Science.gov

Sample records for acute systemic vasculitis

  1. Acute ST elevation myocardial infarction in fulminant systemic p-ANCA vasculitis: a rare catastrophic complication.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Kanupriya; Saini, Aditya; Bah, Tonjeh; Katikaneni, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old Caucasian man presented to the hospital with a 3-month history of fatigue, bilateral upper and lower limb paresthesias and gradually worsening ascending paralysis. A few weeks later, he developed acute renal failure requiring haemodialysis. Investigations revealed presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Renal biopsy was conclusive for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with crescents. Treatment for ANCA positive vasculitis was initiated with pulsed steroids, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. The hospital course took an unexpected turn when the patient developed acute chest pain with an EKG consistent with inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Urgent left heart catheterisation revealed distal occlusions in multivessel coronary distribution. Coronary involvement is rare in ANCA vasculitis and STEMI has not been reported in MPO-ANCA positive vasculitis, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27358099

  2. Systemic necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L

    1997-05-01

    The revival of interest in systemic necrotizing vasculitis was initiated by the discovery of its association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). The close association of certain ANCA subspecificities, for example, proteinase 3 (Pr3) and myeloperxoidase ANCA, with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome has led to their designation as 'ANCA-associated vasculitides'. This article describes the common and divergent clinical and immunological features of the members of this 'new' family of systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which continues to grow with the widespread use of ANCA testing. In addition, the 'standard' treatment for systemic necrotizing vasculitis (daily 'low dose' cyclophosphamide plus glucocorticosteroids or 'Fauci's scheme') is compared with new stage and activity adapted therapeutic regimens. PMID:9220078

  3. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, and ionizing radiation. In 1989 a painful macular skin lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. By 1992 he developed gross hematuria and dyspnea. Blood laboratory results revealed a serum creatinine concentration of 2.1 mg/dL, ethrythrocyte sedimentation rate of 61 mm/hr, negative cANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody cytoplasmic pattern), positive pANCA (ANCA perinuclear pattern), and antiglomerular basement membrane negative. Renal biopsy showed proliferative (crescentric) and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. The patient's diagnoses included microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and glomerulonephritis. Environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of an idiopathic expression of systemic autoimmune disease. Crystalline silica exposure has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and some of the small vessel vasculitides. DOE workers are currently able to apply for compensation under the federal Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP). However, the only diseases covered by EEOICP are cancers related to radiation exposure, chronic beryllium disease, and chronic silicosis. PMID:14644669

  4. Educational Needs of Patients With Systemic Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-11

    Behcet's Disease; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Giant Cell Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu's Arteritis

  5. Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Drenkard, C; Villa, A R; Reyes, E; Abello, M; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the frequency, location, clinical and histopathological features, associated manifestations, and prognosis of vasculitides in a cohort of 667 SLE patients. Exclusion of patients with previous vasculitis or insufficient information left 540 patients, 194 of whom has vasculitis (incidence density: 0.053 new cases/person/year, cumulative incidence of 0.051 at one year, 0.232 at 5 years and 0.411 at 10 years). Vasculitis was confirmed by biopsy in 46 cases, by arteriography in five, and by both in three. A single episode of vasculitis occurred in 119 and two or more in 75 patients. Vasculitis was cutaneous in 160, visceral in 24, both in 10. In the first episode of cutaneous vasculitides, 111 had punctuate lesions, 32 palpable purpura, 6 urticaria, 6 ulcers, 8 papules, 5 erythematous plaques or macules confirmed with biopsy, 2 erythema with necrosis, and 1 panniculitis (plus small vessel vasculitis). Of 29 with visceral vasculitis in the first episode, 19 had mononeuritis multiplex, 5 digital necrosis, 3 large artery vasculitis of limbs, one mesenteric, and one coronary, more than one type could appear simultaneously or in subsequent episodes. Patients with vasculitis had longer disease duration and followup, younger age of onset of SLE, and were more frequently males than those without. Lupus manifestations associated with vasculitis in univariate logistic regression included myocarditis, psychosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, serositis, leukopenia, lymphopenia and pleuritis. Vasculitis also associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The strength of this association increased when patients with vasculitis confirmed by biopsy and/or arteriography were considered separately. Visceral vasculitis associated with increased mortality when controlled for age of onset and nephropathy. PMID:9104729

  6. [Primary central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Magnus, T

    2015-12-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder. However, it is often considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular or inflammatory CNS diseases. Diagnosis is challenging, as specific biomarkers are lacking and the clinical presentation can be variable. A definitive diagnosis can only be established by biopsy of the inflammatory changes in the vascular wall. Alternatively, the diagnosis of PACNS can also be based on the synopsis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Different subtypes of PACNS have been described in recent years, depending on the size of the affected vessels or histopathological patterns. Based on selective literature research in the database PubMed on the subject of CNS vasculitis, this article reviews the diagnostic characteristics and differential diagnosis of the condition. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm customized to the size of the affected vessels. Lastly, therapeutic options and the outcome of PACNS are briefly outlined. PMID:26589203

  7. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  8. Systemic paraneoplastic vasculitis secondary to papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Guerouaz, N; Alaoui, M; Raiss, M; Hassam, B; Senouci, K

    2016-08-01

    Systemic vasculitis secondary to thyroid carcinomas is exceptional. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with systemic vasculitis involving leucocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis and renal disorders secondary to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Her symptoms resolved completely after total thyroidectomy. Other causes of vasculitis were excluded. To our knowledge, this is only the second case reported of systemic vasculitis associated with PTC in a paraneoplastic manner. PMID:27416971

  9. Allergic vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cutaneous vasculitis Images Vasculitis on the palm Vasculitis Vasculitis, urticarial on the hand References Stone JH. The systemic vasculitides. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... small vessel vasculitis. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes ...

  10. Classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, M E; Gaskin, G; Pusey, C D

    1996-09-01

    Patients with systemic vasculitis (SV), especially Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis, regularly present with renal involvement. Although considered a rare disease, either the incidence of SV is increasing or it is being increasingly recognized. Accurate classification systems are required to allow comparison of data from different groups investigating and treating these patients. Systemic vasculitis is known to be an autoimmune disease, but the mechanisms of pathogenesis have not been established, despite many studies on this topic in recent years. Most of this work has been done in vitro, although development of animal models is underway. Patient and renal survival have improved with aggressive immunosuppressive treatment, but morbidity is high and controversies remain in establishing the most effective regimens with minimum adverse effects. In this review we discuss the classification of SV, review the current knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms, and consider the relative merits of different treatment protocols. PMID:8903093

  11. Impact of Vasculitis on Employment and Income

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis; Temporal Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu's Arteritis; Urticarial Vasculitis

  12. Catastrophic primary central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D; Morris, Jonathan M; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition that affects the brain and the spinal cord. It is heterogeneous in presenting characteristics and outcomes. We report a patient with a catastrophic rapidly progressive course refractory to intensive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone and iv cyclophosphamide. The condition rapidly deteriorated and the patient died 6 weeks after presentation. Rapidly progressive PCNSV represents the worst end of the clinical spectrum of PCNSV. These patients are characterised by bilateral, multiple, large cerebral vessel lesions on angiograms and multiple bilateral cerebral infarctions. PMID:24854370

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Vasculitis: A Current Therapeutic Overview.

    PubMed

    Toubi, Elias; Kessel, Aharon; Bamberger, Ellen; Golan, Theo Dov

    2004-04-01

    The development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) vasculitis is of prognostic value. The earlier the vasculitis is treated, the better the prognosis for SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis is common in SLE, whereas visceral vasculitis is rare. Skin SLE vasculitis is successfully treated with antimalarials, but its discontinuation may result in an SLE flare even among patients in remission. When visceral SLE vasculitis is encountered, or when a disease state is perceived to be life-threatening, a more aggressive therapy is warranted. A combination of medications, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, along with high-dose steroids and cytotoxic drugs, are typically employed in the treatment of severe SLE vasculitis. Finally, patients with SLE vasculitis may benefit from a number of autoimmune disease therapies currently under investigation, such as switching cytokine responses from Th1 to Th2, and the manipulation of toll-like receptors, chemokines, and FcR receptors. Specific B-cell therapies (eg, anti-Blys, B-cell depletion) may also emerge as potential treatments for SLE vasculitis. PMID:15066237

  14. Peroneal nerve involvement as initial manifestation of primary systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Varrasi, Claudia; Maldi, Elena; Cantello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of two patients with foot drop due to peroneal nerve infarct as early sign of two different forms of primary systemic vasculitides: a predominantly small-vessel p-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis (microscopic polyangiitis) and a predominantly medium-vessel vasculitis (polyarteritis nodosa). PMID:24686810

  15. Cerebral large vessel vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Böckle, B C; Jara, D; Aichhorn, K; Junker, D; Berger, T; Ratzinger, G; Sepp, N T

    2014-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is defined by involvement of the central nervous system in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with a wide range of both neurological and psychiatric manifestations. Although its aetiopathogenesis is not fully elucidated, NPSLE seems to be a consequence of cerebral vascular pathology including thromboembolism, small-vessel vasculopathy and, in rare cases, true vasculitis. Cerebral vasculitis is rare, and cerebral large-vessel vasculitis in SLE is even more unusual. We report the case of a female patient with the diagnosis of SLE. She presented with stroke-like symptoms, headache and vertigo, and palpable purpura on her legs. Further investigations revealed that she suffered from both vasculitis of the cerebral large vessels and coexisting cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:24969082

  16. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed

    Trendelenburg, M; Courvoisier, S; Späth, P J; Moll, S; Mihatsch, M; Itin, P; Schifferli, J A

    1999-10-01

    The 2 patients presented here showed the typical signs of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). During follow-up, there was an inverse correlation between anti-C1q autoantibody titer and C1q antigen concentration in serum in both patients over a period of 2 years. The first patient had nephritis characterized by immune deposits in glomeruli and around the tubules. The histological findings, C1q deposits, and presence of tubuloreticular inclusions in capillary endothelial cells suggested a disease process identical to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The second patient, after a lag phase of 2 years, fulfilled a fourth American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE when she developed anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies. HUVS and SLE overlap, and the criteria for identifying HUVS as an entity distinct from SLE are lacking. PMID:10516358

  17. Vasculitis Pregnancy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA); Wegener's Granulomatosis; IgA Vasculitis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura (HSP); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu Arteritis (TAK); Urticarial Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis

  18. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  19. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome: a mimicker of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Krishnendu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kumar, Bappaditya; Sarkar, Sumanta

    2013-01-01

    A middle aged female patient presented with generalised palpable purpura associated with intense pruritus along with subconjunctival haemorrhage and orbital inflammation. There was extensive dermographism. Other systemic examinations were within normal limits. Haematological profile was normal except raised D-dimer. Skin biopsy revealed the presence of leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Antinuclear antibody was positive in a titre of 1 : 160, but antidouble-stranded DNA was negative. Urine examination revealed haematuria and proteinuria. Complement C3, C4 and C1q levels were decreased with the presence of anti-C1q antibody. There was a diagnostic dilemma between systemic lupus erythematosus and hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. However, as the patient did not fulfil the American College of Rheumatology criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, but fulfilled all the criteria for hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, the case was finally diagnosed as hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome and treated accordingly with favourable outcome. PMID:23704433

  20. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given. PMID:26932179

  1. [ANCA associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Monika; Hruby, Zbigniew; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Vasculitis is a process caused by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessel walls and results in a variety of disorders. An accepted classification system for vasculitis is categorized by the size or type of the involved blood vessel as large-, medium-, or small-vessel vasculitis. Small-vessel vasculitis is defined as vasculitis that affects vessels smaller than arteries (i.e., arterioles, venules, and capillaries); however, small-vessel vasculitis can also involve medium-sized arteries. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Microscopoc polyangiitis, Churg Strauss syndrome and Renal Limited Vasculitis where the kidney is the only organ involved are clasified as a small vesselvasculitis. These disorders are described to be commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA). The etiology is not known and the incidence of vasculitis is incresasing occuring more often in elderly population. These diseases can cause the focal necrotizing lesions witch affect vessels and organs. In the lung it may cause alveolar hemorrhage, in the kidneys crescentic glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure, in the skin purpuric rash and ulcerations. Treatment usually includes corticosteroids, immunosupresive therapy and in some cases plasmapheresis. Advances in clinical management have been achieved during the past few years. PMID:24003670

  2. Urticarial Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Store Home / Resources / Forms of Vasculitis / Urticarial Vasculitis Urticarial Vasculitis Urticarial vasculitis is a form of vasculitis that ... of complements; it’s called hypocomplementemic vasculitis. What causes Urticarial Vasculitis? The cause of most cases of urticarial vasculitis ...

  3. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-05-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  4. Isolated Central Nervous System Vasculitis as a Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Philippe Joaquim Oliveira Menezes; da Silveira, Victor Calil; Ramos, Luíza Tavares; Nóbrega, Felipe Resende; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old male presented to our clinic with recurrent fever, skin lesions (petechiae), scleral wounds, and hilar adenomegaly. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established, which resolved with corticosteroid treatment. After a few months, the patient developed confusion and behavioral changes, with few objective neurological deficits. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed slight focal meningeal enhancement (prepontine region). The level of angiotensin-converting enzymes was normal in the serum and increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis, and corticosteroid treatment was prescribed, yielding good clinical response. Nine months later, the patient presented with multiple ischemic strokes, and arteriography demonstrated multiple distal irregularities in all arterial territories, suggesting cerebral vasculitis. Even with corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient died. Vasculitis is rarely seen in association with sarcoidosis, and in this case, no systemic manifestation was observed at the time that the patient developed vasculitis. PMID:27083067

  5. Vessel wall enhancement in herpes simplex virus central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Dababneh, Haitham; Hedna, Shushrutha; Johnson, James A; Peters, Keith; Waters, Michael F

    2013-09-01

    Infection is a well-known cause of cerebral vasculopathy and vasculitis. We report a 36-year-old woman with cerebral vasculitis and ischemic stroke secondary to herpes simplex virus (HSV). MRI studies revealed a pontine stroke with basilar artery stenosis and vessel wall gadolinium enhancement. This case demonstrates the ability of HSV to cause a focal brainstem vasculitis and the utility of enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of stroke related to HSV central nervous system vasculitis. PMID:23517674

  6. Epigenomic functional characterization of genetic susceptibility variants in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Amr H; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are poorly understood inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels that are frequently associated with significant organ damage. Genetic risk variants contribute to the susceptibility of vasculitis, but functional consequences of these genetic variants are largely unknown. Most genetic risk variants in immune-mediated diseases, including systemic vasculitis, are localized to non-coding genetic regions suggesting they might increase disease risk by influencing regulatory elements within the genome. Long range regulatory interactions pose an additional obstacle in localizing functional consequences associated with risk variants to specific genes or cell types. We used cell-type specific enrichment patterns of histone changes that mark poised, primed, and active enhancers, and DNase hypersensitivity to identify specific immune cells mediating genetic risk in vasculitis. Our data suggest that genetic risk variants in ANCA-associated vasculitis are significantly enriched in enhancer elements in Th17 cells, supporting a role for Th17 cells in this disease. Primed and active enhancer elements in B cells can be potentially affected by genetic risk variants associated with Kawasaki disease. Genetic risk in Behçet's disease and Takayasu arteritis might affect enhancer elements in multiple cell types, possibly explained by influencing enhancers in hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, our analyses indicate a role for B cells in Kawasaki disease, Behçet's disease, and Takayasu arteritis, and suggest that further work to characterize the involvement of B cells in these diseases is warranted. PMID:26492816

  7. Biological Therapy-Induced Systemic Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis Arturo

    2016-07-01

    The use of biologics has been associated with the paradoxical development of biologics-induced autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review was to describe the key immunopathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of these conditions, and to discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics usually described in the medical literature, reviewing case reports as well as records on national biologic therapies (BIOGEAS, RABBIT, BSRBR-RA, BIOBADAVEN). More than 200 cases have so far been reported, all of them diagnosed on the basis of the histopathology or meeting the ACR/Chapel Hill criteria. Over 75 % of the cases were females with a mean age of 48 ± 5 years. More than 50 % had rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the biologics-associated vasculitis developed in 90 ± 31 days. Complete resolution in almost 75 % of the cases was observed upon treatment discontinuation; however, steroid therapy was indicated for all patients and one death was recorded. The use of cyclophosphamide, rituximab or plasma exchange was reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:27165496

  8. Large vessel vasculitis in a patient with acute Q-fever: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baziaka, Fotini; Karaiskos, Ilias; Galani, Lamprini; Barmpouti, Eleftheria; Konstantinidis, Stilianos; Kitas, George; Giamarellou, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the rickettsial organism Coxiella burnetii. Infection has an acute course, usually with a self-limited febrile illness and the possibility of the evaluation to a chronic course with endocardial involvement. The presence of autoantibodies and various autoimmune disorders have also been associated with C. burnetii infection. We report a case of acute Q fever in which the patient developed large vessel vasculitis. The FDG-PET/CT scan detected inflammation of the thoracic aortic wall, suggesting an unusual immunologic host response to acute Q fever infection. PMID:26952153

  9. Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis With Optic Nerve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Benson, Christy E; Knezevic, Alexander; Lynch, Shannon C

    2016-06-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with headache, decreased vision, eye pain, and urinary retention. During her clinical course, visual acuity declined to 20/800, right eye, and 20/50, left eye, associated with bilateral optic disc edema. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed enhancement of the leptomeninges, right optic nerve, and right side of the optic chiasm. Extensive evaluation of the central nervous system (CNS) for an infectious cause was negative. Brain biopsy showed a pattern consistent with vasculitis. The patient was treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide, resulting in improvement of her vision and systemic symptoms. Primary CNS vasculitis is a rare condition that may affect the anterior visual pathways. PMID:26693942

  10. Delayed diagnosis of ocular syphilis that manifested as retinal vasculitis and acute posterior multifocal placoid epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Joe, Soo Geun; Yoon, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    A 55-year-old female presented with bilateral progressive retinal vasculitis. She was on systemic and intravitreal steroids on the basis of uveitis work-up result (negative result including rapid plasma reagin), but her visual acuity continued to deteriorate to light perception only. Ocular examination showed retinal vasculitis, multiple yellow placoid lesions and severe macula edema in both eyes. Repeated work-up revealed positivity of fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption in serum and subsequently in cerebrospinal fluid. Ocular syphilis was diagnosed. And intravenous penicillin G resulted in rapid resolution of vasculitis and macular edema. To avoid delay in the diagnosis of ocular syphilis, high index of suspicion and repeating serological tests (including both treponemal and non-treponemal tests) are warranted. PMID:24145569

  11. Measurement of damage in systemic vasculitis: a comparison of the Vasculitis Damage Index with the Combined Damage Assessment Index

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Ravi; Flossmann, Oliver; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Alberici, Federico; Baslund, Bo; Brown, Denise; Hasan, Nadeem; Holle, Julia; Hruskova, Zdenka; Jayne, David; Judge, Andrew; Little, Mark A; Merkel, Peter A; Palmisano, Alessandra; Seo, Philip; Stegeman, Coen; Tesar, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Westman, Kerstin; Luqmani, Raashid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) with the Combined Damage Assessment Index (CDA) as measures of damage from vasculitis. Methods A total of 283 patients with vasculitis from 11 European centres were evaluated in a cross-sectional study using the VDI and CDA. Results Wegener’s granulomatosis (58.4%) and microscopic polyangiitis (11.0%) were the most common diagnoses. Agreement between VDI and CDA scores (Spearman’s correlation) was 0.90 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.92). There was good correlation between individual comparably evaluated organ systems (Spearman’s correlation 0.70–0.94). Interobserver reliability (assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.98) for VDI and 0.78 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.93) for CDA. Intraobserver reliability was 0.92 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.00) for VDI and 0.87 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.00) for CDA. A total of 13 items were not used in the VDI compared to 23 in the CDA. Observers agreed that the CDA covered the full spectrum of damage attributable to vasculitis but was more time consuming and thus possibly less feasible for clinical and research purposes. Conclusions The VDI and CDA capture reliable data on damage among patients with vasculitis. The CDA captures more detail but is more complex and less practical than the VDI. Further evolution of damage assessment in vasculitis is likely to include key elements from both instruments. PMID:20736392

  12. Challenges in diagnosis of isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Amy W; Bashir, Khurram; Palmer, Cheryl A; Walker, Harrison C

    2011-01-01

    Isolated central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is a rare and complicated disorder. Patients typically present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms such as headache and encephalopathy, and have variable progression and severity of the disease. Challenges to definitive diagnosis include the limitations of currently available diagnostic modalities with high likelihood of false-positive or false-negative findings. Imaging, serologic, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evaluation, and even angiography can fail to establish the diagnosis. Often, brain biopsy is required. In order to illustrate these challenges, we report the case of a patient who presented with subacute cognitive decline and was ultimately diagnosed with isolated CNS eosinophilic vasculitis. Initial work-up included CSF and serologic analyses, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography, but definitive diagnosis required brain biopsy. Immunosuppressive therapy resulted in clinical improvement and stabilization. To our knowledge, only one other case of isolated CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has been reported in the literature. We discuss the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in cases of progressive nonspecific neurologic symptoms. PMID:22398982

  13. Increased serum levels of soluble vascular endothelial-cadherin in patients with systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Guo, Zai-Pei; Cao, Na; Qin, Sha; Li, Meng-Meng; Jia, Rui-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a commonest systemic vasculitis (SV) in childhood characterized by an inflammatory reaction directed at vessels. Endothelial damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates are vital in the development of HSP. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is an endothelial cell-specific adhesion molecule, which plays critical roles in angiogenesis and endothelial integrity. Herein, we investigated the serum levels of soluble VE-cadherin (sVE-cadherin) in patients with HSP and other forms of SV. The serum levels of sVE-cadherin in 30 patients with HSP, together with patients with urticarial vasculitis, allergic vasculitis, Behcet disease, psoriasis vulgaris (PV) and atopic dermatitis (AD) and 26 health controls were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of sVE-cadherin were significantly increased in patients with HSP in acute stage and patients with other forms of SV but not in patients with PV or AD. Moreover, Serum sVE-cadherin levels in HSP patients were correlated with the severity of this disease and serum concentrations of IgA anticardiolipin antibodies and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, we show firstly that serum sVE-cadherin is abnormally increased in HSP patients. Increased serum levels of sVE-cadherin might be a novel biomarker for evaluating the severity of HSP and useful for identifying the presence of SV in inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:24469639

  14. Acute vasculitis resulting in free flap failure: the importance of early recognition and options for management.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P A; Colbert, S; Spedding, A V; Herd, M K; Mellor, T K; Anand, R; McCrae, F

    2012-11-01

    Unusual or unexpected medical causes for free flap failure do occur but are uncommon. We present a rare case of a fibula free flap failure due to an acute vasculitis which was undiagnosed until after the flap had failed. In addition to two successful flap salvages and intravenous heparin, an epoprostenol infusion was commenced but a third salvage was not successful. The vasculitis resulted in marked blood vessel wall thickening, and cutaneous manifestations which presented as late signs. High peri-nuclear anti nuclear cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) and myeloperoxidase (MOP) titres were subsequently found and histology from several blood vessels showed marked inflammation throughout the wall. A diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis was made and high dose steroids were subsequently commenced. Interestingly, he had vasculitis several years previously treated with oral steroids but had been discharged from the rheumatology clinic. This rare case illustrates the potential hazards of free flap surgery in the vasculitides and discusses the warning signs and various management options to reduce the likelihood of flap failure in these patients. PMID:22534125

  15. Necrotizing vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045170 . Stone JH. Classification and epidemiology of systemic vasculitis. In: Firestein GS, ... MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 ...

  16. Urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Venzor, Joe; Lee, Wai L; Huston, David P

    2002-10-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a clinico-pathologic entity typified by recurrent episodes of urticaria that have the histopathologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The cutaneous features may include painful, burning or pruritic skin lesions, the persistence of individual lesions greater than 24 hours, palpable purpura, pronounced central clearing of lesions, and residual hyperpigmentation following resolution. However, because clinical characteristics of urticarial vasculitis may overlap with those of allergic urticaria, confirmation of the diagnosis requires a lesional skin biopsy. This condition is idiopathic in many patients but can also occur in the context of autoimmune disorders, infections, drug reactions, or as a paraneoplastic syndrome. In idiopathic urticarial vasculitis common laboratory findings are an elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and reduction of serum complement. An association between urticarial vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus has been hypothesized as some clinical manifestations of disease overlap and C1q autoantibodies may be present in both diseases. Normo-complementemic patients usually have minimal or no systemic involvement and often have a better prognosis. On-the-other-hand, hypocomplementemic patients have the propensity to have more severe multi-organ involvement. Response to treatment is variable and a wide variety of therapeutic agents may be efficacious. Initial recommendations for treatment of urticarial vasculitis manifest only as non-necrotizing skin lesions include antihistamines, dapsone, colchicine, hydroxychloroquine or indomethacin, but corticosteroids are often required. With necrotizing skin lesions or visceral involvement, corticosteroids are regularly indicated. Cases of severe corticosteroid resistant urticarial vasculitis or where corticosteroid morbidity is evident [table: see text] may require treatment with other immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, or

  17. Acute dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with beriberi and cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: an unusual potential complication of two rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Ana; Solé, Manel; Prieto-González, Sergio; Alba, Marco Antonio; Grau, Josep Maria; Cid, Maria Cinta; Hernández-Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old patient who presented with acute dilated cardiomyopathy. During admission the patient was consecutively diagnosed with cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and beriberi. In both diseases, cardiac involvement may occur as dilated cardiomyopathy. Thiamin deficiency was the final cause for the severe cardiac manifestations (cardiac acute beriberi or Shoshin syndrome), which returned to normal after thiamin supplementation. PMID:24429381

  18. The long-term outcomes of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Westman, Kerstin; Flossmann, Oliver; Gregorini, Gina

    2015-04-01

    Patients with generalized ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis (AAV) have a very poor outcome if the ANCA-associated vasculitis is not diagnosed, evaluated and treated properly. The introduction of treatment with immunosuppressive therapy has improved patient survival dramatically but with considerable side effects. Besides, almost 50% of surviving patients experience a relapse of vasculitis. Since 1995, the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS) has designed and conducted several clinical trials on patients with AAV independently of pharmaceutical companies. The studies included patients with newly diagnosed AAV and were stratified according to renal function and generalized versus more localized forms. As the immediate patient survival has improved, the longer term outcome has become more important. There are several reports on outcome of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, but the patient groups were heterogeneous regarding diagnosis as well as treatment and follow-up. Therefore, EUVAS decided to further evaluate the effect and possible adverse events of the original randomized trials. This review presents an overview on long-term follow-up of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, with focus on relapse rate, patient and renal survival and development of cardiovascular disease and malignancy. PMID:25601266

  19. Cerebral angiography as a guide for therapy in isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.L.; Martino, C.R.; Weinert, D.M.; Hueftle, M.; Kammer, G.M.

    1987-04-24

    The authors present a case of isolated central nervous system vasculitis documented by cerebral arteriography in which remission, using a treatment regimen of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, was guided by serial arteriography during a 15-month period.

  20. Vasculitis in systemic sclerosis: association with Sjögren's syndrome and the CREST syndrome variant.

    PubMed

    Oddis, C V; Eisenbeis, C H; Reidbord, H E; Steen, V D; Medsger, T A

    1987-10-01

    We describe 7 patients with established systemic sclerosis who developed clinical evidence of vasculitis 1 to 33 (mean 12.7) years after the first symptoms of scleroderma. Six had the CREST variant of systemic sclerosis and also had features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Five of 6 patients tested had serum anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies. Vasculitis presented primarily as cutaneous lesions with ulceration and/or mononeuritis multiplex, and 6 patients had severe systemic manifestations. Vasculitis was histopathologically documented in 6 cases in biopsies of skin (4 of 4), muscle (2 of 3) and sural nerve (3 of 3). Patients with systemic sclerosis with CREST syndrome and SS appear to be at increased risk to develop vasculitis. PMID:3430523

  1. Pediatric Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Durkan, Anne Maria

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis is defined as inflammation of the blood vessels and can result in stenosis or aneurysm, which may in turn lead to occlusion or rupture of the vessel compromising tissue perfusion. The manifestations of these diseases depend on the size and site of the vessels effected. Vasculitis can be secondary to numerous inflammatory and infectious diseases but this review will concentrate on the systemic primary vasculitides and aims to discuss the presentations and approaches to management of a number of these conditions. PMID:26365154

  2. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  3. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  4. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody Associated Systemic Vasculitis Is Associated with Epstein - Barr virus in the Setting of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Syed, Fatima; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction EBV has been a leading candidate as a trigger for several autoimmune diseases. We describe an antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) -associated systemic vasculitis as the initial presenting illness of AIDS. Case report and results The patient was diagnosed ANCA -associated systemic vasculitis in the setting of HIV infection because of a high level of ANCA level, crescent glomerulonephritis in pathology, and clinical signs and symptoms compatible with systemic vasculitis. He also had HIV associated lymphadenopathy with scattered. EBV-RNA positive cells and reactive germinal centers. Conclusion EBV genome was found in reactive lymph nodes and, therefore, may be associated with the immunopathogenesis of vasculitis. PMID:23483275

  5. Diffuse endothelial dysfunction is common to ANCA associated systemic vasculitis and polyarteritis nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Filer, A; Gardner-Medwin, J; Thambyrajah, J; Raza, K; Carruthers, D; Stevens, R; Liu, L; Lowe, S; Townend, J; Bacon, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Excess cardiovascular mortality complicates systemic rheumatic disease, suggesting an accelerated atheromatous process, which it has been proposed relates to the vascular inflammation common in such diseases. Impaired endothelium dependent vasodilatation is an early marker of atheromatous disease. It has previously been shown that such endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) occurring in the brachial artery can complicate primary systemic necrotising vasculitis (SNV). Objective: To determine if ECD occurs in a wider spectrum of primary SNV, if it is restricted to the major arteries, and whether vasculitis subgroup, ANCA status, or renal involvement influenced the endothelial responses. Methods: Fifty four patients attending the Birmingham vasculitis clinic, including patients with a range of ANCA and non-ANCA associated primary vasculitides, and a group of age matched controls were recruited. The length of patient follow up and disease activity was variable. Disease activity, damage scores, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded before assessment of flow mediated brachial artery vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound. Dermal microvascular responses to acetylcholine were also measured in 32 patients and 21 controls by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results: ECD was demonstrated in all primary SNV subgroups of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis and in polyarteritis nodosa, compared with controls. Significant impairment occurred in both vascular beds, regardless of vessel size targeted in the inflammatory vasculitis, ANCA association and titre, or renal involvement. Conclusions: Diffuse endothelial dysfunction, a predictor of atherosclerotic disease, is found extensively in primary systemic vasculitis. Involvement of different vascular beds is independent of target vessel size or ANCA association, and is unrelated to local disease expression. It is suggested that this results from a systemic response that may be a consequence of primary vasculitis

  6. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis revised version with tracked changes removed

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-01-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  7. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jim; McCarty, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, as opposed to urticarial vasculitis or urticarial vasculitis syndrome, is a rare disease process where the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. This article discusses the case of a 34-year-old Hispanic man with an ongoing history of chronic urticaria comprising episodes induced by low ambient temperatures, emotional stress, and spontaneous occurrences. This article serves as a consolidated reference for specialists to comprehensively review the plethora of systemic manifestations that may accompany urticarial vasculitis and highlights new systemic complications reported in association with this disease which are also observed in this case. PMID:22328958

  8. Pulmonary fibrosis—an uncommon manifestation of anti-myeloperoxidase-positive systemic vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanji, Amir; Karim, Mahzuz

    2010-01-01

    Small vessel vasculitides such as microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener’s granulomatosis commonly involve the kidney and lung, with alveolar haemorrhage being the commonest manifestation of pulmonary involvement. Here we describe a patient who developed acute renal failure and pulmonary haemorrhage with positive autoantibodies against myeloperoxidase 1 year after a diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonia had been made and we discuss the uncommon association of pulmonary fibrosis and anti-myeloperoxidase positive vasculitis. PMID:20640181

  9. Recurrent erythema nodosum: a red flag sign of hidden systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Monica; Singh, Kamal; Lehl, SS; Bhalla, Mala

    2013-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a rare, systemic vasculitis with varied presentations across multiple medical specialities. Here, we present a young woman who had recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum on the background of a low-grade fever and no vascular manifestations. The presence of a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate generated a high index of suspicion for underlying vasculitis, and radioimaging confirmed the suspicion of Takayasu's arteritis. The patient was found to have type III diseases in the vasculitic stage and was managed with systemic corticosteroids. PMID:23576669

  10. Burning vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Priyanka; Hobday, Dorian; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old man who was found collapsed close to a heat source and admitted to hospital for severe sepsis. He was also found to have widespread blistering and ulceration of his right leg; however, a history was unobtainable due to reduced consciousness levels. The leg lesions had the initial appearance of mixed depth burns and a management plan was made to transfer the patient to a burns unit for debridement. It was subsequently noted that the patient had a previous diagnosis of seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. A biopsy of the leg lesion was performed and a diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis confirmed. Treatment with systemic steroids, intravenous antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for severe hypogammaglobulinaemia was started, and the patient was not transferred for surgical debridement. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and extremely serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis that can manifest in a number of ways, occasionally mimicking other conditions. This case is essential to raise awareness of rare, severe rheumatoid vasculitis and of the potential for its misdiagnosis as a mixed depth burn. PMID:27118745

  11. Value of anti-infective chemoprophylaxis in primary systemic vasculitis: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Although infections are a major concern in patients with primary systemic vasculitis, actual knowledge about risk factors and evidence concerning the use of anti-infective prophylaxis from clinical trials are scarce. The use of high dose glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide pose a definite risk for infections. Bacterial infections are among the most frequent causes of death, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common isolate. Concerning viral infections, cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus reactivation represent the most frequent complications. The only prophylactic measure that is widely accepted is trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole to avoid Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in small vessel vasculitis patients with generalised disease receiving therapy for induction of remission. PMID:19886977

  12. Vasculitis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to view full calendar Vasculitis Patient-Powered Research Network The V-PPRN seeks to transform how clinical ... patients with various forms of vasculitis. Join The Network! Latest News Brandon Qualifies for the 1500m Semi- ...

