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Sample records for acute systemic disease

  1. Acute aortic syndrome: A systems approach to a time-critical disease.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masashi; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic syndrome represents a group of potentially lethal aortic diseases, including classic acute aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. Among these conditions, type A aortic dissection is the most common acute presentation. Only surgical interventions are recommended in guidelines as lifesaving procedures for type A dissection. Despite new diagnostic imaging methods, advanced surgical strategy, and improved postoperative management in the over 250-year history of aortic dissection, in-hospital mortality and morbidity rates still remain high. Recently, several new system-based approaches, such as implementation of multidisciplinary experienced high-volume centers and establishment of regional systematic management flow have been reported to improve the outcome. Here, we will describe the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment as well as the new systematic approach to treat acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27650339

  2. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  3. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3-8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting-cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs.

  4. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3-8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting-cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  5. High Prevalence of Acute Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease in Japanese Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Fumiko; Watanabe, Ryu; Ishii, Tomonori; Kamogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Yoko; Shirota, Yuko; Sugimura, Koichiro; Fujii, Hiroshi; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by extensive fibrosis and autoantibodies. Its clinical manifestations are diverse and include Raynaud's phenomenon, gastrointestinal dysmotility, interstitial lung disease (ILD), pulmonary hypertension, and renal crisis. Among these, ILD is the primary cause of SSc-related death. It has been considered that acute exacerbation of ILD (AE-ILD) is not common in patients with SSc; however, little is known about the prevalence of AE-ILD in Japanese patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to clarify the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of patients with SSc who developed AE-ILD and to identify predictive factors for AE-ILD in our Japanese cohorts. Clinical data of patients who visited our department from 1990 to 2014 and fulfilled the 2013 classification criteria for SSc were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 139 patients were enrolled. The mean age of onset was 49.1 years, and 113 (81.3%) patients were female; 116 (83.5%) had limited cutaneous involvement, and the overall 10-year survival rate was 92.0%. Among 66 (47.5%) patients with ILD, 13 (9.4%) developed AE-ILD. Patients with AE-ILD had a significantly higher incidence of overlap with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) and lower prevalence of anticentromere antibodies with higher mortality rate compared with those without AE-ILD. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that an overlap with PM or DM was the most significant predictive factor for AE-ILD. Our study results suggest that Japanese patients with SSc, particularly patients overlapped with PM or DM, have a high risk of AE-ILD. PMID:27487743

  6. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are highly prevalent, although most of these diseases develop and progress slowly, often unnoticed by the affected individual. However, a subgroup of these diseases include aggressive and acute forms that have a relatively low prevalence but show a rapid-course, high rate of progression leading to severe destruction of the periodontal tissues, or cause systemic symptoms that often require urgent attention from healthcare providers. Aggressive periodontitis is an early-onset, destructive disease that shows a high rate of periodontal progression and distinctive clinical features. A contemporary case definition of this disease is presented. Population studies show that the disease is more prevalent in certain geographic regions and ethnic groups. Aggressive periodontitis is an infectious disease, and recent data show that in affected subjects the subgingival microbiota is composed of a mixed microbial infection, with a wide heterogeneity in the types and proportions of microorganisms recovered. Furthermore, there are significant differences in the microbiota of the disease among different geographic regions and ethnicities. There is also evidence that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemycomitans-JP2 clone may play an important role in the development of the disease in certain populations. The host response plays an important role in the susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis, where the immune response may be complex and involve multiple mechanisms. Also, genetic factors seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease, but the mechanisms of increased susceptibility are complex and not yet fully understood. The available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations either in a few major genes or in multiple small-effect genes, and there is also evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Diagnostic methods for this disease, based on a specific microbiologic, immunologic or

  7. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses.

  8. [The comparative analysis: the occurrence of acute respiratory system infections and chronic diseases among active smokers and non-smokers].

    PubMed

    Kałucka, Sylwia

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the factors causing a lot of health problems. Breathing the smoke makes the development of arteriosclerosis and ischemic heart disease faster and the risk of myocardial infarction much higher. Toxic substances contained in the smoke induce inflammatory processes in bronchial tree, which finally leads to the destruction of lungs. One of the way of preventing complications in the circulatory system and stopping the inflammatory process in lungs is to give up the habit of smoking. Within the period of three years the group of more than 1000 people (smokers and non-smokers) was examined and the analysis of occurrence of acute respiratory system infections and chronic diseases was conducted. In the studies the questionnaire prepared by the author of the paper, some specialistic studies and medical reports were used. The achieved results show that more and more women smoke as many cigarettes as men and for as many years as they do. Both men and women who graduated either a grammar school or a university smoke more often than with elementary level of education. People who smoke suffer more often from numerous acute respiratory tract infections and must more often pay a visit to general practitioner. Considering the sex there are no statistically significant differences in the occurrence of chronic pulmonary diseases and the cardiovascular system. The achieved results show the changes of the attitude to smoking in Polish society. The increase of the consumption of cigarettes among women with high education is very worrying. It is a serious challenge for the whole medical staff. PMID:17288171

  9. Oral inflammation and bacteremia: implications for chronic and acute systemic diseases involving major organs.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are both highly prevalent gum diseases characterized by an accumulation of a polymicrobial biofilm (dental plaque) around teeth and inflammation in adjacent soft tissues. During dental procedures, even tooth brushing, these bacteria and their components, such as endotoxin, can easily disseminate into the systemic circulation through minor or major gingival injuries. Particularly in immuno-compromised subjects or patients with preexisting pathologic conditions, bacteremia may lead to bacterial infection of distant organs, which may cause immunological reactions. Oral bacteria and endotoxins have been found in sepsis, infective endocarditis, lung infection, liver disease and many other potentially lethal disorders. This article presents a review of the possible pathologic consequences of bacteremia originating in the oral cavity and points out the most commonly affected organs as well as preventive and treatment measures. At the present time, plaque control by subjects and/or dental professionals is one of the most effective means to prevent the onset and progression of oral bacteremia-induced systemic diseases. PMID:25567334

  10. Association between Floods and Acute Cardiovascular Diseases: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using a Geographic Information System Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vanasse, Alain; Cohen, Alan; Courteau, Josiane; Bergeron, Patrick; Dault, Roxanne; Gosselin, Pierre; Blais, Claudia; Bélanger, Diane; Rochette, Louis; Chebana, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Floods represent a serious threat to human health beyond the immediate risk of drowning. There is few data on the potential link between floods and direct consequences on health such as on cardiovascular health. This study aimed to explore the impact of one of the worst floods in the history of Quebec, Canada on acute cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods: A cohort study with a time series design with multiple control groups was built with the adult population identified in the Quebec Integrated Chronic Disease Surveillance System. A geographic information system approach was used to define the study areas. Logistic regressions were performed to compare the occurrence of CVD between groups. Results: The results showed a 25%–27% increase in the odds in the flooded population in spring 2011 when compared with the population in the same area in springs 2010 and 2012. Besides, an increase up to 69% was observed in individuals with a medical history of CVD. Conclusion: Despite interesting results, the association was not statistically significant. A possible explanation to this result can be that the population affected by the flood was probably too small to provide the statistical power to answer the question, and leaves open a substantial possibility for a real and large effect. PMID:26828511

  11. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  12. Anorexia during acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    1996-02-01

    Anorexia is associated with disorders of all systems. Anorexia represents a consistent clinical manifestation during acute and chronic pathophysiological processes (infection, inflammation, injury, toxins, immunological reactions, malignancy and necrosis). Anorexia during disease can be beneficial or deleterious depending on the timing and duration. Temporary anorexia during acute disease may be beneficial to an organism since a restriction in the intake of micro- and macro-nutrients will inhibit bacterial growth. Long-term anorexia during chronic disease, however, is deleterious to an organism and may be associated with cachexia, which can ultimately result in death. Various mechanisms participate in the anorexia observed during disease, including cytokine action. Anorexia induced by cytokines is proposed to involve modulation of hypothalamic-feeding associated sites, prostaglandin-dependent mechanisms, modifications of neurotransmitter systems, gastrointestinal, metabolic, and endocrine factors. In addition, the anorexia-cachexia syndrome is multifactorial and may involve chronic pain, depression or anxiety, hypogeusia and hyposmia, chronic nausea, early satiety, malfunction of the gastrointestinal system, metabolic alterations, cytokine action, production of other anorexigenic substances and/or iatrogenic causes (chemotherapy, radiotherapy). Cachexia may result not only from anorexia and a decreased caloric intake, but also from malabsorption and losses from the body (ulcers, hemorrhage, effusions), or a change in body metabolism. Research has focused on potential interventions to modify anorexia during disease and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Nutritional modifications and the use of specific steroids (such as megestrol acetate) are being tested in the clinical setting. Understanding the specific mechanisms responsible for anorexia during disease as well as their interactions is essential to develop interventions for the control of anorexia (during a critical

  13. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  14. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  16. Gonadal dysfunction in systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Asterios; Harsoulis, Faidon

    2005-04-01

    Gonadal function is significantly affected in many acute and chronic systemic diseases. As the function of the testes and the ovaries is determined by the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, it is obvious that a systemic disease may affect one or more levels of the axis in such a manner that the gonadal dysfunction may have various clinical and laboratory manifestations. In this brief review, the most common disturbances seen in the main systemic diseases will be discussed.

  17. Acute cerebrovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; García-Eroles, L; Maragall, C; Massons, J; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    In 2,000 consecutive stroke patients collected in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 10-year period, we assessed whether stroke in men and women was different in respect to vascular risk factors, clinical features and natural history. The frequency of the different variable in men and women was analyzed by means of univariate analysis and logistic regression models. Women accounted for 48% of the study population (n = 967) and were older than men (mean age 75 vs. 69 years, p < 0.001). In the age group of 85 years or older, stroke was more frequent in women than in men (69.8 vs. 30.2%, p < 0.001). Women showed a higher frequency of cardioembolic infarction and a lower occurrence of lacunar infarction and stroke of undetermined cause than men. In-hospital mortality (17.4 vs. 13.3%) and length of hospital stay (19.6 vs. 16.7 days) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in women than in men. In the model based on demographic variables and cardiovascular risk factors, obesity, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and age were significant predictors of stroke in women, while intermittent claudication, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cigarette smoking and alcohol abuse were predictors in male sex. Hypertension and limb weakness were predictors for stroke in women, and absence of neurological deficit at hospital discharge, lacunar syndrome and ataxia were predictors in men in the models based on all variables. Women differ from men in the distribution of risk factors and stroke subtype, stroke severity and outcome. Differences in stroke pathology and/or differences in functional anatomy or plasticity of the brain between sexes may account for these findings.

  18. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography.

  19. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography. PMID:24530671

  20. Phase II study of dasatinib in Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute and chronic myeloid diseases, including systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew; Cortes, Jorge; O’Brien, Susan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Pardanani, Animesh; Akin, Cem; Faderl, Stefan; Manshouri, Taghi; Thomas, Deborah; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) chronic myeloproliferative disorders, such as systemic mastocytosis (SM), has provided a clear rationale for investigating novel targeted therapies. The tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor dasatinib is 325-fold more potent against Bcr-Abl TK than imatinib in vitro, significantly inhibiting wild-type KIT and PDGFR-B TKs, and is active against cells carrying the mutant KIT-D816V gene. In this phase 2, open-label study, the efficacy of dasatinib (140 mg/day) was investigated in 67 patients with various Ph− myeloid disorders, including SM (N=33; 28 KIT-D816V positive). The overall response rate to dasatinib in patients with SM was 33%. Only two patients, one with SM-myelofibrosis and one with SM-chronic eosinophilic leukemia, achieved complete response (elimination of mastocytosis) lasting for 5 and 16 months, respectively. Both patients were negative for KIT-D816V mutation, had low tryptase levels, abnormal WBC counts, and anemia, and had failed prior therapy with erythropoietin. Additional 9 SM patients had symptomatic response, lasting 3 to 18+ months. Complete responses were achieved in two other patients (acute myeloid leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome). No responses were observed among patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and primary myelofibrosis. The majority of adverse events were grade 1/2. These data show that dasatinib may benefit a selected group of SM patients, primarily by improving their symptoms. PMID:18559612

  1. Acute systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botham, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Use of the test that aimed to identify the single lethal dose of a substance that kills half the animals in a test group (the LD50 test) should finally be discontinued by the end of 2002, after many years of controversy and debate. In its stead are three recently developed alternative animal tests that significantly improve animal welfare: the fixed dose procedure, the acute toxic class method, and the up and down procedure. These tests have already undergone revision, both to improve their scientific performance and, importantly, to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy of acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used (perhaps by mid-2002) as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests to improve dose level selection and reduce (at least modestly) the number of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, which will require at least 10 yr.

  2. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  3. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency.

  4. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency. PMID:26595733

  5. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  6. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome.

  7. Minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weil, S C

    2000-03-01

    In the last decade our understanding of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has advanced tremendously. The recognition of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as a powerful therapeutic agent paralleled the cloning of the t(15;17) breakpoint. RtPCR for the PML-RARA hybrid mRNA has become the hallmark of molecular diagnosis and molecular monitoring in APL. Current techniques are useful in predicting complete remission and a possible cure in many patients who repeatedly test negative by PCR. Standardizing techniques and improving the sensitivity of the assay are important. Doing this in a way so that clinically relevant minimal residual disease can be distinguished from "indolent disease" remains among the future challenges in APL. PMID:10702899

  8. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  10. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  11. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  12. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  13. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  14. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  15. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD, the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help clarifying the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  16. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients. PMID:27606147

  17. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients.

  18. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  19. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: a curable disease.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, F; Nervi, C; Avvisati, G; Mandelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The Second International Symposium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) was held in Rome in 12-14 November 1997. Clinical and basic investigators had the opportunity to discuss in this meeting the important advances in the biology and treatment of this disease achieved in the last 4 years, since the First Roman Symposium was held in 1993. The first part of the meeting was dedicated to relevant aspects of laboratory research, and included the following topics: molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis and of response/resistance to retinoids, biologic and therapeutic effects of new agents such as arsenicals and novel synthetic retinoids; characterization of APL heterogeneity at the morphological, cytogenetic and immunophenotypic level. The updated results of large cooperative clinical trials using variable combinations of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy were presented by the respective group chairmen, and formed the 'core' part of the meeting. These studies, which in most cases integrated the molecular assessment of response to treatment, provided a stimulating framework for an intense debate on the most appropriate frontline treatment options to be adopted in the future. The last day was dedicated to special entities such as APL in the elderly and in the child, as well as the role of bone marrow transplantation. The prognostic value of molecular monitoring studies was also discussed in the final session of the meeting. In this article, we review the major advances and controversial issues in APL biology and treatment discussed in this symposium and emerging from very recent publications. We would like to credit the successful outcome of this meeting to the active and generous input of all invited speakers and to participants from all over the world who provided constructive and fruitful discussions.

  20. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  1. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  2. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Chang, Eun Jae; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  3. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  4. Nervous system Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-06-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis or radiculoneuritis occur in up to 15% of patients with untreated Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Presentations of multifocal PNS involvement can range from painful monoradiculitis to confluent mononeuropathy multiplex. Serologic testing is highly accurate after 4 to 6 weeks of infection. In CNS infection, production of anti-Bburgdorferi antibody is often demonstrable in CSF. Oral antimicrobials are microbiologically curative in virtually all patients, including acute European neuroborreliosis. Severe cases may require parenteral treatment. The fatigue and cognitive symptoms seen in some patients with extra-neurological disease are neither evidence of CNS infection nor specific to Lyme disease.

  5. Family history of autoimmune thyroid disease and childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perillat-Menegaux, Florence; Clavel, Jacqueline; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Nelken, Brigitte; Philippe, Noël; Sommelet, Danièle; Vilmer, Etienne; Hémon, Denis

    2003-01-01

    The association between a familial history of autoimmune disease and childhood acute leukemia was investigated in a French case-control study that, overall, was designed to assess the role of perinatal, infectious, environmental, and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. Familial histories of autoimmune disease in first- and second-degree relatives were compared in 279 incident cases, 240 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 39 cases of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 285 controls. Recruitment was frequency matched by age, gender, hospital, and ethnic origin. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using an unconditional regression model taking into account the stratification variables, socioeconomic status, and familial structure. A statistically significant association between a history of autoimmune disease in first- or second-degree relatives and ALL (OR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.8) was found. A relationship between thyroid diseases overall and ALL (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.9) was observed. This association was more pronounced for potentially autoimmune thyroid diseases (Grave's disease and/or hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease and/or hypothyroidism) (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1-10.7 and OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.0-31.1, respectively for ALL and ANLL), whereas it was not statistically significant for the other thyroid diseases (thyroid goiter, thyroid nodule, and unspecified thyroid disorders) (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.5 and OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.2-7.0, respectively, for ALL and ANLL). The results suggest that a familial history of autoimmune thyroid disease may be associated with childhood acute leukemia.

  6. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  7. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed.

  8. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases.

  9. Acute diarrhoeal disease in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John E.; Guzmán, Miguel A.; Ascoli, Werner; Scrimshaw, Nevin S.

    1964-01-01

    A number of primary epidemiological characteristics are recognized as common to members of a syndrome designated “acute undifferentiated diarrhoeal disease”. This syndrome includes both specific and non-specific diarrhoeal disorders. Within the existing knowledge and with the facilities available in less developed countries, an epidemiological basis for control, directed against the syndrome as a whole, is presented as the practical approach to community management. Clinical and microbiological distinctions do not extend to the main bulk of the problem. Individual epidemiological patterns exist according to age and varying social and ecological conditions. Field study by periodic home visits over four years has defined these patterns in highland rural villages in Guatemala. The chief problem was weanling diarrhoea. PMID:14230899

  10. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  11. Identification of acute myocardial infarction from electronic healthcare records using different disease coding systems: a validation study in three European countries

    PubMed Central

    Coloma, Preciosa M; Valkhoff, Vera E; Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Nielsson, Malene Schou; Pedersen, Lars; Molokhia, Mariam; Mosseveld, Mees; Morabito, Paolo; Schuemie, Martijn J; van der Lei, Johan; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Trifirò, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate positive predictive value (PPV) of different disease codes and free text in identifying acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from electronic healthcare records (EHRs). Design Validation study of cases of AMI identified from general practitioner records and hospital discharge diagnoses using free text and codes from the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC), International Classification of Diseases 9th revision-clinical modification (ICD9-CM) and ICD-10th revision (ICD-10). Setting Population-based databases comprising routinely collected data from primary care in Italy and the Netherlands and from secondary care in Denmark from 1996 to 2009. Participants A total of 4 034 232 individuals with 22 428 883 person-years of follow-up contributed to the data, from which 42 774 potential AMI cases were identified. A random sample of 800 cases was subsequently obtained for validation. Main outcome measures PPVs were calculated overall and for each code/free text. ‘Best-case scenario’ and ‘worst-case scenario’ PPVs were calculated, the latter taking into account non-retrievable/non-assessable cases. We further assessed the effects of AMI misclassification on estimates of risk during drug exposure. Results Records of 748 cases (93.5% of sample) were retrieved. ICD-10 codes had a ‘best-case scenario’ PPV of 100% while ICD9-CM codes had a PPV of 96.6% (95% CI 93.2% to 99.9%). ICPC codes had a ‘best-case scenario’ PPV of 75% (95% CI 67.4% to 82.6%) and free text had PPV ranging from 20% to 60%. Corresponding PPVs in the ‘worst-case scenario’ all decreased. Use of codes with lower PPV generally resulted in small changes in AMI risk during drug exposure, but codes with higher PPV resulted in attenuation of risk for positive associations. Conclusions ICD9-CM and ICD-10 codes have good PPV in identifying AMI from EHRs; strategies are necessary to further optimise utility of ICPC codes and free-text search. Use of

  12. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats.

  13. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  14. [Acute atrioventricular block in chronic Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vince; Zima, Endre; Gellér, László; Merkely, Béla

    2010-09-26

    The tick bite transmitted Lyme disease is one of the most common antropozoonosis, about 10 000 new infections are reported in Hungary each year. The progress and clinical presentation can vary, and carditis can occur in later stages. A serologically verified Lyme disease caused third degree atrioventricular block in young male presenting with presyncope. Based on the tick-bites mentioned a few weeks prior to hospital admission, Lyme carditis was considered with the administration of antibiotics and monitor observation. Typical skin lesions were not recognized and laboratory findings showed no pathology. An electrophysiological study recorded a predominant supra-His atrioventricular block. Total regression of conduction could be detected later and the serological tests established an underlying Lyme disease. Currently no definite treatment recommendation is available for the potentially reversible Lyme carditis. The tick bite seemed to be the key on our way to diagnosis; however, serological tests proved the disease to be older than one year. A detailed medical history and serological tests are essential in identifying the cause and pacemaker implantation can be avoided.

  15. Acute graft-vs-host disease: pathobiology and management.

    PubMed

    Goker, H; Haznedaroglu, I C; Chao, N J

    2001-03-01

    Acute graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to safe allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. GVHD occurs when transplanted donor T lymphocytes react to foreign host cells. It causes a wide variety of host tissue injuries. This review focuses on the pathobiological basis, clinical aspects, and current management strategies of acute GVHD. Afferent phase of acute GVHD starts with myeloablative conditioning, i.e., before the infusion of the graft. Total-body irradiation (TBI) or high-dose chemotherapy regimens cause extensive damage and activation in host tissues, which release inflammatory cytokines and enhance recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. Recognition of the foreign host antigens by donor T cells and activation, stimulation, and proliferation of T cells is crucial in the afferent phase. Effector phase of acute GVHD results in direct and indirect damage to host cells. The skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver are major target organs of acute GVHD. Combination drug prophylaxis in GVHD is essential in all patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Steroids have remained the standard for the treatment of acute GVHD. Several clinical trials have evaluated monoclonal antibodies or receptor antagonist therapy for steroid-resistant acute GVHD, with different successes in a variety of settings. There are some newer promising agents like mycophenolate mofetil, glutamic acid-lysine-alanine-tyrosine (GLAT), rapamycin, and trimetrexate currently entering in the clinical studies, and other agents are in development. Future experimental and clinical studies on GVHD will shed further light on the better understanding of the disease pathobiology and generate the tools to treat malignant disorders with allogeneic HSCT with specific graft-vs-tumor effects devoid of GVHD. PMID:11274753

  16. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  17. Nervous system Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi involves the nervous system in 10-15% of affected individuals. Manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and mononeuropathy multiplex. Encephalopathy, identical to that seen in many systemic inflammatory diseases, can occur during active systemic infection. It is not specific to Lyme disease and only rarely is evidence of nervous system infection. Diagnosis of systemic disease is based on demonstration of specific antibodies in peripheral blood by means of two-tier testing with an ELISA and Western blot. Central nervous system infection often results in specific antibody production in the CSF, demonstrable by comparing spinal fluid to blood serologies. Treatment is straightforward and curative in most instances. Many patients can be treated effectively with oral antibiotics such as doxycycline; in severe CNS infection parenteral treatment with ceftriaxone or other similar agents is highly effective. Treatment should usually be for 2 to at most 4 weeks. Longer treatment adds no therapeutic benefit but does add substantial risk.

  18. Acute viral E hepatitis with chronic liver disease (autoimmune hepatitis).

    PubMed

    Desai, H G; Naik, A S

    2005-03-01

    A 36 years old male presented with anorexia, jaundice and ascites. He was suffering from acute viral E hepatitis. In view of ascites, he was investigated for associated asymptomatic chronic liver disease (CLD). The CLD was diagnosed as cirrhosis with autoimmune hepatitis and was treated with steroid with good response. He is maintaining good health with low dose steroid, on follow up for 1 year.

  19. Respiratory System Disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Danielle M; Singh, Shipra

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory system involvement in cystic fibrosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene throughout the sinopulmonary tract result in recurrent infections with a variety of organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Lung disease occurs earlier in life than once thought and ideal methods of monitoring lung function, decline, or improvement with therapy are debated. Treatment of sinopulmonary disease may include physiotherapy, mucus-modifying and antiinflammatory agents, antimicrobials, and surgery. In the new era of personalized medicine, CFTR correctors and potentiators may change the course of disease. PMID:27469180

  20. Stepwise Approach to Myopathy in Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jasvinder

    2011-01-01

    Muscle diseases can constitute a large variety of both acquired and hereditary disorders. Myopathies in systemic disease results from several different disease processes including endocrine, inflammatory, paraneoplastic, infectious, drug- and toxin-induced, critical illness myopathy, metabolic, and myopathies with other systemic disorders. Patients with systemic myopathies often present acutely or sub acutely. On the other hand, familial myopathies or dystrophies generally present in a chronic fashion with exceptions of metabolic myopathies where symptoms on occasion can be precipitated acutely. Most of the inflammatory myopathies can have a chance association with malignant lesions; the incidence appears to be specifically increased only in patients with dermatomyositis. In dealing with myopathies associated with systemic illnesses, the focus will be on the acquired causes. Management is beyond the scope of this chapter. Prognosis is based upon the underlying cause and, most of the time, carries a good prognosis. In order to approach a patient with suspected myopathy from systemic disease, a stepwise approach is utilized. PMID:21886637

  1. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Patrícia; Cimões, Renata; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia). Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations. PMID:19838549

  2. The origins of cachexia in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2006-02-01

    The term cachexia originates from the Greek root kakos hexis, which translates into "bad condition," recognized for centuries as a progressive deterioration of body habitus. Cachexia is commonly associated with a number of disease states, including acute inflammatory processes associated with critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cachexia is responsible for the deaths of 10%-22% of all patients with cancer and approximately 15% of the trauma deaths that occur from sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and malnutrition days to weeks after the initial traumatic event. The abnormalities associated with cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, a preferential loss of somatic muscle and fat mass, altered hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and anemia. Anorexia alone cannot fully explain the development of cachexia; metabolic alterations in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism contribute to the severe tissue losses. Despite significant advances in our understanding of specific disease processes, the mechanisms leading to cachexia remain unclear and multifactorial. Although complex, increasing evidence from both animal models and clinical studies suggests that an inflammatory response, mediated in part by a dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, plays a role in the genesis of cachexia, associated with both critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases. These cytokines are further thought to induce an acute phase protein response (APR) and produce the alterations in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism identified as crucial markers of acute inflammation in states of malignancy and critical illness. Although much is still unknown about the etiology of cachexia, there is growing appreciation that cachexia represents the endproduct of an inappropriate interplay between multiple cytokines, neuropeptides, classic stress

  3. Acute arthropathy in patients with rash diseases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Bastos Camacho, Luiz Antonio; Fernandes Bruno, Letícia; de Gusmão, Rodrigo Coimbra; de Medeiros Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Coca Velarde, Luis Guillermo; Mendonça Siqueira, Marilda

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of acute arthropathy and selected clinical features in patients with acute rash diseases. Serum samples from 1,554 patients were tested for anti-measles, dengue, human parvovirus B19, and rubella virus IgM using enzyme immunoassay. Sera from children, in whom these infections were excluded, were studied for anti-human herpesvirus type 6 IgG antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence test. Joint complaints occurred in 31.2% of the 862 patients with an etiologic diagnosis and were more frequently seen in adults than in children (OR 8.5). Among the adults, arthropathy prevailed in women compared to men (OR 1.8). Arthropathy was most frequently reported in rubella (41.2%) and in dengue fever cases (41.1%) than in the other rash diseases studied (p < 0.0001). Joint complaints were more frequently seen in patients with fever (OR 1.6) and with five or more days of onset of the disease (OR 1.6), regardless of serological diagnosis. Arthropathy appeared as a frequent condition in rash diseases, typically with low severity and no specific pattern of joint involvement.

  4. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context

  5. [Legionnaires' disease complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: about a case].

    PubMed

    Bac, Arnaud; Ramadan, Ahmed Sabry; Youatou, Pierre; Mols, Pierre; Cerf, Dominique; Ngatchou, William

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial disease of the respiratory system caused by a gram-negative germ whose clinical manifestation can be benign limiting to flu-like syndrome or can be more severe being characterized by pneumonia which may be complicated by multisystem disease that can lead to death. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient with rhabdomyolysis complicated by acute renal failure following Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. We here highlight the pathophysiological aspects and treatment of this rare complication during Legionella infection. PMID:27642464

  6. Noninvasive imaging in acute coronary disease. A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, B.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Numerous highly complex and sensitive noninvasive imaging techniques have enhanced the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optimum use requires specific objectives to be defined in advance, including a review of the potential impact of the test on subsequent decisions. An additional issue that is subject to scrutiny in the current climate of cost containment relates to the incremental value of a specific examination. The imaging modality to be used will partially depend on other issues, including accessibility, cost, and interindividual or institutional expertise with a particular technique. Major applications in noninvasive imaging in the acute coronary syndromes include the following: (1) diagnosis, including identification of associated diseases and contraindications for acute reperfusion; (2) evaluation and management of complications ; (3) determination of prognosis (both early and late); (4) estimation of myocardial viability; (5) assessment of therapeutic efficacy; (6) investigational approaches, including 99mTc-sestamibi tomographic imaging, ultrafast cine computed tomographic scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Previous studies in the prethrombolytic era have documented the powerful impact of radionuclide stress testing on prognosis, but this needs to be reevaluated in the light of the changing current population undergoing stress testing. Preliminary data imply that the prognostic accuracy of stress testing after thrombolytic therapy is diminished. Moreover, the role of the open infarct-related artery in traditional estimates of prognosis requires further study. Noninvasive imaging has multiple applications in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary disease, but the decision to use a specific technology in a particular circumstance mandates good clinical judgment and selectivity. 82 references.

  7. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  8. Nervous System Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Nervous system involvement occurs in 10% to 15% of patients infected with the tick-borne spirochetes Borrelia burgdorferi, B afzelii, and B garinii. Peripheral nervous system involvement is common. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, most commonly presenting with lymphocytic meningitis, causes modest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Parenchymal CNS infection is rare. If the CNS is invaded, however, measuring local production of anti-B burgdorferi antibodies in the CSF provides a useful marker of infection. Most cases of neuroborreliosis can be cured with oral doxycycline; parenteral regimens should be reserved for patients with particularly severe disease.

  9. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion.

    PubMed

    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Cocco, Giulio; Iannetti, Giovanni; Romano, Marcello; Schiavone, Cosima

    2015-12-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) can be defined as acute inflammatory disease of the gallbladder without evidence of gallstones. The first case was reported in 1844 by Duncan et al.; however, some cases may have been missed previously in view of the complexity of the diagnosis. Several risk factors have been identified, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in view of its multiple mechanisms of action, seems to play a key role. Atypical clinical onset, paucity of symptoms, overlap with comorbidities, and lack of robust, controlled trials result often in under or misdiagnosed cases. Moreover, laboratory results may be negative or not specific in the late stage of the disease, when a surgical treatment cannot be longer helpful if complications arise. A rapid diagnosis is therefore essential to achieve a prompt treatment and to avoid further clinical deterioration. In this short review, we would present the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of the complex relation between AAC and CVD. Then, we fully emphasize the role of ultrasound to achieve an early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment in suspected cases, reducing mortality and complications rates.

  10. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  11. Acute thyroid eye disease (TED): principles of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Verity, D H; Rose, G E

    2013-03-01

    The active inflammatory phase of thyroid eye disease (TED) is mediated by the innate immune system, and management is aimed at aborting this self-limited period of autoimmune activity. In most patients with TED, ocular and adnexal changes are mild and management involves controlling thyroid dysfunction, cessation of smoking, and addressing ocular surface inflammation and exposure. In patients with acute moderate disease, this being sufficient to impair orbital functions, immunosuppression reduces the long-term sequelae of acute inflammation, and adjunctive fractionated low-dose orbital radiotherapy is used as a steroid-sparing measure. Elective surgery is often required following moderate TED, be it for proptosis, diplopia, lid retraction, or to debulk the eyelid, and this should be delayed until the disease is quiescent, with the patient stable and weaned off all immunosuppression. Thus, surgical intervention during the active phase of moderate disease is rarely indicated, although clinical experience suggests that, where there is significant orbital congestion, early orbital decompression can limit progression to more severe disease. Acute severe TED poses a major risk of irreversible loss of vision due to marked exposure keratopathy, 'hydraulic' orbital congestion, or compressive optic neuropathy. If performed promptly, retractor recession with or without a suture tarsorrhaphy protects the ocular surface from severe exposure and, in patients not responding to high-dose corticosteroid treatment, decompression of the deep medial orbital wall and floor can rapidly relieve compressive optic neuropathy, as well as alleviate the inflammatory and congestive features of raised orbital pressure.

  12. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  13. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  14. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  15. Advancing the Minimal Residual Disease Concept in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B; Mulé, Matthew P; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past 60 years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and preclinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (non-APL) AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption, including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients, and finally the need to involve patients in decision-making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  16. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  17. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  18. MRI of diffuse liver disease: characteristics of acute and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chundru, Surya; Kalb, Bobby; Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Sharma, Puneet; Costello, James; Martin, Diego R

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse liver disease, including chronic liver disease, affects tens of millions of people worldwide, and there is a growing need for diagnostic evaluation as treatments become more readily available, particularly for viral liver diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides unique capabilities for noninvasive characterization of the liver tissue that rival or surpass the diagnostic utility of liver biopsies. There has been incremental improvement in the use of standardized MRI sequences, acquired before and after administration of a contrast agent, for the evaluation of diffuse liver disease and the study of the liver parenchyma and blood supply. More recent developments have led to methods for quantifying important liver metabolites, including lipids and iron, and liver fibrosis, the hallmark of chronic liver disease. Here, we review the MRI techniques and diagnostic features associated with acute and chronic liver disease. PMID:24808418

  19. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries.

  20. Acute myopericarditis associated with cat scratch disease in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Barson, William J; Honegger, J Robert; Texter, Karen

    2014-09-01

    Cat scratch disease is generally characterized by a self-limited chronic regional lymphadenopathy, but numerous other clinical manifestations involving a variety of organ systems have been reported. Cardiac involvement is unusual and when reported, it has been associated with culture-negative endocarditis in adults. We present the case of an adolescent male with typical cat scratch disease and associated myopericarditis.

  1. Systemic diseases and oral health.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Mary; Lindefjeld Calabi, Kari A; San Martin, Laura

    2014-10-01

    The US population is at the beginning of a significant demographic shift; the American geriatric population is burgeoning, and average longevity is projected to increase in the coming years. Elder adults are affected by numerous chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and cerebrovascular diseases. These older adults need special dental care and an improved understanding of the complex interactions of oral disease and systemic chronic diseases that can complicate their treatment. Oral diseases have strong associations with systemic diseases, and poor oral health can worsen the impact of systemic diseases.

  2. Systemic sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure: about 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Mamlouk, Habiba; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis affecting most frequently the lungs and the mediastinum. An acute renal failure reveals exceptionally this disease. It's a retrospective study implicating 12 cases of sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to determine epidemiological, clinical, biological and histological profile in these cases and then to indicate the interest to consider the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in cases of unexplained renal failure. Extra-renal complications, therapeutic modalities and the outcome were determined in all patients. Our series involved 12 women with an average age of 40 years. Biological investigations showed an abnormal normocalcemia in 7 cases, a hypercalcemia in 5 cases, a hypercalciuria in 10 cases and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia in 7 cases. An acute renal failure was found in all patients with a median creatinin of 520 umol/L. For all patients, the renal echography was normal however, the kidney biopsy showed tubulo-interstitial nephritis. The extra-renal signs highlighting pulmonary interstitial syndrome in 5 cases, a sicca syndrome in 4 cases, mediastinal lymph nodes in 2 cases, a lymphocytic alveolitis in 3 cases, an anterior granulomatous uveitis in 2 cases and a polyarthritis in 5 cases. Five patients benefited of hemodialysis. The treatment consisted of corticosteroid in all cases. The follow up was marked by complete resolution of clinical and biological signs. The diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis must be done quickly to prevent renal failure.

  3. Systemic sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure: about 12 cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Mamlouk, Habiba; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis affecting most frequently the lungs and the mediastinum. An acute renal failure reveals exceptionally this disease. It's a retrospective study implicating 12 cases of sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to determine epidemiological, clinical, biological and histological profile in these cases and then to indicate the interest to consider the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in cases of unexplained renal failure. Extra-renal complications, therapeutic modalities and the outcome were determined in all patients. Our series involved 12 women with an average age of 40 years. Biological investigations showed an abnormal normocalcemia in 7 cases, a hypercalcemia in 5 cases, a hypercalciuria in 10 cases and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia in 7 cases. An acute renal failure was found in all patients with a median creatinin of 520 umol/L. For all patients, the renal echography was normaln however, the kidney biopsy showed tubulo-interstitial nephritis. The extra-renal signs highlighting pulmonary interstitial syndrome in 5 cases, a sicca syndrome in 4 cases, mediastinal lymph nodes in 2 cases, a lymphocytic alveolitis in 3 cases, an anterior granulomatous uveitis in 2 cases and a polyarthritis in 5 cases. Five patients benefited of hemodialysis. The treatment consisted of corticosteroid in all cases. The follow up was marked by complete resolution of clinical and biological signs. The diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis must be done quickly to prevent renal failure. PMID:26834928

  4. Primary Epstein-Barr-virus infections in acute neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grose, C; Henle, W; Henle, G; Feorino, P M

    1975-02-20

    Infectious mononucleosis has been associated with Guillain--Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, meningoencephalitis and transverse myelitis. Since it is not known that many children with infectious mononucleosis do not develop heterophil antibodies, we looked for evidence of current or recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients with these neurologic diseases by using serodiagnostic procedures for detection and titration of antibodies to various antigens related to Epstein-Barr virus. Seven of 24 cases with Guillain-Barre syndrome and three of 16 with facial palsy were definitely associated with primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus as were two cases each of the other two neurologic diseases. Only one of these patients had obvious clinical infectious mononucleosis, and only a few demonstrated heterophil agglutinins. It is evident that the virus must be considered in the diagnosis of various acute neurologic diseases affecting children and young adults, even in the absence of heterophil-antibody response or other signs of infectious mononucleosis.

  5. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  6. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  7. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  8. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  9. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  10. [Acute painful crisis in a female Nigerian patient with sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Nin, Sayaka; Seki, Masanori; Maie, Koichiro; Kuroda, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kana; Ogawa, Shinichi; Ito, Yufu; Kurita, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Sakata Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Obara, Naoshi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Ogino, Yasuko; Ito, Takayoshi; Chiba, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old Nigerian woman with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease had been diagnosed when she experienced her first sickle cell crisis episode at age 8 years. Thereafter, she had infrequent minor episodes. She visited a hospital presenting with fever, anemia, jaundice, and systemic pain, and was then transferred to our hospital. Together with rehydration and red blood cell transfusion, analgesics and antibiotics were prescribed, and produced gradual improvement of all symptoms and signs. The patient was discharged on day 9 of hospitalization. Sickle cell crisis is an acute painful episode caused by occlusion of arterioles. The degree of pain and accompanying symptoms, as well as the frequencies of crises, are variable. Moreover, one third of individuals with sickle cell disease never experience a crisis. As our society becomes increasingly globalized, the probabilities of encountering sickle cell disease patients will be higher. PMID:25745965

  11. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  12. Neuromuscular disease classification system.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns. PMID:23804164

  13. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  14. Nervous system lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, a multisystem spirochetal infection, continues to be the subject of considerable debate, but not controversy. Recent years have seen improvements in diagnostic tools, better understanding of pathophysiology, and increasing evidence of efficacy of standard treatment regimens. Nervous system involvement is particularly confusing to patients and many physicians. A rational approach based on objective findings can clarify the cause and dictate the best treatment of patients' difficulties. Diagnosis for all but the earliest cases rests on the combination of likely contact with infected Ixodes ticks and laboratory confirmation of exposure to the causative organism, Borrelia burgdorferi (two-tier serology, combining ELISA with a confirmatory Western blot). Treatment is generally with oral antimicrobials such as doxycycline. Parenteral regimens are usually necessary only for the most severe cases.

