient temperatures. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Signs and symptoms of EAH include nausea, vomiting, confusion, headache and seizures; it may result in severe clinical conditions associated with pulmonary and cerebral edema, respiratory failure and death. A rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment with a hypertonic saline solution is essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. PMID:26237602

  5. [A case of severe hyponatremia in a patient suffering from epilepsy and using oxcarbazepine].

    PubMed

    Gumbrevicius, Gintautas; Sveikata, Audrius

    2006-01-01

    A 70-year-old patient treated with oxcarbazepine experienced severe hyponatremia. The patient used oxcarbazepine (600 mg twice a day) concomitantly with diuretics (torasemide 10 mg and indapamide 1.25 mg once per day), perindopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and amlodipine, a Ca(2+) channel blocker. The patient complained of a nausea, malaise, diplopia, drowsiness, apathy, decreased diuresis (creatinine clearance - 41.51 ml/min), and exacerbation of epileptic seizures. Sodium concentration in the plasma was 113 mmol/l. The patient was hospitalized. It was suggested that a decrease in plasma sodium concentration was caused by oxcarbazepine used together with diuretics for six months. Oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia is reported in 22.2-50% of patients, although symptoms are present only in 5.9% of patients. The most common symptoms of central nervous system injury, experienced by patients, are drowsiness, dizziness, decreased cognitive function, coordination impairment, etc. Physicians not always in time pay proper attention to undesirable antiepileptic drug-induced effects, which can be dangerous. PMID:16963831

  6. Analysis of Risk Factors for Hyponatremia During or Following Chemotherapy in Children With Cancer: A Hospital-based, Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Kenji; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Sano, Hirozumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Yasuda, Kazue; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for hyponatremia during chemotherapy in children. A total of 111 consecutive pediatric patients (age, 0 to 18 y) with hematological malignancy (n=87) or solid tumor (n=24) who received chemotherapy in our hospital between 2010 and 2014 were enrolled. The number of chemotherapy cycles reviewed was 472, with a median of 3 (range, 1 to 8) per patient. Hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium level of <135 mmol/L. Hyponatremia was observed in 80 of 111 (72%) patients, and 138 of 472 (29%) cycles. Neurological sequelae were seen in 2 of 111 (2%) patients, and 2 of 472 (0.4%) cycles. Multivariate logistic regression identified age 10 to 18 years (odds ratio [OR]=3.24, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07-5.07), total parenteral nutrition (OR=8.15, 95% CI, 2.17-30.5), first or second chemotherapy cycle (OR=1.74, 95% CI, 1.12-2.70) as independent risk factors for hyponatremia. Clinical conditions of patients and chemotherapeutic agents may have a profound impact on the development of hyponatremia. Patients with these factors should be managed carefully to prevent severe symptoms and sequelae caused by hyponatremia. PMID:26583616

  7. High plasma exposure to pemetrexed leads to severe hyponatremia in patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gota, Vikram; Kavathiya, Krunal; Doshi, Kartik; Gurjar, Murari; Damodaran, Solai E; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Pemetrexed-platinum doublet therapy is a standard treatment for stage IIIb/IV nonsquamous non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While the regimen is associated with several grade ≥3 toxicities, hyponatremia is not a commonly reported adverse effect. Here we report an unusually high incidence of grade ≥3 hyponatremia in Indian patients receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet, and the pharmacological basis for this phenomenon. Methods Forty-six patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled for a bioequivalence study of two pemetrexed formulations. All patients received the pemetrexed-platinum doublet for six cycles followed by single-agent pemetrexed maintenance until progression. Pharmacokinetic blood samples were collected at predefined time points during the first cycle and the concentration-time profile of pemetrexed was investigated by noncompartmental analysis. Hyponatremic episodes were investigated with serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urinary sodium, and urine osmolality. Results Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) had at least one episode of grade ≥3 hyponatremia. Twenty-four episodes of grade ≥3 hyponatremia were observed in 200 cycles of doublet chemotherapy. Plasma exposure to pemetrexed was significantly higher in patients with high-grade hyponatremia than in those with low-grade or no hyponatremia (P=0.063 and P=0.001, respectively). Pemetrexed clearance in high-grade hyponatremia was quite low compared with normal and low-grade hyponatremia (P=0.001 and P=0.055, respectively). Median pemetrexed exposure in this cohort was much higher than that reported in the literature from Western studies. Conclusion Higher exposure to pemetrexed is associated with grade ≥3 hyponatremia. The pharmacogenetic basis for higher exposure to pemetrexed in Indian patients needs further investigation. PMID:24940080

  8. [Oxytocin and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic neonatal hormone. Case report of early severe hyponatremia and literature review].

    PubMed

    Aldana-Valenzuela, Carlos; Prieto-Pantoja, José Alfredo; Hernández-Acevedo, Angélica

    2010-12-01

    This is a clinical case presentation of a full term newborn infant who suffered severe hyponatremia and early seizures, associated with maternal fluid overload with electrolyte free solutions and high doses of oxytocin for labor augmentation. Although this condition has been recognized since the 1960's with isolated reports, this particular case has features that needs further investigation, not only for the unsually severe hyponatremia, but most importantly we think, for the prominent signs of fluid retention, the infant had, that suggest excessive antidiuretic activity probably due to oxytocin. These findings are consistent with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Although until now there is no proof that oxytocin by itself produces this syndrome. We think the association is possible in certain clinical circumstances, such as those found in this case. We also, briefly discussed the pathophysiology of perinatal hyponatremia, the neonatal treatment of this condition and the current guidelines for the women in labor. Hyponatremia should not be considered a benign condition, since in the neonate, it may affect brain function. PMID:21961376

  9. Mild hyponatremia, hypernatremia and incident cardiovascular disease and mortality in older men: A population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wannamethee, S.G.; Shaper, A.G.; Lennon, L.; Papacosta, O.; Whincup, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To examine the association between serum sodium concentration and incident major cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes and total mortality in older men. Methods and Results A prospective study of 3099 men aged 60–79 years without a history of cardiovascular disease followed up for an average 11 years during which there were 528 major CVD events (fatal coronary heart disease [CHD] and non-fatal MI, stroke and CVD death) and 873 total deaths. A U shaped relationship was seen between serum sodium concentration and major CVD events and mortality. Hyponatremia (<136 mEq/L) and low sodium within the normal range (136–138 mEq/L) showed significantly increased risk of major CVD events and total mortality compared to men within the upper normal range (139–143 mEq/L) after adjustment for a wide range of confounders and traditional risk factors [adjusted HRs 1.55 (1.13,2.12) and 1.40 (1.14,1.72) for major CVD events respectively and 1.30 (1.02,1.66) and 1.30 (1.11,1.53) respectively for total mortality]. Hyponatremia was associated with inflammation, NT-proBNP, low muscle mass and alkaline phosphatase; these factors contributed to the increased total mortality associated with hyponatremia but did not explain the increased risk of CVD events associated with hyponatremia or low normal sodium concentration. Hypernatremia (≥145 mEq/L) was associated with significantly increased risk of CVD events and mortality due to CVD causes. Conclusion Mild hyponatremia even within the normal sodium range and hypernatremia are both associated with increased total mortality and major CVD events in older men without CVD which is not explained by known adverse CV risk factors. PMID:26298426

  10. Changes in Copeptin and Bioactive Vasopressin in Runners With and Without Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D.; Stuempfle, Kristin J.; Rogers, Ian R.; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in both the N-terminal (arginine vasopressin; AVP) and C-terminal (copeptin) fragments of the vasopressin prohormone before, during, and after an ultramarathon race and to assess vasopressin and copeptin concentrations in runners with and without hyponatremia. Design Observational study. Setting Three trials (2 sodium balance and 1 hyponatremia treatment) in 2 separate approximately 160-km footraces [Western States Endurance Run (WSER) and Javelina Jundred Mile Race (JJ100)]. Participants Six hyponatremic and 20 normonatremic runners; 19 finishers with 7 completing 100 km. Main Outcome Measures Plasma AVP ([AVP]p), copeptin ([copeptin]p), sodium ([Na+]p), and protein (%plasma volume change; %PV) concentrations. Results In the WSER Sodium Trial, a 3-fold prerace to postrace increase in both [AVP]p (0.7 ± 0.4 to 2.7 ± 1.9 pg/mL; P < 0.05) and [copeptin]p (10.3 ± 12.5 to 28.2 ± 16.3 pmol/L; nonsignificant) occurred, despite a 2 mEq/L decrease in [Na+]p (138.7 ± 2.3 to 136.7 ± 1.6 mEq/L; NS). A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p postrace (r = 0.82; P < 0.05). In the WSER Treatment Trial, despite the presence of hyponatremia pre-treatment versus posttreatment ([Na+]p = 130.3 vs 133.5 mEq/L, respectively), both [AVP]p (3.2 vs 2.1 pg/mL) and [copeptin]p (22.5 vs 24.9 pmol/L) were well above the detectable levels. A significant correlation was noted between [AVP]p and [copeptin]p 60 minutes after treatment (r = 0.94; P < 0.05). In the JJ100 Sodium Trial, significant correlations were found between [copeptin]p change and %PV change (r = −0.34; P < 0.05) and between [AVP]p change and [Na+]p change (r = 0.39; P < 0.05) but not vice-versa. Conclusions [Copeptin]p seems to be a reliable surrogate of stimulated [AVP]p during exercise. Nonosmotic vasopressin stimulation occurs during ultradistance running. [Copeptin]p may better reflect chronic (%PV) vasopressin secretion under conditions of endurance exercise

  11. Imaging of the symptomatic type II accessory navicular bone.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Leigh D; Kat, Evelyn; Voyvodic, Frank

    2004-06-01

    Accessory ossicles of the foot are commonly mistaken for fractures. The accessory navicular is one of the most common accessory ossicles of the foot. There is a higher incidence in women and the finding might be bilateral in 50-90%. This entity is usually asymptomatic, although populations with medial foot pain have a higher prevalence. Three types of accessory navicular bone have been described. The type II accessory navicular is the most commonly symptomatic variant with localized chronic or acute on chronic medial foot pain and tenderness with associated inflammation of overlying soft tissues. Plain radiographic identification of the accessory navicular is insufficient to attribute symptomatology. Ultrasound allows for comparison with the asymptomatic side and localization of pain. Bone scintigraphy has a high sensitivity but positive findings lack specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging is of high diagnostic value for demonstrating both bone marrow and soft tissue oedema. PMID:15230772

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists for Euvolemic or Hypervolemic Hyponatremia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyun; Zhao, Mingyi; Du, Wei; Zu, Dongni; Sun, Yingwei; Xiang, Rongwu; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-04-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a nonartifactual serum sodium level <135 mmol/L, is the most common fluid and electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Traditional managements (fluid restriction, hypertonic saline and loop diuretics, etc.) are difficult to maintain or ineffective. Recently, vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRAs) have shown promise for the treatment of hyponatremia.We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of VRAs in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia. We searched Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Springer, etc. (latest search on June 4, 2015) for English publications with randomized controlled trials. Two authors independently screened the citations and extracted data. We calculated pooled relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD), weighted mean difference (WMD) or standard mean difference (SMD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by using random and fixed effect models.We collected data from 18 trials involving 1806 patients. Both random and fixed effect meta-analyses showed that VRAs significantly increased the net change of serum sodium concentration (WMDrandom = 4.89 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.35-5.43 and WMDfixed = 4.70 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.45-4.95), response rate (RRrandom = 2.77, 95%CIs = 2.29-3.36 and RRfixed = 2.95, 95%CIs = 2.56-3.41), and 24-hour urine output (SMDrandom = 0.82, 95%CIs = 0.65-1.00 and SMDfixed = 0.79, 95%CIs = 0.66-0.93) compared to placebo. Furthermore, VRAs significantly decreased body weight (WMDrandom = -0.87 kg, 95%CIs = -1.24 to -0.49 and WMDfixed = -0.91 kg, 95%CIs = -1.22 to -0.59). In terms of safety, rates of drug-related adverse events (AEs), rapid sodium level correction, constipation, dry mouth, thirst, and phlebitis in the VRA-treated group were greater than those in control group. However, there was no difference in the total number of AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, serious AEs, death

  13. A 36-year-old man with vomiting, pain abdomen, significant weight loss, hyponatremia, and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Sivasami, Kartik; Tewari, Vanmalini; Nandi, Bhaskar; Nair, G Lakhsmi; Patil, Sunita D

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can be a challenge. The key to a timely diagnosis is to have a high index of suspicion. We present a rare case of a 36-year-old human immunodeficiency virus negative male patient, who was on multidrug therapy for lepromatous leprosy and was treated for type 2 lepra reactions with steroids in the past. The patient presented with vomiting and pain abdomen, persistent hyponatremia, and terminal hypoglycemia. He had features of malnutrition and had a rapid downhill course following admission. A diagnosis of S. stercoralis hyperinfection with sepsis and multiorgan failure, adrenal hemorrhage, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion was established on a postmortem examination. PMID:26549076

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists for Euvolemic or Hypervolemic Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyun; Zhao, Mingyi; Du, Wei; Zu, Dongni; Sun, Yingwei; Xiang, Rongwu; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hyponatremia, defined as a nonartifactual serum sodium level <135 mmol/L, is the most common fluid and electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Traditional managements (fluid restriction, hypertonic saline and loop diuretics, etc.) are difficult to maintain or ineffective. Recently, vasopressin receptor antagonists (VRAs) have shown promise for the treatment of hyponatremia. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of VRAs in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia. We searched Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Springer, etc. (latest search on June 4, 2015) for English publications with randomized controlled trials. Two authors independently screened the citations and extracted data. We calculated pooled relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD), weighted mean difference (WMD) or standard mean difference (SMD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by using random and fixed effect models. We collected data from 18 trials involving 1806 patients. Both random and fixed effect meta-analyses showed that VRAs significantly increased the net change of serum sodium concentration (WMDrandom = 4.89 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.35–5.43 and WMDfixed = 4.70 mEq/L, 95%CIs = 4.45–4.95), response rate (RRrandom = 2.77, 95%CIs = 2.29–3.36 and RRfixed = 2.95, 95%CIs = 2.56–3.41), and 24-hour urine output (SMDrandom = 0.82, 95%CIs = 0.65–1.00 and SMDfixed = 0.79, 95%CIs = 0.66–0.93) compared to placebo. Furthermore, VRAs significantly decreased body weight (WMDrandom = −0.87 kg, 95%CIs = −1.24 to −0.49 and WMDfixed = −0.91 kg, 95%CIs = −1.22 to −0.59). In terms of safety, rates of drug-related adverse events (AEs), rapid sodium level correction, constipation, dry mouth, thirst, and phlebitis in the VRA-treated group were greater than those in control group. However, there was no difference in the total number of AEs, discontinuations

  15. Gene Expression Signatures Diagnose Influenza and Other Symptomatic Respiratory Viral Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zaas, Aimee K.; Chen, Minhua; Varkey, Jay; Veldman, Timothy; Hero, Alfred O.; Lucas, Joseph; Huang, Yongsheng; Turner, Ronald; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Øien, N. Christine; Nicholson, Bradly; Kingsmore, Stephen; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a common reason for seeking medical attention and the threat of pandemic influenza will likely add to these numbers. Using human viral challenge studies with live rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza A, we developed peripheral blood gene expression signatures that distinguish individuals with symptomatic ARI from uninfected individuals with > 95% accuracy. We validated this “acute respiratory viral” signature - encompassing genes with a known role in host defense against viral infections - across each viral challenge. We also validated the signature in an independently acquired dataset for influenza A and classified infected individuals from healthy controls with 100% accuracy. In the same dataset, we could also distinguish viral from bacterial ARIs (93% accuracy). These results demonstrate that ARIs induce changes in human peripheral blood gene expression that can be used to diagnose a viral etiology of respiratory infection and triage symptomatic individuals. PMID:19664979

  16. Hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH): therapeutic decision-making in real-life cases

    PubMed Central

    Laville, Maurice; Burst, Volker; Peri, Alessandro; Verbalis, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most common electrolyte disturbance encountered in clinical practice, the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatremia (defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/L) remains far from optimal. This is extremely troubling because not only is hyponatremia associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay and hospital resource use, but it has also been shown to be associated with increased mortality. The reasons for this poor management may partly lie in the heterogeneous nature of the disorder; hyponatremia presents with a variety of possible etiologies, differing symptomology and fluid volume status, thereby making its diagnosis potentially complex. In addition, a general lack of awareness of the clinical impact of the disorder, a fear of adverse outcomes through overcorrection of sodium levels, and a lack of effective targeted treatments until recent years, may all have contributed to a reticence to actively treat cases of hyponatremia. There is therefore a clear unmet need to further educate physicians on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of this important condition. Through the use of a variety of real-world cases of patients with hyponatremia secondary to the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone—a condition that accounts for approximately one-third of all cases of hyponatremia—this supplement aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the challenges faced in diagnosing and managing hyponatremia. These cases will also help to illustrate how some of the limitations of traditional therapies may be overcome with the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:26069838

  17. [Treated with Artemether-Lumefantrine Five Evaluation of P. Falciparum Malaria Cases in Terms of Hyponatremia and Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Murat; Sevim, Erol; Duran, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    The most severe type of malaria, P. falciparum may progress with several complications. We have detected hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia in the cases with falciparum malaria. We have launched coartemether which is used in resistant falciparum and supportive care with our four cases. We found out hyponatremia in the cases because serum concentrations were between 117-134 mEq/L. Clinical conditions of the case were highly heavy, in which blood sodium level was pretty low. While the other three cases responded to the treatment in three days, this case responded after the fifth day. Owing to this situation, we thought that there was a relationship between the severity of hyponatremia and clinical course. We measured the number of blood platelet of three cases as 11000-65000-80000/mm3. There was no thrombocytopenia in other two cases. The patient with lowest blood sodium level had the lowest number of blood platelet, as well. With the help of coartemether and supportive care, thrombocytopenia recovered within three-five days in general, but in the patient with severe thrombocytopenia, it got better after the fifth day. PMID:26081891

  18. Management of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianqiang; Sun, Yongdong; Huang, Xin; Luan, Wenzhong

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been no consensus on the optimal treatment of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Most previous reports concerning the management methods were either sporadic case reports or a series of limited cases. This study is to further optimize the management for patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts by analyzing the outcomes of a cohort of patients who were treated with different strategies. Methods and Findings We reviewed the outcomes of 15 patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts who were managed by three different modalities from 1998 through 2010. Six patients underwent microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication. Seven patients underwent a modified surgical procedure, during which the cerebrospinal fluid leak aperture was located and repaired. Two patients were treated with medication and physical therapy. Outcomes of the patients were assessed by following up (13 months to 10 years). All of the six patients treated with microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication experienced complete or substantial relief of their preoperative symptoms. However, the symptoms of one patient reappeared eight months after the operation. Another patient experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six of the seven patients treated with the modified surgical operation experienced complete or substantial resolution of their preoperative symptoms, with only one patient who experienced temporary worsening of his preoperative urine incontinence, which disappeared gradually one month later. No new postoperative neurological deficits, no cerebrospinal fluid leaks and no recurrence were observed in the seven patients. The symptoms of the two patients treated with conservative measures aggravated with time. Conclusions Microsurgical operation should be a treatment consideration in patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Furthermore, the surgical procedure with partial cyst removal and aperture repair

  19. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  20. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function. PMID:26238098

  1. Clinical relevance of symptomatic superficial-vein thrombosis extension: lessons from the CALISTO study.

    PubMed

    Leizorovicz, Alain; Becker, François; Buchmüller, Andrea; Quéré, Isabelle; Prandoni, Paolo; Decousus, Hervé

    2013-09-01

    The clinical relevance of symptomatic extension of spontaneous, acute, symptomatic, lower-limb superficial-vein thrombosis (SVT) is debated. We performed a post hoc analysis of a double-blind trial comparing fondaparinux with placebo. The main study outcome was SVT extension by day 77, whether to ≤ 3 cm or > 3 cm from the sapheno-femoral junction (SFJ). All events were objectively confirmed and validated by an adjudication committee. With placebo (n = 1500), symptomatic SVT extension to ≤ 3 cm or > 3 cm from the SFJ occurred in 54 (3.6%) and 56 (3.7%) patients, respectively, inducing comparable medical resource consumption (eg, anticoagulant drugs and SFJ ligation); subsequent deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism occurred in 9.3% (5/54) and 8.9% (5/56) of patients, respectively. Fondaparinux was associated with lower incidences of SVT extension to ≤ 3 cm (0.3%; 5/1502; P < .001) and > 3 cm (0.8%; 12/1502; P < .001) from the SFJ and reduced related use of medical resources; no subsequent deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism was observed in fondaparinux patients. Thus, symptomatic extensions are common SVT complications and, whether or not reaching the SFJ, are associated with a significant risk of venous thromboembolic complications and medical resource consumption, all reduced by fondaparinux. PMID:23821661

  2. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: A case report in a patient with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-06-01

    Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date.We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy.Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  3. Case of inappropriate ADH syndrome: hyponatremia due to polyethylene glycol bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Seung Hun; Baeg, Myong Ki; Oh, Hyun Jin

    2014-09-14

    Colonoscopic screening has been reported to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. Adequate bowel preparation is essential for this and safety is an important issue in choosing the methods. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is regarded as a safe method for cleansing, especially compared with oral sodium phosphate. Here, we present a case of hyponatremia caused by the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) syndrome after PEG precolonoscopic cleansing resulting in generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A 62-year-old women had ingested PEG for precolonoscopic bowel cleansing. While waiting for the colonoscopy, she developed a stuporous mentality and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, which did not correlate with brain magnetic resonance imaging. Her serum sodium level was 113 mEq per liter and laboratory analyses were consistent with inappropriate ADH syndrome. Her thyroid and adrenal functions were normal. There were no malignancies, infections, respiratory disorders or central nervous disorders and she had no history of taking either diuretics or other medications, which might have caused inappropriate ADH syndrome. She was treated with 3% hypertonic saline and showed a complete neurological recovery as her sodium levels recovered. Follow-up visits showed the patient to have a normal sodium level without neurologic deficits. This case shows that inappropriate ADH syndrome can be caused by PEG preparation, which implies that physicians have to be aware of the possible side effects of this colonic cleansing approach and mindful of the possible ensuing symptoms. PMID:25232272

  4. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-09-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:23590928

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Symptomatic Carpal Bossing

    PubMed Central

    Radmer, Sebastian; Fresow, Robert; Tabibzada, Arash Mehdi; Kamusella, Peter; Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2015-01-01

    Context Carpal bossing is an osseous formation at the dorsal portion of the quadrangular joint, which rarely becomes symptomatic. However, in some patients it causes pain, restricted mobility and can lead to complications like tendon rupture, inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. Aim In this article, we present our experiences with this rare disorder in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings. Settings Design This is a multicenter and interdisciplinary observation made by orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists in the years 2010 to 2015. Retrospective observational study. The follow up period was 2 years. Materials and Methods In the observed time period, eight patients were diagnosed with symptomatic carpal bossing. Symptoms were pain at palmar flexion and limited mobility of the wrist in combination with a palpable protuberance over the quadrangular joint. All patients underwent X-ray, CT and MRI examinations. A conservative treatment strategy was initiated for 6 weeks in all patients, followed by a wedge resection when symptoms were persisting and disabling. Results After the conservative treatment schedule, five patients were asymptomatic. Three patients had persisting pain and were thus recommended for surgery. In the postoperative course, two patients were asymptomatic. One patient developed a type 1 complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the first postoperative year, which was successfully treated with pain-adapted physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy with analgesics and calcitonin, and a triple CT-guided thoracic sympathetic nerve blockade. Conclusion Carpal bossing is a mostly asymptomatic entity, which in our experience gets symptomatic due to direct trauma or repetitive stress, especially in competitive racket sports players. It can be diagnosed by thorough clinical examination and multimodal diagnostic imaging. Conservative treatment comprises an excellent prognosis, however surgery, either wedge resection or arthrodesis, must be

  6. Symptomatic Hardware Removal After First Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Thompson, John

    2016-01-01

    Severe hallux valgus deformity with proximal instability creates pain and deformity in the forefoot. First tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis is performed to reduce the intermetatarsal angle and stabilize the joint. Dorsomedial locking plate fixation with adjunctive lag screw fixation is used because of its superior construct strength and healing rate. Despite this, questions remain regarding whether this hardware is more prominent and more likely to need removal. The purpose of the present study was to determine the incidence of symptomatic hardware at the first tarsometatarsal joint and to determine the incidence of hardware removal resulting from prominence and/or discomfort. A review of 165 medical records of consecutive patients who had undergone first tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis with plate fixation was conducted. The outcome of interest was the incidence of symptomatic hardware removal in patients with clinical union. The mean age was 55 (range 18.4 to 78.8) years. The mean follow-up duration was 65.9 ± 34.0 (range 7.0 to 369.0) weeks. In our cohort, 25 patients (15.2%) had undergone hardware removed because of pain and irritation. Of these patients, 18 (72.0%) had a locking plate and lag screw removed, and 7 (28.0%) had crossing lag screws removed. The fixation of a first tarsometatarsal joint fusion poses a difficult situation owing to minimal soft tissue coverage and the inherent need for robust fixation to promote fusion. Hardware can become prominent postoperatively and can become painful and/or induce cutaneous compromise. The results of the present observational investigation imply that surgeons can reasonably inform patients that the incidence of symptomatic hardware removal after first tarsometatarsal arthrodesis is approximately 15% within a median duration of 9.0 months after surgery. PMID:26215552

  7. Clinical Experience of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young

    2012-01-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  8. MRI of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Tsukaguchi, I; Ishida, T; Ootani, M; Yamamoto, T; Tomoda, K; Mitomo, M

    1992-01-01

    Sacral perineural cyst is a relatively rare condition. To our knowledge, reports of MR findings associated with sacral perineural cyst have been limited to only six cases. We present for the first time high field MR findings in a case of sacral perineural cyst. The cyst appeared as a cystic lesion in the sacral spinal canal and had intermediate signal intensity on T1W images and high signal intensity on T2*W images compared with CSF. Slight erosion remodeling of the sacrum was also seen anteriorly. Our case was symptomatic and present with radiculopathy (sciatic pain). Surgical treatment was done to result in dramatic improvement of the sciatic pain. PMID:1337620

  9. Clinical experience of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young; Lim, Kyung Joon

    2012-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  10. Symptomatic 5-fluorouracil-induced sinus bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Lee, A D; McKay, M J

    2011-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a commonly used anti-neoplastic agent. 5-FU has been not uncommonly associated with cardiotoxicity, although the many potentially causative mechanisms are yet to be established. Here, we present the case of a 61-year-old gemstone miner who developed symptomatic sinus bradycardia while receiving a continuous 5-FU infusion combined with radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. This dysrhythmia is an unusual type of 5-FU toxicity, our case being the second described. We review the actions of 5-FU and the various proposed mechanisms of its cardiotoxic effects. PMID:21762335

  11. Symptomatic Morgagni Hernia Misdiagnosed As Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, Phyllis A.

    2011-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome, symptomatic interposition of bowel beneath the right hemidiaphragm, is uncommon and usually managed without surgery. Morgagni hernia is an uncommon diaphragmatic hernia that generally requires surgery. In this case a patient with a longstanding diagnosis of bowel interposition (Chilaiditi sign) presented with presumed Chilaiditi syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography was performed and revealed no bowel interposition; instead, a Morgagni hernia was found and surgically repaired. Review of the literature did not reveal similar misdiagnosis or recommendations for advanced imaging in patients with Chilaiditi sign or syndrome to confirm the diagnosis or rule out other potential diagnoses. PMID:21691487

  12. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival. PMID:21927882

  13. The arthroscopic anatomy of symptomatic meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Dandy, D J

    1990-07-01

    The anatomy of 1000 symptomatic meniscus lesions is described and related to the age of the patients. All symptomatic lesions found during the study period were treated by arthroscopic surgery. Meniscal lesions were commoner in the right knee (56.5%) and 81% of the patients were men. Of the medial meniscus tears, 75% were vertical and 23% horizontal. Vertical tears of the medial meniscus occurred most often in the fourth decade and horizontal tears in the fifth. There were 22% type I, 37% type II and 31% type III vertical tears; 62% of type I tears and 23% of type II tears had locked fragments. Superior flaps were six times more common than inferior flaps. Of all medial meniscus fragments, 6% were inverted; 51% of these were flaps and the rest ruptured bucket-handle fragments. Of the lateral meniscus lesions 54% were vertical tears, 15% oblique, 15% myxoid, 4% were inverted and 5% were lesions of discoid menisci. The commonest pattern of tear in the lateral compartment (27%) was a vertical tear involving half the length and half the width of the meniscus. PMID:2380218

  14. Symptomatic Epilepsies due to Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dakaj, Nazim; Shatri, Nexhat; Isaku, Enver; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebro-vascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsies. This study aims to investigate: a) Frequency of epilepsy in patients with CVD; b) Correlation of epilepsy with the type of CVD (ischemic and hemorrhage) and with age. Methodology: It is analyzed medical documentation of 816 hospitalized patients with CVD in the clinic of Neurology in University Clinical Center (UCC) during the period January - December 2010. The study included data on patients presenting with epileptic seizures after CVD, and those with previously diagnosed epilepsy, are not included in the study. The diagnosis of CVD, are established in clinical neurological examination and the brain imaging (computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). The diagnosis of epilepsy is established by the criteria of ILAE (International League against Epilepsy) 1983, and epileptic seizures are classified according to the ILAE classification, of 1981. Results: Out of 816 patients with CVD, 692 were with ischemic stroke and 124 with hemorrhage. From 816 patients, epileptic seizures had 81 (10%), of which 9 patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy earlier and they are not included in the study. From 72 (99%) patients with seizures after CVD 25 (33%) have been with ischemia, whereas 47 (67%) with hemorrhage. Conclusion: CVD present fairly frequent cause of symptomatic epilepsies among patients treated in the clinic of Neurology at UCC (about 10%). The biggest number of patients with epilepsy after CVD was with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25685086

  15. Chemical sensitivity in symptomatic Cambodia veterans.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Erik W M A; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; De Vries, Maaike; Scheepers, Paul T I; Bleijenberg, Gijs; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2003-12-01

    Following their participation in a United Nations peacekeeping operation in Cambodia (1992-1993), Dutch veterans complained of symptoms similar to those reported by Gulf War veterans. The authors conducted a matched case-control study to evaluate 76 symptomatic and 32 matched asymptomatic Cambodia veterans on the basis of data collected by postal questionnaire. The number of symptomatic veterans who reported having used insect repellants that contained N,N,-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) during the mission in Cambodia was significantly higher, compared with asymptomatic veterans. The percentage of veterans who reported feeling ill following brief exposures to chemicals such as paint or pesticides was equal in both groups, but the percentage was low compared with the results of other studies of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The current study was limited by self-report and time delay (potential recall bias) between deployment to Cambodia and the time of survey. Nevertheless, the study results did not support the hypothesis that symptoms in the total group of Cambodia veterans could be related to Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. PMID:15859508

  16. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:21479984

  17. A sign of symptomatic chronic cholecystitis on biliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Barkin, J.S.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    Five hundred patients with acute right-upper-quadrant pain underwent biliary scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc paraisopropyliminodiacetic acid. One hundred and thirty-four studies were reported normal (both gallbladder and activity in bowel are noted in 1 hr). Of the 134 studies reported as normal, 32 showed intestinal activity before gallbladder visualization during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography revealed that 24 patients had gallstones, and eight patients had no demonstrable pathology in the biliary system. Of the 134 studies, 102 showed visualization of the gallbladder before intestinal activity during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography showed that 73 patients had normal biliary system. The remaining 29 patients had gallstones. The overall sensitivity of this finding is 45%, the specificity is 90%, and the accuracy is 73%. In this group of symptomatic patients, the appearance of intestinal activity before gallbladder activity on biliary scintigraphy warrants further evaluation of these patients by sonography and/or oral cholecystography.

  18. Symptomatic Therapy and Rehabilitation in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and a major cause of chronic neurological disability in young adults. Primary progressive MS (PPMS) constitutes about 10% of cases, and is characterized by a steady decline in function with no acute attacks. The rate of deterioration from disease onset is more rapid than relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS types. Multiple system involvement at onset and rapid early progression have a worse prognosis. PPMS can cause significant disability and impact on quality of life. Recent studies are biased in favour of relapsing remitting patients as treatment is now available for them and they are more likely to be seen at MS clinics. Since prognosis for PPMS is worse than other types of MS, the focus of rehabilitation is on managing disability and enhancing participation, and application of a “neuropalliative” approach as the disease progresses. This chapter presents the symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation for persons with MS, including PPMS. A multidisciplinary approach optimizes the intermediate and long-term medical, psychological and social outcomes in this population. Restoration and maintenance of functional independence and societal reintegration, and issues relating to quality of life are addressed in rehabilitation processes. PMID:22013521

  19. Differential Impact of Hyponatremia and Hepatic Encephalopathy on Health-Related Quality of Life and Brain Metabolite Abnormalities in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Wade, James B; Thacker, Leroy; Kraft, Kenneth A; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R Todd; Fuchs, Michael; Bouneva, Iliana; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Sanyal, Arun J; Gilles, HoChong; Heuman, Douglas M; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia (HN) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) together can impair health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) and cognition in cirrhosis. Aim To study effect of hyponatremia on cognition, HRQOL and brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) independent of HE. Methods Four cirrhotic groups(no HE/HN, HE alone, HN alone (sodium<130mEq/L),HE+HN) underwent cognitive testing, HRQOL using Sickness Impact Profile (SIP: higher score is worse; has psycho-social and physical sub-scores) and brain MRS (myoinositol(mI) and glutamate+glutamine(Glx)), which were compared across groups. A subset underwent HRQOL testing before/after diuretic withdrawal. Results 82 cirrhotics (30 no HE/HN, 25 HE, 17 HE+HN and 10 HN, MELD 12, 63% Hepatitis C) were included. Cirrhotics with HN alone and without HE/HN had better cognition compared to HE groups (median abnormal tests no-HE/HN:3, HN:3.5, HE:6.5,HE+HN:7, p=0.008). Despite better cognition, HN only patients had worse HRQOL in total and psychosocial SIP while both HN groups (with/without HE) had a significantly worse physical SIP(p<0.0001, all comparisons). Brain MRS showed lowest Glx in HN and highest in HE groups (p<0.02). mI levels were comparably decreased in the three affected (HE,HE+HN and HN) groups compared to no HE/HN and were associated with poor HRQOL. Six HE+HN cirrhotics underwent diuretic withdrawal which improved serum sodium and total/psycho-social SIP scores. Conclusions Hyponatremic cirrhotics without HE have poor HRQOL despite better cognition than those with concomitant HE. Glx levels were lowest in HN without HE but mI was similar across affected groups. HRQOL improved after diuretic withdrawal. Hyponatremia has a complex, non-linear relationship with brain Glx and mI, cognition and HRQOL. PMID:23665182

  20. Symptomatic Pneumocephalus after Lumbar Disc Surgery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Ismailoglu, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic pneumocephalus is frequently seen after traumatic fracture of the skull base bone. However, it has rarely been reported after spinal surgery and its mechanism has not been fully explained. In this paper, we present a 30 year old male patient who had lumbar discectomy due to a symptomatic midline lumbar disc herniation. He had developed symptomatic pneumocephalus after the lumbar disc surgery associated with application of a vacuum suction device. We present and discuss our patient in the light of the literatures.