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C; Murphy, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80(+)macrophages, and T. cruzi tetramer-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus,T. cruzi infection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  14. Bartonella henselae aortic valve endocarditis mimicking systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Laurence S G; Hart, Hamish H; Soh, May Ching; Christiansen, Jonathan P; Bhally, Hasan; Philips, Martin S; Rai-Chaudhuri, Dominic S

    2010-01-01

    A 28-year-old man with a bicuspid aortic valve presented with facial droop and slurred speech with several months of constitutional symptoms of night sweats, weight loss and productive cough. Examination confirmed aortic regurgitation, palpable spleen and left facial droop. Multiple peripheral blood cultures were negative. Inflammatory markers, cytoplasmic staining antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (cANCA) and anti-PR3 antibody were all elevated. MRI of the brain and CT of the chest and abdomen confirmed embolic infarcts to brain, kidney and spleen. Transoesophageal echocardiogram (ECG) showed valve vegetations and severe aortic regurgitation. Endocardial Wegener's granulomatosis was considered. Aortic valve replacement was performed. Grindings from aortic valve leaflets were analysed for rpoB gene, which confirmed the presence of Bartonella henselae. Serological assays demonstrated B henselae IgM 20 (normal <20) and IgG >2048 (normal < 64). The patient completely recovered after prolonged antibiotic treatment. Culture-negative infective endocarditis may mimic vasculitis and be associated with positive cANCA. Serology and molecular techniques may aid diagnosis. PMID:22791485

  15. The lung in systemic vasculitis: radiological patterns and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Feragalli, Beatrice; Mantini, Cesare; Sperandeo, Marco; Galluzzo, Michele; Belcaro, Giovanni; Tartaro, Armando; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2016-05-01

    The respiratory system may be involved in all systemic vasculitides, although with a variable frequency. The aim of our review is to describe radiographic and high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of pulmonary vasculitides and to correlate radiological findings with pathological results. Lung disease is a common feature of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) and microscopic polyangiitis. Pulmonary involvement is less frequent in immune-complex-mediated small-vessel vasculitides, such as Behçet's disease and Goodpasture's syndrome. Pulmonary involvement associated to large-vessel (gigantocellular arteritis and Takayasu's disease) or medium-vessel (nodose polyarteritis and Kawasaki's disease) vasculitides is extremely rare. The present review describes the main clinical and radiological features of pulmonary vasculitides with major purpose to correlate HRCT findings (solitary or multiple nodules, cavitary lesions, micronodules with centrilobular or peribronchial distribution, airspace consolidations, "crazy paving", tracheobronchial involvement, interstitial disease) with pathological results paying particular attention to the description of acute life-threatening manifestations. A thorough medical history, careful clinical examination and the knowledge of radiological patterns are mandatory for a correct and early diagnosis. PMID:26876879

  16. Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitides have a variety of presentations, but cardiac valvular involvement is rarely diagnosed and its management is not established. Case presentation We report the case of a 44 year old man who presented with an ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and aortic regurgitation of unusual mechanism. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography disclosed septal hypertrophy preventing a complete closure of the aortic valve and thus responsible for a massive aortic regurgitation. After 4 months of immunosuppressive therapy, the valve lesion did not subside and the patient had to undergo aortic valve replacement. This report also reviews the 20 cases of systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis with endocardial valvular involvement previously reported in the English language medical literature. Conclusions Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitides is rarely reported. Most of these lesions are due to Wegener's granulomatosis and half are present when the diagnosis of vasculitis is made. The valvular lesion is usually isolated, aortic regurgitation being the most frequent type, and often requires valve replacement in the months that follow it's discovery. PMID:21345235

  17. [Immunocorrection in combined prevention of early postoperative complications in patients with systemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Andrievskikh, I A; Omel'ianiuk, M Iu

    2015-01-01

    The authors studied peculiarities of the immune status in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, as well as possibilities of immunodiagnosis and immunocorrection in prevention of early coagulopathic and reparative complications after angiosurgical interventions in this cohort of patients. A total of 172 angiosurgical patients presenting with systemic vasculitis were subdivided into two groups depending on the preoperative preparation methods used. In Group One (Study Group) comprising 81 patients preoperative preparation was carried out using immunosuppressive therapy with hormones and cytostatics according to the rheumatologist's indications. In Group Two (n=91) hormones and/or cytostatics were replaced by the proposed four-component immunocorrection including various combinations of correcting the lifestyle, use of antioxidative-activity immunomodulators, plasmapheresis and intravenous administration of immunoglobulins. It was determined that using this method of correction made it possible to achieve a good anti-inflammatory effect in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, thus avoiding negative aftermaths of immunosuppression. The developed method of immunocorrection makes it possible to decrease the rate of early postoperative coagulopathic and reparative complications in angiosurgical patients as compared to therapy with hormones and/or cytostatics. PMID:26673291

  18. Successful treatment of cerebral large vessel vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus with intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Kato, R; Sumitomo, S; Kawahata, K; Fujio, K; Yamamoto, K

    2015-07-01

    A 39-year-old woman with a six-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was admitted because of a prolonged high fever, discoid rash, and multiple lymphadenopathies. She also developed pericarditis, and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by prednisolone 50 mg daily and cyclosporine 100 mg daily. Meanwhile, she had a progressive headache, and a brain MRI revealed right pons infarction, although she did not have any abnormal neurological findings. An MRA revealed obvious irregular narrowing in the basilar, right vertebral and right posterior cerebral artery. There was no evidence of antiphospholipid syndrome. We concluded that the cause of the asymptomatic brain infarction was cerebral large vessel vasculitis associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was started, and two months later, we confirmed that the irregular arterial narrowing had markedly ameliorated.Cerebral large vessel vasculitis in neuropsychiatric SLE is very rare, and a marked amelioration has not been reported to date. Here, we present a rare case of cerebral large vessel vasculitis treated successfully with a clear visual presentation. PMID:25661835

  19. Antigen inhalation as a triggering factor in systemic small-sized-vessel vasculitis. Four cases.

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L; Khaled, M; Cohen, P; Subra, J F; Guillevin, L

    2001-04-01

    In order to identify small-sized-vessel vasculitis occurring immediately after massive inhalation of particles which could be considered antigenic, we performed a retrospective review of patients who consulted our Department of Internal Medicine between 1980 and 1998 and were diagnosed as having small-vessel vasculitis that developed immediately after massive exposure to inhaled particles. Four patients, 27 to 55 years old, presented with small-sized-vessel vasculitis (one with Wegener's granulomatosis and three with Churg-Strauss syndrome) which developed after massive inhalation of particles. Clinical manifestations occurred from a few hours to 10 days after inhalation of diesel fumes, cereal dust, flour or cereal dust and/or pigeon droppings. Three patients remain disease-free 8, 9 and 18 years after discontinuing treatment. One patient remains well after 3 years on low-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide therapy. Our data suggest that primary antigens can cause small-sized-vessel vasculitides. Identifying such etiological factors could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitides and prevent relapses due to similar antigenic exposure. PMID:11431572

  20. Tissue microscopic changes and artifacts in multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography in a hospital setting: a fatal case of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Caroline; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Marcheix, Bertrand; Rousseau, Hervé; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel; Dedouit, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    A 27-year-old man suddenly died in hospital of acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe systemic vasculitis. Multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography followed by scientific autopsy of the thoracic and abdominal cavity and histology was performed, illustrating the advantages and drawbacks of such techniques. Imaging enabled us to examine the cranium, as the family refused cerebral dissection. MPMCTA revealed absence of opacification of the left middle cerebral artery. But parenchymal findings of thoracic and abdominal organs were still difficult to interpret after both imaging and macroscopic examination during the autopsy. Microscopic examination provided the definitive diagnosis of cause of death. Analysis revealed systemic vasculitis of the lung complicated by diffuse alveolar, mediastinal, splenic and retroperitoneal lesions. We were unable to determine the type of vasculitis, whether polyarteritis nodosa or microscopic polyangiitis, because of artifactual glomerular collapse. We observed some structural changes in tissue secondary to contrast agent injection, affecting the vascular system and renal parenchyma in particular. Such artifacts must be known in order to avoid misinterpreting them as pathological findings. MPMCTA and conventional autopsy are two complementary techniques showing both their specific advantages and limits which have to be known in order to choose the appropriate technique. One limit of both techniques is the detection of microscopic findings which can only be obtained by additional histological examination. This case report underlines this fact and demonstrates that caution is required in some cases if microscopic analyses are carried out after contrast agent injection. PMID:25085763

  1. Medium-size-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Medium-size-artery vasculitides do occur in childhood and manifest, in the main, as polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), cutaneous PAN and Kawasaki disease. Of these, PAN is the most serious, with high morbidity and not inconsequential mortality rates. New classification criteria for PAN have been validated that will have value in epidemiological studies and clinical trials. Renal involvement is common and recent therapeutic advances may result in improved treatment options. Cutaneous PAN is a milder disease characterised by periodic exacerbations and often associated with streptococcal infection. There is controversy as to whether this is a separate entity or part of the systemic PAN spectrum. Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis, the second commonest vasculitis in childhood and the commonest cause of childhood-acquired heart disease. Renal manifestations occur and include tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal failure. An infectious trigger and a genetic predisposition seem likely. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IV-Ig) and aspirin are effective therapeutically, but in resistant cases, either steroid or infliximab have a role. Greater understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these three types of vasculitis and better long-term follow-up data will lead to improved therapy and prediction of prognosis. PMID:19946711

  2. Testicular vasculitis: findings differentiating isolated disease from systemic disease in 72 patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Tan, Carmela D; Koening, Curry L; Khasnis, Atul; Rodríguez, E René; Hoffman, Gary S

    2012-03-01

    Testicular vasculitis (TV) may be part of systemic (testicular) vasculitis (STV) or may exist as single-organ/isolated (testicular) vasculitis (ITV). In the current study we sought to identify clinical and histologic features that distinguish STV from ITV. The distinction was deemed important because it is already well established that in other forms of single organ vasculitis, surgical therapy alone may be curative. We identified patients with biopsy-proven TV from pathology databases from our institution and from an English-language PubMed search. Patients were included if data were available to determine TV extent confidently. Data recorded included clinical, laboratory, and histologic features; treatment; and clinical follow-up. The study included 72 patients with TV (mean age, 42 yr; range, 4-78 yr) (7 from our institution). About 74% of patients presented with painful testicular swelling/mass, 10% with a painless testicular swelling/mass, and 4% with epididymal swelling/mass. Eleven percent had no testicular complaints and vasculitis was discovered at autopsy or in other surgical interventions. Vasculitis involved the testicle in 80.3% of cases, the epididymis in 44.6%, and the spermatic cord in 30.6%. Thirty-seven (51%) patients had ITV and 35 (49%) had STV. No differences between ITV and STV patients were found in regards to age, presenting testicular features, duration of testicular symptoms, and time of follow-up. Compared to ITV patients, STV patients presented more often with constitutional/musculoskeletal symptoms (74.3% vs. 8.3%, respectively; p = 0.0001), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (94.7% vs. 16%; p = 0.0001), and anemia (50% vs. 0%; p = 0.0001). Neoplasm was more frequently suspected in ITV than in STV (74.2% vs. 31.6%; p = 0.001), but only occurred in 2 ITV patients. Long-term glucocorticoid therapy was given only to STV patients, and 59.1% of them also received cytotoxic agents. ITV was diagnosed more often by orchiectomy (81.1% vs

  3. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  4. Studies of epitope restriction on myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important antigen in systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    SHORT, A K; LOCKWOOD, C M

    1997-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are important components of the inflammatory response in patients with systemic vasculitis. Their role in the pathogenesis of these conditions remains incompletely defined. Several antigens have been identified, and MPO is one of the most important. To gain more understanding of the immune mechanisms involved, we were keen to see if the antibody response to MPO was restricted, or whether there was a general loss of tolerance to the whole surface of the molecule. To study the epitopes we employed both ELISA and biosensor technology, and were able to demonstrate restriction both in the number and localization of the epitopes being recognized. PMID:9367412

  5. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  6. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Garge, Shaileshkumar S; Vyas, Pooja D; Modi, Pranav D; Ghatge, Sharad

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn's disease (CD) seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,) showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA) showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH. PMID:25506170

  7. Central nervous system vasculitis in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Twilt, Marinka; Benseler, Susanne M

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is an inflammatory brain disease targeting the cerebral blood vessels, leading to a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, including neurologic deficits, cognitive dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. The inflammation could be reversible if diagnosed and treated early. The diagnosis requires the careful consideration and rapid evaluation of systemic underlying conditions and disease mimics. The differential diagnosis is distinctly different for angiography-positive and -negative PACNS subtypes and differs depending on age, so there is childhood PACNS or adult PACNS. Distinct disease subtypes have been described, with characteristic disease course, neuroimaging findings, and histopathologic features. Novel and traditional biomarkers, including von Willebrand factor antigen and cytokine levels, can help diagnose, and define subtype and disease activity. Treatment of PACNS should be tailored to the disease subtypes and clinical symptoms. Beyond immunosuppression it should include medications to control symptoms in order to support and enhance the child's or adult's ability to actively participate in rehabilitation. The mortality of PACNS has decreased; studies determining the morbidity and its determinants are urgently needed. PMID:27112683

  8. [Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Blank, N; Lorenz, H-M

    2016-04-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a disease of the small arteries and affects the skin, joints, peripheral nerves, kidneys and other organs. Even small amounts of cryoglobulins can lead to severe impairment for the patient but the detection of such low amounts of cryoglobulins can be difficult. The causes of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis include monoclonal hematological diseases, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. Therapy involves treatment of the underlying disease and glucocorticoids, rituximab and plasmapheresis depending on the severity of the vasculitis. Recognition of typical clinical symptoms is essential in order to initiate appropriate laboratory diagnostic procedures. Sometimes many investigations are necessary. In the absence of clinical trials treatment recommendations can often only be derived from registry data. PMID:27034078

  9. Autoimmunity in chronic urticaria and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Napoli, D C; Freeman, T M

    2001-07-01

    In contrast to acute urticaria, etiology cannot be identified in most cases of chronic urticaria. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of patients with chronic urticaria may have an autoimmune basis for their condition. The demonstration of antithyroid autoantibodies in some patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) provides support for an association. However, the discovery of a positive skin test response to intradermal injection of autologous serum in as many as 60% of patients with CIU led to the identification of autoantibodies to IgE and the alpha-chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor, Fc epsilon RI alpha. Additional studies have demonstrated that some of these autoantibodies are capable of releasing histamine from donor basophils and mast cells. This article reviews the literature that addresses a possible autoimmune etiology in a subset of patients with CIU. Urticarial vasculitis is differentiated from chronic urticaria based on clinical features and biopsy findings of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Most cases of urticarial vasculitis are secondary to an underlying systemic disease. The presence of autoantibodies has also been demonstrated in a subset of patients with primary urticarial vasculitis. This article briefly reviews some of this data. PMID:11892055

  10. Rheumatoid vasculitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Pecly, Inah Maria Drummond; Ocampo, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Guillermo Pandales; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Guedes; Saud, Claudia Guerra Murad; Arantes, Milton Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease and its main manifestation is persistent synovitis affecting peripheral joints symmetrically, In spite of its destructive potential, the evolution of RA is highly variable. Some patients may have only a short-term process oligoarticular with minimum lesion, while others suffers a polyarthritis evolving with progressive and continuous involvement of other organ systems such as skin, heart, lungs, muscles and blood vessels rarely leading to rheumatoid vasculitis. The aim of this study was to describe a case of rheumatoid vasculitis a rare and severe condition. PMID:25772654

  11. Pediatric Vasculitis Initiative

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Wegeners Granulomatosis (Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg Strauss Syndrome (Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu Arteritis; Primary CNS Vasculitis; Unclassified Vasculitis

  12. Primary central nervous system vasculitis preceded by granulomatous hypophysitis: Case report with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meng; Steele, William J.; Baskin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is an idiopathic inflammatory process that selectively affects CNS vasculature without a systemic inflammatory response, and causes luminal obstruction with resultant ischemia of recipient tissue. Its varying clinical symptoms and signs depend on the caliber of vessels involved and distribution and location of the affected structures. Granulomatous hypophysitis (GH) is an autoimmune inflammatory process typically affecting women, and usually presents with hypopituitarism, and at times, diabetes insipidus, and/or visual loss. Both entities are rare CNS diseases, which, to our knowledge, have never been previously reported in the same patient. Case Description: We present a unique case of chronic progressive primary CNS vasculitis causing limbic encephalopathy in a 30-year-old male with only a history of medication-controlled hypertension. He initially presented 4 months prior with nonspecific neurological complaints and was found to have a homogenously enhancing and enlarged pituitary, which was biopsy proven to be GH. Conclusion: This rather unique presentation highlights the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for underlying PCNS vasculitis in a patient who does not fit the typical demographic for isolated GH. PMID:26539311

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and seizure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Borahay, Mostafa A; Kelly, Brent C; Harirah, Hassan M

    2009-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare multisystem disease with a wide array of presentation and is a diagnostic challenge during pregnancy. A 20-year-old gravida 1 at 39 weeks' gestation was referred to our hospital for elevated blood pressure, headache, and history of seizure. She was admitted with the impression of severe preeclampsia. Intravenous magnesium sulfate for seizure prophylaxis and oxytocin for induction of labor were started. Primary lower-segment cesarean section was performed for nonreassuring fetal heart tracing. The postoperative course was complicated with fever requiring prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy, appearance of violaceous skin lesions on the periungual areas of fingers and toes, recurrent seizures, and altered sensorium. Biopsy of the lesions revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) with thrombi. Laboratory workup confirmed SLE with a dramatic improvement of the patient's condition upon initiating intravenous steroid therapy. LCV and neuropsychiatric SLE are rare presentations of SLE during pregnancy, and obstetricians should be aware of them. Workup for SLE is warranted in cases with atypical presentation of preeclampsia that does not resolve with delivery. PMID:19326323

  14. A case of primary central nervous system vasculitis diagnosed by second brain biopsy and treated successfully.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuri; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Maeda, Norihisa; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-03-30

    We report a case of primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) diagnosed by second brain biopsy. A 53-year-old man initially presented with left lateral gaze diplopia. Brain MRI revealed multiple enhanced lesions in the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral basal ganglia, left cerebellum and brainstem. An initial brain biopsy of the right frontal lobe suggested immune-related encephalitis with angiocentric accumulation of chronic inflammatory cells, while malignant lymphoma could not be completely ruled out. The patient deteriorated despite being treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. A second brain biopsy of the right temporal lobe was then performed. The biopsied specimens showed vascular wall disruption and fibrinoid necrosis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates, mainly composed of CD8-positive T cells, and PCNSV was diagnosed. He was treated with high dose corticosteroids, in combination with methotrexate (8 mg/week), which reduced the brain lesions. As brain biopsy is an essential investigation for the histological diagnosis of PCNSV; subsequent biopsies may be required when a histopathological diagnosis has not been obtained by the first biopsy, and further aggressive therapy is being considered. PMID:26960271

  15. Systemic Levamisole-Induced Vasculitis in a Cocaine User without Cutaneous Findings: A Consideration in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Gillian G.; Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Masud, Tahsin; Bonsall, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is a known immunomodulating agent frequently used as a cutting agent in cocaine consumed in the United States today. Numerous cases of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis connected with the use of levamisole-adulterated cocaine have previously been reported in the literature, classically characterized by a retiform purpuric rash. We report a case of a crack-cocaine user without cutaneous abnormalities who developed ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis that progressed to renal failure. This case demonstrates the difficulties in solidifying the diagnosis of levamisole-induced vasculitis in the absence of cutaneous findings and the need to pursue more testing to establish causality in ANCA-associated vasculitis that has potential for severe end-organ damage in patients who continue to use cocaine. PMID:26635879

  16. Hepatotropic viral infection associated systemic vasculitides-hepatitis B virus associated polyarteritis nodosa and hepatitis C virus associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Sharma, Kusum

    2013-09-01

    Two hepatotropic viruses have been shown to have causal relationship with systemic vasculitis-hepatitis B with classical polyarteritis nodosa and hepatitis C with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. The present paper provides an updated overview on the clinical presentations and management of these vasculitides. HBV associated PAN patients have higher weight loss, peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal manifestations requiring surgery, cardiomyopathy, orchitis, hypertension, and/or elevated transaminase levels. Microaneurysms are also more common in mesenteric artery. Skin manifestations, however are less common. These patients also have a severe disease as suggested by higher five factor score and higher BVAS. Though relapses are less common, mortality is higher in patients with HBV PAN as compared to non HBV PAN. Plasmapheresis has a role in treatment in clearing off immune complexes. The common clinical manifestations of HCV associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis are skin lesions, peripheral neuropathy, glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and sicca symptoms. Though combination therapy comprising of pegylated interferon α and ribavirin is the first line of management, immunotherapy is needed for severe or life threatening manifestations. Recent randomized trials have shown the efficacy of rituximab in such situations. PMID:25755502

  17. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  18. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  19. Reproductive Health in Men and Women With Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-25

    Giant Cell Arteritis; Takayasu's Arteritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Kawasaki Disease; Henoch-schoenlein Purpura; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Drug-induced Necrotizing Vasculitis

  20. An Update of the Mayo Clinic Cohort of Patients With Adult Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D.; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V.; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with

  1. CNS vasculitis and stroke in neonatal lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saini, Arushi G; Sankhyan, Naveen; Bhattad, Sagar; Vyas, Sameer; Saikia, Biman; Singhi, Pratibha

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus refers to the clinical spectrum of cardiac, cutaneous and other systemic abnormalities in neonates born to mothers with autoantibodies against Ro/SSA and La/SSB antigens. Isolated central nervous system involvement is very rare and has been described as transient vasculopathy only. We describe a 2-months-old girl who presented with acute ischemic stroke secondary to central nervous system vasculitis without any cardiac, cutaneous or hematological manifestations. The mother was pauci-symptomatic with raised anti-Ro autoantibody titers; the baby was positive for autoantibodies against Ro-antigen. Angiography confirmed vasculitis in cerebral vasculature. Our case highlights that neonatal lupus erythematosus can present with isolated nervous system manifestations and the vascular damage can be permanent in the form of vasculitis. Early recognition will help pediatricians identify such possible permanent complications in newborns with neonatal lupus erythematosus. A review of previously reported central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus is also presented. PMID:24508360

  2. A case of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis, cerebral neutrophilic vasculitis, and cerebritis.

    PubMed

    Modjinou, Dodji; Gurin, Lindsey; Chhabra, Arpit; Mikolaenko, Irina; Lydon, Eileen; Smiles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with multiple clinical presentations and manifestations. Here, we report an intriguing case of a 30-year-old female with full-blown SLE, associated with longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) manifested by lower extremity weakness, neurogenic bladder and bowel, and central nervous system (CNS) lupus clinically manifested by changes in mood and behavior as well as neutrophilic vasculitis and cerebritis on pathology. LETM is a rare complication of SLE; however, what makes this case even more intriguing is that it additionally had cerebral lesions consistent with neutrophilic vasculitis and cerebritis, and that it may all have started at least 10 years prior with nonspecific musculoskeletal manifestations subsequently followed by a rash as well as intractable fevers of unknown etiology—much later attributed to her lupus. Although she had a most concerning and dramatic presentation, she, so far, had responded very well to therapy including pulse dose steroids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), cyclophosphamide, and related medications. PMID:25986355

  3. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association. PMID:23000939

  4. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel R; Sullivan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  5. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  6. Damage assessment in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bhamra, Kuljeet; Luqmani, Raashid

    2012-12-01

    greater detail in describing and observing the long-term natural history of primary systemic vasculitis in patients treated with immunosuppressive agents who survive their initial disease process. PMID:22983618

  7. Urticarial vasculitis and urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Tavecchio, S; Venturini, M; Sala, R; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Gattorno, M

    2015-02-01

    Urticaria is a frequent disorder classified as acute and chronic forms, which presents with wheals that can be associated with angioedema. Several entities may manifest with urticarial skin lesions, encompassing a heterogeneous group of conditions that have to be differentiated from ordinary urticaria. This review is focused on two of these urticarial syndromes: urticarial vasculitis (UV), which represents the most important differential diagnosis with common urticaria, and autoinflammatory diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and Schnitzler's Syndrome, both rare multisystem forms that may masquerade as common urticaria. UV is a small-vessel vasculitis with predominant skin involvement, characterized by wheals persisting for more than 24 hours, burning rather than itching and resolving with hyperpigmentation as well as by other cutaneous manifestations including purpura, papules, vesicles, bullae and necrotic-ulcerative lesions. Histology shows a classic pattern of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, with possible presence of upper dermal edema. CAPS are classified as three distinct entities: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells Syndrome and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome, which represent a spectrum of disorders caused by different mutations in a single gene, NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor 3). This gene encodes for cryopyrin, an inflammasome protein that activates interleukin-1β, leading to an overproduction of this pivotal proinflammatory cytokine. Histologically, urticarial lesions are generally characterized by a perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate. Unlike urticaria, neither UV nor urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes do respond to antihistamines: thus, it is important not to misdiagnose such conditions in order to give the patients specific treatments, potentially preventing serious systemic complications. PMID:25586657

  8. [MPO-ANCA related vasculitis complicating mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas and severe acute pancreatitis after steroid pulse therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Kayori; Sekiya, Syuusuke; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Kenichirou; Shimazaki, Minako; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Shirai, Sayuri; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjirou

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive proteinuria of 2.2 g/day. She had seen a general practitioner for management of Basedow disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 24 years. On admission, she complained of anorexia and nausea. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 3.62 mg/dL and MPO-ANCA of 68 EU. Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis complicated with membranous nephropathy. Thiamazole (MMI), which was being given for Basedow disease for years, was withdrawn on the suspicion as a cause of MPO-ANCA. Three years after the withdrawal of MMI, renal failure slowly progressed to the end-stage, while MPO-ANCA was negative. She was introduced onto hemodialysis. At that time, MPO-ANCA became positive again, the titer being 12.9 EU. Therefore, we suspected a relapse of ANCA-related vasculitis and performed steroid pulse therapy on the patient with methylprednisolone at 0.5 g/day for 3 days. On hospital day 14, MPO-ANCA became negative. On day 25, however, severe acute pancreatitis developed and a pancreatic tumor lesion was found on CT. In spite of amelioration of the pancreatitis by medical treatment, the pancreatic tumor lesion did not show any significant change. On day 48, she died of multiple organ failure. Autopsy showed a mucinous cyst adenoma of pancreas and necrotizing pancreatitis. We suspected steroid therapy as the cause of the pancreatic lesions. PMID:19069154

  9. Urticarial Reactions: Vascular Erythema, Urticaria, Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, R. Gary

    1987-01-01

    Vascular erythemas, including urticaria and vasculitis, represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. A careful systemic approach to history and physical examination should be followed by appropriate investigations to rule out systemic disease. Chronic urticaria patients should be physically tested to identify cholinergic, dermagraphic, and cold-induced responses. Food diaries and careful drug history may be important to identify exacerbating factors in chronic urticaria. A skin biopsy is necessary to diagnose vasculitis. Therapy of any underlying cause is supplemented with H1 antihistamines in urticaria patients, while vasculitis requires a different anti-inflammatory approach. PMID:21263956

  10. A retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes in patients with hepatitis C related systemic vasculitis receiving intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Amira A; El Desouky, Soha M; Zayed, Hania S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the outcome of a series of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related vasculitis who were treated with corticosteroids and I.V. cyclophosphamide without receiving any antiviral therapy. The data of 16 patients with HCV infection and vasculitis were retrospectively analyzed for the treatment outcome in the present study. Eleven patients were females (68.8%) with a mean age of 49.6 ± 10.0 years. Nine patients (56.2%) had medium-sized vessel vasculitis (group A) and seven patients (43.8%) had small vessel vasculitis (group B). Disease activity was assessed using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS 2003) and organ damage was assessed by the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). HCV infection was confirmed in all patients by the detection of antibodies to HCV in serum by ELISA and HCV RNA using qualitative PCR. Quantitative PCR was done using the branched DNA technique. None of our study patients had received antiviral therapy, but they all received I.V.-pulsed cyclophosphamide monthly for 6 months, then every 3 months for six times if needed, preceded by I.V. methylprednisolone. Twelve patients (75%) had undetectable viral load by the quantitative technique. The drop in mean BVAS recorded at different intervals was highly significant. Although there was a drop in the VDI mean between the first and second reading, it was not statistically significant. All patients responded to treatment. Seven patients (43.8%) had relapse. Two patients died (12.5%). One patient died from renal failure (group B) and another died from sepsis (group A). The treatment outcomes were not statistically significant between the two vasculitis groups. A subset of patients with HCV-related vasculitis and with low levels of viremia can be safely treated with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide alone. Despite successful treatment, a significant proportion of patients relapse and some develop severe complications and death. PMID:20924628

  11. How Is Vasculitis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aneurysm Blood Tests Kawasaki Disease Raynaud's Smoking and Your Heart Send a ... of vasculitis. For example, the standard treatment for Kawasaki disease is high-dose aspirin and immune globulin. ...

  12. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up.HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  13. Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Ghersetich, I; Comacchi, C; Jorizzo, J L

    1998-11-01

    Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV) refers to a group of disorders usually characterized by palpable purpura; it is caused by leukocytoclastic vasculitis of postcapillary venules. CSVV can be idiopathic or can be associated with a drug, infection, or underlying systemic disease. Initially, the pathogenesis of CSVV is immune complex related, but in its later stages different pathogenetic mechanisms may intensify the reaction and lymphocytes may predominate in the infiltrate. Cure requires elimination of the cause (ie, drugs, chemicals, infections, food allergens) when possible, as well as therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, corticosteroids, dapsone, potassium iodide, fibrinolytic agents, aminocaproic acid, immunosuppressive agents (ie, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine) or even monoclonal antibodies, depending on disease severity. PMID:9810883

  14. Epigenetics and Vasculitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides represent a group of relatively rare systemic inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels. Despite recent progress in understanding the genetic basis and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in vasculitis, the etiology and pathogenesis of vasculitis remain incompletely understood. Epigenetic dysregulation plays an important role in immune-mediated diseases, and the contribution of epigenetic aberrancies in vasculitis is increasingly being recognized. Histone modifications in the PR3 and MPO gene loci might be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Similarly, other studies revealed important epigenetic contribution to other vasculitides, including Kawasaki disease and IgA vasculitis. More recently, genome-wide epigenomic studies have been performed in several vasculitides. A recent genome-wide DNA methylation study uncovered an important role for epigenetic remodeling of cytoskeleton-related genes in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and suggested that reversal of some of these DNA methylation changes associates with disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling characterized the inflammatory response in temporal artery tissue from patients with giant cell arteritis and showed increased activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling, prompting the suggestion that a specific calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor that is well tolerated and with the added beneficial anti-platelet activity, such as dipyridamole, might be of therapeutic potential in giant cell arteritis. While epigenetic studies in systemic vasculitis are still in their infancy, currently available data clearly indicate that investigating the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these diseases will help to better understand the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provide novel targets for the development of disease biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26093659

  15. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years. PMID:27097818

  16. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome.A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome.The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%).In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  18. How Is Vasculitis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether vasculitis is affecting your abdominal organs. Computed Tomography Scan A computed tomography (to-MOG-rah-fee) scan, or CT scan, ... that vein or artery. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) identifies areas that show higher glucose ...

  19. Time to focus on outcome assessment tools for childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Childhood systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases with multi-organ involvement and potentially devastating consequences. After establishment of new classification criteria (Ankara consensus conference in 2008), it is now time to establish measures for proper definition of activity and damage in childhood primary vasculitis. By comparison to adult vasculitis, there is no consensus for indices of activity and damage assessment in childhood vasculitis. Assessment of disease activity is likely to become a major area of interest in pediatric rheumatology in the near future. After defining the classification criteria for primary systemic childhood vasculitis, the next step was to perform a validation study using the original Birmingham vasculitis activity score as well as the disease extent index to measure disease activity in childhood vasculitis. Presently, there are efforts in place to develop a pediatric vasculitis activity score. This paper reviews the current understanding about the assessment tools (i.e., clinical features, laboratory tests, radiologic assessments, etc.) widely used for evaluation of the disease activity and damage status of the children with vasculitis. PMID:21943296

  20. Paraneoplastic vasculitis associated to pelvic chondrosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arvinius, Camilla; González-Pérez, Ana; García-Coiradas, Javier; García-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrián-Parra, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Vasculopathic syndromes have been associated with hematological and solid organ malignancies. The pathogenesis of these syndromes remains largely unknown and there are no biologic markers identified. Whether it is or is not a paraneoplastic syndrome is under discussion, the close temporal relationship of cancer and vasculitis suggests that these vasculitides are a paraneoplastic condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old female patient with pelvic chondrosarcoma who underwent surgical treatment and started to present visual loss, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SRIS), cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis as well as pulmonary bleeding suggesting a sarcoma-associated vasculitis. All antibodies were negative as in secondary vasculitis. After corticoideal therapy the vasculitis resolved and at 3-year follow-up the patient had not showed any further medical complications or recurrences of the vasculitis. The parallel evolution of the vasculitis and the solid tumor combined with the resolution of the vasculitis after corticotherapy enhances the likelihood of a paraneoplastic vasculitis associated with a chondrosarcoma according to literature review. PMID:27163097

  1. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient. PMID:23256875

  2. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  3. Primary CNS vasculitis presenting as intraventricular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sreeja Hareendranathan; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Menon, Girish; Kannoth, Santhosh; Pn, Sylaja

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder affecting both medium- and small-sized vessels. Intracranial haemorrhages though less reported are in the form of parenchymal haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage. We report a case of PACNS with intraventricular haemorrhage due to aneurysms secondary to progression of vasculitis. PMID:27570401

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis? The signs and symptoms ... symptoms develop quickly, over days or weeks. Systemic Signs and Symptoms Systemic signs and symptoms are those ...

  5. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  6. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... you think. More serious than you know. Support. Awareness. Education. Become a member today! Our Mission The ... Foundation supports and empowers our community through education, awareness and research. Contact Us Click here to send ...

  7. T lymphocyte responses to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) antigens are present in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and persist during disease remission

    PubMed Central

    King, W J; Brooks, C J; Holder, R; Hughes, P; Adu, D; Savage, C O S

    1998-01-01

    ANCA with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) are present in patients with systemic vasculitis. The aim of this work was to determine whether such patients have T cell responses to these antigens and whether these responses are related to disease activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 45 patients and 19 controls were cultured with ANCA antigens and proliferation measured. The antigens used were heat-inactivated (HI) MPO, HI PR3, native (non-HI) PR3, HI whole α-granules, and 25 overlapping peptides covering the entire PR3 sequence. Significant responses to both whole PR3 preparations were seen from patient and control groups, and to the α-granules from the patient group. Patients responded at all stages of disease: active, remitting, treated or untreated. Only two patients responded significantly to MPO. Responses were significantly higher with the patient group than the control group to all four whole ANCA antigens. Responses to those PR3 peptides containing epitopes known to be recognized by ANCA were detected from one patient. Thus, these studies demonstrate that T cells from vasculitis patients can proliferate to PR3 and occasionally to associated ANCA antigens. Further, responses may persist even after disease remission has been achieved. PMID:9649227

  8. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  9. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  10. Telmisartan induced urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Singh, Ravinder; Gupta, Mrinal; Raina, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man developed urticarial vasculitis following ingestion of telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide combination for hypertension. Treatment with prednisolone and cetirizine was curative, but his lesions recurred when he continued telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide against medical advice. Re-challenge with the same doses of telmisartan precipitated similar lesions with telmisartan and not with hydrochlorothiazide. This uncommon cutaneous adverse reaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers has implication for the clinicians as more such cases may become apparent with their wider use than in premarketing studies. PMID:26600649

  11. Local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis; C3d,g and terminal complement complex as sensitive markers.