  15. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  16. [Acute encephalic manifestations in Senegalese children with sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Diagne, I; Diagne-Guèye, N R; Fall, L; Ndiaye, O; Camara, B; Diouf, S; Signate-Sy, H; Kuakuvi, N

    2001-01-01

    The course of sickle cell disease (SCD) may be complicated by neurologic events, mainly bactérial meningitidis and stroke. We retrospectively studied all cases with acute encephalic manifestations (AEM) in a cohort of 461 children and adolescents with SCD followed at Albert Royer Children Hospital of Dakar (Senegal) from january 1991 to december 2000 (ten years). Among them 438 had sickle cell anemia (SCA), 19 SC disease and 4 S-beta thalassemia (3 S-beta+, 1 S-beta0). Seven patients, all with SCA, presented antecedents of AEM revealed by flacid and proportionnal hemiplegia evoking stroke. Prevalence of these AEM was 1.5 per cent among patients with SCD and 1.6 per cent among those with SCA. They were 4 girls and 3 boys (sex ratio = 0.75) aged 4 to 8.5 years when occurred the first accident. We observed no clinical or biological distinctive characteristic of SCA in these patients compared to those without crebrovascular accident. Recurrence was observed once in a boy after a 12 months interval and twice in a girl after 20 and 60 months intervals successively. No transfusionnal program was applied to prevent recurrent stroke because of insufficient conditions for long-term transfusion. Stroke appears to be rare in senegalese children with SCD. However it poses in our context the major problem of applicability of transfusionnal program which constitute the only therapy universally recognised to be effective to prevent recurrence. Nevertheless hydroxyurea could be a satisfactory alternative.

  17. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare.

  18. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE QUANTITATION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Shook, David; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is heterogeneous. A minority of patients has clinical and biologic features that are associated with a very high risk of relapse. For the remaining patients no clear prognostic factors can be identified at diagnosis. The degree of treatment response is likely to be an informative predictor of outcome for these patients. Modern assays to detect AML cells that are undetectable by conventional morphologic techniques, i.e. minimal residual disease (MRD), can potentially improve measurements of treatment response. It is plausible that modifications to treatment based on the results of these assays will improve clinical management and ultimately increase cure rates. Established MRD assays for AML are based on either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genetic abnormalities or flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes. Residual disease and treatment response can be measured by these assays in a manner that is much more sensitive and objective than that afforded by conventional morphologic examination. The expanding use of MRD testing is beginning to change the definition of treatment response and of remission. Other clinically informative uses of MRD testing include the detection of early relapse and the evaluation of the efficacy of new antileukemic agents. PMID:19778853

  19. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  20. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  1. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  2. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  3. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  4. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-08-28

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense (99m)Technetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of "coated aorta" or "hairy kidneys". ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  6. Cigarette smoke causes acute airway disease and exacerbates chronic obstructive lung disease in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Conlon, Thomas M; Ballester Lopez, Carolina; Seimetz, Michael; Bednorz, Mariola; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Weissmann, Norbert; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates a strong link between postnatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and increased respiratory morbidity in young children. However, how CS induces early onset airway disease in young children, and how it interacts with endogenous risk factors, remains poorly understood. We, therefore, exposed 10-day-old neonatal wild-type and β-epithelial sodium ion channel (β-ENaC)-transgenic mice with cystic fibrosis-like lung disease to CS for 4 days. Neonatal wild-type mice exposed to CS demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), which was accompanied by increased levels of Mmp12 and Cxcl1 BALF from β-ENaC-transgenic mice contained greater numbers of macrophages, which did not increase following acute CS exposure; however, there was significant increase in airway neutrophilia compared with filtered air transgenic and CS-exposed wild-type controls. Interestingly, wild-type and β-ENaC-transgenic mice demonstrated epithelial airway and vascular remodeling following CS exposure. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that CS exposure caused increased mucus accumulation in the airway lumen of neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice compared with wild-type controls, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of goblet cells and Muc5ac upregulation. We conclude that short-term CS exposure 1) induces acute airway disease with airway epithelial and vascular remodeling in neonatal wild-type mice; and 2) exacerbates airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and mucus plugging in neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice with chronic lung disease. Our results in neonatal mice suggest that young children may be highly susceptible to develop airway disease in response to tobacco smoke exposure, and that adverse effects may be aggravated in children with underlying chronic lung diseases. PMID:27448665

  7. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare. PMID:21983132

  8. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  9. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  10. [Psoriasis, a systemic disease?].

    PubMed

    Puig-Sanz, L

    2007-01-01

    It has long been recognized the epidemiological association of psoriasis, especially the most severe forms, with several diseases that share a common pathogenic substrate involving TNF-alpha and different target organs (arthritis and Crohn's disease, for example), as well as an increased risk of coronary heart disease and occlusive cardiovascular disease. In the patient with severe psoriasis there is also an increased prevalence of obesity, dyslipemia, adult diabetes mellitus, alcohol abuse and tobacco habit which contribute to the increased risk of mortality associated with atherosclerosis. Recently it has been identified the so-called metabolic syndrome, characterized by the association of abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipemia, hypertension, insulin resistance with or without glucose intolerance and a proinflammatory and prothrombotic state as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. There is evidence that in rheumatoid arthritis as well as in psoriasis, chronic inflammation has a pathogenic role in the metabolic syndrome and associated comorbidities, and its adequate treatment may contribute to revert it. The dermatologist should recognize the elements of the metabolic syndrome and propose the patient with psoriasis, in addition to the optimal dermatologic treatment, changes in life habits and appropriate drug therapy to reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbi-mortality. PMID:17663929

  11. Periodontal disease and systemic complications.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Weidlich, Patricia; Musskopf, Marta Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health. PMID:23318743

  12. IgG4-related disease manifesting as an acute gastric-pericardial fistula.

    PubMed

    Frydman, James; Grunner, Shahar; Kluger, Yoram

    2014-11-28

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized entity linked initially to autoimmune pancreatitis and has been subsequently described in nearly every organ system. Men over the age of 50 represent the most affected demographic group and a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria has been developed to aid treating clinicians. Though elevated levels of IgG4 in the serum are suggestive of the disease, definitive diagnosis is made on histopathology. Treatment is tailored to the clinical presentation with corticosteroid therapy known to have proven efficacy. Gastric manifestations of the IgG4-related disease primarily come in two varieties, notably chronic ulceration or pseudotumor formation. Autoimmune pancreatitis conveys increased risk for IgG4-related disease of the stomach, which is independent of Helicobacter pylori status. In this case report, we present an acute gastric-pericardial fistula secondary to IgG4-related disease that required urgent operative management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing this complication of IgG4-related disease. PMID:25469052

  13. IgG4-related disease manifesting as an acute gastric-pericardial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, James; Grunner, Shahar; Kluger, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized entity linked initially to autoimmune pancreatitis and has been subsequently described in nearly every organ system. Men over the age of 50 represent the most affected demographic group and a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria has been developed to aid treating clinicians. Though elevated levels of IgG4 in the serum are suggestive of the disease, definitive diagnosis is made on histopathology. Treatment is tailored to the clinical presentation with corticosteroid therapy known to have proven efficacy. Gastric manifestations of the IgG4-related disease primarily come in two varieties, notably chronic ulceration or pseudotumor formation. Autoimmune pancreatitis conveys increased risk for IgG4-related disease of the stomach, which is independent of Helicobacter pylori status. In this case report, we present an acute gastric-pericardial fistula secondary to IgG4-related disease that required urgent operative management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing this complication of IgG4-related disease. PMID:25469052

  14. Exploring waiving opportunities for mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Asturiol, David; Prieto, Pilar; Worth, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    A survey was carried out to explore opportunities for waiving mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests. We were interested in finding out whether data from a sub-acute toxicity test could be used to predict the outcome of an acute systemic toxicity test. The survey was directed at experts in the field of toxicity testing, and was carried out in the context of the upcoming 2018 final registration deadline for chemicals under the EU REACH Regulation. In addition to the survey, a retrospective data analysis of chemicals that had already been registered with the European Chemicals Agency, and for which both acute and sub-acute toxicity data were available, was carried out. This data analysis was focused on chemicals that were administered via the oral route. The answers to the questionnaire showed a willingness to adopt waiving opportunities. In addition, the responses showed that data from a sub-acute toxicity test or dose-range finding study might be useful for predicting chemicals that do not require classification for acute oral toxicity (LD50 > 2000mg/kg body weight). However, with the exception of substances that fall into the non-classified category, it is difficult to predict current acute oral toxicity categories. PMID:27494626

  15. The Role of Purine Metabolites as DAMPs in Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Apostolova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) causes high mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. An early event in the classical pathogenesis of acute GvHD is tissue damage caused by the conditioning treatment or infection that consecutively leads to translocation of bacterial products [pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)] into blood or lymphoid tissue, as well as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mostly intracellular components that act as pro-inflammatory agents, once they are released into the extracellular space. A subtype of DAMPs is nucleotides, such as adenosine triphosphate released from dying cells that can activate the innate and adaptive immune system by binding to purinergic receptors. Binding to certain purinergic receptors leads to a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and promotes allogeneic T cell priming. After priming, T cells migrate to the acute GvHD target organs, mainly skin, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract and induce cell damage that further amplifies the release of intracellular components. This review summarizes the role of different purinergic receptors in particular P2X7 and P2Y2 as well as nucleotides in the pathogenesis of GvHD.

  16. Plasma exchange for hemolytic crisis and acute liver failure in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nishant; Pai, Gautham; Hari, Pankaj; Lodha, Rakesh

    2014-05-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism which primarily involves the liver and the central nervous system. Rarely, WD can present as acute liver failure (ALF) and this disease is universally fatal in the absence of liver transplantation. The authors report a young girl with WD ALF, who showed signs of recovery after prompt initiation of plasma exchange (PE) and chelation therapy. Though liver transplantation could not be done in this child and the child died 8 d after stopping PE, this case highlights that PE can be a successful medical treatment in WD ALF and should be considered as a therapeutic measure to stabilize a patient by decreasing serum copper, reducing hemolysis, and helping to prevent renal tubular injury from copper and copper complexes until liver transplantation is possible.

  17. [Current treatment and management of the acute phase of Peyronies's disease].

    PubMed

    Vanni, Alex J; Bennett, Nelson E

    2009-10-01

    The true pathophysiologic nature of Peyronie's disease continues to evolve. This pathology often results in a penile plaque(s), penile deformity, curvature, pain, and erectile dysfunction. Clinically, there are two distinct phases, acute and chronic. The focus of this review will center on the management of the acute phase of Peyronie's disease. While little data exists demonstrating disease resolution, disease stabilization is an important clinical goal for patients as this often allows acceptable sexual function. Thus, medical management during the acute phase of Peyronie's disease is aimed at limiting and stabilizing the degree of penile fibrosis, decreasing penile curvature, and reducing penile pain. In this manuscript we explain different therapies; oral, topical, intralesional injection and others like extracorporeal shockwave (ESWT), radiation and penile traction for acute phase of Peyronie's disease. Although no consensus exists for the treatment of acute phase Peyronie's disease, a majority of patients can achieve stabilization and in some cases regression of their disease with proper medical therapy. The goals of therapy should be discussed extensively with each patient, noting that erectile function will be likely despite some degree of curvature.

  18. [Autoimmune Diseases of Digestive System].

    PubMed

    Ivashkinl, V T; Sheptulina, A F; Raĭkhelson, K L; Losik, E A; Ivashkin, K V; Okhlobystin, A V; Baranskaia, E K; Polouvektova, E A; Shifrin, O S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of digestive system refer to pathological conditions, caused by autoimmune mechanisms, and their etiology remains unknown. This is a group of relatively rare diseases, however, during the last years a marked tendency towards the raise in incidence andprevalence is observed, which led to an increase in number of clinical investigations on etiology, pathogenesis, and, accordingly, development of new diagnostic methods and therapies. Results of such trials shown, for example, that the pathogenesis of chronic cholestatic liver diseases is associated with nuclear receptors function, while the main etiological and pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel diseases represents gut microbiota. Despite new achievements in autoinmune diseases of digestive system research, therapies are low effective and are accompanied by a huge number of adverse events. The fact that these diseases may lead to malignant tumors is also worth noting. For example, patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis have a 160 times higher risk of cholangiocellular carcinoma, while 10-14% ofpatients with celiac disease may develop malignancies of esophagus, small and large intestine. Thus, these diseases require further investigation with a purpose of more accurate diagnostic methods for the detection of disease at early stages and new effective and safe therapies development.

  19. The role of the complement system in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McCullough, James W; Renner, Brandon; Thurman, Joshua M

    2013-11-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common and severe clinical problem. Patients who develop acute kidney injury are at increased risk of death despite supportive measures such as hemodialysis. Research in recent years has shown that tissue inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of renal injury, even after nonimmune insults such as ischemia/reperfusion and toxins. Examination of clinical samples and preclinical models has shown that activation of the complement system is a critical cause of acute kidney injury. Furthermore, complement activation within the injured kidney is a proximal trigger of many downstream inflammatory events within the renal parenchyma that exacerbate injury to the kidney. Complement activation also may account for the systemic inflammatory events that contribute to remote organ injury and patient mortality. Complement inhibitory drugs have now entered clinical use and may provide an important new therapeutic approach for patients suffering from, or at high risk of developing, acute kidney injury.

  20. Acute abdomen in adult Celiac disease: an intestinal intussusception case.

    PubMed

    Makay, Ozer; Kazimi, Mircelal; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Osmanoğlu, Necla; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that half of the cases admitted to hospital emergency services complain of abdominal pain and that nearly half of these cases are diagnosed with nonspecific abdominal pain. The population of patients with celiac sprue is rarely encountered at the emergency room. Although acute abdominal pain is rarely seen in adult celiac sprue, it should be added to the differential diagnosis. It should also be remembered that acute abdominal pain in these patients could be originating from perforation, intussusceptions and/or intestinal lymphoma. Herein we report a case of adult celiac sprue where successful surgical exploration was carried out because of entero-enteral intussusception. PMID:17602358

  1. RDIS: The Rabies Disease Information System

    PubMed Central

    Dharmalingam, Baskeran; Jothi, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a deadly viral disease causing acute inflammation or encephalitis of the brain in human beings and other mammals. Therefore, it is of interest to collect information related to the disease from several sources including known literature databases for further analysis and interpretation. Hence, we describe the development of a database called the Rabies Disease Information System (RDIS) for this purpose. The online database describes the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology of the disease using diagrammatic representations. It provides information on several carriers of the rabies viruses like dog, bat, fox and civet, and their distributions around the world. Information related to the urban and sylvatic cycles of transmission of the virus is also made available. The database also contains information related to available diagnostic methods and vaccines for human and other animals. This information is of use to medical, veterinary and paramedical practitioners, students, researchers, pet owners, animal lovers, livestock handlers, travelers and many others. Availability The database is available for free http://rabies.mscwbif.org/home.html PMID:26912951

  2. The long-term prognosis of acute kidney injury: acute renal failure as a cause of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    There is a widespread opinion that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rather harmless complication and that survival is determined not by renal dysfunction per se, but by the severity of the underlying disease. This opinion is in sharp contrast to evidence from several recent experimental and clinical investigations indicating that AKI is a condition which exerts a fundamental impact on the course of the disease, the evolution of associated complications and on prognosis, independently from the type and severity of the underlying condition. In conclusion, severe AKI in the critically ill patient is associated with high rates of morbidity, mortality and consumption of health care resources.

  3. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  4. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  5. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  6. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers.

    PubMed

    Levine, John E; Hogan, William J; Harris, Andrew C; Litzow, Mark R; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L M

    2014-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD.

  7. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers.

    PubMed

    Levine, John E; Hogan, William J; Harris, Andrew C; Litzow, Mark R; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L M

    2014-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD. PMID:25455279

  8. Management of Acute Exacerbation of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Suau, Salvador J; DeBlieux, Peter M C

    2016-02-01

    Acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are the most common respiratory diseases requiring emergent medical evaluation and treatment. Asthma and COPD are chronic, debilitating disease processes that have been differentiated traditionally by the presence or absence of reversible airflow obstruction. Asthma and COPD exacerbations impose an enormous economic burden on the US health care budget. In daily clinical practice, it is difficult to differentiate these 2 obstructive processes based on their symptoms, and on their nearly identical acute treatment strategies; major differences are important when discussing anatomic sites involved, long-term prognosis, and the nature of inflammatory markers. PMID:26614239

  9. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered. PMID:8525575

  10. Complement system in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pankita H; Wilkes, David S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  12. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  13. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gergő A.; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2nd and 3rd days (p<0.05 vs. controls), and the kinetics follows the intensity of the systemic inflammation correlating with serum procalcitonin levels. In a similar study subset, urinary meta-tyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (p<0.01 for both). Using linear regression model, meta-tyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + ortho-tyrosine)/para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:26785996

  14. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  15. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  16. Oral microbiota and systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Purnima S

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that bacteria are the primary cause of infectious diseases, however, evidence is emerging that these organisms are also indirectly responsible for several diseases including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The oral cavity is home to several million bacteria that can cause two major diseases-periodontitis and caries. The relationship between periodontopathic bacteria and systemic diseases has been explored for several years. The concept of the oral cavity as a source of distant infection has been debated for at least a century. This review will discuss the historic aspects of the development of the focal infection theory, the reasons for its demise, its re-emergence and current status. PMID:24128801

  17. Hepatic failure and liver cell damage in acute Wilson's disease involve CD95 (APO-1/Fas) mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Strand, S; Hofmann, W J; Grambihler, A; Hug, H; Volkmann, M; Otto, G; Wesch, H; Mariani, S M; Hack, V; Stremmel, W; Krammer, P H; Galle, P R

    1998-05-01

    Wilson's disease can result in fulminant liver failure due to hepatic copper overload. The CD95 system mediates apoptosis and has been demonstrated to be involved in liver disease. In this study CD95 mediated apoptosis was investigated in patients with fulminant hepatic failure in the course of Wilson's disease and in an in vitro model of copper treated human hepatoma cells. In patients, hepatic expression of CD95 and CD95L mRNA and apoptosis were detected. Copper overload in vitro resulted in hepatocytic apoptosis which could be reduced with a neutralizing anti-CD95L antibody. Copper treatment of hepatocytes results in activation of the CD95 system and induction of apoptosis which is operative during the course of hepatic failure in acute Wilson's disease.

  18. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  19. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  20. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options.

  1. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  2. Atypical presentation of acute and chronic coronary artery disease in diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Khafaji, Hadi AR Hadi; Suwaidi, Jassim M Al

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of mortality and chest pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with stable and acute coronary artery disease. However, there is little knowledge concerning the pervasiveness of uncommon presentations in diabetics. The symptomatology of acute coronary syndrome, which comprises both pain and non-pain symptoms, may be affected by traditional risk factors such as age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Such atypical symptoms may range from silent myocardial ischemia to a wide spectrum of non-chest pain symptoms. Worldwide, few studies have highlighted this under-investigated subject, and this aspect of ischemic heart disease has also been under-evaluated in the major clinical trials. The results of these studies are highly diverse which makes definitive conclusions regarding the spectrum of atypical presentation of acute and even stable chronic coronay artery disease difficult to confirm. This may have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease in diabetics. In this up-to-date review we will try to analyze the most recent studies on the atypical presentations in both acute and chronic ischemic heart disease which may give some emphasis to this under-investigated topic. PMID:25228959

  3. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  4. Wilson's disease: acute and presymptomatic laboratory diagnosis and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, D; Fell, G; O'Reilly, D

    2000-01-01

    Wilson's disease, the most common inherited disorder of copper metabolism, is a recessive genetic condition. The clinical presentation of Wilson's disease is very variable. It is characterised by low serum copper and caeruloplasmin concentrations coupled with the pathological accumulation of copper in the tissues. However, there are diagnostic difficulties and these are discussed. The current value of DNA diagnosis, both in gene tracking in families or as applied to de novo cases, is examined. Wilson's disease can be treated successfully but treatment must be life long. Patients are best treated by specialist centres with experience and expertise in the condition. Key Words: Wilson's disease • copper • diagnosis PMID:11127261

  5. Outcomes before and after the Implementation of a Critical Pathway for Patients with Acute Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyu Chul; Lee, Hye Sun; Park, Joon Min; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Ko, Young-Guk; Park, Incheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, can be life-threatening vascular conditions. In this study, we compared outcomes before and after the implementation of a critical pathway (CP) for patients with acute aortic disease at the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective observational cohort study. The CP was composed of two phases: PRE-AORTA for early diagnosis and AORTA for prompt treatment. We compared patients who were diagnosed with acute aortic disease between pre-period (January 2010 to December 2011) and post-period (July 2012 to June 2014). Results Ninety-four and 104 patients were diagnosed with acute aortic disease in the pre- and post-periods, respectively. After the implementation of the CP, 38.7% of acute aortic disease cases were diagnosed via PRE-AORTA. The door-to-CT time was reduced more in PRE-AORTA-activated patients [71.0 (61.0, 115.0) min vs. 113.0 (56.0, 170.5) min; p=0.026]. During the post-period, more patients received emergency intervention than during the pre-period (22.3% vs. 36.5%; p=0.029). Time until emergency intervention was reduced in patients, who visited the ED directly, from 378.0 (302.0, 489.0) min in the pre-period to 200.0 (170.0, 299.0) min in the post-period (p=0.001). The number of patients who died in the ED declined from 11 to 4 from the pre-period to the post-period. Hospital mortality decreased from 26.6% to 14.4% in the post-period (p=0.033). Conclusion After the implementation of a CP for patients with acute aortic disease, more patients received emergency intervention within a shorter time, resulting in improved hospital mortality. PMID:26996561

  6. Systems biology of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Levi B; Winslow, Ashley R; Strasser, Samantha Dale

    2015-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) collectively afflict more than 40 million people worldwide. The majority of these diseases lack therapies to slow or stop progression due in large part to the challenge of disentangling the simultaneous presentation of broad, multifaceted pathophysiologic changes. Present technologies and computational capabilities suggest an optimistic future for deconvolving these changes to identify novel mechanisms driving ND onset and progression. In particular, integration of highly multi-dimensional omic analytical techniques (e.g., microarray, mass spectrometry) with computational systems biology approaches provides a systematic methodology to elucidate new mechanisms driving NDs. In this review, we begin by summarizing the complex pathophysiology of NDs associated with protein aggregation, emphasizing the shared complex dysregulation found in all of these diseases, and discuss available experimental ND models. Next, we provide an overview of technological and computational techniques used in systems biology that are applicable to studying NDs. We conclude by reviewing prior studies that have applied these approaches to NDs and comment on the necessity of combining analysis from both human tissues and model systems to identify driving mechanisms. We envision that the integration of computational approaches with multiple omic analyses of human tissues, and mouse and in vitro models, will enable the discovery of new therapeutic strategies for these devastating diseases.

  7. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos.

  8. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos. PMID:24929227

  9. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Acute myocardial infarction following scorpion sting in a case with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Satish, K; Singla, Vivek; Ravindranath, K S

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) following a scorpion sting has been very rarely reported in the previous literature. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms include severe hypotension due to hypovolaemic shock and coronary spasm with subsequent thrombosis of coronary vessels developed after the release of vasoactive, inflammatory and thrombogenic substances contained in the scorpion venom. All of the previously reported cases had normal coronary angiogram. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with severe scorpion sting and was treated with prazosin. But a few hours later, she developed acute anterior wall MI. Coronary angiogram revealed the presence of significant stenosis in coronary arteries. As acute MI owing to significant coronary artery disease can be evident after severe scorpion envenomation, so every case of acute coronary syndrome following scorpion sting needs early diagnosis, thorough cardiovascular evaluation and appropriate treatment. PMID:23715842

  11. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  12. Cardiovascular disease in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cannarile, Francesca; Valentini, Valentina; Mirabelli, Giulia; Alunno, Alessia; Terenzi, Riccardo; Luccioli, Filippo; Bartoloni, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) system involvement is a frequent complication of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It still remains unclear if a premature atherosclerosis (ATS) occurs even in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although microvascular disease is a hallmark of SSc, in the last few years a number of studies highlighted a higher prevalence of macrovascular disease in SSc patients in comparison to healthy individuals and these data have been correlated with a poorer prognosis. The mechanisms promoting ATS in SSc are not fully understood, but it is believed to be secondary to multi-system organ inflammation, endothelial wall damage and vasculopathy. Both traditional risk factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to participate to the onset and progression of ATS in such patients. In particular, endothelial cell injury induced by anti-endothelial antibodies, ischemia/reperfusion damage, immune-mediated cytotoxicity represent the main causes of vascular injury together with an impaired vascular repair mechanism that determine a defective vasculogenesis. Aim of this review is to analyse both causes and clinical manifestations of macrovascular involvement and ATS in SSc. PMID:25705640

  13. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP).

  14. Mycobacterium marinum causes both long-term subclinical infection and acute disease in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, L; Valdivia, R H; McKerrow, J H; Falkow, S

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum grows at an optimal temperature of 33 degrees C, far lower than that for M. tuberculosis. Consequently, M. marinum infection of mammals is restricted largely to the cooler surfaces of the body, such as the extremities, but it causes a systemic infection in a large number of poikilothermic animals. Here, we describe a laboratory animal model for M. marinum disease in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), a natural host species. M. marinum causes a chronic granulomatous, nonlethal disease in immunocompetent frogs. Immunosuppression of the frogs with hydrocortisone results in an acute, fulminant, lethal disease. This animal model, in which a spectrum of tuberculosis-like disease can be produced, will be useful for the dissection of the genetic basis of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:9009340

  15. Seasonal effects on the reported incidence of acute diarrhoeal disease in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pinfold, J V; Horan, N J; Mara, D D

    1991-09-01

    This paper examines the seasonal variation in the reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for selected areas in the northeast of Thailand. Charts are presented which show rainfall, temperature and reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for the period 1982 to 1987. Incidence of diarrhoea appears to be inversely related to a sharp decrease in temperature around January each year. Although rainfall does not appear to have a direct effect on the relative incidence of acute diarrhoea, there is always a consistent reduction during July or August, after the rains have begun. Seasonal changes in climate may be indirectly related to other factors which have an important bearing on diarrhoeal disease. Rainwater collection is an important water source in this region and the affect this has on water use is discussed in relation to faeco-oral disease transmission.

  16. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  17. Acute myocardial infarction after heart irradiation in young patients with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, H.

    1989-02-01

    Forty-seven patients younger than 40 years at the time of the diagnosis, and irradiated to the mediastinum for Hodgkin's disease at Turku University Central Hospital from 1977 to 1982, were regularly followed for 56 to 127 months after therapy. Two patients developed an acute myocardial infarction ten and 50 months after cardiac irradiation at the age of only 28 and 24 years, respectively. None of the patients died from lymphoma within five years from the diagnosis, but one of the infarctions was eventually fatal. Since acute myocardial infarction is rare in this age group, the result suggests strongly that prior cardiac irradiation is a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. The possibility of radiation-induced myocardial infarction should be taken into account both in treatment planning and follow-up of patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  18. Ischemic heart disease in systemic inflammatory diseases. An appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Paola; Marsico, Fabio; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Cecere, Milena; Casaretti, Laura; Pellegrino, Angela Maria; Formisano, Tiziana; Fabiani, Irma; Soricelli, Andrea; Trimarco, Bruno; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory diseases are inflammatory syndromes that are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The link between inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases can be attributed to coexistence of classical risk factors and of inflammatory mechanisms activated in systemic inflammatory diseases and involving the immune system. Yet, clinical implications of these findings are not entirely clear and deeper knowledge and awareness of cardiac involvement in inflammatory diseases are necessary. The aims of this review are to summarize cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases and to identify areas where evidence is currently lacking that deserve further investigation in the future.

  19. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  20. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  1. Brief communication: Legionnaire's disease successfully treated in acute myelocytic leukemia during severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H; Mahizhnan, P

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia developed progressive lung infiltrates and unremitting fevers during a profound neutropenic state. Legionnaire's disease was diagnosed by simple immunologic studies and successfully treated with erythromycin. This index case alerts physicians toward a treatable infection which would not normally be susceptible to the empiric antibiotic regimens given neutropenic patients with fevers.

  2. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  3. [Prognostication of malignization and acute complications of gastric ulcer disease, using multiparametric neuronet clasterization].

    PubMed

    Dzyubanovskiy, I Ya; Selskiy, P R; Viytovych, L E

    2015-03-01

    Results of examination of 20 gastric ulcer disease patients were analyzed for delineation of a high risk group for an acute complications occurrence, and in whom the conduction of organ preserving preventive operative interventions is expedient. For prognostication such following indices were applied: quantity of cells-producents of various immunoglobulins, mitotic and apoptotic indices, relative volume of damaged epitheliocytes, the patients' age.

  4. Clinical features and outcome of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yuko; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Kishi, Jun; Kawano, Hiroshi; Morizumi, Shun; Sato, Seidai; Kondo, Mayo; Takikura, Terumi; Tezuka, Toshifumi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Acute exacerbation (AE) of interstitial lung disease is reported to be developed in not only idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis but also connective tissue disease-associated interstitial pneumonia (CTD-IP). As the significance of AE of CTD-IP has not been so widely recognized, its clinical feature is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the incidence, clinical features and outcome of AE of CTD-IP. We retrospectively reviewed admitted cases in our department with medical record from 2011 to 2015. Among 155 patients with CTD-IP, 10 (6.5%) cases developed AE (6 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 polymyositis/dermatomyositis, 1 systemic lupus erythematosus, 1 Sjögren syndrome), and one died of AE within 30 days. Median survival time after the onset of AE was 169 days in all 10 patients. The treatment with immunosuppressant just before AE onset might improve the prognosis of AE. The median survival time after the onset of AE was significantly longer in patients showing good response to corticosteroid compared with those with poor response to corticosteroid (805 days and 45 days, respectively) (p <0.05), suggesting that there are some cases in CTD-IP, showing the good response to corticosteroid even when AE was complicated. J. Med. Invest. 63: 294-299, August, 2016. PMID:27644575

  5. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  6. Diagnostic challenges of Wilson's disease presenting as acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and jaundice.

    PubMed

    Nussinson, Elchanan; Shahbari, Azmi; Shibli, Fahmi; Chervinsky, Elena; Trougouboff, Philippe; Markel, Arie

    2013-11-27

    Wilson's disease is a rare disorder of copper transport in hepatic cells, and may present as cholestatic liver disease; pancreatitis and cholangitis are rarely associated with Wilsons's disease. Moreover, cases of Wilson's disease presenting as pigmented gallstone pancreatitis have not been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with jaundice and abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and obstructive jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones that were detected during retrograde cholangiopancreatography. However, because of his long-term jaundice and the presence of pigmented gallstones, the patient underwent further evaluation for Wilson's disease, which was subsequently confirmed. This patient's unique presentation exemplifies the overlap in the clinical and laboratory parameters of Wilson's disease and cholestasis, and the difficulties associated with their differentiation. It suggests that Wilson's disease should be considered in patients with pancreatitis, cholangitis, and severe protracted jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones.

  7. Tryptophan catabolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulcev, Makedonka; Reilly, Cavan; Griffin, Timothy J; Broeckling, Corey D; Sandri, Brian J; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Hodgson, Shane W; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exacerbations are a leading cause of morbidity in COPD. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Methods We measured metabolites via mass spectrometry (MS) in plasma drawn within 24 hours of admission to the hospital for 33 patients with an AECOPD (day 0) and 30 days later and for 65 matched controls. Individual metabolites were measured via selective reaction monitoring with mass spectrometry. We used a mixed-effect model to compare metabolite levels in cases compared to controls and a paired t-test to test for differences between days 0 and 30 in the AECOPD group. Results We identified 377 analytes at a false discovery rate of 5% that differed between cases (day 0) and controls, and 31 analytes that differed in the AECOPD cases between day 0 and day 30 (false discovery rate: 5%). Tryptophan was decreased at day 0 of AECOPD compared to controls corresponding to an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Conclusion Patients with AECOPD have a unique metabolomic signature that includes a decrease in tryptophan levels consistent with an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. PMID:27729784

  8. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  9. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time.

  10. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  11. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003–2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  12. A rare cause of acute abdominal disease: two reports of caecal diverticulum perforation.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, İbrahim; Eren, Abdülkadir

    2016-05-01

    Diverticulum of the caecum is a rare lesion. From a clinical point of view, the inflammation it causes can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis, causing difficulties in diagnosis and thus prescription of appropriate treatment. It is almost impossible to differentiate this disease from acute appendicitis through physical examination alone, and radiological imaging may also prove insufficient. For this reason, it is common to perioperatively diagnose diverticula of the caecum. Two cases of patients who underwent surgery for perforated caecal diverticula are presently described. PMID:27598596

  13. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  14. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  16. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  17. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient. PMID:20850107

  18. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome and its lesions in digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious atypical pneumonia that has recently been recognized in the patients in 32 countries and regions. This brief review summarizes some of the initial etiologic findings, pathological description, and its lesions of digestive system caused by SARS virus. It is an attempt to draw gastroenterologists and hepatologists' attention to this fatal illness, especially when it manifests itself initially as digestive symptoms. PMID:12800212

  20. Impact of acute caffeine ingestion on endothelial function in subjects with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Shalmon, Guy; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Koren-Morag, Nira; Feinberg, Micha S; Harats, Dror; Sela, Ben Ami; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Chouraqui, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    Although coffee is a widely used, pharmacologically active beverage, its impact on the cardiovascular system is controversial. To explore the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in subjects without coronary artery disease (CAD; controls) and patients with CAD, we prospectively assessed brachial artery FMD in 40 controls and 40 age- and gender-matched patients with documented stable CAD on 2 separate mornings 1 week to 2 weeks apart. After overnight fasting, discontinuation of all medications for ≥12 hours, and absence of caffeine for >48 hours, participants received capsules with caffeine 200 mg or placebo. One hour after drug ingestion, participants underwent brachial artery FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTG) using high-resolution ultrasound. As expected, patients with CAD were more often diabetic, hypertensive, obese, dyslipidemic, and smoked more than controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). Aspirin, Clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and statins were significantly more common in patients with CAD than in controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). At baseline, FMD, but not NTG, was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls. Acute caffeine ingestion significantly increased FMD (patients with CAD 5.6 ± 5.0% vs 14.6 ± 5.0%, controls 8.4 ± 2.9% vs 18.6 ± 6.8%, p <0.001 for all comparisons) but not NTG (patients with CAD 13.0 ± 5.2% vs 13.8 ± 6.1%, controls 12.9 ± 3.9% vs 13.9 ± 5.8%, p = NS for all comparisons) and significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (patients with CAD 2.6 ± 1.4 vs 1.4 ± 1.2 mg/L, controls 3.4 ± 3.0 vs 1.2 ± 1.0 mg/L, p <0.001 for all comparisons) in the 2 groups compared to placebo. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion significantly improved endothelial function assessed by brachial artery FMD in subjects with and without CAD and was associated with lower plasma markers of inflammation.

  1. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  2. [On the importance of a comprehensive study for diagnostics of death from acute ethanol poisoning and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Porodenko, V A; Korkhmazov, V T

    2011-01-01

    Over 30 000 cases of acute poisoning with ethyl alcohol and its surrogates are recorded annually in this country. Differential diagnostics between fatal poisoning and death from coronary heart disease encounters serious difficulties. The authors report a comprehensive forensic chemical, morphometric, and pathomorphological study of the activity of ethanol-oxidizing enzyme systems in the internal organs. The results of histochemical examination provide a basis for the extension of diagnostic potential of the available methods and the enhancement of the objective value of expert reports. PMID:21866846

  3. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  4. Emerging roles of the acute phase protein pentraxin-3 during central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, Ivana; Denes, Adam; Allan, Stuart M; Pinteaux, Emmanuel

    2016-03-15

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is an acute phase protein (APP) and a member of the long pentraxin family that is recognised for its role in peripheral immunity and vascular inflammation in response to injury, infection and diseases such as atherosclerosis, cancer and respiratory disease. Systemic levels of PTX3 are highly elevated in these conditions, and PTX3 is now recognised as a new biomarker of disease risk and progression. There is extensive evidence demonstrating that central nervous system (CNS) disorders are primarily characterised by central activation of innate immunity, as well as activation of a potent peripheral acute phase response (APR) that influences central inflammation and contributes to poor outcome. PTX3 has been recently recognised to play important roles in CNS disorders, having both detrimental and neuroprotective effects. The present review aims to give an up-to-date account of the emerging roles of PTX3 in CNS disorders, and to provide a critical comparison between peripheral and central actions of PTX3 in inflammatory diseases.

  5. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  6. [Acute encephalopathy due to late-onset maple syrup urine disease in a school boy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Su-Qing; Yang, Li-Cai; Luan, Zuo; Du, Kan; Yang, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Maple syrup urine disease is a common amino acids metabolic disease. In most patients, onset occurs in the neonatal period and infancy. In this study, the case of a school boy with acute encephalopathy due to late-onset maple syrup urine disease is summarized. The boy (8.5 years) was admitted because of acute encephalopathy after suffering from infection for two days at the age of eight and a half years. Metabolic acidosis, hyperuricemia and decreased protein level in cerebrospinal fluid were found by general laboratory tests. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed signal intensity abnormalities in the bilateral cerebellum dentate nucleus, brainstem, thalamus, putamen, caudate nucleus and cortex of the cerebral hemispheres. On T1WI and T2WI scanning, hyperintensive signal was found. Blood leucine and valine were significantly elevated. Urinary 2-hydroxy isovaleric acid, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, 2-keto isovaleric acid, and 2-keto acid also increased. Both the blood amino acid and urine organic acid profiles led to the diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease. In the acute period, the patient was treated with a large dose of vitamin B1, glucose, L-carnitine and a protein-restrict diet. The patient's condition improved significantly after five days of treatment, and he recovered completely two days later. Afterwards, treatment with vitamin B1, L-carnitine and a protein-restrict diet (1 g/kg/day) was continued. One and a half months later, blood amino acids and urine organic acids returned to normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain also indicated a great improvement. It was concluded that inborn metabolic disease should be considered in the patients with an onset similar to acute encephalopathy. Early diagnosis and proper treatment can prevent brain damage and improve prognosis.