  1. Symptomatic torn discoid lateral meniscus in adults.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Yong Seuk; Yoo, Jae Chul; Chang, Moon Jong; Bae, Sooho; Bae, Young Ryeol

    2011-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to report degenerative changes that coexist with a symptomatic torn discoid lateral meniscus in adults and to analyze the factors associated with the accompanied degenerative changes. From 1997 to 2008, 329 knees in the 305 patients were included. Associations between the status of the meniscus and the coexisting degenerative changes on the images and the arthroscopic findings were statistically analyzed. Marginal osteophyte was seen on conventional radiography in 118 patients (36%). Ninety patients (27%) had arthroscopically confirmed chondral lesion. Age, duration of symptoms, the type of meniscus, the type of tear and the magnetic resonance image classification were associated with the formation of the marginal osteophyte and chondral lesion on univariate analysis (P < 0.05). After conducting multivariate analysis, the type of tear and magnetic resonance image classification had a statistically significant association with the severity of marginal osteophyte and chondral lesion (P < 0.05). PMID:20143046

  2. Scapholunate fusion in chronic symptomatic scapholunate instability.

    PubMed

    Zubairy, A I; Jones, W A

    2003-08-01

    Since 1989 scapholunate fusion has been performed on 13 patients with chronic scapholunate instability causing debilitating symptoms. These cases were reviewed at a mean 93 (range, 60-132) months after surgery. Establishing whether bony fusion had been achieved proved extremely difficult even after CT scanning, but fusion was unequivocally achieved in four cases. Ten patients were subjectively satisfied with their treatment. Two patients who had no symptomatic improvement subsequently underwent total wrist arthrodesis. A method of fusing the scaphoid and lunate is described, though we accept that a firm fibrous union may be all that is achieved in most patients. However, this appears sufficient to restore stability with a high patient satisfaction. PMID:12849940

  3. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  4. Microsurgical technique of symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Fu; Hsu, Sanford P C; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2015-07-01

    Symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm is rare. Cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus are subjected to the mass effect of an expanding aneurysm. Microsurgical clipping is the treatment of choice to relieve compressive cranial neuropathy. In this video, the authors present a case of intracavernous aneurysm causing diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness. The patient was operated on via a pretemporal transclinoid-transcavernous approach. The aneurysm was completely obliterated through direct clipping. There were no new-onset neurologic deficits and complications after the operation. Complete recovery of the diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness was observed at the 6-month postoperative follow up. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4w5QUoNIAQM. PMID:26132609

  5. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  6. Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    From 2000 through 2015, there were 1,542 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Annual incidence rates rose sharply from 2008 through 2010 but then decreased by more than 50% from 2010 through 2013. In 2015, the number of cases (n=116) increased by approximately 20% from the previous year. The recent increase in rates overall reflects increased rates in the Army and the Marine Corps. Relative to their respective counterparts, crude incidence rates of exertional hyponatremia for the entire 16-year surveillance period were higher among females, those in the youngest age group, Marines, and recruit trainees. Service members (particularly recruit trainees) and their supervisors must be vigilant for early signs of heat-related illnesses and must be knowledgeable of the dangers of excessive water consumption and the prescribed limits for water intake during prolonged physical activity (e.g., field training exercises, personal fitness training, recreational activities) in hot, humid weather. PMID:27030930

  7. Rationale and design of the treatment of hyponatremia based on lixivaptan in NYHA class III/IV cardiac patient evaluation (THE BALANCE) study.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Aranda, Juan M; Boehmer, John P; Elkayam, Uri; Gilbert, Edward M; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Kukin, Marrick; Lowes, Brian D; O'Connell, John B; Tavazzi, Luigi; Feldman, Arthur M; Ticho, Barry; Orlandi, Cesare

    2010-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder in patients with heart failure (HF) associated with cognitive dysfunction and increased mortality and rehospitalization rates. Loop diuretics worsen renal function, produce neurohormonal activation, and induce electrolyte imbalances. Lixivaptan is a selective, oral vasopressin V(2) -receptor antagonist that improves hyponatremia by promoting electrolyte-free aquaresis without significant side effects. The Treatment of Hyponatremia Based on Lixivaptan in NYHA Class III/IV Cardiac Patient Evaluation (BALANCE) study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial designed to evaluate the effects of lixivaptan on serum sodium in patients hospitalized with worsening heart failure (target N= 650), signs of congestion and serum sodium concentrations <135 mEq/L. Other endpoints include assessment of dyspnea, body weight, cognitive function, and days of hospital-free survival. Patients are randomized 1:1 to lixivaptan or matching placebo for 60 days, with a 30-day safety follow-up. Doses of lixivaptan or placebo are adjusted based on serum sodium and volume status. Lixivaptan was shown to increase serum sodium and reduce body weight, without renal dysfunction or hypokalemia. BALANCE seeks to address unmet questions regarding the use of vasopressin antagonists including their effects on cognitive function and clinical outcomes in patients with hyponatremia and worsening heart failure. PMID:20973922

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Low-osmolarity ORS vs. Modified Rehydration Solution for Malnourished Children for Treatment of Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition and Diarrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ruchika; Kumar, Praveen; Aneja, S; Kumar, Virendra; Rehan, Harmeet S

    2015-12-01

    World Health Organization-recommended rehydration solution for malnourished children (ReSoMal) for rehydrating severe acute malnourished children is not available in India. In present study, 110 consecutive children aged 6-59 months with severely acute malnourishment and acute diarrhea were randomized to low-osmolarity oral rehydration solution (ORS) (osmolarity: 245, sodium: 75) with added potassium (20 mmol/l) or modified ReSoMal (osmolarity: 300, sodium: 45). In all, 15.4% of modified ReSoMal group developed hyponatremia as compared with 1.9% in low-osmolarity ORS, but none developed severe hyponatremia or hypernatremia. Both groups had equal number of successful rehydration (52 each). Both types of ORS were effective in correcting hypokalemia and dehydration, but rehydration was achieved in shorter duration with modified ReSoMal. PMID:26314308

  9. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Following Symptomatic Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Yu; Shen, Cheng-Che; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Wen, Chun-Hsien; Chiang, Yung-Yen; Lu, Ti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal transition is highly symptomatic in at least 20% of women. A higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms, including depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, has been shown in women with symptomatic menopausal transition. However, a clear correlation between symptomatic menopausal transition and psychiatric disorders has not been established. We explored the association between symptomatic menopausal transition and subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia as well as bipolar, depressive, anxiety, and sleep disorders. We investigated women who were diagnosed with symptomatic menopausal transition by an obstetrician-gynecologist according to the data in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprised age-matched women without symptomatic menopausal transition. The incidence rate and the hazard ratios of subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders were evaluated in both cohorts, based on the diagnoses of psychiatrists. The symptomatic menopausal transition and control cohorts each consisted of 19,028 women. The incidences of bipolar disorders (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–2.80), depressive disorders (HR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.93–2.45), anxiety disorders (HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.84–2.41), and sleep disorders (HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.73–2.34) were higher among the symptomatic menopausal transition women than in the comparison cohort. After stratifying for follow-up duration, the incidence of newly diagnosed bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders following a diagnosis of symptomatic menopausal transition remained significantly increased in the longer follow-up groups (1–5 and ≥ 5 years). Symptomatic menopausal transition might increase the risk of subsequent newly onset bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders. A prospective study

  10. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  11. Corrective osteotomy for symptomatic scaphoid malunion.

    PubMed

    El-Karef, Essam Awad

    2005-12-01

    A prospective study aimed at assessment of the outcome of management of symptomatic scaphoid malunion (hump-back deformity). The work included 13 scaphoid malunions in 13 patients. All patients complained of weak painful hand grip and limitation of wrist function. All cases were subjected to a corrective opening wedge scaphoid osteotomy with insertion of a trapezoid-shaped tricortical iliac bone graft. At the final assessment, after a mean follow-up period of 42 months, the achieved results were rated excellent in seven cases, good in four and fair in two according to the scoring system used. Objectively, the mean range of wrist motion and hand grip strength improved from 48% and 47% pre-operatively to 82% and 79% at the final assessment. Radiological parameters including height to length ratio, lateral intrascaphoid angle and dorsal cortical angle were also effectively improved. The intra-operative corrected carpal alignment has almost been maintained at the final follow-up. The procedure did not have serious drawbacks such as non-union or avascular necrosis and perhaps might delay the development of degenerative arthritis of the wrist. PMID:16256995

  12. Prevalence of Symptomatic Lumbar Spondylolysis in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Akihiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Goda, Yuichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakamaki, Tadanori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis, is prevalent in adolescent athletes. Recent advances in diagnostic tools and techniques enable early diagnosis before these fractures progress to complete fractures through the pars. However, because patients often consult family physicians for primary care of low back pain and these physicians may not have access to diagnostic modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, stress fractures can be missed. This study surveyed the prevalence of symptomatic spondylolysis in pediatric patients who consulted an orthopedic clinic for primary care and investigated whether such acute stress fractures may be overlooked without MRI. The prospective study investigated 264 patients who were younger than 19 years and had low back pain. Of the 153 patients (58.0%) with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks, 136 who agreed to undergo MRI were included in the study. This group included 11 elementary school students, 71 junior high school students, and 54 high school students. The overall prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was 39.7% (54 of 136) and was 9.3% in elementary school students (5 of 11, 45.5%), 59.3% in junior high school students (32 of 71, 45.1%), and 31.5% in high school students (17 of 54, 31.5%). All 54 patients with spondylolysis had a history of athletic activity. Primary care physicians should recognize that approximately 40% of pediatric patients presenting with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks may have spondylolysis and should consider MRI in those with a history of athletic activity. Because the spine is immature in this age group, almost half of affected elementary school and junior high school students may have lumbar spondylolysis. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e434-e437.]. PMID:27064777

  13. A Quick Screening Model for Symptomatic Bacterascites in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long-Chuan; Xu, Long; He, Wen-Hua; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhosis can be made when a patient has an ascites polymorphonuclear leukocyte count ≥250/mm3. However, symptomatic bacterascites, which is a variant of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis with signs of infection but an ascites polymorphonuclear leukocyte count <250/mm3, cannot be confirmed until the time-consuming ascites culture becomes positive. Currently, early indicators for symptomatic bacterascites remain undetermined. Aims: To develop a quick screening model for early detection of symptomatic bacterascites in cirrhosis. Materials and Methods: Data on patients with cirrhotic ascites from two hospitals (from 2010 to 2014) were collected retrospectively. Patients with symptomatic bacterascites were enrolled in the case group and compared with patients without any infection in the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to build a model for screening symptomatic bacterascites, and a receiver operating characteristics curve was used to assess the model. Results: In total, 103 patients were enrolled in the case group and 204 patients were enrolled in the control group. A screening model was constructed based on body temperature, abdominal tenderness, blood neutrophil percentage, blood total bilirubin, prothrombin time, and ascites nucleated leukocyte count. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.939; a screening score of 0.328 was the best cutoff value. Conclusion: Patients with suspected symptomatic bacterascites can be quickly screened according to the developed model, and a screening score ≥0.328 indicates symptomatic bacterascites. PMID:27488322

  14. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  15. Detection of Treponema Denticola in Symptomatic Apical Periodontitis and in Symptomatic Apical Abscesses by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Ozbek, Ahmet; Erdogan, Aziz S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Treponema denticola in symptomatic apical periodontitis and in symptomatic apical abscesses by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Methods: Microbial samples were collected from 60 single-rooted teeth having carious lesions and necrotic pulps. For each tooth, clinical data including patient symptoms were recorded. Teeth were categorized by diagnosis as having symptomatic apical periodontitis or symptomatic apical abscess. Aseptic microbial samples were collected using paper points from 30 infected root canals and from aspirates of 30 abscesses. DNA was extracted from the samples by using a QIAamp® DNA mini-kit and analyzed with real-time PCR. Results: T. denticola was detected in 24 of 30 cases diagnosed as symptomatic apical abscesses (80%), and 19 of 30 cases diagnosed as symptomatic apical periodontitis (63.3%). In general T. denticola was found in 43 of 60 cases (71.6%). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that T. denticola can participate in the pathogenesis of symptomatic apical abscesses. PMID:19421390

  16. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  17. Profiling the clinical presentation of diagnostic characteristics of a sample of symptomatic TMD patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients might present a number of concurrent clinical diagnoses that may be clustered according to their similarity. Profiling patients’ clinical presentations can be useful for better understanding the behavior of TMD and for providing appropriate treatment planning. The aim of this study was to simultaneously classify symptomatic patients diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of TMD into homogenous groups based on their clinical presentation and occurrence of comorbidities. Methods Clinical records of 357 consecutive TMD patients seeking treatment in a private specialized clinic were included in the study sample. Patients presenting multiple subtypes of TMD diagnosed simultaneously were categorized according to the AAOP criteria. Descriptive statistics and two-step cluster analysis were used to characterize the clinical presentation of these patients based on the primary and secondary clinical diagnoses. Results The most common diagnoses were localized masticatory muscle pain (n = 125) and disc displacement without reduction (n = 104). Comorbidity was identified in 288 patients. The automatic selection of an optimal number of clusters included 100% of cases, generating an initial 6-cluster solution and a final 4-cluster solution. The interpretation of within-group ranking of the importance of variables in the clustering solutions resulted in the following characterization of clusters: chronic facial pain (n = 36), acute muscle pain (n = 125), acute articular pain (n = 75) and chronic articular impairment (n = 121). Conclusion Subgroups of acute and chronic TMD patients seeking treatment can be identified using clustering methods to provide a better understanding of the clinical presentation of TMD when multiple diagnosis are present. Classifying patients into identifiable symptomatic profiles would help clinicians to estimate how common a disorder is within a population of TMD patients and

  18. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    PubMed

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. PMID:27266642

  19. Endovascular stenting of symptomatic innominate artery stenosis under distal balloon protection of the internal carotid and vertebral artery for cerebral protection: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kajihara, Yosuke; Mukada, Kazutoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2013-02-01

    The use of cerebral protection devices in endovascular treatment for innominate artery (IA) stenosis is not well established. We describe a novel technique for cerebral protection during endovascular stenting of symptomatic IA stenosis. An 82-year-old man presented with acutely scattered brain infarction by artery-to-artery embolism due to IA stenosis. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic IA stenosis was planned to prevent recurrent attacks. Endovascular stenting for IA stenosis via the right femoral artery approach was performed under simultaneous distal balloon protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) and vertebral artery (VA) via the right brachial artery approach. Successful treatment of symptomatic IA stenosis was achieved with no complications. The technique with simultaneous distal balloon protection of the ICA and VA provided excellent cerebral protection in stenting of IA stenosis. PMID:23263481

  20. A case of symptomatic primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Segawa, Satoko; Kawashima, Makoto; Itoda, Ichiro; Shima, Takako; Imai, Mitsunobu

    2005-02-01

    A 30-year-old homosexual Japanese man had fourteen days of fever, malaise, appetite loss, sore throat, and four days of diarrhea and slightly congested eyes before he developed a skin eruption. He presented with measles-like exanthems on his face, trunk, and extremities. Deep red enanthems were seen on his left buccal mucosa opposite the premolar teeth, and whitish enanthems were seen on the buccal and gingival mucosa. HIV RNA was detected at the high concentration of 5.8 x 10(6) copies /ml in his serum. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed aseptic meningitis with 5,488 copies /ml of HIV RNA. Anti-HIV 1 antibodies against Gp160 and p24 tested by Western blot assay showed seroconversion on day 5 of his admission, seven days after he developed the skin eruptions. The fever lasted for three weeks from the initial onset, and the skin eruptions lasted for twelve days. Histopathologically, a mononuclear cell infiltration was seen mainly in the upper dermis surrounding small vessels and sweat ducts, with CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes predominant. Additionally, CD1a+ putative interdigitating dendritic cells had also infiltrated perivascularly, and were surrounded by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. In situ hybridization study failed to detect HIV products in skin biopsy specimens. Our findings suggested that CD8+ T cells and their interaction with CD1a+ dendritic cells in the skin may be important in inducing skin manifestations in acute HIV infections. PMID:15906546

  1. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W.

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  2. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  3. Selection, management, and early outcome of 113 patients with symptomatic gall stones treated by percutaneous cholecystolithotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Donald, J J; Lake, S P; Ainley, C A; Hatfield, A R; Lees, W R

    1992-01-01

    Between January 1988 and December 1990, 283 patients with symptomatic gall stones were referred for non-operative treatment. After ultrasound scanning including a functional assessment, 220 (78%) patients were found to be suitable for percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Of these, 113 underwent the procedure including 10 in whom extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or methyl tert-butyl ether therapy had failed. Forty four patients underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, methyl tert-butyl ether therapy or rotary lithotripsy, 46 chose laparoscopic cholecystectomy or minicholecystectomy and 27 declined treatment. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy was successfully performed in 100 patients. Thirty four patients were a high operative risk and 14 presented with an acute complication of gall stone disease. Complications developed in 15 patients, all of whom were managed conservatively and most occurred during development of the technique. Outcome has been assessed clinically and by ultrasound scanning in 92 patients with a median follow up period of 14 months (six to 37 months). Seventy nine per cent were completely cured of their symptoms. Ninety three per cent of gall bladders were shown to be functioning and nine (9.8%) contained stones, although five of these are believed to have developed from residual fragments. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy is a safe, non-operative treatment for symptomatic gall stones and enabled the patient to fully recover within two to three weeks; it has a definite role in the management of the elderly and high risk patient but its use for the treatment of other groups is likely to remain controversial. PMID:1427381

  4. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    MOIS, EMIL IOAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; SECHEL, ROXANA; AL-HAJJAR, NADIM

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible. PMID:27152085

  5. Norovirus in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals: cytokines and viral shedding.

    PubMed

    Newman, K L; Moe, C L; Kirby, A E; Flanders, W D; Parkos, C A; Leon, J S

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis world-wide. NoV infections are often asymptomatic, although individuals still shed large amounts of NoV in their stool. Understanding the differences between asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals would help in elucidating mechanisms of NoV pathogenesis. Our goal was to compare the serum cytokine responses and faecal viral RNA titres of asymptomatic and symptomatic NoV-infected individuals. We tested serum samples from infected subjects (n = 26; 19 symptomatic, seven asymptomatic) from two human challenge studies of GI.1 NoV for 16 cytokines. Samples from prechallenge and days 1-4 post-challenge were tested for these cytokines. Cytokine levels were compared to stool NoV RNA titres quantified previously by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). While both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups had similar patterns of cytokine responses, the symptomatic group generally exhibited a greater elevation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines and IL-8 post-challenge compared to the asymptomatic group (all P < 0·01). Daily viral RNA titre was associated positively with daily IL-6 concentration and negatively with daily IL-12p40 concentration (all P < 0·05). Symptoms were not associated significantly with daily viral RNA titre, duration of viral shedding or cumulative shedding. Symptomatic individuals, compared to asymptomatic, have greater immune system activation, as measured by serum cytokines, but they do not have greater viral burden, as measured by titre and shedding, suggesting that symptoms may be immune-mediated in NoV infection. PMID:26822517

  6. Symptomatic ecchordosis physaliphora mimicking as an intracranial arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-06-01

    Ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) is a rare, benign tumor derived from the notochordal remnants. Usually slow growing with an indolent course, most cases are incidental findings on autopsy. Limited data exists on symptomatic patients with EP. Diagnosis mainly relies on correlating histopathologic findings confirming the notochordal elements with MRI. We herein present a middle aged woman with symptomatic EP in the pre-pontine cistern that mimicked an arachnoid cyst on preoperative scans. Additionally, we emphasize the pathological and radiological characteristics of EP that could aid in prompt diagnosis of the lesion with emphasis on considering EP as a differential for mass lesions localized in the pre-pontine cistern. PMID:26778354

  7. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  8. Low prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in male 100 km ultra-marathon runners in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in 145 male ultra-marathoners at the '100-km ultra-run' in Biel, Switzerland. Changes in body mass, urinary specific gravity, haemoglobin, haematocrit, plasma [Na(+)], and plasma volume were determined. Seven runners (4.8%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, haematocrit and haemoglobin decreased, plasma [Na(+)] remained unchanged and plasma volume increased. Δ body mass correlated with both post race plasma [Na(+)] and Δ plasma [Na(+)]. Δ plasma volume was associated with post race plasma [Na(+)]. The athletes consumed 0.65 (0.30) L/h; fluid intake correlated significantly and negatively (r = -0.50, p < 0.0001) to race time. Fluid intake was neither associated with post race plasma [Na(+)] nor with Δ plasma [Na(+)], but was related to Δ body mass. To conclude, the prevalence of EAH was low at ~5% in these male 100 km ultra-marathoners. EAH was asymptomatic and would not have been detected without the measurement of plasma [Na(+)]. PMID:21082192

  9. LigaSure Hemorrhoidectomy for Symptomatic Hemorrhoids: First Pediatric Experience.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Ole; Soccorso, Giampiero; Murthi, Govind

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhoids are uncommon in children. Third and fourth degree symptomatic hemorrhoids may be surgically excised. We describe the first experience of using LigaSure (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts, United States) to perform hemorrhoidectomies in children. LigaSure hemorrhoidectomy has been well described in adults and is found to be superior in patient tolerance as compared with conventional hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:24918403

  10. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-02-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. PMID:21323277

  11. Dural diverticulum with a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Nicholas; Williamson, Clinton; Williamson, Natalie; Fortes, Manuel; Tjauw, Iwan; Vij, Vikas; Trojan, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    A case report of a 63-year-old female patient with a cervical spinal dural diverticulum and intracranial hypotension secondary to a symptomatic CSF leak after minor trauma. The patient responded well after the cervical approach epidural blood patch procedure. PMID:26973722

  12. Symptomatic vs. asymptomatic plaque classification in carotid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Rajendra U; Faust, Oliver; Alvin, A P C; Sree, S Vinitha; Molinari, Filippo; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of carotid atherosclerosis and classification into symptomatic or asymptomatic type is crucial in both diagnosis and treatment planning. This paper describes a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system which analyzes ultrasound images and classifies them into symptomatic and asymptomatic based on the textural features. The proposed CAD system consists of three modules. The first module is preprocessing, which conditions the images for the subsequent feature extraction. The feature extraction stage uses image texture analysis to calculate Standard deviation, Entropy, Symmetry, and Run Percentage. Finally, classification is performed using AdaBoost and Support Vector Machine for automated decision making. For Adaboost, we compared the performance of five distinct configurations (Least Squares, Maximum- Likelihood, Normal Density Discriminant Function, Pocket, and Stumps) of this algorithm. For Support Vector Machine, we compared the performance using five different configurations (linear kernel, polynomial kernel configurations of different orders and radial basis function kernels). SVM with radial basis function kernel for support vector machine presented the best classification result: classification accuracy of 82.4%, sensitivity of 82.9%, and specificity of 82.1%. We feel that texture features coupled with the Support Vector Machine classifier can be used to identify the plaque tissue type. An Integrated Index, called symptomatic asymptomatic carotid index (SACI), is proposed using texture features to discriminate symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid ultrasound images using just one index or number. We hope this SACI can be used as an adjunct tool by the vascular surgeons for daily screening. PMID:21243411

  13. Ambrisentan: new drug. Too risky in mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) In patients with mildly symptomatic pulmonary hypertension (stage III), there is no firm evidence that ambrisentan reduces mortality or slows disease progression. In contrast, ambrisentan has frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects; (2) In patients whose physical activity is markedly restricted by pulmonary hypertension, it is better to continue using bosentan, with which we have far more experience. PMID:19585715

  14. Acute rhinosinusitis in adults: an update on current management

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Ajmal; Moumoulidis, Ioannis; Panesar, Jaan

    2007-01-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common disease with worldwide prevalence. It is a significant burden on the health services. It is most commonly caused by viruses and is self‐limiting in nature. The diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis is clinical and sinus radiography is not indicated routinely. Most cases of acute rhinosinusitis are treated symptomatically. However, symptoms may persist beyond 10 days when secondary bacterial infection prevails. Antibiotics are reserved for moderate or severe cases or when there is development of complications of acute rhinosinusitis. This paper provides an update on the current management of acute rhinosinusitis. PMID:17551072

  15. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  16. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  17. No case of exercise-associated hyponatremia in male ultra-endurance mountain bikers in the 'Swiss Bike Masters'.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-12-31

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) has mainly been investigated in runners and triathletes. In mountain bikers, EAH was studied in two multi-stage races, but not in a single stage race. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in a single-stage mountain bike ultra-marathon. In the 'Swiss Bike Masters' over 120 km with a climb of ~ 5,000 m in altitude, we determined pre and post race body mass, hematocrit, plasma sodium concentration ([Na⁺]), and urinary specific gravity in 37 cyclists. Athletes recorded their fluid intake while racing. No athlete developed EAH. The cyclists drank on average (means ± SD) 0.7 ± 0.2 l/h. Fluid intake was significantly and negatively related to race time (r = -0.41, P < 0.05), but showed no association with post race plasma [Na⁺], the change in plasma [Na⁺], post race body mass, or the change in body mass. The athletes lost 1.4 kg body mass (P < 0.05), plasma [Na⁺] decreased by 0.7% (P < 0.05), plasma volume increased by 1.4% and urinary specific gravity increased by 0.4% (P < 0.05). The change in body mass was neither related to post race plasma [Na⁺] nor to the change in plasma [Na⁺]. The decrease in plasma [Na⁺] was not related to fluid intake. The change in plasma [Na⁺] was related to post race plasma [Na⁺] (r = 0.40, P < 0.01). Ad libitum fluid intake showed no case of EAH in a single-stage mountain bike ultra-marathon. In contrast to previous findings, the faster athletes drank more than the slower ones. PMID:22229504

  18. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in triple iron ultra-triathletes than reported for ironman triathletes.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    "In a recent study of male and female ultra-marathoners in a 161-km ultra-marathon, the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was higher than reported for marathoners. Regarding triathletes, the prevalence of EAH has been investigated in Ironman triathletes, but not in Triple Iron ultra-triathletes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in male ultra-triathletes competing in a Triple Iron ultra-triathlon over 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma volume, plasma sodium concentration ([Na ⁺ ]) and urine specific gravity were determined in 31 male athletes with (means ± standard deviation) 42.1 ± 8.1 years of age, 77.0 ± 7.0 kg body mass, 1.78 ± 0.06 m body height and a BMI of 24.3 ± 1.7 kg/m² in the 'Triple Iron Triathlon Germany'. Of the 31 finishers, eight athletes (26%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and haematocrit decreased, plasma volume increased ( P < 0.05), plasma [Na ⁺], total body water and urine specific gravity remained stable. The decrease in body mass was related to both the decrease in fat mass and skeletal muscle mass ( P < 0.05), but was not related to overall race time, the change in plasma [Na ⁺ ], post-race plasma [Na ⁺ ], or urine specific gravity. The prevalence of EAH was higher in these Triple Iron ultra-triathletes compared to existing reports on Ironman triathletes. Body fluid homeostasis remained stable in these ultra-triathletes although body mass decreased." PMID:22784278

  19. Symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma successfully treated with enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Krasniqi, Avdyl Selmon; Hoxha, Faton Tatil; Bicaj, Besnik Xhafer; Hashani, Shemsedin Isuf; Hasimja, Shpresa Mehmet; Kelmendi, Sadik Mal; Gashi-Luci, Lumturije Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Gastric lipomas are rare tumors, accounting for 2%-3% of all benign gastric tumors. They are of submucosal or extremely rare subserosal origin. Although most gastric lipomas are usually detected incidentally, they can cause abdominal pain, dyspeptic disorders, obstruction, invagination, and hemorrhages. Subserosal gastric lipomas are rarely symptomatic. There is no report on treatment of subserosal gastric lipomas in the English literature. We present a case of a 50-year-old male with symptomatic subserosal gastric lipoma which was successfully managed with removal, enucleation of lipoma, explorative gastrotomy and edge resection for histology check of gastric wall. The incidence of gastric lipoma, advanced diagnostic possibilities and their role in treatment modalities are discussed. PMID:18855998

  20. Multinuclide digital subtraction imaging in symptomatic prostnetic joints

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.; Hattner, R.S.; Ruarke, W.C.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Murray, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    One hundred eleven patients with symptomatic prosthetic joints (86 hips, 23 knees, and two shoulders) were evaluated for prosthetic loosening and infection by combined technetium-99m-MDP/gallium-67 digital subtraction imaging. Clinical correlation was based on the assessment of loosening and bacterial cultures obtained at the time of surgery in 54 patients, joint aspiration cultures obtained in 37 patients, and long-term clinical follow-up for greater than 1.5 years in an additional 15 patients. Results revealed an 80-90% predictive value of a positive test for loosening, and a 95% predictive value of a negative test for infection. However, because of the low sensitivities and specificities observed, this approach to the evaluation of symptomatic prosthetic joints does not seem cost effective.

  1. [Symptomatic calcification in the newborn. Phenocopies of chondrodysplasia punctata].