    PubMed Central

    Dauchel, H; Joly, P; Delpech, A; Thomine, E; Sauger, F; Le Loet, X; Lauret, P; Tron, F; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1993-01-01

    We have studied complement activation both in plasma samples and in lesional skin from patients with leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis (LCV). Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) quantification of the complement activation markers, C3d,g and the terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma, showed that their levels were significantly increased in 66% and 55% of the patients, respectively (n = 29) compared with healthy controls, whereas the standard measurements of C3, factor B, C1q, C4 and C2 were generally within normal range. Elevations of C3d,g and TCC levels in plasma were significantly correlated. Importantly, a significant correlation was found between the severity of the vasculitis and both C3d,g and TCC plasma levels. Immunofluorescence studies of skin biopsy specimens demonstrated simultaneous presence of perivascular dermal deposits of C3d,g and TCC in lesional skin from 96% and 80% respectively of the patients (n = 25). There was a significant correlation between the intensity of the deposits of both markers. Clusterin, a TCC inhibitory protein, was always found at the same sites of perivascular TCC deposits. Immunofluorescence studies at the epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ) revealed in each case deposits of C3d,g which were accompanied by TCC deposits in 52% of the biopsy specimens. These data demonstrate that there is a local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human LCV. The presence of both C3d,g and clusterin-associated TCC perivascular deposits suggests an intervention of a regulatory mechanism of local complement activation in LCV. Finally, measurement of plasma C3d,g and TCC appears to be a sensitive indicator of systemic complement activation and disease severity in LCV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8485913

  12. CHILDHOOD CUTANEOUS VASCULITIS: A COMPREHENSIVE APPRAISAL

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Aparna; Inamadar, Arun C

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides in childhood are rare and often present with clinical features distinct from adults. Diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitides in children was difficult because of lack of a satisfactory classification systems for this age group. A new international classification system for childhood vasculitis has been discussed in the following section along with important clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and recent therapeutic developments of important vasculitides in children. PMID:20101304

  13. Urticarial vasculitis and Schnitzler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Zuberbier, H C Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Both urticarial vasculitis and Schnitzler syndrome are serious diseases but a recently gained better understanding of their underlying pathomechanism allows better treatment options than only a decade ago. PMID:24262694

  14. Differential Diagnosis of Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Herbort, Carl P.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings. PMID:20404987

  15. Safety and efficacy of rituximab treatment for vasculitis in hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic B-cell depletion and clinical remission of the systemic effects of cryoglobulins have already been achieved using rituximab in hepatitis C virus-positive immunocompetent patients. Conversely, to the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature regarding the use of rituximab in hepatitis B virus-associated cryoglobulinemia. Case presentation We report here the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia with severe multisystem disease, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure. The vasculitis was refractory to conventional and antiviral therapy but rituximab use led to a fall in cryoglobulin levels and disease control. The B-cell depletion was safe and efficient to induce a complete remission of the disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the benefit and the efficacy of rituximab in association with antiviral therapy in small vessel vasculitis related to hepatitis B virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22284897

  16. A rheumatology perspective on cutaneous vasculitis: assessment and investigation for the non-rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Charlotte R; Fremlin, Georgina A; Nash, Julian; Harding, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis, by definition, is inflammation of the vasculature. This inflammation can result in either vessel wall destruction causing aneurysm or rupture, or stenosis causing ischaemia or necrosis. This autoimmune response does not always have a clear cause. Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders that has been categorised not only by primary and secondary causes, but also by the size of the affected vessel. The secondary causes that can trigger vasculitis include infection (particularly hepatitis B and C and haemorrhagic fever);cancer, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's; drugs or allergic reactions. As vasculitis can affect any part of the vasculature, it can result in a wide range of signs and symptoms. However, one of the most common presentations of vasculitis is a rash, due to small vessel vasculitis, which is most common. A vasculitic rash has certain characteristics that are easily identifiable and differentiate it from other rashes. This is a review from a rheumatologist's perspective of how to identify vasculitis skin changes. If cutaneous vasculitis is suspected, this article identifies other areas of skin that can be affected that need identification, in addition to what to screen for in the history and other differential diagnoses to consider. Subsequently, the article addresses the key investigations to request and a brief overview of the treatment principles for primary vasculitis. PMID:25818263

  17. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  18. Cutaneous vasculitis in primary Sjögren syndrome: classification and clinical significance of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; García-Carrasco, Mario; Rosas, José; Bové, Albert; Claver, Gisela; Diaz, Luis-Aurelio; Herrero, Carmen; Font, Josep

    2004-03-01

    overwhelming predominance of small versus medium vessel vasculitis and leukocytoclastic versus mononuclear vasculitis, with a higher prevalence of extraglandular and immunologic SS features. Small vessel vasculitis manifested as palpable purpura, urticarial lesions, or erythematosus maculopapules, with systemic involvement in 44% of patients in association with cryoglobulins in 30%. Life-threatening vasculitis was closely related to cryoglobulinemia. PMID:15028963

  19. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease with ANCA-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The association between interstitial lung disease (ILD) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), has been described in a number of case reports and case series reports in the last 2 decades. In addition, patients with pulmonary fibrosis and ANCA positivity but without other manifestations of systemic vasculitis have also been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis was clinically manifested at the time of diagnosis in the majority of AAV patients that developed this condition. Moreover, ANCA-positive conversion occurs in patients initially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and as a result, other manifestations of systemic vasculitis develop in some of these patients. There is significant predominance of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and MPA in patients with AAV and ILD. Radiological and pathological findings generally demonstrate usual interstitial pneumonia (pattern) in the lungs of these patients. In most studies, AAV patients with ILD have a worse prognosis than those without it. PMID:26448696

  1. Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Patient with Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Khushboo; Parke, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilia, caused by autoantibodies to anticardiolipin (aCL), or antibeta 2 glycoprotein I, or the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) in plasma. It is characterized by recurrent venous and/or arterial thrombi and/or pregnancy related morbidities. We present the case of a 52-year-old female with long-standing APS, who developed cutaneous vasculitis following a common cold. Most of the cutaneous manifestations of APS have been found to be thrombotic on histopathology without evidence of perivascular inflammation. Vasculitis is usually seen in APS patients with coexistent Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). However, our patient had evidence of vasculitis on skin biopsy and did not have SLE. Though rare, this is a disease process which must be considered in patients with primary APS which must be closely monitored for other vasculitic complications of APS, particularly diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:27024977

  2. A Case of Brucellosis with Recurrent Attacks of Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Pınar; Kıdır, Mehtap; Namdar, Nazlı Dizen; Özmen, Ahmet; Uyar, Cemile; Değer, Ayşe Nur

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis that affects several organs or systems. Skin involvement is nonspecific and it is reported to range between 0,4 and 17% of the patients with brucellosis. Here, we defined a 36-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with a clinical picture of recurrent attacks of vasculitis due to brucellosis for the first time. Skin involvement and vasculitic lesions as a finding of skin involvement are nonspecific in brucellosis. Therefore, in the regions like Turkey where brucellosis is endemic, brucellosis should be kept in mind necessarily in the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27042369

  3. Cogan syndrome with severe medium and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Duriye D.; Sobrin, Lucia; Papaliodis, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cogan syndrome is a rare disease characterized by coexisting audiovestibular and ocular symptoms. Almost half of patients develop systemic manifestations. We report the case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with severe medium and large vessel vasculitis as a systemic manifestation of Cogan syndrome. PMID:27330475

  4. Use of positron emission tomography (PET) for the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Loricera, J; Blanco, R; Hernández, J L; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M; Lavado, C; Jiménez, M; González-Vela, C; González-Gay, M Á

    2015-01-01

    The term vasculitis encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the vascular wall. The diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis is often a challenge because the presenting clinical features are nonspecific in many cases and they are often shared by different types of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including other systemic vasculitides. Moreover, the pathogenesis of large-vessel vasculitis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, the advent of new imaging techniques has constituted a major breakthrough to establish an early diagnosis and a promising tool to monitor the follow-up of patients with largevessel vasculitis. This is the case of the molecular imaging with the combination of positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). In this review we have focused on the contribution of (18)F-FDG PET in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:26272121

  5. Markers of acute neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: a multidisciplinary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abda, Essam A; Selim, Zahraa I; Radwan, Moustafa E M; Mahmoud, Nagham M; Herdan, Omar M; Mohamad, Khalid A; Hamed, Sherifa A

    2013-05-01

    This study was aimed to assess: (1) the additive diagnostic utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) over conventional MRI in detecting brain lesions in patients with acute primary neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE), and (2) the relevance of their findings to the associated NP manifestations. Included were 34 patients with acute NPSLE with mean age of 33.26 ± 10.14 years and duration of illness of 3.33 ± 1.71 years. Clinical interviewing and psychiatric and cognitive evaluations were performed by applying the criteria of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental health disorders criteria (DSM-IV), Stanford Binet Subset Testing, Mini-Mental State Examination and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised. Serologic tests included looking for antinuclear antibodies, anti-double strand DNA, anti-phospholipid antibodies. Radiologic evaluation included conventional MRI, DWI and MRA. One or more NP manifestations were diagnosed in 28 patients, in which cognitive deficits were reported with headache, psychosis and CVS. Anti-phospholipid antibodies were reported in patients with CVS. Twenty patients (71.43 %) with primary NPSLE (n = 28) had MRI abnormalities in which hyperintense signals at subcortical and periventricular white matter and at the junction between the gray and white matter represented 75 % (n = 15) and with headache (n = 6), psychosis (n = 6) and acute confusional state (n = 3) with and without cognitive deficits, respectively. Moderate-sized infarctions with restricted diffusion in the distribution of middle cerebral arteries were represented in 35 % (n = 7) and with CVS, of them, 71.43 % (n = 5) had beading and focal narrowing of carotid arteries were consistent with vasculitis. Brain atrophy represented 20 % (n = 4) and with psychosis. Compared to those with normal MRI, patients with MRI abnormalities were older (P < 0.050) and had longer duration of illness (P < 0.050). To conclude, although DWI

  6. Histologic and clinical features of primary and secondary vasculitis: a retrospective study of 42 dogs (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Swann, James W; Priestnall, Simon L; Dawson, Charlotte; Chang, Yu-Mei; Garden, Oliver A

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation of the blood vessel wall has been reported infrequently in dogs, and it may occur without apparent cause (primary vasculitis) or as a pathologic reaction to a range of initiating insults (secondary vasculitis). The aims of our study were to report histologic, clinical, and survival data from a large series of cases with primary and secondary vasculitis, and to compare the clinical parameters and outcome data between groups. Clinical data was collected retrospectively from the medical records of 42 client-owned dogs with a histologic diagnosis of primary or secondary vasculitis, and follow-up information was obtained. Cases were grouped according to clinical and histologic descriptors, and biochemical, hematologic, and survival data was compared between groups. Several forms of primary vasculitis were observed, and vascular inflammation was observed in conjunction with numerous other diseases. Female dogs were more likely to develop primary vasculitis, and serum globulin concentration was greater in dogs with primary vasculitis compared to those with underlying disease. All dogs with primary vasculitis of the central nervous system died or were euthanized shortly after presentation, but other forms of primary vasculitis could be managed effectively. In conclusion, presentation of clinical cases in this series was variable, and there did not appear to be well-defined vasculitic syndromes as described in people. PMID:26077546

  7. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  8. Ten year clinical experience with stroke and cerebral vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; McLean, Catriona A; Phan, Thanh G

    2016-05-01

    Angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS) is difficult to diagnose but potentially fatal. When stroke occurs in a younger individual or is associated with multiple infarcts on imaging, clinicians must decide how far to pursue a possible diagnosis of vasculitis. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of primary and secondary cerebral angiitis among patients presenting with stroke. Hospital attendances over a 10year period were surveyed by searching for diagnostic codes and key words specific for cerebral vasculitis/angiitis. Case notes were reviewed by the authors using two sets of criteria for angiitis of the CNS. Thirty-two patients were initially considered likely to have cerebral angiitis by treating physicians. Thirteen had been admitted to hospital with stroke. During this period, there were 7475 admissions for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Six patients had a final diagnosis of vasculitic stroke but only one had definite CNS angiitis with a first presentation as ischaemic stroke (0.02%). Most patients who did have cerebral vasculitis developed multifocal or subacute neurological deficits, or already had an immunological disorder known to be associated with secondary CNS angiitis. Of 19 patients given an alternative final diagnosis, the most common were atherosclerotic/embolic cerebrovascular disease (n=9) and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (n=7). Stroke is rarely the first manifestation of cerebral vasculitis. Our findings suggest that routine screening for angiitis in stroke patients may not be warranted. PMID:26778046

  9. Focal cerebral vasculitis associated with circulating immune complexes and brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, D.R.; Mikhael, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    In this report we describe a patient with a benign glioma treated with surgery and radiation. After a period of stability he developed subacute bacterial endocarditis, and deteriorated neurologically. Computed tomographic scans did not show recurrent tumor. An angiogram showed vasculitis restricted to the previously irradiated area. Secondary to subacute bacterial endocarditis was the presence of high levels of circulating immune complexes. His neurological status was unchanged after antibiotics, but improved after treatment with dexamethasone. We interpret the clinical course as an immune-complex-mediated vasculitis superimposed on a subclinical radiation vasculitis. This case supports the hypothesis that immune mechanisms may be involved in delayed radiation injury to the nervous system.

  10. Omalizumab for Urticarial Vasculitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Misbah Nasheela; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is characterised by inflamed itching or burning red patches or wheals that resemble urticaria but persist for greater than 24 hours. It is often idiopathic but is sometimes associated with collagen-vascular disease, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. Treatment options include oral antihistamines, oral corticosteroids, dapsone, colchicine or hydroxychloroquine. We describe a male patient with urticarial vasculitis who was treated with omalizumab (anti-IgE) with convincing results and provide a review of previous reports of patients with urticarial vasculitis treated with omalizumab. PMID:26435858

  11. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  12. Cerebral vasculitis in adults: what are the steps in order to establish the diagnosis? Red flags and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Berlit, P; Kraemer, M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis is a rare cause of juvenile stroke. It may occur as primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) or as CNS manifestation in the setting of systemic vasculitis. Clinical hints for vasculitis are headache, stroke, seizures, encephalopathy and signs of a systemic inflammatory disorder. Diagnostic work-up includes anamnesis, whole body examination, laboratory and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and brain biopsy. Due to the rarity of the disease, exclusion of more frequent differential diagnoses is a key element of diagnostic work-up. This review summarizes the steps that lead to the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis and describes the red flags and pitfalls. Despite considering the dilemma of angiography-negative vasculitis and false-negative brain biopsy in some cases, it is important to protect patients from ‘blind’ immunosuppressive therapy in unrecognized non-inflammatory differential diagnosis. PMID:24117125

  13. Vasculitis complicating granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of leukopenia and infection in Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farhey, Y D; Herman, J H

    1995-06-01

    Recombinant myeloid growth factors have been increasingly used in recent years to combat induced and disease associated neutropenia. Their application in the management of Felty's syndrome with intercurrent infection has raised concern that resultant neutrophilia and activation of a diverse array of polymorphonuclear cell functions may have an adverse effect on the rheumatoid disease process. We describe a patient with Felty's syndrome receiving short term treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), who then developed acute renal failure in conjunction with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and presumptive gout. We address the issue of "adding fuel to the fire" and review reported implications of GCSF in induction of vasculitis. PMID:7545756

  14. A Case of Cerebral Vasculitis Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Naveen; Arkebauer, Matthew; Waters, Barry; Dickinson, Brucha

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, debilitating condition characterized by inflammation of the colonic mucosa. It is regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder that can affect a number of organ systems. Central nervous system disease associated with UC is a rare sequela of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in less than 5% of cases. These manifestations include arterial and venous thrombosis, leukoencephalitis, seizures, and vasculitis. We present a case of a 61-year-old female with a two-year history of well-controlled ulcerative colitis, who developed altered mental status and weakness. On brain imaging, she was found to have cerebral lesions which were biopsied. Histopathology subsequently revealed coagulative necrosis and inflammation characteristic of vasculitis. Rheumatology serologies were negative, and the patient was started on steroids that dramatically improved her neurological function, with no residual deficits, and led to resolution of the brain lesions. PMID:26557402

  15. Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  16. Biotherapies in large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ferfar, Y; Mirault, T; Desbois, A C; Comarmond, C; Messas, E; Savey, L; Domont, F; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) are large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and aortic involvement is not uncommon in Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). Glucocorticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy in LVV. However, a significant proportion of patients have glucocorticoid dependance, serious side effects or refractory disease to steroids and other immunosuppressive treatments such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis have resulted in the use of biological agents in patients with LVV. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs seem effective in patients with refractory Takayasu arteritis and vascular BD but have failed to do so in giant cell arteritis. Preliminary reports on the use of the anti-IL6-receptor antibody (tocilizumab), in LVV have been encouraging. The development of new biologic targeted therapies will probably open a promising future for patients with LVV. PMID:26883459

  17. Vasculitis: determinants of disease patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S; Calabrese, Leonard H

    2014-08-01

    The vasculitides are a large group of heterogeneous diseases for which it has been assumed that pathogenesis is largely autoimmune. As clinicians, we distinguish one form of vasculitis from another on the basis of observed patterns of organ injury, the size of the vessels affected and histopathological findings. The terms 'small-vessel', 'medium-vessel' and 'large-vessel' vasculitis are useful clinical descriptors, but fail to inform us about why vessels of a certain calibre are favoured by one disease and not another. Classification based on vessel size also fails to consider that vessels of a specific calibre are not equally prone to injury. Distinct vulnerabilities undoubtedly relate to the fact that same-size vessels in different tissues may not be identical conduits. In fact, vessels become specialized, from the earliest stages of embryonic development, to suit the needs of different anatomical locations. Vessels of the same calibre in different locations and organs are as different as the organ parenchymal cells through which they travel. The dialogue between developing vessels and the tissues they perfuse is designed to meet special local needs. Added to the story of vascular diversity and vulnerability are changes that occur during growth, development and ageing. An improved understanding of the unique territorial vulnerabilities of vessels could form the basis of new hypotheses for the aetiopathogenesis of the vasculitides. This Review considers how certain antigens, including infectious agents, might become disease-relevant and how vascular diversity could influence disease phenotypes and the spectrum of vascular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24934189

  18. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  19. [Vasculitis caused by Pseudomonas: a case report].

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Y; Gutiérrez, M; Martínez, T; Bodoque, M; Gómez, J M; Moreno, A

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomona vasculitis is an exceptional disease. Only a few cases have been reported, non with oropharyngeal involvement. The case of a 30-year-old, HIV-positive man who suddenly developed septicemia and necrotizing lesions with tissue destruction of the oropharynx is reported. Histological study confirmed vasculitis. Pseudomona aeruginosa was isolated in peripheral blood and in the biopsy of the palatal lesion. Antibiotic treatment produced satisfactory results. PMID:8991411

  20. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered. PMID:26784915

  1. Ocular disease in patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Angela S.; Kempen, John H.; Choi, Dongseok; Liesegang, Teresa L.; Pujari, S. S.; Newcomb, Craig; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Foster, C. Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Suhler, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis—the term recently applied to Wegener's granulomatosis—is a rare multi-system inflammation characterized by necrotizing granulomas and vasculitis. We investigated the ocular manifestations of this disease in a group of patients drawn from five inflammatory eye disease clinics across the United States. Of 8,562 persons with ocular inflammation, 59 individuals were diagnosed with ANCA-positive vasculitis; 35 males and 21 females, aged 16 to 96 years, were included in this study. Ocular diagnoses were scleritis (75.0%), uveitis (17.9%), and other ocular inflammatory conditions (33.9%) including peripheral ulcerative keratitis and orbital pseudotumor. Mean duration of ocular disease was 4.6 years. Oral corticosteroids and other systemic immunosuppressive agents were used by 85.7% and 78.5% of patients, respectively. Over time, patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis experienced 2.75-fold higher mortality than other patients with inflammatory eye disease. PMID:20835396

  2. The wound/burn guidelines - 4: Guidelines for the management of skin ulcers associated with connective tissue disease/vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Manabu; Asano, Yoshihide; Ishii, Takayuki; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kodera, Masanari; Abe, Masatoshi; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association prepared guidelines focused on the treatment of skin ulcers associated with connective tissue disease/vasculitis practical in clinical settings of dermatological care. Skin ulcers associated with connective tissue diseases or vasculitis occur on the background of a wide variety of diseases including, typically, systemic sclerosis but also systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), various vasculitides and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Therefore, in preparing the present guidelines, we considered diagnostic/therapeutic approaches appropriate for each of these disorders to be necessary and developed algorithms and clinical questions for systemic sclerosis, SLE, dermatomyositis, RA, vasculitis and APS. PMID:26972733

  3. Monitoring Vasculitis with 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Bucerius, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Whereas in the past the term "vasculitis" was most frequently used in context with systemic vasculitides, such as the large vessel vasculitides (LVV) Takayasa arteritis and giant cell arteritis, characterized by inflammation of blood vessel walls, it nowadays comprises also inflammatory changes of the vessel wall as a substantial part of the atherosclerotic disease process. Implementing non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnostic algorithm of atherosclerosis and LVV, depicts a promising step towards an earlier detection with a, consecutively, improved therapeutic approach and potentially prognostic benefit in patients suffering from vasculitis. Mainly molecular imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET seems to be promising in offering an early and sensitive identification of inflammatory changes in both, atherosclerosis and LVV. This review will therefore provide an overview on the diagnostic performance and clinical relevance of FDG-PET in monitoring vasculitis in atherosclerosis and LVV, with a focus on LVV. PMID:27280732

  4. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis. PMID:21674412

  5. Comparison of autoantibodies to the collagen-like region of C1q in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, J J; Jones, S M

    1992-03-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is an apparent autoimmune disorder that resembles SLE. We previously showed that C1q precipitins in HUVS sera are IgG autoantibody to human C1q. We have compared HUVS anti-C1q autoantibody to a similar autoantibody in the serum of some patients with SLE. As with anti-C1q autoantibody in SLE sera, the HUVS autoantibody binds only to the collagen-like region (CLR) of C1q. In both HUVS and SLE, IgG2 is the predominant subclass of IgG autoantibody and IgM autoantibody to C1q is uncommon. In both diseases, anti-C1q autoantibodies bind preferentially to surface-adsorbed C1q or CLR fragments compared to these antigens in solution. Finally, when HUVS or SLE autoantibodies were added to CLR-coated wells already bound, respectively, by SLE or HUVS autoantibodies, no increases in CLR binding were observed, suggesting that HUVS and SLE autoantibodies to C1q bind to the same CLR epitope(s). PMID:1538123

  6. [Neuromuscular biopsy and diagnosis of vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2006-09-01

    One characteristic histological lesion on biopsy specimens is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of vasculitis. Combined nerve and muscle biopsies, by the same cutaneous incision, improve significantly the percentage of positive results. Nerve fragments should be taken in every patient presenting sensory manifestations. Such vasculitic lesions are present in medium-sized arterioles and/or small vessels, and correspond mainly to 4 necrotizing vasculitis: panarteritis nodosa (PAN), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg and Strauss syndrome and Wegener granulomatosis. Microvasculitis should be added to these classical entities, because it corresponds to small vessel wall infiltration by inflammatory cells, as observed in PAN and MPA, but without any necrosis. Microvasculitis has to be differentiated from the inflammatory cell infiltrates surrounding small vessels. However, such perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates enable the diagnosis of probable vasculitis when associated with clusters of neo-vessels, hemosiderin deposits, or a focal damage of nerve fibers. Grossly, one third of vasculitis diagnosis is confirmed on muscle fragments, a second third on nerve fragments, and the last third on both nerve and muscle fragments. Moreover, in the search for vasculitis, an unpredicted diagnosis of lymphoma or amyloidosis is occasionally established on the neuro-muscular biopsy. PMID:17128151

  7. ANCA-associated vasculitis in Hispanic Americans: an unrecognized severity.

    PubMed

    Sreih, Antoine G; Mandhadi, Ranadeep; Aldaghlawi, Fadi; Khan, Asad; Irshad, Vajiha; Finn, Katherine; Block, Joel A

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to compare the severity and outcomes of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) between Hispanics and Caucasians living in the same geographical area. All patients diagnosed with AAV at two academic institutions in Chicago from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively and prospectively identified. Disease activity was measured with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), and disease damage was measured with the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). Student's t test and chi-square tests were employed; p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Seventy patients with AAV were identified; 15 patients were excluded. Fifty-five patients were included in the study: 23 Hispanics and 32 Caucasians, 35 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), 12 with microscopic polyangiitis, 7 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 1 with renal-limited vasculitis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics had a higher BVAS at presentation (16.3 ± 7.6 versus 10.7 ± 7.5, p = 0.006), a higher VDI at presentation (2.90 ± 1.50 versus 2.06 ± 1.30, p = 0.030), and a cumulative VDI (3.90 ± 1.70 versus 2.50 ± 1.90, p = 0.010). Renal involvement was more common among Hispanics (85 % of Hispanics versus 48 % of Caucasians, p = 0.01). Seventy percent of Hispanics had acute renal failure (mean creatinine = 3.37 ± 4.4 mg/dl) of whom seven (50 %) required dialysis, versus 25 % of Caucasians (mean creatinine = 1.78 ± 1.57 mg/dl, p = 0.03) and only two requiring dialysis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics with AAV present with more severe disease and higher damage indices. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings and delineate the respective roles of environment and genetics in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24752347

  8. Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Thomas, Cheddhi; Engler, John; Shapiro, Maksim; Becske, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms is a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that presents unique diagnostic challenges owing to a nuanced clinical presentation. Here, we report on the diagnosis and management of the first known case of an isolated PSA aneurysm in the context of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. A 53-year-old male presented to an outside institution with acute bilateral lower extremity paralysis 9 days after admission for recurrent cellulitis. Early magnetic resonance imaging was read as negative and repeat imaging 15 days after presentation revealed SAH and a compressive spinal subdural hematoma. Angiography identified a PSA aneurysm at T9, as well as other areas suspicious for inflammatory or post-hemorrhagic reactive changes. The patient underwent a multilevel laminectomy for clot evacuation and aneurysm resection to prevent future hemorrhage and to establish a diagnosis. The postoperative course was complicated by medical issues and led to the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis that may have predisposed the patient to aneurysm development. Literature review reveals greater mortality for cervical lesions than thoracolumbar lesions and that the presence of meningitic symptoms portents better functional outcome than symptoms of cord compression. The outcome obtained in this case is consistent with outcomes reported in the literature. PMID:27114966

  9. HIV diagnosis in a patient presenting with vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharif, M; Hameed, S; Akin, I; Natarajan, U

    2016-02-01

    A patient with digital ischaemia and gangrene was treated with iloprost and antiplatelets for two weeks. His vasculitic screen was negative except for a positive HIV test. His vasculitis improved three weeks after treatment with antiretroviral medications. Though vasculitis is well known to be associated with HIV infection, very few cases of HIV present as vasculitis. PMID:25769887

  10. Influenza vaccination induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yanai-Berar, N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Gree, J; Nakhoul, F

    2002-09-01

    Influenza vaccination is a widely accepted practice, particularly among the elderly and high-risk individuals. Minor and transitory side effects following the vaccination are common, while systemic complications are infrequently reported. We describe here a case of a patient who presented to the emergency room with arthralgia, myalgias and purpura, following influenza vaccination. Necrotizing vasculitis associated with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis was observed on kidney biopsy. With increasing use of influenza vaccination, attention should be drawn to the possible expression of systemic adverse effects such as vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:12356192

  11. Imipenem-cilastatin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reiner, M R; Brunetti, V A

    1997-05-01

    A maculopapular rash has been associated with the administration of imipenem-cilastatin, an antibiotic that was used for treatment of a postoperative infection. This is a first-time association of imipenem with a leukocytoclastic vasculitic reaction. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis has been previously documented with ciprofloxacin, zidovudine, piperazine, and lithium. PMID:9158321

  12. Capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis under neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Bryan K.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer under curative neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using capecitabine. After 5 days of the initiation of capecitabine the patient developed a pruritic maculopapular rash in her extremities consistent with vasculitis which was confirmed on skin biopsy without any signs of systemic involvement. Capecitabine was held and the rash was treated with topical steroids with complete resolution of both rash and pruritus. Due to a lack of other alternative chemotherapeutic options and the cutaneous-only involvement of vasculitis, the capecitabine was re-introduced. Two days later, the patient developed an identical maculopapular rash with a similar distribution. Prednisone was initiated while the capecitabine was continued with complete resolution of the rash. The patient successfully completed her curative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy treatment without the need to permanently discontinue the capecitabine. PMID:26029464

  13. Large Vessel Vasculitis Occurring in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient under Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cestelli, Valentina; Spinella, Amelia; Campomori, Federica; Esposito, Carmela; Ciaffi, Sara; Sandri, Gilda; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of necrotic inflammatory phenomena and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic) or secondary to infections, connective tissue diseases and drugs but can also be considered as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Evidence shows that the increasing use of biological agents results in a growing number of reports of autoimmune diseases induced by these therapies. An inflammatory articular chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis may be complicated by extra-articular manifestations, such as cutaneous or systemic vasculitis. Herewith, we describe the case of a great vessels arteritis in a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis in therapy with an anti-TNF agent (etanercept). PMID:25544845

  14. Etiologies and prognostic factors of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with skin involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bouiller, Kévin; Audia, Sylvain; Devilliers, Hervé; Collet, Evelyne; Aubriot, Marie Hélène; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Bonniaud, Philippe; Chavanet, Pascal; Besancenot, Jean-François; Vabres, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Samson, Maxime; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, outcomes of patients with leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) were analyzed focusing on clinical, histopathology and laboratory findings, relapses, and survival. Data from patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, at Dijon University Hospital (France) were retrospectively reviewed. LCV was defined as perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate, endothelial cell nuclear swelling, extravasation of red blood cells, and/or fibrin deposition in vessels. Patients were classified according to the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference. Relapses were defined as the recurrence of vasculitis symptoms after a period of remission >1 month. Time to relapse and/or death was calculated from the date of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate (Cox model) analyses were performed. A total of 112 patients (57 males and 55 females), with a mean age of 60 ± 19 (18–98) years, were analyzed. Overall follow-up was 61 ± 38 months. At diagnosis, all patients had skin lesions, purpura being the most common (n = 83). Lesions were associated with systemic involvement in 55 (51%) patients. Only 41 (36.6%) patients received specific treatment: glucocorticoids in 29 of 41 (70.7%) and immunosuppressants in 9 of 41 (22%). Sixty-two patients (55%) had LCV due to underlying causes, 29 (25.9%) had single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (SoCSVV), and 21 (18.8%) had unclassifiable LCV. Twenty patients of the cohort (18%) experienced relapse, 14 ± 13 (1–40) months after the diagnosis of LCV. None of the 29 patients with SoCSVV relapsed. Independent risk factors for relapse were vascular thrombosis in the biopsy [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.9; P = 0.017], peripheral neuropathy (HR = 9.8; P = 0.001), hepatitis (HR = 3.1; P = 0.004), and positive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, HR = 5.9 P = 0.005). In contrast, SoCSVV was a protective factor for relapse (HR = 0.12; P = 0.043). The 1-, 3-, and 6-year overall

  15. Stroke-like Phenomena Revealing Multifocal Cerebral Vasculitis in Pediatric Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Mary; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Fluss, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Stroke-like presentation in Lyme neuroborreliosis is rare in the pediatric age group. We report a previously healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with acute left hemiparesis and meningeal signs. Neuroimaging failed to reveal any cerebral infarction but demonstrated a multifocal cerebral vasculitis involving small, medium and large-sized vessels affecting both the anterior and posterior circulation. Concentric contrast enhancement of the basilar artery was also observed. Further investigations and laboratory findings were consistent with Lyme neuroborreliosis. A rapidly favorable clinical outcome was obtained with appropriate antibiotic treatment along with antiaggregants and steroids. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be considered in the diagnostic differential, not only in adults but also among children, especially in the context of an unexplained cerebral vasculitis. PMID:25316727

  16. Cutaneous Necrotizing Vasculitis and Leukopenia in a Cocaine User: Is Levamisole the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    Zeineddine, Nabil; Felix, Richard; Goldstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic drug banned by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 because of its dangerous side effects. Over the past few years, it has been identified as an adulterant in cocaine and reported to cause cutaneous vasculitis in cocaine users. The health burden of levamisole is serious since it is estimated that over 5 million Americans use cocaine and that 70% of the cocaine used in the USA contains levamisole. In this paper we report the case of a 23-year-old female cocaine user that presented with purpuric rash and skin necrosis, found to have positive c-ANCA and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Her skin biopsy showed fibroconnective tissue with signs of necrosis, acute and chronic inflammation, and thrombus formation. She was diagnosed with levamisole-induced vasculitis and successfully treated with withdrawal of cocaine use and local wound care. PMID:27579207

  17. Juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum: Is it a variant of pyoderma gangrenosum?

    PubMed

    Caputo, Ruggero; Marzano, Angelo V; Di Benedetto, Alessandra; Ramoni, Stefano; Cambiaghi, Stefano

    2006-08-01

    Juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum was described by Piñol et al in 1974 as a unique variant of scrotal gangrene of unknown origin, occurring exclusively in young individuals. It was characterized by an acute onset of skin ulcers undergoing complete resolution after appropriate therapy, with no relapses. We present a typical case of this extremely rare disease affecting a 16-year-old boy in whom the scrotal ulcerations were preceded by an episode of pharyngitis with fever. The condition promptly regressed after administration of intramuscular betamethasone in combination with oral ciprofloxacin. According to Piñol et al, juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum, although poorly known to dermatologists, should be regarded as a distinctive entity within the wide group of scrotal gangrenes. On the other hand, the hypothesis that this condition may well represent a variant of pyoderma gangrenosum is discussed. PMID:16843125

  18. Warfarin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Jumean, Khalid; Arqoub, Ahmad Abu; Hawatmeh, Amer; Qaqa, Firas; Bataineh, Ayham; Shaaban, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is typically prescribed for patients with thromboembolic diseases and atrial fibrillation. In addition to the complications of bleeding, allergic skin reaction is one of its rare adverse effects. We herein report a case of a 79 year old male patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria secondary to warfarin. The warfarin was discontinued and oral prednisone therapy was initiated. The cutaneous lesions and the proteinuria resolved thereafter. PMID:27453863

  19. Hypernephroma Presenting with Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis and Lupus Anticoagulant: Resolution after Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Ruíz, Amparo; Reyes, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Hypernephroma can present as a variety of paraneoplastic, nonmetastatic conditions, including vasculitis, and rarely a lupus-type anticoagulant. Nephrectomy leads to the resolution of the systemic complaints. Malignancy, in this case hypernephroma, can present as an immune-mediated paraneoplastic syndrome which resolves after removal of the underlying tumor. PMID:22919534

  20. Recurrent stroke in a case of left atrial myxoma masquerading vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant K; Sureka, R K; Sharma, Anjani K; Bhuyan, Sushant; Gupta, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of left atrial myxoma presenting as recurrent neurological deficits with absent peripheral pulses mimicking systemic vasculitis. Due to absence of cardiac signs and symptoms, there was one year delay in diagnosis from initial symptom. Left atrial myxomas are rare but treatable cause of recurrent stroke. PMID:24968552

  1. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  2. Urticarial vasculitis: an autoimmune disorder following therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Strickland, D K; Ware, R E

    1995-09-01

    Immunological abnormalities have been described in patients with Hodgkin's disease, both associated with the malignancy itself and occurring secondary to therapy. These abnormalities often manifest as an immunodeficiency state, but can also present as immune dysregulation and autoimmune disease. We report two young patients with Hodgkin's disease who, following successful therapy, developed urticarial vasculitis (UV), a form of cutaneous autoimmune vasculitis. Both patients also had systemic symptoms including fever, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum copper, and abnormal in vitro studies of lymphocyte enumeration and proliferation. Distinguishing UV from recurrent Hodgkin's disease was especially difficult in one patient, and was possible only by lymph node biopsy. One patient has responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, while the other, who has more profound immune dysfunction, has developed a chronic autoimmune disorder. UV may thus occur in patients after therapy for Hodgkin's disease; we hypothesize that immune dysregulation, either associated with the malignancy or resulting from therapy, is important in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune process. PMID:7623731

  3. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Qi

    2015-09-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  4. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  5. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  6. [Rare forms of hypertension : From pheochromocytoma to vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Limbourg, F; Schmidt, B M; Menne, J

    2015-03-01

    Secondary hypertension affects only 5-10 % of hypertensive patients. Screening is expensive and time-consuming and should be performed only in patients for whom there is a high clinical suspicion of secondary hypertension. Clinical signs of secondary forms of hypertension are new-onset hypertension in patients without other risk factors (i.e., family history, obesity, etc.), sudden increase of blood pressure (BP) in a previously stable patient, increased BP in prepubertal children, resistant hypertension, and severe hypertension or hypertensive emergencies. In adults, renal parenchymal and vascular diseases as well as obstructive sleep apnea are the most common causes of secondary hypertension. Medication-induced hypertension and non-adherence to medication have to be ruled out. Of the endocrine causes associated with hypertension, primary aldosteronism is the most common. Other endocrine causes of hypertension such as thyroid disease (hypo- or hyperthyroidism), hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma are rare. Monogenetic forms of hypertension are mostly of tubular origin and associated with alterations in mineralocorticoid handling or signaling. Rare causes of hypertension also include inflammatory vascular disease. Acute forms of vasculitis may present as "malignant" hypertension with associated thrombotic microangiopathy and organ damage/failure. It is important to diagnose these rare forms of hypertension in order to prevent acute organ damage in these patients or unnecessary invasive treatment strategies. PMID:25700646

  7. [Disease-modifying factors in chronic polyarthritis. Correlations amongsystemic vasculitis, secondary amyloidosis, septic infections and occurrence of miliary epitheloid-cell granuloma. A review of autopsies].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1993-03-01