  7. Systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of chronic periodontal diseases: a dilemma.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Martin, M V

    2003-01-01

    The use of systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of acute and chronic periodontal diseases must be viewed as a dilemma. On the one hand, the approach is attractive because of the microbial nature of periodontal diseases but, on the other hand, evidence of benefit of these agents is equivocal for the majority of periodontal diseases and antimicrobials have the potential to cause harm. The disadvantages of systemic antimicrobials can be grouped under the headings of allergic reactions, superinfection, toxicity, drug interactions, patient compliance and, perhaps of most widespread importance, bacterial resistance. Mechanical debridement methods, including drainage of pus for acute periodontal abscesses, should be considered the first line treatment for most periodontal diseases. Systemic antimicrobials should be considered as adjuncts to mechanical debridement methods and, in chronic disease, never used alone as they can predispose to abscess formation. Adjunctive systemic antimicrobials may be considered in acute disease where debridement or drainage of pus is difficult, where there is local spread or systemic upset. In chronic periodontal diseases, adjunctive antimicrobials should be considered in early onset or rapidly progressive disease or in advanced chronic adult disease where mechanical therapies have failed or surgery is not a preferred option. Inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco smoking are contraindications to the use of antimicrobials. The value of systemic antimicrobials, where other systemic risk factors co-exist, has still to be established. The role of microbial diagnosis and sensitivity testing for antimicrobial selection at this time must be questioned.

  8. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in Cameroon: A Cross Sectional Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Nkwabong, Elie; Dingom, Madye A N

    2015-12-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study, aimed at identifying the sociodemographic characteristics of women diagnosed with acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), as well as the microorganisms isolated, was carried out between October 1st, 2013 and March 31st, 2014 in two major hospitals in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Seventy women diagnosed with acute PID were recruited. The main variables recorded were maternal age, occupation, marital status, number of current sexual partners, the clinical presentation at admission and the microorganisms identified. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0. Mean maternal age was 29.0 ± 7.7 years. Students were more represented (37.1%), 58.6 % were single, 64.3% had ≥ 2 sexual partners. The most frequent signs and symptoms were abnormal vaginal discharge (100%), adnexal tenderness (97.1%), cervical motion tenderness (94.3%) and fever ≥ 38.3 degrees C (82.9%). No microorganism was isolated in 20% of cases, especially among women who underwent intra-uterine procedures. The most frequent microorganisms were genital tract mycoplasmas (54.3%). Acute PID is common among young, single women with multiple sexual partners. The micro-organisms frequently responsible for acute PID were genital tract mycoplasmas, whose identification should be included among routine tests for women with suspected acute PID in the hospitals. PMID:27337857

  9. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity. PMID:18650409

  10. [Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and biofilm].

    PubMed

    Legnani, Delfino

    2009-07-01

    The lower respiratory tract of patients affected by COPD is constantly colonized by pathogenic microrganisms such as H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae. Role of bacterial colonization of big and small airways in patients affected by COPD is still unclear but it is likely to play a role in directly or indirectly maintaining the vicious circle of infection/inflammation. Colonizer pathogens are capable to stimulate mucus production, to alter the ciliary function by inducing dyskinesia and stasis; in addition, they represent a strong stimulus for neutrophils to come in the airways, which release elastase that, in turn, inhibit the mucus-ciliary function. The same pathogens are responsible for epithelial damage and chronic inflammation, by releasing neutrophilic elastase, leading to the damage progression and obstruction. Recent studies have also shown that infection sustained by H. influenzae is not limited to bronchial mucosa, i.e. surface epithelial cells, but that the pathogen is capable to penetrate cells, so spreading the infection in sub-epithelial cellular layers. In addition, the ability to produce biofilm is another possible defence mechanism which allows them to grow and colonise. Such a mechanism could in part explain the lack of response to antimicrobials and contribute to stimulation of parenchymal inflammatory response, the cause of pathological-anatomic damage which occurs in COPD. The impossibility to eradicate chronic infection and bacterial exacerbations of COPD are likely the elements that promt and worsen obstruction, so determining the disease's progression. PMID:19696555

  11. Management of acute painful crises in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kotila, T R

    2005-08-01

    Pain is a common mode of manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD) but there is limited information on pain management in this disorder. This study examines the use of opioids and non-opioid analgesia in the management of painful crisis in adult SCD patients; the routine use of antimalarials and antibiotics as adjunct therapy was also examined. A total of 87% of the patients had had a form of analgesics before presentation, 20% of which had parenteral analgesia. Ten per cent had not used any form of medication while another 10% used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. When asked, 59% of the patients desired oral non-opioid analgesics while 31% were not concerned about the type of analgesic given. Only 8% requested opioids. Hospital admission was not necessary in 65% of the patients; they were observed in the day-care unit and allowed home within 24 h. Sixty per cent did not have a test for malaria; 66% of those who had the test performed were negative, 35% of those whose thick film for malaria was negative had antimalarials prescribed. Only five patients (7%) were febrile at presentation. Thirty-four per cent had antibiotics prescribed, a third of these parenterally. Thirty-nine per cent had no fever but received antibiotics.

  12. The role of multiparametric flow cytometry in the detection of minimal residual disease in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denise; Grigoriadis, George; Westerman, David

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry is the most accessible method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection due to its availability in most haematological centres. Using a precise combination of different antibodies, immunophenotypic detection of MRD in acute leukaemia can be performed by identifying abnormal combinations or expressions of antigens on malignant cells at diagnosis, during and post treatment. These abnormal phenotypes, referred to as leukaemia-associated immunophenotypes (LAIPs) are either absent or expressed at low frequency in normal bone marrow (BM) cells and are used to monitor the behaviour and quantitate the amount of residual disease following treatment. In paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the level of MRD by multiparametric flow cytometry (MPFC) during therapy is recognised as an important predictor of outcome. Although less extensively studied, adult ALL and adult and paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have also demonstrated similar findings. The challenge now is incorporating this information for risk-stratification so that therapy can be tailored individually and ultimately improve outcome while also limiting treatment-related toxicity. In this review we will elaborate on the current and future role of MPFC in MRD in acute leukaemia while also addressing its limitations.

  13. Acute Q fever: an emerging and endemic disease in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chung-Hsu; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chin, Chuen; Chung, Hsing-Chun; Huang, Wu-Shiung; Lin, Chih-Wen; Hsu, Chuan-Yuan; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2008-01-01

    Acute Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii infection. In Taiwan, cases of acute Q fever increased during 3 y of observation, especially at Kaohsiung County and City in southern Taiwan. From 15 April 2004 to 15 April 2007, a total of 67 cases of acute Q fever were identified at E-Da hospital located at Kaohsiung County. 19 (28.4%) patients had a history of travel in rural areas and only 1 had been outside southern Taiwan. 21 (31.3%) patients had a history of animal contact. 20 (30.8%) of the 65 examined patients had underlying chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus infection. Fever (98.5%), chills (79.1%), headache (79.1%), relative bradycardia (44.8%), elevated aminotransferases (100%), and thrombocytopenia (74.6%) were common manifestations. 12 (19.0%) cases had abnormal findings on chest X-ray. Fatty liver (50.0%) and hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly (41.9%) were found by abdominal image examinations. 42 (76.4%) of 55 cases had defervescence within 3 d after treatment, whereas 4 (7.3%) had spontaneous remission. Acute Q fever is an endemic infectious disease with hepatitis rather than pneumonia as the major presentation in southern Taiwan and the emergence of Q fever is due to increased alertness for the disease by physicians. PMID:17852909

  14. High-throughput sequencing detects minimal residual disease in acute T lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Sherwood, Anna; Fromm, Jonathan R; Winter, Stuart S; Dunsmore, Kimberly P; Loh, Mignon L; Greisman, Harvey A; Sabath, Daniel E; Wood, Brent L; Robins, Harlan

    2012-05-16

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of lymphoid receptor genes is an emerging technology that can comprehensively assess the diversity of the immune system. Here, we applied HTS to the diagnosis of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Using 43 paired patient samples, we then assessed minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 29 after treatment. The variable regions of TCRB and TCRG were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform after performance of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, which targeted all potential V-J rearrangement combinations. Pretreatment samples were used to define clonal T cell receptor (TCR) complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences, and paired posttreatment samples were evaluated for MRD. Abnormal T lymphoblast identification by multiparametric flow cytometry was concurrently performed for comparison. We found that TCRB and TCRG HTS not only identified clonality at diagnosis in most cases (31 of 43 for TCRB and 27 of 43 for TCRG) but also detected subsequent MRD. As expected, HTS of TCRB and TCRG identified MRD that was not detected by flow cytometry in a subset of cases (25 of 35 HTS compared with 13 of 35, respectively), which highlights the potential of this technology to define lower detection thresholds for MRD that could affect clinical treatment decisions. Thus, next-generation sequencing of lymphoid receptor gene repertoire may improve clinical diagnosis and subsequent MRD monitoring of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  15. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Murray, Toby B. J.; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J.; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W.; Garden, O. James; Iredale, John P.; Uings, Iain J.; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L.; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P.; Mole, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27669975

  16. Pathogen-directed Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the natural history of this chronic lung disorder. These events can be caused by a large number of infectious and noninfectious agents and are associated with an increased local and systemic inflammatory response. Their frequency and severity have been linked to progressive deterioration in lung function and health status. Infectious pathogens ranging from viral to atypical and typical bacteria have been implicated in the majority of episodes. Most therapeutic regimens to date have emphasized broad, nonspecific approaches to bronchoconstriction and pulmonary inflammation. Increasingly, therapy that targets specific etiologic pathogens has been advocated. These include clinical and laboratory-based methods to identify bacterial infections. Further additional investigation has suggested specific pathogens within this broad class. As specific antiviral therapies become available, better diagnostic approaches to identify specific pathogens will be required. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy for at-risk individuals during high-risk times may become a standard therapeutic approach. As such, the future will likely include aggressive diagnostic algorithms based on the combination of clinical syndromes and rapid laboratory modalities to identify specific causative bacteria or viruses. PMID:18073397

  17. The severity of acute kidney injury predicts progression to chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Amodeo, Susan; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with progression to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether patients who survive AKI and are at higher risk for CKD progression can be identified during their hospital admission, thus providing opportunities to intervene. This was assessed in patients in the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System hospitalized with a primary diagnosis indicating AKI (ICD9 codes 584.xx). In the exploratory phase, three multivariate prediction models for progression to stage 4 CKD were developed. In the confirmatory phase, the models were validated in 11,589 patients admitted for myocardial infarction or pneumonia during the same time frame that had RIFLE codes R, I, or F and complete data for all predictor variables. Of the 5351 patients in the AKI group, 728 entered stage 4 CKD after hospitalization. Models 1, 2, and 3 were all significant with ‘c' statistics of 0.82, 0.81, and 0.77, respectively. In model validation, all three were highly significant when tested in the confirmatory patients, with moderate to large effect sizes and good predictive accuracy (‘c' 0.81–0.82). Patients with AKI who required dialysis and then recovered were at especially high risk for progression to CKD. Hence, the severity of AKI is a robust predictor of progression to CKD. PMID:21430640

  18. Subacute radiation dermatitis: a histologic imitator of acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoit, P.E.

    1989-02-01

    The histopathologic changes of radiation dermatitis have been classified either as early effects (necrotic keratinocytes, fibrin thrombi, and hemorrhage) or as late effects (vacuolar changes at the dermal-epidermal junction, atypical radiation fibroblasts, and fibrosis). Two patients, one exposed to radiation therapeutically and one accidentally, are described. Skin biopsy specimens showed an interface dermatitis characterized by numerous dyskeratotic epidermal cells with lymphocytes in close apposition (satellite cell necrosis); that is, the epidermal changes were similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease. Because recipients of bone marrow transplants frequently receive total body irradiation as part of their preparatory regimen, the ability of radiation to cause persistent epidermal changes similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease could complicate the interpretation of posttransplant skin biopsy specimens.

  19. Acute Schistosomiasis in Brazilian Traveler: The Importance of Tourism in The Epidemiology of Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history. PMID:22844623

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  1. Haemodialysis is an effective treatment in acute metabolic decompensation of maple syrup urine disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwal, P.S.; Macmurdo, C.; Grimm, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Acute metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease can occur during intercurrent illness and is a medical emergency. A handful of reports in the medical literature describe the use of peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis as therapeutic inventions. We report the only patient from our centre to have haemodialysis performed in this setting. Combined with dietary BCAA restriction and calorific support, haemodialysis allows rapid reduction in plasma leucine concentrations considerably faster than conservative methods. PMID:26937409

  2. Haemodialysis is an effective treatment in acute metabolic decompensation of maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Atwal, P S; Macmurdo, C; Grimm, P C

    2015-09-01

    Acute metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease can occur during intercurrent illness and is a medical emergency. A handful of reports in the medical literature describe the use of peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis as therapeutic inventions. We report the only patient from our centre to have haemodialysis performed in this setting. Combined with dietary BCAA restriction and calorific support, haemodialysis allows rapid reduction in plasma leucine concentrations considerably faster than conservative methods. PMID:26937409

  3. Endotoxaemia and acute pancreatitis: correlation between the severity of the disease and the anti-enterobacterial common antigen antibody titre.

    PubMed Central

    Kivilaakso, E; Valtonen, V V; Malkamäki, M; Palmu, A; Schröder, T; Nikki, P; Mäkelä, P H; Lempinen, M

    1984-01-01

    Enterobacterial common antigen is a highly immunogenic component of the Gram negative bacterial cell wall that is common to all enteric bacteria. In the present study, the humoral antibody response against enteric bacteria was investigated by measuring antibodies to enterobacterial common antigen in paired serum samples in 38 patients with acute pancreatitis and in 31 healthy subjects. In mild pancreatitis (11 patients), no changes in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres were observed as compared with healthy controls. Nine of the 10 patients had a significant increase (greater than or equal to 8 times) in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres during the disease. Similarly, in patients with fulminant (haemorrhagic) pancreatitis who survived, a significant increase in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres occurred during the course of the disease (in nine of the 11 patients). Paradoxically, only one of the six patients with fulminant pancreatitis with fatal outcome showed a significant increase in his anti-enterobacterial common antigen titre. The results suggest that Gram negative bacterial components escape into the systemic circulation in acute pancreatitis. This may have pathophysiologic significance in this disease. PMID:6479681

  4. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  5. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with coronary aneurysm and stenosis due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Drossner, David M; Chappell, Clay; Rab, Tanveer; Kim, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of an acutely ill 3-year-old female, with a previous medical history of Kawasaki disease, who presented to care with an acute myocardial infarction. We describe the coordinated therapies employed by pediatric and adult cardiologists aimed to establish coronary revascularization.

  6. Fentanyl Iontophoretic Transdermal System: A Review in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-04-01

    Fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) [Ionsys(®)] is indicated for the management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital setting. This article reviews the clinical use of fentanyl ITS for postoperative pain management, and summarizes the pharmacology of fentanyl and the characteristics of the two-component fentanyl ITS (Ionsys(®)) device. In well-designed, multicentre clinical trials, fentanyl ITS was an effective and generally well tolerated method for managing acute postoperative pain in inpatients who had undergone major abdominal, thoracic or orthopaedic surgery. Overall, fentanyl ITS provided equivalent analgesic efficacy to that with morphine patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA), but was perceived to be more convenient/easier to use than morphine PCIA by patients, nurses and physical therapists. Patients receiving fentanyl ITS also had a greater ability to mobilize after surgery than patients receiving morphine PCIA. In addition, relative to morphine PCIA, fentanyl ITS offers advantages in terms of the noninvasive administrative route (i.e. transdermal needle-free administration), pre-programmed delivery (no risk of programming errors/incorrect dosing) and improved tolerability with regard to the overall incidence of opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs) and some individual ORAEs. Hence, fentanyl ITS is a useful option for the management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital setting.

  7. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  8. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI. PMID:26981437

  9. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  10. [Primary Central Nervous System Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yoshiko; Nakaya, Aya; Fujita, Shinya; Hotta, Masaaki; Fujita, Yukie; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with acute lymphocytic leukemia, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complained of nausea and blurred vision 288 days after the transplantation. Intracranial tumors were identified on brain MRI. She received whole brain radiation after open biopsy, but she died. The tumors had characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and she was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This disease is rare and has a poor outcome. Therefore, accumulation of cases and establishment of treatments for this condition are urgently needed.

  11. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  12. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-02-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32-0.41; P=0.0009-0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential role of

  13. Invasive fungal infection of the central nervous system in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Janik-Moszant, Anna; Matyl, Aleksander; Rurańska, Iwona; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka; Kluczewska, Ewa; Szczepański, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Although the new intensive chemotherapeutic programs introduced recently into hematooncological therapies have led to a higher number of recoveries, persistent neutropenia favours the spread of severe infections, frequently fungal infections. Systemic fungal infections in patients treated for proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system are characterised by a severe, progressing course and high morbidity. Case Reports: We present a case report that demonstrates the diagnostic problem of lesions in the central nervous system which developed following the fourth block of chemotherapy in an eight-year-old boy treated for acute myeloid leukaemia. The risk factors, high values of the inflammatory parameters and imaging results enabled us to diagnose a fungal infection of the central nervous system. Results: A fast improvement in the clinical condition of the patient after the applied antifungal therapy and the regression of lesions in the central nervous system shown in the imaging studies confirmed our final diagnosis. PMID:22802867

  14. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF.

  15. A mobile tomographic gamma camera system for acute studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, S.; Holmberg, M.; Larsson, H.

    1997-04-01

    A mobile tomographic gamma camera system, called Cardiotom Mark 1, has been developed for imaging the myocardium and other small organs. The Cardiotom system is based on a tomographic technique, ectomography, which is a limited view angle method using a rotating slant hole collimator (RSHC) and a stationary detector to produce projection images. This enables the ectomographic system to be implemented as a mobile system. With the system developed, almost 200 perfusion studies have been performed. The system is based on a second-hand detector and a 30{degree} RSHC. By segmenting the collimator, total system efficiency is increased and acquisition time can be reduced by a factor equal to the number of segments. The system developed is PC-based and totally self-contained with data acquisition, reconstruction, and image presentation. The mobility of the system and the fact that the examination requires no patient cooperation enable acute studies of myocardial perfusion in the critically ill patient, either in the intensive care unit or the emergency room. A mobile system with three-dimensional imaging can offer new possibilities in cardiological research and diagnosis.

  16. Phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone reverses mitochondrial decay in acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Popov, Vsevolod L; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanism(s) of mitochondrial functional decline in acute Chagas' disease. Our data show a substantial decline in respiratory complex activities (39 to 58%) and ATP (38%) content in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected murine hearts compared with normal controls. These metabolic alterations were associated with an approximately fivefold increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production rate, substantial oxidative insult of mitochondrial membranes and respiratory complex subunits, and >60% inhibition of mtDNA-encoded transcripts for respiratory complex subunits in infected myocardium. The antioxidant phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) arrested the oxidative damage-mediated loss in mitochondrial membrane integrity, preserved redox potential-coupled mitochondrial gene expression, and improved respiratory complex activities (47 to 95% increase) and cardiac ATP level (>or=40% increase) in infected myocardium. Importantly, PBN resulted twofold decline in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production rate in infected myocardium. Taken together, our data demonstrate the pathological significance of oxidative stress in metabolic decay and energy homeostasis in acute chagasic myocarditis and further suggest that oxidative injuries affecting mitochondrial integrity-dependent expression and activity of the respiratory complexes initiate a feedback cycle of electron transport chain inefficiency, increased reactive oxygen species production, and energy homeostasis in acute chagasic hearts. PBN and other mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may be useful in altering mitochondrial decay and oxidative pathology in Chagas' disease.

  17. Role of TNF in sickness behavior and allodynia during the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, H; Thomas, L E; Castillo, E; Cárdenas, E; Mogollón, F; Mijares, A

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with inflammation, discomfort and pain during the acute phase. The influence of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) in this disease outcome is controversial. In this way, the aim of this work was to determine the role of the TNF-α blocker etanercept in the pain, discomfort, and survival during the Chagas' acute phase of mice experimentally infected with a wild virulent strain of T. cruzi. The infection with this wild strain was responsible for a severe visceral inflammation and said parasite showed a tropism in peritoneal fluid cells. Etanercept was able to restore spontaneous vertical and horizontal activities during the second week after infection and to abolish mechanical allodynia during the first week after infection. Finally, etanercept delayed the mortality without any effect on the parasitemia rates. This is the first report that correlates sickness behavior and allodynia with TNF-α and suggests that this cytokine may play an important role in the physiopathology of the acute phase. PMID:23684908

  18. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders. PMID:24152019

  19. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders.

  20. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia.

  1. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  2. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  3. [EFFICIENCY OF COMBINATION OF ROFLUMILAST AND QUERCETIN FOR CORRECTION OXYGEN- INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF MACROPHAGE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WHEN COMBINED WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Gerych, P; Yatsyshyn, R

    2015-01-01

    Studied oxygen independent reaction and phagocytic activity of macrophage cells of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) II-III stage when combined with coronary heart disease (CHD). The increasing oxygen independent reactions monocytes and neutrophils and a decrease of the parameters that characterize the functional state of phagocytic cells, indicating a decrease in the functional capacity of macrophage phagocytic system (MPS) in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, which runs as its own or in combination with stable coronary heart disease angina I-II. FC. Severity immunodeficiency state in terms of cellular component of nonspecific immunity in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD II-III stage in conjunction with the accompanying CHD increases with the progression of heart failure. Inclusion of basic therapy of COPD exacerbation and standard treatment of coronary artery disease and drug combinations Roflumilastand quercetin causes normalization of phagocytic indices MFS, indicating improved immune status and improves myocardial perfusion in terms of daily ECG monitoring.

  4. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  5. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  6. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after hospitalization for acute exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Mirjam; Leuppi, Jörg D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to sum up the literature regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation. Guidelines recommend a follow-up 4-6 weeks after hospitalization to assess coping strategies, inhaler technique, the need for long-term oxygen therapy and the measurement of FEV(1). This review discusses the follow-up of patients with exacerbations of COPD, the use and value of spirometry in their further management, the potential benefit of home monitoring, the value of long-term oxygen therapy, the value of self-management programs including the use of action plans, the potential benefit of noninvasive ventilation as well as the value of early rehabilitation. There is not enough literature to allow specific recommendations and to define components of a care plan after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation; however, early rehabilitation should be included.

  7. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  8. The acute haemolytic syndrome in Wilson's disease--a review of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Walshe, J M

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of 321 case notes of patients with Wilson's disease seen between 1955 and 2000 and one case seen in 1949 has revealed that 22 patients presented with a haemolytic crisis. This study was not a specific research project but a retrospective analysis of 321 patients with Wilson's disease seen between 1949 and 2000. All investigations were carried out in the best interests of diagnosis and management of patients referred to my clinic. The delay in diagnosis in 18 cases resulted in progression to severe hepatic disease in 14 cases and to neurological disease in 4 cases. One patient had no symptoms at the time her sister's illness was diagnosed as Wilson's disease. In a second patient, with liver disease, the diagnosis was also made when a sister was found to have Wilson's disease. There was a female to male ratio of 15:7. The average age of onset was 12.6 years and the incidence 6.9%. Delay in diagnosis resulted in nine deaths. Three patients, late in the series, were admitted in the acute phase, two female and one male; of these two responded to chelation therapy, the third required liver transplantation. Haemolysis appeared to be extravascular, and possible mechanisms of the haemolysis are discussed.

  9. Diagnostic challenges of Wilson’s disease presenting as acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Nussinson, Elchanan; Shahbari, Azmi; Shibli, Fahmi; Chervinsky, Elena; Trougouboff, Philippe; Markel, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Wilson’s disease is a rare disorder of copper transport in hepatic cells, and may present as cholestatic liver disease; pancreatitis and cholangitis are rarely associated with Wilsons’s disease. Moreover, cases of Wilson’s disease presenting as pigmented gallstone pancreatitis have not been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with jaundice and abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and obstructive jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones that were detected during retrograde cholangiopancreatography. However, because of his long-term jaundice and the presence of pigmented gallstones, the patient underwent further evaluation for Wilson’s disease, which was subsequently confirmed. This patient’s unique presentation exemplifies the overlap in the clinical and laboratory parameters of Wilson’s disease and cholestasis, and the difficulties associated with their differentiation. It suggests that Wilson’s disease should be considered in patients with pancreatitis, cholangitis, and severe protracted jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones. PMID:24303094

  10. Health-related QOL in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doll, Helen; Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of emphasis on health-related QOL (HR-QOL) changes associated with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to examine the use of HR-QOL instruments to evaluate acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, so as to form recommendations for future research.A literature search of papers published between 1966 and July 2003 identified more than 300 articles that used acute exacerbation of CB or COPD as the search term. However, only 21 of these studies employed HR-QOL measures as predictors of outcome or in the assessment of the impact, evolution or treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD or CB. A variety of HR-QOL measures were used, both generic and disease specific. The disease-specific St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), devised for patients with stable CB and with a recall period of 1-12 months, was the most widely used measure, with the Chronic Respiratory disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnoea Index (BDI, TDI) being the only other disease-specific measures used. Most measures, both generic and disease specific, performed adequately when used during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD and indicated poor HR-QOL during acute exacerbation, which improved on resolution of the exacerbation. Relationships were evident between HR-QOL during an acute exacerbation and various outcomes, including post-exacerbation functional status, hospital re- admission for acute exacerbation or COPD, and mortality. There is a need for studies of treatments for acute exacerbation of CB or COPD to include an appropriate HR-QOL instrument to aid in the stratification of patients so as to target the right treatment to the right patient group. While a new instrument could be developed to measure HR-QOL during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, currently available disease-specific measures such as the CRQ and the SGRQ appear to be acceptable to patients during acute

  11. Legionnaire's disease and acute renal failure: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boucree, M C

    1988-10-01

    A case report is presented of a young man admitted to a general hospital with leukocytosis, elevated temperature, right lower lobe infiltrate, and confusion. A diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and Legionnaire's disease was made. The patient subsequently had a respiratory arrest and died on the 29th hospital day. This triad is currently an enigma in the field of internal medicine. The diagnosis of each entity is elusive, and in many cases must be made by the astute clinician. Diagnostic features along with early intervention measures and their expected outcomes are discussed. Recognition of the interrelationship of these diseases, risk factors, and vague clinical presentations might allow further prospective intervention methods and diagnostic procedures to be undertaken to avoid the fatal consequences seen in this disease triad.

  12. Anti-GBM Disease in Pregnancy: Acute Renal Failure Resolved After Plasma Exchange, Hemodialysis, and Steroids.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Mohammed Muqeet; Morton, Jordan; Hashmi, Syed; Abdul Mujeeb, Sufyan; Kern, William; Cowley, Benjamin D

    2016-01-01

    Antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease presenting during pregnancy is uncommon. We present a case of a pregnant female who presented with acute renal failure requiring dialysis due to anti-GBM disease. She responded well to plasma exchange, high-dose steroids, and hemodialysis. Cyclophosphamide was discussed but not given at the patient's request due to concerns for the well-being of the fetus. Unfortunately, she suffered a spontaneous abortion in her eighth week of pregnancy. Subsequently, she had progressive improvement in her renal function and became hemodialysis independent at 2 weeks after diagnosis. Her renal function returned to baseline 3 months after diagnosis. We present this case in detail and review the literature regarding anti-GBM disease in pregnancy. PMID:26788531

  13. Monitoring minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukaemia: a review of the current evolving strategies.

    PubMed

    Ommen, Hans Beier

    2016-02-01

    Several disease-monitoring techniques are available for the physician treating acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Besides immunohistochemistry assisted light microscopy, the past 20 years have seen the development and preclinical perfection of a number of techniques, most notably quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multicolor flow cytometry. Late additions to the group of applicable assays include next generation sequencing and digital PCR. In this review the principles of use of these modalities at three different time points during the AML disease course are discussed, namely at the time of treatment evaluation, pretransplantation and postconsolidation. The drawbacks and pitfalls of each different technique are delineated. The evidence or lack of evidence for minimal residual disease guided treatment decisions is discussed. Lastly, future strategies in the MRD field are suggested and commented upon.

  14. [Validation of a diagnostic scoring system (Ohmann score) in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Zielke, A; Sitter, H; Rampp, T A; Schäfer, E; Hasse, C; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    1999-07-01

    A diagnostic scoring system, recently published by Ohmann et al. in this journal, was validated by analyzing the clinicopathological data of a consecutive series of 2,359 patients, admitted for suspicion of acute appendicitis. The results of the scoring system were compared to the results of clinical evaluation by junior (provisional) and senior surgeons (final clinical diagnosis). To assess the diagnostic ability of the score, the accuracy and positive predictive value were defined as the major diagnostic performance parameters; the rate of theoretical negative laparotomies and that of diagnostic errors served as the major procedural performance parameters. Of 2,359 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis, 662 were proven to have acute appendicitis by histology, for a prevalence of 28%. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the provisional clinical diagnosis were 0.50, 0.94, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.82; 0.93, for the score 0.63, 0.93, 0.77, 0.86 and 0.84, and for the final clinical diagnosis 0.90, 0.94, 0.85, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Of the main diagnostic performance parameter, the accuracy of the score was significantly better than that of provisional clinical diagnosis (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The score yielded a rate of negative appendecomies and laparotomies of 14.3 and 12.3%. With respect to the rate of overlooked cases of acute apendicitis, the score demonstrated a superior performance, with only 6 cases missed (0.9%). However, the number of patients with acute appendicitis, including those with perforated disease, who were not identified by the score, was almost four times that of the final clinical diagnosis (245 vs 63). With regard to the main procedural performance parameter, the score resulted in a significantly smaller number of diagnostic errors than the provisional clinical investigator (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The results of this study indicate that the diagnostic scoring

  15. Acute coronary syndrome in Behcet’s disease caused by a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Bahar; Özen, Gülsen; Tekayev, Nazar; Gerçek, Şeyma; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis that can involve vessels of all sizes and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers with variable manifestations affecting the skin, eyes, and central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Vascular involvement in BD is reported to be up to 40% in different series. The abdominal and thoracic aorta and pulmonary and femoral arteries are the most commonly involved arteries. However coronary arteries are rarely affected. Herein, we present a 29-year-old man who was consulted with progressive severe chest pain of 3 days in duration to our clinic. The patient was diagnosed with BD with mucocutaneous symptoms and a positive pathergy test 1 year ago and was in clinical remission for the last 6 months. At the first evaluation in the emergency department, the patient’s vital signs were stable, whereas he had elevated troponin T levels with a normal electrocardiogram and hypokinetic areas in the apex of the heart in the echocardiography. Conventional and computed tomography coronary angiography revealed aneurysms and intramural thrombosis in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Although ischemic symptoms and signs improved with anticoagulant and antiaggregant therapies, coronary aneurysms were observed to increase in size. Immunosuppressive (IS) treatment was started with pulse intravenous corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Because of the high re-stenosis risk, stents were not applied to the affected vessels during the acute thrombosis period. During routine investigations, an in situ pulmonary thrombosis was also detected bilaterally in the peripheral pulmonary arteries. In conclusion, coronary artery aneurysm is a rare and poor prognostic manifestation of BD. The treatment protocol for these aneurysms is not well clarified. IS therapies are definitely indicated, but the role of anticoagulants and invasive vascular interventions is controversial.

  16. Eosinophils in the blood of hematopoietic stem cell transplanted patients are activated and have different molecular marker profiles in acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Cromvik, Julia; Johnsson, Marianne; Vaht, Krista; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Wennerås, Christine

    2014-01-01

    While increased numbers of eosinophils may be detected in patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, it is not known if eosinophils play a role in GVHD. The aims of this study were to determine: whether eosinophils are activated during GVHD; whether the patterns of activation are similar in acute and chronic GVHD; and the ways in which systemic corticosteroids affect eosinophils. Transplanted patients (n = 35) were investigated for eosinophil numbers and the expression levels of 16 eosinophilic cell surface markers using flow cytometry; all the eosinophil data were analyzed by the multivariate method OPLS-DA. Different patterns of molecule expression were observed on the eosinophils from patients with acute, chronic, and no GVHD, respectively. The molecules that provided the best discrimination between acute and chronic GVHD were: the activation marker CD9; adhesion molecules CD11c and CD18; chemokine receptor CCR3; and prostaglandin receptor CRTH2. Patients with acute or chronic GVHD who received systemic corticosteroid treatment showed down-regulation of the cell surface markers on their eosinophils, whereas corticosteroid treatment had no effect on the eosinophil phenotype in the patients without GVHD. In summary, eosinophils are activated in GVHD, display different activation profiles in acute and chronic GVHD, and are highly responsive to systemic corticosteroids. PMID:25400930

  17. Topical vs. systemic treatments for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Kathy; Parrish, Francie; Swords, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common condition in children that is often treated with systemic antibiotic therapy; however, research suggests that non-complicated AOM will resolve spontaneously using only eardrops. To determine best practice for the use of systematic antibiotics compared to topical treatment of AOM, a systematic review of evidence was conducted. Cochrane, Medline, CINAHL, and other databases were searched. Inclusion criteria were studies published from 1995-2010 that included children with AOM and were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five systematic reviews and five RCTs were included in the review. Current evidence recommends using topical and other alternative approaches for treating non-complicated AOM in children 2 years of age or older; however, many practitioners are not currently following these recommendations for various reasons. Additional research to address these reasons may help determine how to improve practitioner adherence to best practice evidence and guidelines to help reduce the unnecessary use of systemic antibiotics.

  18. Successful cord blood transplantation in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Shugo; Fujishima, Yukiteru; Suzuki, Yuzo; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Oyake, Tatsuo; Togawa, Ryou; Oyama, Kotaro; Ikai, Akio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in surgical corrections and supportive care for congenital heart disease have resulted in increasing numbers of adult survivors who may develop hematological malignancies. Treatments including chemotherapy for such patients may cause serious hemodynamic or cardiac complications, especially in those receiving stem cell transplantation. We present a 29-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and congenital heart disease. She had been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum at birth, and the anomaly was surgically corrected according to the Fontan technique at age 9 years. Her induction chemotherapy required modifications due to poor cardiac status with Fontan circulation. However, after surgical procedures including total cavopulmonary connection and aortic valve replacement at first complete remission, her cardiac status was significantly improved. Subsequently, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation at the third complete remission. She required intensive supportive care for circulatory failure as a pre-engraftment immune reaction and stage III acute graft versus host disease of the gut, but recovered from these complications. She was discharged on day 239, and remained in complete remission at 1-year post-transplantation. PMID:27599417

  19. Serial assessment of laser Doppler flow during acute pain crises in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Patricia Ann; Manwani, Deepa; Olowokure, Olugbenga; Nandi, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Changes in basal laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) of skin blood flow in sickle cell disease are reported to have pathophysiologic relevance in pain crisis. This is the first study to strictly control for LDF variability in determining the value of serial, basal (unprovoked) skin LDF as a practical method to assess resolution of acute pain crisis in sickle cell patients. Daily LDF measurements were repeated on the exact same skin areas of the calf and forehead throughout each of 12 hospital admissions for uncomplicated acute pain crisis. A progressive increase in perfusion was observed in the calf throughout hospitalization as pain crisis resolved, but measurement reproducibility in the calf was poor. Reproducibility in the forehead was better, but no significant trend over time in perfusion was seen. There was no significant correlation between perfusion and pain scores over time. There was also no significant pattern of LDF oscillations over time. In conclusion, only perfusion units and not oscillatory pattern of LDF has probable pathophysiological significance in sickle cell disease vaso-occlusion. The reproducibility of basal skin LDF specifically in sickle cell disease needs to be confirmed. PMID:24857171

  20. Serial assessment of laser Doppler flow during acute pain crises in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Patricia Ann; Manwani, Deepa; Olowokure, Olugbenga; Nandi, Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Changes in basal laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) of skin blood flow in sickle cell disease are reported to have pathophysiologic relevance in pain crisis. This is the first study to strictly control for LDF variability in determining the value of serial, basal (unprovoked) skin LDF as a practical method to assess resolution of acute pain crisis in sickle cell patients. Daily LDF measurements were repeated on the exact same skin areas of the calf and forehead throughout each of 12 hospital admissions for uncomplicated acute pain crisis. A progressive increase in perfusion was observed in the calf throughout hospitalization as pain crisis resolved, but measurement reproducibility in the calf was poor. Reproducibility in the forehead was better, but no significant trend over time in perfusion was seen. There was no significant correlation between perfusion and pain scores over time. There was also no significant pattern of LDF oscillations over time. In conclusion, only perfusion units and not oscillatory patterns of LDF have probable pathophysiological significance in sickle cell disease vaso-occlusion. The reproducibility of basal skin LDF specifically in sickle cell disease needs to be confirmed.

  1. Spectrum of glomerular diseases causing acute kidney injury; 25 years experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Rubina; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ahmed, Ejaz; Akhtar, Fazal; Bhatti, Sajid; Naqvi, Anwar; Rizvi, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in nephro-urological practice. Its incidence, prevalence and etiology vary widely, mainly due to variations in the definitions of AKI. Objectives: We aim to report the spectrum of glomerular diseases presenting as AKI at a kidney referral center in Pakistan. Patients and Methods: An observational cohort of patients identified as having AKI which was defined according to RIFLE criteria, with normal size, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, along with active urine sediment, edema and new onset hypertension. Results: From 1990 to 2014, 236 cases of AKI secondary to acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) registered at this institution. Mean age of patients was 27.94± 12.79 years and M:F ratio was 0.77:1. Thirty percent patients revealed crescents on renal biopsy. AGN without crescents was seen in 33.05% of cases. Postinfectious GN was found in 14.4%, lupus nephritis in 8.5% and mesangiocapillary GN in 3.4% cases. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) required in 75.84% patients. Pulse steroids were given in 45.33% cases followed by oral steroids. Pulse cyclophoshphamide was given in 23.7% cases and plasmapheresis was used in 3.38% cases. Complete recovery was seen in 44%, while 11.44% died during acute phase of illness. About 19.49 % developed chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 25.84% were lost to long- term follow-up. Conclusion: Although glomerular diseases contribute only 4.19 % of total AKI at this center, morbidity associated with illness and its treatment is more marked than other AKI groups. Another notable factor is late referral of these patients to specialized centers resulting in undesirable outcome. PMID:26693497

  2. Systems Biology of Meridians, Acupoints, and Chinese Herbs in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Ya-Hui; Lai, Chi-Yu; Chau, Chan-Lao; Su, Guan-Chin; Yang, Chun-Yi; Lou, Shu-Ying; Chen, Szu-Kai; Hsu, Kuan-Hao; Lai, Yen-Ling; Wu, Wei-Ming; Huang, Jian-Long; Liao, Chih-Hsin; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Meridians, acupoints, and Chinese herbs are important components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). They have been used for disease treatment and prevention and as alternative and complementary therapies. Systems biology integrates omics data, such as transcriptional, proteomic, and metabolomics data, in order to obtain a more global and complete picture of biological activity. To further understand the existence and functions of the three components above, we reviewed relevant research in the systems biology literature and found many recent studies that indicate the value of acupuncture and Chinese herbs. Acupuncture is useful in pain moderation and relieves various symptoms arising from acute spinal cord injury and acute ischemic stroke. Moreover, Chinese herbal extracts have been linked to wound repair, the alleviation of postmenopausal osteoporosis severity, and anti-tumor effects, among others. Different acupoints, variations in treatment duration, and herbal extracts can be used to alleviate various symptoms and conditions and to regulate biological pathways by altering gene and protein expression. Our paper demonstrates how systems biology has helped to establish a platform for investigating the efficacy of TCM in treating different diseases and improving treatment strategies. PMID:23118787

  3. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Morphologic, immunologic, and cytogenetic characteristics of secondary acute unclassifiable leukemia in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Orazi, A; Cattoretti, G; Sozzi, G; Miozzo, M; Polli, N; Delia, D; Viviani, S; Negretti, E; Della Porta, G; Rilke, F

    1988-08-31

    Blast cells from five cases of secondary unclassifiable leukemia following therapy for Hodgkin's disease were studied by cytochemical, immunological and cytogenetic analyses. Cytochemical and immunological reactivity were in accordance with poorly differentiated, myeloid blasts. The four cases in which karyotype analysis was performed showed specific chromosomal abnormalities. No evidence of multiple lineage involvement was found. Problems in classifying these cases of secondary ANLL were due to the high grade of undifferentiation of the blast cells. Their low cytochemical reactivity with markers of myeloid differentiation was similar to what may be observed in patients with acute undifferentiated leukemia or with chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis.