    PubMed

    Leicher-Düber, A; Schumacher, R; Spranger, J

    1990-04-01

    Stippled epiphyses occur in the new-born and young infant in the different hereditary forms of chondrodysplasia punctata. Symptomatic stippling has been described also in association with chromosomal anomalies, gangliosidosis and drug induced embryopathies. We present patients with Cumarin-embryopathy (2), fetal alcohol syndrome (1), Zellweger-syndrome (2) and chromosomal anomaly 16 (1) and discuss the typical roentgenographic features, distribution and differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling. PMID:2160110

  2. [Occult cancer in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Duarte, C; Aguillón, J; Rodríguez, H

    1991-05-01

    The results of a prospective study undertaken in 29 patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are presented. Transrectal ultrasound, ultrasound-guided biopsy and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were utilized in the search for hidden cancer of the prostate. However, no cancer was detected in any patient. Very high values of PSA were found, particularly in patients with an indwelling catheter. Transrectal ultrasound yielded no false negatives and no complications were observed. PMID:1712190

  3. Management of symptomatic hemifacial spasm or trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Xing; Zhong, Jun; Dou, Ning-Ning; Xia, Lei; Li, Bin; Li, Shi-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) or trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a kind of hyperactivity disorder of cranial nerves caused by vascular compression. However, sometimes, the disease may arise from nerve damage produced by tumors, which was called as symptomatic HFS/TN. Until now, little is known about the exact mechanism and the necessity of microvascular decompression (MVD) regarding the tumor-induced HFS/TN, which is necessary to be retrospectively analyzed in a considerable sample. Among the 4021 patients who underwent MVD in our department between 2006 and 2014, 44 were finally diagnosed as symptomatic HFS or TN. These patients were focused in this study and their clinical features as well as intraoperative findings and postoperative outcomes were retrospectively investigated. Data analysis exhibited the symptomatic HFS/TN cases accounted for 1.1 % in the study, which were caused by epidermoid in 18 (40.9 %) and meningioma in 15 (34.1 %) followed by neuroma in 7 (15.9 %) as well as aneurysm in 2 (4.5 %) and arteriovenous malformation in 2 (4.5 %). Compared to those with idiopathic HFS/TN, younger females were more susceptible (p < 0.05). After resection of the neoplasm, the offending vessel was identified in 26 (59.1 %), which were followed by MVD process. Postoperatively, the symptoms relief rate was 88.6 %. Our study showed that surgical management of patients with symptomatic HFS/TN may lead to a satisfactory result, yet those primary lesions should be removed firstly. In some cases, a microvascular decompression process might be unnecessary afterward, but the entire nerve root should be checked to exclude any vessel in contact with. PMID:26876893

  4. Symptomatic versus asymptomatic pyeloplasties: A single institution review

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Peter D.; Assmus, Mark; Kiddoo, Darcie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Historically, pyeloplasties have been performed after symptoms and radiographic confirmation of an ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). However, with prenatal ultrasonography, the approach to patients has fundamentally changed. Increasingly, patients are diagnosed and treated before the advent of morbidity, based on imaging findings alone. However, optimum screening strategies and thresholds for intervention vary significantly, are controversial, and are not founded on outcome-based evidence. We examined all pyeloplasties performed at our institution and reviewed their indication for surgery. We hypothesized that, despite ubiquitous screening for UPJO, most pyeloplasties had been performed secondary to symptoms and did not benefit from antenatal screening. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of all pyeloplasties performed at the Stollery Children’s Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, over the past 8 years. Patients were categorized according to indication for surgery: symptomatic or asymptomatic. Results: Most (60%) of our pyeloplasties were performed for symptomatic indications. Furthermore, 12% of these patients had antenatally detected hydronephrosis that was thought to have resolved spontaneously during follow-up. Of our symptomatic patients, 37% were undergoing surveillance with the expectation for spontaneous resolution. Of the 29 patients who underwent pyeloplasty, 8 suffered a preoperative loss of function on renal scans; however, only 50% returned to within 90% of their original function. Conclusion: Despite active surveillance of antenatally detected hydronephrosis, most pyeloplasties at our institution were performed for de-novo symptoms. We believe that this simple observation reinforces that our current surveillance strategies are unable to predict and eliminate all morbidity from UPJO. PMID:25553157

  5. Human giardiasis in Serbia: asymptomatic vs symptomatic infection*

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, A.; Klun, I.; Bobić, B.; Ivović, V.; Vujanić, M.; Živković, T.; Djurković-Djaković, O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of giardiasis in all of Europe, reliable data on the incidence and prevalence in Western Balkan Countries (Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and FYR Macedonia) are scarce, and the relative contribution of waterborne and food-borne, or person-to-person and/or animalto- person, transmission of human giardiasis is not yet clear. To provide baseline data for the estimation of the public health risk caused by Giardia, we here review the information available on the epidemiological characteristics of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection in Serbia. Although asymptomatic cases of Giardia represent a major proportion of the total cases of infection, high rates of Giardia infection were found in both asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. No waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis have been reported, and it thus seems that giardiasis mostly occurs sporadically in our milieu. Under such circumstances, control measures to reduce the high prevalence of giardiasis in Serbia have focused on person-to-person transmission, encouraging proper hygiene, but for more targeted intervention measures, studies to identify other risk factors for asymptomatic and symptomatic infections are needed. PMID:21678797

  6. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  7. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations

    PubMed Central

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  8. Demographic Differences in Catheter Ablation After Hospital Presentation With Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Bhave, Prashant D; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Okin, Peter M; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is increasingly used for rhythm control in symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing this procedure are unclear. Methods and Results We used data on all admissions at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York to identify patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011. Our primary outcome was readmission for catheter ablation of AF, identified using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Cox regression models were used to assess relationships between demographic characteristics and catheter ablation, adjusting for Elixhauser comorbidities. We identified 397 612 eligible patients. Of these, 16 717 (4.20%, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.43) underwent ablation. These patients were significantly younger, more often male, more often white, and more often privately insured, with higher household incomes and lower rates of medical comorbidity. In Cox regression models, the likelihood of ablation was lower in women than men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.86) despite higher rates of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.24). Compared to whites, the likelihood of ablation was lower in Hispanics (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.64) and blacks (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.73), even though blacks had only a slightly lower likelihood of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.99) and a higher likelihood of all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 1.39). Essentially the same pattern existed in Hispanics. Conclusions We found differences in use of catheter ablation for symptomatic AF according to sex and race despite adjustment for available data on demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities. PMID:26396201

  9. Symptomatic intravenous antipyretic therapy: efficacy of metamizol, diclofenac, and propacetamol.

    PubMed

    Oborilová, Andrea; Mayer, Jirí; Pospísil, Zdenek; Korístek, Zdenek

    2002-12-01

    Fever is a common symptom in cancer patients. The most frequent causes of fever are infections, malignancy itself, various medications, transfusions, and allergy. Although it is necessary to treat the cause of fever, if possible, symptomatic fever management is also important. Surprisingly, little attention is paid to this topic in the medical literature, despite the fact that it is a very frequent problem. In order to support symptomatic fever therapy, we wanted to study the patients' discomfort accompanying fever and the beneficial effects of the symptomatic fever management. To the best of our knowledge, there is an absence of studies in this area, despite the fever discomfort can be an important reason for the antipyretic treatment, mainly in cancer patients. In this non-randomized open label pilot study, three intravenous antipyretics were tested in five groups of patients: diclofenac (75 mg, brief intravenous [IV] infusion) vs. metamizol (2500 mg or 1000 mg, brief IV infusion) vs. propacetamol (2000 mg or 1000 mg, slow IV injection or brief IV infusion). The study included 254 febrile episodes mainly in hemato-oncological patients with axillary temperature at least 38 degrees C. The main study endpoints were: changes in axillary temperature, improvement in patient comfort, and number and nature of adverse events. To support justification for symptomatic fever management in febrile patients, we asked the first 45 study subjects to fill in a questionnaire concerning their opinions about fever, fever-associated discomfort, and relief upon antipyretic therapy. All study medications had a significant antipyretic effect. However, metamizol at the dose 2500 mg was considered as the most effective, while propacetamol at the dose 1000 mg showed the lowest antipyretic efficacy. Concerning tolerability and adverse events, there were significant differences among the treatment groups. Diclofenac and metamizol (both 2500 mg and 1000 mg) were tolerated at best. All tested

  10. Genotypic characterization of symptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Nady, Soad; Galal, Gehan; Marzuuk, Naglaa; Rafaat, Marwaa M.; Daef, Enas; Din, Salwa Seif El; Purcell, Robert H.; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Sherman, Kenneth E.; Shata, M. Tarek

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in many developing countries. In Egypt, HEV seroprevalence is among the highest in the world; however, only a very limited number of Egyptian HEV sequences are currently available. Objectives The objectives were to determine the HEV genotype(s) currently circulating in Egypt. Study Design AVH patients without serologic evidence of hepatitis A, B, and C viruses were evaluated for possible HEV infection using serologic assays for anti-HEV IgM and anti-HEV IgG and real-time PCR for HEV RNA. Stool suspensions from suspected cases were inoculated into rhesus macaques to confirm the presence of HEV. Sequence analysis was utilized to determine HEV genotype. Results Of 287 subjects with AVH enrolled, 58 had serologic evidence of acute HEV infection. Stool samples for two of these patients were repeatedly positive for HEV RNA by real-time PCR. Macaques experimentally inoculated with these human stools also developed viremia. Sequence analysis of open reading frame (ORF) 1 demonstrated that these isolates belonged to HEV genotype 1 and were 3.9% – 9.5% divergent from other genotype 1 isolates. ORF2 was 5.3% – 8.7% divergent from previously reported Egyptian isolates. Conclusions This study strongly suggests that genotype 1 HEV related to other North African isolates is circulating in acute symptomatic patients in Egypt. Further evaluation of genotypic variability is underway in this highly endemic cohort and is considered an important component of our increased understanding of HEV pathogenesis. PMID:19651539

  11. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  12. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  13. Babesiosis-induced acute kidney injury with prominent urinary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Moeckel, Gilbert; Palmer, Matthew; Perazella, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Babesia is an obligate intracellular erythrocyte parasite that can infect humans. Severe symptomatic disease from massive hemolysis and multiorgan system failure, including acute kidney injury (AKI), occurs. Acute tubular injury from a combination of volume depletion and heme pigment toxicity from profound hemolysis is the most common cause of AKI. We present a case of severe babesiosis complicated by dialysis-requiring AKI with the unique finding of large macrophages containing engulfed erythrocyte fragments in urine sediment. This urinary finding raised the possibility of another diagnosis distinct from acute tubular injury. Subsequent kidney biopsy demonstrated infection-associated acute interstitial nephritis. PMID:23643302

  14. Dose comparison of conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia – efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Biff F; Rock, Amy D; Woodward, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of 20 and 40 mg/day conivaptan (Vaprisol®) in patients with hypervolemic or euvolemic hyponatremia. Methods Hyponatremic patients – serum sodium (sNa) ≤130 mEq/L – received either 20 or 40 mg/day of conivaptan for 4 days, following an initial 20 mg loading dose. Efficacy was evaluated by the magnitude and extent of change in sNa. Safety was evaluated by the incidence of adverse events, changes in vital signs and laboratory parameters, rate of sNa correction, and frequency of infusion-site reactions. Pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results A total of 37 patients received 20 mg/day and 214 patients received 40 mg/day conivaptan. Baseline-adjusted sNa-area under the concentration–time curve increased by an average of 753.8±499.9 mEq·hr/L (20 mg/day) and 689.2±417.3 mEq·hr/L (40 mg/day) over the course of the 4-day treatment period. The majority of patients in both treatment groups achieved a 4 mEq/L increase in sNa over baseline in ~24 hours (82.5%). Average increase in sNa after 4 days was ~10 mEq/L, varying with dosage level and baseline volume status. Treatment success (normal sNa or increase of ≥6 mEq/L) was attained by 70.3% of patients in the 20 mg/day group and 72.0% in the 40 mg/day group. Conclusion Both 20 and 40 mg/day doses of conivaptan are efficacious in increasing sNa over 4 days of treatment with no observed increase in the frequency of adverse events or specific infusion-site reactions using the higher dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both doses were similar to what has been reported previously, exhibiting greater-than-dose-proportional plasma concentrations. PMID:26848258

  15. Ginsenoside Re Attenuates Neuroinflammation in a Symptomatic ALS Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mudan; Yang, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons, which cause paralysis and respiratory dysfunction. There is currently no permanently effective drug for patients with ALS. Ginsenoside Re (G-Re), one of the most active ingredients of ginseng, has pharmacological activities that affect a number of targets. To investigate the effects of G-Re on neuroinflammation, we used G-Re (2.5[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]g/g) at the Joksamni acupressure point (ST36) once every other day for one week. To evaluate G-Re function in symptomatic human-superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1[Formula: see text] transgenic mice, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were performed with the spinal cord of symptomatic hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice. Here, we report that G-Re exhibits potent neuroprotective effects against neuroinflammation in a murine model of ALS. G-Re treatment reduced the loss of motor neurons and active-microglia-related expression of Iba-1 in the spinal cord of symptomatic hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice. In addition, compared with age-matched hSOD1(G93A) mice, G-Re-treated hSOD1(G93A) mice showed a significant reduction in expression of pro-inflammatory proteins such as CD14 and TNF-[Formula: see text] protein related to TLR4 signaling pathway. G-Re administration also led to a decrease in cell death-related phospho-p38 protein levels, and had an antioxidative effect by reducing HO1 expression. Together, our data suggest that G-Re could have potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects on ALS by inhibiting the TLR4 pathway. PMID:27080948

  16. Symptomatic Post-Discectomy Pseudocyst after Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of symptomatic postdiscectomy pseudocyst (PP) after endoscopic discectomy and to compare the results of surgical and conservative management of them. Methods Initial study participants were 1,503 cases (1,406 patients) receiving endoscopic lumbar discectomy by 23-member board of neurosurgeons from March 2003 to October 2008. All patients' postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated. On the postoperative MRI, cystic lesion of T2W high and T1W low at discectomy site was regarded as PP. Reviews of medical records and radiological findings were done. The PP patients were divided into two groups, surgical and conservative management by treatment modality after PP detection. We compared the results of the two groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back pain (LBP), VAS for leg pain (LP) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Results Among 1,503 cases of all male soldiers, the MRIs showed that pseudocysts formed in 15 patients, about 1.0% of the initial cases. The mean postoperative interval from surgery to PP detection was 53.7 days. Interlaminar approach was correlated with PP formation compared with transforaminal approach (p=0.001). The mean VAS for LBP and LP in the surgical group improved from 6.5 and 4.8 to 2.0 and 2.3, respectively. The mean VAS for LBP and LP in the conservative group improved from 4.4 and 4.4 to 3.9 and 2.3, respectively. There was no difference in treatment outcome between surgical and conservative management of symptomatic PP. Conclusion Although this study was done in limited environment, symptomatic PP was detected at two months' postoperative period in about 1% of cases. Interlaminar approach seems to be more related with PP compared with transforaminal approach. PMID:21494360

  17. Treatment of symptomatic intraosseous pneumatocyst using intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Formby, Peter M; Kang, Daniel G; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Intraosseous pneumatocysts are benign air-containing lesions that are most often found in the spine and pelvis and are nearly always treated nonoperatively. Although rarely clinically symptomatic, studies have shown pneumatocysts to be present in up to 10% of computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis and spine. Radiographic characteristics of these lesions include a localized collection of gas with a thin sclerotic rim, no bony destruction, no soft tissue masses, and no medullary abnormalities. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice, with Hounsfield units ranging from -580 to -950, showing a gas-containing lesion. Few studies have described the management of symptomatic pneumatocysts, and all reported cases concern underwater divers, presumably because of greater pressure cycling and barotrauma encountered while underwater diving. The goal of this report is to describe the intraoperative CT-guided navigation and percutaneous injection of calcium sulfate-calcium phosphate composite bone graft substitute material for the treatment of a symptomatic pneumatocyst in the ilium of a Navy dive instructor. The patient reported a 1-year history of increasing buttock pain with increased depth of diving, consistently reproduced by diving past a depth of 20 to 30 feet. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description in the English literature of the operative treatment of an intraosseous pneumatocyst of the ilium. The use of intraoperative CT guidance permitted accurate percutaneous localization, decompression, and filling of the lesion with synthetic bone graft substitute, with complete early relief of symptoms. At 6-month follow up, the patient had reached diving depths of 170 feet without pain. PMID:25760515

  18. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28%) presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy could bring clear advantages

  19. Symptomatic aorto-pulmonary collaterals early after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Carrozza, Marianna; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Enlarged bronchial arteries and/or systemic-to-pulmonary collaterals have been frequently demonstrated in association with transposition of the great arteries. They are usually clinically silent, although they might be large enough to cause accelerated pulmonary vascular obstructive disease or symptomatic cardiac volume overload after surgical repair. We report on a low-weight neonate with transposition of the great arteries and intact ventricular septum who showed a stormy postoperative course because of multiple aorto-pulmonary collaterals early after a successful arterial switch operation. Percutaneous coil embolization of these anomalous vessels resulted in sudden weaning from mechanical ventilation and hospital discharge in a few weeks. PMID:18185950

  20. A symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Hee; Kim, Jin Mo

    2012-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts are formed by the arachnoid membrane of the nerve root at the lumbosacral level. Most of these cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for other causes of chronic lower back pain. This type of cyst requires a differential diagnosis to distinguish it from other causes of radiating pain and neurological symptoms. In the present case, a symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst was found, and pain relief was achieved by non-surgical treatment. A lumbosacral perineural cyst was identified from a differential diagnosis of a lumbar disc disorder that presented as radiating pain and neurological symptoms. PMID:22679550

  1. The case for angioplasty in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Marks, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  2. The Case for Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Ryan A.; Marks, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  3. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved. PMID:25136872

  4. Prognostic value of hyponatremia in heart failure patients: an analysis of the Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in the Relation with Serum Sodium Level in Asian Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure (COAST) study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Su; Park, Jin Joo; Kang, Seok-Min; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Wen, Ming-Shien; Zhang, Jian; Ge, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Hyponatremia is a well-known risk factor for poor outcomes in Western studies of heart failure (HF) patients. We evaluated the predictive value of hyponatremia in hospitalized Asian HF patients. Methods The Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in the Relation with Serum Sodium Level in Asian Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure (the COAST) study enrolled hospitalized patients with systolic HF (ejection fraction < 45%) at eight centers in South Korea, Taiwan, and China. The relationship between admission sodium level and clinical outcomes was analyzed in 1,470 patients. Results The mean admission sodium level was 138 ± 4.7 mmol/L, and 247 patients (16.8%) had hyponatremia defined as Na+ < 135 mmol/L. The 12-month mortality was higher in hyponatremic patients (27.9% vs. 14.6%, p < 0.001), and hyponatremia was an independent predictor of 12-month mortality (hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.65). During hospital admission, 57% of hyponatremic patients showed improvement without improvement in their clinical outcomes (p = 0.620). The proportion of patients with optimal medical treatment was only 26.5% and 44.2% at admission and discharge, respectively, defined as the combined use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and β-blocker. Underuse of optimal medical treatment was more pronounced in hyponatremic patients. Conclusions In hospitalized Asian HF patients, hyponatremia at admission is common and is an independent predictor of poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hyponatremic patients receive less optimal medical treatment than their counterparts. PMID:26161012

  5. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Associated With Jaundice and Elevated Aminotransferase Levels During Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Findings From the InC3 Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kimberly; Mirzazadeh, Ali; Rice, Thomas M.; Grebely, Jason; Kim, Arthur Y.; Cox, Andrea L.; Morris, Meghan D.; Hellard, Margaret; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H.; Dore, Gregory J.; Maher, Lisa; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Lauer, Georg; Prins, Maria; McGovern, Barbara H.

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic acute HCV infection and interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4) genotypes are important predictors of spontaneous viral clearance. Using data from a multicohort database (Injecting Cohorts [InC3] Collaborative), we establish an independent association between host IFNL4 genotype and symptoms of acute hepatitis C virus infection. This association potentially explains the higher spontaneous clearance observed in some patients with symptomatic disease. PMID:26973850

  6. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  7. Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Cord Herniation: Case Series and Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Wright, Neill M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there is little data on clinical outcomes. Clinical Presentation In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially due to multiple sclerosis. Finally compared to compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISH led to rapid improvement despite long duration of symptoms. Conclusion Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair. PMID:24871148

  8. Results of hemivertebrectomy and fusion for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Debnath, U K; McConnell, J R; Sengupta, D K; Mehdian, S M H; Webb, J K

    2003-06-01

    We retrospectively analysed ten consecutive patients (age range 32-77 years) treated surgically from 1994 to 1999 for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. Clinically, eight patients had varying grades of back pain and eight patients had paraparesis. Radiography showed calcification in 50% of the herniated discs. Two patients had two-level thoracic disc herniation. Hemivertebrectomy followed by discectomy and fusion was carried out in all patients. Instrumentation with cages was performed in eight patients and bone grafting alone in two patients. The average follow-up was 24 months (range 13-36 months). Six patients had an excellent or good outcome, three had a fair outcome and one had a poor outcome. One patient had atelectasis, which recovered within 2 days of surgery. Another patient had developed complete paraplegia, detected at surgery by SSEPs, and underwent resurgery following magnetic resonance (MR) scan with complete corpectomy and instrumented fusion. At 2 years, she had a functional recovery. The patient with poor outcome had undergone a previous discectomy at T9/10. He developed severe back pain and generalised hyper-reflexia following corpectomy and fusion for disc herniation at T10/11. We advocate anterior transthoracic discectomy following partial corpectomy for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. This procedure offers improved access to the thoracic disc for an instrumented fusion, which is likely to decrease the risk of iatrogenic injury to the spinal cord. PMID:12800003

  9. Familial Mediterranean Fever With Complete Symptomatic Remission During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Taek; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Mi Kang; Yoo, Jun Jae; Lee, Gye Yeon; Kae, Sea Hyub; Lee, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder, ethnically restricted and commonly found among populations surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. FMF is the most prevalent autoinflammatory disease; is characterized by recurrent, self-limited episodes of fever with serositis; and is caused by Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV) mutations on chromosome 16. We describe a case of adult-onset FMF with complete symptomatic remission during pregnancy, without the use of colchicine. A 25-year-old woman had presented with periodic fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting since she was 21. Her abdominal computed tomography scan showed intestinal nonrotation. She underwent exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy for her symptoms 1 year prior. She had a symptom-free pregnancy period, but abdominal pain and fever recurred after delivery. Mutation analysis of the MEFV gene revealed two point mutations (p.Leu110Pro and p.Glu148Gln). We report an adult female patient with FMF in Korea with complete symptomatic remission during pregnancy. PMID:26131005

  10. Supportive and symptomatic management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Esther V; McDermott, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    The main aims in the care of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are to minimize morbidity and maximize quality of life. Although no cure exists for ALS, supportive and symptomatic care provided by a specialist multidisciplinary team can improve survival. The basis for supportive management is shifting from expert consensus guidelines towards an evidence-based approach, which encourages the use of effective treatments and could reduce the risk of harm caused by ineffective or unsafe interventions. For example, respiratory support using noninvasive ventilation has been demonstrated to improve survival and quality of life, whereas evidence supporting other respiratory interventions is insufficient. Increasing evidence implicates a causal role for metabolic dysfunction in ALS, suggesting that optimizing nutrition could improve quality of life and survival. The high incidence of cognitive dysfunction and its impact on prognosis is increasingly recognized, although evidence for effective treatments is lacking. A variety of strategies are used to manage the other physical and psychological symptoms, the majority of which have yet to be thoroughly evaluated. The need for specialist palliative care throughout the disease is increasingly recognized. This Review describes the current approaches to symptomatic and supportive care in ALS and outlines the current guidance and evidence for these strategies. PMID:27514291

  11. Antibodies against specific proteins of and immobilizing activity against three strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato can be found in symptomatic but not in infected asymptomatic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hovius, J W; Hovius, K E; Oei, A; Houwers, D J; van Dam, A P

    2000-07-01

    In an area where Lyme disease is endemic in The Netherlands all dogs had positive titers by whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and appeared to be naturally infected by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. To compare the antibody responses of symptomatic dogs and asymptomatic controls, we performed Western blots and in vitro immobilization assays to study antibody-dependent bactericidal activity. Strains from three different genospecies were employed as the antigen source: B. burgdorferi strain B31, Borrelia garinii strain A87S, and Borrelia afzelii strain pKo. Antibodies against flagellin (p41) and p39 for three strains were found in sera from both symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs and were therefore considered to be markers of exposure. Antibodies against p56 and p30 of strain B31, against p75, p58, p50, OspC, and p<19 of strain A87S, and against p56, p54, p45, OspB, p31, p26, and p<19 of strain pKo were found significantly more frequently in sera from symptomatic dogs younger than 8 years when the first symptoms were observed than in those from age-matched controls (P<0.01). These antibodies were not found in preclinical sera and appeared during development of disease. Antibodies against OspA of strains B31 and A87S were only seen in acute-phase and convalescent sera from three dogs that recovered from disease. Incubation with 25% normal canine serum did not result in the immobilization of strains B31 and pKo, but partial immobilization of strain A87S (61%+/-24% [standard deviation] at 5 h) occurred. Seven of 15 sera from symptomatic dogs but none of the sera from 11 asymptomatic dogs had antibody-dependent immobilizing activity against one of the strains. Consecutive sera from one of these dogs immobilized two different strains. Antibody-mediated bactericidal serum was not seen before onset of disease, was strongest in the acute phase of disease, and fluctuated during chronic disease. From seven out of eight symptomatic dogs Borrelia DNA was amplified by

  12. Conservative management of symptomatic Carpal Bossing in an elite hockey player: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kissel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the characteristics and create awareness of symptomatic carpal bossing and discuss potential etiologies and the role of conservative management through the presentation of an athlete with traumatic onset of symptomatic carpal bossing. Clinical features: This case report outlines the presentation and conservative management of an elite eighteen year old hockey player with symptomatic carpal bossing after a traumatic on ice collision. Carpal bossing is a bony, dorsal prominence in the quadrangular joint of the wrist that is inconsistently symptomatic. Intervention and outcome: A conservative treatment plan consisting of education, reassurance, avoidance of aggravation, and soft tissue therapy allowed return to play in two weeks without restrictions or need for surgical consultation. Conclusion: With inconsistent recurrence rates and surgical complications, the role of conservative management for symptomatic carpal bossing deserves further exploration. The conservative practitioner should be aware of the signs and symptoms of symptomatic carpal bossing to institute suitable treatment. PMID:20037693

  13. Chronic basilar artery dissection with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Rajz, Gustavo; Vargas, Andres; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Basilar artery dissection (BAD) is a rare condition with a worse prognosis than a dissection limited to the vertebral artery. We report a rare case of chronic BAD with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 54-year-old woman. The diagnosis of acute BAD could only be made retrospectively, based on clinical and neuroradiological studies from a hospital admission 10months earlier. Angiography performed after her SAH showed unequivocal signs of imperfect healing; she was either post-recanalization of a complete occlusion or post-dissection. Residual multi-channel intraluminal defects led to the development of a small aneurysm, which was responsible for the massive hemorrhage. The occurrence of an associated aneurysm, and wall disease, but not an intraluminal process, reinforces the diagnosis of dissection. The patient was fully recovered at 90day follow-up. This case reinforces the need for long-term neuroradiological surveillance after non-hemorrhagic intracranial dissections to detect the development of de novo aneurysms. PMID:26960262

  14. Giardia in symptomatic dogs and cats in Europe--results of a European study.

    PubMed

    Epe, C; Rehkter, G; Schnieder, T; Lorentzen, L; Kreienbrock, L

    2010-10-11

    The percentage of Giardia infection in dogs and cats with gastrointestinal signs presenting to clinics was examined across Europe using the IDEXX SNAP Giardia Test (IDEXX Laboratories). Veterinary practices were asked to identify diarrheic and/or vomiting dogs and cats and to use the test on fecal samples from these animals. A selection for "asymptomatic" testing was also available on the data collection sheet for testing that occurred outside the target "symptomatic" population. Results from 8685 dogs and 4214 cats were submitted during the sampling period from 2005 to 2006. Analysis of the data showed 24.78% of the samples positive for Giardia among tested dogs and 20.3% among tested cats. The younger the dog or the cat, the higher the risk of being positive, peaking in the category below 6 months. The main clinical symptom, diarrhoea, also showed a higher risk of being positive, OR's of acute diarrhoea were almost double of those of the category "asymptomatic" for dogs or cats, the same range was calculated for chronic diarrhoea. Differences in participating countries were also seen. The risk of being positive was half or less in UK, Spain, Netherlands, Italy compared to Germany, and only in Belgium it showed to be higher. The results of this study show that Giardia is a common enteric agent among dogs and cats with gastrointestinal signs in Europe. PMID:20637546

  15. Stent-assisted coil embolization of a symptomatic middle cerebral artery aneurysm in an infant.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis E; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O; Pandey, Aditya S

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:25171722

  16. Initial clinical results of laser prostatectomy procedure for symptomatic BPH using a new 50-watt diode laser (wavelength 1000 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Krishna M.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers have been used for symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in both contact and non-contact modes with reported success rates equivalent to that of Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP). A new high power diode laser (Phototome), capable of delivering up to 50 watts of 1000 nm wavelength laser power via a 1 mm quartz fiber, was used to treat 15 patients with symptomatic BPH. Five patients had acute retention, 3 had long term catheter (7 - 48 months), and 8 had severe prostatism. Spinal anesthesia was used in 11 patients, and 4 patients had local anesthesia and intravenous sedation. Four quadrant coagulation with an angle firing probe delivering 50 watts of laser power for 60 seconds in one quadrant was used as the core of the treatment in 11 patients, contact vaporization of BPH tissue was performed in one patient using a 4.5 mm ball tip was used in one patient and three patients with bladder neck stenosis had bladder neck incision performed using a 1 mm quartz fiber delivering 30 watts of laser power. A foley catheter was left indwelling and removed after 5 - 7 days. All patients except one were catheter free after a mean of 8 days. One patient continued to have severe prostatism and had a TURP performed with good results after 3 months of his laser prostatectomy procedure. AUA symptom scores available in 11 patients was found to be 4 after 1 - 3 months of the initial procedure.

  17. The effect of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. Results This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. Conclusions This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on

  18. Repetitive surgery for recurrent symptomatic endometriosis: what to do?

    PubMed

    Vercellini, Paolo; Barbara, Giussy; Abbiati, Annalisa; Somigliana, Edgardo; Viganò, Paola; Fedele, Luigi

    2009-09-01

    In spite of the increasing number of operative laparoscopies performed for endometriosis associated pelvic pain, postoperative symptomatic recurrences are very common. Reoperation is often considered the best treatment option, but the extent and duration of the effect of second-line surgery is still unclear. The best available evidence has been reviewed in order to define the results of repetitive conservative surgery, the effects of pelvic denervating procedures and postoperative medical treatments, as well as the long-term outcome of definitive surgery. Because of the paucity of published data, estimating the real risk of symptomatic recurrence and need for reoperation after repetitive conservative surgery for endometriosis is very difficult. Based on the limited information available, the long-term outcome appears suboptimal, with a cumulative probability of pain recurrence between 20% and 40%, and of a further surgical procedure between 15% and 20%. These figures are probably an underestimate related to drawbacks in study design, exclusions of dropouts, and publication bias and should be considered with caution. Systematic complementary performance of denervating procedures in addition to reoperation cannot be recommended, as only a few symptomatic patients complain of predominantly midline, hypo-gastric pain. The outcome of hysterectomy for endometriosis-associated pain at medium-term follow-up seems quite satisfactory. Nevertheless, about 15% of patients had persistent symptoms, and 3-5% experienced worsening of pain. Concomitant bilateral oophorectomy reduced the risk of reoperation due to recurrent pelvic pain by six times. However, at least one gonad should be preserved in young women, especially in those with objections to the use of oestrogen-progestogens. Medical treatment appears to have limited and inconsistent effects when used for only a few months after conservative procedures. Data on the benefit of prolonged drug regimens with oral contraceptives

  19. Vomiting and Hyponatremia Are Risk Factors for Worse Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Hospitalized Due to Nonsurgical Abdominal Pain: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Goren, Idan; Israel, Ariel; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin N; Kliers, Iris; Gringauz, Irina; Dagan, Amir; Lavi, Bruno; Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad

    2016-04-01

    After initial evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), many patients complaining of abdominal pain are classified as suffering from nonsurgical abdominal pain (NSAP). Clinical characteristics and risk factors for worse prognosis were not published elsewhere.Characterizing the clinical profile of patients hospitalized due to NSAP and identifying predictor variables for worse clinical outcomes.We made a retrospective cohort analysis of patients hospitalized due to NSAP compared to matched control patients (for age, gender, and Charlson comorbidity index) hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons in a ratio of 1 to 10. We further performed in-group analysis of patients admitted due to NSAP in order to appreciate variables (clinical and laboratory parameters) potentially associated with worse clinical outcomes.Overall 23,584 patients were included, of which 2144 were admitted due to NSAP and 21,440 were matched controls. Patients admitted due to NSAP had overall better clinical outcomes: they had lower rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality (2.8% vs 5.5% and 7.9% vs 10.4% respectively, P < 0.001 for both comparisons). They also had a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (3.9 vs 6.2 days, P < 0.001). Rates of re-hospitalization within 30-days were not significantly different between study groups. Among patients hospitalized due to NSAP, we found that vomiting or hyponatremia at presentation or during hospital stay were associated with worse clinical outcomes.Compared to patients hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons, the overall prognosis of patients admitted due to NSAP is favorable. The combination of NSAP with vomiting and hyponatremia is associated with worse clinical outcomes. PMID:27057886

  20. Hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hypoalbuminemia predict an increased risk of mortality during the first year of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected Zambian and Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Dao, Christine N; Peters, Philip J; Kiarie, James N; Zulu, Isaac; Muiruri, Peter; Ong'ech, John; Mutsotso, Winfred; Potter, Dara; Njobvu, Lungowe; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Borkowf, Craig B; Bolu, Omotayo; Weidle, Paul J

    2011-11-01

    Early mortality rates after initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) are high in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined whether serum chemistries at ART initiation predicted mortality among HIV-infected women. From May 2005 to January 2007, we enrolled women initiating ART in a prospective cohort study in Zambia and Kenya. We used Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors associated with mortality. Among 661 HIV-infected women, 53 (8%) died during the first year of ART, and tuberculosis was the most common cause of death (32%). Women were more likely to die if they were both hyponatremic (sodium <135 mmol/liter) and hypochloremic (chloride <95 mmol/liter) (37% vs. 6%) or hypoalbuminemic (albumin <34 g/liter, 13% vs. 4%) when initiating ART. A body mass index <18 kg/m(2) [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 5.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6-10.6] and hyponatremia with hypochloremia (aHR 4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.4) were associated with 1-year mortality after adjusting for country, CD4 cell count, WHO clinical stage, hemoglobin, and albumin. Among women with a CD4 cell count >50 cells/μl, hypoalbuminemia was also a significant predictor of mortality (aHR=3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.8). Baseline hyponatremia with hypochloremia and hypoalbuminemia predicted mortality in the first year of initiating ART, and these abnormalities might reflect opportunistic infections (e.g., tuberculosis) or advanced HIV disease. Assessment of serum sodium, chloride, and albumin can identify HIV-infected patients at highest risk for mortality who may benefit from more intensive medical management during the first year of ART. PMID:21417949

  1. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  2. Clinically symptomatic heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Deschauer, Marcus; Zierz, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    Two symptomatic patients with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are reported. Patient 1, a 21-year-old female professional tennis player, suffered from exercise-induced attacks of muscle pain, burning sensations and proximal weakness. Patient 2, a 30-year-old male amateur marathon runner developed muscle cramps and rhabdomyolysis upon extensive exercise and insolation-induced fever. In both patients, the common p.S113L mutation was found in heterozygote state. No second mutation could be found upon sequencing of all the exons of CPT2 gene including exon-intron boundaries. Biochemically, residual CPT activity in muscle homogenate upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton-X-100 was intermediate between controls and patients with mutations on both alleles. Although CPT II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder, the reported patients indicate that heterozygotes might also have typical attacks of myalgia, pareses or rhabdomyolysis. PMID:23184072

  3. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  4. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Erosion Causing Symptomatic Obstructive Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Nathan; Duchene, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Transcaval inferior vena cava (IVC) filter penetration involving the urinary tract is rare, but has been previously reported. We herein present unique management of symptomatic hydronephrosis secondary to erosion of an IVC filter limb into the lumen of the proximal right ureter. Case Presentation: A 59-year-old woman presented with abdominal and right flank pain in October 2015 and was found to have right hydronephrosis, apparently secondary to obstruction from erosion of an IVC filter limb into the proximal right ureter. This was effectively managed with percutaneous, endovascular, and endourologic procedures, without the need for a major invasive surgical procedure. Conclusion: Endovascular removal of the IVC filter was performed safely in this case and can be considered when the urinary tract is involved in filter erosion.