    The following findings were obtained from autopsies performed on 169 deceased with chronic polyarthritis (CP): systemic vasculitis in 26 cases (15.4%), systemic secondary amyloidosis in 32 cases (18.9%), sepsis in 13 cases (7.7%) and miliary epithelioid-cell granulomatosis (probably tuberculosis) in six cases (3.6%). Vasculitis was combined with amyloidosis in five patients, with sepsis in two and with miliary epithelioid-cell granulomatosis in four. Critical random check, using the Mann-Whitney test, did not support significance of relationship between vasculitis and amyloidosis or fatal sepsis, whereas significant correlations were found to exist in CP cases between vasculitis and miliary epithelioid-cell granulomatosis (P < 0.005). The latter had no effect on the severity of vasculitis, but the incidence of the granulomatous type of vasculitis was higher with significance (P < 0.02). The conclusion is that biopsy evidence of granulomatous vasculitis in CP patients should be followed by systematic clinical search for miliary tuberculosis because of above-average incidence of that combination. PMID:8499420

  8. Higher Serum Angiotensinogen Is an Indicator of IgA Vasculitis with Nephritis Revealed by Comparative Proteomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Peiwei; Yue, Xin; Yu, Chunhua; Laing, Xiaohui; Zhao, YuLan

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis (IgAV), previously named as Henoch–Schönlein purpura, is the most common systematic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Lack of appropriate study system and/or animal model limits the understanding of its molecular pathogenesis and hinders the identification of targets for rational therapy, especially for its long-term complication, IgAV nephritis (IgAVN). In this study, we applied comparative analysis of serum proteomes to obtain an insight about disease pathogenesis. This study has utilized high sensitivity nanoscale ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) to investigate the alterations in serum proteomic profiles in patients with IgAV (n=6), IgAVN (n=6) and healthy subjects (n=7). The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by PANTHER and DAVID software. We identified 107 differentially expressed proteins among three different groups, and functional analysis suggested that, in addition to earlier reported pathways, such as acute phase response, immune response, complement and blood coagulation pathways, hemostasis and Wnt signaling pathway were probably involved in pathogenesis of IgAV. A few differentially abundant proteins identified, such as C4a, serum amyloid A, angiotensinogen, and kininogen 1, were further validated by ELISA. More importantly, we found that angiotensinogen concentration is correlated with IgAVN and could be used as a potential marker for the progression of IgAV. This is the first report of analyzing the proteomic alterations in IgAV patients and the differentially proteins identified in this study may enhance understanding of the pathology of IgAV and a few of them may be used to monitor disease progression. PMID:26098644

  9. Higher Serum Angiotensinogen Is an Indicator of IgA Vasculitis with Nephritis Revealed by Comparative Proteomes Analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Xuelian; Yin, Wei; Ding, Yan; Cui, Shu-jian; Luan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Peiwei; Yue, Xin; Yu, Chunhua; Laing, Xiaohui; Zhao, YuLan

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis (IgAV), previously named as Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is the most common systematic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Lack of appropriate study system and/or animal model limits the understanding of its molecular pathogenesis and hinders the identification of targets for rational therapy, especially for its long-term complication, IgAV nephritis (IgAVN). In this study, we applied comparative analysis of serum proteomes to obtain an insight about disease pathogenesis. This study has utilized high sensitivity nanoscale ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) to investigate the alterations in serum proteomic profiles in patients with IgAV (n=6), IgAVN (n=6) and healthy subjects (n=7). The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by PANTHER and DAVID software. We identified 107 differentially expressed proteins among three different groups, and functional analysis suggested that, in addition to earlier reported pathways, such as acute phase response, immune response, complement and blood coagulation pathways, hemostasis and Wnt signaling pathway were probably involved in pathogenesis of IgAV. A few differentially abundant proteins identified, such as C4a, serum amyloid A, angiotensinogen, and kininogen 1, were further validated by ELISA. More importantly, we found that angiotensinogen concentration is correlated with IgAVN and could be used as a potential marker for the progression of IgAV. This is the first report of analyzing the proteomic alterations in IgAV patients and the differentially proteins identified in this study may enhance understanding of the pathology of IgAV and a few of them may be used to monitor disease progression. PMID:26098644

  10. Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gerald S; Horster, Sophia; Wagner, Katrin S; Ihrler, Stephan; Schmid, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Cryoglobulinaemia may cause cutaneous vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, potentially leading to end stage renal failure. An important proportion of cryoglobulinaemias are secondary to hepatitis C virus infection. Emerging antiviral treatment options offer a chance for causal therapy of these cases of cryoglobulinaemia. This review summarises the classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:17308210

  11. Cutaneous lymphocytic vasculitis: a definition, a review, and a proposed classification.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Mihm, M C; LeBoit, P E

    1996-02-01

    Lymphocytic vasculitis is not widely accepted as a pathologic mechanism by dermatopathologists, and a comprehensive list of its causes cannot be found in the literature. This state of affairs stems largely from the lack of a rigorous definition. In this report, the authors review past efforts at coming to terms with lymphocytic vasculitis and why those efforts have fallen short. The authors propose that lymphocytic vasculitis can be separated from the ubiquitous perivascular dermatitides in routinely processed specimens by requiring the presence of either acute or chronic damage to the walls of small vessels (eg, fibrin deposition, lamination by pericytes). In the case of muscular vessels, the presence of lymphocytes within the vessel walls is sufficient, because diapedesis of lymphocytes does not occur in arteries or veins. Although lymphocytic infiltrates meeting this definition are uncommon, there are a number of conditions, with both typical and atypical lymphocytes, in which damage to vessels occurs. The authors review these conditions, outline possible pathogenetic mechanisms, ranging from delayed hypersensitivity reactions directed against endothelial cells to direct infection of these cells, and present classifications based on morphological changes and pathogenesis respectively. PMID:8834516

  12. Phenytoin-Associated Granulomatous Pulmonary Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Fayez; Daroca, Philip; Lasky, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin was introduced in 1938 for the control of seizure disorders and remains widely used today. Since that time, many cases of phenytoin-induced allergic reactions and clinical pulmonary disease have been reported. However, pulmonary vascular pathology from phenytoin use has been only very rarely described. We report a case of phenytoin-associated vasculitis in a 39-year-old African American man presenting with progressive dyspnea and abnormal chest imaging. The importance of reviewing the medication history along with familiarity with the array of drug-associated lung diseases is crucial to recognize and treat pneumotoxicity. PMID:24247101

  13. Erdheim-Chester Disease: An Unusual Cause of Intracranial Vasculitis and Progressive Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sagnier, Sharmila; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Lepreux, Sébastien; Sibon, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a non-Langerhans histiocytosis affecting multiple organs. Stroke as symptom onset of ECD with intracranial vasculitis is unusual. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with an acute ischemic stroke associated with a moderate leukoencephalopathy and intracranial arteries stenosis. Four years later, he developed movement disorders with dysarthria and cognitive impairment. Neuroradiological findings demonstrated a rapidly progressive and diffuse leukoencephalopathy associated with brain atrophy and infiltration of the intracranial vertebral artery wall. Brain postmortem evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of ECD. This diagnosis should be evoked in patients with cryptogenic stroke, progressive leukoencephalopathy, and infiltration of the arterial wall. PMID:26996751

  14. Histopathology of the Inner Ear in a Case With Recent Onset of Cogan's Syndrome: Evidence for Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jung, David H; Nadol, Joseph B; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Merola, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    The association of sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo with inflammatory eye disease, usually interstitial keratitis, has been called Cogan's syndrome. The pathogenesis of Cogan's syndrome is unknown, but it has been assumed to be an immune mediated disorder with vasculitis. The histopathology of the inner ear in Cogan's syndrome has been described in 6 case reports. Although common pathologic findings in these reports include degeneration of the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelium, endolymphatic hydrops, fibrosis, and new bone formation, direct pathologic evidence of a vasculitis has not been published. A possible reason for this failure to identify vasculitis was a substantial delay (range, 4-40 years) between the onset of symptoms and examination of the otopathology. In the current case report, the patient had both auditory and vestibular symptoms and interstitial keratitis with a time delay of only 2 to 4 weeks between symptoms and death. Evidence of a vasculitis as a possible underlying etiology included H&E histopathology and anti-CD45 immunostaining of vessels both in the auditory and vestibular systems, supporting the hypothesis of a vasculitis as a mechanism in this disorder. PMID:26195577

  15. Exploring waiving opportunities for mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Asturiol, David; Prieto, Pilar; Worth, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    A survey was carried out to explore opportunities for waiving mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests. We were interested in finding out whether data from a sub-acute toxicity test could be used to predict the outcome of an acute systemic toxicity test. The survey was directed at experts in the field of toxicity testing, and was carried out in the context of the upcoming 2018 final registration deadline for chemicals under the EU REACH Regulation. In addition to the survey, a retrospective data analysis of chemicals that had already been registered with the European Chemicals Agency, and for which both acute and sub-acute toxicity data were available, was carried out. This data analysis was focused on chemicals that were administered via the oral route. The answers to the questionnaire showed a willingness to adopt waiving opportunities. In addition, the responses showed that data from a sub-acute toxicity test or dose-range finding study might be useful for predicting chemicals that do not require classification for acute oral toxicity (LD50 > 2000mg/kg body weight). However, with the exception of substances that fall into the non-classified category, it is difficult to predict current acute oral toxicity categories. PMID:27494626

  16. Systemic thrombolysis for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Billie

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a frequent cause of hospitalization and is associated with a wide range of symptom severity. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of treatment for acute pulmonary embolism; however, in patients with massive or submassive pulmonary embolism, advanced therapy with thrombolytics may be considered. The decision to use thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism should be based on careful risk-benefit analysis for each patient, including risk of morbidity and mortality associated with the embolism and risk of bleeding associated with the thrombolytic. Alteplase is currently the thrombolytic agent most studied and with the most clinical experience for this indication, although the most appropriate dose remains controversial, especially in patients with low body weight. When considering thrombolysis, unfractionated heparin is the preferred initial anticoagulant due to its short duration of action and its reversibility should bleeding occur. PMID:25559613

  17. Cutaneous Vasculitis, Interstitial Pneumonia with Crazy-Paving Appearance, and Positive pANCA in a Patient with Severe Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-liang; Wang, Juan; Li, Li-mei; Mo, Han-you; Ye, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis, interstitial pneumonia with crazy-paving appearance on high-resolution computed tomography, and repeated positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) are rarely found together in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the existing literature. We report the case of a Chinese patient previously diagnosed with cutaneous vasculitis and interstitial pneumonia, who presented with acute pain and mass in his right lower quadrant a couple of years later. The terminal ileum biopsy and postoperative pathology confirmed Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:25371834

  18. Lepra reaction with lucio phenomenon mimicking cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  19. Lepra Reaction with Lucio Phenomenon Mimicking Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  20. The Spectrum of Paraneoplastic Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Defined Population

    PubMed Central

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A.; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C.; Alvarez, Lino; Mata, Cristina; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Taboada, Victor M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous vasculitis may be associated with malignancies, and may behave as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This association has been reported in a variable proportion of patients depending on population selection. We conducted the current study to assess the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of paraneoplastic vasculitis in a large unselected series of 766 patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed at a single university hospital. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 67.94 ± 14.20 yr; range, 40–85 yr) presenting with cutaneous vasculitis were ultimately diagnosed as having an underlying malignancy. They constituted 3.80% of the 421 adult patients. There were 9 hematologic and 7 solid underlying malignancies. Skin lesions were the initial clinical presentation in all of them, and the median interval from the onset of cutaneous vasculitis to the diagnosis of the malignancy was 17 days (range, 8–50 d). The most frequent skin lesions were palpable purpura (15 patients). Other clinical manifestations included constitutional syndrome (10 patients) and arthralgia and/or arthritis (4 cases). Hematologic cytopenias (11 cases) as well as immature peripheral blood cells (6 cases) were frequently observed in the full blood cell count, especially in those with vasculitis associated with hematologic malignancies. Specific treatment for vasculitis was prescribed in 10 patients; nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (4 patients), corticosteroids (3 patients), chloroquine (1 patient), antihistamines (1 patient), and cyclophosphamide (1 patient). Ten patients died due to the malignancy and 6 patients recovered following malignancy therapy. Patients with paraneoplastic vasculitis were older, more frequently had constitutional syndrome, and less frequently had organ damage due to the vasculitis than the remaining patients with cutaneous vasculitis. In summary, cutaneous paraneoplastic vasculitis is an entity not uncommonly

  1. Immunoglobulin A Vasculitis Complicated with Clostridium difficile Infection: a Rare Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cojocariu, Camelia; Stanciu, Carol; Ancuta, Codrina; Danciu, Mihai; Chiriac, Stefan; Trifan, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, formerly called Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is a leukocytoclastic type of vasculitis affecting small vessels with a deposition of immune IgA complexes, clinically characterized by the classic tetrad of nonthrombocytopenic palpable purpura, arthralgia (or arthritis), and gastrointestinal and renal involvement. Although the cause of the disease remains unknown, immune complexes of IgA and unidentified antigens seem to play a central pathogenic role. The diagnosis is easily established in the presence of purpura, but may be challenging in its absence, especially when colicky abdominal pain precedes the cutaneous lesions. IgA vasculitis is usually a self-limited disease with a benign course and symptomatic treatment is sufficient for most; in severe cases, however, corticosteroids are necessary. We describe the case of a young adult male presenting with severe abdominal pain, vomiting and fever (38.4ºC). Clinical examination, abdominal ultrasound and plain abdominal radiography excluded an acute abdomen. The occurrence of arthralgia involving both knees and erosive duodenitis at endoscopy, 48 hours upon admission, suggested the diagnosis of IgA vasculitis, confirmed on the following day by the presence of typical purpuric rash on the lower extremities. Corticosteroid therapy led to the resolution of all gastrointestinal and joint manifestations as well as to a significant improvement of cutaneous purpura. However, during the 3rd week of corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed watery diarrhea and the clinical suspicion of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was confirmed. The treatment with metronidazole led to the resolution of diarrhea.The peculiarity of this case resides in several aspects: the gastrointestinal and joint manifestations preceded purpura, making diagnosis more difficult; CDI is an extremely rare complication of IgA vasculitis, being, in fact, the second case reported in adults in the literature. PMID

  2. Scabies presenting as a necrotizing vasculitis in the presence of lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, P; Snow, J

    1998-10-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with a progressive eruption of 6 weeks' duration. Purpura and focal areas of cutaneous infarction were present on the legs. There were scabies burrows on the wrists and hands, and a mite was extracted. Histology of a skin biopsy showed a necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Circulating lupus anticoagulant was detected. Treatment consisted of topical 5% permethrin cream and systemic steroids. PMID:9892918

  3. A 15-year exercise program for rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Marley, W P; Santilli, T F

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of rheumatoid vasculitis and responses to a 15-year supervised exercise program. This patient presented with significant impairment in mobility and physical work capacity. His exercise tolerance improved considerably and he benefited emotionally. PMID:9572643

  4. Increased cellularity and expression of adhesion molecules in muscle biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis with clinical suspicion of vasculitis, but negative routine histology

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, P.; Voskuyl, A.; Smeets, T; Zwinderman, K.; Breedveld, F.; Tak, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Histological analysis of random quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens can be used to detect vasculitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aimed at determining the immunohistological features in patients with clinical suspicion of rheumatoid vasculitis, but without a transmural infiltrate or fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall on routine histology.
METHODS—Three groups of patients with RA were studied: (a) without clinical signs of vasculitis (n=6); (b) with recent onset of extra-articular features and a clinical suspicion of vasculitis but normal routine histology (n=11); and (c) with recent onset of extra-articular features and vasculitis, histologically proved either in muscle or other biopsy specimens (n=14). A control group of patients with osteoarthritis was also included (n=5). Frozen sections from quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens were analysed with monoclonal antibodies to detect CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and HLA-DR. The slides were evaluated using a semiquantitative scoring system (0-4).
RESULTS—The mean scores gradually increased from group 1 to 3, leading to significant differences between groups 1 and 2, but not between groups 2 and 3 for most markers (p< 0.05). Thus the pathological changes were similar for the two groups with clinical signs of vasculitis, even when the conventional histological evaluation was negative. Higher immunohistological scores were associated with perivascular infiltrates on routine histology.
CONCLUSION—The pathophysiological events leading to vasculitis are reflected by the changes in the quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens. The data indicate that the sensitivity of examination of muscle biopsy specimens for the diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis can be increased by the use of new criteria.

 PMID:10913056

  5. VISUAL SYSTEM DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING ACUTE TRIMETHYLTIN EXPOSURE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trimethyltin (TMT) has been shown to produce damage in the limbic system and several other brain areas. To date, damage to sensory systems has not been reported. The present study investigated the integrity of the visual system following acute exposure to TMT. Rats were chronical...

  6. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients. PMID:27606147

  7. A case of scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion preceding Henoch-Schönlein vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, C

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common types of multisystemic vasculitis seen in childhood. The major clinical manifestations are cutaneous purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and nephritis. Isolated central nervous system vasculitis, seizures, coma and hemorrhage, Guillan--Barré syndrome, ataxia and central and peripheral neuropathy, ocular involvement, orchitis, epididymitis or testicular torsion are medical or surgical complications. In this study, we report a 7-year-old boy with scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion with ultrasonographic and clinical findings that the typical clinical features of Henoch-Schönlein purpura including rashes and arthritis were developed after one week of surgery (Ref. 15). PMID:22693978

  8. Letrozole-induced necrotising leukocytoclastic small vessel vasculitis: First report of a case in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Pathmarajah, Pirunthan; Shah, Karishma; Taghipour, Kathy; Ramachandra, Su; Thorat, Mangesh A; Chaudhry, Ziaullah; Patkar, Vivek; Peters, Francesca; Connor, Thomas; Spurrell, Emma; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is a commonly used neo-adjuvant drug to treat hormone-sensitive breast cancer. There have been a few cases of aromatase inhibitor induced vasculitis but the first case of letrozole-induced vasculitis was reported from Switzerland in 2014 (Digklia et al.) [1]. Presentation of case We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a small breast cancer. She was started on pre-operative letrozole (2.5 mg/d) whilst awaiting surgery. Ten days later she presented with burning pain and purpuric skin lesions which progressed to extensive ischaemic superficial necrosis of the lower limb skin, resolving over 3–4 months after local and systemic steroids. Histologically, it showed leucocytoclasis with evidence of eosinophilia consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic small vessel vasculitis. Discussion The initial clinical presentation was severe burning pain around the ankles and a spreading violaceous rash. Letrozole was stopped. Wide local excision (lumpectomy) and sentinel node biopsy were postponed because of the accompanying pneumonitis and gastrointestinal upset, and were carried out 3.5 months later. Fortunately, the tumour size did not increase, but appeared to reduce, and axillary lymph nodes remained negative, i.e., this patient’s cancer outcome does not seem to have been jeopardized. Conclusion Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a hypersensitivity reaction that is usually self-resolving, though our case needed systemic steroid treatment. Letrozole is a commonly used drug in clinical practice and prescribers should be aware of this rare side effect, which in our case delayed treatment without any apparent harm and possibly reduced tumour size. PMID:26432999

  9. Morphologic features and development of granulomatous vasculitis in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; May, H; Menger, S; Weber, M; Leukert, W; Reinacher, M

    2005-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus (CoV)-induced systemic disease in cats, characterized by granulomas in organs and granulomatous vasculitis. This study describes the morphologic features of granulomatous vasculitis in FIP as well as its development in the course of monocyte-associated feline CoV (FCoV) viremia in five naturally infected Domestic Shorthair cats with FIP. Monocyte-associated FCoV viremia was demonstrated by immunohistology, RNA in situ hybridization, and electron micropscopy. Granulomatous phlebitis at different stages of development was observed. Vasculitic processes ranged from attachment and emigration of FCoV-infected monocytes to vascular/perivascular granulomatous infiltrates with destruction of the vascular basal lamina. Monocytes as well as perivascular macrophages were activated because they were strongly positive for CD18 and expressed cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In addition, general activation of endothelial cells, represented by major histocompatibility complex II upregulation, was observed in all cases. These results confirm FIP as a monocyte-triggered systemic disease and demonstrate the central role of activated monocytes in FIP vasculitis. PMID:15872378

  10. Immunomodulation with eicosapentaenoic acid supports the treatment of autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirahashi, Junichi; Kawahata, Kimito; Arita, Makoto; Iwamoto, Ryo; Hishikawa, Keiichi; Honda, Mie; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Okubo, Koshu; Kurosawa, Miho; Takase, Osamu; Nakakuki, Masanori; Saiga, Kan; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kawachi, Shoji; Tojo, Akihiro; Seki, George; Marumo, Takeshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a life-threatening autoimmune disease that is frequently associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Conventional immunotherapy including steroids and cyclophosphamide can cause serious adverse events, limiting the efficacy and safety of treatment. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a key component of fish oil, is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid widely known to be cardioprotective and beneficial for vascular function. We report two elderly patients with systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) in whom the administration of EPA in concert with steroids safely induced and maintained remission, without the use of additioal immunosuppressants. To explore the mechanisms by which EPA enhances the treatment of AAV, we employed SCG/Kj mice as a spontaneous murine model of AAV. Dietary enrichment with EPA significantly delayed the onset of crescentic glomerulonephritis and prolonged the overall survival. EPA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators and their precursors were present in the kidney, plasma, spleen, and lungs in the EPA-treated mice. Furthermore, a decrease in ANCA production and CD4/CD8-double negative T cells, and an increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes of the kidney were observed in the EPA-treated mice. These clinical and experimental observations suggest that EPA can safely support and augment conventional therapy for treating autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:25230773

  11. Goodpasture's Syndrome and p-ANCA Associated Vasculitis in a Patient of Silicosiderosis: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Gupta, Dheeraj; Garg, Mandeep

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Goodpasture's syndrome is a rare clinical entity and is characterized by circulating autoantibodies which are principally directed against the glomerular/alveolar basement membrane. The etiology of Goodpasture's syndrome is still unknown. Lung involvement occurs as a result of lung injury and the exposure of new epitopes to the immune system. Recently, several studies have suggested the role of silica as one of etiological factors in ANCA associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. Materials and Methods. We present a case of a 40-year-old welder with silicosiderosis, who developed anti-GBM disease with p-ANCA positivity. Case Report. Patient presented to an emergency with gradually increasing breathlessness along with renal failure and died after short hospital stay. Autopsy pathology findings revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear glomerular basement membrane antibody deposition, splenic vasculitis, pulmonary haemorrhage, and pulmonary silicosiderosis. Conclusion. This case reinforces the role of environmental triggers like exposure to silica, metal dust, and tobacco in pathogenesis of Goodpasture's syndrome and p-ANCA associated vasculitis. PMID:25349763

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  13. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  14. [Vasculitis as a reason of chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Ataia, I; Casaulta, C; von Vigier, R O; Pfammatter, J P; Brekenfeld, C; Sauvain, M J; Steinlin, M

    2008-03-19

    A 13-year-old girl presented to our emergency with a one week history of fever and skin rash and new onset of chorea for the last three days. There was a long standing history of right predominant headache; followed by personality change, fatigue, arthralgia and weight loss over the last few months. Previous investigations by head CT and ophthalmological examination did not explain the symptoms. Further investigations revealed peri- and pancarditis with aortic insufficiency, a renal involvement with elevated creatinin, protein- and hematuria and a hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis of lupus eythematodes was confirmed by high ANA, anti-dsDNS and Anticardiolipin antibodies. Within the first 48 hours after admission there was significant deterioration with reduced vigilance and dysarthria. MRI of the brain and dopplersonography of cerebral vessels showed a complete thrombosis of the right medial cerebral artery with a small net of collaterals, irregularities of the left cerebral artery due to vasculitis and several subacute leftsided ischemias. Immunosuppressive therapy with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid together with antithrombotic therapy induced an improvement of neurologic, renal and cardiac function. PMID:18548940

  15. [Usefulness of imaging in large vessel vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Mekinian, A; Djelbani, S; Viry, F; Fain, O; Soussan, M

    2016-04-01

    The imaging is essential for the diagnosis of large vessels arteritis, in order to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions, to evaluate the treatment response and search the vascular complications. In patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA), the aortitis could be suspected in 2 situations: in the presence of general constitutional symptoms or systematic screening of aortitis in patient with confirmed GCA. The frequency of aortitis varies according to the imaging method and could be detected in 40 % of patients with computed tomography and MRI, and approximately in 60 % with FDG-PET/CT. The clinical and prognostic value of systematic detection of aortitis during the GCA remains to be determined. In Takayasu arteritis, imaging is performed to diagnose the large vessels vasculitis, to determine the arterial lesions extension to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions. The persistent vascular inflammation should be suspected in the presence of arterial thickness, of arterial enhancement, a parietal edema and increased arterial FDG uptake (>liver). However, the value of these parameters and the threshold remain to be determined. Thus, the value of FDG-PET/CT and MRI and of parameters used to characterize the persistent arterial inflammation should be further studied. PMID:26880245

  16. Urinary neopterin in idiopathic retinal vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, H; Giovannoni, G; Stanford, M; Wallace, G; Graham, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether urinary neopterin:creatinine (UNC) ratios relate to disease activity in idiopathic retinal vasculitis (RV).
METHODS—18 patients with RV were prospectively recruited into a year long longitudinal study. Patients collected first morning urine samples on a weekly basis and on the same day completed a diary which documented their subjective view of RV activity and any concurrent infection. They were examined in clinic on a 6-8 weekly basis and an objective assessment was made of RV disease activity. 14 healthy controls collected urine samples in the same way.
RESULTS—UNC ratios were significantly higher in patients than in controls (p=0.004, Mann-Whitney U test). UNC ratios were significantly higher when, according to their diaries, the patients had a subjective flare up of RV (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Subjective increased RV activity occurred more often when the patients had a concurrent infection (p<0.0001, χ2 test). There was no significant difference in the UNC ratio between objective clinical relapse and non-relapse of RV. There was moderate agreement between the clinical assessment and patients' subjective impression of RV activity (κ=0.48).
CONCLUSIONS—Higher neopterin levels reflect cell mediated disease that occurs in RV, but UNC ratios are not recommended as a means of monitoring clinical disease activity in RV.

 PMID:11133708

  17. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos. PMID:24929227

  18. Pediatric vasculitis: recognizing multisystemic manifestations at body imaging.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Geetika; Sargar, Kiran; Baszis, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric vasculitides are multisystem diseases that can be diagnostic challenges because of variable clinical manifestations. The clinical manifestation is determined by the size of the affected vessels, organs involved, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathologic characteristics. Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the two most common subtypes of pediatric vasculitis. Diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis can be difficult, and the outcome can be serious or fatal in the absence of timely intervention. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the diagnosis of vasculitis involving large- and medium-sized vessels, visualizing its vascular and extravascular manifestations, and monitoring the disease course and response to treatment. Although imaging cannot depict the vessel changes of small-vessel vasculitis directly, it can be used to detect tissue damage resulting from vessel inflammation. This article discusses the classification and clinical features of the major pediatric vasculitides. The imaging approach to and nonneurologic findings of major pediatric vasculitis subtypes are reviewed for the pediatric body imager. PMID:25969938

  19. Drug-induced lupus with leukocytoclastic vasculitis: a rare expression associated with adalimumab*

    PubMed Central

    Amarante, Carolina Forte; Acedo, Livia Mendes Sabia; Rabay, Fátima Maria de Oliveira; Campos, Benedito do Espírito Santo; Lira, Márcia Lanzoni de Alvarenga; Mandelbaum, Samuel Henrique

    2015-01-01

    TNF alpha antagonist-induced lupus-like syndrome is a rare condition which predominantly affects women (4:1). The average age of onset is 46-51 years. It occurs after exposure to TNF alpha antagonist and disappears after discontinuation of such agents. The pathogenic mechanism for development of the TNF alpha antagonist-induced lupus-like syndrome is not fully defined. It is believed that the medication induces apoptosis, leading to an accumulation of nucleosomal antigens of apoptotic cells. This would cause autoantibodies to be produced by susceptible individuals. The most common cutaneous manifestations include maculopapular exanthem, malar rash, alopecia, photosensitivity and, more rarely, vasculitis. Extracutaneous manifestations include: fever, weight loss, arthritis or arthralgia, myositis and hematological abnormalities. Antinuclear antibody may be positive in 80% of cases and anti-histone antibody is considered a disease marker for TNF alpha antagonist-induced lupus-like syndrome. Treatment corresponds to drug discontinuation. We report a rare case of sub-acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus with leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by adalimumab in a 42-year-old patient. PMID:26312693

  20. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with type 1 cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul Y; Prete, Pamela E; Kukes, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of type 1 cryoglobulinemia are usually related to vascular occlusion by noninflammatory thrombosis; rarely is leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen in type 1 cryoglobulinemia. We report the case of a 64-year-old male who presented with isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis that was initially attributed to essential mixed cryoglobulinemia after thorough diagnostic evaluation. A lack of adequate clinical response to therapy prompted further investigation, including cryoprecipitate electrophoresis and immunofixation, which revealed an IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy consistent with type 1 cryoglobulinemia. A renewed search for an underlying malignancy led to the discovery of early Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Although leukocytoclastic vasculitis is more characteristic of mixed cryoglobulinemia, it can be a presenting manifestation of type 1 cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22937435

  1. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  2. Large-system acute care transformation.

    PubMed

    Tatman, Judy; Zauner, Janiece

    2014-01-01

    All organizations are steeped in making delivery model changes to address the changing health care landscape specific to the expectations of health care reform. Too often, these changes focus solely on improving processes rather than developing creative and innovative work processes that decrease waste and increase quality. The Providence Health and Services system has embraced the challenge to transform health care services from a large-system perspective, beginning with 1 region. The authors share the beginning stages of this innovative work, the unique contributions to health care processes, and the early outcomes on 2 patient care units. PMID:24317032

  3. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. PMID:25109905

  4. Possible implication of disordered neutrophil extracellular traps in the pathogenesis of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are characterized by the presence of extracellular DNA fibers studded with antimicrobial proteins, including myeloperoxidase (MPO). Although NETs play an important role in the innate immune system, the scattered extracellular enzymes, such as MPO, pose risks to the host. Therefore, NETs are strictly regulated by DNase I in the serum, which prevents them from persisting. Recent studies have demonstrated that dysregulation of NETs could be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we interpret the association of disordered NETs with autoimmune diseases, especially propylthiouracil-induced MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23224024

  5. Acute systemic histoplasmosis associated with chorioretinitis in an immunocompetent adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Brian; Shen, Christopher; Mastellone, Joseph; Chaum, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Summary Histoplasmosis is an endemic, systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. A minority of patients develop asymptomatic chorioretinitis known as presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS), which is typically associated with chorioretinal scarring and peripapillary atrophy and occasionally with choroidal neovascularization secondary to maculopathy. We report a case of acute severe bilateral chorioretinitis associated with disseminated H. capsulatum in an immunocompetent adolescent boy living in an endemic area. The chorioretinitis did not respond to systemic antifungal therapy, but both his systemic illness and ocular lesions resolved with the addition of systemic steroids. PMID:23362391

  6. Unusual cause of flare in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Glanville, James Robert William; Penn, Henry

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman attended for a routine outpatient appointment for follow-up of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. Her disease had relapsed despite appropriate medical management with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), as evidenced by rising acute phase response and antimyeloperoxidase titre with ongoing symptoms. On further questioning, she had been taking oral charcoal as part of a detoxification diet, which we postulate was causing significantly impaired MMF absorption. This case report summarises the presentation and highlights the importance of a thorough drug history, and should prompt the reader to keep an open mind with regard to drug interactions and treatment regimen adherence when treatment is, unexpectedly, seemingly failing. PMID:26746838

  7. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    PubMed

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities. PMID:26503355

  8. [Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Successful therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Staubach-Renz, P; von Stebut, E; Bräuninger, W; Maurer, M; Steinbrink, K

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases can initially present as chronic urticaria. We describe the course of a patient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) as well as his successful treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). HUVS was diagnosed clinically and confirmed by histology and laboratory studies. After only one cycle with IVIG (2 g/kg) all HUVS symptoms were significantly decreased. PMID:17453168

  9. Acute mental status change as the presenting feature of adrenal insufficiency in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II and stroke.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sara; Raj, Shekar; Eugster, Erica; Sanchez, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency (AI) in children usually presents with non-specific symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. Here, we report an unusual case of a 15 year old girl who presented with acute mental status change and was ultimately diagnosed with AI due to autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II (APS2). Central nervous system imaging revealed a cerebral infarction. To our knowledge, the constellation of APS2, stroke and acute mental status change has not been previously reported. We review the literature with regard to the presentation of AI as well as the association between vasculitis and APS2. PMID:24259239

  10. Identification of Fetal Inflammatory Cells in Eosinophilic/T-cell Chorionic Vasculitis Using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Philip J; Li, LiQiong; Wang, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic/T-cell chorionic vasculitis (ETCV) is an inflammatory lesion of placental fetal vessels. In contrast to acute chorionic vasculitis, inflammation in ETCV is seen in chorionic vessel walls opposite the amnionic surface. It is not known whether inflammation in ETCV consists of maternal cells from the intervillous space or fetal cells migrating from the vessel. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to differentiate fetal versus maternal cells in ETCV. Placentas with ETCV, previously identified for a published study, were used. Infant sex in each case was identified using the electronic medical record. For male infants, 3-μm sections were cut from archived tissue blocks from placentas involving ETCV and stained with fluorescent X- and Y-chromosome centromeric probes. A consecutive hematoxylin/eosin-stained section was used for correlation. FISH analysis was performed on 400 interphase nuclei at the site of ETCV to determine the proportion of XX, XY, X, and Y cells. Of 31 ETCV cases, 20 were female and 10 were male (1 sex not recorded). Six of 10 cases with male infants had recuts with visible ETCV. In these 6 cases the average percentages (ranges) of XY cells, X-only cells, and Y-only cells in the region of inflammation were 81 (70-90), 11 (6-17), and 8 (2-14), respectively. There was a 2:1 female:male infant ratio in ETCV. Similar to acute chorionic vasculitis, the inflammation in ETCV is of fetal origin. It is still unknown, however, whether the stimulus for ETCV is of fetal or maternal origin. PMID:25756311

  11. Use of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in diagnosing vasculitis in a Chinese patient population.

    PubMed

    Li, P K; Leung, J C; Lai, F M; Wang, A; Lui, S F; Leung, C B; Lai, K N

    1994-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) have been used as markers of systemic vasculitides, including microscopic polyarteritis (MPA) and Wegener's granulomatosis. The diagnostic potential of ANCA assays together with antibodies against the neutrophil enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 for detecting a systemic vasculitis was tested in a Chinese patient population. 672 sera were received for ANCA assay, and ANCA detected by indirect immunofluorescence was positive in 73 sera from 42 patients. Of the 42 patients, 3 had cytoplasmic ANCA, while 39 had a perinuclear pattern. There was no patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Two cytoplasmic ANCA positive patients suffered from ulcerative colitis. Another cytoplasmic ANCA positive patient was a carrier of human immunodeficiency virus. Of the 39 perinuclear ANCA positive patients, 10 had MPA. Eight of them were tested for anti-MPO antibody, and all were positive. Other immune disorders that were perinuclear ANCA positive included: 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 3 with mixed connective tissue disease, 1 with Goodpasture's syndrome, 2 with inflammatory bowel disease, and 2 patients with IgA nephropathy. Anti-MPO antibody was not specific for MPA, and 7 out of the 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were anti-MPO antibody positive. Our study suggests that ANCA and anti-MPO antibody are not specific for MPA in a Chinese population. They would alert the clinician of the possibility of vasculitis, but a clinicopathological correlation is essential in making the diagnosis. PMID:7915885

  12. The predictive value of kidney biopsy in renal vasculitis: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Villacorta, Javier; Acevedo, Mercedes; Cavero, Teresa; Guerrero, Carmen; García Díaz, Eugenio; Orradre, Juan Luis; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Praga, Manuel; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-06-01