  5. The cell biology of disease: Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies.

    PubMed

    de Thé, Hugues; Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation.

  6. Endothelial-cell injury in cutaneous acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. S.; Beschorner, W. E.; Farmer, E. R.; Di Gennaro, K. A.; Saral, R.; Santos, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of an erythematous skin rash and hemorrhagic complications in acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) suggest that the vasculature may be involved in the immunopathologic process. We reviewed endothelial and vascular histopathologic changes on light microscopy and on immunoperoxidase stained sections of skin biopsies obtained from 41 HLA-identical allogeneic marrow transplant recipients with at least grade 2 GVHD. Biopsies taken from 14 allogeneic HLA-identical bone marrow transplant recipients who never developed GVHD were used as controls. Sections were evaluated for evidence of immunologic vascular injury using the rank file analysis of histologic features, expression of HLA-DR antigen, and the distribution of fibrin and factor VIII-related antigen (F VIII RAg). Patients with acute GVHD had significantly greater intimal lymphocytic infiltrates, perivascular nuclear dust deposition, perivascular F VIII Rag extravasation and deposition and vascular proliferation than controls. We find significantly greater endothelial injury in GVHD patients, which may represent primary immunologic injury to the vasculature. The clinical findings in acute GVHD probably result from cumulative endothelial as well as epithelial injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2596572

  7. Methanobactin reverses acute liver failure in a rat model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Lichtmannegger, Josef; Leitzinger, Christin; Wimmer, Ralf; Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Eberhagen, Carola; Rieder, Tamara; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Straub, Beate K.; Schirmacher, Peter; DiSpirito, Alan A.; Bandow, Nathan; Baral, Bipin S.; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Denk, Gerald; Reiter, Florian P.; Hohenester, Simon; Eckardt-Schupp, Friedericke; Dencher, Norbert A.; Sauer, Vanessa; Niemietz, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H.J.; Merle, Uta; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Kroemer, Guido; Weiss, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    In Wilson disease (WD), functional loss of ATPase copper-transporting β (ATP7B) impairs biliary copper excretion, leading to excessive copper accumulation in the liver and fulminant hepatitis. Current US Food and Drug Administration– and European Medicines Agency–approved pharmacological treatments usually fail to restore copper homeostasis in patients with WD who have progressed to acute liver failure, leaving liver transplantation as the only viable treatment option. Here, we investigated the therapeutic utility of methanobactin (MB), a peptide produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, which has an exceptionally high affinity for copper. We demonstrated that ATP7B-deficient rats recapitulate WD-associated phenotypes, including hepatic copper accumulation, liver damage, and mitochondrial impairment. Short-term treatment of these rats with MB efficiently reversed mitochondrial impairment and liver damage in the acute stages of liver copper accumulation compared with that seen in untreated ATP7B-deficient rats. This beneficial effect was associated with depletion of copper from hepatocyte mitochondria. Moreover, MB treatment prevented hepatocyte death, subsequent liver failure, and death in the rodent model. These results suggest that MB has potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute WD. PMID:27322060

  8. Methanobactin reverses acute liver failure in a rat model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Lichtmannegger, Josef; Leitzinger, Christin; Wimmer, Ralf; Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Kabiri, Yaschar; Eberhagen, Carola; Rieder, Tamara; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Straub, Beate K; Schirmacher, Peter; DiSpirito, Alan A; Bandow, Nathan; Baral, Bipin S; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Denk, Gerald; Reiter, Florian P; Hohenester, Simon; Eckardt-Schupp, Friedericke; Dencher, Norbert A; Adamski, Jerzy; Sauer, Vanessa; Niemietz, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Merle, Uta; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Kroemer, Guido; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Zischka, Hans

    2016-07-01

    In Wilson disease (WD), functional loss of ATPase copper-transporting β (ATP7B) impairs biliary copper excretion, leading to excessive copper accumulation in the liver and fulminant hepatitis. Current US Food and Drug Administration- and European Medicines Agency-approved pharmacological treatments usually fail to restore copper homeostasis in patients with WD who have progressed to acute liver failure, leaving liver transplantation as the only viable treatment option. Here, we investigated the therapeutic utility of methanobactin (MB), a peptide produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, which has an exceptionally high affinity for copper. We demonstrated that ATP7B-deficient rats recapitulate WD-associated phenotypes, including hepatic copper accumulation, liver damage, and mitochondrial impairment. Short-term treatment of these rats with MB efficiently reversed mitochondrial impairment and liver damage in the acute stages of liver copper accumulation compared with that seen in untreated ATP7B-deficient rats. This beneficial effect was associated with depletion of copper from hepatocyte mitochondria. Moreover, MB treatment prevented hepatocyte death, subsequent liver failure, and death in the rodent model. These results suggest that MB has potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute WD. PMID:27322060

  9. Oral infections and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Palle; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Andersen, Lone; Skuldbøl, Tanja; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2003-07-01

    An association between periodontal infection and CVD has been revealed in some epidemiologic studies, whereas other studies were unable to demonstrate such an association. A link between the two diseases may be explained by shared established or nonestablished risk factors. Future studies with extended control of confounding factors and intervention studies may add to the understanding of a possible relationship between the diseases. In some cases, IE is caused by dental plaque bacteria. Several studies are suggestive of oral bacteria causing respiratory infection. The pathogenesis and course of a number of other diseases including DM and rheumatoid arthritis have been associated wish periodontitis, but more research is necessary to elucidate possible pathogenic interactions. PMID:12848466

  10. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  11. Isolated central nervous system relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sang-Hyun; Jang, In-Seok

    2014-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of childhood cancer and may exhibit central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Advances in chemotherapy and effective CNS prophylaxis have significantly decreased the incidence of CNS relapse of ALL to 5-10%. Here, we report the case of a patient with isolated CNS relapse of standard risk group pre-B-cell type ALL in an 11-year-old girl, relapsed 3 years after successful completion of chemotherapy. An 11-year-old girl visited our hospital complaining of headache, dizziness, vomiting, and visual field defects. Neurological examination revealed left-side homonymous hemianopsia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a large irregular dural-based sulcal hematoma in the right parietal and occipital lobes. Surgery to remove the hematoma revealed the existence of hematopoietic malignancy after pathologic evaluation. Bone marrow biopsy was subsequently performed but showed no evidence of malignancy. PMID:25408936

  12. Viral diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Phillip A; McGavern, Dorian B

    2015-04-01

    Virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a significant burden to human health worldwide. The complexity of these diseases is influenced by the sheer number of different neurotropic viruses, the diverse routes of CNS entry, viral tropism, and the immune system. Using a combination of human pathological data and experimental animal models, we have begun to uncover many of the mechanisms that viruses use to enter the CNS and cause disease. This review highlights a selection of neurotropic viruses that infect the CNS and explores the means by which they induce neurological diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis.

  13. [The combined treatment of acute suppurative diseases of the fingers and hand using decamethoxin].

    PubMed

    Fishchenko, A Ia; Paliĭ, G K; Kravets, V P

    1992-03-01

    The authors discuss the results of complex treatment of 286 patients with acute pyoinflammatory diseases of the fingers and hand with the use of a new Soviet-produced antiseptic decametoxin. Panaris was diagnosed in 196 (68.5%), phlegmons and abscesses in 82 (29.7%), furuncle in 6 (2.1%) and carbuncle in 2 (0.7%) patients. 224 (78.4%) patients received out-patient and 62 (21.6%) in-patient treatment. The authors established that as the result of the applied complex treatment with the use of various antiseptic compositions containing decametoxin the mean duration of treatment was 7.8 days. The article discusses the causes of the disease, the methods of operative treatment, and management of patients in the postoperative period.

  14. Quantitative assessment of relative roles of drivers of acute respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Prashant; Baruah, Jurismita

    2014-10-01

    Several thousands of people, including children, suffer from acute respiratory disease (ARD) every year worldwide. Pro-active planning and mitigation for these diseases require identification of the major drivers in a location-specific manner. While the importance of air pollutants in ARD has been extensively studied and emphasized, the role of weather variables has been less explored. With Delhi with its large population and pollution as a test case, we examine the relative roles of air pollution and weather (cold days) in ARD. It is shown that both the number of cold days and air pollution play important roles in ARD load; however, the number of cold days emerges as the major driver. These conclusions are consistent with analyses for several other states in India. The robust association between ARD load and cold days provides basis for estimating and predicting ARD load through dynamical model, as well as impact of climate change.

  15. [Acute conditions after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Bujdák, P; Pribylincová, V; Reznícek, J; Miklosi, M; Breza, J

    2003-05-01

    There is a high risk of severe complications after kidney transplantation. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) the incidence of complications like ischaemic cardiac disease, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, perforation of colonic diverticulosis is especially higher. The authors want to indicate another specific complication, rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Within the group of 658 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1981 and January 2000 there were 54 (8.2%) patients with AD-PKD. Four patients with severe retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney we present in a short case reports. All cases were fatal. Expect morphologic and functional follow up of the graft it is necessary to follow up polycystic kidney and indicate urgent nephrectomy in the case of any change.

  16. Mitochondrion-Permeable Antioxidants to Treat ROS-Burst-Mediated Acute Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and cytokine outbreak, such as during virus infections, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, antioxidant is an important medicine to ROS-related diseases. For example, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, VC) was suggested as the candidate antioxidant to treat multiple diseases. However, long-term use of high-dose VC causes many side effects. In this review, we compare and analyze all kinds of mitochondrion-permeable antioxidants, including edaravone, idebenone, α-Lipoic acid, carotenoids, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10, and mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ and SkQ and propose astaxanthin (a special carotenoid) to be the best antioxidant for ROS-burst-mediated acute diseases, like avian influenza infection and ischemia-reperfusion. Nevertheless, astaxanthins are so unstable that most of them are inactivated after oral administration. Therefore, astaxanthin injection is suggested hypothetically. The drawbacks of the antioxidants are also reviewed, which limit the use of antioxidants as coadjuvants in the treatment of ROS-associated disorders.

  17. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups.

  18. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: An Italian position statement

    PubMed Central

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the “6-mo rule”. Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The “Group of Italian Regions” suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  19. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  20. Mitochondrion-Permeable Antioxidants to Treat ROS-Burst-Mediated Acute Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and cytokine outbreak, such as during virus infections, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, antioxidant is an important medicine to ROS-related diseases. For example, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, VC) was suggested as the candidate antioxidant to treat multiple diseases. However, long-term use of high-dose VC causes many side effects. In this review, we compare and analyze all kinds of mitochondrion-permeable antioxidants, including edaravone, idebenone, α-Lipoic acid, carotenoids, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10, and mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ and SkQ and propose astaxanthin (a special carotenoid) to be the best antioxidant for ROS-burst-mediated acute diseases, like avian influenza infection and ischemia-reperfusion. Nevertheless, astaxanthins are so unstable that most of them are inactivated after oral administration. Therefore, astaxanthin injection is suggested hypothetically. The drawbacks of the antioxidants are also reviewed, which limit the use of antioxidants as coadjuvants in the treatment of ROS-associated disorders. PMID:26649144

  1. Mitochondrion-Permeable Antioxidants to Treat ROS-Burst-Mediated Acute Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Liu, Ting; Yuan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and cytokine outbreak, such as during virus infections, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, antioxidant is an important medicine to ROS-related diseases. For example, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, VC) was suggested as the candidate antioxidant to treat multiple diseases. However, long-term use of high-dose VC causes many side effects. In this review, we compare and analyze all kinds of mitochondrion-permeable antioxidants, including edaravone, idebenone, α-Lipoic acid, carotenoids, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10, and mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ and SkQ and propose astaxanthin (a special carotenoid) to be the best antioxidant for ROS-burst-mediated acute diseases, like avian influenza infection and ischemia-reperfusion. Nevertheless, astaxanthins are so unstable that most of them are inactivated after oral administration. Therefore, astaxanthin injection is suggested hypothetically. The drawbacks of the antioxidants are also reviewed, which limit the use of antioxidants as coadjuvants in the treatment of ROS-associated disorders. PMID:26649144

  2. Synthetic Reconstruction of Zoonotic and Early Human Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Isolates That Produce Fatal Disease in Aged Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Rockx, Barry; Sheahan, Timothy; Donaldson, Eric; Harkema, Jack; Sims, Amy; Heise, Mark; Pickles, Raymond; Cameron, Mark; Kelvin, David; Baric, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic was characterized by high mortality rates in the elderly. The molecular mechanisms that govern enhanced susceptibility of elderly populations are not known, and robust animal models are needed that recapitulate the increased pathogenic phenotype noted with increasing age. Using synthetic biology and reverse genetics, we describe the construction of a panel of isogenic SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strains bearing variant spike glycoproteins that are representative of zoonotic strains found in palm civets and raccoon dogs, as well as isolates spanning the early, middle, and late phases of the SARS-CoV epidemic. The recombinant viruses replicated efficiently in cell culture and demonstrated variable sensitivities to neutralization with antibodies. The human but not the zoonotic variants replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cultures, supporting earlier hypotheses that zoonotic isolates are less pathogenic in humans but can evolve into highly pathogenic strains. All viruses replicated efficiently, but none produced clinical disease or death in young animals. In contrast, severe clinical disease, diffuse alveolar damage, hyaline membrane formation, alveolitis, and death were noted in 12-month-old mice inoculated with the palm civet HC/SZ/61/03 strain or early-human-phase GZ02 variants but not with related middle- and late-phase epidemic or raccoon dog strains. This panel of SARS-CoV recombinants bearing zoonotic and human epidemic spike glycoproteins will provide heterologous challenge models for testing vaccine efficacy against zoonotic reintroductions as well as provide the appropriate model system for elucidating the complex virus-host interactions that contribute to more-severe and fatal SARS-CoV disease and acute respiratory distress in the elderly. PMID:17507479

  3. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  4. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  5. [Acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa in a case of von Willebrand's disease].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, N; Mine, T; Ikeda, E; Iwai, H; Kusano, S

    1988-01-01

    A rare case of acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with von Willebrand's disease is reported. A 9-year-old boy fell down and hit his occipital region against a floor. Soon after he came home and slept, but three hours later he began to vomit and became drowsiness. He visited our hospital and his Glasgow Coma Scale showed 13 points. CT scan on admission showed acute epidural hematoma of left posterior fossa and contusional hematoma in the right temporal lobe. The bleeding time was over 18 minutes. He had been suspected to be suffering from von Willebrand's disease two years ago. Then fresh blood, fresh frozen plasma and anti-hemophilic globulin were prepared. Ten hours after injury, the operation was begun. Fresh epidural hematoma existed as a clot beyond transverse sinus. During the procedure of dural tenting suture, diffuse bleeding from bone, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and dura occurred and it was difficult to stop the bleeding. By using fresh blood and anti-hemophilic globulin, the bleeding was controlled, and then the operation was achieved. In the postoperative course a new epidural hematoma was found in the left temporal region and a new but asymptomatic retinal hemorrhage was found in his right eye. He was discharged without any neurological deficits 25 days after operation.

  6. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with giant coronary aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Mongiovì, Maurizio; Alaimo, Annalisa; Vernuccio, Federica; Pieri, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of acute myocardial infarction in an 8-year-old boy with a history of Kawasaki disease and giant coronary aneurysms in the right and left coronary arteries. We performed coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention 4 hours after the onset of symptoms. This case suggests that primary percutaneous coronary intervention might be safe and effective in the long-term treatment of acute myocardial infarction due to coronary sequelae of Kawasaki.

  7. Follicular Mucinosis in a Male Adolescent with a History of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Julie; Taube, Janis; Grossberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Although many cases of follicular mucinosis are idiopathic, numerous others are associated with mycosis fungoides or, rarely, other neoplastic or inflammatory disorders. There are only three reported cases, all in adults, of follicular mucinosis arising in association with acute myelogenous leukemia, two of which involved mycosis fungoides-associated follicular mucinosis, including one case in which the patient had a preceding bone marrow transplant. We present the first reported case of follicular mucinosis arising in an adolescent with acute myelogenous leukemia and acute graft-versus-host disease after an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26645410

  8. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Methods: Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. Results: In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. Conclusions: A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes. PMID:25674124

  9. Markers of acute neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: a multidisciplinary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abda, Essam A; Selim, Zahraa I; Radwan, Moustafa E M; Mahmoud, Nagham M; Herdan, Omar M; Mohamad, Khalid A; Hamed, Sherifa A

    2013-05-01

    This study was aimed to assess: (1) the additive diagnostic utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) over conventional MRI in detecting brain lesions in patients with acute primary neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE), and (2) the relevance of their findings to the associated NP manifestations. Included were 34 patients with acute NPSLE with mean age of 33.26 ± 10.14 years and duration of illness of 3.33 ± 1.71 years. Clinical interviewing and psychiatric and cognitive evaluations were performed by applying the criteria of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental health disorders criteria (DSM-IV), Stanford Binet Subset Testing, Mini-Mental State Examination and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised. Serologic tests included looking for antinuclear antibodies, anti-double strand DNA, anti-phospholipid antibodies. Radiologic evaluation included conventional MRI, DWI and MRA. One or more NP manifestations were diagnosed in 28 patients, in which cognitive deficits were reported with headache, psychosis and CVS. Anti-phospholipid antibodies were reported in patients with CVS. Twenty patients (71.43 %) with primary NPSLE (n = 28) had MRI abnormalities in which hyperintense signals at subcortical and periventricular white matter and at the junction between the gray and white matter represented 75 % (n = 15) and with headache (n = 6), psychosis (n = 6) and acute confusional state (n = 3) with and without cognitive deficits, respectively. Moderate-sized infarctions with restricted diffusion in the distribution of middle cerebral arteries were represented in 35 % (n = 7) and with CVS, of them, 71.43 % (n = 5) had beading and focal narrowing of carotid arteries were consistent with vasculitis. Brain atrophy represented 20 % (n = 4) and with psychosis. Compared to those with normal MRI, patients with MRI abnormalities were older (P < 0.050) and had longer duration of illness (P < 0.050). To conclude, although DWI

  10. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  11. Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Watcharakorn, Arvemas; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews the characteristic imaging appearances of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system, including cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, cystic echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, amebiasis, malariasis, sparganosis, paragonimiasis, and American and African trypanosomiases. Routine precontrast and postcontrast MR imaging helps in localization, characterization, delineation of extension, and follow-up of the parasitic lesions. Moreover, recently developed tools, such as diffusion, perfusion, and MR spectroscopy, help to differentiate parasitic diseases of the central nervous system from simulating lesions. Combining imaging findings with geographic prevalence, clinical history, and serologic tests is required for diagnosis of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system.

  12. Behçet's Disease Presenting with Acute Transverse Myelitis: MRI Findings and Review of the Nosology. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sanal, H T; Bulakbasi, N; Kocaoglu, M; Tayfun, C

    2007-04-30

    Spinal cord involvement, either isolated or together with brain, in Behçet's disease (BD) has been reported. In these cases the existence of the disease was previously known or the classical triad of disease such as oral and genital ulcers with uveitis/iritis was present. Here we describe a 22-year-old man in whom acute transverse myelitis diagnosed with MRI was the first finding of BD. PMID:24299651

  13. Detection of minimal residual disease in NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Fromm, Jonathan R; Shendure, Jay; Wood, Brent L; Wu, David

    2014-11-01

    Detection of minimal residual disease predicts adverse outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Currently, minimal residual disease may be detected by RQ-PCR or flow cytometry, both of which have practical and diagnostic limitations. Here, we describe a next-generation sequencing assay for minimal residual disease detection in NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia, which encompasses ∼60% of patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia. Exon 12 of NPM1 was PCR amplified using sequencing adaptor-linked primers and deep sequenced to enable detection of low-prevalence, acute myeloid leukemia-specific activating mutations. We benchmarked our results against flow cytometry, the standard of care for acute myeloid leukemia minimal residual disease diagnosis at our institution. The performance of both approaches was evaluated using defined dilutions of an NPM1 mutation-positive cell line and longitudinal clinical samples from acute myeloid leukemia patients. Using defined control material, we found this assay sensitive to approximately 0.001% mutant cells, outperforming flow cytometry by an order of magnitude. Next-generation sequencing was precise and semiquantitative over four orders of magnitude. In 22 longitudinal samples from six acute myeloid leukemia patients, next-generation sequencing detected minimal residual disease in all samples deemed negative by flow cytometry. Further, in one-third of patients, sequencing detected alternate NPM1 mutations in addition to the patient's index mutation, consistent with tumor heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing provides information without prior knowledge of NPM1 mutation subtype or validation of allele-specific probes as required for RQ-PCR assays, and without generation and interpretation of complex multidimensional flow cytometry data. This approach may complement current technologies to enhance patient-specific clinical decision-making.

  14. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children’s hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists. PMID:26936083

  15. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  16. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) registry--leading the charge for National Cardiovascular Disease (NCVD) Database.

    PubMed

    Chin, S P; Jeyaindran, S; Azhari, R; Wan Azman, W A; Omar, I; Robaayah, Z; Sim, K H

    2008-09-01

    Coronary artery disease is one of the most rampant non-communicable diseases in the world. It begins indolently as a fatty streak in the lining of the artery that soon progresses to narrow the coronary arteries and impair myocardial perfusion. Often the atherosclerotic plaque ruptures and causes sudden thrombotic occlusion and acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI) or unstable angina (UA). This phenomenon is called acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and is the leading cause of death not only in Malaysia but also globally. In order for us to tackle this threat to the health of our nation we must arm ourselves with reliable and accurate information to assess current burden of disease resources available and success of current strategies. The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) registry is the flagship of the National Cardiovascular Disease Database (NCVD) and is the result of the dedicated and untiring efforts of doctors and nurses in both public and private medical institutions and hospitals around the country, ably guided and supported by the National Heart Association, the National Heart Foundation, the Clinical Research Centre and the Ministry of Health of Malaysia. Analyses of data collected throughout 2006 from 3422 patients with ACS admitted to the 12 tertiary cardiac centres and general hospitals spanning nine states in Malaysia in this first report has already revealed surprising results. Mean age of patients was 59 years while the most consistent risk factor for STEMI was active smoking. Utilization of medications was high generally. Thirty-day mortality for STEMI was 11%, for NSTEMI 8% and UA 4%. Thrombolysis (for STEMI only) reduced in-hospital and 30-day mortality by nearly 50%. Percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI also reduced 30-day mortality for patients with non-ST elevation MI and unstable angina. The strongest determinants of mortality appears to be Killip Class and age of the patient. Fewer women received

  17. Nervous system Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease, and none of the above.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, causes nervous system involvement in 10-15 % of identified infected individuals. Not unlike the other well-known spirochetosis, syphilis, infection can be protracted, but is microbiologically curable in virtually all patients, regardless of disease duration. Diagnosis relies on 2-tier serologic testing, which after the first 4-6 weeks of infection is both highly sensitive and specific. After this early, acute phase, serologic testing should rely only on IgG reactivity. Nervous system involvement most commonly presents with meningitis, cranial neuritis and radiculoneuritis, but can also present with a broader array of peripheral nervous system manifestations. Central nervous system infection typically elicits a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and, often, intrathecal production of specific antibody, findings that should not be expected in disease not affecting the CNS. Treatment with recommended courses of oral or, when necessary, parenteral antibiotics is highly effective. The attribution of chronic, non-specific symptoms to "chronic Lyme disease", in the absence of specific evidence of ongoing B. burgdorferi infection, is inappropriate and unfortunate, leading not only to unneeded treatment and its associated complications, but also to missed opportunities for more appropriate management of patients' often disabling symptoms.

  18. Nervous system Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease, and none of the above.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, causes nervous system involvement in 10-15 % of identified infected individuals. Not unlike the other well-known spirochetosis, syphilis, infection can be protracted, but is microbiologically curable in virtually all patients, regardless of disease duration. Diagnosis relies on 2-tier serologic testing, which after the first 4-6 weeks of infection is both highly sensitive and specific. After this early, acute phase, serologic testing should rely only on IgG reactivity. Nervous system involvement most commonly presents with meningitis, cranial neuritis and radiculoneuritis, but can also present with a broader array of peripheral nervous system manifestations. Central nervous system infection typically elicits a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and, often, intrathecal production of specific antibody, findings that should not be expected in disease not affecting the CNS. Treatment with recommended courses of oral or, when necessary, parenteral antibiotics is highly effective. The attribution of chronic, non-specific symptoms to "chronic Lyme disease", in the absence of specific evidence of ongoing B. burgdorferi infection, is inappropriate and unfortunate, leading not only to unneeded treatment and its associated complications, but also to missed opportunities for more appropriate management of patients' often disabling symptoms. PMID:26377699

  19. Acute and Chronic Ophthalmic Involvement in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis - A Comprehensive Review and Guide to Therapy. II. Ophthalmic Disease.

    PubMed

    Kohanim, Sahar; Palioura, Sotiria; Saeed, Hajirah N; Akpek, Esen K; Amescua, Guillermo; Basu, Sayan; Blomquist, Preston H; Bouchard, Charles S; Dart, John K; Gai, Xiaowu; Gomes, José A P; Gregory, Darren G; Iyer, Geetha; Jacobs, Deborah S; Johnson, Anthony J; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mantagos, Iason S; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Perez, Victor L; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Sangwan, Virender S; Sippel, Kimberly C; Sotozono, Chie; Srinivasan, Bhaskar; Tan, Donald T H; Tandon, Radhika; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Ueta, Mayumi; Chodosh, James

    2016-04-01

    Our purpose is to comprehensively review the state of the art with regard to Stevens- Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), with particular attention to improving the management of associated ocular surface complications. SJS and TEN are two ends of a spectrum of immune-mediated disease, characterized in the acute phase by a febrile illness followed by skin and mucous membrane necrosis and detachment. Part I of this review focused on the systemic aspects of SJS/TEN and was published in the January 2016 issue of this journal. The purpose of Part II is to summarize the ocular manifestations and their management through all phases of SJS/TEN, from acute to chronic. We hope this effort will assist ophthalmologists in their management of SJS/TEN, so that patients with this complex and debilitating disease receive the best possible care and experience the most optimal outcomes in their vision and quality of life. PMID:26882981

  20. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  1. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sivagnanalingam, Umayal; Balys, Marlene; Eberhardt, Allison; Wang, Nancy; Myers, Jason R.; Ashton, John M.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.; Mendler, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH). Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26177509

  2. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  3. [Acute hemolytic crisis followed by fulminant hepatic failure with fatal outcome, as a first clinical manifestation of Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    de Andrade Júnior, D R; Fujita Neto, F G; Vieira, G S; Tibério, I F; Warth, M P; Calich, I

    1994-01-01

    We describe in this work a clinical case of a female patient aged 21 years, bearer of Wilson's disease, a first clinical manifestation of the disease occurred as an acute hemolytic crisis followed by fulminant hepatic failure evolving to death after 26 days' internment. The definitive diagnosis was obtained only as a quantitative measurement of hepatic copper from the necropsy material. The search for Kayser-Fleischer ring was negative and the serum ceruloplasmin level was 9 mg/dl (15 to 60). No involvement of the central nervous system was noted from the pathologic analysis. The patient presented two Coombs negative hemolytic crises during the internment; the first on being admitted to hospital and the second after a transjugular hepatic biopsy carried out on the 16th day after internment. The last hemolytic crisis was accompanied by an increase of serum and urinary copper levels. On this occasion the patient evolved to a progressive hepatic failure with severe jaundice and hepatic encephalopathy. We are presenting the clinical-biochemical evolution of the patient and we shall discuss the existent hypotheses to the pathophysiology of this rare form for manifestation of the Wilson's disease as well the diagnostic difficulties.

  4. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare in these patients. Methods One-hundred-fifty patients with CD reporting increased stool frequency, meteorism and/or abdominal pain were prospectively evaluated for SIBO with the Hydrogen Glucose Breath Test (HGBT). Results Thirty-eight patients (25.3%) were diagnosed with SIBO based on positive findings at HGBT. SIBO patients reported a higher rate of abdominal complaints and exhibited increased stool frequency (5.9 vs. 3.7 bowel movements/day, p = 0.003) and lower body weight (63.6 vs 70.4 kg, p = 0.014). There was no correlation with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. SIBO was significantly more frequent in patients with partial resection of the colon or multiple intestinal surgeries; there was also a clear trend in patients with ileocecal resection that did not reach statistical significance. SIBO rate was also higher in patients with affection of both the colon and small bowel, while inflammation of the (neo)terminal ileum again showed only tendential association with the development of SIBO. Conclusion SIBO represents a frequently ignored yet clinically relevant complication in CD, often mimicking acute flare. Because symptoms of SIBO are often difficult to differentiate from those caused by the underlying disease, targeted work-up is recommended in patients with corresponding clinical signs and predisposing factors. PMID:19643023

  5. Determining the community prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness and gaps in surveillance of acute gastroenteritis and foodborne diseases in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Persuad, Shamdeo; Mohamed-Rambaran, Pheona; Wilson, Alexis; James, Colin; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Guyana is an English-speaking country in South America and, culturally, it is part of the Caribbean. Objective of this study was to determine the community prevalence and true burden and economic impact of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and foodborne diseases (FBDs) in Guyana. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 7 of the 10 regions in Guyana during August and November 2009 to capture the high- and low-AGE season respectively. Overall, 1,254 individual surveys were administered at a response rate of 96.5%. The overall monthly prevalence of self-reported cases of AGE was 7.7% (97 cases) (95% CI 6.3-9.3), and the yearly incidence was 1.0 episodes per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE was observed in region 4 (8.9%) and in children aged 1-4 year(s) (12.7%). Of the 97 AGE cases, 23% sought medical care; 65% reported spending time at home due to their illness [range 1-20 day(s), mean 2.7 days], of whom 51% required other individuals to look after them while ill. The maximum number of stools per 24 hours ranged from 3 to 9 (mean 4.5), and number of days an individual suffered from AGE ranged from 1 to 21 day(s) (mean 2.7 days). The burden of syndromic AGE cases in the population for 2009 was estimated to be 131,012 cases compared to the reported 30,468 cases (76.7% underreporting), which implies that, for every syndromic case of AGE reported, there were additional 4.3 cases occurring in the community. For every laboratory-confirmed case of FBD/AGE pathogen reported, it was estimated that approximately 2,881 more cases were occurring in the population. Giardia was the most common foodborne pathogen isolated. The minimum estimated annual cost associated with the treatment for AGE was US$ 2,358,233.2, showing that AGE and FBD pose a huge economic burden on Guyana. Underreporting of AGE and foodbome pathogens, stool collection, and laboratory capacity were major gaps, affecting the surveillance of AGE in Guyana.

  6. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing by higher performance techniques such as flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to detect the proportion of remaining leukemic cells in bone marrow or peripheral blood during and after the first phases of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The results of MRD testing are used to reclassify these patients and guide changes in treatment according to their future risk of relapse. We conducted a systematic review of the economic literature, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget-impact analysis to ascertain the cost-effectiveness and economic impact of MRD testing by flow cytometry for management of childhood precursor B-cell ALL in Ontario. Methods A systematic literature search (1998–2014) identified studies that examined the incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing by either flow cytometry or PCR. We developed a lifetime state-transition (Markov) microsimulation model to quantify the cost-effectiveness of MRD testing followed by risk-directed therapy to no MRD testing and to estimate its marginal effect on health outcomes and on costs. Model input parameters were based on the literature, expert opinion, and data from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Using predictions from our Markov model, we estimated the 1-year cost burden of MRD testing versus no testing and forecasted its economic impact over 3 and 5 years. Results In a base-case cost-effectiveness analysis, compared with no testing, MRD testing by flow cytometry at the end of induction and consolidation was associated with an increased discounted survival of 0.0958 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and increased discounted costs of $4,180, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,613/QALY gained. After accounting for parameter uncertainty, incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing was associated with an ICER of $50,249/QALY gained. In

  7. The emergency room in systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Slobodin, G; Hussein, A; Rozenbaum, M; Rosner, I

    2006-01-01

    Complications of systemic rheumatic diseases frequently have protean manifestations and may present a diagnostic problem. Patients with connective tissue diseases and vasculitides may have dangerous or life threatening conditions, which must be recognised and treated promptly to prevent rapidly evolving morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of possible emergencies in the context of a defined rheumatic disease may aid in promoting a high index of suspicion and contribute significantly to the timely diagnosis of many potentially dangerous conditions. This review is written for the emergency room physician and discusses the early recognition of selected emergencies in the context of a defined rheumatic disease. PMID:16921075

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Is it one disease?

    PubMed

    Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic disease with a variety of clinical presentations. Monogenic predisposing conditions to the development of this disease have been described. As examples, an impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes or complement deficiencies have been reported in patients with SLE, with particular clinical presentations. Those defects present particular presentations and a different severity, making an argument that lupus is not a single disease but many. Treatment could be individualized depending on the underlying defect generating the subtype of the disease.

  9. Retrocrural Space Involvement on Computed Tomography as a Predictor of Mortality and Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haotong; Ebner, Lukas; Jiang, Shiming; Wu, Yi; Christe, Andreas; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Luo, Zhulin; Tian, Fuzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Because computed tomography (CT) has advantages for visualizing the manifestation of necrosis and local complications, a series of scoring systems based on CT manifestations have been developed for assessing the clinical outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP), including the CT severity index (CTSI), modified CTSI, etc. Despite the internationally accepted CTSI having been successfully used to predict the overall mortality and disease severity of AP, recent literature has revealed the limitations of the CTSI. Using the Delphi method, we establish a new scoring system based on retrocrural space involvement (RCSI), and compared its effectiveness at evaluating the mortality and severity of AP with that of the CTSI. Methods We reviewed CT images of 257 patients with AP taken within 3–5 days of admission in 2012. The RCSI scoring system, which includes assessment of infectious conditions involving the retrocrural space and the adjacent pleural cavity, was established using the Delphi method. Two radiologists independently assessed the RCSI and CTSI scores. The predictive points of the RCSI and CTSI scoring systems in evaluating the mortality and severity of AP were estimated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Principal Findings The RCSI score can accurately predict the mortality and disease severity. The area under the ROC curve for the RCSI versus CTSI score was 0.962±0.011 versus 0.900±0.021 for predicting the mortality, and 0.888±0.025 versus 0.904±0.020 for predicting the severity of AP. Applying ROC analysis to our data showed that a RCSI score of 4 was the best cutoff value, above which mortality could be identified. Conclusion The Delphi method was innovatively adopted to establish a scoring system to predict the clinical outcome of AP. The RCSI scoring system can predict the mortality of AP better than the CTSI system, and the severity of AP equally as well. PMID:25222846

  10. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended. PMID:10599332

  11. Plant disease management in organic farming systems.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, Ariena H C; Gamliel, Abraham; Finckh, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Organic farming (OF) has significantly increased in importance in recent decades. Disease management in OF is largely based on the maintenance of biological diversity and soil health by balanced crop rotations, including nitrogen-fixing and cover crops, intercrops, additions of manure and compost and reductions in soil tillage. Most soil-borne diseases are naturally suppressed, while foliar diseases can sometimes be problematic. Only when a severe disease outbreak is expected are pesticides used that are approved for OF. A detailed overview is given of cultural and biological control measures. Attention is also given to regulated pesticides. We conclude that a systems approach to disease management is required, and that interdisciplinary research is needed to solve lingering disease problems, especially for OF in the tropics. Some of the organic regulations are in need of revision in close collaboration with various stakeholders.

  12. An Early Warning System for Flounder Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Bin; Li, Daoliang; Wang, Jianqin; Duan, Qingling; Wen, Jiwen

    With the constant expansion of the scale and mismanagement in aquaculture,the diseases of flounder occur more and more frequently than before, which has brought great economic losses to fish farmers. For the sake of the problem described above, based on a great number of surveys, the early warning theory of flounder disease, the analysis of the outbreak and development of diseases and the relationship between disease and factors, the logic process of the early warning for flounder disease was confirmed. It consists of five parts: specifying the target, searching for the source, distinguishing the sign, predicting the degree and eliminating the menace. Using the expert survey method the early warning indexes which affect the normal life of the flounder and calculated the range of the water environment factors were also confirmed. Finally, an early warning system was implemented, which can reduce the damage from the flounder disease.

  13. Scoring systems predict the prognosis of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fa-Ling; Shi, Ke-Qing; Chen, Yong-Ping; Braddock, Martin; Zou, Hai; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure is a devastating condition that is associated with mortality rates of over 50% and is consequent to acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B in patients with previously diagnosed or undiagnosed chronic liver disease. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment to lower mortality rate, but there is a great imbalance between donation and potential recipients. An early and accurate prognostic system based on the integration of laboratory indicators, clinical events and some mathematic logistic equations is needed to optimize treatment for patients. As parts of the scoring systems, the MELD was the most common and the donor-MELD was the most innovative for patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. This review aims to highlight the various features and prognostic capabilities of these scoring systems. PMID:24762209

  14. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27267533

  15. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  16. [Relationship between child day-care attendance and acute infectious disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Barajas Sánchez, M Verisima; Muñoz Martín, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Child day-care attendance is considered to be an acute early childhood disease risk factor, the studies available however not affording the possibility of fully quantifying this risk. A systematic review of clinical trials and cohort studies was conducted, in which the effects child day-care attendance had on the health of young children based on the Cochrane Collaboration, PubMed and Spanish Medical Index databases, without any time or language-related limits, were analyzed and rounded out with analyses of referenced works and an additional EMBASE search. The methodological quality was evaluated by means of personalized criteria. Pooling measures (relative risks, incidence density ratios and weighted mean differences) were calculated with their confidence intervals, assuming random effects models. A significant increase was found to exist of a risk consistent over time and among different social and geographical environments. Considering the most methodologically-stringent studies with adjusted effect estimates, child day-care attendance was related to an increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection (RR=1,88), acute otitis media (RR=1,58), otitis media with fluid draining (RR=2,43), lower respiratory tract infections (overall RR=210; acute pneumonia RR=1.70; broncholitis RR=1,80; bronchitis RR=2,10) and gastroenteritis (RR=1,40). Child day-care attendance could be responsible for 33%-50% of the episodes of respiratory infection and gastroenteritis among the exposed population. In conclusion, it can be said that the risk for childhood health attributable to the child day-care attendance is discreet but of high-impact. This information has some major implications for research, clinical practice, healthcare authorities and society as a whole.