  5. Symptomatic Exposures Among California Inmates 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Michael; Al-Abri, Suad; Huntington, Serena; Carlson, Terry; Geller, Richard J; Olson, Kent R

    2015-09-01

    Prisoners have a high prevalence of substance misuse and abuse, but few studies have examined symptomatic exposures among incarcerated populations. We sought to further characterize the nature of these exposures among this population using the California Poison Control System data. Keyword searches identified inmate cases in 2011-2013 for patients 20+ years old exposed to a single substance and taken to hospital from jail, prison, or police custody. Comparisons were made with non-inmate cases during the same period, using similar limitations. Body stuffers and body packers were analyzed as a subgroup. Seven hundred four inmate cases were compared to 106,260 non-inmate cases. Inmates were more likely to be younger, male, and to have engaged in drug misuse or abuse. They most commonly ingested methamphetamine, heroin, acetaminophen, and anticonvulsants. Inmates were more likely to receive activated charcoal (OR 9.87, 8.20-11.88), whole bowel irrigation (OR 44.50, 33.83-58.54), undergo endotracheal intubation (OR 4.09, 2.91-5.73), and to experience a major clinical outcome or death (OR 1.41, 1.05-1.89). When body stuffers and packers were removed, clinical findings were similar, though the odds of a major outcome or death became statistically non-significant. Body stuffers and body packers primarily used methamphetamine and heroin, and compared with other inmates had significantly higher odds of both adverse clinical effects and poor outcome. This large series provides a profile of symptomatic exposures among inmates, a little-studied population. The potential for high morbidity among body stuffers and packers suggests that a high index of suspicion of such ingestions be maintained when evaluating patients prior to incarceration. PMID:25526949

  6. Sialyllactose ameliorates myopathic phenotypes in symptomatic GNE myopathy model mice.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Malicdan, May Christine V; Cho, Anna; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mine, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nishino, Ichizo; Noguchi, Satoru

    2014-10-01

    Patients with GNE myopathy, a progressive and debilitating disease caused by a genetic defect in sialic acid biosynthesis, rely on supportive care and eventually become wheelchair-bound. To elucidate whether GNE myopathy is treatable at a progressive stage of the disease, we examined the efficacy of sialic acid supplementation on symptomatic old GNE myopathy mice that have ongoing, active muscle degeneration. We examined the therapeutic effect of a less metabolized sialic acid compound (6'-sialyllactose) or free sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) by oral, continuous administration to 50-week-old GNE myopathy mice for 30 weeks. To evaluate effects on their motor performance in living mice, spontaneous locomotion activity on a running wheel was measured chronologically at 50, 65, 72 and 80 weeks of age. The size, force production, and pathology of isolated gastrocnemius muscle were analysed at the end point. Sialic acid level in skeletal muscle was also measured. Spontaneous locomotion activity was recovered in 6'-sialyllactose-treated mice, while NeuAc-treated mice slowed the disease progression. Treatment with 6'-sialyllactose led to marked restoration of hyposialylation in muscle and consequently to robust improvement in the muscle size, contractile parameters, and pathology as compared to NeuAc. This is due to the fact that 6'-sialyllactose is longer working as it is further metabolized to free sialic acid after initial absorption. 6'-sialyllactose ameliorated muscle atrophy and degeneration in symptomatic GNE myopathy mice. Our results provide evidence that GNE myopathy can be treated even at a progressive stage and 6'-sialyllactose has more remarkable advantage than free sialic acid, providing a conceptual proof for clinical use in patients. PMID:25062695

  7. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms. PMID:26558670

  8. Incidence of Symptomatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Hierholzer, Johannes Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin; Baumann, Clemens; Slotosch, Christine; Schulz, Rudolf

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of secondary symptomatic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) in patients previously treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty (VTP). Three hundred sixteen patients with 486 treated VCFs were included in the study according to the inclusion criteria. Patients were kept in regular follow-up using a standardized questionairre before, 1 day, 7 days, 6 months, and 1 year after, and, further on, on a yearly basis after VTP. The incidence of secondary symptomatic VCF was calculated, and anatomical distribution with respect to previous fractures characterized. Mean follow-up was 8 months (6-56 months) after VTP. Fifty-two of 316 (16.4 %) patients (45 female, 7 male) returned for treatment of 69 secondary VCFs adjacent to (35/69; 51%) or distant from (34/69; 49%) previously treated levels. Adjacent secondary VCF occurred significantly more often compared to distant secondary VCF. Of the total 69 secondary VCFs, 35 of 69 occurred below and 27 of 69 above pretreated VCFs. Of the 65 sandwich levels generated, in 7 of 65 (11%) secondary VCFs were observed. Secondary VCF below pretreated VCF occurred significantly earlier in time compared to VCF above and compared to sandwich body fractures. No major complication occurred during initial or follow-up intervention. We conclude that secondary VCFs do occur in individuals after VTP but the rate found in our study remains below the level expected from epidemiologic studies. Adjacent fractures occur more often and follow the cluster distribution of VCF as expected from the natural history of the underlying osteoporosis. No increased rate of secondary VCF after VTP was observed in this retrospective analysis. In accordance with the pertinent literature, short-term and also midterm clinical results are encouraging and provide further support for the usefulness and the low complication rate of this procedure as an adjunct to the spectrum of pain management in patients with severe

  9. Norovirus Infections in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Food Handlers in Japan▿

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Oka, Tomoichiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Hansman, Grant S.

    2007-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the world. At present, norovirus genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII/4), strains are the most prevalent in many countries. In this study we investigated 55 outbreaks and 35 sporadic cases of norovirus-associated gastroenteritis in food handlers in food-catering settings between 10 November 2005 and 9 December 2006 in Japan. Stool specimens were collected from both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals and were examined for norovirus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR; the results were then confirmed by sequence analysis. Norovirus was detected in 449 of 2,376 (19%) specimens. Four genogroup I (GI) genotypes and 12 GII genotypes, including one new GII genotype, were detected. The GII/4 sequences were predominant, accounting for 19 of 55 (35%) outbreaks and 16 of 35 (46%) sporadic cases. Our results also showed that a large number of asymptomatic food handlers were infected with norovirus GII/4 strains. Norovirus GII had a slightly higher mean viral load (1 log unit higher) than norovirus GI, i.e., 3.81 × 108 versus 2.79 × 107 copies/g of stool. Among norovirus GI strains, GI/4 had the highest mean viral load, whereas among GII strains, GII/4 had the highest mean viral load (2.02 × 108 and 7.96 × 109 copies/g of stool, respectively). Importantly, we found that asymptomatic individuals had mean viral loads similar to those of symptomatic individuals, which may account for the increased number of infections and the predominance of an asymptomatic transmission route. PMID:17928420

  10. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  11. Acute renal failure following oxalic acid poisoning: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid poisoning is being recognized as an emerging epidemic in the rural communities of Sri Lanka as it is a component of locally produced household laundry detergents. Herein we describe a case of a 32 year old female, presenting after direct ingestion of oxalic acid. She then went on to develop significant metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure, requiring dialysis. Renal biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with diffuse moderate acute tubular damage with refractile crystals in some of the tubules. The patient symptomatically improved with haemodialysis and renal functions subsequently returned to normal. PMID:22978510

  12. Management of Vertebral Stenosis Complicated by Presence of Acute Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Sahin, Gurdal; Turkbey, Baris; Elibol, Bulent

    2007-04-15

    A 44-year-old male presented with multiple punctate acute infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation and a computed tomographic angiogram showing stenosis of the right vertebral origin. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a new intraluminal filling defect at the origin of the stenotic vertebral artery where antegrade flow was maintained. This filling defect was accepted to be an acute thrombus of the vertebral origin, most likely due to rupture of a vulnerable plaque. The patient was treated with intravenous heparin. A control angiogram revealed dissolution of the acute thrombus under anticoagulation and the patient was treated with stenting with distal protection. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no additional acute ischemic lesions. We were unable to find a similar report in the English literature documenting successful management of an acute vertebral ostial thrombus with anticoagulation. Anticoagulation might be considered prior to endovascular treatment of symptomatic vertebral stenoses complicated by the presence of acute thrombus.

  13. Symptomatic Epidural Fluid Collection Following Cranioplasty after Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Ho; Wang, Ui Seok; Ha, Sang Woo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Symptomatic epidural fluid collection (EFC) arising as a complication of cranioplasty is underestimated and poorly described. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors for development of symptomatic EFC after cranioplasty following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods From January 2010 to December 2014, 82 cranioplasties following decompressive hemicraniectomy for TBI were performed by a single surgeon. Of these 82 patients, 17 were excluded from this study due to complications including postoperative hematoma, hydrocephalus, or infection. Sixty-five patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they had developed symptomatic EFC: 13 patients required an evacuation operation due to symptomatic EFC after cranioplasty (Group I), and 52 obtained good outcome without development of symptomatic EFC (Group II). We compared the 2 groups to identify the risk factors for symptomatic EFC according to sex, age, initial diagnosis, timing of cranioplasty, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during cranioplasty, size of bone flap, and bone material. Results A large bone flap and CSF leakage during cranioplasty were identified as the statistically significant risk factors (p<0.05) for development of symptomatic EFC. In Group I, 11 patients were treated successfully with 5 L catheter drainage, but 2 patients showed recurrent EFC, eventually necessitating bone flap removal. Conclusion A larger skull defect and intraoperative CSF leakage are proposed to be the significant risk factors for development of symptomatic EFC. Careful attention to avoid CSF leakage during cranioplasty is needed to minimize the occurrence of EFC, especially in cases featuring a large cranial defect. PMID:27182495

  14. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute and acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Aron, Jonathan; Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients developing liver failure; acute on chronic liver failure and acute liver failure continues to increase, along with the demand for donor livers for transplantation. As such there is a clinical need to develop effective extracorporeal devices to support patients with acute liver failure or acute-on-chronic liver failure to allow time for hepatocyte regeneration, and so avoiding the need for liver transplantation, or to bridge the patient to liver transplantation, and also potentially to provide symptomatic relief for patients with cirrhosis not suitable for transplantation. Currently devices can be divided into those designed to remove toxins, including plasma exchange, high permeability dialyzers and adsorption columns or membranes, coupled with replacement of plasma proteins; albumin dialysis systems; and bioartificial devices which may provide some of the biological functions of the liver. In the future we expect combinations of these devices in clinical practice, due to the developments in bioartificial scaffolds. PMID:26894968

  15. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Following Symptomatic Menopausal Transition: A Nationwide Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Yu; Shen, Cheng-Che; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Wen, Chun-Hsien; Chiang, Yung-Yen; Lu, Ti

    2016-02-01

    Menopausal transition is highly symptomatic in at least 20% of women. A higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms, including depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance, has been shown in women with symptomatic menopausal transition. However, a clear correlation between symptomatic menopausal transition and psychiatric disorders has not been established.We explored the association between symptomatic menopausal transition and subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia as well as bipolar, depressive, anxiety, and sleep disorders.We investigated women who were diagnosed with symptomatic menopausal transition by an obstetrician-gynecologist according to the data in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprised age-matched women without symptomatic menopausal transition. The incidence rate and the hazard ratios of subsequent newly diagnosed psychiatric disorders were evaluated in both cohorts, based on the diagnoses of psychiatrists.The symptomatic menopausal transition and control cohorts each consisted of 19,028 women. The incidences of bipolar disorders (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-2.80), depressive disorders (HR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.93-2.45), anxiety disorders (HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.84-2.41), and sleep disorders (HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.73-2.34) were higher among the symptomatic menopausal transition women than in the comparison cohort. After stratifying for follow-up duration, the incidence of newly diagnosed bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders following a diagnosis of symptomatic menopausal transition remained significantly increased in the longer follow-up groups (1-5 and ≥ 5 years).Symptomatic menopausal transition might increase the risk of subsequent newly onset bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders. A prospective study is necessary to confirm

  16. Cavum Septi Pellucidi in Symptomatic Former Professional Football Players.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Muehlmann, Marc; Tripodis, Yorghos; Stamm, Julie M; Pasternak, Ofer; Giwerc, Michelle Y; Coleman, Michael J; Baugh, Christine M; Fritts, Nathan G; Heinen, Florian; Lin, Alexander; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-02-15

    Post-mortem studies reveal a high rate of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). It remains, however, to be determined whether or not the presence of CSP may be a potential in vivo imaging marker in populations at high risk to develop CTE. The aim of this study was to evaluate CSP in former professional American football players presenting with cognitive and behavioral symptoms compared with noncontact sports athletes. Seventy-two symptomatic former professional football players (mean age 54.53 years, standard deviation [SD] 7.97) as well as 14 former professional noncontact sports athletes (mean age 57.14 years, SD 7.35) underwent high-resolution structural 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Two raters independently evaluated the CSP, and interrater reliability was calculated. Within National Football League players, an association of CSP measures with cognitive and behavioral functioning was evaluated using a multivariate mixed effects model. The measurements of the two raters were highly correlated (CSP length: rho = 0.98; Intraclass Correlation Coefficient [ICC] 0.99; p < 0.0001; septum length: rho = 0.93; ICC 0.96; p < 0.0001). For presence versus absence of CSP, there was high agreement (Cohen kappa = 0.83, p < 0.0001). A higher rate of CSP, a greater length of CSP, as well as a greater ratio of CSP length to septum length was found in symptomatic former professional football players compared with athlete controls. In addition, a greater length of CSP was associated with decreased performance on a list learning task (Neuropsychological Assessment Battery List A Immediate Recall, p = 0.04) and decreased test scores on a measure of estimate verbal intelligence (Wide Range Achievement Test Fourth Edition Reading Test, p = 0.02). Given the high prevalence of CSP in neuropathologically confirmed CTE in addition to the results of this study, CSP may serve as a potential early in vivo imaging marker to identify those at high risk for CTE

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome: a mild disorder; purely symptomatic treatment.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) Patients frequently complain of occasional bowel movement disorders, associated with abdominal pain or discomfort, but they are rarely due to an underlying organ involvement. Even when patients have recurrent symptoms, serious disorders are no more frequent in these patients than in the general population, unless other manifestations, anaemia, or an inflammatory syndrome is also present; (2) There is currently no way of radically modifying the natural course of recurrent irritable bowel syndrome; (3) The effects of antispasmodics on abdominal pain have been tested in about 20 randomised controlled trials. Pinaverium and peppermint essential oil have the best-documented efficacy and only moderate adverse effects. Antispasmodics with marked atropinic effects do not have a favourable risk-benefit balance; (4) Tricylic antidepressants seem to have only modest analgesic effects in this setting. In contrast, their adverse effects are frequent and they have somewhat negative risk-benefit balances. Nor has the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) been demonstrated; (5) Alosetron and tegaserod carry a risk of potentially life-threatening adverse effects and therefore have negative risk-benefit balances; (6) Seeds of plants such as psyllium and ispaghul, as well as raw apples and pears, have a limited impact on constipation and pain. Osmotic laxatives are effective on constipation. Symptomatic treatments for constipation can sometimes aggravate abdominal discomfort; (7) Loperamide has been poorly assessed in patients with recurrent irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea. It modestly slows bowel movement but does not relieve pain or abdominal discomfort; (8) Dietary measures have not been tested in comparative trials. Some patients are convinced that certain foods provoke a recurrence of irritable bowel syndrome, but restrictive diets carry a risk of nutritional deficiencies; (9) Various techniques intended to control emotional and

  18. Why do symptomatic patients delay obtaining care for tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Asch, S; Leake, B; Anderson, R; Gelberg, L

    1998-04-01

    The resurgence of tuberculosis (TB) has coincided with deteriorating access to care for high-risk populations. We sought to determine what perceived access barriers delayed symptomatic TB patients from obtaining care. In order to do this, we conducted a survey in Los Angeles County, California, using a consecutive sample of patients with active TB as confirmed by the county TB control authority. The measures used in the study were a self-reported delay in seeking care of more than 60 d from symptom onset, a period sufficient to cause skin-test conversion in exposed contacts, and self-reported access barriers. The county TB registry provided supplementary clinical data. We found that one in five of the 248 symptomatic respondents (response rate: 60%) delayed obtaining care for > 60 d (mean = 74 d, SD = 216 d). During the delay, patients exposed an average of eight contacts. As compared with the rest of the sample, delay was more common in those who were unemployed (25% versus 14%), concerned about cost (27% versus 14%), anticipated prolonged waiting-room time (26% versus 14%), believed they could treat themselves (31% versus 14%), anticipated difficulty in getting an appointment (28% versus 16%), were uncertain about where to get care (33% versus 16%), and feared immigration authorities (47% versus 18%) (p < 0.05). Logistic regression revealed that uncertainty about where to get care, unemployment, and belief in the efficacy of self-treatment independently predicted delay > 60 d. Illness severity as measured by chest radiography, sputum smears, and symptoms had little impact on delay. We conclude that because access variables such as lack of employment and knowledge about where to obtain care were more closely associated with clinically significant delay than was severity of illness, these results raise concerns about the equity of access to care among TB patients. The results suggest that improving the availability of services for high-risk groups may substantially

  19. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. PMID:26896381

  20. Clinical outcomes of symptomatic arterioportal fistulas after transcatheter arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masakazu; Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the complications and clinical outcomes of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for symptoms related to severe arterioportal fistulas (APFs). METHODS: Six patients (3 males, 3 females; mean age, 63.8 years; age range, 60-71 years) with chronic liver disease and severe APFs due to percutaneous intrahepatic treatment (n = 5) and portal vein (PV) tumor thrombosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) underwent TAE for symptoms related to severe APFs [refractory ascites (n = 4), hemorrhoidal hemorrhage (n = 1), and hepatic encephalopathy (n = 1)]. Control of symptoms related to APFs and complications were evaluated during the follow-up period (range, 4-57 mo). RESULTS: In all patients, celiac angiography revealed immediate retrograde visualization of the main PV before TAE, indicating severe APF. Selective TAE for the hepatic arteries was performed using metallic coils (MC, n = 4) and both MCs and n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n = 2). Three patients underwent repeated TAEs for residual APFs and ascites. Four patients developed PV thrombosis after TAE. During the follow-up period after TAE, APF obliteration and symptomatic improvement were obtained in all patients. CONCLUSION: Although TAE for severe APFs may sometimes be complicated by PV thrombosis, TAE can be an effective treatment to improve clinical symptoms related to severe APFs. PMID:23494252

  1. Surgical treatment of symptomatic acromioclavicular joint problems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, R David; McCarty, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Excision of the distal clavicle has become the mainstay of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular joint arthritis and osteolysis refractory to nonoperative management. Surgical options for symptomatic acromioclavicular joint abnormalities refractory to nonoperative treatment are the classic open distal clavicle excision, direct (superior) arthroscopic excision, and indirect (bursal) arthroscopic distal clavicle excision. We asked whether any of these three procedures provided a better result. We systematically reviewed the medical literature (Medline, EMBASE), assigned a level of evidence for available studies, and critically identified the flaws and biases in the studies to provide comparisons between the published reports. We limited the literature review to clinical reports in the English language published in peer-reviewed journals. The literature supports surgical excision, but the reports are all Level III or IV evidence consisting largely of retrospective case series. Arthroscopic distal clavicle resection has provided more "good or excellent" results than has the open procedure, but is comprised of low-level evidence. Distal clavicle resection has provided satisfactory results when combined with other procedures. Simple distal clavicle resection may have worse outcomes when performed after preceding trauma. The published reports of the removal of medial acromial and inferior distal clavicle osteophytes when performing subacromial decompression are conflicting and may increase post-operative acromioclavicular symptoms. PMID:17159577

  2. Evaluation and management of symptomatic isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissection.

    PubMed

    Galastri, Francisco Leonardo; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Motta-Leal-Filho, Joaquim Mauricio; De Fina, Bruna; Affonso, Breno Boueri; de Amorim, Jorge Eduardo; Wolosker, Nelson; Nasser, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe 10 cases of symptomatic isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissection (ISCTD) in order to evaluate the initial clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment modalities and outcomes. A retrospective search was performed from 2009 to 2014 and 10 patients with ISCTD were included in the study. Patients with associated aortic and/or other visceral artery dissection were excluded. The following information was collected from each case: sex, age, associated risk factors, symptoms, diagnostic method, anatomic dissection pattern, treatment modality and outcome. Most patients were male (90%), with an average age of 44.8 years, and the most common symptom was abdominal pain (100%). Hypertension and vasculitis (polyarteritis nodosa) were the most frequent risk factors (40% and 30%, respectively). Diagnosis was made in all patients with computed tomography. Dissection was limited to the celiac trunk in three patients and extended to celiac branches in the other seven. Initial conservative treatment was attempted in every case and was successful in nine patients. In one case, initial conservative treatment was unsuccessful and arterial stenting with coil embolization of the false lumen was performed. After successful initial treatment, late progression of the dissection to aneurysmal dilatation was observed in two patients and it was decided to perform endovascular treatment. Mean follow-up was 19 months, ranging from 2 to 59 months. In conclusion, initial conservative treatment seems adequate for most patients with ISCTD. Long-term follow-up is mandatory, owing to the risk of later progression to aneurysm. PMID:25910918

  3. Unusual symptomatic inclusion cysts in a newborn: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dental lamina cysts are cysts that occur as white or pink small nodules, often multiple, approximately 1 to 3mm in diameter. They are typically located on the midpalatine raphe and less frequently on the maxillary and mandibular alveolar mucosa; in the latter case these can be appear to be neonatal teeth. On microscopic examination, these lesions show a stratified squamous epithelium (two to three cell layers); it is possible to find protein, keratin and/or exfoliated epithelial cells in the lumen of the lesions. Neonatal cysts usually show no particular symptoms. They are associated with an excellent prognosis because they regress spontaneously within a few weeks and are not associated to any complications. However, if pain, bleeding or other symptoms occur, a surgical excision is required. Case presentation In this paper, we present an anomalous case of symptomatic dental lamina cyst which affected a 60-day-old male Caucasian newborn. The surgical treatment was elective in this case and 6-month follow-ups were mandatory. Conclusions We can underline the successful predictability of the surgical approach; however, we consider that the treatment choice should take place in the light of medical history and clinical considerations, and always be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Further studies and reviews in this field should be performed in order to suggest guidelines for clinicians, although these cases are rare. PMID:25241967

  4. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  5. Radioembolization of Symptomatic, Unresectable Neuroendocrine Hepatic Metastases Using Yttrium-90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Hoffmann, Ralf-T.; Haug, Alexander; Sommer, Wieland H.; Raessler, Franziska; Trumm, Christoph G.; Schmidt, Gerwin P.; Ashoori, Nima; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Jakobs, Tobias F.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate safety, efficacy, and symptom-control of radioembolization in patients with unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETLMs). Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age of 62 years) with treatment-refractory NETLMs underwent radioembolization using yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres. Posttreatment tumor response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and tumor-marker levels. Laboratory and clinical toxicities and clinical symptoms were monitored. Results: The median activity delivered was 1.63 GBq (range 0.63-2.36). Imaging follow-up using RECIST at 3-month follow-up demonstrated partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease in 22.5, 75.0, and 2.5% of patients, respectively. In 97.5% of patients, the liver lesions appeared hypovascular or partially necrotic. The mean follow-up was 16.2 months with 40 patients (95.2%) remaining alive. The median decrease in tumor-marker levels at 3 months was 54.8% (chromogranin A) and 37.3% (serotonin), respectively. There were no acute or delayed toxicities greater than grade 2 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE (v3.0)]. No radiation-induced liver disease was noted. Improvement of clinical symptoms 3 months after treatment was observed in 36 of 38 symptomatic patients. Conclusion: Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-microspheres is a safe and effective treatment option in patients with otherwise treatment-refractory NETLMs. Antitumoral effect is supported by good local tumor control, decreased tumor-marker levels, and improved clinical symptoms. Further investigation is warranted to define the role of radioembolization in the treatment paradigm for NETLMs.

  6. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  7. A unique case of isolated, spontaneous, symptomatic celiac trunk dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rockley, Mark; Panu, Anukul; Turnbull, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cases of isolated spontaneous celiac trunk dissections have been appearing in the literature more recently with the increased availability of high-resolution computerized tomography angiograms. We report a unique case of this entity. A 48-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain that radiated to the back and worsened with breathing. This was diagnosed as a celiac trunk dissection by computerized tomography angiogram. She was treated conservatively with antihypertensive medications, anticoagulants, and opioid medication for pain control. PMID:27489674

  8. Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease and Decreased Risk of Cancer-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; de la Aleja, Jesús González; Martínez-Salio, Antonio; Louis, Elan D.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The few studies that have assessed the association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer have had conflicting results. In addition, these studies ascertained participants either from treatment settings (ie, service-based studies) or by using a records linkage system (ie, medical records of patients evaluated at clinics or hospitals) and, therefore, were prone to selection bias. Our purpose was to estimate the risk of cancer mortality in a large population-based sample of elderly people, comparing participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (atherosclerotic stroke and coronary disease) to their counterparts without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (ie, controls) in the same population. In this population-based, prospective study (Neurological Disorders of Central Spain, NEDICES), 5262 elderly community-dwelling participants with and without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for a median of 12.1 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were reviewed. A total of 2701 (53.3%) of 5262 participants died, including 314 (68.6%) of 458 participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and 2387 (49.7%) of 4804 controls. Cancer mortality was reported significantly less often in those with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (15.6%) than in controls (25.6%) (P < 0.001). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of cancer-specific mortality was decreased in participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (HR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55−0.98, P = 0.04) vs. those without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (reference group). In an adjusted Cox model, HR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38−0.89; P = 0.01. This population-based, prospective study suggests that there is an inverse association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer mortality. PMID:26266364

  9. Two cases of symptomatic perineural cysts (tarlov cysts) in one family: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jun; Kim, Il Sup; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-09-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed. PMID:19096672

  10. Two Cases of Symptomatic Perineural Cysts (Tarlov Cysts) in One Family: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed. PMID:19096672

  11. Pre-symptomatic diagnosis and treatment of filovirus diseases.

    PubMed

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Whitehouse, Chris A; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses are virulent human pathogens which cause severe illness with high case fatality rates and for which there are no available FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics. Diagnostic tools including antibody- and molecular-based assays, mass spectrometry, and next-generation sequencing are continually under development. Assays using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have become the mainstay for the detection of filoviruses in outbreak settings. In many cases, real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR allows for the detection of filoviruses to be carried out with minimal manipulation and equipment and can provide results in less than 2 h. In cases of novel, highly diverse filoviruses, random-primed pyrosequencing approaches have proved useful. Ideally, diagnostic tests would allow for diagnosis of filovirus infection as early as possible after infection, either before symptoms begin, in the event of a known exposure or epidemiologic outbreak, or post-symptomatically. If tests could provide an early definitive diagnosis, then this information may be used to inform the choice of possible therapeutics. Several exciting new candidate therapeutics have been described recently; molecules that have therapeutic activity when administered to animal models of infection several days post-exposure, once signs of disease have begun. The latest data for candidate nucleoside analogs, small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, phosphorodiamidate (PMO) molecules, as well as antibody and blood-product therapeutics and therapeutic vaccines are discussed. For filovirus researchers and government agencies interested in making treatments available for a nation's defense as well as its general public, having the right diagnostic tools to identify filovirus infections, as well as a panel of available therapeutics for treatment when needed, is a high priority. Additional research in both areas is required for ultimate success, but significant progress is being made to reach these goals. PMID

  12. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A Pubmed search using the specific key words “LSTV,” “lumbosacral transitional vertebrae,” and “Bertolotti's Syndrome” was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. Results LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a “false joint” susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Conclusions Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential

  13. Pre-symptomatic diagnosis and treatment of filovirus diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Ward, Michael D.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses are virulent human pathogens which cause severe illness with high case fatality rates and for which there are no available FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics. Diagnostic tools including antibody- and molecular-based assays, mass spectrometry, and next-generation sequencing are continually under development. Assays using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have become the mainstay for the detection of filoviruses in outbreak settings. In many cases, real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR allows for the detection of filoviruses to be carried out with minimal manipulation and equipment and can provide results in less than 2 h. In cases of novel, highly diverse filoviruses, random-primed pyrosequencing approaches have proved useful. Ideally, diagnostic tests would allow for diagnosis of filovirus infection as early as possible after infection, either before symptoms begin, in the event of a known exposure or epidemiologic outbreak, or post-symptomatically. If tests could provide an early definitive diagnosis, then this information may be used to inform the choice of possible therapeutics. Several exciting new candidate therapeutics have been described recently; molecules that have therapeutic activity when administered to animal models of infection several days post-exposure, once signs of disease have begun. The latest data for candidate nucleoside analogs, small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, phosphorodiamidate (PMO) molecules, as well as antibody and blood-product therapeutics and therapeutic vaccines are discussed. For filovirus researchers and government agencies interested in making treatments available for a nation’s defense as well as its general public, having the right diagnostic tools to identify filovirus infections, as well as a panel of available therapeutics for treatment when needed, is a high priority. Additional research in both areas is required for ultimate success, but significant progress is being made to reach these goals. PMID

  14. Clinical & radiological evaluation of atherosclerotic changes in carotid & coronary arteries in asymptomatic & clinically symptomatic individuals as a tool for pre-symptomatic diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Prasad, T.N.; Ananthalakshmi, S.; Karthik, G.A.; Cherian, George; Dayananda, Yaligar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: An increase in prevalence of atherosclerosis has been noted worldwide with reports of higher incidence of atherosclerotic vascular changes in Asian Indians. There is a need to measure vascular atherosclerotic changes and provide objective parameter to predict cardiac and cerebrovascular adverse events. Atherosclerotic changes in carotids and coronaries are generally accepted as an association. We attempted in this study to relate intimal-luminal changes in carotid arteries to luminal changes in coronary arteries. Our study presents results of high resolution ultra sonographic (HRUS) evaluation of intimal-medial-thickness (IMT) in carotid with luminal changes in coronaries on multidetector-CT (MDCT) in clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. Methods: In this prospective study, HRUS examination of the carotid bifurcation was performed in 151 individuals to measure IMT in asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Assessments of coronary arteries of the same group of patients were evaluated by MDCT within a week interval. IMT changes were associated with age, sex, predisposing factors, calcium burden of coronaries and structural atherosclerotic changes in coronary arteries. Results: A linear association of IMT was observed with increasing age. IMT of 0.5-0.69 mm was noted in 50 per cent of patients between 51-56 yr with higher number of symptomatic patients in this group. Linear increases in coronary vascular changes were noted with increasing IMT thickness. Changes were more prevalent in diabetic, hypertensive, treadmill test (TMT) positive and clinically symptomatic patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Age-related progression of atherosclerosis was evident in internal carotid arteries. Significant association was observed in the IMT thickness of right common carotid (RCC) and coronary disease in symptomatic group; whereas IMT of left common carotid and internal carotid arteries did not show any association. RCC IMT between 0

  15. Invasive evaluation of plaque morphology of symptomatic superficial femoral artery stenoses using combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Sibin K; Safian, Robert D; Madder, Ryan D; Hanson, Ivan D; Pica, Mark C; Smith, James L; Goldstein, James A; Abbas, Amr E

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the plaque morphology of severe stenoses in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) employing combined near-infrared spectroscopy and intravascular ultrasound (NIRS-IVUS). Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Plaque composition of SFA stenoses has been characterized as primarily fibrous or fibrocalcific by non-invasive and autopsy studies. NIRS has been validated to detect lipid-core plaque (LCP) in the coronary circulation. We imaged severe SFA stenoses with NIRS-IVUS prior to revascularization in 31 patients (46 stenoses) with Rutherford claudication ⩾ class 3. Angiographic parameters included lesion location and stenosis severity. IVUS parameters included plaque burden and presence of calcium. NIRS images were analyzed for LCP and maximum lipid-core burden index in a 4-mm length of artery (maxLCBI4mm). By angiography, 38 (82.6%) lesions were calcified and 9 (19.6%) were chronic total occlusions. Baseline stenosis severity and lesion length were 86.0 ± 11.0% and 36.5 ± 46.5 mm, respectively. NIRS-IVUS identified calcium in 45 (97.8%) lesions and LCP in 17 (37.0%) lesions. MaxLCBI4mm was 433 ± 244. All lesions with LCP also contained calcium; there were no non-calcified lesions with LCP. In conclusion, this is the first study of combined NIRS-IVUS in patients with PAD. NIRS-IVUS demonstrates that nearly all patients with symptomatic severe SFA disease have fibrocalcific plaque, and one-third of such lesions contain LCP. These findings contrast with those in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and may have implications regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in different vascular beds. PMID:26957574

  16. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  17. Antibody isotypes in urethral swabs of symptomatic and asymptomatic men infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Naglaa F A; Eassa, Ahmed H A; Shoeib, Eman Y S; Abo-Raia, Gamal Y S

    2007-12-01

    Trichomoniasis may be asymptomatic or symptomatic in both sexes. The outcome of infection depends on the virulence factors of T. vaginalis, but these factors remain unclear. Genetic variability of the isolates and the host's immune response are likely to be key factors in that respect. Symptomatic and asymptomatic males infected with T. vaginalis were compared regarding the differences in antibody subclasses response in the urethral samples. In symptomatic cases there was a significant elevation in IgM, IgG1 & IgG2b levels in urethral samples, and a little, non-significant rise in IgG2a levels. However, there were no statistically significant differences between levels of IgA, IgG3 & IgG4. The results showed that specific IgG1 & IgM and to a lesser extent IgG2 may be involved in established symptomatic trichomoniasis in men, compared to asymptomatic ones. PMID:18383797

  18. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  19. Fatal case of acute gastroenteritis with multiple viral coinfections.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julien; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Germi, Raphaële; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Morand, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We report a fatal case of acute gastroenteritis in a child with autism spectrum disorder. Multiple viral coinfections were detected by PCR in the patient's stool and digestive biopsy specimens. As viral detection is not necessarily associated with symptomatic disease, a semi-quantitative approach using cycle treshold values was proposed for the clinical interpretation of PCR. We discuss whether concomitant viral infections could be a risk factor for severe outcome in gastroenteritis cases. Individual risk factors are also addressed. PMID:26655270