    The histopathologic classification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been demonstrated to have prognostic value in small cohorts of patients with pauci-immune extracapillary glomerulonephritis. We aimed to validate this histologic subgrouping system in a large cohort of patients with renal vasculitis from 3 Spanish centers. The additional value of several histologic parameters for predicting renal outcome was investigated. A total of 151 biopsies of patients with renal vasculitis were reviewed and classified as follows: 41% crescentic, 24% mixed, 21% focal, and 14% sclerotic. The cumulative proportions of renal survival at 5 years were 83.2%, 81.2%, 60.5%, and 50.7% for the focal, mixed, crescentic, and sclerotic categories, respectively (P < .05). In the crescentic category, patients with less than 75% of glomeruli showing crescents had better survival at 1 and 5 years compared with those having greater than or equal to 75% of crescents (77.9% and 70.6% versus 51.3% and 45.6%; P = .02). When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, the percentage of extracapillary proliferation and glomerulosclerosis remained as significant predictors for renal survival (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .001, and hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .002, respectively). In conclusion, patients with pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis experienced different outcomes depending on the percentage of crescents observed, so that extensive extracapillary proliferation was associated with the poorest renal survival. These findings validate the prognostic utility of the histologic classification scheme in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative patients and suggest a subdivision of crescentic category (<75% and ≥75% of crescents) based on the different survival rates observed among these subgroups. PMID:26980047

  13. Circulating Markers of Vascular Injury and Angiogenesis in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Ikle, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St.Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gu, Yi-Zhong; Snyder, Ronald D; Merkel, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify biomarkers that distinguish between active ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner superior or complementary to established markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Markers of vascular injury and angiogenesis were measured before and after treatment in a large clinical trial in AAV. 163 subjects enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Serum levels of E-selectin, ICAM-3, MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, P-selectin, thrombomodulin, and VEGF were measured at study screening (time of active disease) and at month 6. ESR and CRP levels had been measured at the time of the clinical visit. The primary outcome was the difference in marker level between screening and month 6 among patients in remission (BVAS/WG score of 0) at month 6. Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (mean BVAS/WG score 8.6 +/− 3.2 SD) at screening. Among the 123 subjects clinically in remission at month 6, levels of all markers except E-selectin showed significant declines. MMP3 levels were also higher among the 23 subjects with active disease at month 6 than among the 123 subjects in remission. MMP3 levels correlated weakly with ESR and CRP. Conclusion Many markers of vascular injury and angiogenesis are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but MMP3 appears to distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied. Further study of MMP3 is warranted to determine its clinical utility in combination with conventional markers of inflammation and ANCA titers. PMID:21953143

  14. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  15. Central nervous system effects in acute thallium poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Tai; Huang, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Wang, Hsuan-Min; Shen, Wu-Shiun; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chu, Nai-Shin

    2006-03-01

    We report the central nervous system manifestations, neuropsychological studies and brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings of two patients with acute thallium intoxication. Neurologically the patients suffered from confusion, disorientation, and hallucination in the acute stage, followed by anxiety, depression, lack of attention, and memory impairment, in addition to peripheral neuropathy. Neuropsychological tests revealed an impairment of memory function, including reversed digital span, memory registration, memory recall, memory recognition, similarity, proverb reasoning, and verbal fluency. High concentrations of thallium were found in the urine, blood, and drinking water of these two patients. Brain MRI showed lesions in the corpus striatum in one patient. During the follow-up periods, the clinical manifestations and neuropsychological studies showed a slowly progressive improvement, and a follow-up brain MRI 1.5 months later demonstrated a resolution of the lesions. We conclude that thallium intoxication might induce encephalopathy, and brain MRI studies demonstrated the acute-stage brain lesions in a severe intoxicated patient. In addition, neuropsychological tests also confirmed memory deficits, although the brain lesions in the corpus striatum might resolve. PMID:16337004

  16. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  17. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Associated with Vertebral Artery Vasculitis Treated Successfully with Tocilizumab and Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kae; Rajderkar, Dhanashree A; Modica, Renee F

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric polyarteritis nodosa is rare systemic necrotizing arteritis involving small- and medium-sized muscular arteries characterized by aneurysmal dilatations involving the vessel wall. Aneurysms associated with polyarteritis nodosa are common in visceral arteries; however intracranial aneurysms have also been reported and can be associated with central nervous system symptoms, significant morbidity, and mortality. To our knowledge extracranial involvement of the vertebral arteries has not been reported but has the potential to be deleterious due to fact that they supply the central nervous system vasculature. We present a case of a 3-year-old Haitian boy with polyarteritis nodosa that presented with extracranial vessel involvement of his vertebral arteries. After thorough diagnostic imaging, including a bone scan, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Angiography, and Computed Tomography Angiography, he was noted to have vertebral artery vasculitis, periostitis, subacute epididymoorchitis, arthritis, and myositis. He met diagnostic criteria for polyarteritis nodosa and was treated with cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone, and tocilizumab, which resulted in improvement of his inflammatory markers, radiographic findings, and physical symptoms after treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of vertebral artery vasculitis in polyarteritis nodosa as well as successful treatment of the condition using the combination cyclophosphamide and tocilizumab for this condition. PMID:27018080

  18. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Associated with Vertebral Artery Vasculitis Treated Successfully with Tocilizumab and Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kae; Rajderkar, Dhanashree A.; Modica, Renee F.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric polyarteritis nodosa is rare systemic necrotizing arteritis involving small- and medium-sized muscular arteries characterized by aneurysmal dilatations involving the vessel wall. Aneurysms associated with polyarteritis nodosa are common in visceral arteries; however intracranial aneurysms have also been reported and can be associated with central nervous system symptoms, significant morbidity, and mortality. To our knowledge extracranial involvement of the vertebral arteries has not been reported but has the potential to be deleterious due to fact that they supply the central nervous system vasculature. We present a case of a 3-year-old Haitian boy with polyarteritis nodosa that presented with extracranial vessel involvement of his vertebral arteries. After thorough diagnostic imaging, including a bone scan, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Angiography, and Computed Tomography Angiography, he was noted to have vertebral artery vasculitis, periostitis, subacute epididymoorchitis, arthritis, and myositis. He met diagnostic criteria for polyarteritis nodosa and was treated with cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone, and tocilizumab, which resulted in improvement of his inflammatory markers, radiographic findings, and physical symptoms after treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of vertebral artery vasculitis in polyarteritis nodosa as well as successful treatment of the condition using the combination cyclophosphamide and tocilizumab for this condition. PMID:27018080

  19. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  20. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of otitis media with ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-12-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is histologically characterized by systemic necrotizing vasculitis and is clinically classified into two phases, systemic or localized. Recently, otological symptoms such as otitis media and hearing loss, not previously often associated with AAV, have been reported in AAV cases. In these cases we propose a diagnosis of otitis media with AAV (OMAAV). The ANCA titer is important for the diagnosis of OMAAV, and in most cases rapid progressive hearing loss is observed as localized AAV. Peripheral facial nerve palsy or hypertrophic pachymeningitis are coupled with 25% of cases and 18% of cases respectively. Proteinase 3-ANCA (PR3-ANCA) positive otitis media causes granulomatous formation or middle ear effusion in the middle ear, on the other hand myeloperoxidase-ANCA (MPO-ANCA) positive otitis media predominantly presents as otitis media with effusion. The early diagnosed case and the sensorineural hearing loss not progressed deaf could be recovered by the immunosuppressive therapy. Delayed diagnosis of AAV occasionally leads to progression to the irreversible phase; therefore, diagnosis at the early-localized stage is important for treating AAV. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of this newly proposed concept of OMAAV. PMID:25339433

  1. Vasculitis-like hemorrhagic retinal angiopathy in Wegener’s granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, also known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that can also involve the eyes. We report a case of massive retinal and preretinal hemorrhages with perivascular changes as the initial signs in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis). Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian male presented with blurred vision in his right eye, myalgia and arthralgia, recurrent nose bleeds and anosmia. Fundus image of his right eye showed massive retinal hemorrhages and vasculitis-like angiopathy, although no fluorescein extravasation was present in fluorescein angiography. Laboratory investigations revealed an inflammation with increased C-reactive protein, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil count. Tests for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were positive for c-ANCA (cytoplasmatic ANCA) and PR3-ANCA (proteinase 3-ANCA). Renal biopsy demonstrated a focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis) was diagnosed and a combined systemic therapy of cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids was initiated. During 3 months of follow-up, complete resorption of retinal hemorrhages was seen and general complaints as well as visual acuity improved during therapy. Conclusion Vasculitis-like retinal changes can occur in Wegener’s granulomatosis. Despite massive retinal and preretinal hemorrhages that cause visual impairment, immunosuppressive therapy can improve ocular symptoms. PMID:24021028

  2. Retinal vasculitis: a novel paradoxical effect of anti-TNFα?

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Slouma, Maroua; Ben Jalel, Wady; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Retinal vasculitis (RV) is extremely rare in spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α, is efficient in spondyloarthritis, Crohn's disease and RV. We present the case of a 41-year-old man with a known history of spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. He was under treatment with infliximab. Four days after his 12th infusion of infliximab, he presented with sudden blurred vision. Although his disease was in remission, ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral peripheral retinal occlusive vasculitis. The patient responded positively to the treatment by laser photocoagulation and peribulbar corticosteroid injection. Infliximab was not stopped. There was improvement in his eye disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of new onset of RV occurring under infliximab in a patient with Crohn's related spondyloarthritis. This case illustrates the possibility of a paradoxical effect of this kind of therapy. PMID:25143312

  3. Dividing the Janus vasculitis? Pathophysiology of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Benjamin; Terrier, Benjamin; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis (EGPA) is a rare small- and medium-sized vessel vasculitis belonging to the group of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV). It is commonly divided into two phenotypes depending on the presence of ANCAs targeting myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO-ANCAs are present in 31% to 38% of patients and are associated with a vasculitis phenotype of the disease, whereas patients without MPO-ANCA are at risk of cardiac involvement. Despite significant advances in understanding the overall pathogenesis of the disease, the explanation for this dichotomy is still unclear. In this review, we synthesize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of EGPA and attempt to i) distinguish EGPA from other diseases including other AAVs, asthma, allergy and hypereosinophilic-associated conditions and ii) speculate about the preponderant mechanisms, which could explain the two disease phenotypes. PMID:26506114

  4. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in urticaria induced by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R B; Horan, D B; Silvers, D N

    1985-09-01

    A 35-year-old woman would develop urticarial lesions over one to four hours after irradiation with sunlight or artificial ultraviolet radiation. Lesions could persist for days before resolving. Although lesions were morphologically typical of solar urticaria, their evolution and resolution were both much slower than expected. Histologically, the lesions showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This unexpected finding suggests the possibility that there may be novel mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of some cases of solar urticaria. PMID:4037839

  5. Current Status of Outcome Measure Development in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Peter A.; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Boers, Maarten; Cornell, Christina; Direskeneli, Haner; Gebhart, Don; Hatemi, Gulen; Luqmani, Raashid; Matteson, Eric L.; Milman, Nataliya; Robson, Joanna; Seo, Philip; Tomasson, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of randomized controlled trials for vasculitis, especially for the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides [AAV, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s) and microscopic polyangiitis], has been greatly advanced by the development, use, and acceptance of validated outcome measures. Trials have subsequently provided the opportunity to validate and refine reliable, valid outcome measures for these multisystemic and relapsing rare diseases. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Vasculitis Working Group was formed in 2004 to foster development of validated and widely accepted outcomes in vasculitis using data-driven analyses, a dedication to building consensus, and adherence to, and guidance by, the principles of the OMERACT approach. This work led to the endorsement by OMERACT of the core set of domains and associated outcome measures for AAV. Next steps for the study of existing outcome tools in AAV include better definition of response criteria through development of more data-driven weighting of the elements of activity and damage assessment. The Working Group is now also embarking on a series of linked projects to develop validated patient-reported outcomes for use in clinical research in vasculitis. Additionally, the Working Group is studying how current methods of disease assessment and plans for new outcomes can be informed by the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Function of the World Health Organization. The success of the Group’s work in AAV has also led to a formal process for developing outcomes for the large vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis) and Behçet disease. PMID:24429177

  6. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  7. Cutaneous Small Vessel Vasculitis Accompanied by Pustulosis Palmaris et Plantaris

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Motoko; Kato, Tokue; Kawana, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 64-year-old woman who has suffered from pustulosis palmaris et plantaris for 10 years. At the first examination, many erythematous lesions with purpura, blood crusts, and blisters were present in the lower legs and dorsum of the feet. Painful swelling in the sternal region and dorsal pain were also noted. Elevation of the CRP and myogenic enzyme levels, and liver and renal dysfunctions were noted on blood testing. Histopathologically, leukocytoclastic vasculitis was noted in small blood vessels in the whole dermal layers, and deposition of IgM and C3 in the vascular wall was detected by the direct immunofluorescence techniques. Based on these findings, cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was diagnosed. Because the patient complained of a toothache during the clinical course, an X-ray examination was performed. On pantomography, a radicular cyst and apical periodontitis were noted. The tooth symptoms changed with exacerbation and remission of the skin symptoms. These findings indicate that odontogenic infection is very likely to be a cause of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis in a manner similar to pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. PMID:22548039

  8. Long-term efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in giant cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jobie; Steel, Lauren; Borg, Frances; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis affecting large-sized and medium-sized vessels. Glucocorticoids are currently the mainstay of treatment for GCA and associated large vessel vasculitis (LVV) but are associated with frequent adverse events. Methotrexate has only demonstrated a modest benefit while anti-TNF biological agents (infliximab and etanercept) have been inefficacious. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been associated with GCA. Tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanised antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, has been used successfully in several reports as a treatment for GCA and LVV. We report the potentially long-term successful use of TCZ in 8 cases of refractory LVV. All of our patients achieved a good clinical response to TCZ and C reactive protein reduced from an average of 70.3 to 2.5. In all cases, the glucocorticoid dose was reduced, from an average of 24.6 mg prednisolone prior to TCZ treatment to 4.7 mg, indicating that TCZ may enable a reduction in glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. However, regular TCZ administration was needed for disease control in most cases. TCZ was discontinued in one case due to the development of an empyema indicating the need for careful monitoring of infection when using this treatment. PMID:26819753

  9. Exploration, Development, and Validation of Patient-reported Outcomes in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–associated Vasculitis Using the OMERACT Process

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Joanna C.; Milman, Nataliya; Tomasson, Gunnar; Dawson, Jill; Cronholm, Peter F.; Kellom, Katherine; Shea, Judy; Ashdown, Susan; Boers, Maarten; Boonen, Annelies; Casey, George C.; Farrar, John T.; Gebhart, Don; Krischer, Jeffrey; Lanier, Georgia; McAlear, Carol A.; Peck, Jacqueline; Sreih, Antoine G.; Tugwell, Peter; Luqmani, Raashid A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of linked multisystem life- and organ-threatening diseases. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) vasculitis working group has been at the forefront of outcome development in the field and has achieved OMERACT endorsement of a core set of outcomes for AAV. Patients with AAV report as important some manifestations of disease not routinely collected through physician-completed outcome tools; and they rate common manifestations differently from investigators. The core set includes the domain of patient-reported outcomes (PRO). However, PRO currently used in clinical trials of AAV do not fully characterize patients’ perspectives on their burden of disease. The OMERACT vasculitis working group is addressing the unmet needs for PRO in AAV. Methods Current activities of the working group include (1) evaluating the feasibility and construct validity of instruments within the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) to record components of the disease experience among patients with AAV; (2) creating a disease-specific PRO measure for AAV; and (3) applying The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to examine the scope of outcome measures used in AAV. Results The working group has developed a comprehensive research strategy, organized an investigative team, included patient research partners, obtained peer-reviewed funding, and is using a considerable research infrastructure to complete these interrelated projects to develop evidence-based validated outcome instruments that meet the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, and feasibility. Conclusion The OMERACT vasculitis working group is on schedule to achieve its goals of developing validated PRO for use in clinical trials of AAV. (First Release September 1 2015; J Rheumatol 2015;42:2204–9; doi:10.3899/jrheum.141143) PMID:26329344

  10. Serum proteins reflecting inflammation, injury and repair as biomarkers of disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Warner, Roscoe L; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Iklé, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Krischer, Jeffrey; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St. Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Johnson, Kent J; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify circulating proteins that distinguish between active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner complementary to markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Twenty-eight serum proteins representing diverse aspects of the biology of AAV were measured before and 6 months after treatment in a large clinical trial of AAV. Subjects (n=186) enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were available for comparison. The primary outcome was the ability of markers to distinguish severe AAV (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)≥3 at screening) from remission (BVAS/WG=0 at month 6), using areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (median BVAS/WG=8) at screening. In the 137 subjects in remission at month 6, 24 of the 28 markers showed significant declines. ROC analysis indicated that levels of CXCL13 (BCA-1), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) best discriminated active AAV from remission (AUC>0.8) and from healthy controls (AUC>0.9). Correlations among these markers and with ESR or CRP were low. Conclusions Many markers are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but CXCL13, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied, including ESR and CRP. These proteins are particularly promising candidates for future studies to address unmet needs in the assessment of patients with AAV. PMID:22975753

  11. Static and fatigue tensile properties of cross-ply laminates containing vascules for self-healing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luterbacher, R.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of including hollow channels (vascules) within cross-ply laminates on static tensile properties and fatigue performance is investigated. No change in mechanical properties or damage formation is observed when a single vascule is included in the 0/90 interface, representing 0.5% of the cross sectional area within the specimen. During tensile loading, matrix cracks develop in the 90° layers leading to a reduction of stiffness and strength (defined as the loss of linearity) and a healing agent is injected through the vascules in order to heal them and mitigate the caused degradation. Two different healing agents, a commercial low viscosity epoxy resin (RT151, Resintech) and a toughened epoxy blend (bespoke, in-house formulation) have been used to successfully recover stiffness under static loading conditions. The RT151 system recovered 75% of the initial failure strength, whereas the toughened epoxy blend achieved a recovery of 67%. Under fatigue conditions, post healing, a rapid decay of stiffness was observed as the healed damage re-opened within the first 2500 cycles. This was caused by the high fatigue loading intensity, which was near the static failure strength of the healing resin. However, the potential for ameliorating (via self-healing or autonomous repair) more diffuse transverse matrix damage via a vascular network has been shown.

  12. Systemic tuberculosis presenting with acute transient myopia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Sher A; Kashani, Shahram; Morley, Roland K

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transient myopia has been reported to occur in a number of conditions, either ocular in origin or associated with an underlying systemic cause. We present a rare case of this abnormality occurring in the setting of systemic tuberculosis. Case presentation A 29-year-old Indian woman presented with sudden onset blurred distance vision and fever. Examination revealed visual acuity of counting fingers in both eyes improving to 6/9 with pinhole with N5 reading acuity. Anterior segment examination revealed narrow angles on gonioscopy. Posterior segments were normal. Systemic examination revealed a fluctuant mass in her left loin, aspiration of which yielded pus which was culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Mantoux test elicited a strongly positive reaction. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were unremarkable. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine and abdomen revealed a large psoas abscess communicating with the loin mass. Two vertebrae were involved but not the spinal cord or canal. Conclusion Transient myopia is a rare presenting feature of systemic tuberculosis. A postulated mechanism in this patient is that development of a uveal effusion related to systemic tuberculosis caused anterior rotation of the iris-lens diaphragm, thereby inducing narrowing of the angle and acute myopia. PMID:19014689

  13. Epigenetic coordination of acute systemic inflammation: potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Liu, Tiefu; McCall, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming of thousands of genes directs the course of acute systemic inflammation, which is highly lethal when dysregulated during sepsis. No molecular-based treatments for sepsis are available. A new concept supports that sepsis is an immunometabolic disease and that loss of control of nuclear epigenetic regulator Sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1), a NAD+ sensor directs immune and metabolic pathways during sepsis. SIRT-1, acting as homeostasis checkpoint, controls hyper and hypo inflammatory responses of sepsis at the microvascular interface, which disseminates inflammatory injury to cause multiple organ failure. Modifying SIRT-1 activity, which can prevent or treat established sepsis in mice, may provide a new way treat sepsis by epigenetically restoring immunometabolic homeostasis. PMID:25088223

  14. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long

  15. Multidrug-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis raising suspicion of sexual homicide-things are not always what they seem.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Krocker, Klaus; Sautter, Julia; Tsokos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguous findings during external examination of a deceased in combination with dubious autopsy findings can raise doubts concerning the manner and cause of death. We report the case of a 35-year-old female deceased who had suffered from a borderline personality and depressive disorder with suicidal ideation. At the death scene, the body showed massive facial swelling accompanied by complete reddening of the skin of the face, with patchy skin abrasions on the forehead and neck, and purple bruise-like discolorations distributed symmetrically over both shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees, lower legs, and feet, raising the suspicion of underlying massive external blunt force injury. Police investigators strongly suspected sexual homicide. At autopsy, dissection in layers revealed massive subcutaneous hemorrhages as the cause of the reddish skin discolorations. Toxicological analyses showed fatal levels of lamotrigine with additional proof of zopiclone, zolpidem, diphenhydramine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, pregabalin, tramadol, and modafinil in venous blood. Histologically, both the macroscopically impressive purple skin changes with underlying bleeding into the subcutaneous tissue and the skin abrasions were due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a form of acute hypersensitivity vasculitis that was a reaction to the multiple therapeutic drugs that the woman had taken shortly before death. The manner of death was classified as suicide, and sexual homicide was ruled out. PMID:25957602

  16. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a child with interleukin-12 receptor beta-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kutukculer, Necil; Genel, Ferah; Aksu, Guzide; Karapinar, Bulent; Ozturk, Can; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fieschi, Claire

    2006-03-01

    We report a patient with complete interleukin-12 receptor beta-1 deficiency associated with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient experienced Bacille Calmette Guérin, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Salmonella enteritidis infection. Vasculitis affecting both small arteries and postcapillary venules due to deposition of immune complexes was probably caused by S. enteritidis and/or M. chelonae infection. PMID:16615980

  17. Making post-acute care assets viable: a system's approach to continuing care.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jeffery S; Oberst, Larry; Griffin, Kathleen M

    2013-04-01

    To build a strong continuing care network, leaders at Spectrum Health: Recruited industry veterans in post-acute care, Increased the visibility of the parent brand, Gained greater alignment throughout the system, Filled gaps in the health system's post-acute care portfolio. PMID:23596835

  18. Sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system for the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Vikelis, Michail; Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Rapoport, Alan M

    2014-03-01

    SUMMARY We will describe the pharmacokinetic profile, clinical efficacy and safety data of the sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system (Zecuity®, NuPathe Inc., PA, USA), recently approved for the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura in adults, by the US FDA. This transdermal system utilizes a low-level electrical current to deliver sumatriptan transdermally and circumvents the GI tract. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that iontophoretic delivery of sumatriptan achieves detectable plasma concentrations 15 min after activation with a maximum mean serum concentration of 22 ng/ml. A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial demonstrated minimal triptan-related side effects and superior efficacy versus placebo. The pain-free rate at 2 h postdose was 18% of patients applying the sumatriptan patch versus 9% using the placebo (p = 0.0092). This sumatriptan transdermal system may be a good choice for migraineurs with severe nausea or vomiting, those with intolerable triptan-related adverse events and/or those not responding optimally to oral medications. PMID:24641436

  19. Nodular Vasculitis That Developed during Etanercept (Enbrel) Treatment in a Patient with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Bae; Chang, In-Kyu; Im, Myung; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang-Deok; Seo, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Nodular vasculitis was introduced by Montgomery for cases of erythema induratum-like lesions that were not associated with tuberculosis. Nodular vasculitis has been associated with both nontuberculous infections and noninfectious conditions. However, there has been no report on the development of nodular vasculitis during tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor treatment. A 28-year-old man visited our clinic for the treatment of severe psoriasis with a 20-year history. Subcutaneous injection of etanercept (25 mg, twice weekly) was started. One year later, erythematous nodules developed on his lower leg. A skin biopsy showed lobular panniculitis with extensive necrosis and vasculitis. To exclude latent tuberculosis, an assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens was performed, with a negative result. After stopping etanercept under the diagnosis of nodular vasculitis associated with etanercept, the lesions gradually disappeared, leaving depressed scars in 3 months. There has been no recurrence after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26512176

  20. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury

    PubMed Central

    Giusto, Elena; Mallucci, Giulia; Marchetti, Bianca; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalks between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged central nervous system (CNS) activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, which would ultimately bring the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation is described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on the spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damages is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Here we have reviewed the available information about the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of recovery after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that ultimately are associated to intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. PMID:24785677

  1. Defining and Regulating Acute Inflammatory Lesion Formation during the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Christopher; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The primary pathology of the human central nervous system disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the animal counterpart experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) includes immunological and inflammatory events. Immune system involvement in MS has been widely debated but the role of inflammation has received less attention. Classic acute inflammation features vasculitis, resident tissue macrophage and mast cell participation plus the involvement of circulatory-derived neutrophils and platelets. Pre-lesion development in MS incorporates cerebral vasculitis, activated resident microglia in normal appearing white matter together with infiltrating cell types and factors indicative of an acute inflammatory reaction. Similarly, the formation of perivascular lesions during early EAE includes characteristic neurovasculitis, the participation of central nervous system microglial phenotypes plus haemopoietic cells and mediators, signifying an ongoing acute inflammatory response. EAE has been extensively used as a screen to select drugs for MS treatment but has been criticised as unrepresentative of the human condition due to fundamental differences in disease induction and pathogenesis. The review provides compelling evidence for a distinct acute inflammatory phase in MS lesion formation that is convincingly reproduced in early EAE pathology. Moreover, consideration of drug efficacy studies undertaken during initial EAE validates the occurrence of an acute inflammatory phase in disease pathogenesis. Critical appraisal, recognition and acceptance of the mutual acute inflammatory components inherent in the primary pathology of MS and EAE reveals new targets and encourages confident and reliable employment of the animal model in the assessment of novel compounds for the control of key primary pathological events in human demyelinating disease. PMID:26177741

  2. Role of Brain Perfusion SPECT with 99mTc HMPAO in the Assessment of Response to Drug Therapy in Patients with Autoimmune Vasculitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Liberatore; Manuela, Morreale; Valentina, Megna; Sara, Collorone; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maria, Drudi Francesco; Christos, Anagnostou; Liana, Civitelli; Ada, Francia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of vasculitis in the brain remains a quite difficult achievement. To the best of our knowledge, there is no imaging method reported in literature which is capable of reaching to a diagnosis of vasculitis with very high sensitivity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be usefully employed in monitoring the treatment of vasculitis, allowing treating only potentially responder patients and avoiding the side effects on patients who do not respond. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (two males and 18 females) suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 5), Behcet's disease (BD; n = 5), undifferentiated vasculitis (UV; n = 5), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS; n = 5) were included in the study. All patients underwent a wide neurological anamnestic investigation, a complete objective neurological examination and SPECT of the brain with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO). The brain SPECT was then repeated after appropriate medical treatment. The neurological and neuropsychiatric follow-up was performed at 6 months after the start of the treatment. Results: Overall, the differences between the scintigraphic results obtained after and before the medical treatment indicated a statistically significant increase of the cerebral perfusion (CP). In 19 out of 200 regions of interest (ROI) studied, the difference between pre- and post treatment percentages had negative sign, indicating a worsening of CP. This latter event has occurred six times (five in the same patients) in the UV, 10 times (eight in the same patients) in the SLE, never in BD, and three times (two in the same patient) in the SS. Conclusion: The reported results seem to indicate the possibility of identifying, by the means of a brain SPECT, responder and nonresponder (unchanged or worsened CP) patients, affected by autoimmune vasculitis, to the therapy. PMID:25973400

  3. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare initial manifestation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Valdano; Pedro, Gertrudes Maria; Cordeiro, Lemuel Bornelli; de Miranda, Sandra Maria da Rocha Neto

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare gastrointestinal manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus and becomes rarer as an initial manifestation. There are only two cases reported. The authors report a 20-year-old black woman that presented acute acalculous cholecystitis revealed by abdominal computed tomography. During hospitalization, she was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus. Conservative treatment with antibiotics was performed with complete remission of the symptoms. Corticosteroid was started in ambulatory. Cholecystectomy has been the treatment of choice in acute acalculous cholecystitis as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient responded well to conservative treatment, and surgery was not required. This case is unique in the way that corticosteroid was started in ambulatory care. We should not forget that the acute acalculous cholecystitis can be the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus although its occurrence is very rare. Conservative treatment should be considered. Abdominal computed tomography was a determinant exam for better assessment of acute acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27267533

  4. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  5. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, B.; John, G. T.; O’Callaghan, C.; Ranganathan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  6. Pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-André; Kaplanski, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) constitutes a group of rare diseases characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels and the presence of ANCA. Although these autoantibodies were initially used to classify pauci-immune vasculitis, increasing clinical and experimental evidence now supports their pathogenic role, mainly through ANCA-induced activation of primed neutrophils and monocytes leading to destructive vascular necrosis. The mechanisms of ANCA generation remain however unclear. Neutrophils play a central role in the pathophysiological process of AAV since they are both effector cells responsible for endothelial damage and targets of autoimmunity. Another role of neutrophils is due to their ability to generate neutrophil extracellular traps, which support the presentation of ANCA autoantigens, could break immune tolerance and induce autoantibody generation. Alternatively, the ANCA autoimmune response is facilitated by insufficient T-cell and B-cell regulation, and the role of complement alternative pathway has recently been emphasized. This review summarizes the main pathogenesis concepts of AAV as well as the putative mechanisms for the origin of ANCA autoimmune response. PMID:26970490

  7. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. PMID:24785677

  8. Acute upper limb ischemia, a rare presentation of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Morais, Luís; Galego, Sofia; Marques, Nélia; Pack, Tiago; Rodrigues, Hugo; Abreu, Rodolfo; Vasconcelos, Leonor; Marques, Hugo; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic large vessel vasculitis, with extracranial arterial involvement described in 10-15% of cases, usually affecting the aorta and its branches. Patients with GCA are more likely to develop aortic aneurysms, but these are rarely present at the time of the diagnosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman, who reported proximal muscle pain in the arms with morning stiffness of the shoulders for eight months. In the previous two months, she had developed worsening bilateral arm claudication, severe pain, cold extremities and digital necrosis. She had no palpable radial pulses and no measurable blood pressure. The patient had normochromic anemia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 120 mm/h, and a negative infectious and autoimmune workup. Computed tomography angiography revealed concentric wall thickening of the aorta extending to the aortic arch branches, particularly the subclavian and axillary arteries, which were severely stenotic, with areas of bilateral occlusion and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta (47 mm). Despite corticosteroid therapy there was progression to acute critical ischemia. She accordingly underwent surgical revascularization using a bilateral carotid-humeral bypass. After surgery, corticosteroid therapy was maintained and at six-month follow-up she was clinically stable with reduced inflammatory markers. GCA, usually a chronic benign vasculitis, presented exceptionally in this case as acute critical upper limb ischemia, resulting from a massive inflammatory process of the subclavian and axillary arteries, treated with salvage surgical revascularization. PMID:27006059

  9. Mononeuropathy multiplex associated with acute parvovirus B19 infection: characteristics, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lenglet, Timothée; Haroche, Julien; Schnuriger, Aurélie; Maisonobe, Thierry; Viala, Karine; Michel, Yanne; Chelbi, Farhat; Grabli, David; Seror, Paul; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Amoura, Zahir; Bouche, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    To describe the characteristics of peripheral neuropathy related to acute parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection. We reviewed clinical, electrophysiological and histological data of three patients with peripheral neuropathy and positive B19V detection (IgG, IgM and PCR) compatible with acute infection. The neuropathy fulfilled criteria for mononeuropathy multiplex (MM). It could be preceded by or concurrent with a limited purpuric eruption, but systemic manifestations were absent. The first neurological symptoms were always sensory and localized in a hand. Neuropathy was initially limited to a restricted sensory part of a nerve trunk territory. The course was subacute with successive and asymmetric injury of the limb and cranial nerves. Electromyographic study confirmed the diagnosis of MM with multifocal asymmetric sensory and motor axonal loss in two patients, whereas the neuropathy was purely sensory and limited to two nerves in the other patient. Nerve biopsies showed no evidence of necrotizing vasculitis but, in one patient, revealed a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate evocative of hypersensitivity vasculitis secondary to an infectious agent. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) was systematically administered. Long-term outcome was good but with incomplete sensory recovery and, for one patient, persistence of a functional disability. B19 V infection should be considered in the etiological assessment of MM, especially in the event of a progressive sensory disorder in the hands and a concomitant history of rash. IVIg may be an effective treatment for this inflammatory disorder. PMID:21287183

  10. Influence of acute renal failure on the mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Sousa, V R; Sousa, A A; Petroianu, A; Simal, C J; Barbosa, A J

    2001-09-01

    Several studies show the ability of macrophages to remove particles injected into the bloodstream. This function seems to be increased in the presence of acute renal failure. The objective of the present study was to assess the phagocytic function of the main organs (spleen, liver and lung) of the mononuclear phagocytic system in renal and postrenal failures. Fifteen rats (250-350 g) were divided into three groups (N = 5): group I - control; group II - ligature of both ureters, and group III - bilateral nephrectomy. On the third postoperative day, all animals received an iv injection of 1 ml/kg 99mTc sulfur colloid. Blood samples were collected for the assessment of plasma urea, creatinine, sodium, and potassium concentrations and arterial gasometry. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and blood clots were obtained and radioactivity was measured. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and kidney were prepared for routine histopathological analysis. Plasma urea, creatinine and potassium concentrations in groups II and III were higher than in group I (P<0.05). Plasma sodium concentrations in groups II and III were lower than in group I (P<0.05). Compensated metabolic acidosis was observed in the presence of postrenal failure. Group II animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (0.98) and lung (2.63), and a higher level in the liver (105.51) than control. Group III animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (11.94) and a higher level in the liver (61.80), lung (11.30) and blood clot (5.13) than control. In groups II and III liver steatosis and bronchopneumonia were observed. Renal and postrenal failures seem to interfere with blood clearance by the mononuclear phagocytic system. PMID:11514841

  11. Urinary retention secondary to acute vasculitic penile swelling in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Nicholas; Black, John; Gupta, Ashish

    2016-03-01

    Acute urinary retention secondary to vasculitic penile swelling in children is extremely rare. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a self-limiting IgA-mediated cutaneous vasculitis, which can cause soft tissue edema. Acute urinary retention requires urgent intervention to prevent obstructive uropathy. Suprapubic catheterization provides an effective management strategy in the emergency setting. PMID:27014447

  12. Fatal-Stroke Syndrome Revealing Fungal Cerebral Vasculitis Due to Arthrographis kalrae in an Immunocompetent Patient ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, N.; Ajzenberg, D.; Desnos-Ollivier, M.; Clavel, M.; Gantier, J. C.; Labrousse, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report an uncommon clinical presentation of a unique case of fatal invasive fungal cerebral vasculitis due to Arthrographis kalrae in a nonimmunocompromised host. The identity of the fungus was determined by morphological characteristics and by analysis of internal transcribed spacer 1 sequences and was confirmed by postmortem examination of the brain tissues. Establishing rapidly the link between the clinical syndromes and the fungal infection of the central nervous system is essential to improve the outcome. As our case has shown, it is more challenging to make a diagnosis of fungal infection when there are no risk factors of immunodeficiency and when the clinical presentation seems uncommon. PMID:18650350

  13. Urticarial vasculitis in northern Spain: clinical study of 21 cases.

    PubMed

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Mata, Cristina; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A; Alvarez, Lino; González-Vela, M Carmen; Armesto, Susana; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a subset of cutaneous vasculitis (CV), characterized clinically by urticarial skin lesions of more than 24 hours' duration and histologically by leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We assessed the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of a series of patients with UV. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with UV included in a large series of unselected patients with CV from a university hospital. Of 766 patients with CV, UV was diagnosed in 21 (2.7%; 9 male and 12 female patients; median age, 35 yr; range, 1-78 yr; interquartile range, 5-54 yr). Eight of the 21 cases were aged younger than 20 years old. Potential precipitating factors were upper respiratory tract infections and drugs (penicillin) (n = 4; in all cases in patients aged <20 yr), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (n = 1), and malignancy (n = 1). Besides urticarial lesions, other features such as palpable purpura (n = 7), arthralgia and/or arthritis (n = 13), abdominal pain (n = 2), nephropathy (n = 2), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1) were observed. Hypocomplementemia (low C4) with low C1q was disclosed in 2 patients. Other abnormal laboratory findings were leukocytosis (n = 7), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 6), anemia (n = 4), and antinuclear antibody positivity (n = 2). Treatment included corticosteroids (n = 12), antihistaminic drugs (n = 6), chloroquine (n = 4), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (n = 3), colchicine (n = 2), and azathioprine (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 10 months (interquartile range, 2-38 mo) recurrences were observed in 4 patients. Apart from 1 patient who died because of an underlying malignancy, the outcome was good with full recovery in the remaining patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that UV is rare but not exceptional. In children UV is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Urticarial lesions and joint manifestations are the most frequent clinical manifestation

  14. Rapid regression of exudative maculopathy in idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome after intravitreal ranibizumab.