  17. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  18. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents increase the risk of acute stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Stephen L.; Zhang, Amy D.; Weir, Matthew R.; Walker, Loreen; Hsu, Van Doren; Parsa, Afshin; Diamantidis, Clarissa; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are effective in ameliorating anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, a recent trial in diabetic CKD patients suggested a greater stroke risk associated with full correction of anemia using ESAs. We performed a case-control study examining the association of incident ESA use with acute stroke in CKD patients, using national Veterans Affairs data. Patients with eGFR<60 cc/min/1.73m2 and outpatient hemoglobin (Hb)<12g/dL were included. Acute hospitalized stroke cases (N=2071) were identified using diagnosis codes and matched 1:5 to controls without stroke. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association of ESA use with stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. After multivariate adjustment, ESA use (N=1026, 8.3%) was associated with 30% greater odds of stroke (odds ratio[OR]=1.30, 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.06, 1.58). There was significant interaction (p=.015) between ESA use and cancer; ESA use was associated with 85% greater odds of stroke in cancer patients (95% CI: 1.26, 2.65), but not associated with stroke in patients without cancer (OR=1.07, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.35). ESA-treated patients with cancer received a median initial dose 2.5 to 4 times greater than ESA patients without cancer, but pre-ESA Hb and rate of Hb change did not differ between groups. Among a large national sample of anemic CKD patients, ESA treatment is associated with an increased risk of acute stroke, with the greatest effect among patients with cancer. PMID:21389972

  19. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization.

  20. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. PMID:24785677

  1. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  2. Managing systemic symptoms in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Newton, Julia L; Jones, David E J

    2012-01-01

    Improved medical management and the changing disease demographic mean that the majority of patients with chronic liver disease are living with the disease rather than dying from it. Historically, the perception has been that the impact of chronic liver disease is related entirely to the consequences of endstage liver disease; however, more recently a number of systemic symptoms have been recognised that can occur at any point in the natural history of chronic liver disease and which can be associated with functional impairment and reduced quality of life. The most characteristic of these systemic symptoms is fatigue, which frequently associates with sleep disturbance and autonomic dysfunction, particularly manifest as abnormality of blood pressure regulation. Cognitive symptoms can occur even in non-cirrhotic patients. Falls can present in patients with autonomic dysfunction, complicated by the presence of peripheral muscle strength problems. Importantly for clinicians managing chronic liver disease, the severity of these systemic symptoms is typically not related to liver disease severity, and therefore despite optimal liver disease management, patients can often continue to experience debilitating symptoms. The similarity in systemic symptoms between different chronic liver diseases (and indeed chronic inflammatory conditions affecting other organs) suggests the possibility of shared pathogenetic processes and raises the possibility of common management strategies, although further research is urgently needed to confirm this. In primary biliary cirrhosis, where our understanding of systemic symptoms is arguably most developed, structured management strategies have been shown to improve the quality of life of patients. It is highly likely that similar approaches will have comparable benefits for other chronic liver disease groups. Here, we review the current understanding of systemic symptoms in chronic liver disease and offer recommendations regarding the

  3. Clinical and biochemical landmarks in systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Vitale, Antonio; Gianneramo, Valentina; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are a group of inherited disorders of the innate immune system characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation recurring at variable intervals and involving skin, serosal membranes, joints, and gastrointestinal apparatus, with reactive amyloidosis as a possible severe long-term complication. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, and hereditary pyogenic and granulomatous disorders: the vast majority of these conditions are related to the activation of the interleukin-1 pathway, which results in (or from?) a common unifying pathogenetic mechanism. Their diagnostic identification derives from the combination of clinical data, evaluation of acute phase reactants, clinical efficacy in response to specific drugs, and recognition of specific mutations in the relevant genes, although genetic tests may be unconstructive in some cases. This review will discuss clinical and laboratory clues useful for a diagnostic approach to systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

  4. [Aeromonas spp asociated to acute diarrheic disease in Cuba: case-control study].

    PubMed

    Bravo, Laura; Fernández, Anabel; Núñez, Fidel Á; Rivero, Luis A; Ramírez, Margarita; Aguila, Adalberto; Ledo, Yudith; Cruz, Yanaika; Hernández, Jenny

    2012-02-01

    The members of the genus Aeromonas are currently considered important gastrointestinal pathogens in different geographical areas. From February 1985 to January 2005 several case-control studies were coordinated by the National Reference Laboratory for Diarrheal Diseases from the Pedro Kouri Institute. The study purpose was to analyze a possible pathogenic role for Aeromonas spp in Cuban children with acute diarrhea. In that period 2,322 children less than 5 years old with acute diarrhea were studied for diarhoeal pathogens and another group of 2,072 non hospitalized children without diarrhea during the similar time from the same geographical areas and matched by ages were recruited. In the group of children with diarrheas (cases), Aeromonas spp. was isolated in 166 (7.15%) and in the control group the microorganism was found in only 35 (1.76%). When Aeromonas isolation rates were compared between both groups, we found that probability to isolate this specie was significantly higher in cases than in controls (OR = 4.48, 95% IC: 3.05-6.60; P < 0.001). The Aeromonas species more frequently isolated were A. caviae, A. hydrophila, and A. veronii bv sobria. Other enteric pathogens detected in children with diarrhea were: Shigella spp in 418 (18%) (P < 0.0001), Salmonella spp in 53 (2.3%) (P < 0.01), and enteropathogenic E. coli in 58 (2.49%) (P < 0.05).

  5. Gentle Massage Improves Disease- and Treatment-Related Symptoms in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ann Gill; Snyder, Audrey E; Anderson, Joel G; Brown, Cynthia J; Densmore, John J; Bourguignon, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cancer treatment is reported to be stressful, and patients diagnosed with hematologic cancers often exhibit higher levels of anxiety and emotional distress than individuals with other malignancies. Management of these symptoms in patients with hematologic cancer presents significant challenges, as many of them are in and out of the hospital while undergoing high dose chemotherapy. Oncology patients use complementary modalities such as therapeutic massage in an attempt to alleviate disease and treatment-related symptoms, including anxiety and emotional distress. In the current study, the feasibility of a novel massage intervention delivered over the continuum of care, as well as assessment of the immediate and cumulative effects of massage, was examined in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Methods A mixed-methods, unmasked, prospective, randomized study was conducted with two groups: a usual care alone control group and a massage therapy intervention plus usual care group. Results Significant improvements in levels of stress and health-related quality of life were observed in the massage therapy group versus the usual care alone group, after adjusting for anxiety level, including both immediate and cumulative effects of massage. Conclusions While the findings of the current study regarding acceptability, feasibility, and potential efficacy of therapeutic massage as a complementary health-enhancing intervention in patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia are very promising, the relatively small size of the study sample limits generalizability. PMID:25530922

  6. The Circulatory System in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Steven M; Waldman, Brett

    2016-07-01

    In the cirrhotic liver, distortion of the normal liver architecture is caused by structural and vascular changes. Portal hypertension is often associated with a hyperdynamic circulatory syndrome in which cardiac output and heart rate are increased and systemic vascular resistance is decreased. The release of several vasoactive substances is the primary factor involved in the reduction of mesenteric arterial resistance, resulting in sodium and water retention with eventual formation of ascites. Management of these patients with acute cardiac dysfunction often requires invasive hemodynamic monitoring in an intensive care unit setting to tailor decisions regarding use of fluids and vasopressors.

  7. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  8. Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) outbreaks in Penaeus vannamei and P. monodon cultured in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Leobert D; Cabillon, Nikko Alvin R; Catedral, Demy D; Amar, Edgar C; Usero, Roselyn C; Monotilla, Wilberto D; Calpe, Adelaida T; Fernandez, Dalisay Dg; Saloma, Cynthia P

    2015-10-27

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) has recently emerged as a serious disease of cultured shrimp. It has also been described as early mortality syndrome (EMS) due to mass mortalities occurring within 20 to 30 d after stocking of ponds with postlarvae. Here, Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon from shrimp farms in the Philippines were examined for the toxin-producing strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus due to AHPND-like symptoms occurring in marketable size shrimp. In the P. vannamei, histology revealed typical AHPND pathology, such as sloughing of undifferentiated cells in the hepatopancreatic tubule epithelium. Analysis using the IQ2000 AHPND/EMS Toxin 1 PCR test generated 218 bp and 432 bp amplicons confirmative of the toxin-producing strain of V. parahaemolyticus among shrimp sampled from 8 of 9 ponds. In the P. monodon, histology revealed massive sloughing of undifferentiated cells of the hepatopancreatic tubule epithelium in the absence of basophilic bacterial cells. PCR testing generated the 2 amplicons confirmatory for AHPND among shrimp sampled from 5 of 7 ponds. This study confirms the presence of AHPND in P. vannamei and P. monodon farmed in the Philippines and suggests that the disease can also impact late-stage juvenile shrimp.

  9. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis. PMID:25830761

  10. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis.

  11. Air pollution and acute respiratory diseases in children: regression analysis of morbidity data.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, M; Zejda, J E; Skiba, M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute respiratory diseases and the air quality in the urban area of the Upper Silesian Industrial Zone during autumn and winter with special emphasis on temporal variability in the air concentrations of pollutants. The survey was carried out in 5 primary care units in Chorzów where the morbidity data on the selected respiratory diseases were collected from 1 November 1992 to 31 March 1993. The air pollution data were obtained from the monitoring station, being a part of the Sanitary and Epidemiological Station Network. Regression analysis with mean values of concentrations of air pollutants as explanatory variables revealed a positive effect of combined suspended particulate matter and SO2 concentration on the increased prevalence of bronchitis and bronchiolitis. Similar and even stronger effect was observed at the level of temporal variability coefficients of the air pollutants. A hypothesis that temporal variability of the air concentration of pollutants might be a more relevant factor for determining the prevalence of respiratory diseases than simple mean values of the pollutant concentrations is very interesting worthy of further investigations.

  12. Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

  13. Rotavirus and acute diarrhoeal disease in children in a southern Indian coastal town*

    PubMed Central

    Paniker, C. K. J.; Mathew, S.; Mathan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Rotavirus was found by electron microscopy in the stools of 70.7% of a representative sample (368) of the 3355 children with acute diarrhoea admitted to hospital over a period of 16 months in Calicut on the west coast of India. The prevalence of the virus was high (nearly 100% of cases examined) in the period from November to January and lowest in May just before the onset of the monsoon. Prevalence was high (75.1%) in infants aged from 6 to 23 months, but was considerably lower in those under 6 months of age (34.8%). The management of cases and the planning of control measures for this disease are discussed in the light of knowledge of the high prevalence of rotavirus. PMID:6282478

  14. Rotavirus and acute diarrhoeal disease in children in a southern Indian coastal town.

    PubMed

    Paniker, C K; Mathew, S; Mathan, M

    1982-01-01

    Rotavirus was found by electron microscopy in the stools of 70.7% of a representative sample (368) of the 3355 children with acute diarrhoea admitted to hospital over a period of 16 months in Calicut on the west coast of India. The prevalence of the virus was high (nearly 100% of cases examined) in the period from November to January and lowest in May just before the onset of the monsoon. Prevalence was high (75.1%) in infants aged from 6 to 23 months, but was considerably lower in those under 6 months of age (34.8%). The management of cases and the planning of control measures for this disease are discussed in the light of knowledge of the high prevalence of rotavirus.

  15. Supplemental nasogastric feeding in cystic fibrosis patients during treatment for acute exacerbation of chest disease.

    PubMed

    Daniels, L; Davidson, G P; Martin, A J; Pouras, T

    1989-06-01

    The use of overnight, nasogastric, nutritional supplementation during hospitalization of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) receiving antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of respiratory disease was evaluated in 11 children (mean age = 7.75 years). Supplementary feeding significantly increased inpatient energy intake from 116 +/- 30% to 165 +/- 30% (P less than 0.001) of recommended dietary allowance with minimal effect on oral intake. It also resulted in significantly improved weight gains but neither increased energy intakes nor weights were sustained at short-term (mean = 5.7 weeks) or long-term (mean = 21.6 weeks) follow-up. The notion that short bursts of nasogastric feeding for inpatients with CF improve growth status is not supported. However, the study did show that treatment of chest infections alone does not positively affect spontaneous oral energy intake. PMID:2504140

  16. ROLE OF MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE MONITORING IN ADULT AND PEDIATRIC ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Assays that measure minimal residual disease (MRD) can determine the response to treatment in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) much more precisely than morphological screening of bone marrow smears. The clinical significance of MRD detected by flow cytometry or polymerase chain reaction-based methods in childhood ALL has been conclusively established. Hence, MRD is being used in several clinical trials to adjust treatment intensity. Similar findings have been gathered in adult patients with ALL, making MRD one of the most powerful and informative parameters to guide clinical management. This article discusses practical issues related to MRD methodologies and the evidence supporting the use of MRD for risk assignment in clinical trials. PMID:19825454

  17. Painful acute radiation thyroiditis induced by 131I treatment of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kinjal K; Tarasova, Valentina; Davidian, Michael; Anderson, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman, chronic smoker with Graves' disease was treated with radioactive iodine ablation (RAI). One week after the treatment, she presented with severe pain in the anterior neck with radiation to the angle of the jaw associated with fatigue, tremor and odynophagia. Physical examination demonstrated an asymmetric and exquisitely tender thyroid gland. There was no laboratory evidence of thyrotoxicosis. Acute radiation thyroiditis was diagnosed. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hydrocodone-acetaminophen started initially were ineffective for pain control. Prednisone provided relief and was continued for 1 month with a tapering dose. Symptoms completely resolved after 1 month at which time the thyroid remained diffusely enlarged and non-tender. Three months following RAI ablation she developed hypothyroid symptoms. Levothyroxine was initiated. The patient has remained asymptomatic on continued follow-up care. PMID:25576511

  18. Five genome sequences of subspecies B1 human adenoviruses associated with acute respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Liu, Elizabeth B; Seto, Jason; Torres, Sarah F; Hudson, Nolan R; Kajon, Adriana E; Metzgar, David; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S; Seto, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Five genomes of human subspecies B1 adenoviruses isolated from cases of acute respiratory disease have been sequenced and archived for reference. These include representatives of two prevalent genomic variants of HAdV-7, i.e., HAdV-7h and HAdV-7d2. The other three are HAdV-3/16, HAdV-16 strain E26, and HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi. All are recombinant genomes. Genomics and bioinformatics provide detailed views into the genetic makeup of these pathogens and insight into their molecular evolution. Retrospective characterization of particularly problematic older pathogens such as HAdV-7h (1987) and intriguing isolates such as HAdV-3+7 strain Takeuchi (1958) may provide clues to their phenotypes and serology and may suggest protocols for prevention and treatment. PMID:22158846

  19. Plasmapheresis for hemolytic crisis and impending acute liver failure in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Asfaha, Samuel; Almansori, Mohammed; Qarni, Uwais; Gutfreund, Klaus S

    2007-01-01

    Wilsonian crisis is fatal unless copper removal is initiated early and liver transplantation is performed for patients that fulfill criteria for a poor outcome. We report a patient presenting with severe hemolysis and impending acute liver failure that made a rapid recovery with prompt initiation of plasmapheresis and chelation therapy. Rapid copper removal by plasmapheresis alleviated hemolysis and liver injury. A review of the literature was performed examining the use of plasmapheresis and albumin dialysis with continuous veno-venous hemodialysis or molecular adsorbents and recirculating system.

  20. [Differential diagnostics of acute inflammatory diseases and tumors of the neck].

    PubMed

    Vuĭtsik, N B; Butkevich, A Ts; Kuntsevich, G I; Zemlianoĭ, A B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to assess the clinical significance of ultrasonography for differential diagnostics between acute inflammatory and tumorous lesions of the neck. One hundred and eighty-six patients with soft-tissue lesions of the neck aged 18 to 74 (mean age 31.45 +/- 8.39 years), 95 (51%) males and 91 (49%) females were examined. Basing on clinical and ultrasonographic examination, the patients were divided into two groups: 149 or 80% patients with acute inflammatory lesions (Group 1), and 37 or 20% patients with tumorous lesions (Group 2). Thirty-four of the 149 Group 1 patients (22.82%) had lymphadenitis, 30 (20.13%) had soft tissue infiltrates, 13 (8.72%) had abscesses, 19 (12.72%) had phlegmons, 32 (21.48%) had acute inflammatory changes in the major salivary glands, 3 (2.01%) had teratomas with signs of inflammation, and 17 (11.41%) patients had inflammatory changes in the tumors. Of 37 patients with tumorous lesions, 16 (43.2%) had salivary gland tumors, 12 (32.4%) had metastases in the lymphatic nodes, and 9 (24.3%) had neurofibromatosis. Soft tissue ultrasonography was performed using Sonos-5500 and Image-Point ultrasound scanners with 7.5 MHz sensors (Hewlett-Packard, USA), Logio-pro, Uoluson-730 Expert (General Electric, USA), and Premium Edition (ACUSON Antares, Siemens, Germany) with 5 to 13 MHz wide-frequency sensors. Visualization was performed in B-modes using tissue harmonics, color duplex scanning, Sie Scape panoramic visualization, contrast visualization and Sight 4D and 3D-Scape modes. The results of ultrasonography were analyzed taking into account additional methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography, intraoperative findings, the results of puncture biopsy, histological, morphological, and bacteriological studies. The study demonstrates that ultrasonography is the method of choice, which is in some cases enough to establish a diagnosis of an acute inflammatory disease or a tumorous formation of various

  1. Acute labyrinthitis associated with systemic Candida albicans infection in ageing mice.

    PubMed

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M; Fulurija, A

    1996-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with disease of the inner ear. This study describes the histopathology of acute labyrinthitis caused by systemic infection with C. albicans in aging inbred mice. Within four days after infection, yeast and hyphal forms of C.albicans were found in the membranous labyrinth. The utricle and the adjacent parts of the ampullary regions of the semicircular canals were most severely affected, but damage was also seen in the scala media, the scala tympani, the saccule, and the scala vestibuli. In the utricle, the lining epithelium of the membranous labyrinth was disrupted, and the lining cells of the vestibular membrane showed foci in which the membrane was disrupted. The data suggest that age may represent a risk factor for fungal labyrinthitis.

  2. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  3. Ocular manifestations of systemic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Amir; Huang, John J

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the eye is often times seen in association with systemic inflammatory diseases. Understanding the various forms of ocular involvement in these conditions is important as untreated ophthalmic involvement can lead to severe vision loss. In addition to providing a basic framework for diagnosis and treatment, this review will highlight the ocular manifestations of the following systemic inflammatory conditions: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarteritisnodosa, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, Behçet's syndrome, Kawasaki disease, Cogan's syndrome and relapsing polychondritis.

  4. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771.

  5. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771. PMID:27228454

  6. Incorporating measurable ('minimal') residual disease-directed treatment strategies to optimize outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Kristen; Stock, Wendy; Walter, Roland B

    2016-07-01

    Curative-intent therapy leads to complete remissions in many adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but relapse remains common. Numerous studies have unequivocally demonstrated that the persistence of measurable ('minimal') residual disease (MRD) at the submicroscopic level during morphologic remission identifies patients at high risk of disease recurrence and short survival. This association has provided the impetus to customize anti-leukemia therapy based on MRD data, a strategy that is now routinely pursued in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). While it is currently uncertain whether this approach will improve outcomes in AML other than APL, randomized studies have validated MRD-based risk-stratified treatment algorithms in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we review the available studies examining MRD-directed therapy in AML, appraise their strengths and limitations, and discuss avenues for future investigation.

  7. The complement system in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Umang; Otley, Anthony R; Van Limbergen, Johan; Stadnyk, Andrew W

    2014-09-01

    Complement is well appreciated to be a potent innate immune defense against microbes and is important in the housekeeping act of removal of apoptotic and effete cells. It is also understood that hyperactivation of complement, or the lack of regulators, may underlie chronic inflammatory diseases. A pipeline of products to intervene in complement activation, some already in clinical use, is being studied in various chronic inflammatory diseases. To date, the role of complement in inflammatory bowel disease has not received a lot of research interest. Novel genetically modified laboratory animals and experiments using antagonists to complement effector molecules have kindled important research observations implicating the complement system in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. We review the evidence base for the role and potential therapeutic manipulation of the complement cascade in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Transcranial near-infrared laser therapy applied to promote clinical recovery in acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to treat neurodegeneration is noninvasive transcranial near-infrared laser therapy (NILT), which appears to promote acute neuroprotection by stimulating mitochondrial function, thereby increasing cellular energy production. NILT may also promote chronic neuronal function restoration via trophic factor-mediated plasticity changes or possibly neurogenesis. Clearly, NILT is a treatment that confers neuroprotection or neurorestoration using pleiotropic mechanisms. The most advanced application of NILT is for acute ischemic stroke based upon extensive preclinical and clinical studies. In laboratory settings, NILT is also being developed to treat traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. There is some intriguing data in the literature that suggests that NILT may be a method to promote clinical improvement in neurodegenerative diseases where there is a common mechanistic component, mitochondrial dysfunction and energy impairment. This article will analyze and review data supporting the continued development of NILT to treat neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22145842

  9. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica; Hu, Shaoyan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families' economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival.

  10. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  11. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  12. Systemic Diseases Caused by Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Kolltveit, Kristin M.; Tronstad, Leif; Olsen, Ingar

    2000-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that oral infection, especially periodontitis, may affect the course and pathogenesis of a number of systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes mellitus, and low birth weight. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status of oral infections, especially periodontitis, as a causal factor for systemic diseases. Three mechanisms or pathways linking oral infections to secondary systemic effects have been proposed: (i) metastatic spread of infection from the oral cavity as a result of transient bacteremia, (ii) metastatic injury from the effects of circulating oral microbial toxins, and (iii) metastatic inflammation caused by immunological injury induced by oral microorganisms. Periodontitis as a major oral infection may affect the host's susceptibility to systemic disease in three ways: by shared risk factors; subgingival biofilms acting as reservoirs of gram-negative bacteria; and the periodontium acting as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators. Proposed evidence and mechanisms of the above odontogenic systemic diseases are given. PMID:11023956

  13. Aspects on antidote therapy in acute poisoning affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Persson, H

    1984-01-01

    The number of toxic substances affecting the nervous system through acute or chronic exposure is overwhelming. This survey will elucidate the possibilities of antidote therapy in some acute cases of poisoning, caused by nervous system toxicants. Antidotes exert their therapeutic effects through a variety of mechanisms: Adsorption, formation of inert complexes, inhibited conversion to toxic metabolites, enhancement of endogenous detoxification, interference at receptor sites, and physiological antagonism. The application of these principles in treating some poisonings caused by important nervous system toxicants will be considered. This survey is by no means comprehensive, but rather gives some relevant examples and deals only with acute poisoning.

  14. [Fatal acute interstitial lung disease associated with docetaxel administration: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Youssef, Seddik; Ziani, Fatima Zahra; Afqir, Said

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent belonging to the taxane family. This drug is widely used to treat cancers. Interstitial lung disease is a rare but serious toxicity due to the high mortality risk. We report a case of a patient with breast cancer who had fatal acute interstitial lung disease after auxiliary chemotherapy with docetaxel. The clinician should be aware of this risk and should consider it in differential diagnosis in patients with respiratory symptoms treated with docetaxel. PMID:27642457

  15. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels.

  16. Pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected Malawian adults: acute mortality and long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Stephen B.; Chaponda, Mas; Walsh, Amanda L.; Whitty, Christopher J.M.; Gordon, Melita A.; Machili, C. Edward; Gilks, Charles F.; Boeree, Martin J.; Kampondeni, Sam; Read, Robert C.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected patients in Africa are vulnerable to severe recurrent infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but no effective preventive strategy has been developed. We set out to determine which factors influence in-hospital mortality and long-term survival of Malawians with invasive pneumococcal disease. Design, setting and patients Acute clinical features, inpatient mortality and long-term survival were described among consecutively admitted hospital patients with S. pneumoniae in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Factors associated with inpatient mortality were determined, and patients surviving to discharge were followed to determine their long-term outcome. Results A total of 217 patients with pneumococcal disease were studied over an 18-month period. Among these, 158 out of 167 consenting to testing (95%) were HIV positive. Inpatient mortality was 65% for pneumococcal meningitis (n = 64), 20% for pneumococcaemic pneumonia (n = 92), 26% for patients with pneumococcaemia without localizing signs (n = 43), and 76% in patients with probable meningitis (n = 17). Lowered consciousness level, hypotension, and age exceeding 55 years at presentation were associated with inpatient death, but not long-term outcome in survivors. Hospital survivors were followed for a median of 414 days; 39% died in the community during the study period. Outpatient death was associated with multilobar chest signs, oral candidiasis, and severe anaemia as an inpatient. Conclusion Most patients with pneumococcal disease in Malawi have HIV co-infection. They have severe disease with a high mortality rate. At discharge, all HIV-infected adults have a poor prognosis but patients with multilobar chest signs or anaemia are at particular risk. PMID:12131218

  17. Recurrent acute obstructive hydrocephalus as clinical onset of cerebral Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Vincenzo; Imperato, Alessia; Colella, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Valentina; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Gangemi, Michelangelo

    2010-10-01

    Whipple's disease is a rare multisystemic infection caused by the intracellular bacteria Thropheryma whippelii. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not rare. The most frequent CNS manifestations are cognitive and behavioural changes, sopranuclear ophtalmoplegia, myoclonus, epilepsy, ataxia, meningitis and focal cerebral palsy. We report one case of cerebral localization of Whipple's disease with a clinical presentation of recurrent endocranic hypertension and hydrocephalus, and uncommon neurological symptoms, successfully treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy and antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole.

  18. [Magnetic-resonance tomography in differential diagnosis of brain lesions in demyelinating and systemic autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Totolian, N A

    2005-01-01

    An aim of the study was to establish MRT signs that may be useful for differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Three groups of patients have been examined: 300 patients with MS, 35 with demyelinating diseases (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica--Devic's syndrome); 90 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, sclerodermatitis, Sjugren's syndrome, autoimmune thyroiditis, vasculitis and vasculopathy). Classification of MRT syndromes in MS and their frequency are presented: syndrome of chronic inflammatory demyelination (79%), syndrome of acute inflammatory demyelination (9%), syndrome of multifocal degenerative leucoencephalopathy (8%), syndrome of combined multifocal diffusive leucoencephalopathy (4%). The similarity and differences in MRT semiotics of the above diseases and MS are described.

  19. A comprehensive infectious disease management system.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Alex; Farley, John D

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electronic management system is now an essential tool for the successful management and monitoring of those affected by communicable infectious diseases (Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV, hepatitis C - HEP C) during the course of the treatment. The current methods which depend heavily on manual collecting, compiling and disseminating treatment information are labor-intensive and time consuming. Clinics specialized in the treatment of infectious diseases use a mix of electronic systems that fail to interact with each other, result in data duplication, and do not support treatment of the patient as a whole. The purpose of the Infectious Disease Management System is to reduce the administrative overhead associated with data collection and analysis while providing correlation abilities and decision support in accordance with defined treatment guidelines. This Infectious Disease Management System was developed to: Ensure cost effectiveness by means of low software licensing costs, Introduce a centralized mechanism of collecting and monitoring all infectious disease management data, Automate electronic retrieval of laboratory findings, Introduce a decision support mechanism as per treatment guidelines, Seamlessly integrate of application modules, Provide comprehensive reporting capabilities, Maintain a high level of user friendliness.

  20. Minimal residual disease detection using flow cytometry: Applications in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S; Venkatesan, S

    2016-04-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) describes disease that can be diagnosed by methodologies other than conventional morphology, and includes molecular methods (like polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) or flow cytometry (FCM). Detection and monitoring of MRD is becoming the standard of care, considering its importance in predicting the treatment outcome. MRD aids in identifying high-risk patients and hence therapy can be intensified in them while deintensification of therapy can prevent long-term sequelae of chemotherapy in low-risk category. FCM is considered as a less labor-intensive and faster MRD technique as compared to PCR although it has its own share of disadvantages. Current immune-based methodologies for detection of MRD depend on establishing leukemia-associated aberrant immunophenotype (LAIP), at diagnosis or relapse and use this information at specified time points for detection of MRD, or apply a standardized panel of antibody combinations for all MRD cases, in a different-from-normal approach. This review highlights MRD detection by FCM and its application in acute leukemia.

  1. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  2. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction: implication in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Coates, Thomas D

    2013-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hemoglobinopathy caused by a single amino acid substitution in the β chain of hemoglobin that causes the hemoglobin to polymerize in the deoxy state. The resulting rigid, sickle-shaped red cells obstruct blood flow causing hemolytic anemia, tissue damage, and premature death. Hemolysis is continual. However, acute exacerbations of sickling called vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) resulting in severe pain occur, often requiring hospitalization. Blood rheology, adhesion of cellular elements of blood to vascular endothelium, inflammation, and activation of coagulation decrease microvascular flow and increase likelihood of VOC. What triggers the transition from steady state to VOC is unknown. This review discusses the interaction of blood rheological factors and the role that autonomic nervous system (ANS) induced vasoconstriction may have in triggering crisis as well as the mechanism of ANS dysfunction in SCD. PMID:23643396

  3. Untangling the Web of Systemic Autoinflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Caso, Francesco; De Clemente, Caterina; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is involved in the pathophysiology of systemic autoinflammatory diseases (SAIDs), an enlarging group of disorders caused by dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, in which autoreactive T-lymphocytes and autoantibodies are indeed absent. A widely deranged innate immunity leads to overactivity of proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent multisite inflammatory symptoms depicting various conditions, such as hereditary periodic fevers, granulomatous disorders, and pyogenic diseases, collectively described in this review. Further research should enhance our understanding of the genetics behind SAIDs, unearth triggers of inflammatory attacks, and result in improvement for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25132737

  4. [Intra-alveolar hemorrhages in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Bonnotte, B; Chantereau, M J; Lorcerie, B; Chauffert, B; Noblet, J F; Chalopin, J M; Martin, F

    1992-05-16

    Alveolar haemorrhage is usually, but often belatedly, diagnosed in patients presenting with haemoptysis and radiological alveolar syndrome. Its occurrence frequently marks a turn for the worst in the course of a systemic disease, since its prognosis is sombre. Recognizing its early signs might enable treatment to be instituted and prognosis to be improved. In the presence of typical alveolar haemorrhage, if high-dose corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppressants do not improve the symptoms within 48 hours plasmapheresis must be started. Alveolar haemorrhage must be considered a vital emergency justifying this therapeutic approach without waiting for the hypothetical diagnosis of the underlying systemic disease.

  5. Systemic Coronaviral Disease in 5 Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Autieri, Christopher R; Miller, Cassandra L; Scott, Kathleen E; Kilgore, Alexandra; Papscoe, Victoria A; Garner, Michael M; Haupt, Jennifer L; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of reported systemic coronaviral disease in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo), which resembles the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis, has been increasing in the literature since its initial diagnosis and characterization approximately 10 y ago. Here we describe the clinical signs, pathologic findings, and diagnosis by immunohistochemistry using an FIPV3-70 monoclonal antibody of systemic coronaviral disease in 5 ferrets, 2 of which were strictly laboratory-housed; the remaining 3 were referred from veterinary private practices. This case report illustrates the importance of considering FRSCV infection as a differential diagnosis in young, debilitated ferrets with abdominal masses and other supporting clinical signs. PMID:26678368

  6. Systemic Coronaviral Disease in 5 Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Autieri, Christopher R; Miller, Cassandra L; Scott, Kathleen E; Kilgore, Alexandra; Papscoe, Victoria A; Garner, Michael M; Haupt, Jennifer L; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of reported systemic coronaviral disease in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo), which resembles the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis, has been increasing in the literature since its initial diagnosis and characterization approximately 10 y ago. Here we describe the clinical signs, pathologic findings, and diagnosis by immunohistochemistry using an FIPV3-70 monoclonal antibody of systemic coronaviral disease in 5 ferrets, 2 of which were strictly laboratory-housed; the remaining 3 were referred from veterinary private practices. This case report illustrates the importance of considering FRSCV infection as a differential diagnosis in young, debilitated ferrets with abdominal masses and other supporting clinical signs. PMID:26678368

  7. Hemorheological risk factors of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crisis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamarre, Yann; Romana, Marc; Waltz, Xavier; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tressières, Benoît; Divialle-Doumdo, Lydia; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Petras, Marie; Broquere, Cedric; Maillard, Frederic; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of blood rheology on the occurrence of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin SC disease. Design and Methods To address this issue, steady-state hemorheological profiles (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability, aggregation properties) and hematologic parameters were assessed in 44 children with sickle cell anemia and 49 children with hemoglobin SC disease (8-16 years old) followed since birth. Clinical charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine prior acute chest syndrome or vaso-occlusive episodes, and rates of these complications were calculated. Results Multivariate analysis revealed that: 1) a higher steady-state blood viscosity was associated with a higher rate of vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia, but not in children with hemoglobin SC disease; 2) a higher steady-state red blood cell disaggregation threshold was associated with previous history of acute chest syndrome in children with hemoglobin SC disease and boys with sickle cell anemia. Conclusions Our results indicate for the first time that the red blood cell aggregation properties may play a role in the pathophysiology of acute chest syndrome in children with hemoglobin SC disease and boys with sickle cell anemia. In addition, whereas greater blood viscosity is associated with a higher rate of vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia, no association was found in children with hemoglobin SC disease, underscoring differences in the etiology of vaso-occlusive crises between sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin SC disease. PMID:22689686

  8. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil.

  9. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil. PMID:26670404

  10. Health systems perspectives - infectious diseases of poverty.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Dale

    2012-11-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization's charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty - its social, political and economic dimensions - remain in the reader's mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal's first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions.

  11. Interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Athol U

    2014-10-01

    Based on international collaborative data, interstitial lung disease is now the most frequent cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), having supplanted renal crisis in that regard. Despite detailed explorations of candidate mediators, no primary pathway in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease associated with SSc (SSc-ILD) has been definitively identified and, therefore, treatment with current agents is only partially successful. However, as immunomodulatory agents do, on average, retard progression of lung disease, early identification of SSc-ILD, using thoracic high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), is highly desirable. The decision whether to introduce therapy immediately is often difficult as the balance of risk and benefit favours a strategy of careful observation when lung disease is very limited, especially in long-standing SSc. The threshold for initiating treatment is substantially reduced when lung disease is severe, systemic disease is short in duration or ongoing progression is evident, based on pulmonary function tests and symptoms. This review summarises epidemiology, pathogenesis, difficult clinical problems and management issues in SSc-ILD.

  12. Health systems perspectives - infectious diseases of poverty.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Dale

    2012-01-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization's charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty - its social, political and economic dimensions - remain in the reader's mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal's first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions. PMID:23848993

  13. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD.

  14. Predicting mortality after acute coronary syndromes in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeeth, Liam; Pearce, Neil; Herrett, Emily; Timmis, Adam; Hemingway, Harry; Wedzicha, Jadwiga; Quint, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores in predicting mortality at 6 months for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to investigate how it might be improved. Methods Data were obtained on 481 849 patients with acute coronary syndrome admitted to UK hospitals between January 2003 and June 2013 from the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) database. We compared risk of death between patients with COPD and those without COPD at 6 months, adjusting for predicted risk of death. We then assessed whether several modifications improved the accuracy of the GRACE score for people with COPD. Results The risk of death after adjusting for GRACE score predicted that risk of death was higher for patients with COPD than that for other patients (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.33). Adding smoking into the GRACE score model did not improve accuracy for patients with COPD. Either adding COPD into the model (relative risk (RR) 1.00, 0.94 to 1.02) or multiplying the GRACE score by 1.3 resulted in better performance (RR 0.99, 0.96 to 1.01). Conclusions GRACE scores underestimate risk of death for people with COPD. A more accurate prediction of risk of death can be obtained by adding COPD into the GRACE score equation, or by multiplying the GRACE score predicted risk of death by 1.3 for people with COPD. This means that one third of patients with COPD currently classified as low risk should be classified as moderate risk, and could be considered for more aggressive early treatment after non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction or unstable angina. PMID:27177534

  15. MEK1/2 inhibitors reverse acute vascular occlusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulin; Schwartz, Evan A; Palmer, Gregory M; Zennadi, Rahima

    2016-03-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), treatment of recurrent vasoocclusive episodes, leading to pain crises and organ damage, is still a therapeutic challenge. Vasoocclusion is caused primarily by adherence of homozygous for hemoglobin S (SS) red blood cells (SSRBCs) and leukocytes to the endothelium. We tested the therapeutic benefits of MEK1/2 inhibitors in reversing vasoocclusion in nude and humanized SCD mouse models of acute vasoocclusive episodes using intravital microscopy. Administration of 0.2, 0.3, 1, or 2 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice before human SSRBC infusion inhibited SSRBC adhesion in inflamed vessels, prevented the progression of vasoocclusion, and reduced SSRBC organ sequestration. By use of a more clinically relevant protocol, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor given to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice after human SSRBC infusion and onset of vasoocclusion reversed SSRBC adhesion and vasoocclusion and restored blood flow. In SCD mice, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor also reversed leukocyte and erythrocyte adhesion after the inflammatory trigger of vasoocclusion and improved microcirculatory blood flow. Cell adhesion was reversed by shedding of endothelial E-selectin, P-selectin, and αvβ3 integrin, and leukocyte CD44 and β2 integrin. Thus, MEK1/2 inhibitors, by targeting the adhesive function of SSRBCs and leukocytes, could represent a valuable therapeutic intervention for acute sickle cell vasoocclusive crises.

  16. Imaging Systemic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Borghammer, Per; Knudsen, Karoline; Brooks, David J

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is now widely recognized to be a multisystem disorder affecting the brain and peripheral autonomic nerves. Extensive pathology is present in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system and the intrinsic gastrointestinal plexuses in patients. Autonomic pathology and symptoms such as constipation can predate the clinical diagnosis by years or decades. Imaging studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of Parkinson's disease but focused primarily on imaging cerebral pathology. However, given the importance of understanding the nature, chronology, and functional consequences of peripheral pathology, there has been renewed interest in imaging peripheral organs in Parkinson's disease. Suitable imaging tools can be divided into two types: radiotracer studies that directly estimate loss of sympathetic or parasympathetic nerve terminals, and imaging modalities to quantitate dysphagia, gastric emptying, esophageal and intestinal transit times, and anorectal dyssynergia. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about peripheral imaging in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27072951

  17. Acute Radiation Disease : Cutaneous Syndrome and Toxic properties of Radiomimetics -Radiation Neurotoxins and Hematotoxins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Cutaneous injury is an important complication of a general or local acute irradiation. A type of a skin and tissues lesions depends on a type, intensity, and period of irradiation. Also, the clinical picture, signs, and manifestations of the cutaneous syndrome depend on a type of the radiation toxins circulated in lymph and blood of irradiated mammals. Radiation Toxins were isolated from lymph of the mammals that were irradiated and developed different forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) -Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, and Hematopoietic. Radiation Toxins can be divided into the two important types of toxins (Neu-rotoxins and Hematotoxins) or four groups. The effects of Radiation Neurotoxins include severe damages and cell death of brain, heart, gastrointestinal tissues and endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels. The hematotoxicity of Hematotoxic Radiation Toxins includes lym-phopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia in the blood circulation and transitory lymphocytosis and leukocytosis in the Central Lymphatic System. In all cases, administration of the Radiomimetics (Radiation Toxins) intramuscularly or intravenously to healthy, radiation naive mammals had induced and developed the typical clinical manifestations of the ARS. In all cases, administration of Radiomimetics by subtoxic doses had demonstrated development of typical clinical signs of the cutaneous syndrome such as hair loss, erythema, swelling, desqua-mation, blistering and skin necrosis. In animal-toxic models, we have activated development of the local skin and tissue injury after injection of Radiation Toxins with cytoxic properties.