  20. Event-related brain potential correlates of prospective memory in symptomatically remitted male patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoliang; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Weiyan; Zhou, Renlai; Xu, Peng; Lu, Shan; Sun, Li; Jiang, Zhongdong; Li, Huiju; Li, Yansong; Cui, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) refers to the ability to remember to perform intended actions in the future. Although PM deficits are a prominent impairment in schizophrenia, little is still known about the nature of PM in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia. To address this issue, event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 20 symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls during an event-based PM paradigm. Behavioral results showed that symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia performed poorly on the PM task compared with healthy controls. On the neural level, the N300, a component of the ERPs related to PM cue detection, was reliable across these two groups, suggesting a degree of functional recovery of processes supporting cue detection in patients with symptomatically remitted schizophrenia. By contrast, the amplitude of the prospective positivity, a component of the ERPs related to PM intention retrieval, was significantly attenuated in symptomatically remitted schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the amplitude of the prospective positivity and accuracy on the PM task was found in those patients, indicating that patients’ poor performance on this task may result from the failure to recover PM cue-induced intention from memory. These results provide evidence for the existence of altered PM processing in patients with symptomatically remitted schizophrenia, which is characterized by a selective deficit in retrospective component (intention retrieval) of PM. Therefore, these findings shed new light on the neurophysiological processes underlying PM in schizophrenia patients during clinical remission. PMID:26483650

  1. Gray matter volumes in symptomatic and asymptomatic offspring of parents diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hanford, Lindsay C; Hall, Geoffrey B; Minuzzi, Luciano; Sassi, Roberto B

    2016-09-01

    Children of parents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BD), termed high-risk offspring (HRO), are at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders compared to healthy children of healthy parents (HCO). Gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been observed in HRO, however, these reports are inconsistent. We posit that this variability may be attributed to differences in methodology among offspring studies; in particular, the presence of psychiatric symptoms in HRO. Here, we directly compared GMVs between symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO, and HCO. High-resolution T1-weighted MR images were collected from 31 HRO (18 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic) and 20 age- and sex-matched HCO. HRO had at least one parent diagnosed with BD. Symptomatic HRO were defined as having a psychiatric diagnosis other than BD, while asymptomatic HRO were required to be free of any psychiatric diagnosis. Scans were processed using voxel-based morphometry methods and between group analyses were performed in SPM. Compared to HCO, the HRO group showed decreased GMV in the right inferior orbitofrontal, right middle frontal, and bilateral superior and middle temporal regions. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO groups showed decreased GMV in these regions separately when compared to HCO. When comparing symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO, GMVs were comparable in all regions except the lateral occipital cortex. Our study compared symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO directly. In doing so, we provided further support for the presence of discrete GMV deficits in HRO, and confirmed that these deficits are present irrespective of the presence of symptoms in HRO. PMID:26767977

  2. Unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality have abnormal hip biomechanics during walking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyan; McWilliams, Anthony B.; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stone, Martin H.; Redmond, Anthony C.; Stewart, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic leg length inequality accounts for 8.7% of total hip replacement related claims made against the UK National Health Service Litigation authority. It has not been established whether symptomatic leg length inequality patients following total hip replacement have abnormal hip kinetics during gait. Methods Hip kinetics in 15 unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality during gait was determined through multibody dynamics and compared to 15 native hip healthy controls and 15 ‘successful’ asymptomatic unilateral total hip replacement patients. Finding More significant differences from normal were found in symptomatic leg length inequality patients than in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. The leg length inequality patients had altered functions defined by lower gait velocity, reduced stride length, reduced ground reaction force, decreased hip range of motion, reduced hip moment and less dynamic hip force with a 24% lower heel-strike peak, 66% higher mid-stance trough and 37% lower toe-off peak. Greater asymmetry in hip contact force was also observed in leg length inequality patients. Interpretation These gait adaptions may affect the function of the implant and other healthy joints in symptomatic leg length inequality patients. This study provides important information for the musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation of symptomatic leg length inequality patients. PMID:25900447

  3. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  5. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  6. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  7. Symptomatic Peripheral Mycotic Aneurysms Due to Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    González, Isabel; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; San Román, Alberto; Olmos, Carmen; Sáez, Carmen; Revilla, Ana; Hernández, Miguel; Caniego, Jose Luis; Fernández, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral mycotic aneurysms (PMAs) are a relatively rare but serious complication of infective endocarditis (IE). We conducted the current study to describe and compare the current epidemiologic, microbiologic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics of patients with symptomatic PMAs (SPMAs). A descriptive, comparative, retrospective observational study was performed in 3 tertiary hospitals, which are reference centers for cardiac surgery. From 922 definite IE episodes collected from 1996 to 2011, 18 patients (1.9%) had SPMAs. Because all SPMAs developed in left-sided IE, we performed a comparative study between 719 episodes of left-sided IE without SPMAs and 18 episodes with SPMAs. We found a higher frequency of intravenous drug abuse, native valve IE, intracranial bleeding, septic emboli, multiple embolisms, and IE diagnostic delay >30 days in patients with SPMAs than in patients without SPMAs. The causal microorganisms were gram-positive cocci (n =10), gram-negative bacilli (n = 2), gram-positive bacilli (n = 3), Bartonella henselae (n = 1), Candida albicans (n = 1), and negative culture (n = 1). The median IE diagnosis delay was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 13–33 d) in the case of high-virulence microorganisms versus 45 days (IQR, 30–240 d) in the case of low- to medium-virulence microorganisms. Twelve SPMAs were intracranial and 6 were extracranial. In 10 cases (8 intracranial and 2 extracranial), SPMAs were the initial presentation of IE; the remaining cases developed symptoms during or after finishing parenteral antibiotic treatment. The initial diagnosis of intracranial SPMAs was made by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging in 6 unruptured aneurysms and by angiography in 6 ruptured aneurysms. The initial test in extracranial SPMAs was Doppler ultrasonography in limbs, CT in liver, and coronary angiography in heart. Four (3 intracranial, 1 extracranial) of 7 (6 intracranial, 1 extracranial

  8. Bakers' cyst and tibiofemoral abnormalities are more distinctive MRI features of symptomatic osteoarthritis than patellofemoral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Visser, A W; Mertens, B; Reijnierse, M; Bloem, J L; de Mutsert, R; le Cessie, S; Rosendaal, F R; Kloppenburg, M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which structural MR abnormalities discriminate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), taking co-occurrence of abnormalities in all compartments into account. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45–65 years. In 1285 participants (median age 56 years, 55% women, median body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2), MRI of the right knee were obtained. Structural abnormalities (osteophytes, cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), subchondral cysts, meniscal abnormalities, effusion, Baker's cyst) at 9 patellofemoral and tibiofemoral locations were scored following the knee OA scoring system. Symptomatic OA in the imaged knee was defined following the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Logistic ridge regression analyses were used to investigate which structural abnormalities discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic OA, crude and adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Symptomatic knee OA was present in 177 individuals. Structural MR abnormalities were highly frequent both in individuals with OA and in those without. Baker's cysts showed the highest adjusted regression coefficient (0.293) for presence of symptomatic OA, followed by osteophytes and BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment (0.185–0.279), osteophytes in the medial trochlear facet (0.262) and effusion (0.197). Conclusions Baker's cysts discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic knee OA. Structural MR abnormalities, especially in the medial side of the tibiofemoral joint and effusion, add further in discriminating symptomatic OA. Baker's cysts may present as a target for treatment. PMID:27252896

  9. Advanced Age and Disease Predict Lack of Symptomatic Improvement after Endovascular Iliac Treatment in Male Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Brownson, Kirstyn E.; Hall, Michael R.; Kuwahara, Go; Vasilas, Penny; Dardik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovascular angioplasty and stent placement is currently the most frequent treatment for iliac artery occlusive disease. However, despite a successful endovascular procedure, some patients do not experience symptomatic improvement and satisfaction with their care. This study seeks to identify patient-related factors associated with lack of symptomatic improvement after endovascular iliac artery treatment in male veterans. Methods: Retrospective review of patients treated with endovascular methods for iliac artery occlusive disease between January 2008 and July 2012 at VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Symptomatic improvement on the first post-operative visit was evaluated, with bilateral treatments counted separately. Results: Sixty-two patients had 91 iliac arteries treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Forty-seven (52 percent) legs had critical limb ischemia, and 77 (85 percent) had at least two-vessel distal runoff. Angiographic success was 100 percent. Patient-reported symptomatic improvement at the first post-operative visit was 55 percent (50/91). Lack of symptomatic improvement correlated with older age (OR 1.09 [1.03-1.17], p = 0.008), presence of critical limb ischemia (OR 3.03 [1.09-8.65], p = 0.034), and need for additional surgical intervention (OR 5.61 [1.65-17.36], p = 0.006). Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from restenosis were comparable between patients who reported symptomatic improvement and those who did not. Conclusions: Despite angiographically successful revascularization, patients who are older or have critical limb ischemia who are treated with isolated endovascular iliac artery intervention are more likely to require additional interventions and less likely to experience symptomatic improvement. These patients may need more extensive infra-inguinal revascularization than isolated iliac angioplasty and stent placement, despite a preserved ankle-brachial index. Quality of life needs to be measured

  10. Melanoma Metastasizing to the Small Intestine: A Case Report Illustrating Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Involvement.

    PubMed

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, Fnu; Abbass, Aamer; Majeed, Umair; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) involvement of melanoma is rare, however, it is a frequent autopsy finding in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma. We present a case of metastatic cutaneous melanoma with initial asymptomatic jejunal involvement as found on a positron emission tomography (PET) scan, with subsequent duodenal perforation. A 69-year-old man presented to the hospital with a three-week history of worsening headache, dizziness, and vomiting with a history of Clark level III malignant melanoma that was completely excised from the right flank three years ago at the hospital. A magnetic resonance image of his brain revealed a subacute right-sided cerebellar hemorrhage adjacent to a 1-cm nodule. He underwent a right suboccipital craniomy with resection; the biopsy of which revealed metastatic malignant melanoma. A staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan revealed areas of increased uptake of fludeoxyglucose (FDG) in the left lower lung and left upper quadrant of the abdomen abutting the small bowel. Subsequent enteroscopy revealed a 40-mm cratered jejunal ulcer with heaped edges; the biopsy of which also revealed malignant melanoma. Since he had widespread disease, abdominal surgery was deferred, and treatment with ipilimumab and radiotherapy to the brain was initiated. He presented three months later with acute abdominal pain and diarrhea. A computed tomography scan of his abdomen revealed free peritoneal air, and an exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass at the antimesenteric border of the duodenum with a biopsy consistent with melanoma. The perforated area was resected and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Unfortunately, our patient had a postoperative intracranial hemorrhage and was referred to palliative care. Our case portrays how malignant melanoma may metastasize insidiously and widely and present as a catastrophe. Melanoma involvement in the GI tract is a poor prognostic marker. Our case offers a unique illustration of both the

  11. Melanoma Metastasizing to the Small Intestine: A Case Report Illustrating Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Abbass, Aamer; Majeed, Umair; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) involvement of melanoma is rare, however, it is a frequent autopsy finding in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma. We present a case of metastatic cutaneous melanoma with initial asymptomatic jejunal involvement as found on a positron emission tomography (PET) scan, with subsequent duodenal perforation. A 69-year-old man presented to the hospital with a three-week history of worsening headache, dizziness, and vomiting with a history of Clark level III malignant melanoma that was completely excised from the right flank three years ago at the hospital. A magnetic resonance image of his brain revealed a subacute right-sided cerebellar hemorrhage adjacent to a 1-cm nodule. He underwent a right suboccipital craniomy with resection; the biopsy of which revealed metastatic malignant melanoma. A staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan revealed areas of increased uptake of fludeoxyglucose (FDG) in the left lower lung and left upper quadrant of the abdomen abutting the small bowel. Subsequent enteroscopy revealed a 40-mm cratered jejunal ulcer with heaped edges; the biopsy of which also revealed malignant melanoma. Since he had widespread disease, abdominal surgery was deferred, and treatment with ipilimumab and radiotherapy to the brain was initiated. He presented three months later with acute abdominal pain and diarrhea. A computed tomography scan of his abdomen revealed free peritoneal air, and an exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass at the antimesenteric border of the duodenum with a biopsy consistent with melanoma. The perforated area was resected and an end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Unfortunately, our patient had a postoperative intracranial hemorrhage and was referred to palliative care. Our case portrays how malignant melanoma may metastasize insidiously and widely and present as a catastrophe. Melanoma involvement in the GI tract is a poor prognostic marker. Our case offers a unique illustration of both the

  12. Urine sodium excretion after tolvaptan administration is dependent upon baseline serum sodium levels: a possible explanation for the improvement of hyponatremia with scarce chance of hypernatremia by a vasopressin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Minatsuki, Shun; Muraoka, Hironori; Kato, Naoko; Inaba, Toshiro; Maki, Hisataka; Hatano, Masaru; Yao, Atsushi; Komuro, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that tolvaptan (TLV) can improve hyponatremia in advanced heart failure (HF) patients with rare chance of hypernatremia. However, changes in serum sodium concentrations (S-Na) in patients with or without hyponatremia during TLV treatment have not been analyzed.Ninety-seven in-hospital patients with decompensated HF who had received TLV at 3.75-15 mg/day for 1 week were enrolled. Among 68 "responders", who had achieved any increases in urine volume (UV) during the fi rst day, urinary sodium excretion during 24 hours (U-NaEx(24)) increased significantly during one week of TLV treatment along with higher baseline S-Na (P < 0.05 and r = 0.325). Considering a cut-off value (S-Na, 132 mEq/L; AUC, 0.711) for any increases in U-NaEx(24), we defined "hyponatremia" as S-Na < 132 mEq/L. In hyponatremic responders (n = 25), S-Na increased significantly, although 1 week was not sufficient for normalization (125.8 ± 5.0 versus 128.9 ± 4.3 mEq/L, P < 0.05), along with unchanged U-NaEx(24) (2767 ± 2703 versus 2972 ± 2950 mg/day, NS). In contrast, in normonatremic responders (n = 43), S-Na remained unchanged (136.6 ± 3.1 versus 137.4 ± 2.9 mEq/L, NS) along with increased U-NaEx(24) (2201 ± 1644 versus 4198 ± 3550 mg/day, P < 0.05). TLV increased S-Na only in hyponatremic responders by way of pure aquaresis, but increased U-NaEx(24) only in normonatremic responders, which explains the scarcity of hypernatremia. Epithelial Na-channels in the distal nephrons, whose repression by TLV increases urinary sodium excretion, may be attenuated by reduced ATP-supply in worse hemodynamics under hyponatremia. PMID:24632953

  13. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  14. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  15. Siltuximab (Sylvant). Castleman's disease: good symptomatic efficacy in some patients.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by disseminated lymphadenopathy. Symptoms and outcomes differ widely from one patient to another. The median survival time is about 2.5 years. There is no consensus on treatment. Siltuximab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonises interleukin-6, has been authorised in the European Union for patients with multicentric Castleman's disease who are not infected with HIV or HHV-8. In a randomised, double-blind trial in 79 patients, most of whom had mild or moderate symptoms, the estimated one-year survival rate was 100% in the siltuximab group versus 92% in the placebo group after a median follow-up of 60 weeks. However, half of the patients in the placebo group received siltuximab after disease progression. Symptoms disappeared for at least 18 weeks in one-quarter of patients in the siltuximab group versus none of those in the placebo group; the median symptom-free period in the siltuximab group was about 16 months. The known adverse effects of siltuximab are related to its immunosuppressive effect. They include frequent infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Reactions can occur during the infusion, and mouth sores have been reported. Other adverse events that appear to be more frequent with siltuximab include cutaneous disorders, oedema, renal and cardiac disorders, and peripheral neuropathy. Cases of gastrointestinal perforation have been reported in trials in other clinical settings. Siltuximab can mask the signs and symptoms of acute inflammation, in particular by suppressing fever and acute-phase markers such as C-reactive protein. Interleukin-6 is a cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Siltuximab activates its isoenzymes and can thus reduce the effectiveness of the numerous drugs that are substrates of this enzyme system. This risk of interactions is likely to persist up to several weeks after siltuximab withdrawal, because of its long plasma elimination half-life (about 16 days

  16. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  17. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  18. Impact of the control of symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Guédon-Moreau, Laurence; Capucci, Alessandro; Denjoy, Isabelle; Morgan, Caroline Claire; Périer, Antoine; Leplège, Alain; Kacet, Salem

    2010-01-01

    Aims Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) consider the related symptoms disruptive to their quality of life (QoL). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the control of symptomatic paroxysmal AF (PAF) on QoL. Methods and results Patients with symptomatic PAF were treated for 48 weeks with open-label flecainide acetate controlled release (Flec CR). Quality of life was assessed by SF-36 and Atrial Fibrillation Severity Scale scores at baseline, Week 12 (W12), W24, and W48. Of the 229 treated patients, 217 were analysed for QoL (123 with controlled and 94 with uncontrolled symptomatic PAF at inclusion). The controlled group had a similar or better QoL (SF-36) at baseline compared with a reference population (significantly better for: physical functioning, bodily pain, and physical component). The uncontrolled group had an inferior QoL (significantly worse for: role physical, general health, vitality, role emotional, social functioning, mental health, and mental component). When treated with Flec CR, the controlled group baseline QoL scores were maintained and the uncontrolled group scores were improved to a level comparable to the controlled group scores. Safety findings reflect the known clinical safety profile of flecainide acetate. Conclusion In this study, patients with uncontrolled symptomatic PAF at baseline had an inferior QoL to those with controlled symptomatic PAF. Following treatment with controlled-release flecainide acetate, their QoL improved to a level comparable to controlled patients. PMID:20154349

  19. Differences in autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, C. F.; Katritsis, D.; Crowther, A.; Cooper, I. C.; Coltart, J. D.; Webb-Peploe, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Autonomic neuropathy provides a mechanism for the absence of symptoms in silent myocardial ischaemia, but characterisation of the type of neuropathy is lacking. AIM--To characterise and compare autonomic nerve function in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS--The Valsalva manoeuvre, heart rate variation (HRV) in response to deep breathing and standing, lower body negative pressure, isometric handgrip, and the cold pressor test were performed by patients with silent (n = 25) and symptomatic (n = 25) ambulatory ischaemia and by controls (n = 21). No difference in parasympathetic efferent function between patients with silent and symptomatic ischaemia was recorded, but both had significantly less HRV in response to standing than the controls (p < 0.005 for silent and p < 0.01 for symptomatic). Patients with silent ischaemia showed an increased propensity for peripheral vasodilatation compared with symptomatic patients (p < 0.02) and controls (p < 0.04). Impaired sympathetic function was found in patients with pure silent ischaemia (n = 4) compared with the remaining patients with silent ischaemia whose pain pathways were presumed to be intact. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with silent ischaemia and pain pathways presumed to be intact have an enhanced peripheral vasodilator response, and if this applied to the coronary vasculature it could provide a mechanism for limiting ischaemia to below the pain threshold. Patients with pure silent ischaemia have evidence of sympathetic autonomic dysfunction. Images PMID:8297687

  20. [Symptomatic psychosis--to create new things by taking lessons from the past].

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic psychosis is one of the central problems in research psychosomatic correlational research. My topic forthis lecture is on the research of symptomatic psychosis, which could be called one of the central problems in the field of clinical psychiatry. It is true that if a person is not physically stable, their "brain" and/or "mind" will not be calm. The opposite is equally true. 1. Are delusions of theft symptomatic psychosis In the elderly, there are some physical disease cases which developed into mental illness. For example, delusions of theft were triggered by physical diseases such as knee osteoarthritis, high blood pressure and glaucoma. I think it is possible to position these patients group as having symptomatic psychosis. 2. "Schizophrenia" is symptomatic psychosis We are thinking that there is a group that the biological material (bilirubin) in body fluid by way of hepatic failure did play a role leading to the expression of schizophrenia. Therefore I propose the following hypothesis: "there is a schizophrenia group that is an expression of a very mild kernicterus". This research started from our experiences having patients who had Gilbert's syndrome which has a high indirect (unconjugated) bilirubin. The patients also had schizophrenia. The psychological symptoms of schizophrenia fluctuated depending on the indirect (unconjugated) bilirubin levels. Also, we clarified that the frequency of patients with schizophrenia coexisting with GS is significantly higher than with other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23367845

  1. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  2. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  3. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  4. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  5. [Neonatal asymptomatic and childhood symptomatic hydronephrosis: Are they different nosological entities?].

    PubMed

    Calisti, A; Vallasciani, S; Perrotta, M L; Miele, V; Menghini, M L

    2003-01-01

    The authors reviewed two groups of patients with ureteropelvic junction obstructión divided by age and mode of presentation: patients with neonatal asymptomatic hydronephrosis diagnosed by prenatal ultrasonography and patients with symptomatic hydronephrosis. It was assumed that in these patients we are observing a continuous spectrum of the same pathology; nevertheless, some relevant differences were found between the two groups. Diuretic renograms did not show any change in postoperative renal function among prenatally detected cases while a significative improvement followed surgery among most of symptomatic cases. A possible explanation could be found in the obstructive mechanism which was responsible of obstruction in a significative proportion of these patients. Lower polar vessels produce a progressive symptomatic hydronephrosis in an healthy kidney in respect to intrinsic obstruction which are mainly found among prenatally detected cases and which are frequently associated to congenital renal damage unresponsive to surgery. PMID:12793294

  6. Cognitive dysfunction at baseline predicts symptomatic 1-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Lambert, M; Perro, C; Ganzer, S; Naber, D

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the consequences of cognitive disturbances on symptomatic outcome. Fifty-three first-episode schizophrenics were reassessed (n = 32) 1 year after admission. Simple regression analyses revealed that several self-perceived cognitive deficits at baseline as measured with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire significantly predicted increased Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale global scores at follow-up (p = 0.05 to p = 0.005). A stepwise regression analysis proved memory dysfunction to be the strongest predictor of symptomatic worsening (p = 0.005). It is suggested that the exploration and treatment of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia is of great clinical importance with regard to its impact on both functional and symptomatic outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:10601828

  7. [From symptomatic stability to functional recovery in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia and unipolar depression].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the chronic course of schizophrenia and unipolar depresion. It is aimed to answer three questions: does it cure these diseases? Does it exert any significant effect on the symptomatic presentation of the disorders? Which is its action on the social dysfunction provoked by schizophrenia or depression? A conceptual analysis of available bibliography was performed. It could be concluded that antypsychotics improve the symptomatic course of schizophrenia, although their efficacy is limited, and that these drugs does not act on the social dysfunction provoked by the disease. With respect to depression, it could be concluded that a significant proportion of patients remain symptomatic despite receiveng adequate treatments. No data about efficacy of pharmacotherapy on the dysfunction resultant from unipolar depression is available. PMID:20038986

  8. Amygdalar Atrophy in Symptomatic AD Based on Diffeomorphometry: The BIOCARD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael I.; Younes, Laurent; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Brown, Timothy; Trinh, Huong; Lee, David S.; Tward, Daniel; Mahon, Pamela; Mori, Susumu; Albert, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the diffeomorphometry of MRI derived structural markers for the amygdala, in subjects with symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using linear mixed-effects models we show differences between those with symptomatic AD and controls. Based on template centered population analysis, the distribution of statistically significant change is seen in both the volume and shape of the amygdala in subjects with symptomatic AD compared to controls. We find that high-dimensional vertex based markers are statistically more significantly discriminating (p<.00001) than lower-dimensional markers and volumes, consistent with comparable findings in presymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease. Using a high-field 7T atlas, significant atrophy was found to be centered in the basomedial and basolateral subregions, with no evidence of centromedial involvement. PMID:25444602

  9. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  10. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Huanglongbing-Asymptomatic and -Symptomatic Citrus Trees.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Deisy dos Santos; Carlos, Eduardo Fermino; Gil, Márcia Cristina Soares de Souza; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2015-09-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most severe diseases that affects citrus trees worldwide and is associated with the yet uncultured bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp. To assess the metabolomic differences between HLB-asymptomatic and -symptomatic tissues, extracts from leaf and root samples taken from a uniform 6-year-old commercial orchard of Valencia trees were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics. The results show that the symptomatic trees had higher sucrose content in their leaves and no variation in their roots. In addition, proline betaine and malate were detected in smaller amounts in the HLB-affected symptomatic leaves. The changes in metabolic processes of the plant in response to HLB are corroborated by the relationship between the bacterial levels and the metabolic profiles. PMID:26285838

  11. Amygdalar atrophy in symptomatic Alzheimer's disease based on diffeomorphometry: the BIOCARD cohort.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael I; Younes, Laurent; Ratnanather, J Tilak; Brown, Timothy; Trinh, Huong; Lee, David S; Tward, Daniel; Mahon, Pamela B; Mori, Susumu; Albert, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the diffeomorphometry of magnetic resonance imaging-derived structural markers for the amygdala, in subjects with symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using linear mixed-effects models we show differences between those with symptomatic AD and controls. Based on template centered population analysis, the distribution of statistically significant change is seen in both the volume and shape of the amygdala in subjects with symptomatic AD compared with controls. We find that high-dimensional vertex based markers are statistically more significantly discriminating (p < 0.00001) than lower-dimensional markers and volumes, consistent with comparable findings in presymptomatic AD. Using a high-field 7T atlas, significant atrophy was found to be centered in the basomedial and basolateral subregions, with no evidence of centromedial involvement. PMID:25444602

  12. Neutralizing antibody titers against dengue virus correlate with protection from symptomatic infection in a longitudinal cohort.

    PubMed

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-19

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that infect ∼ 390 million people annually; up to 100 million infections are symptomatic, and 500,000 cases progress to severe disease. Exposure to a heterologous DENV serotype, the specific infecting DENV strains, and the interval of time between infections, as well as age, ethnicity, genetic polymorphisms, and comorbidities of the host, are all risk factors for severe dengue. In contrast, neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are thought to provide long-lived protection against symptomatic infection and severe dengue. The objective of dengue vaccines is to provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes simultaneously. However, the association between homotypic and heterotypic NAb titers and protection against symptomatic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the titer of preinfection cross-reactive NAbs correlates with reduced likelihood of symptomatic secondary infection in a longitudinal pediatric dengue cohort in Nicaragua. The protective effect of NAb titers on infection outcome remained significant when controlled for age, number of years between infections, and epidemic force, as well as with relaxed or more stringent criteria for defining inapparent DENV infections. Further, individuals with higher NAb titers immediately after primary infection had delayed symptomatic infections compared with those with lower titers. However, overall NAb titers increased modestly in magnitude and remained serotype cross-reactive in the years between infections, possibly due to reexposure. These findings establish that anti-DENV NAb titers correlate with reduced probability of symptomatic DENV infection and provide insights into longitudinal characteristics of antibody-mediated immunity to DENV in an endemic setting. PMID:26729879

  13. Symptomatic Management of Multiple Sclerosis–Associated Tremor Among Participants in the NARCOMS Registry

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Amber R.; Rinker, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tremor affects 25% to 58% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is associated with poor prognosis and increased disability. MS-related tremor is difficult to treat, and data regarding patient-reported characterization and response to treatment are limited. We describe the symptomatic treatment of tremor in 508 enrollees in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry who self-reported tremor. Methods: From 777 surveys sent to NARCOMS participants who indicated mild or greater tremor using the Tremor and Coordination Scale, we compiled data regarding disability, tremor severity, symptomatic medication use, and reported response to medications. Results: Symptomatic medications reported to reduce tremor were used by 238 respondents (46.9%). Symptomatic medication use was associated with increased rates of unemployment and disability, and many other characteristics were similar between groups. Symptomatic drug use was more likely in participants reporting moderate (53.9%) or severe (51.3%) tremor than in those with mild (36.6%) or totally disabling (35.0%) tremor. This disparity held true across multiple tremor severity scores. The most commonly used drug classes were anticonvulsants (50.8%) and benzodiazepines (46.2%), with gabapentin and clonazepam used most often in their respective classes. Conclusions: Tremor in MS remains poorly treated; less than half of the participants reported benefit from symptomatic medications. Patients with moderate-to-severe tremor are more likely to report tremor benefit than are those with mild or disabling tremor. γ-Aminobutyric acid–active medications were most commonly reported as beneficial. PMID:27252602

  14. Neutralizing antibody titers against dengue virus correlate with protection from symptomatic infection in a longitudinal cohort

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Montoya, Magelda; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1–4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that infect ∼390 million people annually; up to 100 million infections are symptomatic, and 500,000 cases progress to severe disease. Exposure to a heterologous DENV serotype, the specific infecting DENV strains, and the interval of time between infections, as well as age, ethnicity, genetic polymorphisms, and comorbidities of the host, are all risk factors for severe dengue. In contrast, neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are thought to provide long-lived protection against symptomatic infection and severe dengue. The objective of dengue vaccines is to provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes simultaneously. However, the association between homotypic and heterotypic NAb titers and protection against symptomatic infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the titer of preinfection cross-reactive NAbs correlates with reduced likelihood of symptomatic secondary infection in a longitudinal pediatric dengue cohort in Nicaragua. The protective effect of NAb titers on infection outcome remained significant when controlled for age, number of years between infections, and epidemic force, as well as with relaxed or more stringent criteria for defining inapparent DENV infections. Further, individuals with higher NAb titers immediately after primary infection had delayed symptomatic infections compared with those with lower titers. However, overall NAb titers increased modestly in magnitude and remained serotype cross-reactive in the years between infections, possibly due to reexposure. These findings establish that anti-DENV NAb titers correlate with reduced probability of symptomatic DENV infection and provide insights into longitudinal characteristics of antibody-mediated immunity to DENV in an endemic setting. PMID:26729879

  15. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Zhu, Jiajia; Huang, Dongling; Shi, Changzheng; Guan, Yuqing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Vascular and muscular involvements in Graves disease (GD) are rare. Here, we report a case of a 17-year-old patient with unilateral symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis concurrent with GD and myopathy. He presented with a 1-day history of acute severe right-sided hemiparesis and aphasia and a 3-week history of high metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of the stenosis is most likely vasculitis rather than atherosclerosis, based on contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging showing concentric wall enhancement. We suggest that lipid storage myopathy is secondary to GD, and it is likely mitochondrial dysfunction or immune dysfunction induced by GD responsible for the myopathy and that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of establishing the diagnosis of myopathy. Thus, MRS can be used for follow-up evaluations of the myopathy along with the pathology biopsy. PMID:25444029

  16. Differences in Acetabular Rim Thickness in Patients with Unilateral Symptomatic Pincer-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Kuhns, Benjamin; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Inoue, Nozomu; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the location and magnitude of difference in acetabular rim morphology between the symptomatic and asymptomatic acetabula in a cohort of patients with symptomatic unilateral pincer-type FAI. Methods: After IRB approval, computed tomography (CT) scans of 43 patients (22 males, 21 females) diagnosed with unilateral pincer-type FAI were obtained. CT images of both hips were imported in DICOM format and segmented into 3-dimensional (3D) hemi-pelvises using 3D reconstruction software (Mimics, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The point-cloud data of the asymptomatic hemi-pelvis was mirrored onto the symptomatic side. Protrusion of the symptomatic side was recorded as a positive value and appeared as red on the color map (Figure 1). Data was collected in 3° intervals and analyzed by quadrant using the clock face method; reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions. Results: The symptomatic acetabular rim was on average 0.39 ± 0.36 mm thicker than the corresponding location on the asymptomatic rim. When the acetabular clock face was broken up into quadrants, reflecting the 12-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o’clock positions, the 12-3 o’clock position demonstrated the greatest difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (Table 1). The 12-3 o’clock quadrant demonstrated significantly greater difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (0.53±0.22 mm) as compared to the 3-6 o’clock position (0.39±0.27 mm; p=0.006), the 6-9 o’clock position (0.34±0.05 mm; p<0.001), and the 9-12 o’clock position (0.33±0.03; p<0.001). There was no correlation between gender and magnitude of difference at any location. Conclusion: Small changes in acetabular rim morphology, on the order of 0.5 mm or less can be the difference between symptomatic pincer-type FAI and the asymptomatic state. Knowledge of the healthy, unaffected side in unilateral FAI may provide a better template for rim recession rather

  17. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  18. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment. PMID:23486343

  19. Magnetic resonance venography to assess thrombus resolution with edoxaban monotherapy versus parenteral anticoagulation/warfarin for symptomatic deep vein thrombosis: A multicenter feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Mani, Venkatesh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Grosso, Michael A; Mercuri, Michele; Lanz, Hans J; Schussler, Steven; Hsu, Ching; Chinigo, Amy; Ritchie, Bruce; Nadar, Venkatesh; Cannon, Kevin; Pullman, John; Concha, Mauricio; Schul, Marlin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for measuring change in thrombus volume with a novel anticoagulation regimen versus standard anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been assessed. Our aim was to study the feasibility of MRV to measure change in thrombus volume in patients with acute symptomatic objectively confirmed proximal DVT in an open-label multicenter trial (edoxaban Thrombus Reduction Imaging Study, eTRIS). We randomized patients in a 2:1 allocation ratio to edoxaban 90 mg/day for 10 days followed by 60 mg/day versus parenteral anticoagulation bridging to warfarin for 3 months. The primary efficacy outcome was a surrogate end point of the relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21. A total of 85 eligible patients from 26 study sites were randomized to edoxaban monotherapy (n=56) versus parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (n=29). The mean relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14–21 was similar in patients treated with edoxaban and parenteral anticoagulation as a ‘bridge’ to warfarin (−50.1% vs −58.9%; 95% confidence interval of treatment difference, −12.7%, 30.2%). However, thrombus extension was observed in eight patients in the edoxaban monotherapy group and in none in the warfarin group. Rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism (3.6% vs 3.6%, p=0.45) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.34) were also similar. No major bleeds occurred in either on-treatment group during the study period. In conclusion, MRV can assess change in thrombus volume in patients with acute DVT randomized to two different anticoagulant regimens. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01662908 Investigational New Drug (IND) Application: Edoxaban IND # 63266 PMID:27165711

  20. Magnetic resonance venography to assess thrombus resolution with edoxaban monotherapy versus parenteral anticoagulation/warfarin for symptomatic deep vein thrombosis: A multicenter feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gregory; Mani, Venkatesh; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Grosso, Michael A; Mercuri, Michele; Lanz, Hans J; Schussler, Steven; Hsu, Ching; Chinigo, Amy; Ritchie, Bruce; Nadar, Venkatesh; Cannon, Kevin; Pullman, John; Concha, Mauricio; Schul, Marlin; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) for measuring change in thrombus volume with a novel anticoagulation regimen versus standard anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has not been assessed. Our aim was to study the feasibility of MRV to measure change in thrombus volume in patients with acute symptomatic objectively confirmed proximal DVT in an open-label multicenter trial (edoxaban Thrombus Reduction Imaging Study, eTRIS). We randomized patients in a 2:1 allocation ratio to edoxaban 90 mg/day for 10 days followed by 60 mg/day versus parenteral anticoagulation bridging to warfarin for 3 months. The primary efficacy outcome was a surrogate end point of the relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14-21. A total of 85 eligible patients from 26 study sites were randomized to edoxaban monotherapy (n=56) versus parenteral anticoagulation as a 'bridge' to warfarin (n=29). The mean relative change in MRV-quantified thrombus volume from baseline to Day 14-21 was similar in patients treated with edoxaban and parenteral anticoagulation as a 'bridge' to warfarin (-50.1% vs -58.9%; 95% confidence interval of treatment difference, -12.7%, 30.2%). However, thrombus extension was observed in eight patients in the edoxaban monotherapy group and in none in the warfarin group. Rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism (3.6% vs 3.6%, p=0.45) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.34) were also similar. No major bleeds occurred in either on-treatment group during the study period. In conclusion, MRV can assess change in thrombus volume in patients with acute DVT randomized to two different anticoagulant regimens.ClinicalTrials.gov IDENTIFIER NCT01662908: INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG IND APPLICATION EDOXABAN IND # 63266. PMID:27165711

  1. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  2. Influence of Insurance Status and Demographic Features on Recognition of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Gonorrhea Cases.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Colleen; Anschuetz, Greta; Asbel, Lenore; Madera, Robbie; Johnson, Caroline C

    2015-08-01

    A random sample of individuals diagnosed as having gonorrhea from 2009 to 2013 were interviewed. Demographic and clinical features for asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals were examined to elucidate trends in medical care. Age, race, and sexually transmitted disease history had no association with the absence of symptoms (e.g., infection found by screening), whereas insurance coverage did for women. PMID:26165432

  3. Premenstrual Assessment Form Typological Categories: Classification of Self-Defined Premenstrually Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youdale, J. Valda M.; Freeman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated use of newly developed assessment instrument for premenstrual syndrome, the Premenstrual Assessment Form (PAF), as a retrospective assessment instrument, and the PAF subtypes as accurate reflectors of subjective premenstrual symptomatology. Severely premenstrually symptomatic and asymptomatic women completed the PAF. Results partially…

  4. Treatment of a symptomatic forearm muscle herniation with a mesh graft.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Brett S; Bruce, Jeremy; Robertson, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Symptomatic muscle herniations are an unusual cause of upper extremity pain in the athlete that is rarely reported in the literature. Out of 18 reported cases of upper extremity herniations, only 3 were caused by strenuous exertion. This article describes a successful repair of a 21-year-old rock climber's ventral forearm herniation with polypropylene mesh. PMID:23016006

  5. Dysgeusia in symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: think of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nishith K; Hayes, Shelbi; Hahs, Seth; Varney, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with marked dysgeusia to all food and symptomatic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is described. She eventually turned out to have metastatic small cell lung cancer. The case study explores the interesting constellation of dysgeusia, SIADH and lung cancer. PMID:21686989

  6. Exportations of Symptomatic Cases of MERS-CoV Infection to Countries outside the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Carias, Cristina; O'Hagan, Justin J; Jewett, Amy; Gambhir, Manoj; Cohen, Nicole J; Haber, Yoni; Pesik, Nicki; Swerdlow, David L

    2016-04-01

    In 2012, an outbreak of infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), was detected in the Arabian Peninsula. Modeling can produce estimates of the expected annual number of symptomatic cases of MERS-CoV infection exported and the likelihood of exportation from source countries in the Middle East to countries outside the region. PMID:27358972

  7. Symptomatic bradycardia caused by premature atrial contractions originating from right atrial appendage.

    PubMed

    Alper, At; Gungor, B; Turkkan, C; Tekkesin, Ai

    2013-05-01

    Premature atrial contraction is a common form of supraventricular arrhythmias. In rare cases, severe symptoms other than palpitation may occur. In this report, we present a patient with symptomatic bradycardia which developed secondary to blocked premature atrial contractions and was successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23840105

  8. [The symptomatic psychosis of Friedrich Nietzsche, made evident by his last attempt at an autobiography].