    PubMed

    Marín-Lambíes, Cristina; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Salom, David; Navarrete, Javier; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel

    2012-05-01

    The idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome is a rare retinal vascular disorder characterized by multiple leaking aneurysmal dilations, retinal vasculitis, neuroretinitis and peripheral vascular ischemia. Visual loss mainly occurs due to the development of retinal neovascularization and/or exudative maculopathy. Although the treatment of choice has not yet been established, retinal photocoagulation seems to be the best option to control the disease and to prevent its progression. Herein, we report a case of idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome with both retinal neovascularization and macular exudation successfully managed with intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis(®)) as adjunctive therapy to retinal photocoagulation. PMID:22949913

  15. Disseminated gonococcal infection presenting as vasculitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangita; Win, Htet Nwe; Chalam, Venkat; Yee, Lian

    2007-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with alcoholic liver disease presented with fever, tenosynovitis, polyarthritis and a vasculitic rash on the hands and feet for 4 days. He had neutrophilia and raised inflammatory markers. He had no history of sore throat, urethral discharge or travel abroad. His initial blood cultures were negative, and he was treated for vasculitis with steroids. The rash and arthritis seemed to improve initially, but he had another episode of fever. Repeat blood cultures grew Neisseria gonorrhoeae,and he received intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral ciprofloxacin. He had marked improvement in rash, tenosynovitis and arthritis, and the fever dropped. He also had chlamydial urethritis and received azithromycin. The presentation of disseminated gonococcal infection after a presumptive episode of asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea is highlighted. PMID:17213353

  16. Neutrophilic Dermatoses in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Moreuil, Claire; Néel, Antoine; de Menthon, Mathilde; Meyer, Olivier; Launay, David; Pagnoux, Christian; Guillevin, Loïc; Puéchal, Xavier; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A few reports suggest combination of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and neutrophilic dermatoses (ND). We aimed to describe the main characteristics of patients presenting with both AAV and ND in a French cohort and through a systematic literature review, and to discuss the possible common pathogenic process involved. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with both conditions. Patients were selected via the French Internal Medicine Society (SNFMI) and the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG). A literature review focusing on a combination of both conditions, concentrated only on publications with well-established diagnoses and individual detailed data. Seventeen patients diagnosed with AAV and ND were identified in this cohort. Twelve patients had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 4 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and one had eosinophilic GPA (EGPA). Eight patients, all with GPA, displayed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Sweet's syndrome was observed in 6 patients (4 with MPA, one with GPA and one with EGPA) and erythema elevatum diutinum in the other three (2 with GPA and 1 with MPA). The literature review identified 33 additional patients with both conditions, including 26 with GPA. Altogether, of the 50 patients (17 from our study and 33 from the literature review), 33 (66%) patients presented with PG associated with GPA in 29 cases (89%). Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment in conjunction with an immunosuppressive agent in most cases. Outcomes were good and a total of 15 patients experienced a relapse. Patients who relapsed were more likely to have ear, nose and throat manifestation than patients who did not [12/15 (80%) relapsing patients vs. 15/35 (43%) non-relapsing patients; p = 0.03)]. In our stud, the most frequent association concerned GPA and PG. ND should be considered and specifically researched within the spectrum of cutaneous manifestations observed in AAV. PMID:26986103

  17. Rituximab versus Cyclophosphamide for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John H.; Merkel, Peter A.; Spiera, Robert; Seo, Philip; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St. Clair, E. William; Turkiewicz, Anthony; Tchao, Nadia K.; Webber, Lisa; Ding, Linna; Sejismundo, Lourdes P.; Mieras, Kathleen; Weitzenkamp, David; Ikle, David; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Mueller, Mark; Brunetta, Paul; Allen, Nancy B.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Geetha, Duvuru; Keogh, Karina A.; Kissin, Eugene Y.; Monach, Paul A.; Peikert, Tobias; Stegeman, Coen; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Specks, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been the cornerstone of remission-induction therapy for severe antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis for 40 years. Uncontrolled studies suggest that rituximab is effective and may be safer than a cyclophosphamide-based regimen. METHODS We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial of rituximab (375 mg per square meter of body-surface area per week for 4 weeks) as compared with cyclophosphamide (2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) for remission induction. Glucocorticoids were tapered off; the primary end point was remission of disease without the use of prednisone at 6 months. RESULTS Nine centers enrolled 197 ANCA-positive patients with either Wegener’s granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis. Baseline disease activity, organ involvement, and the proportion of patients with relapsing disease were similar in the two treatment groups. Sixty-three patients in the rituximab group (64%) reached the primary end point, as compared with 52 patients in the control group (53%), a result that met the criterion for noninferiority (P<0.001). The rituximab-based regimen was more efficacious than the cyclophosphamide-based regimen for inducing remission of relapsing disease; 34 of 51 patients in the rituximab group (67%) as compared with 21 of 50 patients in the control group (42%) reached the primary end point (P = 0.01). Rituximab was also as effective as cyclophosphamide in the treatment of patients with major renal disease or alveolar hemorrhage. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups with respect to rates of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Rituximab therapy was not inferior to daily cyclophosphamide treatment for induction of remission in severe ANCA-associated vasculitis and may be superior in relapsing disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Genentech, and Biogen; Clinical

  18. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  19. Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Alice; Khalidi, Nader; Dehghan, Natasha; Barra, Lillian; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Sreih, Antoine; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Van Assche, Gert; Merkel, Peter A.; Pagnoux, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto’s IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients

  20. Cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing uncovering hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis and hepatitis C with mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Almeida, Teresa; Caetano, Mónica; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity characterized by urticarial lesions that persist for more than 24 hours and histologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Patients can be divided into normocomplementemic or hypocomplementemic. The authors report the case of a healthy 49-year-old woman with a 1-year history of highly pruritic generalized cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing. Laboratory tests together with histopathologic examination allowed the diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, chronic hepatitis C and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. The patient started symptomatic treatment and was referred to a gastroenterologist for management of the hepatitis C, with progressive improvement of the skin condition. The development of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in the context of chronic hepatitis C is exceedingly rare and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24474109

  1. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. IL-17 production by CSF lymphocytes as a biomarker for cerebral vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Schmid, Sabrina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Hackbusch, Romy; Kolster, Manuela; Schuster, Simon; Thomalla, Götz; Keminer, Oliver; Pleß, Ole; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Wegscheider, Karl; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by CD4+ T cells in the CSF as a potential biomarker for cerebral vasculitis in stroke patients. Methods: In this consecutive case study, we performed prospective analysis of CSF and blood in patients admitted to a university medical center with symptoms of stroke and suspected cerebral vasculitis. Flow cytometry was performed for intracellular detection of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanded T cells from CSF. Results: CSF CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with cerebral vasculitis showed significantly higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 compared to patients with stroke not due to vasculitis or with other, noninflammatory neurologic diseases. There was no difference in the production of interferon-γ in the CSF and no overall differences in the relative frequencies of peripheral immune cells. Conclusions: Intracellular IL-17 in CSF cells is potentially useful in discriminating cerebral vasculitis as a rare cause in patients presenting with ischemic stroke. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that an increased proportion of IL-17-producing CD4+ cells in CSF of patients presenting with stroke symptoms is indicative of cerebral vasculitis (sensitivity 73%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39–94%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 74%–100%). PMID:27144213

  3. Minocycline-induced polyarteritis nodosa-like vasculitis presenting as brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Klaas, James P; Matzke, Thomas; Makol, Ashima; Fulgham, Jimmy R

    2015-05-01

    Minocycline use has been associated with the development of autoimmune disorders, including drug-induced vasculitis. Previously published reports suggest that clinical manifestations are limited to cutaneous, constitutional, or musculoskeletal symptoms. To our knowledge there has been only one reported patient with ischemic stroke in the setting of minocycline-induced vasculitis. We describe a 26-year-old woman, with no vascular risk factors, who had an ischemic pontine stroke in the setting of biopsy-proven minocycline-induced polyarteritis nodosa-like vasculitis. Discontinuation of minocycline resulted in resolution of the vasculitis, and she has not had any recurrent ischemic events. This report shows that ischemic strokes may occur as a result of minocycline-induced vasculitis. While this is likely a rare association, recognition is important given the widespread use of minocycline and the potential for devastating consequences in a young population. Consequently, drug-induced vasculitis should be considered in patients with an ischemic stroke taking minocycline. PMID:25778384

  4. [Pathophysiology and Laboratory Findings in Patients with ANCA-Associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Pathophysiological features and laboratory findings in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -associated vasculitis are described. In contrast to Western countries, MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis and renal-limited vasculitis is the most common form of ANCA-associated vasculitis in Japanese patients. Oral prednisolone in combination with immunosuppressive agents has improved patient survival in older Japanese patients. However, the recurrence rate has significantly increased in recent years Accumulative evidence supports a direct pathogenic role of ANCA in glomerulonephritis and vasculitis, in which inflammatory processes with the up-regulation of cytokines/chemokines and possible involvement of a neutrophil extracellular trap may play a role. However, whether or not the measurement of ANCA titers reflects disease activity and predicts the onset and/or relapse of ANCA-associated vasculitis remains controversial. Further studies will be required to determine the clinical significance of ANCA in more detail. In addition to ANCA, measurements of novel clinical test items, including anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody, may reveal the possibility of their application as useful biomarkers of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:26897859

  5. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  6. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N. K.; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P. Suresh; Prabhakar, A. T.; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T. V.; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  7. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in an adolescent with ulcerative colitis: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butts, G Tyler; Bishop, Phyllis R; Wyatt, Julie P

    2014-01-01

    An adolescent female with long-standing, difficult-to-control ulcerative colitis developed leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a rare cutaneous extra-intestinal manifestation of the inflammatory bowel disease. The authors provide a literature review on leukocytoclastic vasculitis complicating ulcerative colitis. Furthermore, the clinical features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis are compared and contrasted with the more common cutaneous extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease, erythema nodosum, and pyoderma gangrenosum.

  8. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    PubMed

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-08-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  9. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  10. The role of myeloperoxidase in the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, A; Heeringa, P; Tervaert, J W

    2003-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome and idiopathic pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis are strongly associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). These ANCA-associated vasculitides can serologically be separated into myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA positive patients. The unique properties of the antigen targeted by the anti-MPO antibodies could help to explain the specific characteristics of MPO-ANCA associated disease. Recently, an animal model has been developed that proves that anti-mouse MPO immunoglobulins alone are capable of causing disease similar to that in humans. Also, the in vitro pathologic effects of binding of MPO-ANCA to MPO are better understood. MPO-ANCA can activate (primed) neutrophils directly causing extensive reactive oxygen species formation and degranulation of neutrophil constituents, including MPO, resulting in a destructive inflammatory response towards the vessel wall. MPO-ANCA can prevent the clearing and inactivation of MPO by ceruloplasmin as well, resulting in increased myeloperoxidase activity. Myeloperoxidase produces not only the strong oxidant bleach (hypochlorous acid) out of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ions but also oxidizes LDL into a macrophage high-uptake form, inactivates protease inhibitors, and consumes nitric oxide. These may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and add to the chronic renal lesions observed in patients with MPO-ANCA. MPO levels are influenced by genetic factors including two, MPO463 and MPO129, single nucleotide polymorphisms. The MPO 463 polymorphism has been associated with an increased risk of development of MPO-ANCA associated disease. PMID:14740428

  11. Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... disturbances, such as double vision, blurred vision, or blindness seizures, convulsions stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA, ... years and is rarely fatal. Abrupt but reversible blindness is the most dramatic complication of temporal arteritis. ...

  12. Pulmonary Fibrosis in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloé; Crestani, Bruno; Tazi, Abdellatif; Hervier, Baptiste; Adam-Marchand, Sylvain; Nunes, Hilario; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Wislez, Marie; Cadranel, Jacques; Housset, Bruno; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sève, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Abad, Sébastien; Camuset, Juliette; Bienvenu, Boris; Duruisseaux, Michaël; Hachulla, Eric; Arlet, Jean-Benoît; Hamidou, Mohammed; Mahr, Alfred; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Brun, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Philippe; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is an uncommon manifestation observed in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). While patients with PF associated with AAV seem to have a worse prognosis, these patients have been described only in case reports or small retrospective case series. In this retrospective multicenter study, we report the main features and long-term outcomes of patients with PF associated with AAV, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions. Forty-nine patients (30 men [61%]; median age at diagnosis of AAV, 68 [interquartile range, 58–73] years) with PF associated with AAV were identified. Forty (81.6%) patients had MPA and 9 (18.4%) had granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The diagnosis of PF preceded the onset of vasculitis in 22 (45%) patients. Usual interstitial pneumonia was the main radiologic pattern (n = 18, 43%). ANCA were mostly of antimyeloperoxidase specificity (88%). All patients were treated with glucocorticoids as induction therapy, combined with cyclophosphamide (CYC) (n = 36, 73.5%) or rituximab (RTX) (n = 1, 2%). Factors associated with mortality included occurrence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–34.5; p = 0.003), induction therapy with glucocorticoids alone (HR, 2.94; CI, 1.05–8.33; p = 0.04), and initial weigh loss (HR, 2.83; CI, 1.05–7.65; p = 0.041). The 3-year survival rate in patients treated with glucocorticoids alone or combined with an immunosuppressant (CYC or RTX) as induction therapy was 64% (95% CI, 41–99) and 94% (95% CI, 86–100), respectively (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 48 months [interquartile range, 14–88 mo], 18 (37%) patients died, including 11 related to respiratory insufficiency. PF is a rare manifestation of AAV with a very poor prognosis. Induction therapy with

  13. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  14. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  15. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  16. [Systemic urticarias].

    PubMed

    Hachulla, E

    2003-05-01

    Systemic urticaria remains a challenge in terms of etiology, investigation and management. Most of cases are urticarial vasculitis consequence of inflammatory injury of capillaries and postcapillary venules in the skin. If hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is a classical cause, the majority of patients have an underlying systemic disease like systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, mixed cryoglobulinemia, Still disease or cancer. Others systemic urticaria have been reported without clearly evidence of vasculitis like in primary or acquired angioedema, hereditary periodic fever syndromes and in some thyroiditis. Diagnosis needs a step to step procedure. Treatment depends the underlying disease. Some patients respond to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, some other need corticosteroids or immunosuppression. If urticarial vasculitis seems isolated in the absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, antihistamines, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, colchicine, dapsone or hydroxychloroquine must be first used. PMID:12843810

  17. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  18. Review article: liver support systems in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Rahman, T M; Hodgson, H J

    1999-10-01

    The treatment of acute hepatic failure has developed rapidly over the last 40 years, reducing morbidity and mortality from this syndrome. Whilst this has been partly attributed to significant improvements in the specialist medical management of these patients, advances in surgical techniques and pharmaceutical developments have led to the establishment of successful liver transplantation programmes, which have improved mortality significantly. This review will examine the clinical impact of alternative methods that have been used to provide extra-corporeal hepatic support. Non-biological, bio- logical and hybrid hepatic extra-corporeal support will be explored, offering a comprehensive historical overview and an appraisal of present and future advances. PMID:10540040

  19. Systemic Mastocytosis Presenting as Acute Appendicitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    A. Akbar, Syed; Raza, Shahzad; E. Denney, Jason; J. Johannesen, Eric; C. Doll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by abnormal growth and accumulation of mast cells in various organs. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common disease manifestations in this disease and can significantly impair the quality of life. Signs of GI systemic mastocytosis include steatorrhea, malabsorption, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, portal hypertension, and ascites. Acute appendicitis as a presenting feature in systemic mastocytosis has not been reported in the literature previously. In this report, we discuss the case of a female patient with systemic mastocytosis (c-KIT D816V (+)) who was admitted for right-sided acute abdominal pain. Laboratory study revealed an normal white blood cell count with eosinophilia and an elevated serum tryptase level of 23 μg/l. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed an enlarged appendix of 12 mm in diameter, with minimal wall enhancement. Laparoscopic appendectomy was performed. The appendix was found to be hyperemic and firm, and it was densely adherent to the posterior cecum, the surrounding peritoneal wall, and the overlying mesenteric fat. Pathology revealed acute appendicitis with greater than 30 mast cells per high-power field by immunoperoxidase studies with mast cell tryptase and CD117. The patient subsequently improved and was discharged home. This case is the first reported case with a histological diagnosis of acute appendicitis resulting from mast cell infiltration. Physicians should be aware of acute appendicitis as a manifestation of systemic mastocytosis. Prompt diagnosis and management may prevent potentially fatal complications of appendiceal perforation and peritonitis. PMID:23626557

  20. Cross-Sector Review of Drivers and Available 3Rs Approaches for Acute Systemic Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Seidle, Troy; Robinson, Sally; Holmes, Tom; Creton, Stuart; Prieto, Pilar; Scheel, Julia; Chlebus, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Acute systemic toxicity studies are carried out in many sectors in which synthetic chemicals are manufactured or used and are among the most criticized of all toxicology tests on both scientific and ethical grounds. A review of the drivers for acute toxicity testing within the pharmaceutical industry led to a paradigm shift whereby in vivo acute toxicity data are no longer routinely required in advance of human clinical trials. Based on this experience, the following review was undertaken to identify (1) regulatory and scientific drivers for acute toxicity testing in other industrial sectors, (2) activities aimed at replacing, reducing, or refining the use of animals, and (3) recommendations for future work in this area. PMID:20484382

  1. Neurogenic stunned myocardium - do we consider this diagnosis in patients with acute central nervous system injury and acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Mierzewska-Schmidt, Magdalena; Gawecka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM) is defined as myocardial injury and dysfunction of a sudden onset, occurring after various types of acute brain injury as a result of an imbalance in the autonomic nervous system. The typical spectrum of clinically observed abnormalities includes acute left ventricular failure, not uncommonly progressing to cardiogenic shock with hypotension that requires inotropic agents, pulmonary oedema and various arrhythmias. Commonly-seen electrocardiographic changes include: prolonged QT interval, ST segment changes, T-wave inversion, a new Q-wave or U-wave. Echocardiography shows both an impaired both systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Biochemical markers of NSM comprise metabolic acidosis and increased cardiac enzymes and markers: creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB, troponin I and B-type natriuretic peptide. The main cause of NSM is myocardial injury induced by local catecholamine release from nerve endings within the myocardium. Recently, a theory has been proposed to classify NSM as one of the stress-related cardiomyopathies, together with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, acute left ventricular failure in the critically ill, cardiomyopathy associated with pheochromacytoma and exogenous catecholamine administration. The occurrence of NSM increases the risk of life-threatening complications, death, and worsens neurologic outcome. As far as we know, treatment should generally focus on the underlying neurologic process in order to maximize neurologic recovery. Improvement in neurologic pathology leads to rapid improvement in cardiac function and its full recovery, as NSM is a fully reversible condition if the patient survives. Awareness of the existence of NSM and a deeper knowledge of its etiopathology may reduce diagnostic errors, optimise its treatment. PMID:25940334

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 are expressed in urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Tao; Guo, Zaipei; Li, Jingyi; Cao, Na

    2013-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), a member of the TNF family, has been implicated as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in many types of autoimmune and infectious diseases. However, information about TWEAK in dermatological diseases is limited. To date, no studies have investigated the roles of TWEAK in patients with urticarial vasculitis (UV). This study aimed to assess serum TWEAK levels, together with TWEAK and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) expressions of skin lesions in patients with UV. Serum TWEAK levels in patients with UV, together with patients with cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis (CLA) and healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; TWEAK and Fn14 expressions of skin lesions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that TWEAK and Fn14 were abundantly expressed in the dermal vessel wall of lesional skin in patients with UV but not healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels in the acute stage in patients with UV were significantly higher than those in the convalescent stage and healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels were elevated significantly in patients with CLA compared with those in healthy controls. Our previous study indicated that TWEAK may be an important mediator for the development of vascular inflammation in skin. In addition, we also found that TWEAK blockade substantially reduced vascular damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates in lipopolysaccharide-induced cutaneous vasculitis. Our study shows that TWEAK may be associated with the pathogenesis of UV; it is therefore suggested that TWEAK may be a potential therapeutic target for UV and other types of cutaneous vasculitis. PMID:23968277

  3. Current and emerging techniques for ANCA detection in vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Csernok, Elena; Moosig, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Detection of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) is a well-established diagnostic test used to evaluate suspected necrotizing vasculitis of small blood vessels. Conditions associated with these antibodies, collectively referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitides, include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome). The diagnostic utility of ANCA testing depends on the type of assay performed and on the clinical setting. Most laboratories worldwide use standard indirect immunofluorescence tests (IFT) to screen for ANCA and then confirm positive IFT results with antigen-specific tests for proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Developments such as automated image analysis of immunofluorescence patterns, so-called third-generation PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA ELISA, and multiplex technology have improved the detection of ANCAs. However, challenges in routine clinical practice remain, including methodological aspects of IFT performance, the diverse antigen-specific assays available, the diagnostic value of testing in clinical settings and the prognostic value of serial ANCA monitoring in the prediction of disease relapse. This Review summarizes the available data on ANCA testing, discusses the usefulness of the various ANCA assays and advises on the clinical indications for the use of ANCA testing. PMID:24890776

  4. Circovirus in Tissues of Dogs with Vasculitis and Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; McGraw, Sabrina; Zhu, Kevin; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Marks, Stanley L.; Kubiski, Steven; Gaffney, Patricia; Dela Cruz Jr, Florante N.; Wang, Chunlin; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a novel dog circovirus (DogCV) from the liver of a dog with severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, vasculitis, and granulomatous lymphadenitis. DogCV was detected by PCR in fecal samples from 19/168 (11.3%) dogs with diarrhea and 14/204 (6.9%) healthy dogs and in blood from 19/409 (3.3%) of dogs with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, fever of unknown origin, or past tick bite. Co-infection with other canine pathogens was detected for 13/19 (68%) DogCV-positive dogs with diarrhea. DogCV capsid proteins from different dogs varied by up to 8%. In situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy detected DogCV in the lymph nodes and spleens of 4 dogs with vascular compromise and histiocytic inflammation. The detection of a circovirus in tissues of dogs expands the known tropism of these viruses to a second mammalian host. Our results indicate that circovirus, alone or in co-infection with other pathogens, might contribute to illness and death in dogs. PMID:23628223

  5. Florid urticarial vasculitis heralding a flare up of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Boules, Evon; Lyon, Calum

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) and diet controlled diabetes mellitus presented with a 3-week history of slightly itchy, red plaques on both lower limbs ascending gradually to cover the trunk and arms. One week later, he developed a flare up of his UC. Routine blood tests showed modest drop in haemoglobin (122 g/L) and C reactive protein (85 mg/L). Serology was remarkable for high antiproteinase 3 (c-ANCA). Serum electrophoresis showed a mildly positive paraprotein band (γ region). Stool culture was negative. Urine analysis showed proteinuria. Skin biopsy showed features of urticarial vasculitis (UV). He underwent a flexible sigmoidoscopy after the flare up showed mildly active UC. The patient was given hydrocortisone for 7 days and then prednisolone. Both rash and UC subsided. Electrophoresis was repeated 4 weeks later showing normal pattern. Prednisolone has been gradually reduced. Although rare, UV can be considered as one of the skin manifestations of UC. PMID:25535230

  6. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  7. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH Follow-up... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 414, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  8. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ..., phone 1-800-743-3951. Electronic Access This Federal Register document is also available from the... CFR Parts 412, 413, 415, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011...

  9. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  10. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  11. Blocking Neurogenic Inflammation for the Treatment of Acute Disorders of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Turner, Renée Jade

    2013-01-01

    Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis. PMID:23819099

  12. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  13. Harnessing the immune system in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rebecca; Smyth, Mark J; Lane, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer caused by the proliferation of immature myeloid cells. The genetic abnormalities underlying AML affect signal transduction pathways, transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers. In solid tumours, it is emerging that the genetic landscape of the tumour has a direct effect on the anti-tumour immune responses and response to immunotherapeutic treatment. However, there remains little information as to whether genetic abnormalities affect anti-leukemic immune responses. This review discusses current knowledge of AML antigens and immune responses to AML with a particular focus on the role of T cells and natural killer cells. Understanding immune responses to AML has implications for the development and use of immunotherapies to treat AML patients with distinct genetic abnormalities. PMID:27247119

  14. Acute painful paraplegia in a 49-year-old man with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sorino, Claudio; Agati, Sergio; Milani, Giuseppe; Maspero, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 49-year-old man, with a 10-year history of bronchial asthma and nasal polyposis, who developed acutely painful paraplegia and paresthesias. Laboratory data showed elevated blood creatine kinase levels and myoglobinuria, which were diagnostic for rhabdomyolysis but only partially explained the neurological deficit. Electrophysiological studies revealed a sensorimotor neuropathy of multiple mononeuritis type. The patient also had leucocytosis with marked eosinophilia and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies. Bronchial biopsies showed inflammatory infiltrates with a prevalence of eosinophils. All these findings led us to diagnose eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, a systemic vasculitis with almost constant respiratory tract involvement and good response to corticosteroid treatment. This can also affect other organs including the nervous system, while muscular involvement is unusual. Some diseases deserve attention in differential diagnosis. Histology can support the diagnosis which remains essentially clinical. Steroid sparing agents/immunosuppressants are suggested for extensive disease. PMID:24980994

  15. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  16. [Clinical practice guideline for ANCA-associated vasculitis with renal involvement].

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Vanina; Fayad, Alicia; González, Gabriela; Smuclir Quevedo, Alejandra; Robaina Sindín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of systemic conditions characterized by inflammation and necrosis in small and medium vessels. AAV with different levels of disease severity could respond to different therapeutics protocols. Early diagnosis and treatment could significantly improve the outcome of the disease. The objective was to investigate the quality evidence in different therapeutical protocols proposed to AAV with renal involvement in pediatrics and adults patients and evaluate the ANCA applicability in AAV diagnosis and outcome. Using methodological search filters, we identified literature in Medline, Embase, Lilacs and Cochrane Trials Register published between 1997 and July 2015. From 4236 articles, 59 were included. The quality of evidence was assessed using the check list designed by the Cochrane Renal Group. The strength of recommendation was determinated by Levels of Evidence (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine). On the basis of current evidence, 20 recommendations were elaborated for the treatment and monitoring of patients with AAV with renal involvement in several clinical scenarios, in order to provide physicians a rational approach in daily clinical practice. PMID:26738202

  17. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Heurkens, A H; Hiemstra, P S; Lafeber, G J; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C

    1989-01-01

    IgG antibodies reactive with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were found in 19 out of 28 patients with rheumatoid vasculitis (RV), in four out of 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in seven out of 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in healthy donors. In four patients with RV who were followed longitudinally, regression of vasculitic episodes coincided with decreasing titres of anti-endothelial antibodies (AEA). Binding activity to endothelial cells was observed in intact IgG and F(ab')2 fragments of IgG. AEA activity was unrelated to antibodies against nuclear, blood group or major histocompatibility complex antigens and did not involve immune complexes. AEA activity was not specific for endothelial cells since the AEA-positive sera and the IgG fractions prepared from these sera also reacted with fibroblasts. Adsorption of positive sera and corresponding IgG fractions with endothelial cells decreased the IgG binding reactivity on both fibroblasts and endothelial cells. These findings show that RV patients have IgG-AEA, and suggest that these antibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:2805426

  18. Serum IgG antibodies to C1q in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, J J; Naff, G B

    1989-09-01

    Urticaria, angioedema, and arthritis are cardinal features of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). Considered to be an immune complex-mediated disorder, HUVS has been differentiated from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), based on its clinical manifestations and the C1q precipitin (C1q-p) reaction, which is manifested as gel precipitation of C1q by a small percentage of HUVS IgG molecules. This phenomenon has been attributed to an Fc region abnormality, and the responsible IgG molecules are said to possess C1q-p activity. We purified IgG from 4 HUVS patients and confirmed that HUVS IgG contains C1q binding activity. F(ab')2 fragments from these patients also bound to C1q, as measured by 2 different C1q binding methods at physiologic ionic strength; HUVS IgG Fc fragments did not bind to C1q. Preincubation of HUVS F(ab')2 fragments with antibody to human F(ab')2 prevented subsequent binding to C1q. We conclude that IgG antibodies to C1q are present in HUVS serum, and it is likely that these antibodies are C1q-p. Because the clinical manifestations of HUVS and the presence of anti-C1q antibodies have been described in patients with SLE, our findings support the concept that HUVS is an autoimmune syndrome related to SLE. PMID:2528353

  19. [Primary Sjögren's syndrome with cutaneous vasculitis manifested as leg ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Souza, Sonia Cristina de Magalhães; Kuruma, Katia Akemi Miyazato; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de; Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Figueiredo, Camille Pinto; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Gonçalves, Célio Rodrigues; Borges, Cláudia Teresa Lobato

    2004-04-01

    Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease with a large spectrum of clinical manifestations extending from an organ-specific involvement to a systemic process. The skin is affected quite commonly and the estimated frequency of inflammatory vascular lesions is from 20% to 30%. Two specific, clinically recognizable forms of cutaneous vasculitis predominate, palpable purpura and chronic urticaria, but erythema multiforme, erythema perstans, erythema nodosum, erithematous macules and subcutaneous nodules have also been described. The authors report the case of a 46-year-old female patient, diagnosed as primary SS, who presented ocular and oral symptoms, poliarthritis and laboratory alterations (with a positive ANA, anti-SSA, rheumatoid factor, and hypergammaglobulinemia). Ten years after the diagnosis, she presented leg ulcers. The biopsy confirmed the presence of vasculitic process, and the ulcers improved rapidly after the treatment with endovenous cyclophosphamide. There are only two reports of chronic ulceration of the legs as cutaneous manifestation of SS. The authors stress the importance of considering ulcers in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous involvement of primary SS. PMID:21503546

  20. Presumed reactive polyarthritis and granulomatous vasculitis in a Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla).