  18. Deep Vein Thrombosis in the Lower Extremities in Comatose Elderly Patients with Acute Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Murakami, Hideki; Nakane, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Comatose elderly patients with acute neurological illness have a great risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In this study, the incidence of DVT and the effectiveness of early initiation of treatment were evaluated in those patients. Materials and Methods Total 323 patients were admitted to our ward due to neurological diseases in one year, and 43 patients, whose Glasgow Coma Scale was ≤11 and who was older than ≥60 years, were included in this study. D-dimer was measured on admission and day 7, and lower-extremity ultrasonography was performed on day 7. When DVT was positive, heparin treatment was initiated, and further evaluation of pulmonary embolism (PE) was conducted. Vena cava filter protection was inserted in PE-positive patients. Incidence of DVT and PE, alteration of D-dimer value, and effect of heparin treatment were analyzed. Results DVT was positive in 19 (44.2%) patients, and PE was in 4 (9.3%). D-dimer was significantly higher in DVT-positive group on day 7 (p<0.01). No DVT were identified in patients with ischemic disease, while 66.7% of intracerebral hemorrhage and 53.3% of brain contusion patients were DVT positive. Surgery was a definite risk factor for DVT, with an odds ratio of 5.25. DVT and PE disappeared by treatment in all cases, and no patients were succumbed to the thrombosis. Conclusion Patients with hemorrhagic diseases or who undergo operation possess high risk of DVT, and initiation of heparin treatment in 7 days after admission is an effective prophylaxis for DVT in comatose elderly patients without causing bleeding. PMID:26847291

  19. Acute and chronic effects of anteromedial globus pallidus stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Durif, F.; Lemaire, J.; Debilly, B.; Dordain, G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the effects of acute and chronic stimulation in the anteromedial part of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) on the symptoms of patients with Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—Six patients with severe Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 4-5 in "off" drug condition) with motor fluctuations and levodopa induced dyskinesia (LID) were operated on. Chronic electrodes were implanted in the anteromedial GPi bilaterally in five patients and unilaterally in one patient. The effect of stimulation via the four contacts for each electrode (n=11) was assessed postoperatively on the contralateral parkinsonian signs in the off condition and on the contralateral and ipsilateral LID in the "on" condition. The core assessement program for intracerebral transplantation protocol was performed before surgery and then 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery in on and off conditions and in on and off stimulation conditions.
RESULTS—Stimulation performed postoperatively showed a significant improvement (p<0.05) by 47% (contralateral rigidity) and 32% (contralateral bradykinesia) when stimulation was applied through the distal contact. Levodopa induced dyskinesias were improved by 95% (contralateral LID) and by 66% (ipsilateral LID) when stimulation was applied through the distal contact. Six months after the surgery, GPi stimulation in the off condition led to a mean improvement in the motor score of UPDRS by 36%. The mean daily duration in the off state decreased by 52% (p<0.05). The mean duration of LIDs decreased by 68% (p<0.05) and their severity by 53% (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—Chronic stimulation in the anteromedial GPi shows that this is a safe and effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease with benefit sustained for at least 6months.

 PMID:10449552

  20. Evaluation of D-Dimer in Screening Deep Vein Thrombosis in Hospitalized Japanese Patients with Acute Medical Diseases/Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshie; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Mo, Makoto; Tazaki, Junichi; Doi, Takahiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Suzuki, Takeo; Nakajima, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness of D-dimer as a screening method as well as to explore potent predictors of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized Japanese patients with acute medical diseases/episodes. Methods and Subjects: This study was a multi-center, prospective, observational study. The inclusion criteria were hospitalized patients at high risk of developing venous thromboembolism with; (1) congestive heart failure, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infectious diseases, or inflammatory diseases, (2) bed rest ≥4 days, and (3) ≥60 years old. D-dimer was measured on the same day as ultrasonography. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate predictors associated with the presence of DVT. Results: Sixty-nine patients were enrolled. The prevalence of DVT was 33.3% (23/69; 95% C.I., 19.4% to 47.3%). D-dimer was measured in 42 patients and the sensitivity and negative predictive value reached 100%, while the specificity (13.3%) and positive predictive value (31.6%) were low (cut-off value: 0.9 or 1.0 µg/mL). Statistically significant predictor was not assigned. Conclusion: As the sensitivity and negative predictive value of D-dimer reached 100%, D-dimer have a role in excluding patients who might otherwise undergo diagnostic imaging for DVT in hospitalized Japanese patients with acute medical diseases/episodes. PMID:27738461

  1. Prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation on clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Aashay; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Pau, Dhaval; Patel, Samir; Thakkar, Badal; Nalluri, Nikhil; Asti, Deepak; Kanotra, Ritesh; Kadavath, Sabeeda; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Achint; Sheikh, Azfar; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Paydak, Hakan; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia, which is now on course to reach epidemic proportions in the elderly population. AF is a commonly encountered comorbidity in patients with cardiac and major non-cardiac diseases. Morbidity and mortality associated with AF makes it a major healthcare burden. The objective of our article is to determine the prognostic impact of AF on acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Multiple studies have been conducted to determine if AF has an independent role in the overall mortality of such patients. Our review suggests that AF has an independent adverse prognostic impact on the clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26225200

  2. Intestinal helminths regulate lethal acute graft-versus-host disease and preserve the graft-versus-tumor effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Chen, Hung-Lin; Bannick, Nadine; Henry, Michael; Holm, Adrian N; Metwali, Ahmed; Urban, Joseph F; Rothman, Paul B; Weiner, George J; Blazar, Bruce R; Elliott, David E; Ince, M Nedim

    2015-02-01

    Donor T lymphocyte transfer with hematopoietic stem cells suppresses residual tumor growth (graft-versus-tumor [GVT]) in cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, donor T cell reactivity to host organs causes severe and potentially lethal inflammation called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). High-dose steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat GVHD that have limited ability to control the inflammation while incurring long-term toxicity. Novel strategies are needed to modulate GVHD, preserve GVT, and improve the outcome of BMT. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control alloantigen-sensitized inflammation of GVHD, sustain GVT, and prevent mortality in BMT. Helminths colonizing the alimentary tract dramatically increase the Treg activity, thereby modulating intestinal or systemic inflammatory responses. These observations led us to hypothesize that helminths can regulate GVHD and maintain GVT in mice. Acute GVHD was induced in helminth (Heligmosomoides polygyrus)-infected or uninfected BALB/c recipients of C57BL/6 donor grafts. Helminth infection suppressed donor T cell inflammatory cytokine generation and reduced GVHD-related mortality, but maintained GVT. H. polygyrus colonization promoted the survival of TGF-β-generating recipient Tregs after a conditioning regimen with total body irradiation and led to a TGF-β-dependent in vivo expansion/maturation of donor Tregs after BMT. Helminths did not control GVHD when T cells unresponsive to TGF-β-mediated immune regulation were used as donor T lymphocytes. These results suggest that helminths suppress acute GVHD using Tregs and TGF-β-dependent pathways in mice. Helminthic regulation of GVHD and GVT through intestinal immune conditioning may improve the outcome of BMT.

  3. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  4. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  5. The K(+)-Cl(-) Cotransporter KCC2 and Chloride Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Target in Acute Central Nervous System Injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Che, Xiaoru; Tang, Junjia; Ma, Feiqiang; Pan, Kun; Zhao, Mingfei; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Jianmin; Hong, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-2 (KCC2) is a well-known member of the electroneutral cation-chloride cotransporters with a restricted expression pattern to neurons. This transmembrane protein mediates the efflux of Cl(-) out of neurons and exerts a critical role in inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) and glycinergic neurotransmission. Moreover, KCC2 participates in the regulation of various physiological processes of neurons, including cell migration, dendritic outgrowth, spine morphology, and dendritic synaptogenesis. It is important to note that down-regulation of KCC2 is associated with the pathogenesis of multiple neurological diseases, which is of particular relevance to acute central nervous system (CNS) injury. In this review, we aim to survey the pathogenic significance of KCC2 down-regulation under the condition of acute CNS injuries. We propose that further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regarding KCC2 down-regulation after acute CNS injuries is necessary because of potential promising avenues for prevention and treatment of acute CNS injury. PMID:25941074

  6. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  7. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.; Mattison, H. Reid; Miles, Jessica E.; Simpson, Edward R.; Corbett, Ian J.; Schmitt, Bryan H.; May, M.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections. PMID:26400786

  8. Plaque and systemic disease: a reappraisal of the focal infection concept.

    PubMed

    Thoden van Velzen, S K; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Moorer, W R

    1984-04-01

    The review presented here covers metastatic local and systemic disease secondary to the accumulation of plaque or the formation of other pathogenic microbial depots in the mouth. At least 3 pathways may link oral infection to secondary disease, to wit metastatic infection due to transient bacteremia, metastatic immunological injury, and metastatic toxic injury. The available evidence is presented and examples are provided. They concern among others such divergent diseases as acute bacterial myocarditis, infective endocarditis, brain abscess, uveitis and iridocyclitis, trigeminal and atypical facial neuralgia, unilateral facial paralysis, fever of "unknown' origin, and neutrophil dysfunction.

  9. The role of CD8+T cells in the acute and chronic phases of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Borrow, P; Tonks, P; Welsh, C J; Nash, A A

    1992-07-01

    The technique of in vivo depletion with T cell subset-specific monoclonal antibodies was used to study the involvement of CD8+T cells in protection/pathogenesis during the acute and chronic demyelinating phases of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced disease. Mice rendered CD8-deficient prior to infection with TMEV were less efficient at clearing virus from the central nervous system compared to intact animals and also suffered demyelinating disease of earlier onset and increased severity. This indicates that CD8+ cells have a protective role in virus clearance at early times post-infection, and may also be involved in downregulating the severity of the chronic demyelinating disease. How CD8+ T cells function to produce these effects is discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with NPM1 Marker

    PubMed Central

    Alizad Ghandforoush, Nasrin; Chahardouli, Bahram; Rostami, Shahrbano; Ghadimi, Habibeh; Ghasemi, Ali; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Nadali, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minimal residual disease (MRD) tests provide early identification of hematologic relapse and timely management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Approximately, 50% of AML patients do not have clonal chromosomal aberrations and categorize as a cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). About 60% of adult CN-AML has a mutation in exon 12 of NPM1 gene. This mutation is specific for malignant clone and potentially is a good marker of MRD. In this retrospective study, we set up a quantitative test for quantifying NPM1 type A mutation and AML patients carrying this mutation at the time of diagnosis, were followed-up. Materials and Methods : We prepared plasmids containing a cDNA fragment of NPM1 and ABL genes by PCR cloning. The plasmids were used to construct standard curves. Eleven patients were analyzed using established method. Serial PB and/or BM samples (n=71) were taken in 1-3 months intervals (mean 1.5-month intervals) and median follow-up duration after chemotherapy was 11 months (5-28.5 months). Results: In this study, we developed RNA-based RQ-PCR to quantitation of NPM1 mutation A with sensitivities of 10(-5). The percent of NPMmut/ABL level showed a range between 132 and 757 with median of 383.5 in samples at diagnosis. The median NPMmut transcript level log reduction was 3 logs. Relapse occurred in 54.5% of patients (n=6), all cases at diagnosis demonstrated the same mutation at relapse. In patients who experienced relapse, log reduction levels of NPM1 mRNA transcript after therapy were 4 (n=2), 3 (n=2) and 1 log (n=2). Totally, NPMmut level showed less than 5 log reduction in all of them, whereas this reduction was 5-6 logs in other patients. Conclusion: Despite the limitations of this study in terms of sample size and duration of follow-up, it showed the accuracy of set up for detection of mutation and this marker has worth for following-up at different stages of disease. Because of high frequency, stability, specificity

  11. Redrawing Papez' circuit: a theory about how acute stress becomes chronic and causes disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Arnold E

    2007-01-01

    The diseases of chronic stress include migraine, essential hypertension, depression, and the metabolic syndrome. A theory is presented to explain how acute stress becomes chronic and causes these inter-related conditions. The theory is based on a new "circuit of emotion", which is derived from Papez' famous theory of emotion. The hypothesis is as follows: There is a basic circuit of emotion which runs from the hippocampus (defined as the dentate gyrus plus the CA regions), where emotion arises, to the amygdala and from there to serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN projects back to the dentate gyrus in two ways: a direct route without a stop and an indirect route via pacemaker cells in the entorhinal cortex. The purpose of the direct route is to promote neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate; the indirect route has two purposes: to imprint ongoing moments of consciousness onto new dentate cells for retention as memory and to provide a negative feedback loop for regulation of the whole process. The hippocampus, the amygdala, and the DRN all project to the hypothalamus, which are branches off the basic loop that subserve the autonomic expression of emotion. Pathologic overdrive of the DRN causes overdrive of the entorhinal cortex, which leads to excitotoxic cell death of neurons in the hippocampus involved in the negative feedback loop. The disinhibited amygdala and DRN are then free to orchestrate the syndromes of chronic stress. Recovery from chronic stress requires repopulation of the dentate gyrus and restoration of the feedback loop. Excitotoxic cell death in the hippocampus results from either extraordinary acute stress or increased susceptibility to DRN overdrive, as might be caused, for example, by genetic factors, age, high cortisol levels, or incomplete recovery from previous damage. Three goals for therapeutic intervention are identified: inhibition of pacemaker cells in the DRN (which can be targeted by

  12. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.). PMID:20111855

  13. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  14. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts ... of a vessel of the body). What’s the immune system? The immune system allows us to identify and ...

  15. Emerging coral diseases in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i (USA): two major disease outbreaks of acute Montipora white syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aeby, Greta S.; Callahan, Sean; Cox, Evelyn F.; Runyon, Christina M.; Smith, Ashley; Stanton, Frank G.; Ushijima, Blake; Work, Thierry M.

    2016-01-01

    In March 2010 and January 2012, we documented 2 widespread and severe coral disease outbreaks on reefs throughout Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i (USA). The disease, acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS), manifested as acute and progressive tissue loss on the common reef coral M. capitata. Rapid visual surveys in 2010 revealed 338 aMWS-affected M. capitata colonies with a disease abundance of (mean ± SE) 0.02 ± 0.01 affected colonies per m of reef surveyed. In 2012, disease abundance was significantly higher (1232 aMWS-affected colonies) with 0.06 ± 0.02 affected colonies m-1. Prior surveys found few acute tissue loss lesions in M. capitata in Kāne‘ohe Bay; thus, the high number of infected colonies found during these outbreaks would classify this as an emerging disease. Disease abundance was highest in the semi-enclosed region of south Kāne‘ohe Bay, which has a history of nutrient and sediment impacts from terrestrial runoff and stream discharge. In 2010, tagged colonies showed an average tissue loss of 24% after 1 mo, and 92% of the colonies continued to lose tissue in the subsequent month but at a slower rate (chronic tissue loss). The host-specific nature of this disease (affecting only M. capitata) and the apparent spread of lesions between M. capitatacolonies in the field suggest a potential transmissible agent. The synchronous appearance of affected colonies on multiple reefs across Kāne‘ohe Bay suggests a common underlying factor. Both outbreaks occurred during the colder, rainy winter months, and thus it is likely that some parameter(s) associated with winter environmental conditions are linked to the emergence of disease outbreaks on these reefs.

  16. Emerging coral diseases in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i (USA): two major disease outbreaks of acute Montipora white syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Greta S; Callahan, Sean; Cox, Evelyn F; Runyon, Christina; Smith, Ashley; Stanton, Frank G; Ushijima, Blake; Work, Thierry M

    2016-05-26

    In March 2010 and January 2012, we documented 2 widespread and severe coral disease outbreaks on reefs throughout Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i (USA). The disease, acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS), manifested as acute and progressive tissue loss on the common reef coral M. capitata. Rapid visual surveys in 2010 revealed 338 aMWS-affected M. capitata colonies with a disease abundance of (mean ± SE) 0.02 ± 0.01 affected colonies per m of reef surveyed. In 2012, disease abundance was significantly higher (1232 aMWS-affected colonies) with 0.06 ± 0.02 affected colonies m(-1). Prior surveys found few acute tissue loss lesions in M. capitata in Ka¯ne'ohe Bay; thus, the high number of infected colonies found during these outbreaks would classify this as an emerging disease. Disease abundance was highest in the semi-enclosed region of south Kāne'ohe Bay, which has a history of nutrient and sediment impacts from terrestrial runoff and stream discharge. In 2010, tagged colonies showed an average tissue loss of 24% after 1 mo, and 92% of the colonies continued to lose tissue in the subsequent month but at a slower rate (chronic tissue loss). The host-specific nature of this disease (affecting only M. capitata) and the apparent spread of lesions between M. capitata colonies in the field suggest a potential transmissible agent. The synchronous appearance of affected colonies on multiple reefs across Kāne'ohe Bay suggests a common underlying factor. Both outbreaks occurred during the colder, rainy winter months, and thus it is likely that some parameter(s) associated with winter environmental conditions are linked to the emergence of disease outbreaks on these reefs. PMID:27225202

  17. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  18. Systemic vascular effects of acute electrical baroreflex stimulation.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Steven; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Belenkie, Israel; Tyberg, John V

    2014-07-15

    We intended to determine if acute baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) increases venous capacitance and aortic conductance. BAT is effective in resistant hypertension, but its effect on the systemic vasculature is poorly understood. Left ventricular (LV) and aortic pressures and subdiaphragmatic aortic and caval flows (ultrasonic) were measured in six anesthetized dogs. Changes in abdominal blood volume (Vabdominal) were estimated as the integrated difference in abdominal aortic inflow and caval outflow. An electrode was implanted on the right carotid sinus. Data were measured during control and BAT. Next, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was infused and BAT was subsequently added. Finally, angiotensin II (ANG II) was infused, and three increased BAT currents were added. We found that BAT decreased mean aortic pressure (PAo) by 22.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased aortic conductance by 16.2 ± 4.9% (P < 0.01) and Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01). SNP decreased PAo by 17.4 ± 0.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.05). During the SNP infusion, BAT decreased PAo further, by 26.0 ± 2.1 mmHg (P < 0.001). ANG II increased PAo by 40.4 ± 3.5 mmHg (P = 0.001). When an increased BAT current was added, PAo decreased to baseline (P < 0.01) while aortic conductance increased from 62.3 ± 5.2% to 80.2 ± 3.3% (P < 0.05) of control. Vabdominal increased at a rate of 1.8 ± 0.9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01), reversing the ANG II effects. In conclusion, BAT increases arterial conductance, decreases PAo, and increases venous capacitance even in the presence of powerful vasoactive drugs. Increasing venous capacitance may be an important effect of BAT in hypertension. PMID:24816258

  19. Acute and chronic psychological stress as risk factors for cardiovascular disease: Insights gained from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Lagraauw, H Maxime; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of death worldwide and identification and therapeutic modulation of all its risk factors is necessary to ensure a lower burden on the patient and on society. The physiological response to acute and chronic stress exposure has long been recognized as a potent modulator of immune, endocrine and metabolic pathways, however its direct implications for cardiovascular disease development, progression and as a therapeutic target are not completely understood. More and more attention is given to the bidirectional interaction between psychological and physical health in relation to cardiovascular disease. With atherosclerosis being a chronic disease starting already at an early age the contribution of adverse early life events in affecting adult health risk behavior, health status and disease development is receiving increased attention. In addition, experimental research into the biological pathways involved in stress-induced cardiovascular complications show important roles for metabolic and immunologic maladaptation, resulting in increased disease development and progression. Here we provide a concise overview of human and experimental animal data linking chronic and acute stress to CVD risk and increased progression of the underlying disease atherosclerosis. PMID:26256574

  20. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Electronic integrated disease surveillance system and pathogen asset control system.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Tom G; Burdakov, Aleksey V; Oukharov, Andrey O; Zhilokov, Azamat K

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS) has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO) data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS) has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS.Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA).

  2. Electronic integrated disease surveillance system and pathogen asset control system.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Tom G; Burdakov, Aleksey V; Oukharov, Andrey O; Zhilokov, Azamat K

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System (EIDSS) has been used to strengthen and support monitoring and prevention of dangerous diseases within One Health concept by integrating veterinary and human surveillance, passive and active approaches, case-based records including disease-specific clinical data based on standardised case definitions and aggregated data, laboratory data including sample tracking linked to each case and event with test results and epidemiological investigations. Information was collected and shared in secure way by different means: through the distributed nodes which are continuously synchronised amongst each other, through the web service, through the handheld devices. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System provided near real time information flow that has been then disseminated to the appropriate organisations in a timely manner. It has been used for comprehensive analysis and visualisation capabilities including real time mapping of case events as these unfold enhancing decision making. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System facilitated countries to comply with the IHR 2005 requirements through a data transfer module reporting diseases electronically to the World Health Organisation (WHO) data center as well as establish authorised data exchange with other electronic system using Open Architecture approach. Pathogen Asset Control System (PACS) has been used for accounting, management and control of biological agent stocks. Information on samples and strains of any kind throughout their entire lifecycle has been tracked in a comprehensive and flexible solution PACS.Both systems have been used in a combination and individually. Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance System and PACS are currently deployed in the Republics of Kazakhstan, Georgia and Azerbaijan as a part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program (CBEP) sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). PMID:23327375

  3. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães) that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI). This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as “Distantiae transmission”. PMID:24854494

  4. Acute Infectious Gastroenteritis Potentiates a Crohn's Disease Pathobiont to Fuel Ongoing Inflammation in the Post-Infectious Period

    PubMed Central

    Small, Cherrie L.; Xing, Lydia; Law, Hong T.

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of diverse etiology. Exposure to foodborne pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis produces a long-term risk of CD well into the post-infectious period but the mechanistic basis for this ongoing relationship to disease onset is unknown. We developed two novel models to study the comorbidity of acute gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella Typhimurium or Citrobacter rodentium in mice colonized with adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), a bacterial pathobiont linked to CD. Here, we show that disease activity in the post-infectious period after gastroenteritis is driven by the tissue-associated expansion of the resident AIEC pathobiont, with an attendant increase in immunopathology, barrier defects, and delays in mucosal restitution following pathogen clearance. These features required AIEC resistance to host defense peptides and a fulminant inflammatory response to the enteric pathogen. Our results suggest that individuals colonized by AIEC at the time of acute infectious gastroenteritis may be at greater risk for CD onset. Importantly, our data identify AIEC as a tractable disease modifier, a finding that could be exploited in the development of therapeutic interventions following infectious gastroenteritis in at-risk individuals. PMID:27711220

  5. Silibinin suppresses astroglial activation in a mouse model of acute Parkinson's disease by modulating the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kyung Moon; Jung, Young-Suk; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-11-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, and is characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss in midbrain. The MPTP-induced PD model has been well characterized by motor deficits and selective dopaminergic neuronal death accompanied by glial activation. Silibinin is a constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and has been proposed to have hepatoprotective, anti-cancer, anti-oxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, the authors studied the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in an acute MPTP model of PD. Silibinin was administered for 2 weeks, and then MPTP was administered to mice over 1 day (acute MPTP induced PD). Silibinin pretreatment effectively ameliorated motor dysfunction, dopaminergic neuronal loss, and glial activations caused by MPTP. In addition, an in vitro study demonstrated that silibinin suppressed astroglial activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation in primary astrocytes in response to MPP(+) treatment. These findings show silibinin protected dopaminergic neurons in an acute MPTP-induced mouse model of PD, and suggest its neuroprotective effects might be mediated by the suppression of astrocyte activation via the inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the study indicates silibinin should be viewed as a potential treatment for PD and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with neuroinflammation. PMID:26434409

  6. Genetics of CD33 in Alzheimer's disease and acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Manasi; Chiles, Joe; Xi, Hualin S.; Medway, Christopher; Simpson, James; Potluri, Shobha; Howard, Dianna; Liang, Ying; Paumi, Christian M.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul; Younkin, Steven; Fardo, David W.; Estus, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The CD33 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3865444 has been associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rs3865444 is in linkage disequilibrium with rs12459419 which has been associated with efficacy of an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) chemotherapeutic agent based on a CD33 antibody. We seek to evaluate the extent to which CD33 genetics in AD and AML can inform one another and advance human disease therapy. We have previously shown that these SNPs are associated with skipping of CD33 exon 2 in brain mRNA. Here, we report that these CD33 SNPs are associated with exon 2 skipping in leukocytes from AML patients and with a novel CD33 splice variant that retains CD33 intron 1. Each copy of the minor rs12459419T allele decreases prototypic full-length CD33 expression by ∼25% and decreases the AD odds ratio by ∼0.10. These results suggest that CD33 antagonists may be useful in reducing AD risk. CD33 inhibitors may include humanized CD33 antibodies such as lintuzumab which was safe but ineffective in AML clinical trials. Here, we report that lintuzumab downregulates cell-surface CD33 by 80% in phorbol-ester differentiated U937 cells, at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml. Overall, we propose a model wherein a modest effect on RNA splicing is sufficient to mediate the CD33 association with AD risk and suggest the potential for an anti-CD33 antibody as an AD-relevant pharmacologic agent. PMID:25762156

  7. Oncogenetics and minimal residual disease are independent outcome predictors in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beldjord, Kheira; Chevret, Sylvie; Asnafi, Vahid; Huguet, Françoise; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Leguay, Thibaut; Thomas, Xavier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Grardel, Nathalie; Chalandon, Yves; Boissel, Nicolas; Schaefer, Beat; Delabesse, Eric; Cavé, Hélène; Chevallier, Patrice; Buzyn, Agnès; Fest, Thierry; Reman, Oumedaly; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Lhéritier, Véronique; Béné, Marie C; Lafage, Marina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2014-06-12

    With intensified pediatric-like therapy and genetic disease dissection, the field of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has evolved recently. In this new context, we aimed to reassess the value of conventional risk factors with regard to new genetic alterations and early response to therapy, as assessed by immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor minimal residual disease (MRD) levels. The study was performed in 423 younger adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in first remission (265 B-cell precursor [BCP] and 158 T-cell ALL), with cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) as the primary end point. In addition to conventional risk factors, the most frequent currently available genetic alterations were included in the analysis. A higher specific hazard of relapse was independently associated with postinduction MRD level ≥10(-4) and unfavorable genetic characteristics (ie, MLL gene rearrangement or focal IKZF1 gene deletion in BCP-ALL and no NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutation and/or N/K-RAS mutation and/or PTEN gene alteration in T-cell ALL). These 2 factors allowed definition of a new risk classification that is strongly associated with higher CIR and shorter relapse-free and overall survival. These results indicate that genetic abnormalities are important predictors of outcome in adult ALL not fully recapitulated by early response to therapy. Patients included in this study were treated in the multicenter GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. Both trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027 and #NCT00327678, respectively. PMID:24740809

  8. Quantitative analysis of eosinophils in acute graft-versus-host disease compared with drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Joshua; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2010-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), if not detected and treated early, is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs), the most frequent clinical and histopathological mimickers of early aGVHD, are often still distinguished from aGVHD by the presence of eosinophils within the inflammatory infiltrate on skin biopsy. Distinguishing these entities is important because the delay of appropriate treatment of aGVHD may lead to advanced stages of the disease process with a poor prognosis. To determine whether the existence or amount of eosinophilic infiltrate could be used to differentiate these entities, we employed a quantitative method of analyzing eosinophils in skin biopsies of rashes from patients with aGVHD and DHR. Eosinophils were counted in 50 high-power fields (HPFs) in skin biopsies of patients with clinical grade >or=2 aGVHD (+aGVHD), with clinical grade <2 aGVHD (-aGVHD), and those with clinical DHR (+DHR). The average number of eosinophils per 10 HPFs (ave. eos/10 HPFs) increased throughout each group. The ave. eos/10 HPFs in +DHR was significantly different from both aGVHD groups (P < 0.001). The specificity to completely rule out aGVHD did not reach 100% until 16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs was observed. There is a significant difference between the numbers of eosinophils found in differentiating DHR from aGVHD, but a very high number (>16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs) is necessary to rule out aGVHD completely. Therefore, a quantitative analysis of eosinophils in all biopsies to rule out aGVHD would be of limited value and should only be considered in those biopsies with significant eosinophilia.

  9. Oncogenetics and minimal residual disease are independent outcome predictors in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beldjord, Kheira; Chevret, Sylvie; Asnafi, Vahid; Huguet, Françoise; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Leguay, Thibaut; Thomas, Xavier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Grardel, Nathalie; Chalandon, Yves; Boissel, Nicolas; Schaefer, Beat; Delabesse, Eric; Cavé, Hélène; Chevallier, Patrice; Buzyn, Agnès; Fest, Thierry; Reman, Oumedaly; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Lhéritier, Véronique; Béné, Marie C; Lafage, Marina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2014-06-12

    With intensified pediatric-like therapy and genetic disease dissection, the field of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has evolved recently. In this new context, we aimed to reassess the value of conventional risk factors with regard to new genetic alterations and early response to therapy, as assessed by immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor minimal residual disease (MRD) levels. The study was performed in 423 younger adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in first remission (265 B-cell precursor [BCP] and 158 T-cell ALL), with cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) as the primary end point. In addition to conventional risk factors, the most frequent currently available genetic alterations were included in the analysis. A higher specific hazard of relapse was independently associated with postinduction MRD level ≥10(-4) and unfavorable genetic characteristics (ie, MLL gene rearrangement or focal IKZF1 gene deletion in BCP-ALL and no NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutation and/or N/K-RAS mutation and/or PTEN gene alteration in T-cell ALL). These 2 factors allowed definition of a new risk classification that is strongly associated with higher CIR and shorter relapse-free and overall survival. These results indicate that genetic abnormalities are important predictors of outcome in adult ALL not fully recapitulated by early response to therapy. Patients included in this study were treated in the multicenter GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. Both trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027 and #NCT00327678, respectively.

  10. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Kissling, Grace E; Ledbetter, Allen D; Nyska, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. However, cross-model organ pathologies and clinical manifestations are often not compared. We hypothesized that genetic CVD rat models will exhibit baseline pathologies and will thus express varied lung response to acute ozone exposure. Male 12-14-week-old healthy Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WIS), and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone SH (SHSP), obese SH heart-failure (SHHF), obese diabetic JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h and clinical biomarkers, and lung, heart and kidney pathologies were compared immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Strain differences were observed between air-exposed CVD-prone and WKY rats in clinical biomarkers and in kidney and heart pathology. Serum cholesterol was higher in air-exposed obese SHHF and JCR compared to other air-exposed strains. Ozone did not produce lesions in the heart or kidney. CVD-prone and SD rats demonstrated glomerulopathy and kidney inflammation (WKY = WIS = SH < SD = SHSP < SHHF < JCR = FHH) regardless of ozone. Cardiac myofiber degeneration was evident in SH, SHHF, and JCR, while only JCR tends to have inflammation in coronaries. Lung pathology in air-exposed rats was minimal in all strains except JCR. Ozone induced variable alveolar histiocytosis and bronchiolar inflammation; JCR and SHHF were less affected. This study provides a comparative account of the clinical manifestations of disease and early-life organ pathologies in several rat models of CVD and their differential susceptibility to lung injury from air pollutant exposure.

  11. Soluble DNAM-1, as a Predictive Biomarker for Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Minoru; Shibuya, Kazuko; Hirochika, Rei; Kanemoto, Miyoko; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Okada, Masafumi; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Cho, Yukiko; Kojima, Hiroshi; Teshima, Takanori; Imamura, Masahiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Because diagnosis of aGVHD is exclusively based on clinical symptoms and pathological findings, reliable and noninvasive laboratory tests for accurate diagnosis are required. An activating immunoreceptor, DNAM-1 (CD226), is expressed on T cells and natural killer cells and is involved in the development of aGVHD. Here, we identified a soluble form of DNAM-1 (sDNAM-1) in human sera. In retrospective univariate and multivariate analyses of allo-HSCT patients (n = 71) at a single center, cumulative incidences of all grade (grade I–IV) and sgrade II–IV aGVHD in patients with high maximal serum levels of sDNAM-1 (≥30 pM) in the 7 days before allo-HSCT were significantly higher than those in patients with low maximal serum levels of sDNAM-1 (<30 pM) in the same period. However, sDNAM-1 was not associated with other known allo-HSCT complications. Our data suggest that sDNAM-1 is potentially a unique candidate as a predictive biomarker for the development of aGVHD. PMID:27257974

  12. Retroviral induction of acute lymphoproliferative disease and profound immunosuppression in adult C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have shown that a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) causes the acute onset of lymphoproliferation and immunosuppression when injected into adult C57BL/6 mice. The ecotropic/MCF (mink cell focus- inducing) mixture of MuLV stimulates polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation to antibody-secreting cells. Serum Ig levels are elevated for all isotypes except IgA. The viral infection leads to a rapid decline in T lymphocyte responses to mitogens and alloantigens, as well as a decrease in helper cell activity. Specific antibody responses to both T-dependent and T-independent antigens are impaired, and the response of B lymphocytes to mitogens is abolished. The profound immunosuppression seems to be due to the MuLV-induced polyclonal activation of lymphocytes. No active suppression of normal lymphocyte responses by cells from virus-infected mice was observed. The disease induced by the LP-BM5 MuLV isolate thus seems a promising model for the study of lymphocyte activation and the mechanisms of retrovirus-induced immunosuppression. PMID:2984305

  13. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  14. Soluble DNAM-1, as a Predictive Biomarker for Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Minoru; Shibuya, Kazuko; Hirochika, Rei; Kanemoto, Miyoko; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Okada, Masafumi; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Cho, Yukiko; Kojima, Hiroshi; Teshima, Takanori; Imamura, Masahiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Because diagnosis of aGVHD is exclusively based on clinical symptoms and pathological findings, reliable and noninvasive laboratory tests for accurate diagnosis are required. An activating immunoreceptor, DNAM-1 (CD226), is expressed on T cells and natural killer cells and is involved in the development of aGVHD. Here, we identified a soluble form of DNAM-1 (sDNAM-1) in human sera. In retrospective univariate and multivariate analyses of allo-HSCT patients (n = 71) at a single center, cumulative incidences of all grade (grade I-IV) and sgrade II-IV aGVHD in patients with high maximal serum levels of sDNAM-1 (≥30 pM) in the 7 days before allo-HSCT were significantly higher than those in patients with low maximal serum levels of sDNAM-1 (<30 pM) in the same period. However, sDNAM-1 was not associated with other known allo-HSCT complications. Our data suggest that sDNAM-1 is potentially a unique candidate as a predictive biomarker for the development of aGVHD. PMID:27257974

  15. A polygraph study of ischemic heart disease: behavior of systolic times in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sardella, F; Martinotti, R; Porro, F; Monzani, V; Randazzo, A; Pieri, R

    1983-01-01

    The authors investigated systolic time intervals in 28 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Polygraph recordings were made on the first day of illness and repeated at two, three, five, and seven hospital days. The patients were divided into two groups: one with a contributory history of ischemic and/or hypertensive heart disease (Group PH for "positive history") and one without such history (Group NH for "negative history"). The influence of numerous variables on systolic times were explored in both groups, and the emerging data were processed by multiple stepwise regression analysis. The results show that the left ventricular ejection time (LVET) is invariably shortened in AMI, whereas the pre-ejection indices (PEP and ICT) afford definite differentiation of patients of Group PH (with lengthened PEP and ICT values) from those of Group NH (shortened PEP and ICT). The authors emphasize the importance of obtaining polygraph recordings very early in the course of AMI and of taking into account the patient's history in view of a correct assessment of pre-ejection times.

  16. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10(-3) a 10(-5)), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome in Six Middle Eastern Countries

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan A.; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zubaid, Mohammad; Rashed, Wafa A.; Ridha, Mustafa; Almahmeed, Wael; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Amin, Haitham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2011-01-01

    To describe prevalence and impact of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), data were collected over 5 months from 6 Middle Eastern countries. Patients were divided into 2 groups (with and without PAD). Out of 6705 consecutive ACS patients, PAD was reported in 177 patients. In comparison to non-PAD, PAD patients were older and more likely to have cardiovascular risk factors. They were more likely to have high Killip class, high GRACE risk score, and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation. Thrombolytics, antiplatelet use, and coronary intervention were comparable in both groups. When presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), patients with PAD had worse outcomes, while in NSTEACS; PAD was associated with higher rate of heart failure in comparison to non-PAD patients. In diabetics, PAD was associated with 2-fold increase in mortality when compared to non-PAD (P = 0.028). After adjustment, PAD was associated with high mortality in STEMI (adjusted OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.23–5.65, P = 0.01). Prevalence of PAD in ACS in the Gulf region is low. Patients with PAD and ACS constitute a high risk group and require more attention. PAD in patients with STEMI is an independent predictor of in-hospital death. PMID:22220279

  18. Acute renal failure in obstructive diseases of the extrahepatic biliary ducts.

    PubMed

    Acalovschi, I; Chirileanu, T

    1984-01-01

    A series of 46 patients with obstructive disease of the bile ducts complicated by acute renal failure (ARF) is presented. The patients exhibited obstructive jaundice with prevalence of conjugated bilirubine. In 80% of the cases biliary obstruction was associated with cholangitis. Disturbances of the liver function (from mild cholestasis to biliary cirrhosis) were also present. The renal damage was due to biliary disorders and was either present on admission (33 cases) or developed postoperatively (13 cases). Most of the patients presented nonoliguric ARF as well as poor perfusion resulting from decreased circulating blood volume (dehydration and electrolyte loss). Among the criteria used to determine the type of ARF, the urinary/plasma creatinine ratio less than 10 and urinary/plasma osmolarity ratio less than 1.1 were the most valuable. Management of ARF by dialysis alone was not satisfactory. Attention is called to the surgical treatment of the biliary disorder as being essential to prognosis. Patients not treated by radical surgery died in proportion of 87 to 100%. From the rest of 18 patients in whom the operation provided an adequate biliary drainage, in 15 the renal function was restored and 12 survived. Better prognosis in these patients was dependent not only on the ability to cure the cholestasis and infection, but on the early surgical treatment. The ultimate prognosis depends on the improvement of the liver function.

  19. Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update.