    PubMed

    Peters, U H

    1990-01-01

    Nietzsche's autobiography gestates neither conflicts, nor life problems, nor matter suppressed from his subconscious, nor are the speech distortions of the schizophrenic patient to be found. In all, analysis allows with certainty the conclusion that is was written by a sick person suffering from a psycho-organic disorder of the kind Bonhoeffer referred to by the general term "symptomatic psychosis". PMID:2184449

  9. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence as a result of jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thénint, Marie-Aude; Barbier, Charlotte; Hitier, Martin; Patron, Vincent; Saleme, Suzana; Courthéoux, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A new endovascular treatment consisting of stent-assisted coil implantation is described for jugular bulb abnormalities causing symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence. Three patients presenting with vertigo associated with pulsatile tinnitus or hearing loss were treated. This technique cured the vertigo and pulsatile tinnitus in all patients and preserved normal cerebral venous drainage with no side effects. PMID:25442142

  10. Risk Factors for Recurrence of Symptomatic Common Bile Duct Stones after Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oak, Ju Hyun; Paik, Chang Nyol; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Kang-Moon; Yang, Jin Mo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The recurrence of CBD stone is still observed in a considerable number of patients. The study was to evaluate the risk factors for recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone in patients who underwent cholecystectomy after the removal of CBD stone. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent removal of CBD stone with subsequent cholecystectomy were reviewed. The risk factors for the recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone were compared between the recurrence and the nonrecurrence group. Results. The mean follow-up period was 40.6 months. The recurrence of symptomatic CBD stones was defined as the detection of bile duct stones no sooner than 6 months after complete clearance of CBD stones, based on symptoms or signs of biliary complication. 144 patients (68 males, 47.2%) were finally enrolled and their mean age was 59.8 (range: 26~86) years. The recurrence of CBD stone occurred in 15 patients (10.4%). The mean period until first recurrence was 25.9 months. The presence of type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum and multiple CBD stones were the independent risk factors. Conclusion. For the patients with type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum or multiple CBD stones, careful followup is needed for the risk in recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone. PMID:22991508

  11. Functional Compensation of Motor Function in Pre-Symptomatic Huntington's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Weiller, Cornelius; Frackowiak, Richard S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine the compensatory mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon of…

  12. Baseline Articular Contact Stress Levels Predict Incident Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis Development in the MOST Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A.; Anderson, Donald D.; Iyer, Krishna S.; Baker, Jennifer; Torner, James C.; Lynch, John A.; Felson, David T.; Lewis, Cora E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    We studied whether contact stress estimates from knee magnetic resonance images (MRI) predict the development of incident symptomatic tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) 15 months later in an at-risk cohort. This nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 3026 adults, age 50 to 79 years. Thirty cases with incident symptomatic tibiofemoral OA by their 15-month follow-up visit were randomly selected and matched with 30 control subjects. Symptomatic tibiofemoral OA was defined as daily knee pain/stiffness and Kellgren-Lawrence Grade ≥2 on weight bearing, fixed-flexion radiographs. Tibiofemoral geometry was segmented on baseline knee MRI, and contact stresses were estimated using discrete element analysis. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were used to examine the association between articular contact stress and case/control status. No significant inter-group differences were found for age, sex, BMI, weight, height, or limb alignment. However, the maximum articular contact stress was 0.54 ± 0.77 MPa (mean ± SD) higher in incident OA cases compared to that in control knees (p=0.0007). The interaction between case-control status and contact stress was significant above 3.2 MPa (p<0.0001). The presence of differences in estimated contact stress 15 months prior to incidence suggests a biomechanical mechanism for symptomatic tibiofemoral OA and supports the ability to identify risk by subject-specific biomechanical modeling. PMID:19533741

  13. Coloured Filters Improve Exclusion of Perceptual Noise in Visually Symptomatic Dyslexics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northway, Nadia; Manahilov, Velitchko; Simpson, William

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of visually symptomatic dyslexics have found that their contrast thresholds for pattern discrimination are the same as non-dyslexics. However, when noise is added to the stimuli, contrast thresholds rise markedly in dyslexics compared with non-dyslexics. This result could be due to impaired noise exclusion in dyslexics. Some…

  14. Bird's nest filter causing symptomatic hydronephrosis following transmural penetration of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Stacey, C S; Manhire, A R; Rose, D H; Bishop, M C

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of symptomatic hydronephrosis caused by transcaval penetration of a Bird's Nest filter. Perforation of the wall of the inferior vena cava (IVC) following insertion of a caval filter is a well-recognized complication. Whilst two cases of hydronephrosis have been described with Greenfield filters, no case involving a Bird's Nest filter has been reported previously. PMID:15109231

  15. Bird's Nest Filter Causing Symptomatic Hydronephrosis Following Transmural Penetration of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, C.S. Manhire, A.R.; Rose, D.H.; Bishop, M.C.

    2004-01-15

    We report a case of symptomatic hydronephrosis caused by transcaval penetration of a Bird's Nest filter. Perforation of the wall of the inferior vena cava (IVC) following insertion of a caval filter is a well-recognized complication. Whilst two cases of hydronephrosis have been described with Greenfield filters, no case involving a Bird's Nest filter has been reported previously.

  16. Use of the Crawford tube for symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Nyu-Xia; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Jin, Xiu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of the Crawford tube in treating symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction. METHODS A protocol was adopted for the management of symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction. Patients who suffered symptomatic epiphora without nasolacrimal obstruction in both eyes were included in the study. One eye was treated with Crawford tube intubation and the other eye was treated with medication therapy. Degree of watering, patient satisfaction, and symptomatic improvement were carefully evaluated by one of the authors at the end of the follow-up period, after Crawford tube removal, to ascertain functional results. RESULTS Thirty-seven adult patients (37 eyes) underwent Crawford tube intubation for functional epiphora. The mean follow-up time after removal of the tube was 14.8±4.8mo. The procedure was an overall success in 28 eyes (75.7%), with symptoms improving significantly. Two eyes (5.4%) were relieved of indoor epiphora, two (5.4%) had minimal epiphora outdoors, but only with wind or cold, and five (13.5%) continued to experience tearing both indoors and outdoors. Thirty of the patients (81%) expressed satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSION Crawford tube insertion is an effective, safe, simple, and relatively noninvasive treatment strategy for functional lacrimal system obstruction. PMID:26949652

  17. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphism with Susceptibility to Symptomatic Pertussis.

    PubMed

    Han, Wanda G H; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Poelen, Martien M C; Helm, Kina; Janssen, Riny; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis, caused by infection with the gram negative B. pertussis bacterium, is a serious respiratory illness that can last for months. While B. pertussis infection rates are estimated between 1-10% in the general population, notifications of symptomatic pertussis only comprise 0.01-0.1% indicating that most individuals clear B. pertussis infections without developing (severe) clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated whether genetic risk factors are involved in the development of symptomatic pertussis upon B. pertussis infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes, MBL2, IL17A, TNFα, VDR, and IL10 were genotyped in a unique Dutch cohort of symptomatic clinically confirmed (ex-)pertussis patients and in a Dutch population cohort. Of the seven investigated SNPs in five genes, a polymorphism in the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene (rs10735810) was associated with pertussis. The VDR major allele and its homozygous genotype were more present in the symptomatic pertussis patient cohort compared to the control population cohort. Interestingly, the VDR major allele correlated also with the duration of reported pertussis symptoms. Vitamin D3 (VD3) and VDR are important regulators of immune activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that polymorphisms in the VDR gene may affect immune activation and the clinical outcome of B. pertussis infection. PMID:26894582

  18. Association of Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphism with Susceptibility to Symptomatic Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wanda G. H.; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Poelen, Martien M. C.; Helm, Kina; Janssen, Riny; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pertussis, caused by infection with the gram negative B. pertussis bacterium, is a serious respiratory illness that can last for months. While B. pertussis infection rates are estimated between 1–10% in the general population, notifications of symptomatic pertussis only comprise 0.01–0.1% indicating that most individuals clear B. pertussis infections without developing (severe) clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated whether genetic risk factors are involved in the development of symptomatic pertussis upon B. pertussis infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes, MBL2, IL17A, TNFα, VDR, and IL10 were genotyped in a unique Dutch cohort of symptomatic clinically confirmed (ex-)pertussis patients and in a Dutch population cohort. Of the seven investigated SNPs in five genes, a polymorphism in the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene (rs10735810) was associated with pertussis. The VDR major allele and its homozygous genotype were more present in the symptomatic pertussis patient cohort compared to the control population cohort. Interestingly, the VDR major allele correlated also with the duration of reported pertussis symptoms. Vitamin D3 (VD3) and VDR are important regulators of immune activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that polymorphisms in the VDR gene may affect immune activation and the clinical outcome of B. pertussis infection. PMID:26894582

  19. Radiotherapy for Symptomatic Vertebral Hemangiomas: Results of a Multicenter Study and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Rades, Dirk; Winkler, Cornelia; Eich, Hans T.; Bruns, Frank; Gosheger, Georg; Willich, Normann; Micke, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: The current study analyzes the potential role of radiotherapy (RT) in symptomatic vertebral hemangioma (SVH). Methods and Materials: Seven cooperating German institutions collected clinical information, treatment plans, and outcome data for all patients with SVH referred for local RT. Results: From 1969 to 2008, a total of 84 patients with 96 symptomatic lesions were irradiated for SVH. The primary indication for radiotherapy was pain (97.6%), and 28.6% of patients had additional neurological symptoms. RT was performed at a median total dose of 34 Gy, with a median single dose of 2.0 Gy. After receiving a median follow-up of 68 months, the overall patient response rate was 90.5%. Complete symptom remission occurred in 61.9% of patients, 28.6% of patients had partial pain relief, and 9.5% of patients had no pain relief. In 26.2% of patients, radiological signs of reossification were observed in long-term follow-up but not significantly correlated with pain relief. Most importantly, total doses of >=34 Gy resulted in significantly greater symptomatic relief and control rate than total doses of <34 Gy. Conclusions: This study consists of the largest database of cases reported so far using RT for SVH. RT is easy, safe, and effective for pain relief treatment for SVH. Total doses of at least 34 Gy give the best symptomatic response.

  20. Anaplasmataceae-Specific PCR for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Guidance for Symptomatic Neoehrlichiosis in Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Julia; Mitteregger, Dieter; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Ramharter, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Neoehrlichia is increasingly being recognized worldwide as a tickborne pathogen. We report a case of symptomatic neoehrlichiosis in an immunocompetent Austria resident who had recently returned from travel in Tanzania. The use of Anaplasmataceae-specific PCR to determine the duration of antimicrobial therapy seems reasonable to avert recrudescence. PMID:26811875

  1. Anaplasmataceae-Specific PCR for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Guidance for Symptomatic Neoehrlichiosis in Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Schwameis, Michael; Auer, Julia; Mitteregger, Dieter; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Ramharter, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-02-01

    Candidatus Neoehrlichia is increasingly being recognized worldwide as a tickborne pathogen. We report a case of symptomatic neoehrlichiosis in an immunocompetent Austria resident who had recently returned from travel in Tanzania. The use of Anaplasmataceae-specific PCR to determine the duration of antimicrobial therapy seems reasonable to avert recrudescence. PMID:26811875

  2. Exportations of Symptomatic Cases of MERS-CoV Infection to Countries outside the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Justin J.; Jewett, Amy; Gambhir, Manoj; Cohen, Nicole J.; Haber, Yoni; Pesik, Nicki; Swerdlow, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, an outbreak of infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), was detected in the Arabian Peninsula. Modeling can produce estimates of the expected annual number of symptomatic cases of MERS-CoV infection exported and the likelihood of exportation from source countries in the Middle East to countries outside the region. PMID:27358972

  3. Atheromatic™: symptomatic vs. asymptomatic classification of carotid ultrasound plaque using a combination of HOS, DWT & texture.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Faust, Oliver; Sree, S Vinitha; Alvin, Ang Peng Chuan; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Seabra, José C R; Sanches, João; Suri, Jasjit S

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of carotid atherosclerosis and classification into either symptomatic or asymptomatic is crucial in terms of diagnosis and treatment planning for a range of cardiovascular diseases. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system (Atheromatic™, patented technology from Biomedical Technologies, Inc., CA, USA) which analyzes ultrasound images and classifies them into symptomatic and asymptomatic. The classification result is based on a combination of discrete wavelet transform, higher order spectra and textural features. In this study, we compare support vector machine (SVM) classifiers with different kernels. The classifier with a radial basis function (RBF) kernel achieved an accuracy of 91.7% as well as a sensitivity of 97%, and specificity of 80%. Encouraged by this result, we feel that these features can be used to identify the plaque tissue type. Therefore, we propose an integrated index, a unique number called symptomatic asymptomatic carotid index (SACI) to discriminate symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid ultrasound images. We hope this SACI can be used as an adjunct tool by the vascular surgeons for daily screening. PMID:22255336

  4. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  5. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  6. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  7. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  8. Nosocomial Transmission of C. difficile in English Hospitals from Patients with Symptomatic Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Kleef, Esther; Gasparrini, Antonio; Guy, Rebecca; Cookson, Barry; Hope, Russell; Jit, Mark; Robotham, Julie V.; Deeny, Sarah R.; Edmunds, W. John

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that less than one-quarter of patients with symptomatic nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are linked to other in-patients. However, this evidence was limited to one geographic area. We aimed to investigate the level of symptomatic CDI transmission in hospitals located across England from 2008 to 2012. Methods A generalized additive mixed-effects Poisson model was fitted to English hospital-surveillance data. After adjusting for seasonal fluctuations and between-hospital variation in reported CDI over time, possible clustering (transmission between symptomatic in-patients) of CDI cases was identified. We hypothesised that a temporal proximity would be reflected in the degree of correlation between in-hospital CDI cases per week. This correlation was modelled through a latent autoregressive structure of order 1 (AR(1)). Findings Forty-six hospitals (33 general, seven specialist, and six teaching hospitals) located in all English regions met our criteria. In total, 12,717 CDI cases were identified; seventy-five per cent of these occurred >48 hours after admission. There were slight increases in reports during winter months. We found a low, but statistically significant, correlation between successive weekly CDI case incidences (phi = 0.029, 95%CI: 0.009–0.049). This correlation was five times stronger in a subgroup analysis restricted to teaching hospitals (phi = 0.104, 95%CI: 0.048–0.159). Conclusions The results suggest that symptomatic patient-to-patient transmission has been a source of CDI-acquisition in English hospitals in recent years, and that this might be a more important transmission route in teaching hospitals. Nonetheless, the weak correlation indicates that, in line with recent evidence, symptomatic cases might not be the primary source of nosocomial CDI in England. PMID:24932484

  9. One in four people may develop symptomatic hip osteoarthritis in his or her lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B; Helmick, Charles G.; Schwartz, Todd A; Renner, Jordan B; Tudor, Gail; Koch, Gary G; Dragomir, Anca D; Kalsbeek, William D; Luta, Gheorghe; Jordan, Joanne M

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To estimate the lifetime risk of symptomatic hip osteoarthritis (OA). Design We analyzed data from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (a longitudinal population-based study of OA in North Carolina, United States [n=3,068]). The weighted baseline sample comprised 18% blacks and 54% women, and the mean age was 63 years (range=45-93). Symptomatic hip OA was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) radiographic score of ≥2 (anterior-posterior pelvis x-rays) and pain, aching or stiffness on most days, or groin pain, in the same hip. Lifetime risk, defined as the proportion who developed symptomatic hip OA in at least one hip by age 85, among people who live to age 85, was modeled using logistic regression with repeated measures (through generalized estimating equations). Results Lifetime risk of symptomatic hip OA was 25.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.3–29.3). Lifetime risk was similar by sex, race, highest educational attainment, and hip injury history. We studied lifetime risk by body mass index (BMI) in three forms: at age 18; at baseline and follow-up; and at age 18, baseline and follow-up and found no differences in estimates. Conclusion The burden of symptomatic hip OA is substantial with one in four people developing this condition by age 85. The similar race-specific estimates suggest that racial disparities in total hip replacements are not attributable to differences in disease occurrence. Despite increasing evidence that obesity predicts an increased risk of both hip OA and joint replacement, we found no association between BMI and lifetime risk. PMID:20713163

  10. Role of Coflex as an Adjunct to Decompression for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Siddarth M; Ng, Yau Hong; Pannierselvam, Vinodh Kumar; DasDe, Sudeep; Shen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To assess whether additional implantation of Coflex following spinal decompression provided better clinical outcomes compared to decompression alone for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to determine whether improvement in clinical outcomes correlated with changes in the radiological indices studied. Overview of Literature Literature on benefits of additional Coflex implantation compared to decompression alone for symptomatic LSS is limited. Methods Patients with symptomatic LSS who met the study criteria were offered spinal decompression with Coflex implantation. Those patients who accepted Coflex implantation were placed in the Coflex group (n=22); while those opting for decompression alone, were placed in the comparison group (n=24). Clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively, six-months, one-year and two-years postoperatively, using the Oswestry disability index, 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS)-back pain and VAS-leg pain, and short form-36 (SF-36). Radiological indices (disc height, foraminal height and sagittal angle) were assessed preoperatively, six months, one year, and two years postoperatively. Results Both groups showed statistically significant (p<0.001) improvement in all the clinical outcome indicators at all points in time as compared to the preoperative status. However, improvement in the Coflex group was significantly greater (p<0.001) than the comparison group. Changes in the radiological indices did not correlate significantly with the improvement in clinical outcome indicators. Conclusions Additional Coflex implantation after spinal decompression in symptomatic LSS offers better clinical outcomes than decompression alone in the short-term. Changes in radiological indices do not correlate with the improvements in clinical outcomes after surgery for symptomatic LSS. PMID:24761198

  11. Prognostic value of X-chromosome inactivation in symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Between 8% and 22% of female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity. Development of symptoms in DMD mutation carriers without chromosomal rearrangements has been attributed to skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) favouring predominant expression of the DMD mutant allele. However the prognostic use of XCI analysis is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between X-chromosome inactivation and development of clinical symptoms in a series of symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy. Methods We reviewed the clinical, pathological and genetic features of twenty-four symptomatic carriers covering a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. DMD gene analysis was performed using MLPA and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. Blood and muscle DNA was used for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) analysis thought the AR methylation assay in symptomatic carriers and their female relatives, asymptomatic carriers as well as non-carrier females. Results Symptomatic carriers exhibited 49.2% more skewed XCI profiles than asymptomatic carriers. The extent of XCI skewing in blood tended to increase in line with the severity of muscle symptoms. Skewed XCI patterns were found in at least one first-degree female relative in 78.6% of symptomatic carrier families. No mutations altering XCI in the XIST gene promoter were found. Conclusions Skewed XCI is in many cases familial inherited. The extent of XCI skewing is related to phenotype severity. However, the assessment of XCI by means of the AR methylation assay has a poor prognostic value, probably because the methylation status of the AR gene in muscle may not reflect in all cases the methylation status of the DMD gene. PMID:23092449

  12. Uterine artery embolization for treatment of symptomatic fibroids; a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Laios, A; Baharuddin, N; Iliou, K; Gubara, E; O'Sullivan, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uterine fibroids are the most common reproductive tract tumours in females. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a fertility-sparing procedure for treatment of symptomatic fibroids. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of UAE in the treatment of 118 patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids in a single Academic Centre in the West of Ireland to determine whether fibroid and uterine size affect clinical outcomes and complications. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort of 118 patients who underwent UAE for treatment of symptomatic fibroids between November 2006 and August 2011. Diagnosis of fibroids in symptomatic patients was established by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or transabdominal ultrasonography (US). Three different embolic agents were used. All patients had at least one follow-up using MRI, at three and/or 12 months. A non-validated questionnaire was used to report patient satisfaction with regards to symptoms improvement on a yes-or-no basis. Results: Mean fibroid volume, uterine size and dominant fibroid size were significantly reduced at three months and one year follow-up (p = 0.00) and that was tallied with symptoms improvement (p < 0.05). Overall patient satisfaction at three months was 84% falling to 75.9% by 12 months (all p < 0.05). Few complications were reported (2.5%). No significant difference was observed in safety or efficacy for different embolic agents. Conclusion: The study confirms the safety and efficacy of UAE in the treatment of symptomatic fibroids. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 258-261. PMID:25694762

  13. Impact of screening versus symptomatic measurement of deep vein thrombosis in a national quality improvement registry

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Randall R.; Beck, Adam W.; Edwards, Matthew S.; Corriere, Matthew A.; Wallaert, Jessica B.; Stone, David H.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a quality measure recorded by initiatives such as the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). However, because surveillance-detected DVT rates may be higher than symptomatic DVT rates, we examined how differences in the method of DVT detection may affect the use of this quality measure. Methods Using the NSQIP database (2007–2009), we compared DVT rates of vascular (amputation, open aortic procedures, and lower extremity bypass) and nonvascular (prostatectomy, gastric bypass [GBP], and hip arthroplasty) operations. Using a predefined literature search strategy, we compared the incidence of DVT in NSQIP to the incidence of DVT reported in published literature, diagnosed by symptomatic status or by surveillance studies. Results Within NSQIP, the overall incidence of postoperative DVT was 0.7%. This varied from 0.3% after GBP to 1.8% after open aortic surgery. Across all procedures except amputation, the incidence of DVT in NSQIP was similar to the incidence of DVT reported in our literature survey of “symptomatic” DVTs. The relative rate (RR) of literature-derived symptomatic DVTs to NSQIP ranged from 0.7 for aortic cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–1.7) to 1.4 (95% CI, .7–3.1) for GBP. Overall, surveillance studies had 11.6 higher RR of DVT compared to NSQIP (95% CI, 10.5–13), ranging from 2.6 for GBP (95% CI, 1.4–5) to 14 .5 for hip arthroplasty (95% CI, 10.5–20). Conclusions The incidence of DVT reported in NSQIP is similar to the reported incidence of symptomatic DVT for many high-risk procedures but is much lower than rates of DVT reported in surveillance studies. Clear delineation of symptomatic vs surveillance detection of DVT would improve the usefulness of this measurement in quality improvement registries. PMID:22832263

  14. The acute hepatic porphyrias: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Siegesmund, Marko; van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne-Moniek; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; Frank, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    The porphyrias are predominantly inherited metabolic disorders, which result from a specific deficiency of one of the eight enzymes along the pathway of haem biosynthesis. Historically, they have been classified into hepatic and erythropoietic forms, based on the primary site of expression of the prevailing dysfunctional enzyme. From a clinical point of view, however, it is more convenient to subdivide them into acute and non-acute porphyrias, thereby primarily considering the potential occurrence of life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Unrecognised or untreated, such an acute porphyric attack is associated with a significant mortality of up to 10%. The acute hepatic porphyrias comprise acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Making a precise diagnosis may be difficult because the different types of porphyrias may show overlapping clinical and biochemical characteristics. To date, the therapeutic possibilities are limited and mainly symptomatic. In this overview we report on what is currently known about pathogenesis, clinic, diagnostics, and therapy of the acute hepatic porphyrias. We further point out actual and future challenges in the management of these diseases. PMID:20955962

  15. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  16. Recent advances in the management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Ravaglia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is characterized by acute wheezing in infants or children and is associated with signs or symptoms of respiratory infection; it is rarely symptomatic in adults and the most common etiologic agent is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Usually it does not require investigation, treatment is merely supportive and a conservative approach seems adequate in the majority of children, especially for the youngest ones (<3 months); however, clinical scoring systems have been proposed and admission in hospital should be arranged in case of severe disease or a very young age or important comorbidities. Apnea is a very important aspect of the management of young infants with bronchiolitis. This review focuses on the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics, as well as the recent advances in management of acute bronchiolitis. PMID:25580257

  17. A new approach to treatment of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    Conventional therapies for acute decongestion have yielded uniformly poor results in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). The failure of current strategies may be due to advanced disease in hospitalized patients, incomplete therapy, inherent limitations to existing therapy, or some combination of all three factors. Loop diuretics are the mainstay of current therapy and are in theory not ideal since while producing immediate intravascular volume reduction and relief of symptoms they activate neurohormonal forces that are deleterious to both the heart and the kidney. Ultrafiltration is an alternative to loop diuretics but has not proved advantageous in the setting of renal dysfunction, and if not carefully applied may also aggravate neurohormonal imbalance. In theory decongestive therapy for AHF should remove large volumes of fluid quickly and safely and improve symptoms, particularly dyspnea, without aggravating renal dysfunction or causing neurohormonal activation. Several studies have now suggested that the use of aquaretics such as antagonists to the V2 receptor for arginine vasopressin may be useful as adjunctive therapy in AHF, particularly when renal dysfunction and/or hyponatremia are present. These agents leverage osmotic forces to produce tissue decongestion while causing a water diuresis. They do not adversely affect renal function or neurohormonal balance. Building on the current base of knowledge about outcomes in AHF together with the only study of vasopressin antagonists as short-term monotherapy in chronic heart failure, it would be reasonable to design a trial in AHF in which the use of loop diuretics was minimized in favor of these agents. PMID:26946929

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I. Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow.

  19. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  20. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  1. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  2. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  3. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  4. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  5. Symptomatic tongue atrophy due to atypical polymyositis in a Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Midori; Jeffery, Nick D; Kitagawa, Masato; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Watari, Toshihiro

    2009-08-01

    A three-year-old, 7.3-kg, female Pembroke Welsh Corgi exhibited symptomatic tongue atrophy, crinkling of the tip of the tongue, dysphagia and excessive salivation. Neurological examination suggested multiple cranial neuropathy, but polymyositis was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and muscle biopsy. The dog did not respond to prednisolone treatment and died from aspiration pneumonia 22 months after the first presentation. Post-mortem histopathological examination of the tongue revealed marked myofiber loss and fibrosis with multifocal infiltration of mixed mononuclear cells. Similar findings were also observed in the masticatory muscles and quadriceps without abnormality of peripheral nerves or evidence of infection. Symptomatic tongue atrophy occurring in the course of polymyositis has not been reported previously in dogs. PMID:19721359

  6. Symptomatic Lymphocele Formation After Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Early Stage Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Garagozova, Nigar; Pfiffer, Tatiana; Beier, Anna; Köhler, Christhardt; Favero, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In early stage cervical cancer, nodal status is the most important prognostic factor, and execution of retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy is currently an integral part of surgical therapy. Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been progressively incorporated with surgical therapy and could reduce morbidity. However, the current incidence of complications exclusively related to the procedure is unknown. We report on a 29-year-old woman affected by cervical cancer (Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique Stage 1b1), who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy in combination with radical vaginal trachelectomy, and who later developed a symptomatic pelvic lymphocele that required surgical therapy. Conservative procedures in the pelvic lymph nodes are not free of complications, especially with regard to the formation of symptomatic lymphoceles. This report brings to light an important discussion about the exact magnitude of the complications associated with the procedure. PMID:26260297

  7. Prevalence of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Moyen Chari district, south of Chad.

    PubMed

    Bregani, Enrico Rino; Balzarini, Laura; Mbaïdoum, Narassem; Rovellini, Angelo

    2007-07-01

    Filarial parasites infect an estimated 140 million people worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans are responsible for most filarial infections in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of filariasis in symptomatic patients in Goundi Sanitary district:167 patients were enrolled (99 men, 68 women). M. perstans microfilariae were isolated in peripheral blood in 164 cases, while Loa loa and Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis were diagnosed in only six and three cases, respectively. The most frequent filariasis observed in our study were due to M. perstans and L. loa, while the few cases of W. bancrofti filariasis seem to have been acquired abroad. No cases of O. volvulus were observed. Microfilarial burden was not related to symptoms, but a correlation between eosinophilia and pruritus was evident. No relationship was observed between eosinophils and symptoms. The prevalence observed in symptomatic patients could reflect the real prevalence of filariasis. PMID:17716512

  8. Discourses of the body in euthanasia: symptomatic, dependent, shameful and temporal.

    PubMed

    Street, A F; Kissane, D W

    2001-09-01

    This theoretical paper is derived from a discourse analysis of the textual material from a study of the seven deaths associated with legalised euthanasia in the Northern Territory, Australia. The textual analysis utilises evidence from interviews, letters written by people seeking euthanasia, medical reports, coroner's records and media reports concerning the social experiment of legalised euthanasia in Australia. The paper does not discuss the euthanasia debate. It argues that the body is a neglected concern in the debates and offers a construction of the discourses of the body as symptomatic, dependent, shameful and temporal. Medical discourses frame the body as symptomatic but these people were also concerned with the loss of autonomy associated with dependence, with shame connected with loss of bodily functions and the embodied experience of determining a 'time to die'. PMID:11882215

  9. A Critical Protection Level Derived from Dengue Infection Mathematical Model Considering Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Supriatna, A. K.; Soewono, E.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we formulate a model of dengue fever transmission by considering the presence of asymptomatic and symptomatic compartments. The model takes the form as a system of differential equations representing a host-vector SIR (Susceptible - Infective -Recovered) disease transmission. It is assumed that both host and vector populations are constant. It is also assumed that reinfection of recovered hosts by the disease is possible due to a wanning immunity in human body. We analyze the model to determine the qualitative behavior of the model solution and use the concept of effective basic reproduction number (fraktur Rp) as a control criteria of the disease transmission. The effect of mosquito biting protection (e.g. by using insect repellent) is also considered. We compute the long-term ratio of the asymptomatic and symptomatic classes and show a condition for which the iceberg phenomenon could appear.