    PubMed

    MacLean, Robert; Beaufrère, Hugues; Heggem-Perry, Brittany; Field, Cara; Garner, Michael

    2013-12-01

    A 1.5-year-old female Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was presented and managed for a polyarthritis of the intertarsal and tarsophalangeal articulations. Results of aerobic bacterial cultures, Mycoplasma species culture, and polymerase chain reaction testing of articular fluid did not identify any causative organisms. Results of radiographs and cytologic examination of articular fluid were consistent with an inflammatory, nonerosive polyarthritis. The arthritis did not improve with systemic anti-inflammatory and antibiotic treatment and with joint lavage. A large necrotic granulomatous mass was detected on the right shoulder area from which Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species were isolated as opportunistic pathogens. Two days after surgical resection of the mass, the distal polyarthritis resolved. Histopathologic examination of the mass was consistent with granulomatous vasculitis with abscess formation of unknown origin. In this crane, the unresponsiveness to standard therapy, the presence of an infected and inflammatory mass, and the resolution of the polyarthritis after the resection of the mass strongly supported a diagnosis of reactive immune-mediated nonerosive polyarthritis. Analysis of this case suggests that immune-mediated idiopathic arthritis should be a differential diagnosis of distal polyarthritis in cranes and that an inciting source remote from the joints should be investigated in case of lack of response to standard therapy. PMID:24640933

  1. Systemic corticosteroids in acute chest syndrome: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Folasade; Heeney, Matthew M; Koumbourlis, Anastassios C

    2014-03-01

    Acute chest syndrome(ACS) is the most common pulmonary complication of sickle cell disease (SCD), the second most common cause of hospitalization and the primary cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Its highest prevalence is in early childhood. The pathogenesis of ACS is unknown but many predisposing conditions and mechanisms have been implicated including infections, pulmonary fat embolism, asthma and ischemic reperfusion injury. These conditions are associated with inflammation and therefore, the use of corticosteroids has been advocated because of their anti-inflammatory properties. Although, significant benefits from their use have been shown, there is great reluctance in using them because of reports of serious adverse effects, such as readmission to the hospital due rebound pain crisis, stroke, renal infarction, coma and even death. The current article reviews the evidence in favor and against the use of corticosteroids in ACS. Emphasis is given on the potential benefits vs. risks among the different types of corticosteroids, the importance of the dosing regimen and the role of underlying co-morbidities. PMID:24268617

  2. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in a Patient with Retinal Vasculitis and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Lígia; Rothwell, Renata; Brandão, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of a 47-year-old woman with Crohn's disease (CD) who presented with retinal vasculitis and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) during remission. The patient complained of sudden painless visual loss in her left eye (OS). Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/20 in the right eye and hand movements in OS. Ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography of OS showed signs of nonischemic CRVO and extensive vasculitis. She was treated with oral prednisolone, mercaptopurine, and intravitreal bevacizumab in OS. After 1 month of treatment, VA of OS improved to 5/10 and after 1 year it was 10/10 with complete resolution of retinal vasculitis and nonischemic CRVO. PMID:25506451

  3. A Fatal Case of “Bullous Erysipelas-like” Pseudomonas Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of “bullous erysipelas-like” septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  4. Mouse models of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Ooi, Joshua D; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation of blood vessels (vasculitis) results from many pathological processes and is found in many different diseases. However, in most situations, the pathological processes inducing vasculitis are unknown. The discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) in the 1980s opened the door for studies that eventually led to the description of a new previously undescribed disease, ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Unravelling the immunopathogenesis of this new disease resulted largely from the development of animal models. The major breakthroughs were the description of ANCA, its association with small vessel vasculitis and the discovery of its target autoantigens (myeloperoxidase and Proteinase 3). Three major disease syndromes comprise the AAVs, microscopic polyangiitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Recent human studies suggest that proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase associated vasculitis are two separate but related diseases. The ability to induce murine autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase including ANCA (with the same immune staining patterns as human ANCA) and the capacity of this anti-myeloperoxidase autoimmunity to induce disease with many of the characteristic features of human AAV are well developed. However, the development of animal models of anti-proteinase 3 ANCA and EGPA is much less well developed. Animal models are important in understanding the human disease and in particular in defining potential therapeutic targets and in early stage therapeutic testing of potential drugs. Clearly the relevance of animal models depends on how closely they mimic human diseases. The current status of animal models of vasculitis will be described in detail with reference to these criteria. PMID:25777754

  5. Connective tissue disorders associated with vasculitis and vaso-occlusive disease of the hand.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Brett; Rizzo, Marco; Moran, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Hand ischemia caused by vasculitis is a secondary finding in many autoimmune processes. Many of these autoimmune diseases are managed primarily with medications that can prevent the development of occlusive disease, tissue ischemia, and tissue loss. Unfortunately several disease conditions can be recalcitrant to medical management and can result in ischemic changes within the hand, which may require operative intervention. This article briefly reviews the major connective tissue disorders associated with vasculitis and vaso-occlusive disease of the hand, including scleroderma, lupus, and Buerger disease, and their surgical treatment. PMID:25455357

  6. A case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with a high serum level of rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Atsuko; Murata, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Atsuko; Ogawa, Eisaku; Uhara, Hisashi; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with an elevated serum rheumatoid factor level. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis is an immune complex-mediated disease characterised by urticarial eruptions. High levels of rheumatoid factor may be associated with hypocomplementaemia due to the consumption of complement, because the rheumatoid factor can form immune complexes with immunoglobulin. It is necessary to pay attention to the amounts of complement in cases of urticarial eruptions with elevated rheumatoid factor level. The eruptions were relieved with a combination of prednisolone and colchicine. PMID:23905981

  7. Inflammatory myositis complicating hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis despite on-going immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chew, Gary Y J; Gatenby, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    We present a patient with previously diagnosed hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, with skin, lung, and renal involvement, who presented with congestive cardiac failure. During the course of her hospitalization, she was also found to have profound proximal muscle weakness in both upper and lower limbs associated with raised creatinine kinase levels. A muscle biopsy was performed, which demonstrated evidence of an inflammatory myositis with vasculitis, which had returned despite on-going immunosuppression. This occurrence of a new autoimmune disease may well be an example of the "waste disposal" hypothesis. PMID:16944070

  8. “Missing clot” during mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke using Solitaire stent retrieval system

    PubMed Central

    Huded, Vikram; Nambiar, Vivek; De Souza, Romnesh; Bohra, Vikram; Ramankutty, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Stent retrieval system is an established treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion. Here, we describe a complication which occurred during mechanical thrombectomy in three cases where the clot dislodged during retrieval. There was a possibility of the clot getting reinjected into the artery with possible dire consequences. PMID:27293350

  9. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  10. Acute Bilateral Tuberculous Pneumonia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rama; Bhat, Nitin; D’Souza, Savio; Chenchaiah, Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a common infection associated with immunocompromised state. It usually presents with fibrosis or fibrocavitary lesions in the lung. We report a case of bilateral tuberculous pneumonia of acute presentation in a young lady who was being treated for systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27437280

  11. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  12. Nicotine-induced acute hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic system in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Guo, Jing; Guo, Aike; Li, Yan

    2016-09-22

    Short-term exposure to nicotine induces positive effects in mice, monkeys and humans, including mild euphoria, hyperactivity, and enhanced cognition. However, the underlying neural basis and molecular mechanisms for these effects remain poorly understood. Here, using a video recording system, we find that acute nicotine administration induces locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila, similar to observations made in higher model organisms. Suppressing dopaminergic neurons or down-regulating dopamine 1-like receptor (DopR) abolishes this acute nicotine response, but surprisingly, does so only in male flies. Using a GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) approach, we show that dopaminergic neurons possess potential synaptic connections with acetylcholinergic neurons in wide regions of the brain. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurons are widely activated upon nicotine perfusion in both sexes, while the response curve differs significantly between the sexes. Moreover, knockdown of the β1 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in dopaminergic neurons abolishes the acute nicotine response only in male flies, while panneural knock-down occurs in both sexes. Taken together, our results reveal that in fruit flies, dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine-induced acute locomotor hyperactivity in a sexually dimorphic manner, and Drosophila β1 nAChR subunit plays a crucial role in this nicotine response. These findings provide important insights into the molecular and neural basis of acute nicotine effects, and the underlying mechanisms may play conserved roles across species. PMID:27365175

  13. Acute Scrotal Swelling in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Sunny; Mohan, Muhunthan; Jennings, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis characterized classically by purpura, arthritis and abdominal pain. Epididymitis/orchitis is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. Testicular or scrotal involvement has been reported in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and must be distinguished from testicular torsion. We report a case of a 5 year old boy diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with acute scrotal swelling. He was managed successfully with conservative approach. The history, clinical examination findings and scrotal ultrasound evaluation should suffice to make the correct diagnosis and avoid surgery. Steroid treatment and/or antibiotics appeared to be effective for this condition. PMID:27169017

  14. Acute Scrotal Swelling in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sunny; Mohan, Muhunthan; Jennings, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis characterized classically by purpura, arthritis and abdominal pain. Epididymitis/orchitis is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. Testicular or scrotal involvement has been reported in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and must be distinguished from testicular torsion. We report a case of a 5 year old boy diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with acute scrotal swelling. He was managed successfully with conservative approach. The history, clinical examination findings and scrotal ultrasound evaluation should suffice to make the correct diagnosis and avoid surgery. Steroid treatment and/or antibiotics appeared to be effective for this condition. PMID:27169017

  15. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  16. Systemic inflammation induces acute working memory deficits in the primed brain: relevance for delirium

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Carol; Sanderson, David J.; Barkus, Chris; Deacon, Robert M.J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.; Cunningham, Colm

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is an acute, severe neuropsychiatric syndrome, characterized by cognitive deficits, that is highly prevalent in aging and dementia and is frequently precipitated by peripheral infections. Delirium is poorly understood and the lack of biologically relevant animal models has limited basic research. Here we hypothesized that synaptic loss and accompanying microglial priming during chronic neurodegeneration in the ME7 mouse model of prion disease predisposes these animals to acute dysfunction in the region of prior pathology upon systemic inflammatory activation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) induced acute and transient working memory deficits in ME7 animals on a novel T-maze task, but did not do so in normal animals. LPS-treated ME7 animals showed heightened and prolonged transcription of inflammatory mediators in the central nervous system (CNS), compared with LPS-treated normal animals, despite having equivalent levels of circulating cytokines. The demonstration that prior synaptic loss and microglial priming are predisposing factors for acute cognitive impairments induced by systemic inflammation suggests an important animal model with which to study aspects of delirium during dementia. PMID:20471138

  17. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  18. Different pathways leading to cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, C; Seeliger, S; Schönlau, F; Roth, J; Hallmann, R; Luger, T A; Sorg, C; Kolde, G

    2001-12-01

    To investigate the pathomechanisms of leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LcV) we compared mouse models of LcV with non-vasculitic irritant contact dermatitis (ICD). Criteria for LcV as met by the immune complex-mediated Arthus reaction (Art-r) were also fulfilled by the localized Shwartzman reaction (Shw-r) and by cutaneous Loxoscelism (Lox) (injection of venom from Loxosceles reclusa containing sphingomyelinase D). After depletion of PMN (by gamma-irradiation) vessel damage could not be elicited in these models, distinguishing them from models of direct endothelial insult (necrotizing ICD). Depletion of complement could only delay, but not inhibit the Art-r, and did not change ICD, Lox or the Shw-r. The Shw-r exclusively revealed a sustained local expression of vascular adhesion molecules for 24 h in the preparatory phase (LPS s.c.), not observed in the Art-r, in Lox or ICD. Subsequent challenge with LPS i.p. was associated with upregulation of Mac-1 and ICAM-1 on PMN, but not of VLA-4 or LFA-1 (FACS analysis). Cytokines which were able to replace LPS in priming for LcV in the Shw-r (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) also induced sustained expression of adhesion molecules, whereas IL-12 and IFN-gamma did neither. Neutralizing IL-12 or IFN-gamma also inhibited neither LcV nor sustained expression of adhesion molecules, whereas anti-TNF-alpha inhibited both. Anti-TNF-alpha had no marked inhibitory effects in the Art-r, in Lox or ICD. Combined (but not separate) neutralization of both E-selectin and VCAM-1 by antibodies suppressed LcV independent from reducing influx of PMN, proving that their sustained expression is decisive for the Shw-r and interferes with normal diapedesis. Since Loxosceles venom is known to dysregulate diapedesis and degranulation of PMN in vitro, since adherent immune complexes activate PMN at the vessel wall, and since adhesion molecules are dysregulated in the Shw-r, we suggest that LcV develops when activation of PMN coincides with vascular alterations

  19. Rapid Growth of Lung Nodules due to Combined Pulmonary Vasculitis, Silicoanthracosis, and Chondrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Oliver; Kolios, Antonios G. A.; Weder, Walter; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Silicoanthracosis is a pneumoconiosis due to occupational inhalation of silica and carbon dusts. Clinically, it can be associated with vasculitis or rheumatoid arthritis. In association with these diseases, silicoanthracosis can present within the lung with multiple pulmonary nodules which, as a differential diagnosis, can mimic metastatic disease or multiple abscesses. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 62-year old former pit worker with pulmonary nodules, chondrocalcinosis due to calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD), and a history of renal cancer. Within a short period of time, pulmonary nodules grew rapidly. Thoracoscopically, the resected lung specimen revealed silicoanthracosis associated with small-to-medium-size vasculitis in the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (c-ANCA). Conclusion. Pulmonary silicoanthracotic lesions on the base of ANCA-associated vasculitis and CPPD arthritis can rapidly grow. A mutual correlation between silicoanthracosis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and CPPD seems possible. Apart from this, consideration of metastatic disease should be obligatory in patients with a history of cancer at the same time being immunosuppressed. PMID:27478398

  20. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  1. Acute and prolonged complement activation in the central nervous system during herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Charlotta E; Studahl, Marie; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-06-15

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is characterized by a pronounced inflammatory activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated the acute and prolonged complement system activity in HSE patients, by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for numerous complement components (C). We found increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of C3a, C3b, C5 and C5a in HSE patients compared with healthy controls. C3a and C5a concentrations remained increased also compared with patient controls. Our results conclude that the complement system is activated in CNS during HSE in the acute phase, and interestingly also in later stages supporting previous reports of prolonged inflammation. PMID:27235358

  2. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis. PMID:23628898

  3. Effect of acute systemic hypoxia on human cutaneous microcirculation and endothelial, sympathetic and myogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Paparde, Artūrs; Plakane, Līga; Circenis, Kristaps; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2015-11-01

    The regulation of cutaneous vascular tone impacts vascular vasomotion and blood volume distribution as a challenge to hypoxia, but the regulatory mechanisms yet remain poorly understood. A skin has a very compliant circulation, an increase in skin blood flow results in large peripheral displacement of blood volume, which could be controlled by local and systemic regulatory factors. The aim of this study was to determine the acute systemic hypoxia influence on blood flow in skin, local regulatory mechanism fluctuations and changes of systemic hemodynamic parameters. Healthy subjects (n=11; 24.9±3.7years old) participated in this study and procedures were performed in siting position. After 20min of acclimatization 15min of basal resting period in normoxia (pO2=21%) was recorded, followed by 20min in acute systemic hypoxia (pO2=12%), and after 15min of recovery period in normoxia (pO2=21%). HRV was used to evaluate autonomic nervous system activity to heart from systemic hemodynamic parameters which continuously evaluated cardiac output, total peripheral resistance and mean arterial blood pressure. Regional blood flow was evaluated by venous occlusion plethysmography and skin blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry. To evaluate local factor influences to cutaneous circulation wavelet analysis was used; fluctuations in the frequency intervals of 0.0095-0.021, 0.021-0.052, and 0.052-0.145Hz correspondingly represent endothelial, sympathetic, and myogenic activities. Our results from HRV data suggest that acute systemic hypoxia causes statistically significant increase of sympathetic (LF/HF; N1=0.46±0.25 vs. H=0.67±0.36; P=0.027) and decrease of parasympathetic (RMSSD; 80.0±43.1 vs. H=69.9±40.4, ms; P=0.009) outflow to heart. Acute hypoxia causes statistically significant increase of heart rate (RR interval; N1=960.3±174.5 vs. H=864.7±134.6, ms; P=0.001) and cardiac output (CO; N1=5.4 (5.2; 7.9) vs. H=6.7±1.4, l/min; P=0.020). Regional blood flow and vascular

  4. Nomenclature and classification of vasculitis: lessons learned from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis)

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J C

    2011-01-01

    Names influence how something is perceived. Diagnostic terms (diagnoses) are the names of diseases that are usually derived either from some distinctive characteristic of the disease or include an eponym recognizing someone who elucidated the disease. No matter how logical and appropriate a name may be, if it is not usable and used it is of no lasting value. This brief commentary focuses on the nomenclature of systemic vasculitides, and uses as a prime example Wegener's granulomatosis, which has been renamed recently ‘granulomatosis with polyangiitis’, in part because of concerns about the suitability of Friedrich Wegener as the source of an eponym. The most distinctive pathological feature of Wegener's granulomatosis is multi-focal necrotizing inflammation that has long been called granulomatosis. The systemic variant of Wegener's granulomatosis also is characterized by inflammation in many different vessels or different types, i.e. polyangiitis. Thus, granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a very appropriate alternative term for Wegener's granulomatosis. This term also is in accord with the name for a closely related vasculitis, i.e. microscopic polyangiitis. Terms that indicate aetiology and pathogenesis, when known, are useful to include in names for diseases (diagnoses). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) or proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) are implicated in the cause of granulomatosis with polyangiitis and thus also should be specified in the diagnosis (e.g. PR3-ANCA-positive granulomatosis with polyangiitis or MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis). As our understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and aetiology of vasculitides change over time, the names and approaches for diagnosing these diseases will change accordingly. PMID:21447122

  5. The Innate Immune System in Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amanda S.; Mansbridge, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: This review article provides an overview of the critical roles of the innate immune system to wound healing. It explores aspects of dysregulation of individual innate immune elements known to compromise wound repair and promote nonhealing wounds. Understanding the key mechanisms whereby wound healing fails will provide seed concepts for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Recent Advances: Our understanding of the complex interactions of the innate immune system in wound healing has significantly improved, particularly in our understanding of the role of antimicrobials and peptides and the nature of the switch from inflammatory to reparative processes. This takes place against an emerging understanding of the relationship between human cells and commensal bacteria in the skin. Critical Issues: It is well established and accepted that early local inflammatory mediators in the wound bed function as an immunological vehicle to facilitate immune cell infiltration and microbial clearance upon injury to the skin barrier. Both impaired and excessive innate immune responses can promote nonhealing wounds. It appears that the switch from the inflammatory to the proliferative phase is tightly regulated and mediated, at least in part, by a change in macrophages. Defining the factors that initiate the switch in such macrophage phenotypes and functions is the subject of multiple investigations. Future Directions: The review highlights processes that may be useful targets for further investigation, particularly the switch from M1 to M2 macrophages that appears to be critical as dysregulation of this switch occurs during defective wound healing. PMID:26862464

  6. The diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates in muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Voskuyl, A.; van Duinen, S. G; Zwinderman, A.; Breedveld, F.; Hazes, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates (PVI) in randomly obtained muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis (RV).
METHODS—The number and size of PVIs, defined as the presence of mononuclear or polymorphonuclear cells around ⩾ 50% of the circumference of a vessel wall, as well as the presence of fibrinoid necrosis were determined in frozen sections of muscle samples of RV patients with histologically confirmed vasculitis in fixed muscle tissue (n=12). The findings were compared with those observed in frozen sections of muscle biopsy specimens of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not suspected of vasculitis (n=14) and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) (n=11). The presence of PVIs and of fibrinoid necrosis were sought in four frozen sections of the muscle biopsy specimen.
RESULTS—PVIs were observed in 75% of the RV patients, which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the frequency found in RA (14%) or OA (18%) patients. PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers were found in 67% of the RV patients and in none of the RA and OA patients (p < 0.05). Fibrinoid necrosis was found in least one of four frozen section in 33% of the RV patients. There was a good intra-observer and inter-observer concordance on the presence of fibrinoid necrosis and of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers.
CONCLUSIONS—The assessment of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers in a muscle biopsy specimen is a specific and reliable test in discriminating RV from RA without vasculitis. The demonstration in muscle of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers is more sensitive than that of fibrinoid necrosis in the diagnosis of RV.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; vasculitis; diagnosis; histology; perivascular infiltrates PMID:9613342

  7. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  8. Acute Lyme Neuroborreliosis With Transient Hemiparesis and Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Lienhard, Reto; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Erard, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Nervous system involvement in Lyme disease often mimics other conditions and thus represents a diagnostic challenge, especially in an emergency department setting. We report a case of a female teenager presenting with sudden-onset aphasia and transient right-sided faciobrachial hemiplegia, along with headache and agitation. Ischemia, vasculitis, or another structural lesion was excluded by brain imaging. Toxicologic evaluation results were negative. Cerebral perfusion computed tomography and electroencephalography showed left parietotemporal brain dysfunction. Lumbar puncture result, although atypical, suggested bacterial infection and intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated. Finally, microbiological cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed Lyme neuroborreliosis, showing specific intrathecal antibody production and high level of C-X-C motif chemokine 13. The patient rapidly recovered. To our knowledge, this report for the first time illustrates that acute-onset language and motor symptoms may be directly related to Lyme neuroborreliosis. Neuroborreliosis may mimic other acute neurologic events such as stroke and should be taken into diagnostic consideration even in the absence of classic symptoms and evolution. PMID:25728308

  9. Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children: a concise narrative review.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Elisabetta; Rizzi, Mattia; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Garzoni, Luca; Bianchetti, Mario G; Bettinelli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children is an uncommon but likely underestimated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The condition typically affects infants 6-24 months of age with a history of recent respiratory illness with or without course of antibiotics. The diagnosis is made in children, mostly nontoxic in appearance, presenting with nonpruritic, large, round, red to purpuric plaques predominantly over the cheeks, ears, and extremities, with relative sparing of the trunk, often with a target-like appearance, and edema of the distal extremities, ears, and face that is mostly non-pitting, indurative, and tender. In boys, the lesions sometimes involve the scrotum and, more rarely, the penis. Fever, typically of low grade, is often present. Involvement of body systems other than skin is uncommon, and spontaneous recovery usually occurs within 6-21 days without sequelae. In this condition, laboratory tests are non-contributory: total blood cell count is often normal, although leukocytosis and thrombocytosis are sometimes found, clotting studies are normal, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein test are normal or slightly elevated, complement level is normal, autoantibodies are absent, and urinalysis is usually normal. Experienced physicians rapidly consider the possible diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema when presented with a nontoxic young child having large targetoid purpuric lesions and indurative swelling, which is non-pitting in character, and make the diagnosis either on the basis of clinical findings alone or supported by a skin biopsy study. PMID:21674141

  10. [Acute adverse effects in transfusion. Proposals for the hemosurveillance system].

    PubMed

    Baptista González, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    The management model based on risk prevention has become a major influence in shaping policies for transfusion safety. There are approximately sixty interactions between the health worker and the patient during the transfusion process,representing the number of times where you have the opportunity to make a mistake.We present an analysis of the weaknesses of the National Blood System, with particular attention to the haemovigilance donor and patient. The proposals include the implementation of the National Blood containing the need to establish from the National Blood Safety, significant changes in the regulatory framework and the internal regulations of the Ministry of Health, the CNTS and COFEPRIS. Is required to promote and coordinate the collection of accurate information from the committees of transfusion medicine, which will be accompanied by an initial diagnosis from the National Survey of Blood. Requires notice to other forms of funding to ensure the viability of the projects operating blood bank. Finally, as a strategic resource, the blood is of public, so access should not be restricted. PMID:23435081

  11. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine. PMID:26409801

  12. Proteinase 3 on apoptotic cells disrupts immune silencing in autoimmune vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Arnaud; Martin, Katherine R.; Bonnefoy, Francis; Saas, Philippe; Mocek, Julie; Alkan, Manal; Terrier, Benjamin; Kerstein, Anja; Tamassia, Nicola; Satyanarayanan, Senthil Kumaran; Ariel, Amiram; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Guillevin, Loïc; Cassatella, Marco A.; Mueller, Antje; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Lamprecht, Peter; Mouthon, Luc; Perruche, Sylvain; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that is associated with granulomatous inflammation and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We previously determined that PR3 on the surface of apoptotic neutrophils interferes with induction of antiinflammatory mechanisms following phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that enzymatically active membrane-associated PR3 on apoptotic cells triggered secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including granulocyte CSF (G-CSF) and chemokines. This response required the IL-1R1/MyD88 signaling pathway and was dependent on the synthesis of NO, as macrophages from animals lacking these pathways did not exhibit a PR3-associated proinflammatory response. The PR3-induced microenvironment facilitated recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), and neutrophils, which were observed in close proximity within granulomatous lesions in the lungs of GPA patients. In different murine models of apoptotic cell injection, the PR3-induced microenvironment instructed pDC-driven Th9/Th2 cell generation. Concomitant injection of anti-PR3 ANCAs with PR3-expressing apoptotic cells induced a Th17 response, revealing a GPA-specific mechanism of immune polarization. Accordingly, circulating CD4+ T cells from GPA patients had a skewed distribution of Th9/Th2/Th17. These results reveal that PR3 disrupts immune silencing associated with clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and provide insight into how PR3 and PR3-targeting ANCAs promote GPA pathophysiology. PMID:26436651

  13. Detection of Anti-Pentraxin-3 Autoantibodies in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Guilpain, Philippe; Jeannin, Pascale; Pignon, Pascale; Blanchard, Simon; Garo, Erwan; Jaillon, Sébastien; Chevailler, Alain; Renier, Gilles; Puéchal, Xavier; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Delneste, Yves; Augusto, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), in common with myeloperoxidase and proteinase 3, is stored in human neutrophil granules and is expressed on apoptotic neutrophil surface. We therefore investigated the presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies (aAbs) in the sera of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients. Methods Presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies was analysed by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 150 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), and in sera of 227 healthy subjects (HS), 40 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and 25 giant cell arteritis patients (GCA). Using indirect immunofluorescence on fixed human neutrophils, we also analyzed the staining pattern associated with the presence of anti-PTX3 aAbs. Results Anti-PTX3 aAbs were detected in 56 of 150 (37.3%) of the AAV patients (versus 12 of 227 (5.3%) of HS, p<0.001) and, interestingly, in 7 of 14 MPO and PR3 ANCA negative AAV patients. Moreover, by indirect immunofluorescence on fixed neutrophils, anti-PTX3 aAbs gave rise to a specific cytoplasmic fluorescence pattern distinct from the classical cytoplasmic (c-ANCA), perinuclear (p-ANCA), and atypical (a-ANCA) pattern. Anti-PTX3 aAbs levels were higher in patients with active AAV as compared to patients with inactive disease. Conclusion Our work suggests that PTX3 is as a novel ANCA antigen. Anti-PTX3 aAbs appear thus as a promising novel biomarker in the diagnosis of AAV, including in patients without detectable MPO and PR3 ANCA. PMID:26797217

  14. Proteinase 3 on apoptotic cells disrupts immune silencing in autoimmune vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Millet, Arnaud; Martin, Katherine R; Bonnefoy, Francis; Saas, Philippe; Mocek, Julie; Alkan, Manal; Terrier, Benjamin; Kerstein, Anja; Tamassia, Nicola; Satyanarayanan, Senthil Kumaran; Ariel, Amiram; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Guillevin, Loïc; Cassatella, Marco A; Mueller, Antje; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Lamprecht, Peter; Mouthon, Luc; Perruche, Sylvain; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that is associated with granulomatous inflammation and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We previously determined that PR3 on the surface of apoptotic neutrophils interferes with induction of antiinflammatory mechanisms following phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that enzymatically active membrane-associated PR3 on apoptotic cells triggered secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including granulocyte CSF (G-CSF) and chemokines. This response required the IL-1R1/MyD88 signaling pathway and was dependent on the synthesis of NO, as macrophages from animals lacking these pathways did not exhibit a PR3-associated proinflammatory response. The PR3-induced microenvironment facilitated recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), and neutrophils, which were observed in close proximity within granulomatous lesions in the lungs of GPA patients. In different murine models of apoptotic cell injection, the PR3-induced microenvironment instructed pDC-driven Th9/Th2 cell generation. Concomitant injection of anti-PR3 ANCAs with PR3-expressing apoptotic cells induced a Th17 response, revealing a GPA-specific mechanism of immune polarization. Accordingly, circulating CD4+ T cells from GPA patients had a skewed distribution of Th9/Th2/Th17. These results reveal that PR3 disrupts immune silencing associated with clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and provide insight into how PR3 and PR3-targeting ANCAs promote GPA pathophysiology. PMID:26436651

  15. Topical versus Systemic Antibiotics in the Treatment of Acute Superficial Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Belcon, Michael C.

    1979-01-01

    Use of antibiotics in some superficial skin infections is examined. The choice of a route of administration is dependent on a number of factors, including the site and extent of skin lesions, frequency of recurrence, and clinical and immunological state of the host. However, the consensus of various studies on the subject seem to indicate a preference for the systemic route in acute infectious dermatoses. PMID:423278

  16. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as acute lupus pneumonitis in a young female

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, B; Chatterjee, A; Maiti, A; Debnath, NB

    2015-01-01

    Acute lupus pneumonitis is a rare initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report a 19-year-old female presenting with fever and recurrent hemoptysis with radiological evidence of parenchymal lung involvement with mild pleural effusion. Subsequent development of malar and discoid rash with anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA positivity clinched the diagnosis. Her clinical signs and symptoms resolved with a course of intravenous pulse methyl-prednisolone along with radiological resolution. PMID:25766350

  18. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  19. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Torkaman, Ali; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Mokhatri, Tahmineh; Haghighi, Mohammad Hossein Shabanpour; Monshizadeh, Siamak; Taraz, Hamid; Hasanvand, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH), constant and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71%) were male and four (14.28%) were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments. PMID:26894217

  20. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity.

  1. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: an acute manifestation of systemic lupus erythematous.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dexter Yak Seng; Ong, Yin Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Stroke mimickers are common, and they represent a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. Many, like posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), are easily reversible. The manifestation of PRES is characterised by headaches, convulsions, altered mental functioning and blindness. In most cases, computed tomography of the brain will show hypodense lesions in the parieto-occpitial lobe, which only further confounds the physician. Although this syndrome is uncommon, prompt and accurate recognition allows early treatment, which has been shown to produce favourable outcomes. Herein, we report the case of a 54-year-old woman, who presented with PRES, as an acute manifestation of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and lupus nephritis. The patient was initially thought to be experiencing an ischaemic stroke, but the diagnosis was later changed. On management of her underlying condition, her symptoms resolved. PRES should be recognised as an acute emergency manifestation of SLE. It should not be mistaken for an ischaemic stroke as inappropriate treatment could have adverse outcomes. PMID:24068069

  3. Renin-angiotensin system and its role in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P X; Han, C H; Zhou, F J; Li, L; Zhang, H M; Liu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential to sustain life, but at a high partial pressure oxygen may cause toxicity to the human body. These injuries to the lung are known as hyperoxic acute lung injury [HALI]). To date, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the pathogenesis of HALI, for which some hypotheses have been proposed. Accumulating evidence indicates that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of some lung diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and HALI. In this review, we briefly introduce the classic RAS, local (tissue) RAS and intracellular RAS, and we summarize findings on the relationship between local/classic RAS and HALI. The importance--and ambiguity--of the results of these studies indicate a need for further investigations of the RAS and its role in the patho- genesis of HALI. PMID:27416692

  4. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome in an 8-year-old Boy: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Al Mosawi, Zakiya Saleh Adnan; Al Hermi, Badriya Ebrahim Ahmed

    2013-07-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is an immune complex-mediated disease of unknown etiology. The clinical course is characterized by urticaria, conjunctivitis, joint pain, and hypocomplementemia. We here report a case of a child with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome that progressed to nephritis. Renal biopsy was consistent with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with diffuse subendothelial immune deposits. He responded well to a combination of steroid and mofetil micofenolate. PMID:23904922

  5. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Verheij, Theo J.M.; Sachs, Alfred P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. Methods: We conducted a block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial at 54 primary care practices (68 family physicians) in the Netherlands between Dec. 30, 2008, and Apr. 28, 2011. Adult patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis were randomly assigned to receive either prednisolone 30 mg/d or placebo for 7 days and asked to complete a symptom diary for 14 days. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7. Results: Of the 185 patients included in the trial (93 in the treatment group, 92 in the placebo group), 2 withdrew from the study and 9 were excluded from the primary analysis because of incomplete symptom reporting. The remaining 174 patients (88 in the treatment group, 86 in the placebo group) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The proportions of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7 were 62.5% (55/88) in the prednisolone group and 55.8% (48/86) in the placebo group (absolute risk difference 6.7%, 95% confidence interval −7.9% to 21.2%). The groups were similar with regard to the decrease over time in the proportion of patients with total symptoms (combined symptoms of runny nose, postnasal discharge, nasal congestion, cough and facial pain) and health-related quality of life. Adverse events were mild and did not differ significantly between the groups. Interpretation: Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy had no clinically relevant beneficial effects among patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Netherlands Trial Register

  6. Fatality due to acute systemic fluoride poisoning following a hydrofluoric acid skin burn.

    PubMed

    Tepperman, P B

    1980-10-01

    Reports indicate that death due to hydrofluoric acid exposure is usually the result of inhalation of vapor causing pulmonary edema and fluoride poisoning. Absorption via the skin route of fluoride ion sufficient to cause serious systemic problems and even death has rarely been reported. A fatality resulting from a severe facial burn, which produced acute systemic fluoride poisoning with profound hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia, is presented. The importance of proper personal protective equipment as well as the immediate initiation of first aid and appropriate medical measures, including the monitoring and replacement of serum calcium and magnesium, are emphasized. PMID:7431138

  7. Influence of the acute alcoholism on the phagocytic function of the mononuclear phagocytic system

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, KR; Petroianu, A; Alberti, LR

    2011-01-01

    Rationale:Alcoholics are more likely to have infections, mainly in the respiratory system. Alcohol seems to inhibit the immune system. Despite the extensive literature related to alcoholism, data related to the immune system are still not conclusive. Objective: The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of acute alcohol intake on colloid distribution in the organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Methods and Results: Thirteen male Swiss mice were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 5) – control, and Group 2 (n = 8) – animals that received 0.5 ml ethanol 50%, 30 minutes before the experiment. Colloidal sulphur labeled with ⁸⁸mTc was used to evaluate colloid distribution in the liver, spleen and lungs. Colloid clearance was assessed as well. A gamma camera was used to measure the radioactivity of these organs and of a blood clot. No difference was found in the presence of colloid in the organs of both groups. The liver showed the highest phagocytic intake, followed by the spleen and lungs (p = 0.021 for Group 1 and p = 0.003 for Group 2). A minimum amount of radiation remained in the blood of both groups. Discussion: According to the experiential conditions of this work, acute ingestion of alcohol did not interfere with the phagocytic function of the mononuclear phagocyte system in mice. PMID:22514578

  8. Membranous nephropathy with crescents associated with levamisole-induced MPO-ANCA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Madhrira, Machaiah; Bracamonte, Erika; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy

    2016-07-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is the most common cause of crescentic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Levamisole used as an adulterant in cocaine is increasingly recognized as a cause of AAV. We report the case of a 50 year old woman with atypical anti-MPO AAV associated with cocaine use and exposure to levamisole. In addition to the clinical and pathologic findings of crescentic GN, the patient also had biopsy evidence of secondary membranous nephropathy (MN). Although AAV and MN have been reported previously in the same patient and both have been induced by drug exposures, this is the first report of MN in a patient with AAV likely induced by levamisole. We suggest that MPO can cause both pauci-immune vasculitis and secondary membranous nephropathy in some cases, as in cases of levamisole-adulterated cocaine use. PMID:27067665

  9. Acral keratoses and leucocytoclastic vasculitis occurring during treatment of essential thrombocythaemia with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Worley, B; Glassman, S J

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used in essential thrombocythaemia to lower thromboembolic risk. Cutaneous adverse effects from hydroxyurea are diverse. Small vessel vasculitis has been rarely reported, and the coexistence of several different morphologies has not been described. We report a case of acral keratoses, psoriasiform plaques and leucocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) in a patient with essential thrombocythaemia. A 69-year-old woman developed a confusing array of skin lesions including keratotic papules, psoriasiform plaques and keratoderma 4 years after commencing hydroxyurea therapy. The initial diagnosis was hand and foot psoriasis, but lesions were resistant to therapy. With an increase in the dose of hydroxyurea, the lesions ulcerated. Skin biopsies taken from different sites indicated different diagnoses, including LCV. Discontinuation of hydroxyurea yielded rapid improvement. Although the most commonly reported cutaneous adverse effect from hydroxyurea is leg ulceration, this can be preceded or accompanied by less dramatic skin lesions. Unless recognized, delayed diagnosis and lesion progression can occur. PMID:26269121

  10. The usage of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure system in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T; Tam, A D; Van Zundert, T C R V

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) devices have been used to treat patients in acute respiratory failure. However they require an electric power source, are relatively large in size, and may be difficult to use in prehospital settings. The recently introduced Boussignac CPAP system is capable of delivering 10 cmH2O of CPAP, is compact, portable and requires only an oxygen source. This paper reviews the efficacy of using Boussignac CPAP as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in both prehospital and hospital settings. All studies mainly focused on patients treated for cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the prehospital setting, Boussigac CPAP significantly improved respiratory parameters and oxygenation from baseline values. In the emergency department setting, Boussignac CPAP was more effective than standard oxygen delivery and just as effective as BiPAP in improving patient oxygenation and respiration. In one study, implementing Boussignac CPAP reduced intubation rate and hospital stay. Most hospital staff found Boussignac CPAP easy to use and complication rates were low. Boussigac CPAP is a useful device in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure, especially in the prehospital setting. PMID:23419338

  11. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  12. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures.