    PubMed

    Holtan, Shernan G; Pasquini, Marcelo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2014-07-17

    Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need. PMID:24914140

  20. Losartan reduces ensuing chronic kidney disease and mortality after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shun-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Fang-Ling; Lin, Chi-Chun; Chang, Fan-Chi; Liu, Chia-Hao; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Lin, Shuei-Liong

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical studies disclose that ensuing CKD progresses after functional recovery from AKI, but the underlying mechanisms remain illusive. Using a murine model representing AKI-CKD continuum, we show angiotensin II type 1a (AT1a) receptor signaling as one of the underlying mechanisms. Male adult CD-1 mice presented severe AKI with 20% mortality within 2 weeks after right nephrectomy and left renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Despite functional recovery, focal tubular atrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and fibrosis, upregulation of genes encoding angiotensinogen and AT1a receptor were shown in kidneys 4 weeks after AKI. Thereafter mice manifested increase of blood pressure, albuminuria and azotemia progressively. Drinking water with or without losartan or hydralazine was administered to mice from 4 weeks after AKI. Increase of mortality, blood pressure, albuminuria, azotemia and kidney fibrosis was noted in mice with vehicle administration during the 5-month experimental period. On the contrary, these parameters in mice with losartan administration were reduced to the levels shown in control group. Hydralazine did not provide similar beneficial effect though blood pressure was controlled. These findings demonstrate that losartan can reduce ensuing CKD and mortality after functional recovery from AKI. PMID:27677327

  1. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10−4), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10−4, whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25999452

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin and presepsin for infectious disease in patients with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Gaku; Shibata, Shigehiro; Fukui, Yasuo; Okamura, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and presepsin (PSEP) are sepsis markers, but their diagnostic accuracy may be compromised in acute kidney injury (AKI). We evaluated their diagnostic accuracy in patients with/without AKI. This retrospective study comprised 91 patients with at least one criterion of systematic inflammatory response syndrome. AKI markers plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), plasma cystatin C (CysC), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were measured upon hospital admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Patients were divided into non-AKI and AKI groups. APACHE II severity scores were determined. PCT and PSEP levels were increased significantly in non-AKI and AKI patients with infection. NGAL, CysC, and eGFR in patients with infection were associated with PCT, PSEP, and APACHE II score, and levels of PCT and PSEP were correlated significantly with disease severity. PCT and PSEP are useful markers of bacterial infections in AKI but different thresholds should be applied. PMID:27489118

  3. Secretory phospholipase A(2) predicts impending acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Styles, L A; Aarsman, A J; Vichinsky, E P; Kuypers, F A

    2000-11-01

    Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is the leading cause of death in sickle cell disease. Severe ACS often develops in the course of a vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), but currently there are no predictors for its development. Secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), a potent inflammatory mediator, is elevated in ACS, and previous work suggests that sPLA(2) predicts impending ACS. We prospectively evaluated sPLA(2) concentration during 21 admissions for VOC; 6 of these patients went on to develop ACS. Elevation of sPLA(2) was detected all 6 patients 24 to 48 hours before ACS was clinically diagnosed. Adding the requirement for fever raised the specificity of sPLA(2) to 87% while retaining 100% sensitivity. These data indicate that sPLA(2) can be useful in alerting the clinician to patients with impending ACS. In addition, sPLA(2) may be useful for instituting early therapies to prevent or reduce the clinical morbidity of ACS. PMID:11050014

  4. [Scoring of severity of patients' condition with acute surgical diseases and injuries of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Lesik, P S; Kharisov, A M; Pashaev, A A

    2015-07-01

    Ten of the most frequent symptoms that do not require special methods of their determination except general clinical examinations established by any health care professional on pre-hospital stage were determined on the basis of analysis of more than one thousand records of patients with acute surgical abdominal diseases and clinical symptom load. The authors performed an assessment of each symptom depending on severity of patient's condition ranging from 1 point (satisfactory condition) till 5 points (critical condition). Information has been obtained: in case of satisfactory condition--up to 10 points, moderate--up to 20 points, heavy--up to 30 points, extremely heavy condition--up to 45 points and terminal condition--more than 45 points. Thus, conditional descriptive method of assessment of patient's condition during the clinical examination is combined with objective-scoring. The given method combines numeric expression with methods accepted in literature--"MFS-CA", "APACHE II" and allows to perform an objective assessment of the treatment process at different stages, to practice health care standards, to perform an analysis of outcomes. The article provides tables, which substantiate proposed method.

  5. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  6. Acute systemic toxicity--prospects for tiered testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Botham, P A

    2004-04-01

    After many years of controversy and debate, the LD50 test was finally deleted by the end of 2002. Three alternative animal tests, the Fixed Dose Procedure, the Acute Toxic Class Method and the Up and Down Procedure have been developed which give rise to significant improvements in animal welfare. They have recently undergone revision to improve their scientific performance but more importantly to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy for acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests within the next year or so to improve dose level selection and thus give further modest improvements in the numbers of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, and is at least 10 years away.

  7. Acute coronary syndrome in the elderly: the Malaysian National Cardiovascular Disease Database-Acute Coronary Syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    Zuhdi, Ahmad Syadi Mahmood; Ahmad, Wan Azman Wan; Zaki, Rafdzah Ahmad; Mariapun, Jeevitha; Ali, Rosli Mohd; Sari, Norashikin Md; Ismail, Muhammad Dzafir; Hian, Sim Kui

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The elderly are often underrepresented in clinical trials for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and cardiologists commonly face management dilemmas in the choice of treatment for this group of patients, particularly concerning the use of invasive revascularisation. This study analysed the characteristics of hospitalised elderly patients with ACS, and compared the outcomes of treatments. METHODS From 29 December 2005 to 26 April 2010, 13,545 patients were admitted for ACS in 16 hospitals across Malaysia. These patients were divided into two groups – elderly (≥ 65 years) and non-elderly (< 65 years). The clinical characteristics, treatment received (invasive or non-invasive) and outcomes (in-hospital and 30-day all-cause mortality) of the two groups were compared. The elderly patients were then grouped according to the type of treatment received, and the outcomes of the two subgroups were compared. RESULTS Elderly patients had a higher cardiovascular risk burden and a higher incidence of comorbidities. They were less likely to receive urgent revascularisation for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (elderly: 73.9% vs. non-elderly: 81.4%) and had longer door-to-needle time (elderly: 60 minutes vs. non-elderly: 50 minutes, p = 0.004). The rate of cardiac catheterisation was significantly lower in the elderly group across all ACS strata. Elderly patients had poorer outcomes than non-elderly patients, but those who received invasive treatment appeared to have better outcomes than those who received non-invasive treatment. CONCLUSION Elderly patients with ACS tend to be undertreated, both invasively and pharmacologically. Invasive treatment seems to yield better outcomes for this group of patients. PMID:26768171

  8. Deaths following acute diarrhoeal diseases among hospitalised infants in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Lee, W S; Ooi, T L

    1999-09-01

    The risk factors and modes of death following acute diarrhoeal illness in children admitted to University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur between 1982 and 1997 were studied retrospectively. Among 4,689 cases of acute gastroenteritis admitted, ten deaths were noted. The case mortality rate was 2.1/1000 admissions. All deaths were infants below one year, with eight females and two males. Acute renal failure and acute pulmonary oedema were common preceding events. Female sex, infants less than twelve months, the presence of hyper or hyponatraemia and moderate to severe dehydration on admission were risk factors for deaths.

  9. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and <0.01), with a 5-year RFS of 38%, 50% and 71%, respectively (p=0.002). Cytogenetics is the most relevant prognosis factor in AML, however intermediate risk cytogenetics represent a grey zone that require other biomarkers for risk stratification, and we show that MRD evaluation discriminate three prognostic subgroups (p=0.03). Also, MRD assessments yielded relevant information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics. PMID:26598032

  10. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and <0.01), with a 5-year RFS of 38%, 50% and 71%, respectively (p=0.002). Cytogenetics is the most relevant prognosis factor in AML, however intermediate risk cytogenetics represent a grey zone that require other biomarkers for risk stratification, and we show that MRD evaluation discriminate three prognostic subgroups (p=0.03). Also, MRD assessments yielded relevant information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics.

  11. Successful treatment of acute systemic anaphylaxis in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Hayman, David T S; King, Tony; Cameron, Kenneth

    2010-09-01

    This brief communication describes the successful treatment of acute systemic anaphylaxis in a wild-born but captive infant western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the Republic of Congo. The infant demonstrated signs of acute respiratory distress, lingual swelling, and reaction to intradermal tuberculin, given 55 hr earlier. Details of the treatment with steroids, anesthetic induction, and i.v. epinephrine are all reported, and potential antigens that may have initiated the anaphylactic shock are discussed.

  12. The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal on motor performance and dopaminergic receptor sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, N; Fernandez, W; Lees, A J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal were studied in nine patients with levodopa related on-off oscillations. One patient withdrew from the study due to off period confusion and hallucinations. A marked deterioration in motor disability occurred in all patients following overnight withdrawal of levodopa and a further mild delayed deterioration was present over a mean withdrawal period of 44 hours. Patients with more severe disease were able to tolerate levodopa withdrawal for a shorter period of time than those with milder disease severity. The minimum therapeutic dose of subcutaneous apomorphine needed to produce a similar improvement in patients' mobility, before and after several days of drug withdrawal, did not differ, thus providing no clinical evidence for alterations in striatal dopamine receptor sensitivity after acute levodopa withdrawal. PMID:8331352

  13. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  14. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body.

  15. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, Kate T.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious causes of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease are underrecognized but potentially treatable. Heightened awareness educed by advanced understanding of the presentations and management of these infections can aid diagnosis and facilitate treatment. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the PNS. We additionally detail PNS side effects of some frequently used antimicrobial agents. PMID:25360209

  16. Public health response systems in-action: learning from local health departments' experiences with acute and emergency incidents.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jennifer C; Yang, Jane E; Crawley, Adam W; Biesiadecki, Laura; Aragón, Tomás J

    2013-01-01

    As part of their core mission, public health agencies attend to a wide range of disease and health threats, including those that require routine, acute, and emergency responses. While each incident is unique, the number and type of response activities are finite; therefore, through comparative analysis, we can learn about commonalities in the response patterns that could improve predictions and expectations regarding the resources and capabilities required to respond to future acute events. In this study, we interviewed representatives from more than 120 local health departments regarding their recent experiences with real-world acute public health incidents, such as infectious disease outbreaks, severe weather events, chemical spills, and bioterrorism threats. We collected highly structured data on key aspects of the incident and the public health response, particularly focusing on the public health activities initiated and community partners engaged in the response efforts. As a result, we are able to make comparisons across event types, create response profiles, and identify functional and structural response patterns that have import for future public health preparedness and response. Our study contributes to clarifying the complexity of public health response systems and our analysis reveals the ways in which these systems are adaptive to the character of the threat, resulting in differential activation of functions and partners based on the type of incident. Continued and rigorous examination of the experiences of health departments throughout the nation will refine our very understanding of what the public health response system is, will enable the identification of organizational and event inputs to performance, and will allow for the construction of rich, relevant, and practical models of response operations that can be employed to strengthen public health systems. PMID:24236137

  17. Public Health Response Systems In-Action: Learning from Local Health Departments’ Experiences with Acute and Emergency Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer C.; Yang, Jane E.; Crawley, Adam W.; Biesiadecki, Laura; Aragón, Tomás J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of their core mission, public health agencies attend to a wide range of disease and health threats, including those that require routine, acute, and emergency responses. While each incident is unique, the number and type of response activities are finite; therefore, through comparative analysis, we can learn about commonalities in the response patterns that could improve predictions and expectations regarding the resources and capabilities required to respond to future acute events. In this study, we interviewed representatives from more than 120 local health departments regarding their recent experiences with real-world acute public health incidents, such as infectious disease outbreaks, severe weather events, chemical spills, and bioterrorism threats. We collected highly structured data on key aspects of the incident and the public health response, particularly focusing on the public health activities initiated and community partners engaged in the response efforts. As a result, we are able to make comparisons across event types, create response profiles, and identify functional and structural response patterns that have import for future public health preparedness and response. Our study contributes to clarifying the complexity of public health response systems and our analysis reveals the ways in which these systems are adaptive to the character of the threat, resulting in differential activation of functions and partners based on the type of incident. Continued and rigorous examination of the experiences of health departments throughout the nation will refine our very understanding of what the public health response system is, will enable the identification of organizational and event inputs to performance, and will allow for the construction of rich, relevant, and practical models of response operations that can be employed to strengthen public health systems. PMID:24236137

  18. Acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock caused by spontaneous rupture of renal cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yaman, İsmail; Sağlam, İsmet; Kurt, Kamile

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an important cause of end stage renal failure. Rarely, these patients may present with hemorrhagic shock caused by rupture of the renal cyst. The aim of this study was to report a rare case of a patient who arrived at the emergency department with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. A 58-year-old male with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. The patient was admitted to the Department of Surgery with diagnosis of acute abdomen and perirenal hematoma. Although the patient was on conservative treatment, his symptoms did not improve and the patient was operated emergently. During exploration, there was bleeding from the right polycystic kidney, which was 30×20 cm in dimension. The patient underwent nephrectomy and drainage of the hematoma, and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day without any problems. Bleeding due to rupture of a cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs rarely but it may be life threatening. Although conservative methods are often preferable in treatment, surgery can be life saving for patients in whom the clinical situation does not improve.

  19. Gene drive systems for insect disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Sinkins, Steven P; Gould, Fred

    2006-06-01

    The elegant mechanisms by which naturally occurring selfish genetic elements, such as transposable elements, meiotic drive genes, homing endonuclease genes and Wolbachia, spread at the expense of their hosts provide some of the most fascinating and remarkable subjects in evolutionary genetics. These elements also have enormous untapped potential to be used in the control of some of the world's most devastating diseases. Effective gene drive systems for spreading genes that can block the transmission of insect-borne pathogens are much needed. Here we explore the potential of natural gene drive systems and discuss the artificial constructs that could be envisaged for this purpose.

  20. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine.

  1. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  2. McArdle disease: another systemic low-inflammation disorder?

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Smith, Lucille; Naidoo, Melissa; González-Freire, Marta; Pérez, Margarita; Rubio, Juan C; Martín, Miguel A; Andreu, A L; Arenas, Joaquín

    2008-01-31

    McArdle disease is caused by inherited deficit of human muscle glycogen phosphorylase with subsequent blockade in muscle glycogenolysis. Patients usually experience severe exercise intolerance and 'chronic' skeletal muscle damage. We determined circulating levels of 27 cytokines in a group of 31 adult McArdle patients (15 male 16 female; mean (+/-S.E.M.) age: 39+/-3 years) and 29 healthy sedentary controls (14 male, 15 female) before and after an acute exercise bout involving no muscle damage (cycling). Patients had an ongoing state of muscle breakdown even when following a sedentary lifestyle (serum creatine kinase activity at baseline of 2590+/-461 Ul(-1) vs. 97+/-5 Ul(-1) in controls). Under resting conditions, neutrophil count (+20%) and circulating levels of several cytokines were significantly higher (Pdisease is associated with low-level systemic inflammation whereas appropriate exercise induces a similar response in McArdle patients and healthy controls, with a significant increase in the anti-inflammatory myokine IL-6. Our results support the rationale for prescribing carefully supervised exercise training in these patients.

  3. Reengineering acute episodic and chronic care delivery: the Geisinger Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Jonathan R; Casale, Alfred S; Steele, Glenn D; Toms, Steven A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) represents an evolution in clinical decision-making research that allows for the study of heterogeneous groups of patients with complex diseases processes. It has foundations in decision science, reliability science, and health care policy research. Health care finance will increasingly rely on CER for guidance in the coming years. There is increasing awareness of the importance of decreasing unwarranted variation in health care delivery. In the past 7 years, Geisinger Health System has performed broad reengineering of its acute episodic and chronic care delivery models utilizing macrosystem-level application of CER principles. These provider-driven process initiatives have resulted in significant improvement across all segments of care delivery, improved patient outcomes, and notable cost containment. These programs have led to the creation of novel pricing models, and when "hardwired" throughout a care delivery system, they can lead to correct medical decision making by 100% of providers in all patient encounters. Neurosurgery as a specialty faces unique challenges and opportunities with respect to broad adoption and application of CER techniques. PMID:22746233

  4. Reengineering acute episodic and chronic care delivery: the Geisinger Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Jonathan R; Casale, Alfred S; Steele, Glenn D; Toms, Steven A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) represents an evolution in clinical decision-making research that allows for the study of heterogeneous groups of patients with complex diseases processes. It has foundations in decision science, reliability science, and health care policy research. Health care finance will increasingly rely on CER for guidance in the coming years. There is increasing awareness of the importance of decreasing unwarranted variation in health care delivery. In the past 7 years, Geisinger Health System has performed broad reengineering of its acute episodic and chronic care delivery models utilizing macrosystem-level application of CER principles. These provider-driven process initiatives have resulted in significant improvement across all segments of care delivery, improved patient outcomes, and notable cost containment. These programs have led to the creation of novel pricing models, and when "hardwired" throughout a care delivery system, they can lead to correct medical decision making by 100% of providers in all patient encounters. Neurosurgery as a specialty faces unique challenges and opportunities with respect to broad adoption and application of CER techniques.

  5. Secondary histiocytic sarcoma may cause apparent persistence or recurrence of minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alten, Julia; Klapper, Wolfram; Leuschner, Ivo; Eckert, Cornelia; Beier, Rita; Vallo, Elisabeth; Krause, Martin; Claviez, Alexander; Vieth, Simon; Bleckmann, Kirsten; Möricke, Anja; Schrappe, Martin; Cario, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is a rare disease with poor prognosis which may develop subsequent to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here we report two children treated within the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 trial: one patient succumbed to fulminant hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis triggered by HS during ALL maintenance therapy, the other patient had a smoldering course of HS for over 2 years, and subsequently died after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In both cases, HS and ALL were clonally related and apparent return of minimal residual disease (MRD) was detected by qPCR in bone marrow. Thus, HS should be considered in ALL when MRD appears to persist or reappear.

  6. Characteristics of seroconversion and implications for diagnosis of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome: acute and convalescent serology among a prospective cohort of early Lyme disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rebman, Alison W; Crowder, Lauren A; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Aucott, John N

    2015-03-01

    Two-tier serology is often used to confirm a diagnosis of Lyme disease. One hundred and four patients with physician diagnosed erythema migrans rashes had blood samples taken before and after 3 weeks of doxycycline treatment for early Lyme disease. Acute and convalescent serologies for Borrelia burgdorferi were interpreted according to the 2-tier antibody testing criteria proposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Serostatus was compared across several clinical and demographic variables both pre- and post-treatment. Forty-one patients (39.4%) were seronegative both before and after treatment. The majority of seropositive individuals on both acute and convalescent serology had a positive IgM western blot and a negative IgG western blot. IgG seroconversion on western blot was infrequent. Among the baseline variables included in the analysis, disseminated lesions (p < 0.0001), a longer duration of illness (p < 0.0001), and a higher number of reported symptoms (p = 0.004) were highly significantly associated with positive final serostatus, while male sex (p = 0.05) was borderline significant. This variability, and the lack of seroconversion in a subset of patients, highlights the limitations of using serology alone in identifying early Lyme disease. Furthermore, these findings underline the difficulty for rheumatologists in identifying a prior exposure to Lyme disease in caring for patients with medically unexplained symptoms or fibromyalgia-like syndromes.

  7. [Globosides as key players in the pathophysiology of Shiga toxin-associated acute kidney failure and Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Porubsky, S

    2014-11-01

    Globosides and their isomeric counterparts isoglobosides belong to the class of neutral glycosphingolipids with an as yet undefined physiological function. In the pathogenesis of human diseases, globosides play an important role as cellular receptors for Shiga toxins which are produced by certain strains of S. dysenteriae and E. coli. In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-associated kidney failure, we studied human kidney biopsies and animal models. Our work showed that in patients suffering from Shiga toxin-elicited kidney failure, no complement activation could be demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis of kidney biopsies. Therefore, complement activation is unlikely to play a major role in mediating thrombotic microangiopathy on exposure to Shiga toxin. Moreover, analysis of the human biopsies and of a murine model of Shiga toxin-associated disease pinpointed acute tubular damage as an important and previously neglected contributor to acute kidney failure in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Furthermore, globosides play a decisive role in the pathogenesis of Fabry disease which results from a decreased or absent activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. The results on transgenic mice showed that in vital organs, such as the heart, kidneys and liver, it was possible to revert the phenotype of Fabry disease by eliminating the synthesis of globosides. This implicates that substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of globosides might represent a new therapeutic option for Fabry disease, all the more so as globosides seem to be dispensable.

  8. Ethnic differences in mortality from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in New Mexico, 1958-1982.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, T M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Samet, J M

    1989-01-01

    To examine time trends and differences in mortality rates from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in New Mexico's Hispanic, American Indian, and non-Hispanic white populations, we analyzed vital records data for 1958 through 1982. Age-adjusted mortality rates for acute rheumatic fever were low and showed no consistent temporal trends among the three ethnic groups over the study period. Age-adjusted and age-specific mortality rates for chronic rheumatic heart disease in Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites decreased over the 25-year period, although rates were higher among Hispanics than among non-Hispanics during most of the time period. In American Indians, age-adjusted mortality rates for chronic rheumatic heart disease increased between 1968 and 1977 to twice the non-Indian mortality rates during the same period. Despite this increase in mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease among New Mexico's American Indians from 1968 to 1977, the New Mexico data generally reflect national trends of decreasing mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease. PMID:2735024

  9. Cross-Sector Review of Drivers and Available 3Rs Approaches for Acute Systemic Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Seidle, Troy; Robinson, Sally; Holmes, Tom; Creton, Stuart; Prieto, Pilar; Scheel, Julia; Chlebus, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Acute systemic toxicity studies are carried out in many sectors in which synthetic chemicals are manufactured or used and are among the most criticized of all toxicology tests on both scientific and ethical grounds. A review of the drivers for acute toxicity testing within the pharmaceutical industry led to a paradigm shift whereby in vivo acute toxicity data are no longer routinely required in advance of human clinical trials. Based on this experience, the following review was undertaken to identify (1) regulatory and scientific drivers for acute toxicity testing in other industrial sectors, (2) activities aimed at replacing, reducing, or refining the use of animals, and (3) recommendations for future work in this area. PMID:20484382

  10. Genome Anatomy of Streptococcus parasanguinis Strain C1A, Isolated from a Patient with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Reveals Unusual Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kim Tien; Pang, Yong Kek; Chong, Teik Min; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis causes invasive diseases. However, the mechanism by which it causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of S. parasanguinis C1A, isolated from a patient diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several genes that might be associated with pathogenesis are also described. PMID:26021924

  11. VEGF-121 preserves renal microvessel structure and ameliorates secondary renal disease following acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Ellen C.; Friedrich, Jessica L.; Basile, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) compromises microvascular density and predisposes to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and sodium-dependent hypertension. VEGF-121 was administered to rats fed a standard (0.4%) sodium diet at various times following recovery from I/R injury for up to 35 days. VEGF-121 had no effect on the initial loss of renal function, as indicated by serum creatinine levels measured 24 h after injury. Serum creatinine levels declined thereafter, indicative of renal repair. Rats were then switched to an elevated (4.0%) sodium diet for an additional 28 days to induce CKD. The 4.0% sodium diet enhanced renal hypertrophy, interstitial volume, albuminuria, and cardiac hypertrophy relative to postischemic animals maintained on the 0.4% sodium diet. Administration of VEGF-121 from day 0 to 14, day 0 to 35, or day 3 to 35 after I/R suppressed the effects of sodium diet on CKD development, while delayed administration of VEGF-121 from day 21 to 35 had no effect. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein levels were upregulated in postischemic animals, and this effect was significantly increased by the 4.0% sodium diet but was not influenced by prior treatment with VEGF. Conversely, microvascular density was preserved in postischemic animals treated with VEGF-121 relative to vehicle-treated postischemic animals. These data suggest that early, but not delayed, treatment with VEGF-121 can preserve vascular structure after ischemia and influence chronic renal function in response to elevated sodium intake. PMID:18799550

  12. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT. PMID:26507167

  13. Acute lethal graft-versus-host disease stimulates cellular proliferation in the adult rat liver.

    PubMed

    Klein, R M; Clancy, J; Stuart, S

    1982-11-01

    The present investigation was designed to analyse the effects of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adult (DA x LEW)F1 rats on cellular proliferation within the liver. The influence of the host thymus on GVHD-induced proliferation was also assessed. From 1-28 days after initiation of GVHD [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) was injected i.v. and rats were killed one hour later. Percentage labelled cells (LI) of periportal infiltrating cells (PIC), hepatocytes (H), and sinusoidal lining cells (SC) were counted. Mean values for control rats were 0.3 +/- 0.1% (H), 0.4 +/- 0.1% (SC) and 0.2 +/- 0.1% (PIC). GVHD rats demonstrated a significant increase in LI of PIC (days 1-21), SC (days 2-17) and H (days 2-17). Most labelled cells in PIC were large lymphocytes. Peak LI values were 7.0 +/- 1.0% PIC (day 17), 6.8 +/- 0.9% SC (day 17), and 5.2 +/- 0.9% H (day 7), with all cellular compartments returning to near normal LI values by day 28. Stimulation of cellular proliferation occurred in all three liver cell compartments in neonatally thymectomized (TXM) rats. The intensity of GVHD-induced cell proliferation was significantly decreased at day 7 in all compartments and PIC was dramatically decreased at day 21 in TXM-GVHD rats as compared to non-TXM-GVHD rats. It is hypothesized that the general stimulation of hepatocyte cell proliferation in GVHD is related to the secretion of lymphokines by primarily donor and secondarily host T cells in the periportal infiltrate. PMID:7172201

  14. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: the first transmissible disease of the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Macrì, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is the first severe and easily transmissible disease to emerge in the 21st century. It is caused by the infection with a coronavirus, a single strand RNA capsulated virus, recently found in a small mammalian, the masked palm civet. It is likely to represent the source of human infection. The first cases of SARS have been reported in the Chinese province of Guangdong and, since then, probable cases have been reported world wide. The clinical picture is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, cough or dyspnea in patients affected by air-space opacities (unifocal involvement in the 54.6% of cases) or distress respiratory syndrome and linked to a recent exposure to a SARS case or to a travel/residence in an affected area. The empirical therapy is based on broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids and ribavirin, but susceptibility testing have failed to demonstrate direct anti-viral activity of ribavirin against SARS-related coronavirus in vitro. The exposure to respiratory droplets and the contact with biologic fluids (respiratory and gastrointestinal secretions) represent the most efficient transmission modality of the SARS-related coronavirus. Hand hygiene is the most simple and cost effective measure of infection control to prevent contagion, and the use of airborne, contact and droplet precaution is strictly recommended to all health care workers taking care of such patients. The spread of SARS, to less developed country with limited resource for public health programs, represent the emerging alarming threat in the new global scenario.

  15. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT.

  16. Long-Term Outcomes From Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Vincent Y.F.; Condon, John R.; Zhao, Yuejen; Roberts, Kathryn; de Dassel, Jessica L.; Currie, Bart J.; Fittock, Marea; Edwards, Keith N.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We investigated adverse outcomes for people with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and the effect of comorbidities and demographic factors on these outcomes. Methods: Using linked data (RHD register, hospital, and mortality data) for residents of the Northern Territory of Australia, we calculated ARF recurrence rates, rates of progression from ARF to RHD to severe RHD, RHD complication rates (heart failure, endocarditis, stroke, and atrial fibrillation), and mortality rates for 572 individuals diagnosed with ARF and 1248 with RHD in 1997 to 2013 (94.9% Indigenous). Results: ARF recurrence was highest (incidence, 3.7 per 100 person-years) in the first year after the initial ARF episode, but low-level risk persisted for >10 years. Progression to RHD was also highest (incidence, 35.9) in the first year, almost 10 times higher than ARF recurrence. The median age at RHD diagnosis in Indigenous people was young, especially among males (17 years). The development of complications was highest in the first year after RHD diagnosis: heart failure incidence rate per 100 person-years, 9.09; atrial fibrillation, 4.70; endocarditis, 1.00; and stroke, 0.58. Mortality was higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous RHD patients (hazard ratio, 6.55; 95% confidence interval, 2.45–17.51), of which 28% was explained by comorbid renal failure and hazardous alcohol use. RHD complications and mortality rates were higher for urban than for remote residents. Conclusions: This study provides important new prognostic information for ARF/RHD. The residual Indigenous survival disparity in RHD patients, which persisted after accounting for comorbidities, suggests that other factors contribute to mortality, warranting further research. PMID:27407071

  17. Cancer procoagulant in acute non lymphoid leukemia: relationship of enzyme detection to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Donati, M B; Falanga, A; Consonni, R; Alessio, M G; Bassan, R; Buelli, M; Borin, L; Catani, L; Pogliani, E; Gugliotta, L

    1990-08-13

    Blast cell extracts from patients with acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL) express cancer procoagulant (CP). This factor X (FX) activator is distinct from tissue factor (TF) in that it does not require factor VII (FVII) to trigger blood coagulation, it acts as a cysteine proteinase and is not present in normal mononuclear cells. To assess whether there is any relationship between the presence of CP and the status of the disease, ANLL patients have been studied at diagnosis, during remission, at relapse. The procoagulant activity in either the presence or absence of F VII and sensitivity to cysteine proteinase inhibitors were tested on cell extracts. Immunoreactivity was explored with an anti-CP polyclonal antibody. Data obtained in 91 newly-diagnosed ANLL patients (subtypes M1 to M5, FAB classification) confirmed the presence of CP in M1 to M4 groups (mean +/- SE FVII-independent activity: M1 = 2.1 +/- 0.7 unit/mg; M2 = 5.7 +/- 1.7 unit/mg; M3 = 31.5 +/- 8 unit/mg; M4 = 1.6 +/- 1.2 unit/mg); CP was absent in the M5 type. In eight patients analyzed in a subsequent phase of partial remission, specific activity had dropped from 26.9 +/- 7.8 to 10.5 +/- 4.0 unit/mg. Activity was virtually absent (0-0.05 unit/mg) in the bone marrow of 37 patients studied at complete remission. Bone marrow samples from six subjects tested at different intervals after complete remission were repeatedly negative for CP but became positive 2 to 5 months before relapse. Upon relapse, the FVII independent activity rose to 24.2 +/- 8.2 unit/mg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Primary Angioplasty Versus Stenting for Endovascular Management of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease Following Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Villwock, Mark R.; Padalino, David J.; Ramaswamy, Raghu; Deshaies, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of neuroendovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) has been debated since the results of SAMMPRIS reflected poor outcomes following endovascular therapy. There is currently a large spectrum of current management strategies. We compared historical outcomes of patients with ICAD and stroke that were treated with angioplasty-alone versus stent placement. Methods We extracted a population from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) (2005–2011) and the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) (2012) composed of patients with ICAD and infarction that were admitted nonelectively and received endovascular revascularization. Patients treated with thrombectomy or thrombolysis were excluded. Categorical variables were compared with Chi-squared tests. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate mortality while controlling for age, sex, severity, and comorbidities. Results About 2059 admissions met our criteria. A majority were treated via stent placement (71%). Angioplasty-alone had significantly higher mortality (17.6% vs. 8.4%, P<0.001), but no difference in iatrogenic stroke rate (3.4% vs. 3.6%, P=0.826), compared to stent placement. The adjusted odds ratio of mortality for stented patients was 0.536 (95% CI: 0.381–0.753, P<0.001) in comparison to patients treated with angioplasty alone. Conclusions This study found the risk of mortality to be elevated following angioplasty alone in comparison to revascularization with stent placement, without a corresponding significant difference in iatrogenic stroke rate. This may represent selection bias due to patient characteristics not defined in the database, but it also may indicate that patients with ICAD and acute stroke have increased odds of stenosis that is refractory to angioplasty alone and have a high risk of mortality without revascularization. PMID:27403216

  19. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  20. Alzheimer's Disease: Targeting the Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Guimaraes, Isabella M.; Silva, Flavia R.; Ribeiro, Fabiola M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a crucial role in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is responsible for synthesizing ACh from acetyl-CoA and choline in the cytoplasm and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) uptakes the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles. Following depolarization, ACh undergoes exocytosis reaching the synaptic cleft, where it can bind its receptors, including muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. ACh present at the synaptic cleft is promptly hydrolyzed by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), forming acetate and choline, which is recycled into the presynaptic nerve terminal by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). Cholinergic neurons located in the basal forebrain, including the neurons that form the nucleus basalis of Meynert, are severely lost in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the most ordinary cause of dementia affecting 25 million people worldwide. The hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, there is no real correlation between levels of cortical plaques and AD-related cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, synaptic loss is the principal correlate of disease progression and loss of cholinergic neurons contributes to memory and attention deficits. Thus, drugs that act on the cholinergic system represent a promising option to treat AD patients. PMID:26813123

  1. Sepsis as a cause and consequence of acute kidney injury: Program to Improve Care in Acute Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Josée; Soroko, Sharon B.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Paganini, Emil P.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Sepsis commonly contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI); however, the frequency with which sepsis develops as a complication of AKI and the clinical consequences of this sepsis are unknown. This study examined the incidence of, and outcomes associated with, sepsis developing after AKI. Methods We analyzed data from 618 critically ill patients enrolled in a multicenter observational study of AKI (PICARD). Patients were stratified according to their sepsis status and timing of incident sepsis relative to AKI diagnosis. Results We determined the associations among sepsis, clinical characteristics, provision of dialysis, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay (LOS), comparing outcomes among patients according to their sepsis status. Among the 611 patients with data on sepsis status, 174 (28%) had sepsis before AKI, 194 (32%) remained sepsis-free, and 243 (40%) developed sepsis a median of 5 days after AKI. Mortality rates for patients with sepsis developing after AKI were higher than in sepsis-free patients (44 vs. 21%; p < 0.0001) and similar to patients with sepsis preceding AKI (48 vs. 44%; p = 0.41). Compared with sepsis-free patients, those with sepsis developing after AKI were also more likely to be dialyzed (70 vs. 50%; p < 0.001) and had longer LOS (37 vs. 27 days; p < 0.001). Oliguria, higher fluid accumulation and severity of illness scores, non-surgical procedures after AKI, and provision of dialysis were predictors of sepsis after AKI. Conclusions Sepsis frequently develops after AKI and portends a poor prognosis, with high mortality rates and relatively long LOS. Future studies should evaluate techniques to monitor for and manage this complication to improve overall prognosis. PMID:21152901

  2. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: genetic determinants of susceptibility and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Krajinovic, M; Labuda, D; Sinnett, D

    2001-01-01

    The origin of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common pediatric cancer, can be explained by a combination of genetic factors and environmental exposure. The environmental toxicants to which an individual is exposed are biotransformed and eliminated from the body after metabolic conversion mediated by Phase I and Phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Phase I enzymes catalyze hydroxylation, reduction and oxidation reactions of xenobiotics (carcinogens/drugs), often converting them into more active or toxic compounds. Phase II enzymes catalyze conjugation reactions (glucuronidation, acetylation, methylation), thereby converting the metabolites into non-reactive, water-soluble products that are eliminated from the organism. The genetic polymorphism underlying the variation in enzyme activity can modify susceptibility to diverse adult cancers, probably by influencing the activation and removal of toxicants or drugs. Here we present an overview of the role of genetic variants of certain Phase I and Phase II enzymes in the development of childhood ALL, a good model for such studies because of its short latency period. The genetic contribution to the development of ALL is examined by association studies that analyze the loci of Phase I enzymes (cytochrome P-450, myeloperoxidase) and Phase II enzymes (quinone-oxidoreductase, glutathione-S-transferase, N-acetyltransferase). The loci of the enzyme variants CYPlA1, CYP2E1, NQO1, GSTM1, GSTP1, NAT2 are associated with disease development, and evidence of gene-gene interactions has emerged as well. Despite the improvements in treatment, resistant cases of ALL remain a leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Although the underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not well understood, differences in the capacity of ALL patients to process drugs and environmental carcinogens could play a role by modifying the risk of recurrent malignancy, as well as the response to therapy. Therefore, polymorphic genes

  3. Mechanisms of worsening gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, J A; Roca, J; Ferrer, A; Félez, M A; Díaz, O; Roger, N; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms that determine abnormal gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thirteen COPD patients, hospitalized because of an exacerbation, were studied after admission and 38+/-10 (+/-SD) days after discharge, once they were clinically stable. Measurements included forced spirometry, arterial blood gas values, minute ventilation (V'E), cardiac output (Q'), oxygen consumption (V'O2), and ventilation/perfusion (V'A/Q') relationships, assessed by the inert gas technique. Exacerbations were characterized by very severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 0.74+/-0.17 vs 0.91+/-0.19 L, during exacerbation and stable conditions, respectively; p=0.01), severe hypoxaemia (ratio between arterial oxygen tension and inspired oxygen fraction (Pa,O2/FI,O2) 32.7+/-7.7 vs 37.6+/-6.9 kPa (245+/-58 vs 282+/-52 mmHg); p=0.01) and hypercapnia (arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) 6.8+/-1.6 vs 5.9+/-0.8 kPa (51+/-12 vs 44+/-6 mmHg); p=0.04). V'A/Q' inequality increased during exacerbation (log SD Q', 1.10+/-0.29 vs 0.96+/-0.27; normal < or = 0.6; p=0.04) as a result of greater perfusion in poorly-ventilated alveoli. Shunt was almost negligible on both measurements. V'E remained essentially unchanged during exacerbation (10.5+/-2.2 vs 9.2+/-1.8 L x min(-1); p=0.1), whereas both Q' (6.1+/-2.4 vs 5.1+/-1.7 L x min(-1); p=0.05) and V'O2 (300+/-49 vs 248+/-59 mL x min(-1); p=0.03) increased significantly. Worsening of hypoxaemia was explained mainly by the increase both in V'A/Q' inequality and V'O2, whereas the increase in Q' partially counterbalanced the effect of greater V'O2 on mixed venous oxygen tension (PV,O2). We conclude that worsening of gas exchange during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is primarily produced by increased ventilation/perfusion inequality, and that this effect is amplified by the decrease of mixed venous oxygen

  4. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  5. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  6. Acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to resistance exercise in patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T; Zois, Christos E; Douda, Helen T; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key pointsAcute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD.Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses.With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  7. [Extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy by the acute infectious diseases of the abdominal cavity in children].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, R O; Bataev, S M

    2012-01-01

    Surgery on the reason of the "acute abdomen" in children often reveals the persisting vaginal peritoneal defects, which further lead to hernia formation. 23 children (aged 4-15 years) were operated on the acute uncomplicated appendicitis (n=10), acute mesadenitis (n=3), appendicular local and pelvioperitonitis (n=9) and ovary apoplexia (n=1). Inguinal hernia was revealed in all patients during laparoscopy. After videoendoscopic sanation of the abdomen and appendectomy (if it was necessary) the extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy in author's modification was performed. The were no cases of abdominal complications as well as hernia recurrence among the treated patients.

  8. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the astrocyte intermediate filament system in diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hol, Elly M; Pekny, Milos

    2015-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the hallmark intermediate filament (IF; also known as nanofilament) protein in astrocytes, a main type of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytes have a range of control and homeostatic functions in health and disease. Astrocytes assume a reactive phenotype in acute CNS trauma, ischemia, and in neurodegenerative diseases. This coincides with an upregulation and rearrangement of the IFs, which form a highly complex system composed of GFAP (10 isoforms), vimentin, synemin, and nestin. We begin to unravel the function of the IF system of astrocytes and in this review we discuss its role as an important crisis-command center coordinating cell responses in situations connected to cellular stress, which is a central component of many neurological diseases.