  10. Diagnosis and perioperative management of ruptured AAA mimicking symptomatic groin hernia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Holger Jan; Becker, Daniel; Rancic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) can infrequently present as symptomatic groin hernia. This misleading form of presentation often leads to erroneous preoperative management resulting in poor survival. Case presentation Two patients with RAAA mimicking symptomatic groin hernia underwent different preoperative managements pointing out the importance of the principles of hypotensive haemostasis in the scope of this emergency scenario. Conclusion Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) remains the recommended diagnostic tool—for both safe diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm and precise preoperative planning. Endovascular aortic repair of the RAAA—if feasible—is the treatment of choice. This rare form of RAAA manifestation should call physicians attention—especially in patients with known abdominal aortic aneurysms in their preceding medical history. PMID:26656148

  11. Identification of Symptomatic Fetuses Infected with Cytomegalovirus Using Amniotic Fluid Peptide Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Lacroix, Chrystelle; Breuil, Benjamin; Froment, Carine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P.; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, and is a major cause of sensorineural hearing loss and neurological disabilities. Evaluating the risk for a CMV infected fetus to develop severe clinical symptoms after birth is crucial to provide appropriate guidance to pregnant women who might have to consider termination of pregnancy or experimental prenatal medical therapies. However, establishing the prognosis before birth remains a challenge. This evaluation is currently based upon fetal imaging and fetal biological parameters, but the positive and negative predictive values of these parameters are not optimal, leaving room for the development of new prognostic factors. Here, we compared the amniotic fluid peptidome between asymptomatic fetuses who were born as asymptomatic neonates and symptomatic fetuses who were either terminated in view of severe cerebral lesions or born as severely symptomatic neonates. This comparison allowed us to identify a 34-peptide classifier in a discovery cohort of 13 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic neonates. This classifier further yielded 89% sensitivity, 75% specificity and an area under the curve of 0.90 to segregate 9 severely symptomatic from 12 asymptomatic neonates in a validation cohort, showing an overall better performance than that of classical fetal laboratory parameters. Pathway analysis of the 34 peptides underlined the role of viral entry in fetuses with severe brain disease as well as the potential importance of both beta-2-microglobulin and adiponectin to protect the injured fetal brain infected with CMV. The results also suggested the mechanistic implication of the T calcium channel alpha-1G (CACNA1G) protein in the development of seizures in severely CMV infected children. These results open a new field for potential therapeutic options. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that amniotic fluid peptidome analysis can effectively predict the severity of congenital CMV infection. This

  12. Substance-P in symptomatic mediopatellar plica as a predictor of patellofemoral pain

    PubMed Central

    HE, RUI; YANG, LIU; CHEN, GUANGXING; GUO, LIN; PEI, YING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of a neuropeptide of symptomatic mediopatellar plica (MP) to prove that there was a significant correlation between the expression of substance-P (SP) in MP and patellofemoral pain. The specimens of synovial plica were obtained by knee arthroscopy. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to investigate the expression of SP, and compared the innervation density of SP among the three groups: Blank control (asymptomatic plica), positive control (symptomatic plica with other injuries) and experimental (symptomatic plica without other injuries) groups by the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls test in 60 patients. The expression levels of SP nerve fibers in the superior plica were 24.60±26.17, 117.36±73.62 and 59.06±44.06 in the blank control, positive control and experimental groups, respectively. The density of nerve fibers in medial plica was 23.23±18.41 in the blank control group, 268.00±71.60 in the positive control group and 255.44±87.91 in the experimental group. The density of nerve fibers of MP was higher compared to that of the superior plica. The density was highest in the positive control group, and lowest in the blank control group in MP. There was a close correlation between the density of SP expression and the degree of patellofemoral pain. The SP expression intensity has an important role in the incidence of patellofemoral pain and is responsible for the pathogenesis of symptomatic MP. PMID:26870328

  13. Screening for symptomatic metal sensitivity: a prospective study of 92 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Kondo, Makoto; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-03-01

    Metal sensitivity (MS) reactions to implant metals represent a rare but well-documented complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although 20-25% of post-TJA patients develop MS, only a few highly susceptible patients (< 1%) exhibit symptoms. Whether surgeons should perform screening for MS is currently a matter of debate. The present study investigated the clinical importance of screening for patients predisposed to symptomatic MS, and the specific metals causing symptomatic MS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 2000 and 2002, a total of 108 primary TKAs were performed on 92 patients. Preoperatively, all patients underwent modified lymphocyte stimulation test (mLST) to Ni, Co, Cr, and Fe. Of the 92 patients, 24 (26%) displayed positive preoperative responses to at least one metal. Five patients displayed implant metal-related eczema and were all mLST-positive preoperatively, suggesting that screening for symptomatic MS is clinically useful. Two of these underwent revision TKA and thereafter, eczema healed and mLST results changed from positive to negative. All mLST-positive patients were divided into three groups: Group I, patients with eczema; Group II, patients with clear history of MS; and Group III, patients neither eczema nor history of MS. When the type of sensitive metals were compared among the three groups, a significant association between presence of Cr-sensitivity and development of eczema (P < 0.05) was identified. No significant association was observed between other metals and development of eczema or history of MS. This indicates that Cr is a potential candidate metal for causing eczema in our TKA series, and Cr-sensitivity may offer a potential predictor for symptomatic MS. The present study indicates that the surgeons should undertake routine preoperative screening for MS, particularly to Cr. PMID:15369690

  14. Progesterone for Symptomatic Perimenopause Treatment – Progesterone politics, physiology and potential for perimenopause

    PubMed Central

    Prior, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Perimenopause, women’s normal midlife reproductive transition, is highly symptomatic for about 20% of women who are currently inaccurately counseled and inappropriately treated with oral contraceptives, menopausal hormone therapy or hysterectomy. About 80% of perimenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS), 25% have menorrhagia, and about 10% experience mastalgia. The majority of women describe varying intensities of sleep, coping or mood difficulties. Women are more symptomatic because common knowledge inaccurately says that estradiol (E2) levels are dropping/deficient. Evidence shows that with disturbed brain-ovary feedbacks, E2 levels average 26% higher and soar erratically – some women describe feeling pregnant! Also, ovulation and progesterone (P4) levels become insufficient or absent. The most symptomatic women have higher E2 and lower P4 levels. Because P4 and E2 complement/counterbalance each other’s tissue effects, oral micronized P4 (OMP4 300 mg at bedtime) is a physiological therapy for treatment-seeking, symptomatic perimenopausal women. Given cyclically (cycle d 14-27, or 14 on/off) in menstruating midlife women, OMP4 decreases cyclic VMS, improves sleep and premenstrual mastalgia. Menorrhagia is treated with ibuprofen 200mg/6h plus OMP4 cycle d 4-28. For insulin resistance, metformin plus cyclic or daily OMP4 decreases insulin resistance and weight gain. Non-responsive migraines need daily OMP4 plus usual therapies. VMS and insomnia in late perimenopause respond to daily OMP4. In summary, OMP4 is a physiology-based therapy that improves sleep, treats VMS, does not increase breast proliferation or cancer risk, increases bone formation and has beneficial cardiovascular effects. A controlled trial is testing OMP4 for perimenopausal VMS – more evidence-based data are needed. PMID:24753856

  15. Symptomatic knee osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lidan; Wu, Xiuhua; Wu, Honghua; Su, Jinmei; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    To explore the associated risk factors of symptomatic knee osteonecrosis (KON) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features between SLE patients with and without symptomatic KON matched by age and gender. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate possible associated risk factors. Twenty (one male, nineteen females) out of 3941 lupus patients were identified as symptomatic KON, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age at KON onset was 34.4 (range 12-67) years, and the median course of lupus at KON onset was 72.5 (range 8-123) months. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that the prevalence of cutaneous vasculitis (OR 5.23; 95 % CI 1.11-24.70), hyperfibrinogenemia (OR 4.75; 95 % CI 1.08-20.85), and elevated IgG levels (OR 6.05; 95 % CI 1.58-23.16) were statistically higher in KON group, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) usage was statistically lower in KON group (OR 0.27; 95 % CI 0.07-0.97). Glucocorticoid usage, in terms of maximal dose, duration of treatment, and the percentage of receiving methylprednisolone pulse therapy, did not show statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Symptomatic KON is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis, hyperfibrinogenemia, and elevated IgG levels are possible risk factors, whereas HCQ may provide a protective effect. Our results suggest that lupus activity as well as hypercoagulation status may play a role in the pathogenesis of KON in lupus. PMID:27230994

  16. Transurethral Unroofing of a Symptomatic Imperforate Cowper's Syringocele in an Adult Male

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Catherine R.; Gaither, Thomas W.; Osterberg, E. Charles

    2016-01-01

    Cystic dilatation of bulbourethral gland ducts (Cowper's gland syringocele) is a rare abnormality. The condition has been described among pediatric populations, but it is uncommon in adults. It can be asymptomatic or present with obstructive and irritative urinary symptoms. We report a case of a symptomatic imperforate Cowper's syringocele in a young patient that was successfully managed with transurethral unroofing of the cyst. PMID:27119039

  17. Progesterone for Symptomatic Perimenopause Treatment - Progesterone politics, physiology and potential for perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Prior, J C

    2011-01-01

    Perimenopause, women's normal midlife reproductive transition, is highly symptomatic for about 20% of women who are currently inaccurately counseled and inappropriately treated with oral contraceptives, menopausal hormone therapy or hysterectomy. About 80% of perimenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms (VMS), 25% have menorrhagia, and about 10% experience mastalgia. The majority of women describe varying intensities of sleep, -coping or mood difficulties. Women are more symptomatic because common knowledge inaccurately says that estradiol (E2) levels are dropping/deficient. Evidence shows that with disturbed brain-ovary feedbacks, E2 levels average 26% higher and soar erratically - some women describe feeling pregnant! Also, ovulation and progesterone (P4) levels become insufficient or absent. The most symptomatic women have higher E2 and lower P4 levels. Because P4 and E2 complement/counterbalance each other's tissue effects, oral micronized P4 (OMP4 300 mg at -bedtime) is a physiological therapy for treatment-seeking, symptomatic perimenopausal women. Given cyclically (cycle d 14-27, or 14 on/off) in menstruating midlife women, OMP4 decreases cyclic VMS, improves sleep and premenstrual mastalgia. Menorrhagia is treated with ibuprofen 200mg/6h plus OMP4 cycle d 4-28. For insulin resistance, metformin plus cyclic or daily OMP4 decreases insulin resistance and weight gain. Non-responsive migraines need daily OMP4 plus usual therapies. VMS and insomnia in late perimenopause respond to daily OMP4. In summary, OMP4 is a physiology-based therapy that improves sleep, treats VMS, does not increase breast proliferation or cancer risk, increases bone formation and has beneficial cardiovascular effects. A controlled trial is testing OMP4 for perimenopausal VMS - more evidence-based data are needed. PMID:24753856

  18. Symptomatic severe tricuspid insufficiency as a late complication of pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Rohn, V; Slais, M; Vondráček, V

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of a young adult patient with symptomatic tricuspid valve insufficiency as a late consequence of pulmonary valve balloon dilatation in childhood. Patient was successfully treated by tricuspid valve repair with neo-chordae implantation and a ring plasty. Two years after the operation the patient, an active sportsman, is asymptomatic with trace tricuspid regurgitation on the echo examination. PMID:20946724

  19. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear ‘bad days, bad nights’: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients’ perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. Methods An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. Results The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Conclusions Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient’s lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to

  20. Utility of Microbiological Profile of Symptomatic Vaginal Discharge in Rural Women of Reproductive Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaya; Gupta, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Symptomatic vaginal discharge is the most frequent symptom in women of reproductive age group. Owing to social stigma majority of affected women hesitate to seek medical consultation. Therefore the actual incidence of vaginal discharge is much more than what is reported. The aim of the study is to determine the microbiological profile of symptomatic vaginal discharge in rural area and its utility in the management of genital tract infection. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive type of observational study, conducted in sexually active women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) attending the OPD/IPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of National Institute of Medical Sciences, Shobhanagar, Jaipur (Rajasthan), over a period of 18 months from June 2012 to December 2013. Hundred sexually active non pregnant women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) were included in the study. After taking consent general physical examination along with pelvic examination was performed. Two high vaginal swabs and blood sample were collected for various tests. Hanging drop preparation was immediately made. This was followed by gram staining and culture. Chlamydia trachomatis IgM antibody was detected by ELISA method. Results: Out of 100 women with symptomatic vaginal discharge, specific diagnosis was obtained in 89% of cases whereas no specific aetiology was found in 11% cases. Mean age was 32.60 years. Fifty-three percent patient had Bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis was found in 14% cases, 16% had Chlamydia trachomatis infection while Trichomonas vaginalis infection was detected in 6% cases. Homogenous discharge was most prevalent (52%), followed by mucopurulant discharge in 23% of women. Conclusion: Patient with symptomatic vaginal discharge need to be actively managed with appropriate antimicrobial agents. Judicious management may be helpful in prevention of HIV, HPV, CIN and post infection sequelae. PMID:25954668

  1. Efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vidyalaxmi; Shah, Maitri C.; Patel, Sangita V.; Marfatia, Yogesh S.; Zalavadiya, Dhara

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of a few shortcomings such as over diagnosis and over treatment, syndromic management is a recommended practice in India for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This study tries to find out the efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Objective: The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of syndromic management in terms of symptomatic improvement among females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted in Gynecology Department of Tertiary Care Hospital including 180 symptomatic females having vaginal discharge syndrome. Demographic profile, presenting complaints, menstrual history, obstetric history, partner history, and contraceptive history were noted. This was followed by clinical examination and specimen collection for laboratory tests and blood tests to find out type of STI including viral STI such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Treatment was given according to syndromic management on the same day. All the participants were asked to come for follow-up after 15 days and their improvement in symptoms was noted as complete improvement, some improvement or no improvement on a five point scale. Results: 63.9% cases showed complete improvement, while 36.1% showed some improvement. None of the patients was without any improvement. Vaginal discharge syndrome was most common between 20 and 30 years (43.4%), and 67.8% of symptomatic females with vaginal discharge syndrome belonged to the lower socioeconomic group. HSV infection was the most common (15%) associated viral infection with vaginal discharge syndrome, while hepatitis B infection was the least common (0.5%). HIV was reactive in 2.8% cases only. Conclusion: Syndromic management was found to be effective in relieving symptoms in most of the cases of vaginal discharge syndrome

  2. Symptomatic and Incidental Venous Thromboembolic Disease Are Both Associated with Mortality in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Sidana, Surbhi; Elson, Paul; Khorana, Alok A.; McCrae, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is well established. The independent impact of VTE, both symptomatic and incidental, on survival in patients with prostate cancer is not known. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the effect of VTE of survival in prostate cancer. Methods Data regarding clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes of 453 consecutive prostate cancer patients were collected. Fisher exact (categorical variables) and t-test (continuous variables) were utilized to test associations with VTE and mortality. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan Meier method. A Cox regression model was used to model the mortality hazard ratio (HR). Results At diagnosis, 358 (83%) patients had early stage disease, 43 (10%) had locally advanced disease and 32 (7%) had metastatic disease. During the follow up period, 122 (27%) patients died and 41 (9%) developed VTE (33 deep vein thrombosis, 5 pulmonary embolism, and 3 patients with both DVT and PE). Twenty-five VTE events were symptomatic and 16 were incidentally diagnosed on CT scans obtained for other reasons. VTE was associated with increased mortality [HR 6.89 (4.29–11.08), p<0.001] in a multivariable analysis adjusted for cancer stage, performance status, treatments and co-morbidities. There was no difference in survival between patients who had symptomatic and incidental VTE. Conclusion Venous thromboembolic disease, both symptomatic and incidental, is a predictor of poor survival in patients with prostate cancer, especially those with advanced disease. Further studies are needed to evaluate the benefit of prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulation in this population. PMID:25126949

  3. Acute coronary syndrome in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Gehani, Abdulrazzak; Sulaiman, Kadhim

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the available information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute coronary syndromes (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) during all stages of pregnancy. We searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus and EBSCO host research databases from 1980 through to August 2010 using the indexing terms 'pregnancy', 'ante-,peri-, and postpartum', 'acute coronary syndrome', 'myocardial infarction', 'STEMI' and 'NSTEMI'. Symptomatic coronary artery disease is still infrequent in women of childbearing age, but the recent increase in its prevalence in pregnancy has been attributed to the modern trend of childbearing in older years because many young working women are postponing having children. Although rare, acute pregnancy-related MI is a devastating event that may claim the life of a mother and her fetus. The incidence of MI is estimated at 0.6-1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The case fatality rate has been reported to be 5-37%. Owing to the rarity of the event, information related to MI in pregnancy is derived from case reports and, therefore, is subject to considerable reporting bias. Treatment needs to be prompt and urgent because of the very high mortality rate. Current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of MI should be expanded to include pregnancy-related MI. Screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors should be achieved before pregnancy. PMID:21517733

  4. Local radiotherapy for palliation in multiple myeloma patients with symptomatic bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of symptomatic bone lesions in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who received local radiotherapy (LRT). Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients with 87 symptomatic bone lesions treated via LRT were analyzed. LRT was delivered at a median total dose of 21 Gy (range, 12 to 40 Gy) in a median of 7 fractions (range, 4 to 20 fractions). The clinical outcomes of LRT and the factors affecting treatment response were assessed. Results After a median follow-up time of 66.7 weeks, symptom relief was achieved for 85 of 87 lesions (97.7%). The median time to symptom relief was 7 days from the start of LRT (range, 1 to 67 days). The duration of in-field failure-free survival ranged from 1.1 to 450.9 weeks (median, 66.7 weeks). The radiation dose or use of previous and concurrent chemotherapy was not significantly associated with in-field failure for LRT (p = 0.354, 0.758, and 0.758, respectively). Conclusion Symptomatic bone lesions in patients with MM can be successfully treated with LRT. A higher radiation dose or the use of concurrent chemotherapy may not influence the in-field disease control. A relatively low radiation dose could achieve remission of symptoms in patients with MM. PMID:27104168

  5. Pulpotomy of Symptomatic Permanent Teeth with Carious Exposure Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Barngkgei, Imad Hassan; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Alboni, Roula Safouh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of pulpotomy treatment with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 27-54 years presented with 11 symptomatic permanent teeth (n=11). Each offending carious tooth was clinically and radiographically determined. We removed caries as conservatively as possible; however pulp exposure was inevitable. ProRoot MTA pulpotomy was performed on these teeth. The patients were followed-up clinically and radiographically for 24-42 months. Results Immediate relief of patients` symptoms occurred. Moreover, teeth responses to the electric pulp tester were within normal range on follow-up appointment and the radiographs did not reveal any abnormality/lesion in the periapical areas. Conclusion Pulpotomy using MTA could be a good alternative for root canal therapy (RCT) for managing symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure, however further large-scale multicenter clinical trials are highly encouraged to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:23717332

  6. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity to a sad film predicts depression symptom improvement and symptomatic trajectory.

    PubMed

    Panaite, Vanessa; Hindash, Alexandra Cowden; Bylsma, Lauren M; Small, Brent J; Salomon, Kristen; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity, an index of cardiac vagal tone, has been linked to self-regulation and the severity and course of depression (Rottenberg, 2007). Although initial data supports the proposition that RSA withdrawal during a sad film is a specific predictor of depression course (Fraguas, 2007; Rottenberg, 2005), the robustness and specificity of this finding are unclear. To provide a stronger test, RSA reactivity to three emotion films (happy, sad, fear) and to a more robust stressor, a speech task, were examined in currently depressed individuals (n=37), who were assessed for their degree of symptomatic improvement over 30weeks. Robust RSA reactivity to the sad film uniquely predicted overall symptom improvement over 30weeks. RSA reactivity to both sad and stressful stimuli predicted the speed and maintenance of symptomatic improvement. The current analyses provide the most robust support to date that RSA withdrawal to sad stimuli (but not stressful) has specificity in predicting the overall symptomatic improvement. In contrast, RSA reactivity to negative stimuli (both sad and stressful) predicted the trajectory of depression course. Patients' engagement with sad stimuli may be an important sign to attend to in therapeutic settings. PMID:26681648

  7. Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Nathan, B; Appiah, J; Saunders, P; Heron, D; Nichols, T; Brum, R; Alexander, S; Baraitser, P; Ison, C

    2015-03-01

    In the UK, despite its low sensitivity, wet mount microscopy is often the only method of detecting Trichomonas vaginalis infection. A study was conducted in symptomatic women to compare the performance of five methods for detecting T. vaginalis: an in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR); Aptima T. vaginalis kit; OSOM ®Trichomonas Rapid Test; culture and microscopy. Symptomatic women underwent routine testing; microscopy and further swabs were taken for molecular testing, OSOM and culture. A true positive was defined as a sample that was positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Two hundred and forty-six women were recruited: 24 patients were positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Of these 24 patients, 21 patients were detected by real-time PCR (sensitivity 88%); 22 patients were detected by the Aptima T. vaginalis kit (sensitivity 92%); 22 patients were detected by OSOM (sensitivity 92%); nine were detected by wet mount microscopy (sensitivity 38%); and 21 were detected by culture (sensitivity 88%). Two patients were positive by just one method and were not considered true positives. All the other detection methods had a sensitivity to detect T. vaginalis that was significantly greater than wet mount microscopy, highlighting the number of cases that are routinely missed even in symptomatic women if microscopy is the only diagnostic method available. PMID:24855131

  8. Symptomatic Patients with Intraluminal Carotid Thrombus: Outcome with a Strategy of Initial Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vellimana, Ananth K.; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Rich, Keith M.; Cross, Dewitte T.; Moran, Christopher J.; Zazulia, Allyson R.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Zipfel, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal treatment for patients with symptomatic intraluminal carotid thrombus (ICT) remains poorly defined. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients presenting to our institution between 2001 and 2011 with symptomatic ICT. Results Twenty-four patients (16 males, 8 females) with ICT presented with ischemic stroke (n=18) or TIA (n=6). All were treated initially with anticoagulation ± antiplatelet drugs. Eight of these patients had no or mild carotid stenosis on initial angiography and were treated with medical management alone. The remaining 16 patients had moderate or severe carotid stenosis on initial angiography. Of these, 10 underwent delayed revascularization (endarterectomy, n=8; angioplasty and stenting, n=2), 2 refused revascularization, and 4 were treated with medical therapy alone. One patient had multiple TIAs despite medical therapy and eventually underwent CEA; the remaining 23 patients had no TIAs. No patient suffered ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke while on anticoagulation, during the perioperative period or in long-term follow up; one patient died of an unrelated condition (mean follow-up = 16.4 months). Conclusion Our results suggest that initial anticoagulation of symptomatic ICT results in a low rate of recurrent ischemic events and that carotid revascularization, if indicated, can be safely performed in a delayed manner. PMID:23061393

  9. Nimesulide Improves the Symptomatic and Disease Modifying Effects of Leflunomide in Collagen Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Nofal, Salwa M.; Khalifa, Amani E.; Williams, Richard O.; El-Eraky, Wafaa I.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model. PMID:25375820

  10. External carotid stenting for symptomatic stenosis in a patient with patent EDAS for Moyamoya disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric; Parker, Lindsey; Fraser, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Background Moyamoya disease is characterized by progressive narrowing of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Symptomatic patients typically undergo cerebrovascular intervention via extracranial–intracranial (EC–IC) bypass, most often with the use of the superficial temporal artery. This case of Moyamoya disease is of particular interest as the patient presented with a unilateral atherosclerotic external carotid artery (ECA) stenosis after EC–IC bypass that eliminated the benefit of his original surgery, resulting in a symptomatic presentation. Clinical presentation A 53-year-old man presenting with Moyamoya disease and known left ICA occlusion had received a bilateral encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) bypass 10 years previously. He re-presented complaining of right-sided tingling, weakness, and numbness radiating up the arm. CT angiography indicated significant stenosis of the left ECA. ECA angioplasty and stenting with a distal protection device resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Conclusions This case illustrates that a patient presenting with Moyamoya disease and concurrent symptomatic ECA stenosis post-EDAS can be effectively and safely treated with ECA stenting. PMID:25085947

  11. Symptomatic Infratentorial Thrombosed Developmental Venous Anomaly: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amuluru, Krishna; Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Hannaford, Stephen; Singh, Inder Paul; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are variations of normal transmedullary veins draining white and gray matter. In the vast majority of cases, DVAs are diagnosed incidentally and should be considered as benign entities. In extremely rare circumstances, DVAs may become symptomatic due to mechanical or flow-related etiologies. Thrombosis of the collector vein of a DVA is a rare type of a flow-related complication with only 29 cases reported in the literature, the majority of which are supratentorial. Infratentorial thrombosed DVAs are thus extremely rare and the few cases reported have typically caused symptoms due to venous ischemic infarctions. Summary We report a case of an infratentorial DVA with a thrombosed drainage vein in a patient with nonhemorrhagic, noninfarcted venous congestive edema, which was successfully treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and short-term anticoagulation. We review the pertinent venous anatomy of the posterior fossa as well as the literature of symptomatic infratentorial thrombosed DVAs. Key Message The presented case of an infratentorial thrombosed DVA with cerebellar and pontine venous congestive edema is extremely rare. A working knowledge of posterior fossa venous anatomy and possible pathomechanisms responsible for the rarely symptomatic lesion will aid in the timely and efficacious treatment of such lesions. PMID:27051409

  12. Caffeine restriction has no role in the management of patients with symptomatic idiopathic ventricular premature beats.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, D. E.; Neilson, J. M.; Jarvie, D. R.; Boon, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of caffeine restriction in the management of patients with symptomatic idiopathic ventricular premature beats. DESIGN: A randomised, double blind, 6 week intervention trial incorporating dietary caffeine restriction, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee. SETTING: Cardiac outpatient clinic. PATIENTS: 13 patients with symptomatic frequent idiopathic ventricular premature beats. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Weekly measures of serum caffeine concentration, coffee consumption, visual analogue score of palpitations, and 24 hour ventricular premature beat frequency. RESULTS: The interventions achieved significant alterations in serum caffeine concentrations (P < 0.001) which correlated with coffee consumption (r = 0.70; P < 0.001). Visual analogue palpitation scores showed a small, but significant correlation with ventricular premature beat frequencies (r = 0.34; P = 0.003). However, there were no significant changes in palpitation scores or ventricular premature beat frequencies during the intervention weeks and no significant correlations were found between these variables and serum caffeine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Caffeine restriction has no role in the management of patients referred with symptomatic idiopathic ventricular premature beats. PMID:8983684

  13. Modeling methodology for the accurate and prompt prediction of symptomatic events in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; Risco-Martín, José L; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of symptomatic crises in chronic diseases allows to take decisions before the symptoms occur, such as the intake of drugs to avoid the symptoms or the activation of medical alarms. The prediction horizon is in this case an important parameter in order to fulfill the pharmacokinetics of medications, or the time response of medical services. This paper presents a study about the prediction limits of a chronic disease with symptomatic crises: the migraine. For that purpose, this work develops a methodology to build predictive migraine models and to improve these predictions beyond the limits of the initial models. The maximum prediction horizon is analyzed, and its dependency on the selected features is studied. A strategy for model selection is proposed to tackle the trade off between conservative but robust predictive models, with respect to less accurate predictions with higher horizons. The obtained results show a prediction horizon close to 40min, which is in the time range of the drug pharmacokinetics. Experiments have been performed in a realistic scenario where input data have been acquired in an ambulatory clinical study by the deployment of a non-intrusive Wireless Body Sensor Network. Our results provide an effective methodology for the selection of the future horizon in the development of prediction algorithms for diseases experiencing symptomatic crises. PMID:27260782

  14. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  15. [CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HYPERTROPHIC GINGIVITIS: CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Shinkevich, V; Udaltsova, K; Pisarenko, E; Kolomiets, S; Khmil, T

    2015-12-01

    Gingivitis in traditional national dentistry referred to independent diseases or symptomatic condition in periodontitis and classified morphologically. The diagnostic features of the diseases are characteristic, but the clinical presentation of symptomatic gingivitis and patterns of bone destructions may vary between patients. Successful treatment of the disease depends from proper diagnosis and advanced disease stages, but for symptomatic gingivitis that accompanying chronic periodontitis, protocols include surgical excision. Despite of the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis, its active treatment often start in severe destruction and bone loss (2-3 stage severity). Today etiotropic antimicrobial therapy is real way to control microbial biofilm and has solid evidence base. Applying of etiotropic antimicrobial therapy as systemic azithromycin with timely treatment of mild to moderate periodontal and bone destruction may reduce severe periodontitis incidence of and treatment-related complications in the future. This paper attempts to describe the clinical diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of chronic generalized periodontitis and hypertrophic gingivitis patient with case reports and a brief review. PMID:26719550

  16. Primary repair of symptomatic neonates with tetralogy of Fallot with or without pulmonary atresia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ha; Kwak, Jae Gun; Lee, Cheul

    2014-01-01

    Recently, surgical outcomes of repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) have improved. For patients with TOF older than 3 months, primary repair has been advocated regardless of symptoms. However, a surgical approach to symptomatic TOF in neonates or very young infants remains elusive. Traditionally, there have been two surgical options for these patients: primary repair versus an initial aortopulmonary shunt followed by repair. Early primary repair provides several advantages, including avoidance of shunt-related complications, early relief of hypoxia, promotion of normal lung development, avoidance of ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and psychological comfort to the family. Because of advances in cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and accumulated experience in neonatal cardiac surgery, primary repair in neonates with TOF has been performed with excellent early outcomes (early mortality<5%), which may be superior to the outcomes of aortopulmonary shunting. A remaining question regarding surgical options is whether shunts can preserve the pulmonary valve annulus for TOF neonates with pulmonary stenosis. Symptomatic neonates and older infants have different anatomies of right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstructions, which in neonates are nearly always caused by a hypoplastic pulmonary valve annulus instead of infundibular obstruction. Therefore, a shunt is less likely to preserve the pulmonary valve annulus than is primary repair. Primary repair of TOF can be performed safely in most symptomatic neonates. Patients who have had primary repair should be closely followed up to evaluate the RVOT pathology and right ventricular function. PMID:24578712

  17. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Langevin, Stanley; O'Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G; Kirby, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  18. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  19. Acute hemolysis in a patient with a newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old of Egyptian origin who presented with sudden, severe and symptomatic anemia requiring hospitalization shortly after beginning concurrent radiation and temozolomide for his newly diagnosed glioblastoma. He had also recently been started on steroids, anticonvulsants and Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis. He was ultimately diagnosed with G6PD deficiency with an acute hemolytic anemia precipitated by dapsone. Screening for G6PD deficiency should be considered in high-risk patient populations where P. jirovecii prophylaxis is planned. PMID:27230975

  20. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  1. Effects of Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibition on Systemic and Pulmonary Hemodynamics and Ventricular Function in Patients with Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Zajarias, Alan; Madrazo, José A.; Shah, Jay; Gage, Brian F.; Novak, Eric; Johnson, Stephanie N.; Chakinala, Murali M.; Hohn, Tara A.; Saghir, Mohammed; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pressure overload due to aortic stenosis (AS) causes maladaptive ventricular and vascular remodeling that can lead to pulmonary hypertension, heart failure symptoms, and adverse outcomes. Retarding or reversing this maladaptive remodeling and its unfavorable hemodynamic consequences has potential to improve morbidity and mortality. Preclinical models of pressure overload have shown that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibition is beneficial, however the use of PDE5 inhibitors in patients with AS is controversial because of concerns about vasodilation and hypotension. Methods and Results We evaluated the safety and hemodynamic response of 20 subjects with severe symptomatic AS (mean aortic valve area 0.7±0.2 cm2, ejection fraction 60±14%) who received a single oral dose of sildenafil (40mg or 80mg). Compared to baseline, after 60 minutes sildenafil reduced systemic (−12%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (−29%, p=0.002) vascular resistance, mean pulmonary artery (−25%, p<0.001) and wedge (−17%, p<0.001) pressure, and increased systemic (+13%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (+45%, p<0.001) vascular compliance and stroke volume index (+8%, p=0.01). These changes were not dose dependent. Sildenafil caused a modest decrease in mean systemic arterial pressure (−11%, p<0.001), but was well-tolerated with no episodes of symptomatic hypotension. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that a single dose of a PDE5 inhibitor is safe and well-tolerated in patients with severe AS and is associated with acute improvements in pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics resulting in biventricular unloading. These findings support the need for longer-term studies to evaluate the role of PDE5 inhibition as adjunctive medical therapy in patients with AS. PMID:22447809

  2. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  4. Randomized trial of intensive bisphosphonate treatment versus symptomatic management in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Langston, Anne L; Campbell, Marion K; Fraser, William D; MacLennan, Graeme S; Selby, Peter L; Ralston, Stuart H

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely regarded as the treatment of choice for Paget's disease of bone (PDB) because of their potent inhibitory effects on bone turnover, but the effects of bisphosphonate therapy on symptoms and complications of PDB have been little studied. Here we report the results of a randomized trial that compared the effects of symptomatic treatment with intensive bisphosphonate therapy in a cohort of 1324 patients with PDB who were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 2 to 5 years). The symptomatic treatment group was treated only if they had pagetic bone pain, for which they were first given analgesics or anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by bisphosphonates if they did not respond. The intensive group received repeat courses of bisphosphonates irrespective of symptoms with the aim of reducing and maintaining serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels within the normal range. The endpoints were fracture, orthopedic surgery, quality of life, bone pain, and hearing thresholds. Serum ALP levels were significantly lower in the intensive treatment group than in with the symptomatic treatment group within 4 months of commencing treatment and remained lower throughout the study (p < .001). There was no difference between the groups in quality of life (as assessed by the SF36 questionnaire), in overall bodily pain, or in pagetic bone pain. Hearing thresholds, as assessed by audiometry did not change significantly and did not differ between the treatment groups. Clinical fractures occurred in 46 of 661 patients (7.0%) in the intensive treatment group compared with 49 of 663 patients (7.4%) in the symptomatic treatment group, and orthopedic surgery was required in 50 of 661 patients (7.3%) in the intensive treatment group and in 55 of 663 patients (8.3%) in the symptomatic treatment group. These differences were not significant. Subgroup analyses of patients with elevated ALP levels at baseline and those who did or did not receive bisphosphonates during the

  5. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF) OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI) and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9) and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5), respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the proportion of kneeling

  6. Treating symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in women with schizophrenia: presentation of the ongoing DAAMSEL clinical trial (Dopamine partial Agonist, Aripiprazole, for the Management of Symptomatic ELevated prolactin)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevations occur in people treated with antipsychotic medications and are often much higher in women than in men. Hyperprolactinemia is known to cause amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, galactorrhea and gynecomastia in females and is also associated with sexual dysfunction and bone loss. These side effects increase risk of antipsychotic nonadherence and suicide and pose significant problems in the long term management of women with schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we review the literature on prolactin; its physiology, plasma levels, side effects and strategies for treatment. We also present the rationale and protocol for an ongoing clinical trial to treat symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in premenopausal women with schizophrenia. More attention and focus are needed to address these significant side effects and help the field better personalize the treatment of women with schizophrenia. PMID:23968123

  7. Treating symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in women with schizophrenia: presentation of the ongoing DAAMSEL clinical trial (Dopamine partial Agonist, Aripiprazole, for the Management of Symptomatic ELevated prolactin).