  9. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  10. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et. al Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...

  11. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  12. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  13. Risk Factors, Pattern and Clinical Outcome of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Acute Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok; Punatar, Sachin; Gawande, Jayant; Mathew, Libin; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Kannan, Sadhana; Khattry, Navin

    2015-12-01

    We sought to determine risk factors, pattern and outcome of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) in seventy-seven acute leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant at our centre from January 2008 to March 2013. GVHD prophylaxis with cyclosporine-methotrexate or cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil was used. Patients were divided in 2 groups, grade II-IV aGVHD (group A) and grade 0-I aGVHD (group B). Incidence of any grade and grade II-IV aGVHD was 44 and 18 %, respectively. The most common site of aGVHD was gastro-intestinal tract (65 %) followed by skin (35 %). Higher total nucleated cell (TNC) dose infused was associated with increased incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD. Incidence of relapse and incidence of slippage of chimerism was 21 and 36 % in group A while 37 and 27 % in group B respectively. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 21 % in group A and 13 % in group B. Probability of OS and RFS at 4 years was 63 and 34 % in group A compared with 40 and 38 % in group B, respectively. We conclude that higher TNC dose infused is a risk factor for grade II-IV aGVHD with gut being the commonest site. Grade II-IV aGVHD did not have a significant impact on incidence of relapse, TRM and OS.

  14. Amelioration of Acute Kidney Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome by an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, Fidarestat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Mizukami, Hiroki; Kamata, Kosuke; Inaba, Wataru; Kato, Noriaki; Hibi, Chihiro; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a fatal disease because of multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury is a serious complication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and its genesis is still unclear posing a difficulty for an effective treatment. Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor is recently found to suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac failure and its lethality. We studied the effects of AR inhibitor on LPS-induced acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Methods Mice were injected with LPS and the effects of AR inhibitor (Fidarestat 32 mg/kg) before or after LPS injection were examined for the mortality, severity of renal failure and kidney pathology. Serum concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and their mRNA expressions in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney were measured. We also evaluated polyol metabolites in the kidney. Results Mortality rate within 72 hours was significantly less in LPS-injected mice treated with AR inhibitor both before (29%) and after LPS injection (40%) than untreated mice (90%). LPS-injected mice showed marked increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and cytokines, and AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the changes. LPS-induced acute kidney injury was associated with vacuolar degeneration and apoptosis of renal tubular cells as well as infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. With improvement of such pathological findings, AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the elevation of cytokine mRNA levels in multiple organs and renal sorbitol accumulation. Conclusion AR inhibitor treatment ameliorated LPS-induced acute kidney injury, resulting in the lowered mortality. PMID:22253906

  15. Comparison of cytokine expressions in acute myocardial infarction and stable angina stages of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenwen; Wen, Siwan; Wang, Lemin; Duan, Qianglin; Ding, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differential gene expression of cytokines and compare their impacts on the immune functions among the acute myocardial infarction patients (AMI), the stable angina patients (SA) and the controls. Methods: 20 patients with AMI, 20 patients with SA and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. Whole human genome microarray analysis was used to detect the gene expression differences in interferons, interleukins, chemokines, tumor necrosis factors and associated receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) among three groups. Results: Compared with SA patients and the controls respectively, in AMI patients, IFNα2, IFNαR1, IFNαR2, IFNγR1, IFNγR2, L1β, IL16, IL18, Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Cxcl6, CxcR2, CxcR4, LIGHT, TNFR1, LT-βR, CD137, TRAILR, and TWEAKR mRNA expressions were significantly up-regulated (P<0.05), while Ccl5, Ccl24, Ccl28, CcR5, TWEAK, CD40, CD27, and BAFFR mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05). But, there was no significant difference in cytokine expression between the SA patients and the controls. Conclusion: In AMI patients, mRNA expression levels of cytokines were imbalanced, indicating the dysfunction of the immune system. Together with no significant change of cytokines was observed between the SA and controls, showing the different cytokine related immune activity in the AMI and SA patients. PMID:26770404

  16. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  17. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  18. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aman P; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  19. Targeted Temperature Management in Pediatric Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Newmyer, Robert; Mendelson, Jenny; Pang, Diana; Fink, Ericka L.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Acute central nervous system conditions due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury (TBI), status epilepticus, and central nervous system infection/inflammation, are a leading cause of death and disability in childhood. There is a critical need for effective neuroprotective therapies to improve outcome targeting distinct disease pathology. Fever, defined as patient temperature > 38°C, has been clearly shown to exacerbate brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) is an intervention using targeted temperature management that has multiple mechanisms of action and robust evidence of efficacy in multiple experimental models of brain injury. Prospective clinical evidence for its neuroprotective efficacy exists in narrowly-defined populations with hypoxic-ischemic injury outside of the pediatric age range while trials comparing hypothermia to normothermia after TBI have failed to demonstrate a benefit on outcome but consistently demonstrate potential use in decreasing refractory intracranial pressure. Data in children from prospective, randomized controlled trials using different strategies of targeted temperature management for various outcomes are few but a large study examining HT versus controlled normothermia to improve neurological outcome in cardiac arrest is underway. PMID:26042193

  20. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  1. Non-invasive ventilation: comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management in acute heart failure syndromes and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pladeck, T; Hader, C; Von Orde, A; Rasche, K; Wiechmann, H W

    2007-11-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP) and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) are accepted treatments in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) and acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The aim of the study was a comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management of NPPV in ACPE and AECOPD trying to find an approach for standard management in intensive care. Thirty patients with acute respiratory failure (14 due to ACPE, 16 due to AECOPD) were prospectively included into the study. If clinical stability could not be achieved by standard therapy (pharmacological therapy and oxygen) patients were treated by non-invasive ventilation (NPPV) using a BiPAP-Vision device in S/T-mode. During the first 90 min after the onset of NPPV respiratory and vital parameters were documented every 30 min. Additional relevant outcome parameters (need for intubation, duration of ICU stay, complications and mortality) were monitored. We found that 85.7% of the ACPE patients and 50.0% of the AECOPD patients were treated successfully with NPPV. Intubation rate was 31.2% in the AECOPD group and 14.3% in the ACPE group. 78.6% of the ACPE patients and 43.8% of the AECOPD patients were regularly discharged from hospital in a good condition. In the first 90 min of NIV, there was a significant amelioration of respiratory and other vital parameters. In ACPE patients there was a significant increase in PaO2 from 58.9 mmHg to 80.6 mmHg and of oxygen saturation (SaO2) from 85.1% to 93.1% without changing the inspiratory O2 concentration. This effect was comparable in the AECOPD group, but only could be achieved by increasing the inspiratory ventilation pressure. In the ACPE group inspiratory ventilation pressure could be reduced. In conclusion, in acute respiratory failure, ACPE patients comparably profit from NPPV as do patients with AECOPD, but the algorithm of titration for non-invasive ventilation pressure is different.

  2. Increased concentrations of proteoglycan components in the synovial fluids of patients with acute but not chronic joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, A; Doherty, M; Maini, R N; Hardingham, T E

    1988-01-01

    Synovial fluid samples (139) from 121 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, pseudogout, chronic pyrophosphate arthritis, gout, and reactive arthritis were analysed for cartilage proteoglycan components. Keratan sulphate (KS) epitope was determined by a competitive radioimmunoassay, and total sulphated glycosaminoglycans (S-GAG) were determined after papain digestion by a specific dye binding assay. Increased concentration of both KS epitope and S-GAG were found in synovial fluid from joints with acute inflammatory arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and reactive arthritis). Analysis of consecutive samples from the same joint at different stages showed that the concentration of KS epitope or total S-GAG varied with acute inflammatory activity. In samples from patients with chronic conditions during active and inactive inflammatory phases concentrations were much lower and not distinguishable among these disease groups. The detection of raised concentration of proteoglycan components may reflect the rapid depletion or greatly increased turnover of proteoglycan in the articular cartilage during acute inflammation in the joint. This did not appear to be sustained in most patients with chronic joint diseases. PMID:2461686

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: treating a systemic disease with systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Walsh, R Matthew; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Khorana, Alok A

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, even when resectable, remains highly lethal. Although surgical outcomes have improved considerably, median overall survival after surgery and adjuvant therapy such as single-agent gemcitabine remains less than 2 years. We discuss preclinical and clinical data supporting the contention that even early-stage pancreatic cancer is a systemic disease. Autopsy series reveal that 70% to 85% of patients die of systemic recurrence, rather than local disease, after pancreatic cancer resection. Preclinical studies using genomics and mouse models reveal evidence of metastatic spread even before histopathologic evidence of a pancreatic tumor. Analogous to breast cancer, we propose that the Halstedian approach of treating pancreatic cancer as a local, surgical problem should be replaced by Fisher's alternative hypothesis of cancer as a systemic disease. Newer multiagent chemotherapy regimens have shown meaningful response rates and improvement in overall survival in the metastatic setting and, for the first time, offer investigators an opportunity to use effective systemic therapy. We emphasize that a surgery-first approach is not resonant with our current understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinoma biology and that an upfront systemic approach for even resectable pancreatic cancer warrants testing in clinical trials.

  4. Acute duodenal Crohn's disease successfully managed with low-speed elemental diet infusion via nasogastric tube: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takayuki; Nakahigashi, Maki; Umegae, Satoru; Kitagawa, Tatsushi; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2006-01-28

    Duodenal Crohn's disease is rare, and patients without obstruction are treated medically. We herein report one case whose duodenal Crohn's disease was successfully managed with low-speed elemental diet infusion through a nasogastric tube. A 28-year-old female developed acute duodenal Crohn's disease. Upper GI radiologic and endoscopic examinations showed a stricture in the duodenal bulb. Using the duodenal biopsy specimens, mucosal cytokine levels were measured; interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were remarkably elevated. For initial 2 wk, powdered mesalazine was orally given but it was not effective. For the next 2 wk, she was treated with low-speed elemental diet therapy using a commercially available Elental(TM), which was infused continuously through a nasogastric tube using an infusion pump. The tip of the nasogastric tube was placed at an immediate oral side of the pylorus. The infusion speed was 10 mL/h (usual speed, 100 mL/h). After the 2-wk treatment, her symptoms were very much improved, and endoscopically, the duodenal stricture and inflammation improved. The duodenal mucosal cytokine levels remarkably decreased compared with those before the treatment. Although our experience was limited, low-speed elemental diet infusion through a nasogastric tube may be a useful treatment for acute duodenal Crohn's disease.

  5. Molecular Diagnosis of Chagas Disease in Colombia: Parasitic Loads and Discrete Typing Units in Patients from Acute and Chronic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Flórez, Carolina; Olivera, Mario; Valencia, Carlos; Zambrano, Pilar; León, Cielo; Ramírez, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Chagas disease is complex due to the dynamics of parasitemia in the clinical phases of the disease. The molecular tests have been considered promissory because they detect the parasite in all clinical phases. Trypanosoma cruzi presents significant genetic variability and is classified into six Discrete Typing Units TcI-TcVI (DTUs) with the emergence of foreseen genotypes within TcI as TcIDom and TcI Sylvatic. The objective of this study was to determine the operating characteristics of molecular tests (conventional and Real Time PCR) for the detection of T. cruzi DNA, parasitic loads and DTUs in a large cohort of Colombian patients from acute and chronic phases. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples were obtained from 708 patients in all clinical phases. Standard diagnosis (direct and serological tests) and molecular tests (conventional PCR and quantitative PCR) targeting the nuclear satellite DNA region. The genotyping was performed by PCR using the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sa, 18S and A10 regions. The operating capabilities showed that performance of qPCR was higher compared to cPCR. Likewise, the performance of qPCR was significantly higher in acute phase compared with chronic phase. The median parasitic loads detected were 4.69 and 1.33 parasite equivalents/mL for acute and chronic phases. The main DTU identified was TcI (74.2%). TcIDom genotype was significantly more frequent in chronic phase compared to acute phase (82.1% vs 16.6%). The median parasitic load for TcIDom was significantly higher compared with TcI Sylvatic in chronic phase (2.58 vs.0.75 parasite equivalents/ml). Conclusions/Significance The molecular tests are a precise tool to complement the standard diagnosis of Chagas disease, specifically in acute phase showing high discriminative power. However, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of molecular tests in chronic phase. The frequency and parasitemia of TcIDom genotype in chronic

  6. Acute lupus pneumonitis followed by intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, CAIHONG; YU, XING; WANG, YONG; SHI, LUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IpsO) and acute lupus pneumonitis (ALP) are uncommon severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study reports the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting as initial symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed the jejunal wall was thickened and streaky, mimicking the presentation of intestinal obstruction. Following emergency surgery, the patient's general condition was aggravated, with evident limb erythematous rashes. A series of laboratory examinations revealed SLE, and combined with patient's medical history IpsO was diagnosed, with a disease Activity Index score of 10. During the therapeutic period, high fever, dyspnea and oxygen saturation (SaO2) reductions were detected, and CT scans indicated lung infiltration, excluding other causes through a comprehensive infectious work-up and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination. ALP was confirmed and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and gamma globulin supplement. The patient responded well and was discharged in 2 weeks. In the one-year tapering period and after stopping corticosteroids, the patient recovered well with no relapse detected. In conclusion, the manifestation of IpsO in SLE is rare and represents a challenge for the surgeon to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid inappropriate surgical intervention. ALP may be the consequence of emergency surgery, and immediate high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. PMID:27347044

  7. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction due to left main coronary artery disease in men and women: does ST-segment elevation matter?

    PubMed Central

    Gutkowski, Wojciech; Raczyński, Grzegorz; Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Gierlotka, Marek; Poloński, Lech

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gender-specific issues regarding ST-segment elevation (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) due to unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease were not sufficiently studied. We assessed the value of STEMI/NSTEMI initial classification on the management of men and women with acute MI due to critical stenosis or occlusion of the ULMCA. Material and methods The study group consisted of 643 consecutive patients with acute MI with the ULMCA as the infarct-related artery. Data derive from an ongoing, nationwide, multicenter, prospective, observational registry. Results Isolated ULMCA disease was more frequent in women and multivessel disease was more frequent in men in the NSTEMI group. The incidence of cardiogenic shock or pulmonary edema and cardiac arrest was higher in the STEMI group. Totally occluded ULMCA was more frequent in the STEMI group. Although the majority of patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), it was less frequently used in NSTEMI women and NSTEMI men. Although in-hospital and long-term mortality rates were higher in the STEMI group, there were no gender-related differences within groups. The initial ST-segment elevation was an independent predictor of in-hospital (OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.14–4.91, p = 0.02) and 12-month (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.01–2.27, p = 0.045) mortality. Conclusions There were no gender-related differences in the management within the STEMI or NSTEMI group. Although acute myocardial infarction due to ULMCA disease is associated with high mortality in both genders, STEMI was a negative prognostic factor of in-hospital and 12-month mortality. Despite poor baseline characteristics and clinical presentation in women, female gender itself did not influence mortality. PMID:26788080

  9. Prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of pertussis in adults with acute cough: a prospective, observational study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Ieven, Margareta; Loens, Katherine; Huygen, Kris; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Butler, Chris C; Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Verheij, Theo JM

    2015-01-01

    Background Most cases of adult pertussis probably remain undiagnosed. Aim To explore the prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of acute pertussis infection in adult patients presenting with acute cough. Design and setting Prospective observational study between 2007 and 2010 in primary care in 12 European countries. Method Adults presenting with acute cough (duration of ≤28 days) were included. Bordetella pertussis infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (from nasopharyngeal flocked swabs and sputa) and by measurement of immunoglobulin G antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) in venous blood at day 28. An antibody titre to PT of ≥125 IU/ml or PCR positive result in a respiratory sample defined recent infection. Patients completed a symptom diary for 28 days. Results Serum and/or respiratory samples were obtained in 3074 patients. Three per cent (93/3074) had recent B. pertussis infection. Prior cough duration >2 weeks discriminated to some extent between those with and without pertussis (adjusted odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 3.07; P = 0.010). Median cough duration after presentation was 17 and 12 days in patients with and without pertussis, respectively (P = 0.008). Patients with pertussis had longer duration of phlegm production (P = 0.010), shortness of breath (P = 0.037), disturbed sleep (P = 0.013) and interference with normal activities or work (P = 0.033) after presentation. Conclusion Pertussis infection plays a limited role among adults presenting with acute cough in primary care, but GPs should acknowledge the possibility of pertussis in uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infection. As in children, pertussis also causes prolonged symptoms in adults. However, pertussis is difficult to discern from other acute cough syndromes in adults at first presentation. PMID:26412843

  10. Deciphering deterioration mechanisms of complex diseases based on the construction of dynamic networks and systems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jin, Suoqin; Lei, Lei; Pan, Zishu; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-03-01

    The early diagnosis and investigation of the pathogenic mechanisms of complex diseases are the most challenging problems in the fields of biology and medicine. Network-based systems biology is an important technique for the study of complex diseases. The present study constructed dynamic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks to identify dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs) and analyze the underlying mechanisms of complex diseases from a systems level. We developed a model-based framework for the construction of a series of time-sequenced networks by integrating high-throughput gene expression data into PPI data. By combining the dynamic networks and molecular modules, we identified significant DNBs for four complex diseases, including influenza caused by either H3N2 or H1N1, acute lung injury and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can serve as warning signals for disease deterioration. Function and pathway analyses revealed that the identified DNBs were significantly enriched during key events in early disease development. Correlation and information flow analyses revealed that DNBs effectively discriminated between different disease processes and that dysfunctional regulation and disproportional information flow may contribute to the increased disease severity. This study provides a general paradigm for revealing the deterioration mechanisms of complex diseases and offers new insights into their early diagnoses.

  11. The Cholinergic System and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is viewed traditionally as a motor syndrome secondary to nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, recent studies emphasize non-motor features. Non-motor comorbidities, such as cognitive impairment, are likely the result of an intricate interplay of multi-system degenerations and neurotransmitter deficiencies extending beyond the loss of dopaminergic nigral neurons. The pathological hallmark of parkinsonian dementia is the presence of extra-nigral Lewy bodies that can be accompanied by other pathologies, such as senile plaques. Lewy first identified the eponymous Lewy body in neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM), the source of cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex. Although cholinergic denervation is recognized as a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), in vivo neuroimaging studies reveal loss of cerebral cholinergic markers in parkinsonian dementia similar to or more severe than in prototypical AD. Imaging studies agree with post-mortem evidence suggesting that basal forebrain cholinergic system degeneration appears early in PD and worsens coincident with the appearance of dementia. Early cholinergic denervation in PD without dementia appears to be heterogeneous and may make specific contributions to the PD clinical phenotype. Apart from well-known cognitive and behavioral deficits, central, in particular limbic, cholinergic denervation may be associated with progressive deficits of odor identification in PD. Recent evidence indicates also that subcortical cholinergic denervation, probably due to degeneration of brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus neurons, may relate to the presence of dopamine non-responsive gait and balance impairments, including falls, in PD. PMID:20060022

  12. Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score versus Simplified Acute Physiology score to analyze multiple organ dysfunction in infectious diseases in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Remyasri; Bhandary, Nithish M.; D’Souza, Ashton D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who were diagnosed with infectious disease, as an indicator of multiple organ dysfunction and to examine if initial SOFA score is a better mortality predictor compared to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). Materials and Methods: Hospital-based study done in medical ICU, from June to September 2014 with a sample size of 48. Patients aged 18 years and above, diagnosed with infectious disease were included. Patients with history of chronic illness (renal/hepatic/pulmonary/  cardiovascular), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, those on immunosuppressive therapy/chemoradiotherapy for malignancy and patients in immunocompromised state were excluded. Blood investigations were obtained. Six organ dysfunctions were assessed using initial SOFA score and graded from 0 to 4. SAPS was calculated as the sum of points assigned to each of the 17 variables (12 physiological, age, type of admission, and three underlying diseases). The outcome measure was survival status at ICU discharge. Results: We categorized infectious diseases into dengue fever, leptospirosis, malaria, respiratory tract infections, and others which included undiagnosed febrile illness, meningitis, urinary tract infection and gastroenteritis. Initial SOFA score was both sensitive and specific; SAPS lacked sensitivity. We found no significant association between age and survival status. Both SAPS and initial SOFA score were found to be statistically significant as mortality predictors. There is significant association of initial SOFA score in analyzing organ dysfunction in infectious diseases (P < 0.001). SAPS showed no statistical significance. There was statistically significant (P = 0.015) percentage of nonsurvivors with moderate and severe dysfunction, based on SOFA score. Nonsurvivors had higher SAPS but was not statistically significant (P

  13. Bedside Lung Ultrasound During Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razazi, Keyvan; Deux, Jean-François; de Prost, Nicolas; Boissier, Florence; Cuquemelle, Elise; Galactéros, Frédéric; Rahmouni, Alain; Maître, Bernard; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Mekontso Dessap, Armand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung ultrasound (LU) is increasingly used to assess pleural and lung disease in intensive care unit (ICU) and emergency unit at the bedside. We assessed the performance of bedside chest radiograph (CR) and LU during severe acute chest syndrome (ACS), using computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. We prospectively explored 44 ACS episodes (in 41 patients) admitted to the medical ICU. Three imaging findings were evaluated (consolidation, ground-glass opacities, and pleural effusion). A score was used to quantify and compare loss of lung aeration with each technique and assess its association with outcome. A total number of 496, 507, and 519 lung regions could be assessed by CT scan, bedside CR, and bedside LU, respectively. Consolidations were the most common pattern and prevailed in lung bases (especially postero-inferior regions). The agreement with CT scan patterns was significantly higher for LU as compared to CR (κ coefficients of 0.45 ± 0.03 vs 0.30 ± 0.03, P < 0.01 for the parenchyma, and 0.73 ± 0.08 vs 0.06 ± 0.09, P < 0.001 for pleural effusion). The Bland and Altman analysis showed a nonfixed bias of −1.0 (P = 0.12) between LU score and CT score whereas CR score underestimated CT score with a fixed bias of −5.8 (P < 0.001). The specificity for the detection of consolidated regions or pleural effusion (using CT scan as the reference standard) was high for LU and CR, whereas the sensitivity was high for LU but low for CR. As compared to others, ACS patients with an LU score above the median value of 11 had a larger volume of transfused and exsanguinated blood, greater oxygen requirements, more need for mechanical ventilation, and a longer ICU length of stay. LU outperformed CR for the diagnosis of consolidations and pleural effusion during ACS. Higher values of LU score identified patients at risk of worse outcome. PMID:26886600

  14. [Inflammatory diseases of the gall bladder and biliary system. I. Imaging--cholelithasis--inflammation of the gall bladder].

    PubMed

    Helmberger, H; Kammer, B

    2005-05-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common affliction of the gallbladder and biliary tract. Including its complications, gallstone disease represents the basis for cholecystitis and cholangitis in the majority of cases. Inflammatory diseases of the biliary system are divided into acute and chronic forms originating from the gallbladder as well as from the biliary tract. Although acute calculous cholecystitis is the most common form, gangrenous, and emphysematous inflammation of the gallbladder as well as gallbladder empyema are included in this group of diseases. In the chronic forms, calculous and acalculous inflammation is also differentiated. Recent developments in cross-sectional imaging in sonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging offer numerous tools for depicting the biliary system with high diagnostic accuracy. Invasive imaging modalities of the biliary system are mainly used for therapeutic aspects. PMID:15875153

  15. Crosstalk between platelets and the complement system in immune protection and disease.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, A; Langer, H F

    2013-11-01

    Platelets have a central function in repairing vascular damage and stopping acute blood loss. They are equally central to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke. Beyond these classical prothrombotic diseases, immune mediated pathologies such as haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) or paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) also feature an increased tendency to form thrombi in various tissues. It has become increasingly clear that the complement system, part of the innate immune system, has an important role in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Not only does complement influence prothrombotic disease, it is equally involved in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), an autoimmune disease characterised by thrombocytopenia. Thus, there are complex interrelationships between the haemostatic and immune systems, and platelets and complement in particular. Not only does complement influence platelet diseases such as ITP, HUS and PNH, it also mediates interaction between microbes and platelets during systemic infection, influencing the course of infection and development of protective immunity. This review aims to provide an integrative overview of the mechanisms underlying the interactions between complement and platelets in health and disease.

  16. [The individual prognosis of the gravity and of the outcome of acute radiation disease based on immunological indexes].

    PubMed

    Mal'tsev, V N; Ivanov, A A; Mikhaĭlov, V F; Mazurik, V K

    2006-01-01

    The information significance of the immunological indexes for the prognosis of gravity of course and of outcome of an acute radiation disease for the people after the exposure of ionizing radiation in clinically significant doses is studied. The value of indexes of the C-reactive protein contents, of the complement contents and of the titer of haemagglutinins in serum of a blood of 147 patients damaged at Chernobyl NPP accident as a result of external radiation gamma-exposure in combination with internal irradiation from the incorporation in an organism predominantly beta-emitting radionuclides were compared to the weight of acute radiation disease and its outcome (survival or loss). Was determined, that indexes of the contents of C-reactive protein in a peripheral blood during primary reactions on the irradiation (1-2 day after irradiation) and in latent period of disease (3-9 day after irradiation), and also titer of a complement on 3-9 day after irradiation can serve a source of information for the prognosis of probable gravity of a radiation injury and its outcome at irradiation of the man in clinically significant doses.

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Thirteen Patients with Acute Chagas Disease Acquired through Oral Transmission from Two Urban Outbreaks in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Claudilson J. C.; Aras, Roque; Mota, Gildo; Reis, Francisco; Dias, Juarez Pereira; de Jesus, Robson Silva; Freire, Miralba Silva; de Araújo, Eline G.; Prazeres, Juliana; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2010-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of orally transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi continue to be reported in Brazil and are associated with a high mortality rate, mainly due to myocarditis. Methods This study is a detailed report on the disease progression of acute Chagas disease in 13 patients who were infected during two micro-outbreaks in two northeastern Brazilian towns. Clinical outcomes as well as EKG and ECHO results are described, both before and after benznidazole treatment. Results Fever and dyspnea were the most frequent symptoms observed. Other clinical findings included myalgia, periorbital edema, headache and systolic murmur. Two patients died of cardiac failure before receiving benznidazole treatment. EKG and ECHO findings frequently showed a disturbance in ventricular repolarization and pericardial effusion. Ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction <55%) was present in 27.3% of patients. After treatment, EKG readings normalized in 91.7% of patients. Ventricular repolarization abnormalities persisted in 50% of the patients, while sinus bradycardia was observed in 18%. The systolic ejection fraction normalized in two out of three patients with initially depressed ventricular function, while pericardial effusion disappeared. Conclusions Myocarditis is frequently found and potentially severe in patients with acute Chagas disease. Benznidazole treatment may improve clinical symptoms, as well as EKG and ECHO findings. PMID:20559542

  18. Balance impairment and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Emanuela; Oancea, Cristian; Avram, Claudiu; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Petrescu, Lucian; Timar, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background/purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with systemic inflammation and balance impairment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on equilibrium of stable and exacerbation (acute exacerbation of COPD [AECOPD]) phases of COPD and to investigate if there is a connection between lower extremity muscle weakness and systemic inflammation. Methods We enrolled 41 patients with COPD (22 stable and 19 in AECOPD) and 20 healthy subjects (control group), having no significant differences regarding the anthropometric data. We analyzed the differences in balance tests scores: Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) questionnaire, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, Single Leg Stance (SLS), 6-minute walking distance (6MWD), isometric knee extension (IKE) between these groups, and also the correlation between these scores and inflammatory biomarkers. Results The presence and severity of COPD was associated with significantly decreased score in IKE (P<0.001), 6MWD (P<0.001), SLS (P<0.001), and BBS (P<0.001), at the same time noting a significant increase in median TUG score across the studied groups (P<0.001). The AECOPD group vs stable group presented a significant increase in high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels (10.60 vs 4.01; P=0.003) and decrease in PaO2 (70.1 vs 59.1; P<0.001). We observed that both IKE scores were significantly and positive correlated with all the respiratory volumes. In both COPD groups, we observed that fibrinogen reversely and significantly correlated with the 6MWD, and FES-I questionnaire is correlated positively with TUG test. Hs-CRP correlated reversely with the walking test and SLS test, while correlating positively with TUG test and FES-I questionnaire. Conclusion According to this study, COPD in advanced and acute stages is associated with an increased history of falls, systemic inflammation, balance impairment, and lower extremity

  19. Proteins involved on TGF-β pathway are up-regulated during the acute phase of experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberto Rodrigues; de Souza, Elen Mello; de Oliveira, Fabiane Loiola; Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; Gomes, Leonardo Henrique Ferreira; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Bailly, Sabine; Feige, Jean Jacques; de Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2016-05-01

    Studies developed by our group in the last years have shown the involvement of TGF-β in acute and chronic Chagas heart disease, with elevated plasma levels and activated TGF-β cell signaling pathway as remarkable features of patients in the advanced stages of this disease, when high levels of cardiac fibrosis is present. Imbalance in synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix components is the basis of pathological fibrosis and TGF-β is considered as one of the key regulators of this process. In the present study, we investigated the activity of the TGF-β signaling pathway, including receptors and signaling proteins activation in the heart of animals experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi during the period that mimics the acute phase of Chagas disease. We observed that T. cruzi-infected animals presented increased expression of TGF-β receptors. Overexpression of receptors was followed by an increased phosphorylation of Smad2/3, p38 and ERK. Furthermore, we correlated these activities with cellular factors involved in the fibrotic process induced by TGF-β. We observed that the expression of collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF were increased in the heart of infected animals on day 15 post-infection. Correlated with the increased TGF-β activity in the heart, we found that serum levels of total TGF-β were significantly higher during acute infection. Taken together, our data suggest that the commitment of the heart associates with increased activity of TGF-β pathway and expression of its main components. Our results, confirm the importance of this cytokine in the development and maintenance of cardiac damage caused by T. cruzi infection.

  20. Transcriptome variation in response to Marek’s disease virus acute infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is an economically significant chicken disease that affects the poultry industry worldwide with estimated annual cost of $2 billion [Morrow and Fehler, 2004]. The disease is caused by the highly oncogenic Marek’s disease virus (MDV), an alphaherpesvirus that induces T-cell lymph...

  1. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable

  2. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  3. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258), there were a... effective date requirements. ] IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  4. Acute Bilateral Tuberculous Pneumonia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rama; Bhat, Nitin; D’Souza, Savio; Chenchaiah, Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a common infection associated with immunocompromised state. It usually presents with fibrosis or fibrocavitary lesions in the lung. We report a case of bilateral tuberculous pneumonia of acute presentation in a young lady who was being treated for systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27437280

  5. “Missing clot” during mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke using Solitaire stent retrieval system

    PubMed Central

    Huded, Vikram; Nambiar, Vivek; De Souza, Romnesh; Bohra, Vikram; Ramankutty, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Stent retrieval system is an established treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion. Here, we describe a complication which occurred during mechanical thrombectomy in three cases where the clot dislodged during retrieval. There was a possibility of the clot getting reinjected into the artery with possible dire consequences. PMID:27293350

  6. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  7. Viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases in Rio de Janeiro: first two years of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Sutmoller, F.; Nascimento, J. P.; Chaves, J. R. S.; Ferreira, V.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study was undertaken to establish the incidence and possible viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases among the child population of a shanty town in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrated that nearly half of all the illnesses seen were respiratory infections, 10% of them affecting the lower respiratory tract. Viruses were isolated from 20% of the throat swabs collected. Of the viruses identified, 47% were adenoviruses, 25% were enteroviruses, 9% were influenza A, 8% herpes simplex, 7% parainfluenza, 3% respiratory syncytial and 1% influenza B viruses. PMID:6606500

  8. [Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases competence network].

    PubMed

    Rufenach, C; Burmester, G-R; Zeidler, H; Radbruch, A

    2004-04-01

    The foundation of the competence network for rheumatology, which is funded by the "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung" (BMBF) since 1999, succeeded to create a unique research structure in Germany: medical doctors and scientists from six university rheumatology centres (Berlin, Düsseldorf, Erlangen, Freiburg, Hannover und Lübeck/Bad Bramstedt) work closely together with scientists doing basic research at the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ), with rheumatological hospitals, reha-clinics, and rheumatologists. Jointly they are searching for causes of systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and try to improve therapies-nationwide and with an interdisciplinary approach. The primary objective of this collaboration is to transfer new scientific insights more rapidly in order to improve methods for diagnosis and patients treatment.

  9. Does Treatment of Periodontal Disease Influence Systemic Disease?

    PubMed

    Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2015-10-01

    Periodontal diseases are the most common human diseases globally, with gingivitis affecting up to 90% and periodontitis affecting 50% of adults. Tooth enamel is the only nonshedding tissue in the human body. In the absence of proper oral hygiene measures, microbial biofilm (dental plaque) develops on the teeth to include more than 700 different bacterial species, along with viruses, fungi, archea, and parasites. With time, ecological imbalances promote the growth of selected commensal species that induce host inflammatory pathways resulting in tissue destruction, including ulceration of the periodontal epithelium. PMID:26427573

  10. Major hematologic diseases in the developing world- new aspects of diagnosis and management of thalassemia, malarial anemia, and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, P L; Gordeuk, V; Issaragrisil, S; Siritanaratkul, N; Fucharoen, S; Ribeiro, R C

    2001-01-01

    The three presentations in this session encompass clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hematologic diseases which impact most heavily on developing world countries. Dr. Victor Gordeuk discusses new insights regarding the multi-faceted pathogenesis of anemia in the complicated malaria occurring in Africa. He describes recent investigations indicating the possible contribution of immune dysregulation to this serious complication and the implications of these findings for disease management. Dr. Surapol Issaragrisil and colleagues describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the thalassemic syndromes. In addition to being considered a major health problem in Southeast Asia, the migration throughout the world of people from this region has caused the disease to have global impact. A unique thalassemia variant, Hb Ebeta-thalassemia, with distinctive clinical features, has particular relevance for this demographic issue. Special focus will be reported regarding recent prenatal molecular screening methods in Thailand which have proven useful for early disease detection and disease control strategies. Dr. Raul Ribeiro describes a clinical model for providing effective treatment for a complex malignancy (childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia) in countries with limited resources. With the multidisciplinary approach in Central American of the joint venture between St. Jude Children's Research Hospital International Outreach Program and indigenous health care personnel, major therapeutic advances for this disease have been achieved. Given the major demographic population shifts occurring worldwide, these illnesses also have important clinical implications globally. These contributions demonstrate that lessons learned within countries of disease prevalence aid our understanding and management of a number of disorders prominently seen in developed countries. They will show how effective partnerships between hematologists in more and less developed

  11. Nicotine-induced acute hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic system in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Guo, Jing; Guo, Aike; Li, Yan

    2016-09-22

    Short-term exposure to nicotine induces positive effects in mice, monkeys and humans, including mild euphoria, hyperactivity, and enhanced cognition. However, the underlying neural basis and molecular mechanisms for these effects remain poorly understood. Here, using a video recording system, we find that acute nicotine administration induces locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila, similar to observations made in higher model organisms. Suppressing dopaminergic neurons or down-regulating dopamine 1-like receptor (DopR) abolishes this acute nicotine response, but surprisingly, does so only in male flies. Using a GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) approach, we show that dopaminergic neurons possess potential synaptic connections with acetylcholinergic neurons in wide regions of the brain. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurons are widely activated upon nicotine perfusion in both sexes, while the response curve differs significantly between the sexes. Moreover, knockdown of the β1 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in dopaminergic neurons abolishes the acute nicotine response only in male flies, while panneural knock-down occurs in both sexes. Taken together, our results reveal that in fruit flies, dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine-induced acute locomotor hyperactivity in a sexually dimorphic manner, and Drosophila β1 nAChR subunit plays a crucial role in this nicotine response. These findings provide important insights into the molecular and neural basis of acute nicotine effects, and the underlying mechanisms may play conserved roles across species. PMID:27365175

  12. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  13. Reprint of: Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease: Novel Biological Insights.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Takanori; Reddy, Pavan; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent insights into intestinal homeostasis and uncovering of new pathways and targets have greatly reconciled our understanding of GVHD pathophysiology and will reshape contemporary GVHD prophylaxis and treatment. Gastrointestinal (GI) GVHD is the major cause of mortality. Emerging data indicate that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their niche Paneth cells are targeted, resulting in dysregulation of the intestinal homeostasis and microbial ecology. The microbiota and their metabolites shape the immune system and intestinal homeostasis, and they may alter host susceptibility to GVHD. Protection of the ISC niche system and modification of the intestinal microbiota and metabolome to restore intestinal homeostasis may, thus, represent a novel approach to modulate GVHD and infection. Damage to the intestine plays a central role in amplifying systemic GVHD by propagating a proinflammatory cytokine milieu. Molecular targeting to inhibit kinase signaling may be a promising approach to treat GVHD, ideally via targeting the redundant effect of multiple cytokines on immune cells and enterocytes. In this review, we discuss insights on the biology of GI GVHD, interaction of microflora and metabolome with the hosts, identification of potential new target organs, and identification and targeting of novel T cell-signaling pathways. Better understanding of GVHD biology will, thus, pave a way to develop novel treatment strategies with great clinical benefits. PMID:26899274

  14. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Józef; Wu, Dongmei; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Wallin, Håkan; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-15

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNT{sub Large} exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Systemic and hepatic alterations were evaluated in female mice following MWCNT instillation. • Despite being physicochemically

  15. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  16. Acute but not chronic administration of pioglitazone promoted behavioral and neurochemical protective effects in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Janaína K; Santiago, Ronise M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ariza, Deborah; Morais, Lívia H; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the neurochemical, motor and cognitive effects of pioglitazone in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In the first experiment, we administered MPTP, and 1h later administered a single oral dose of pioglitazone (5, 15 and 30 mg/kg). The following day, we performed the open-field test and neurochemical dose response curve. We demonstrated that 30 mg/kg of pioglitazone was capable of restoring striatal dopamine (DA) concentrations and motor behaviors. A second experiment was conducted to test the effects of two protocols (acute and chronic) of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) administration in the open-field test, two-way active avoidance task and in the DA and metabolites levels. The acute protocol consisted of a single oral administration 1 h after MPTP, whereas the chronic protocol was performed with daily administrations starting 1 h after MPTP and ending 22 days after that. Results showed that neither protocol was able to reverse the cognitive impairment promoted by MPTP. We also demonstrated that acute treatment generated some level of neuroprotection, as confirmed by the absence of DA reduction in the group treated with pioglitazone in comparison to the sham group. By contrast, chronic treatment leaded to a reduction of striatal DA, close to MPTP administration alone. These findings suggest that acute administration of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) was more efficient in generating beneficial effects on motor behaviors and in striatal DA levels. Nevertheless, we failed to demonstrate that pioglitazone administration improved performance on a dopamine-related cognitive task after MPTP.

  17. Confluence of Depression and Acute Psychological Stress Among Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: Effects on Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthew M.; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Soufer, Robert