    PubMed

    Kelly, Deanna L; Wehring, Heidi J; Earl, Amber K; Sullivan, Kelli M; Dickerson, Faith B; Feldman, Stephanie; McMahon, Robert P; Buchanan, Robert W; Warfel, Dale; Keller, William R; Fischer, Bernard A; Shim, Joo-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevations occur in people treated with antipsychotic medications and are often much higher in women than in men. Hyperprolactinemia is known to cause amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, galactorrhea and gynecomastia in females and is also associated with sexual dysfunction and bone loss. These side effects increase risk of antipsychotic nonadherence and suicide and pose significant problems in the long term management of women with schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we review the literature on prolactin; its physiology, plasma levels, side effects and strategies for treatment. We also present the rationale and protocol for an ongoing clinical trial to treat symptomatic hyperprolactinemia in premenopausal women with schizophrenia. More attention and focus are needed to address these significant side effects and help the field better personalize the treatment of women with schizophrenia. PMID:23968123

  8. Symptomatic co-infection with Babesia microti and Borrelia burgdorferi in patient after international exposure; a challenging case in Poland.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska, Joanna; Żarnowska-Prymek, Hanna; Stańczak, Joanna; Kozłowska, Joanna; Wiercińska-Drapało, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The report presents a well-documented case of symptomatic co-infection of Babesia microti and Borrelia burgdorferi in a Polish immunocompetent patient after travelling to Canada and the USA. PMID:27294655

  9. Tissue distribution of Leishmania chagasi and lesions in transplacentally infected fetuses from symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected bitches.

    PubMed

    Pangrazio, Kristel Kegler; Costa, Erica A; Amarilla, Shyrley P; Cino, Ada G; Silva, Teane M A; Paixão, Tatiane A; Costa, Luciana F; Dengues, Enrique G; Diaz, Andres Avalos Ruiz; Santos, Renato L

    2009-11-12

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is primarily transmitted by an invertebrate vector, but transmission in the absence of the vector has been reported. Vertical transmission of VL has been described in man and dogs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Leishmania amastigotes in fetal organs and histopathologic changes associated with parasitism and to determinate the frequency of transplacental transmission and potential of vertical transmission by symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant bitches. Symptomatic (n=4) and asymptomatic (n=4) pregnant bitches, serologically and parasitologically positive for Leishmania sp., carrying a total of 53 fetuses (26 from symptomatic and 27 from asymptomatic bitches) were selected at the Veterinary Hospital of the National University of Asuncion, Paraguay. Samples of placenta and fetal organs such as liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, kidney and heart were histologically evaluated and processed for immunodetection of amastigotes and PCR. There were no lesions compatible with VL in fetal tissues in spite of the presence of amastigotes, particularly in lymphoreticular tissues. However, fetal hepatocytes had marked degenerative changes that were independent of the presence of amastigotes in liver. Twenty-six out of 53 placentas (13 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic) and a total of 17 fetuses out of 53 (nine symptomatic and eight asymptomatic) were PCR positive. Together these findings indicate a high frequency of transplacental transmission and no differences in the potential of transmission when symptomatic were compared to asymptomatic pregnant bitches. PMID:19647368

  10. Epstein–Barr virus-associated acute cholecystitis in a teenager

    PubMed Central

    De Alwis, Y; Saleem, M

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl was admitted to hospital with fever, headache, sore throat and abdominal pain. Her blood lymphocyte count and inflammatory markers were raised. Acute Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection was suspected and confirmed serologically and by measuring the viral load. On day 7, she developed jaundice with abnormal liver function tests. An abdominal ultrasound scan revealed thickening of the gallbladder and bile duct walls without calculi suggesting acute acalculous cholecystitis. The patient improved slowly with symptomatic treatment, and a repeat ultrasound scan six months later was normal. Acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication of EBV infection and usually has a good prognosis.

  11. Acute hepatitis C in an HIV-infected patient: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Driver, Todd H; Terrault, Norah; Saxena, Varun

    2013-05-01

    With the decrease in transmission via transfusions and injection drug use, acute symptomatic hepatitis C is infrequently seen in developed countries. We report a case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adult who presented with abdominal pain. His alanine aminotransferase was greater than sixty times the upper limit of normal without any evidence on examination of fulminant hepatic failure. His workup revealed an elevated hepatitis C viral level with a negative hepatitis C antibody. He was discharged once his liver function tests improved. As an outpatient, he had a recurrent bout of symptoms with an elevation of his alanine aminotransferase and hepatitis C viral levels that promoted anti-hepatitis C virus treatment. This case illustrates the importance of considering acute hepatitis C as a cause of acute hepatitis in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. While patients with acute symptomatic hepatitis C generally have a higher rate of spontaneous viral clearance compared to those with an insidious acute infection, most still progress to chronic hepatitis C infection, and patients with HIV coinfection carry a higher risk of progression to chronic disease. PMID:23151989

  12. Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Neurological Complications of Infective Endocarditis: Impact on Surgical Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye, François; Tattevin, Pierre; Federspiel, Claire; Le Moing, Vincent; Chirouze, Catherine; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Bernard, Yvette; Chocron, Sidney; Obadia, Jean-François; Alla, François; Hoen, Bruno; Duval, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Symptomatic neurological complications (NC) are a major cause of mortality in infective endocarditis (IE) but the impact of asymptomatic complications is unknown. We aimed to assess the impact of asymptomatic NC (AsNC) on the management and prognosis of IE. Methods From the database of cases collected for a population-based study on IE, we selected 283 patients with definite left-sided IE who had undergone at least one neuroimaging procedure (cerebral CT scan and/or MRI) performed as part of initial evaluation. Results Among those 283 patients, 100 had symptomatic neurological complications (SNC) prior to the investigation, 35 had an asymptomatic neurological complications (AsNC), and 148 had a normal cerebral imaging (NoNC). The rate of valve surgery was 43% in the 100 patients with SNC, 77% in the 35 with AsNC, and 54% in the 148 with NoNC (p<0.001). In-hospital mortality was 42% in patients with SNC, 8.6% in patients with AsNC, and 16.9% in patients with NoNC (p<0.001). Among the 135 patients with NC, 95 had an indication for valve surgery (71%), which was performed in 70 of them (mortality 20%) and not performed in 25 (mortality 68%). In a multivariate adjusted analysis of the 135 patients with NC, age, renal failure, septic shock, and IE caused by S. aureus were independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality. In addition SNC was an independent predictor of 1-year mortality. Conclusions The presence of NC was associated with a poorer prognosis when symptomatic. Patients with AsNC had the highest rate of valve surgery and the lowest mortality rate, which suggests a protective role of surgery guided by systematic neuroimaging results. PMID:27400273

  13. Arterial Wall Imaging in Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis: Delayed Enhancement on MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Su Min; Seo, Woo-Keun; Seol, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate progressive enhancement in the carotid arterial wall overlying plaque in the symptomatic side for patients with cerebrovascular symptoms until delayed phase using MDCTA. Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients (all men; ages, 49-82 years; mean, 67.8 ± 8.4 years) with recent stroke and severe extracranial carotid stenosis were retrospectively analyzed. Pre-, early- and delayed phase images of MDCTA were obtained, and Hounsfield units (HU) of carotid walls were measured. We also measured HU of the asymptomatic contralateral carotid arterial wall for comparison. Friedman's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to evaluate the differences between groups. Results The averaged HU of the carotid wall in the symptomatic side was higher on the delayed phase (65.8 ± 14.2 HU) compared to early arterial phase (54.2 ± 12.6 HU). The averaged HU difference of wall enhancement between pre-contrast and delayed phase (28.0 ± 14.8 HU) was significantly higher than the between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (16.4 ± 12.1 HU) with P < 0.05. In analysis of the contralateral asymptomatic side, the HU difference between pre-contrast and delayed phase (15.5 ± 12.0 HU) showed no significant higher value than between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (14.9 ± 10.9 HU). Conclusion The pronounced enhancement of the carotid wall in the delayed phase on MDCTA was demonstrated in symptomatic patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis. In the future, we need more comparative studies to verify this finding as one of risk stratification. PMID:26958408

  14. Endophytic bacterial diversity in the phyllosphere of Amazon Paullinia cupana associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Ferreira, Almir José; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Lacava, Paulo Teixeira; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes colonize an ecological niche similar to that of phytopathogens, which make them candidate for disease suppression. Anthracnose is a disease caused by Colletotrichum spp., a phytopathogen that can infect guarana (Paullinia cupana), an important commercial crop in the Brazilian Amazon. We investigated the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of asymptomatic and symptomatic anthracnose guarana plants. The PCR-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed differences in the structure of the evaluated communities. Detailed analysis of endophytic bacteria composition using culture-dependent and 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria phyla. Firmicutes comprised the majority of isolates in asymptomatic plants (2.40E(-4)). However, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed differences at the genus level for Neisseria (1.4E(-4)), Haemophilus (2.1E(-3)) and Arsenophonus (3.6E(-5)) in asymptomatic plants, Aquicella (3.5E(-3)) in symptomatic anthracnose plants, and Pseudomonas (1.1E(-3)), which was mainly identified in asymptomatic plants. In cross-comparisons of the endophytic bacterial communities as a whole, symptomatic anthracnose plants contained higher diversity, as reflected in the Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices estimation (P < 0.05). Similarly, comparisons using LIBSHUFF and heatmap analysis for the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed differences between endophytic bacterial communities. These data are in agreement with the NMSD and ANOSIM analysis of DGGE profiles. Our results suggest that anthracnose can restructure endophytic bacterial communities by selecting certain strains in the phyllosphere of P. cupana. The understanding of these interactions is important for the development of strategies of biocontrol for Colletotrichum. PMID:26090305

  15. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T. Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L’Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2–14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14’s active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  16. Predictors of Pain and Function in Patients With Symptomatic, Atraumatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Pedroza, Angela; Jones, Grant L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears increases with age, many patients are asymptomatic and may not require surgical repair. The factors associated with pain and loss of function in patients with rotator cuff tears are not well defined. Purpose To determine which factors correlate with pain and loss of function in patients with symptomatic, atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears who are enrolled in a structured physical therapy program. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A multicenter group enrolled patients with symptomatic, atraumatic rotator cuff tears in a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study evaluating the effects of a structured physical therapy program. Time-zero patient data were reviewed to test which factors correlated with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Results A total of 389 patients were enrolled. Mean ASES score was 53.9; mean WORC score was 46.9. The following variables were associated with higher WORC and ASES scores: female sex (P = .001), education level (higher education, higher score; P <.001), active abduction (degrees; P = .021), and strength in forward elevation (P = .002) and abduction (P = .007). The following variables were associated with lower WORC and ASES scores: male sex (P = .001), atrophy of the supraspinatus (P = .04) and infraspinatus (P = .003), and presence of scapulothoracic dyskinesia (P < .001). Tear size was not a significant predictor (WORC) unless comparing isolated supraspinatus tears to supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears (P = .004). Age, tear retraction, duration of symptoms, and humeral head migration were not statistically significant. Conclusion Nonsurgically modifiable factors, such as scapulothoracic dyskinesia, active abduction, and strength in forward elevation and abduction, were identified that could be addressed nonoperatively with therapy. Therefore

  17. Transforaminal endoscopic surgery for symptomatic lumbar disc herniations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nellensteijn, Jorm; Bartels, Ronald; Peul, Wilco; van Royen, Barend; van Tulder, Maurits

    2009-01-01

    The study design includes a systematic literature review. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery and to compare this with open microdiscectomy in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations. Transforaminal endoscopic techniques for patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations have become increasingly popular. The literature has not yet been systematically reviewed. A comprehensive systematic literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed up to May 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts and relevant full text articles for inclusion criteria. Included articles were assessed for quality and outcomes were extracted by the two reviewers independently. One randomized controlled trial, 7 non-randomized controlled trials and 31 observational studies were identified. Studies were heterogeneous regarding patient selection, indications, operation techniques, follow-up period and outcome measures and the methodological quality of these studies was poor. The eight trials did not find any statistically significant differences in leg pain reduction between the transforaminal endoscopic surgery group (89%) and the open microdiscectomy group (87%); overall improvement (84 vs. 78%), re-operation rate (6.8 vs. 4.7%) and complication rate (1.5 vs. 1%), respectively. In conclusion, current evidence on the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery is poor and does not provide valid information to either support or refute using this type of surgery in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations. High-quality randomized controlled trials with sufficiently large sample sizes are direly needed to evaluate if transforaminal endoscopic surgery is more effective than open microdiscectomy. PMID:19756781

  18. Long-term psychological consequences of symptomatic pulmonary embolism: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Simon; Lewis, Rhian; Whithers, Jodie; Lewis, Sarah; Bennett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the psychological consequences of experiencing symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). Design Qualitative interview-based study using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Setting Outpatients who attended an anticoagulation clinic in a district general hospital. Participants Patients attending an anticoagulation clinic following hospital admission for symptomatic PE were approached to participate. A total of 9 (4 women, 5 men) of 11 patients approached agreed to be interviewed. Participants were aged between 26 and 72 years and had previously experienced a PE between 9 and 60 months (median=26 months, mean=24 months). Intervention Audiotaped semistructured qualitative interviews were undertaken to explore participants experiences of having a PE and how it had affected their lives since. Data were transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis to identify emergent themes. Results Three major themes with associated subthemes were identified. Participants described having a PE as a life-changing experience comprising initial shock, followed by feeling of loss of self, life-changing decisions and behaviour modification. Features of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were described with flashbacks, hypervigilance and intrusive thoughts being most prevalent. Participants identified several areas of support needed for such patients including easier access to support through information giving and emotional support. Conclusions Long-term consequences of venous thromboembolism go beyond the physical alone. Patients describe experiencing symptomatic PE to be a life-changing distressing event leading to behaviour modification and in some PTSD. It is likely that earlier psychological intervention may reduce such long-term sequelae. PMID:24694625

  19. Treatment of uncomplicated symptomatic urinary tract infections: Resistance patterns and misuse of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolin Elizabeth; Norman, Gift; Ramana, G Venkata; Mukherjee, Devashri; Rao, Tata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Uncomplicated but symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem seen in practice. The study was undertaken to assess the most common pathogens responsible for uncomplicated symptomatic UTIs and the antimicrobial resistance pattern in a hospital in Bangalore. The study also explores the issue of antibiotic usage for these patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Medicine department of a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. In all, 196 patients presented with symptoms of UTI. Bacterial growth was determined by standard microbiology techniques on freshly voided mid-steam urine samples collected from recruited patients. Patients’ demographic data, urine culture results, resistance rates to antimicrobial agents and prescribed empiric antimicrobial therapy were analyzed. Results: The prevalence of UTI was 32.1%; majority (67.9%) of the symptomatic did not have UTI based on culture report. Gram-negative bacteria constituted the largest group with a prevalence of 84.1% (53/63), with Escherichia coli being the most common (70%) uropathogen. Gram-negative isolates showed high level of sensitivity to amikacin (90.6%) and nitrofurantoin (77.4%). Most of the gram-positive organisms were susceptible to nitrofurantoin (70%) and gentamicin (50%). Uropathogens isolated demonstrated high resistance to cotrimoxazole, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactam antibiotics. It was found out that 30.1% of the patients were wrongly managed of which 14.7% were over treated. Conclusion: UTI can be over diagnosed and over treated on the basis of clinical signs, symptoms and urine microscopy. In the era of emerging anti-microbial resistance, effective counseling and delay in antibiotic initiation or empirical therapy with a short course of nitrofurantoin is highly recommended. Empirical therapy guidelines should be updated periodically to reflect changes in antimicrobial resistance of uropathogens. PMID:26288784

  20. Etiology and clinical characteristics of symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis: A review of 174 cases.

    PubMed

    Troeltzsch, Matthias; Pache, Christoph; Troeltzsch, Markus; Kaeppler, Gabriele; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven; Probst, Florian

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the causative pathology associated with symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis requiring surgical treatment. A retrospective review of all patients that have been treated surgically for unilateral symptomatic maxillary sinusitis between 2006 and 2013 at a single institution was performed. Demographic, anamnesis, clinical, radiological, microbiological and histological data were gathered and analyzed. The patients were allocated into groups depending on the underlying cause of the disease. Descriptive and inferential statistics were computed (level of significance: p ≤ 0.05). The study sample was composed of 174 patients (72 female; 102 male) with a mean age of 52.7 years (SD 16.9). Most cases (130; 75%) were triggered by odontogenic pathology following dentoalveolar surgical interventions (83/130 patients; 64%). Other etiological factors for odontogenic unilateral sinusitis were periapical (23/130 cases; 18%) and periodontal pathology (13/130 cases; 10%). Rhinogenic factors for sinusitis were detected in 13 patients (7.5%) and dental implant-associated unilateral maxillary sinusitis was diagnosed in nine patients (5.2%). Four patients (2.3%) had undergone previous sinus augmentation surgery. A leading cause for the sinus infection could not be identified in 18 patients (10%) who all had a history of midfacial surgery. Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (8) and squamous cell carcinoma (2) were incidental findings. There were no differences in the clinical appearance of the disease with respect to its etiology. Odontogenic causes for maxillary sinusitis must be considered especially in unilateral cases. Maxillary dental implants may induce symptomatic unilateral maxillary sinusitis. PMID:26319958

  1. Population-Based Age Group Specific Annual Incidence Rates of Symptomatic Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saari, Jukka M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the population-based annual incidence rates of exudative, dry and all cases of symptomatic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in different age and sex groups. Methods. This is a one year, prospective, population-based study on all consecutive new patients with AMD in the hospital district of Central Finland. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients with slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a Spectralis HRA + OCT device, and the Heidelberg Eye Explorer 1.6.2.0 program. Fluorescein angiograms were taken when needed. Results. The population-based annual incidence rates of all cases of symptomatic AMD increased from 0.03% (95% CI, 0.01-0.05%) in the age group 50-59 years to 0.82% (95% CI, 0.55-1.09%) in the age group 85-89 years and were 0.2% (95% CI, 0.17-0.24%) in exudative, 0.11% (95% CI, 0.09-0.14%) in dry, and 0.32% (95% CI, 0.28-0.36%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. During the next 20 years in Central Finland the population-based annual incidence rates can be estimated to increase to 0.27% (95% CI, 0.24-0.30%) in exudative, to 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11-0.15%) in dry, and to 0.41% (95% CI, 0.37-0.45%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. The population-based annual incidence of AMD did not show statistically significant differences between males and females (p>0.1). Conclusion: The population-based age-group specific annual incidence rates of symptomatic AMD of this study may help to plan health care provision for patients of AMD. PMID:25674187

  2. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  3. Clinical outcomes after decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic ossification of ligamentum flavum at the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Wu, Qian; Meng, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Jian; Qu, Dong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Lu, Kai-Wu; Zheng, Shuai; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a rare disease that causes acquired thoracic spinal canal stenosis and thoracic myelopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes of symptomatic thoracic OLF treated using posterior decompressive laminectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 22 patients who underwent posterior decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic thoracic OLF. The surgical results were evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system and Hirabayashi recovery rate. The intensity of pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). The mean duration of follow-up was 35.6months. The mean JOA score was significantly improved at final follow-up (9.18±standard deviation of 1.53 points [range, 6-11 points]) compared with before surgery (5.64±2.04 points [range, 3-9 points]) (P<0.001). The mean Hirabayashi recovery rate was 65.49% (range, 20-100%). Recovery outcomes were excellent in nine patients, good in eight patients, fair in four patients and unchanged in one patient. No patient was classified as deteriorated. The VAS scores were 2.82±3.08 before surgery and 0.59±1.05 at final follow-up (P=0.001). Surgical complications, which resolved after appropriate and prompt treatment, included dural tear in five patients, cerebrospinal fluid leakage in one patient, immediate postoperative neurologic deterioration in one patient, epidural hematoma in one patient, and wound infection in one patient. Our findings suggest that posterior decompressive laminectomy is an effective treatment for symptomatic thoracic OLF and provides satisfactory clinical improvement, but surgery for thoracic OLF is associated with a relatively high incidence of complications. PMID:26898582

  4. Asymptomatic Stenosis in the Cervical and Thoracic Spines of Patients with Symptomatic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lyu, Ho Dong; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Studies on age-related degenerative changes causing concurrent stenoses in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines (triple stenosis) are rare in the literature. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the incidence of asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis, (2) the incidence of concurrent radiologic spinal stenosis in the cervical and thoracic spines, and (3) the radiologic features of cervical stenosis that might predict concurrent thoracic stenosis. Methods Whole-spine T2 sagittal magnetic resonance images of patients older than 80 and diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis between January 2003 and January 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. We included patients with asymptomatic spondylotic cervical and thoracic stenosis. We measured the anteroposterior diameters of the vertebral body, bony spinal canal, and spinal cord, along with the Pavlov ratio and anterior or posterior epidural stenosis at the level of the disk for each cervical and thoracic level. We compared the radiologic parameters between the subgroups of cervical stenosis with and without thoracic stenosis. Results Among the 460 patients with lumbar stenosis, 110 (23.9%) had concurrent radiologic cervical stenosis and 112 (24.3%) had concurrent radiologic thoracic stenosis. Fifty-six patients (12.1%) had combined radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in addition to their symptomatic lumbar stenosis (triple stenosis). Anterior epidural stenosis at C7–T1 was associated with a high prevalence of thoracic stenosis. Conclusions It appears that asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis is common in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PMID:26430589

  5. Bilateral Symptomatic Discoid Medial Meniscus of the Knee: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Walker, Peter; Bruce, Warwick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A discoid medial meniscus is a rare pathology of the knee joint, and is even rarer when it presents bilaterally with clinical symptoms. Case Presentation: We present the case of a 38-year-old female with symptomatic bilateral discoid medial meniscus. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed complete discoid meniscus in one knee and incomplete, on the other side. The MRI findings were confirmed on arthroscopy, with horizontal cleavage tear in both knees. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of both menisci were performed. Conclusions: The patient had an excellent functional outcome at the most recent follow-up, with no recurrence of symptoms and full range of movements. PMID:25834792

  6. Therapy decisions for the symptomatic patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Mark C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer continues to kill approximately 30,000 men per year. Since 2010, five new therapeutic agents have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). With the increasing number of therapies available to clinicians, the most effective sequence in which to implement these treatments remains unknown. The presence or absence of symptoms (i.e., bony pain, visceral crisis) is a key parameter that informs the decision-making process regarding therapy. Treatment algorithms based on: 1) asymptomatic/minimal symptoms, 2) moderate symptoms or chemotherapy ineligible or 3) symptomatic disease need to be developed. PMID:25865849

  7. Discoid lateral meniscus: case report of arthroscopic attachment of a symptomatic Wrisberg-ligament type.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T D; Paulos, L E; Parker, R D; Harner, C D; Gurley, W D

    1987-01-01

    The symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus is a well-known congenital anomaly that is of three different types: complete, incomplete, and Wrisberg-ligament type. The Wrisberg-ligament type has no meniscotibial attachment posteriorly, and in the past has been treated by total (open or arthroscopic) meniscectomy. In this article, we review the literature and report a previously unreported case of arthroscopic peripheral attachment after central partial meniscectomy of a Wrisberg-ligament type discoid lateral meniscus, with documentation of healing at arthroscopic second look 1 year following surgery. PMID:3689527

  8. Transvenous sclerotherapy of a large symptomatic orbital venous varix using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Venu; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    An orbital venous varix is rare and can present with diplopia, proptosis, or hemorrhage. Treatment can be challenging, especially if the varix is in a posterior location within the orbit, since surgical exposure becomes difficult. A few case reports have been published describing transcatheter embolization of an orbital varix with coils, direct percutaneous injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue, and the percutaneous injection of bleomycin. We present a case of a symptomatic orbital venous varix of the left inferior ophthalmic vein successfully treated with transvenous endovascular sclerotherapy using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin. PMID:26109623

  9. Technetium-99m red blood cell venography of the lower limb in symptomatic pulmonary embolization.

    PubMed

    Lisbona, R; Rush, C; Lepanto, L

    1987-02-01

    Tc-99m RBC venography of the legs was obtained in 42 patients with primary pulmonary symptomatology and a diagnosis of pulmonary embolization. In 31 of these 42 patients (74%), the nuclear venogram revealed the presence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a source of embolization. Of the 31 patients with leg DVT documented by venography, 13 (42%) showed thrombosis confined to the calf. Clinical findings suggested that only 20 of the 31 patients (65%) with DVT could have harboured a source of embolization in the legs. Tc-99m RBC venography is a useful noninvasive test for the global and comprehensive assessment of patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolization. PMID:3829541

  10. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  11. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic fibroids: the University of Malaya Medical Centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, RN; Vijayananthan, A; Omar, SZ; Nawawi, O; Abdullah, BJJ

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for the treatment of symptomatic fibroids has been performed in several centres in the United States, Western Europe and Asia with promising results. This study reports the authors' experience with UAE at the University Malaya Medical Centre. Method: Fifty women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who declined surgery were treated by transcatheter UAE. The uterine arteries were selectively catheterised and embolised with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Post-procedure analgesia was administered via patient-controlled analgesic pump. The patients were followed up at an interval of 6/12 clinically and with MRI. Results: Transcatheter UAE was performed on all 50 patients with no major complications. 49 patients had both uterine arteries embolised while 1 patient had only the right uterine artery embolised on account of hypoplasia of the left uterine artery due to previous myomectomy. The mean hospital stay was 3.5 days (range, 2 to 7). At a mean follow-up of 24/52, all patients reported improvements in their presenting symptoms. Objective improvement in terms of reduction of uterine and fibroid sizes was determined on MRI. One patient, who initially responded with a decrease in uterine and dominant fibroid size, became symptomatic (menorrhagia) after 6 months and subsequent endometrial sampling revealed cystic glandular hyperplasia for which total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. Two other patients had no change in symptoms and after hysterectomy, the pathology revealed concurrent adenomyosis. Another 2 patients with cervical fibroids were treated with hysterectomy as there was no gross reduction in the size of fibroid following UAE. Overall, 90% of the patients had dramatic improvement of anaemia and symptoms at 1 year follow-up. Conclusion: Out of the 50 patients, 17 patients had total disappearance of their fibroids and 28 patients had more than 50% reduction in the size of fibroids after 1 year. 5 patients

  12. Transvenous sclerotherapy of a large symptomatic orbital venous varix using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Venu; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Kahana, Alon

    2016-08-01

    An orbital venous varix is rare and can present with diplopia, proptosis, or hemorrhage. Treatment can be challenging, especially if the varix is in a posterior location within the orbit, since surgical exposure becomes difficult. A few case reports have been published describing transcatheter embolization of an orbital varix with coils, direct percutaneous injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue, and the percutaneous injection of bleomycin. We present a case of a symptomatic orbital venous varix of the left inferior ophthalmic vein successfully treated with transvenous endovascular sclerotherapy using a microcatheter balloon and bleomycin. PMID:26122325

  13. Transcriptome analysis of symptomatic and recovered leaves of geminivirus-infected pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are a large and important family of plant viruses that infect a wide range of crops throughout the world. The Begomovirus genus contains species that are transmitted by whiteflies and are distributed worldwide causing disease on an array of horticultural crops. Symptom remission, in which newly developed leaves of systemically infected plants exhibit a reduction in symptom severity (recovery), has been observed on pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants infected with Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV). Previous studies have shown that transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms are involved in the reduction of viral nucleic acid concentration in recovered tissue. In this study, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods to assess transcriptional variation in healthy (mock), symptomatic, and recovered pepper leaves following PepGMV infection. Results Differential expression analyses of the pepper leaf transcriptome from symptomatic and recovered stages revealed a total of 309 differentially expressed genes between healthy (mock) and symptomatic or recovered tissues. Computational prediction of differential expression was validated using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR confirming the robustness of our bioinformatic methods. Within the set of differentially expressed genes associated with the recovery process were genes involved in defense responses including pathogenesis-related proteins, reactive oxygen species, systemic acquired resistance, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and ethylene signaling. No major differences were found when compared the differentially expressed genes in symptomatic and recovered tissues. On the other hand, a set of genes with novel roles in defense responses was identified including genes involved in histone modification. This latter result suggested that post-transcriptional and transcriptional gene silencing may be one of the major mechanisms involved in the recovery process. Genes

  14. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction. PMID:24368183

  15. [Symptomatic adrenal myelolipoma: apropos of 2 cases. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Nova Sánchez, E; López López, C; Fernández Puentes, J C; Llorens Martínez, F J; García López, F

    1989-01-01

    We present two symptomatic cases of adrenal myelolipoma with good evolution 24 and 14 months after surgery. We discuss the clinical characteristics of these tumours and diagnostic methods, of which CAT seems to be the most effective. In therapy we single out the need for surgery in those that are of large size and without accompanying symptomatology owing to the risk of spontaneous hemorrhaging or subsequent to traumatism, as well as in those displaying clinical symptoms. In small asymptomatic ones, discovered incidentally, we will carry out periodic observation with controls by CAT and/or echography. PMID:2688368

  16. Purple pigments: the pathophysiology of acute porphyric neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Lee, Ming-Jen; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-12-01

    The porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders arising from disturbance in the haem biosynthesis pathway. The neuropathy associated with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) occurs due to mutation involving the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterised by motor-predominant features. Definitive diagnosis often encompasses a combination of biochemical, enzyme analysis and genetic testing, with clinical neurophysiological findings of a predominantly motor axonal neuropathy. Symptomatic and supportive treatment are the mainstays during an acute attack. If administered early, intravenous haemin may prevent progression of neuropathy. While the pathophysiology of AIP neuropathy remains unclear, axonal dysfunction appears intrinsically linked to the effects of neural energy deficits acquired through haem deficiency coupled to the neurotoxic effects of porphyrin precursors. The present review will provide an overview of AIP neuropathy, including discussion of recent advances in understanding developed through neurophysiological approaches that have further delineated the pathophysiology of axonal degeneration. PMID:21855406

  17. Treatment options in acute porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda, and erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Harper, Pauline; Wahlin, Staffan

    2007-12-01

    The porphyrias are a group of uncommon metabolic diseases caused by enzyme deficiencies within heme biosynthesis that lead to neurotoxic or phototoxic heme precursor accumulation. There are four acute porphyrias characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms: acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Treatment includes elimination of any porphyrogenic factor and symptomatic treatment. Carbohydrate and intravenous heme administration constitute specific therapies in the disorders' acute phase. The mainstay treatment in the cutaneous porphyrias is avoidance of sunlight exposure. In porphyria cutanea tarda and the two acute porphyrias with skin manifestations, variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, care of the vulnerable skin is important. In porphyria cutanea tarda, specific treatment is accomplished by a series of phlebotomies and/or by low-dose chloroquine administration. In erythropoietic protoporphyria, light-protective beta-carotene is prescribed. PMID:18221605

  18. Symptomatic blunt head injury in children--a prospective, single-investigator study.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J D

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this study was to describe a single emergency physician's experience with symptomatic blunt head injury in children and prospectively assess the sensitivity and predictive value of the neurologic examination. The author utilized a prospective patient series comparing neurologic examination with computed tomography (CT) of the head. Nine of 42 patients had intracranial injury for a prevalence of 21%; two patients (5%) had intracranial injury with only subtle neurologic examination findings. Twenty-six patients had a negative neurologic examination, and all had normal-appearing CT scans. Sixteen patients had a positive neurologic examination, of whom nine had a positive CT scan. The properties of the neurologic examination as a diagnostic test, with CT as the gold standard, were as follows: sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 78%, positive predictive value = 56%, negative predictive value = 100%. Normal findings from neurologic examination can be used in some children with symptomatic blunt head injury to delay or eliminate the need for CT of the head. PMID:9272320

  19. Effectiveness of Home-Based Pencil Push-ups (HBPP) for Patients with Symptomatic Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the effectiveness of home-based pencil push-ups (HBPP) therapy for patients with symptomatic convergence insufficiency. Methods Data was collected prospectively on 16 patients who were diagnosed with convergence insufficiency beginning in January 2009. The study group was composed of ten male and six female patients. The duration of symptoms, refractive error, distant and near deviation angles, and near point of convergence (NPC) prior to and after 12 weeks of HBPP therapy were measured in all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 19.3 years. The mean deviation angle of exophoria was 3 prism diopters (PD) at distant and 11.2 PD at near. The mean value of NPC prior to HBPP therapy was 36.3 cm; however, the near point of accommodation was within the normal range. After 12 weeks of HBPP therapy, the mean deviation angle of exophoria decreased to orthophoric at distant and 4 PD at near. The mean value of NPC decreased to 14.4 cm. Conclusions Twelve weeks of HBPP therapy appears to be an easy, cost-free and effective therapy for patients with symptomatic convergence insufficiency. PMID:21655044