    PubMed

    Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a 'lost-wax' technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the 'ray cell' structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  13. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a ‘lost-wax’ technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the ‘ray cell’ structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  14. Update on Outcome Measure Development for Large Vessel Vasculitis: Report from OMERACT 12

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Direskeneli, Haner; Sreih, Antoine; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Gul, Ahmet; Kamali, Sevil; Hatemi, Gulen; Kermani, Tanaz; Mackie, Sarah L.; Mahr, Alfred; Meara, Alexa; Milman, Nataliya; Nugent, Heidi; Robson, Joanna; Tomasson, Gunnar; Merkel, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The rarity of large vessel vasculitis (LVV) is a major factor limiting randomized controlled trials in LVV, resulting in treatment choices in these diseases that are guided mainly by observational studies and expert opinion. Further complicating trials in LVV is the absence of validated and meaningful outcome measures. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) vasculitis working group initiated the Large Vessel Vasculitis task force in 2009 to develop data-driven, validated outcome tools for clinical investigation in LVV. This report summarizes the progress that has been made on a disease activity assessment tool and patient-reported outcomes in LVV as well as the group’s research agenda. Methods The OMERACT LVV task force brought an international group of investigators and patient research partners together to work collaboratively on developing outcome tools. The group initially focused on disease activity assessment tools in LVV. Following a systematic literature review, an international Delphi exercise was conducted to obtain expert opinion on principles and domains for disease assessment. The OMERACT vasculitis working group’s LVV task force is also conducting qualitative research with patients, including interviews, focus groups, and engaging patients as research partners, all to ensure that the approach to disease assessment includes measures of patients’ perspectives and that patients have input into the research agenda and process. Results The preliminary results of both the Delphi exercise and the qualitative interviews were discussed at the OMERACT 12 (2014) meeting and the completion of the analyses will produce an initial set of domains and instruments to form the basis of next steps in the research agenda. Conclusion The research agenda continues to evolve, with the ultimate goal of developing an OMERACT-endorsed core set of outcome measures for use in clinical trials of LVV. PMID:26077399

  15. Kidney transplantation for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kaseda, Koji; Marui, Yuji; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Mise, Koki; Tanaka, Kiho; Takaichi, Kenmei; Tomikawa, Shinji; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl was admitted to our institution for the evaluation of renal dysfunction. Her serum creatinine was 1.1 mg/dL, proteinuria was 1.5 g/day, the urine sediment contained numerous erythrocytes per high-power field, and she was positive for myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Proteinuria was first noted at the age of 12 years. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with slight immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition. A diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis was made. Immunosuppressive therapy was initiated, including steroid pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy, but hemodialysis was required after 6 years. Eight months after the patient became anuric and her MPO-ANCA titer became negative, living-related donor kidney transplantation was done from her mother. ANCA became slightly positive 2 years later, but the patient remains stable without proteinuria or hematuria at 4 years after surgery. This case suggests that kidney transplantation can be performed successfully for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis, and that remission of vasculitis associated with ANCA negativity at transplantation may contribute to a better renal prognosis in this patient. PMID:24645722

  16. [A case of elderly onset loss of consciousness due to bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Kameno, Mami; Takata, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Hisahumi; Hara, Kenta; Okano, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagata, Masao; Yokono, Koichi

    2008-07-01

    We reported an 83-year-old woman, who suffered from bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis. She experienced episodes of loss of consciousness several times in July, 2006. She also had recurrent fever and was admitted to a local hospital. Routine examinations, including brain MRI and electroencephalogram, were negative and urinary tract infection was diagnosed. After successful antibiotic therapy, she was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. After transfer, she had no headache, but presented fever again, and a reduced level of consciousness. Cerebrospinal fluid test showed that cell counts were high with a predominance of neutrophils, and her glucose level was low. She received antibiotic therapy on her suspicion of bacterial meningitis. Bacterial cultures of CSF and blood were negative, probably due to the previous antibiotic therapy. Repeated CSF analysis showed a decrease in cell counts, but her lower consciousness did not improve. Moreover, neurological symptoms such as left pyramidal tract sign appeared. She was transferred to our hospital on the suspicion of vasculitis. Diffusion MRI showed high intensity in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) area and CT angiography showed the stenosis of the right MCA at the M3 portion. Two courses of steroid pulse therapy were performed. Her consciousness gradually improved and eventually could talk although cognitive decline remained as a residual deficit. Our patient failed to be diagnosed early because of atypical symptoms of meningitis. Caution seems necessary for elderly cases presenting with atypical initial symptoms of meningitis. Steroid pulse therapy was effective for the subsequent vasculitis, as reported previously. PMID:18753720

  17. A pain in the neck: carotid artery dissection presenting as vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Collamer, Angelique N; Battafarano, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissection is increasingly recognized as a common cause of ischemic stroke in the young and middle-aged. Noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography have widely replaced conventional angiography as the initial diagnostic study of extracranial dissections, allowing greater numbers of patients to be screened and thus leading to increased frequency of the diagnosis. We present a case of spontaneous carotid artery dissection in a previously healthy 48-year-old woman who presented with neck pain and elevated inflammatory markers. Marked gadolinium enhancement of the right extracranial internal carotid artery on magnetic resonance imaging led to an initial diagnosis of vasculitis. This case shows that the vessel injury associated with spontaneous carotid artery dissection is associated with an inflammatory response that can mimic vasculitis on highly sensitive imaging techniques, a phenomenon not well described previously. In this report, we review the nonvasculitic conditions that can mimic vasculitis and present clinicians complex diagnostic challenges. Recognition of these pseudovasculitic syndromes is important to avoid overdiagnosis resulting in unnecessary and potentially harmful immunosuppressive and cytotoxic treatments. PMID:23820364

  18. [Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in a Patient with ANCA-associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Suemori, Koichiro; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Jun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Murakami, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia asiatica is a rare causative organism responsible for opportunistic infection, and was first reported by Kageyama et al. in 2004. We report herein on a very rare case of N. asiatica infection in a 76-year old male patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis and a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient developed pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. asiatica while receiving glucocorticoid therapy. Chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple granules and cavity formation mainly in the left lower lobe. From the images, we suspected opportunistic infection, possibly pulmonary tuberculosis or pulmonary damage due to ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nocardia sp. was detected from a bronchoalveolar lavage culture and N. asiatica was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Administration of Doripenem (1.5g/day) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4g/day) was started, and the patient's clinical and imaging findings promptly improved. Thereafter, he received sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (2g/day) and prednisolone (10 mg/day) as maintenance therapy for ANCA-associated vasculitis for more than one year, and there has since been no recurrence of the Nocardia infection. PMID:26554223

  19. A role for mast cells in the development of adjuvant-induced vasculitis and arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, B.; Burns, A. R.; Kubes, P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the role of mast cells in the development of vasculitis and joint swelling in adjuvant-immunized rats. Leukocyte trafficking within mesenteric venules (rolling and adhesion) and mast cell activation (ruthenium red uptake) were examined in vivo. Elevated leukocyte trafficking was observed by 4 days after immunization, whereas joint swelling developed between days 10 and 12. Perivascular mast cells took up ruthenium red and appeared activated by electron microscopy at 4 but not 12 days after immunization. Treatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn on days 1 to 4 after immunization blocked ruthenium red uptake at day 4 and reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion by approximately 50%. This treatment also reduced rolling, adhesion, and joint swelling at day 12 by approximately 50%. Cromolyn treatment over days 9 to 12 reduced joint swelling but increased leukocyte emigration into the mesentery. Peritoneal mast cells isolated 4 days after immunization elicited significant neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, whereas day 12 mast cells did not. Mast cell activation and vasculitis were absent in adjuvant-resistant Fisher/344 rats. These data suggest that mast cells play an early role in the initiation of vasculitis and may function by day 12 to limit infiltration of leukocytes from the vasculature. In the joint, however, mast cells appear to contribute to inflammation at early as well as later time points. Images Figure 2 PMID:9466582

  20. EULAR/ERA-EDTA recommendations for the management of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yates, M; Watts, R A; Bajema, I M; Cid, M C; Crestani, B; Hauser, T; Hellmich, B; Holle, J U; Laudien, M; Little, M A; Luqmani, R A; Mahr, A; Merkel, P A; Mills, J; Mooney, J; Segelmark, M; Tesar, V; Westman, K; Vaglio, A; Yalçındağ, N; Jayne, D R; Mukhtyar, C

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the 2009 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) have been updated. The 2009 recommendations were on the management of primary small and medium vessel vasculitis. The 2015 update has been developed by an international task force representing EULAR, the European Renal Association and the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS). The recommendations are based upon evidence from systematic literature reviews, as well as expert opinion where appropriate. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus-finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) determined. In addition to the voting by the task force members, the relevance of the recommendations was assessed by an online voting survey among members of EUVAS. Fifteen recommendations were developed, covering general aspects, such as attaining remission and the need for shared decision making between clinicians and patients. More specific items relate to starting immunosuppressive therapy in combination with glucocorticoids to induce remission, followed by a period of remission maintenance; for remission induction in life-threatening or organ-threatening AAV, cyclophosphamide and rituximab are considered to have similar efficacy; plasma exchange which is recommended, where licensed, in the setting of rapidly progressive renal failure or severe diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. These recommendations are intended for use by healthcare professionals, doctors in specialist training, medical students, pharmaceutical industries and drug regulatory organisations. PMID:27338776

  1. Alteration in systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output during acute cellular rejection and recovery in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Uriel, Nir; Sayer, Gabriel; Sims, Daniel; Zahner, Doris; Farr, Maryjane; Mancini, Donna; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2010-03-01

    Coronary vascular reserve is impaired during acute cellular rejection of the orthotopically transplanted heart, but changes in the peripheral vasculature during rejection have not been well described. To investigate whether peripheral vascular compensatory mechanisms are preserved after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT), we longitudinally observed systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and cardiac output (CO) during acute cellular rejection. CO decreased during high-grade acute cellular rejection, and maintenance of mean arterial pressure was achieved by increases in SVR, and these changes did not return to baseline until several months after histologic resolution of rejection. PMID:19875310

  2. Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

  3. Reduction of the systemic inflammatory induced by acute cerebral infarction through ultra-early thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    YE, LICHAO; CAI, RUOWEI; YANG, MEILI; QIAN, JIAQIANG; HONG, ZHILIN

    2015-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke induces systemic inflammation, exhibited as changes in body temperature, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of intravenous thrombolytic therapy on inflammatory indices in order to investigate the hypothesis that post-stroke systemic inflammatory response occurs in response to the necrosis of brain tissues. In this study, 62 patients with acute cerebral infarction and indications for intravenous thrombolysis were divided into three groups on the basis of their treatment and response: Successful thrombolysis (n=36), failed thrombolysis (n=12) and control (n=14) groups. The body temperature, white blood cell counts and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were recorded pre-treatment and on post-stroke days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score positively correlated with body temperature, white blood cell count and hs-CRP levels. On day 3 of effective intravenous thrombolysis, the body temperature and white blood cell were decreased and on days 3 and 5, the serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced compared with those in the failed thrombolysis and control groups. The results indicate that the systemic inflammatory response following acute cerebral infarction was mainly caused by ischemic injury of local brain tissue; the more serious the stroke, the stronger the inflammatory response. Ultra-early thrombolytic therapy may inhibit the necrosis of brain tissue and thereby reduce the inflammatory response. PMID:26622513

  4. Acute systemic exposure to silver-based nanoparticles induces hepatotoxicity and NLRP3-dependent inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramadi, Khalil B; Mohamed, Yassir A; Al-Sbiei, Ashraf; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Bashir, Ghada; Al Dhanhani, Aisha; Sarawathiamma, Dhanya; Qadri, Shahnaz; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Fernandez-Cabezudo, Maria J; Haik, Yousef; Al-Ramadi, Basel K

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being commercialized for use in biomedicine. NP toxicity following acute or chronic exposure has been described, but mechanistic insight into this process remains incomplete. Recent evidence from in vitro studies suggested a role for NLRP3 in NP cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of systemic administration of composite inorganic NP, consisting of Ag:Cu:B (dose range 1-20 mg/kg), on the early acute (4-24 h post-exposure) and late phase response (96 h post-exposure) in normal and NLRP3-deficient mice. Our findings indicate that systemic exposure (≥2 mg/kg) was associated with acute liver injury due to preferential accumulation of NP in this organ and resulted in elevated AST, ALT and LDH levels. Moreover, within 24 h of NP administration, there was a dose-dependent increase in intraperitoneal neutrophil recruitment and upregulation in gene expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-1β and S100A9. Histological analysis of liver tissue revealed evidence of dose-dependent hepatocyte necrosis, increase in sinusoidal Kupffer cells, lobular granulomas and foci of abscess formation which were most pronounced at 24 h following NP administration. NP deposition in the liver led to a significant upregulation in gene expression of S100A9, an endogenous danger signal recognition molecule of phagocytes, IL-1β and IL-6. The extent of proinflammatory cytokine activation and hepatotoxicity was significantly attenuated in mice deficient in the NLRP3 inflammasome, demonstrating the critical role of this innate immune system recognition receptor in the response to NP. PMID:26956548

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to systemic lupus erythematosus with hemophagocytic syndrome: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuma; Matsuda, Masayuki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Hosoda, Waki; Gono, Takahisa; Hoshi, Kenichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2005-04-01

    This report concerns a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who died of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 1 day after the onset of pulmonary symptoms. Autopsy demonstrated severe hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and histopathology indicating a marked increase in vascular permeability in both lungs and kidneys. In this patient, active SLE and associated hemophagocytic syndrome may have induced an increase in the production of inflammatory cytokines, which immediately induced ARDS. Since fatal ARDS can occur as a life-threatening complication of SLE, careful observation is necessary, particularly when there are clinical findings suggestive of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:15338452

  6. Decreased Numbers of Blood Dendritic Cells and Defective Function of Regulatory T Cells in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rimbert, Marie; Hamidou, Mohamed; Braudeau, Cécile; Puéchal, Xavier; Teixeira, Luis; Caillon, Hélène; Néel, Antoine; Audrain, Marie; Guillevin, Loic; Josien, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) and regulatory cells (Treg) play pivotal roles in controlling both normal and autoimmune adaptive immune responses. DC are the main antigen-presenting cells to T cells, and they also control Treg functions. In this study, we examined the frequency and phenotype of DC subsets, and the frequency and function of Treg from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples from 19 untreated patients with AAV during flares and before any immunosuppressive treatment were analyzed, along with 15 AAV patients in remission and 18 age-matched healthy controls. DC and Treg numbers, and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry, and in vitro suppressive function of Treg was determined by co-culture assay. When compared to healthy volunteers, absolute numbers of conventional and plasmacytoid DC were decreased in AAV patients. During the acute phase this decrease was significantly more pronounced and was associated with an increased DC expression of CD62L. Absolute numbers of Treg (CD4+CD25highCD127low/− Tcells) were moderately decreased in patients. FOXP3 and CD39 were expressed at similar levels on Treg from patients as compared to controls. The suppressive function of Treg from AAV patients was dramatically decreased as compared to controls, and this defect was more pronounced during flares than remission. This Treg functional deficiency occurred in the absence of obvious Th17 deviation. Conclusion In conclusion, these data show that AAV flares are associated with both a decrease number and altered phenotype of circulating DC and point to a role for Treg functional deficiency in the pathogenesis of AAV. PMID:21494636

  7. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Methods: Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. Results: In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. Conclusions: A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes. PMID:25674124

  8. A severe case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia treated with systemic corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder in adults. A treatment of choice for lipoid pneumonia has not been established, and systemic corticosteroid use remains controversial. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with schizophrenia who presented with kerosene-induced acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia that was treated with a systemic corticosteroid. In this case, supportive therapy did not improve the patient's condition, so systemic corticosteroid therapy was commenced four days after he ingested the kerosene. After corticosteroid commencement, the patient's symptoms and hypoxia improved within a few days. Although some radiological characteristics of this disorder have been reported previously, the process of radiological improvement of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is not well known. In this case, computed tomography findings changed dramatically after corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Extensive bilateral consolidations that were observed on admission improved. Although pneumatoceles developed two weeks after corticosteroid commencement, they were nearly gone after two months of the treatment. While corticosteroid therapy is not suitable for all cases, it should be considered for severe or refractory cases. PMID:27222789

  9. A severe case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia treated with systemic corticosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hideki; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder in adults. A treatment of choice for lipoid pneumonia has not been established, and systemic corticosteroid use remains controversial. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with schizophrenia who presented with kerosene-induced acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia that was treated with a systemic corticosteroid. In this case, supportive therapy did not improve the patient's condition, so systemic corticosteroid therapy was commenced four days after he ingested the kerosene. After corticosteroid commencement, the patient's symptoms and hypoxia improved within a few days. Although some radiological characteristics of this disorder have been reported previously, the process of radiological improvement of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is not well known. In this case, computed tomography findings changed dramatically after corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Extensive bilateral consolidations that were observed on admission improved. Although pneumatoceles developed two weeks after corticosteroid commencement, they were nearly gone after two months of the treatment. While corticosteroid therapy is not suitable for all cases, it should be considered for severe or refractory cases. PMID:27222789

  10. A novel immunopathological association of IgG4-RD and vasculitis with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Hiroto; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Hiroto; Nishi, Masahiro; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akinori; Nakanishi, Masanori; Tsuchihashi, Shigeki; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Murata, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Gen; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 73-year-old man with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suffered from purpura on the lower legs. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) with serum IgG4 elevation and dacryo-sialadenitis confirmed histologically. Serum Th2 and Treg cytokines, interleukin 7 (IL7), IL8 and Th2 chemokine levels were elevated, while skewed Th1 balance was seen in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Therefore, preferential Th1 balance in HT appeared to be followed by IgG4-RD characterized with Th2 and Treg polarization. The commencement of steroid therapy dramatically exacerbated clinical manifestations including IgG4-RD-associated HT. The measurement of cytokine and chemokine levels as well as FACS analysis in the development of IgG4-RD seemed to be beneficial. In conclusion, an innovative association of HT, IgG4-RD and vasculitis was observed. This report also offers novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IgG4-RD. Learning points Recently, a subtype of HT has been considered to be a thyroid manifestation of IgG4-RD, although the etiology of IgG4-RD is not established yet. Immunologically a close association between HT and vasculitis was reported. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare skin presentation of IgG4-RD. In the current case, during the course of HT, IgG4-RD and leukocytoclastic vasculitis occurred; thus, innate immunity and acquired immunity seem to be involved in the development of IgG4-RD. The measurement of cytokine and chemokines appeared to be beneficial in the development of IgG4-RD. Remarkably, effectiveness of steroid therapy for HT suggested presence of IgG4-RD-associated HT. Therefore, this report highlights the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and proposes novel therapeutic mechanisms. Clinicians should pay attention to the development of IgG4-RD and vasculitis during long course of HT. PMID:26966543

  11. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  12. Java interface to a computer-aided diagnosis system for acute pulmonary embolism using PIOPED findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Gauger, Matthew; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    An interface to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) from PIOPED radiographic findings was developed. The interface is based on Internet technology which is user-friendly and available on a broad range of computing platforms. It was designed to be used as a research tool and as a data collection tool, allowing researchers to observe the behavior of a CAD system and to collect radiographic findings on ventilation-perfusion lung scans and chest radiographs. The interface collects findings from physicians in the PIOPED reporting format, processes those findings and presents them as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) previously trained on findings from 1,064 patients from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. The likelihood of PE predicted by the ANN and by the physician using the system is then saved for later analysis.

  13. Uncoupling of the autonomic and cardiovascular systems in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, B; Toweill, D; Lai, S; Sonnenthal, K; Kimberly, B

    1998-10-01

    We hypothesized that acute brain injury results in decreased heart rate (HR) variability and baroreflex sensitivity indicative of uncoupling of the autonomic and cardiovascular systems and that the degree of uncoupling should be proportional to the degree of neurological injury. We used HR and blood pressure (BP) power spectral analysis to measure neuroautonomic regulation of HR and BP and the transfer function magnitude (TF) between BP and HR as a measure of baroreflex modulation of HR. In 24 brain-injured patients [anoxic/ischemic injury (n = 7), multiple trauma (n = 6), head trauma (n = 5), central nervous system infection (n = 4), and intracranial hemorrhage (n = 2)], neurological injury and survival was associated with low-frequency (0.01-0.15 Hz) HR and BP power and TF. Brain-dead patients showed decreased low-frequency HR power [0. 51 +/- 0.36 (SE) vs. 2.54 +/- 0.14 beats/min2, P = 0.03] and TF [0. 61 +/- 0.16 (SE) vs. 1.29 +/- 0.07 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1, P = 0.05] compared with non-brain-dead patients. We conclude that 1) severity of neurological injury and outcome are inversely associated with HR and BP variability and 2) there is direct evidence for cardiovascular and autonomic uncoupling in acute brain injury with complete uncoupling during brain death. PMID:9756562

  14. Pathophysiological roles of adrenomedullin-RAMP2 system in acute and chronic cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kyoko; Sakurai, Takayuki; Kamiyoshi, Akiko; Ichikawa-Shindo, Yuka; Kawate, Hisaka; Yamauchi, Akihiro; Toriyama, Yuichi; Tanaka, Megumu; Liu, Tian; Xian, Xian; Imai, Akira; Zhai, Liuyu; Owa, Shinji; Koyama, Teruhide; Uetake, Ryuichi; Ihara, Masafumi; Shindo, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    The accessory protein RAMP2 is a component of the CLR/RAMP2 dimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptor and is the primary determinant of the vascular functionality of AM. RAMP2 is highly expressed in the brain; however, its function there remains unclear. We therefore used heterozygous RAMP2 knockout (RAMP2+/-) mice, in which RAMP2 expression was reduced by half, to examine the actions of the endogenous AM-RAMP2 system in cerebral ischemia. To induce acute or chronic ischemia, mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS), respectively. In RAMP2+/- mice subjected to MCAO, recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was slower than in WT mice. AM gene expression was upregulated after infarction in both genotypes, but the increase was greater in RAMP2+/- mice. Pathological analysis revealed severe nerve cell death and demyelination, and a higher level of oxidative stress in RAMP2+/- mice. In RAMP2+/- mice subjected to BCAS, recovery of cerebral perfusion was slower and less complete than in WT mice. In an 8-arm radial maze test, RAMP2+/- mice required more time to solve the maze and showed poorer reference memory. They also showed greater reductions in nerve cells and less compensatory capillary growth than WT mice. These results indicate the AM-RAMP2 system works to protect nerve cells from both acute and chronic cerebral ischemia by maintaining CBF, suppressing oxidative stress, and in the case of chronic ischemia, enhancing capillary growth. PMID:25252154

  15. Successful use of interleukin 6 antagonist tocilizumab in a patient with refractory cutaneous lupus and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Makol, Ashima; Gibson, Lawrence E; Michet, Clement J

    2012-03-01

    Tocilizumab (Actemra; Genentech, Inc) is the first biologic therapy targeting the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). It is a humanized monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 antibody against the α-chain of the IL-6 receptor that prevents the binding of IL-6 to membrane-bound and -soluble IL-6 receptor. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in January 2010 for rheumatoid arthritis refractory to other approved therapies and in April 2011 for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It has been used as an off-label treatment in many autoimmune diseases, where IL-6 plays a major role in pathogenesis. We report a case of refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a 22-year-old woman with recurrent high-grade fever, polyarthritis, diffuse rash with urticarial vasculitis, and tumid lupus who did not respond to topical corticosteroids, photoprotection, antimalarials, methotrexate, anakinra, mycophenolate mofetil, etanercept, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Symptoms recurred after corticosteroid tapers below 10 mg. She was noted to have an elevated IL-6 level, and tocilizumab was started. She responded favorably with remission of fever, arthritis, and skin manifestations and was able to taper corticosteroid therapy successfully. PMID:22334272

  16. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system.

    PubMed

    Judge, Sarah J; Savy, Claire Y; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G; Morris, Christopher M; Gartside, Sarah E

    2016-02-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  17. Central Nervous System Viral Invasion and Inflammation During Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor; Chalermchai, Thep; Sailasuta, Napapon; Marovich, Mary; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Suttichom, Duanghathai; Suwanwela, Nijasri C.; Jagodzinski, Linda; Michael, Nelson; Spudich, Serena; van Griensven, Frits; de Souza, Mark; Kim, Jerome; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the earliest central nervous system (CNS) events during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is crucial to knowledge of neuropathogenesis, but these have not previously been described in humans. Methods. Twenty individuals who had acute HIV infection (Fiebig stages I-IV), with average 15 days after exposure, underwent clinical neurological, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characterization. Results. HIV RNA was detected in the CSF from 15 of 18 subjects as early as 8 days after estimated HIV transmission. Undetectable CSF levels of HIV (in 3 of 18) was noted during Fiebig stages I, II, and III, with plasma HIV RNA levels of 285 651, 2321, and 81 978 copies/mL, respectively. On average, the CSF HIV RNA level was 2.42 log10 copies/mL lower than that in plasma. There were no cases in which the CSF HIV RNA level exceeded that in plasma. Headache was common during the acute retroviral syndrome (in 11 of 20 subjects), but no other neurological signs or symptoms were seen. Intrathecal immune activation was identified in some subjects with elevated CSF neopterin, monocyte chemotactic protein/CCL2, and interferon γ–induced protein 10/CXCL-10 levels. Brain inflammation was suggested by MRS. Conclusions. CSF HIV RNA was detectable in humans as early as 8 days after exposure. CNS inflammation was apparent by CSF analysis and MRS in some individuals during acute HIV infection. PMID:22551810

  18. MEDUSA: a fuzzy expert system for medical diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Fathi-Torbaghan, M; Meyer, D

    1994-12-01

    Even today, the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain represents a serious clinical problem. The medical knowledge in this field is characterized by uncertainty, imprecision and vagueness. This situation lends itself especially to be solved by the application of fuzzy logic. A fuzzy logic-based expert system for diagnostic decision support is presented (MEDUSA). The representation and application of uncertain and imprecise knowledge is realized by fuzzy sets and fuzzy relations. The hybrid concept of the system enables the integration of rule-based, heuristic and case-based reasoning on the basis of imprecise information. The central idea of the integration is to use case-based reasoning for the management of special cases, and rule-based reasoning for the representation of normal cases. The heuristic principle is ideally suited for making uncertain, hypothetical inferences on the basis of fuzzy data and fuzzy relations. PMID:7869951

  19. Neonatal herpes simplex virus type-1 central nervous system disease with acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Choong Yi; Aye, Aye Mya Min; Peyman, Mohammadreza; Nor, Norazlin Kamal; Visvaraja, Subrayan; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Ong, Lai Choo

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 central nervous system disease with bilateral acute retinal necrosis (ARN). An infant was presented at 17 days of age with focal seizures. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction was positive for HSV-1 and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebritis. While receiving intravenous acyclovir therapy, the infant developed ARN with vitreous fluid polymerase chain reaction positive for HSV-1 necessitating intravitreal foscarnet therapy. This is the first reported neonatal ARN secondary to HSV-1 and the first ARN case presenting without external ocular or cutaneous signs. Our report highlights that infants with neonatal HSV central nervous system disease should undergo a thorough ophthalmological evaluation to facilitate prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment of this rapidly progressive sight-threatening disease. PMID:24378951

  20. FloTrac/Vigileo system monitoring in acute-care surgery: current and future trends.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Fong; Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2013-11-01

    As acute critical-care surgery evolves, it is imperative to introduce reliable devices that can intraoperatively assess a patient's cardiovascular functions. Owing to the fact that traditional methods are usually invasive, non- or less-invasive innovations have attracted the attention of clinicians in recent decades. The FloTrac system monitors cardiovascular performance by analyzing peripheral arterial waveforms and a preset database, and it decreases the invasiveness by using a pulmonary arterial catheter. The reliability of cardiac output measurements was confirmed in many critically ill subjects in cardiac surgeries and intensive care units. Moreover, the FloTrac system is easy to set up, and interpreting the information is simple. The FloTrac system also provides a useful preload predictor, that is, stroke volume variation (SVV), for fluid management, which has been proven to enhance surgical safety in the treatment of critically ill patients. Goal-directed therapy guided by SVV and other hemodynamic variables was advocated for peri-operative fluid optimization. Although the evolution of each updated algorithm of the FloTrac system has demonstrated improved accuracy and limited shortcomings, the latest third-generation algorithm is still not equal to the gold standard reference. The accuracy of the latest third-generation algorithm is controversial in septic conditions, and its use is still unacceptable in liver transplantation. Due to vasoactive challenges, especially in the administration of norepinephrine, a conclusion could not be reached. Clinicians should recognize the appropriate uses and limitations when using the algorithm during acute critical surgeries. PMID:24147549

  1. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs... workshop regarding the design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of... of clinical trials of antibacterial agents for the treatment of acute otitis media (middle...

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-01-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  3. Evaluation of the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of the fluorocarbon trifluoromethane in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, C.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ewing, J.R.; Butt, S.S.; Gayner, J.; Fagan, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    The gaseous fluorocarbon trifluoromethane has recently been investigated for its potential as an in vivo gaseous indicator for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of brain perfusion. Trifluoromethane may also have significant value as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbon fire retardants. Because of possible species-specific cardiotoxic and anesthetic properties, the toxicological evaluation of trifluoromethane in primates (Papio anubis) is necessary prior to its evaluation in humans. We report the acute cardiac and central nervous system effects of trifluoromethane in eight anesthetized baboons. A dose-response effect was established for respiratory rate, electroencephalogram, and cardiac sinus rate, which exhibited a stepwise decrease from 10% trifluoromethane. No spontaneous arrhythmias were noted, and arterial blood pressure remained unchanged at any inspired level. Intravenous epinephrine infusions (1 {mu}g/kg) induced transient cardiac arrhythmia in 1 animal only at 70% FC-23 (v/v) trifluoromethane. Trifluoromethane appears to induce mild dose-related physiological changes at inspired levels of 30% or more, indicative of an anesthetic effect. These data suggest that trifluoromethane may be safe to use in humans, without significant adverse acute effects, at an inspired level of 30%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Acute phase treatment of venous thromboembolism: advanced therapy. Systemic fibrinolysis and pharmacomechanical therapy.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Wärntges, Simone

    2015-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism, which encompasses deep-vein thrombosis and acute pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a major contributor to global disease burden worldwide. For patients who present with cardiogenic shock or persistent hypotension (acute high-risk PE), there is consensus that immediate reperfusion treatment applying systemic fibrinolysis or, in the case of a high bleeding risk, surgical or catheter-directed techniques, is indicated. On the other hand, for the large, heterogeneous group of patients presenting without overt haemodynamic instability, the indications for advanced therapy are less clear. The recently updated guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology emphasise the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function) and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury) for distinguishing between an intermediate and a low risk for an adverse early outcome. In intermediate-high-risk PE defined by the presence of both right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography (or computed tomography) and a positive troponin (or natriuretic peptide) test, the bleeding risks of full-dose fibrinolytic treatment have been shown to outweigh its potential clinical benefits unless clinical signs of haemodynamic decompensation appear (rescue fibrinolysis). Recently published trials suggest that catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, low-dose local fibrinolysis may provide an effective and particularly safe treatment option for some of these patients. PMID:25789580

  5. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  6. Critical role for the AIM2 inflammasome during acute central nervous system bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanamsagar, Richa; Aldrich, Amy; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is essential for eliciting protective immunity during the acute phase of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). We previously demonstrated that microglial IL-1β production in response to live S. aureus is mediated through the Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, including the adapter protein ASC (apoptosis-associated, speck-like, caspase-1 recruiting domain-containing protein), and pro-caspase-1. Here we utilized NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1/11 knockout (KO) mice to demonstrate the functional significance of inflammasome activity during CNS S. aureus infection. ASC and caspase-1/11 KO animals were exquisitely sensitive, with approximately 50% of mice succumbing to infection within 24 h. Unexpectedly, the survival of NLRP3 KO mice was similar to WT animals, suggesting the involvement of an alternative upstream sensor, which was later identified as absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) based on the similar disease patterns between AIM2 and ASC KO mice. Besides IL-1β, other key inflammatory mediators, including IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, and CCL2 were significantly reduced in the CNS of AIM2 and ASC KO mice, implicating autocrine/paracrine actions of IL-1β, since these mediators do not require inflammasome processing for secretion. These studies demonstrate a novel role for the AIM2 inflammasome as a critical molecular platform for regulating IL-1β release and survival during acute CNS S. aureus infection. PMID:24484406

  7. Photoprotective effect and acute oral systemic toxicity evaluation of the novel heterocyclic compound LQFM048.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Daniela C; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Vieira, Marcelo S; Luzin, Rangel M; Quintino, Michelle P; Nunes, Liliane M; Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos Chaves; de Camargo, Henrique Santiago; Pinto, Angelo C; Dos Santos Júnior, Helvécio M; Chiari, Bruna G; Isaac, Vera; Valadares, Marize C; Martins, Tatiana Duque; Lião, Luciano M; de S Gil, Eric; Menegatti, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    The new heterocyclic derivative LQFM048 (3) (2,4,6-tris ((E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate)-1,3,5-triazine) was originally designed through the molecular hybridization strategy from Uvinul® T 150 (1) and (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (2) sunscreens, using green chemistry approach. This compound was obtained in global yields (80%) and showed an interesting redox potential. In addition, it is thermally stable up to temperatures around 250°C. It was observed that LQFM048 (3) showed a low degradation after 150min of sunlight exposure at 39°C, whereas the extreme radiation conditions induced a considerable photodegradation of the LQFM048 (3), especially when irradiated by VIS and VIS+UVA. During the determination of sun protection factor, LQFM048 (3) showed interesting results, specially as in association with other photoprotective compounds and commercial sunscreen. Additionally, the compound (3) did not promote cytotoxicity for 3T3 fibroblasts. Moreover, it was not able to trigger acute oral systemic toxicity in mice, being classified as a compound with low acute toxicity hazard (2.000mg/kg>LD50<5.000mg/kg). Therefore, this compound synthesized using green chemistry approach is promising showing potential to development of a new sunscreen product with advantage of presenting redox potential, indicating antioxidant properties. PMID:27208746

  8. Systemic amyloidosis involving the diaphragm and acute massive hydrothorax during peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, R F; Thirlweil, M; Arzoumanian, A; Mehio, A

    2002-06-01

    Hydrothorax secondary to trans-diaphragmatic fluid leakage through a peritoneo-pleural communication is an occasional, potentially serious complication of peritoneal dialysis. The etiology of this condition is not clear, being thought to be due either to congenital or acquired diaphragmatic fenestrations or acquired scarcity of muscle fibers in the tendinous part of the diaphragm which are compounded by increased intra-abdominal pressure during the dwell period of peritoneal dialysis. We report a 54-year-old woman who developed irreversible acute renal failure from adjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer previously resected surgically. Three days after the onset of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, she developed acute respiratory distress associated with a massive right hydrothorax secondary to a peritoneo-pleural communication demonstrated by scintigraphy. At autopsy 2 weeks later, systemic amyloidosis was surprisingly found and histologic examination of the right hemidiaphragm showed the presence of amyloid, among sparse muscle fibers. This is the first case report of a distinct pathological process, i.e. amyloidosis, involving the diaphragm associated with a peritoneo-pleural communication causing massive hydrothorax at the onset of peritoneal dialysis. PMID:12078953

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-07-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  10. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO{sub 2} therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. {yields} Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO{sub 2} infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. {yields} These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. {yields} NaNO{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO{sub 2} with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO{sub 2} on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO{sub 2}, at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  11. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous Sensing of Systemic Acute Toxicants in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A bioluminescent-cell-based microfluidic device for sensing toxicants in drinking water was designed and fabricated. The system employed Vibrio fischeri cells as broad-spectrum sensors to monitor potential systemic cell toxicants in water, such as heavy metal ions and phenol. Specifically, the chip was designed for continuous detection. The chip design included two counter-flow micromixers, a T-junction droplet generator and six spiral microchannels. The cell suspension and water sample were introduced into the micromixers and dispersed into droplets in the air flow. This guaranteed sufficient oxygen supply for the cell sensors. Copper (Cu2+), zinc (Zn2+), potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol were selected as typical toxicants to validate the sensing system. Preliminary tests verified that the system was an effective screening tool for acute toxicants although it could not recognize or quantify specific toxicants. A distinct non-linear relationship was observed between the zinc ion concentration and the Relative Luminescence Units (RLU) obtained during testing. Thus, the concentration of simple toxic chemicals in water can be roughly estimated by this system. The proposed device shows great promise for an early warning system for water safety. PMID:24300075

  12. Exposure to welding fumes is associated with acute systemic inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Chen, J; Boyce, P; Christiani, D

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the acute systemic inflammatory response to welding fume exposure. Methods: Twenty four welders (42% smokers) and 13 non-exposed controls (23% smokers) were monitored at a welding school. Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was assessed using cyclone samplers. Markers of systemic inflammation, including C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cell (WBC) levels, were determined in peripheral blood samples collected at baseline and after 5.3 (SD 1.0) hours of exposure. Results: The median PM2.5 concentration for welders was 1.66 mg/m3, which was significantly greater than that for controls (0.04 mg/m3). Compared to non-smokers, smokers had a significantly higher baseline WBC count, but comparable levels of CRP and fibrinogen. In non-smokers, welding fume exposure was associated with a significant increase in WBC and neutrophil counts immediately following exposure (+0.8x103/µl, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.6, and +1.0x103/µl, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.7, respectively). A significant decrease in fibrinogen levels was observed in non-smokers (–32 mg/dl, 95% CI –63 to –1). No significant changes in WBC, neutrophil, and fibrinogen levels were found in smokers. Sixteen hours after welding exposure, CRP levels were found to be significantly increased in both non-smokers and smokers (0.90 mg/l, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.64). PM2.5 concentrations were found to be significantly associated with absolute neutrophil counts in non-smokers, and CRP levels in both non-smokers and smokers. Conclusions: High levels of welding fume exposure induce acute systemic inflammation in a relatively young, healthy working population. These results also suggest that smoking may modify the effect of welding fume exposure on specific inflammatory markers. PMID:15723880

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  14. Dysregulation of Autoantigen Genes in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Involves Alternative Transcripts and New Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Elizabeth A.; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Muthigi, Akhil; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Allred, S. Colby; Yang, Jiajin; Free, Meghan E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are two major autoantigens in patients with vasculitis with ANCA. The genes encoding these autoantigens are abnormally expressed in peripheral granulocytes of patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study provides evidence that this transcriptional dysregulation results in a variety of mRNA processing events from the PRTN3 gene locus. In addition to elevated levels of PR3 message, leukocyte RNA from patients contained PR3 transcripts with an alternative 3′ untranslated region. Furthermore, we detected usage of an alternative transcription start site within intron 1 of the PRTN3 gene locus that coincided with active disease (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 8.4; P=0.01). This promoter may be developmentally regulated, because it was active in normal human bone marrow, multiple leukemia cell lines, MCF-7 cells, and subjects after GM-CSF treatment but not subjects with a neutrophil left shift. This transcript, which lacks exon 1 of PRTN3, encodes a 24-kD protein (p24PR3/MBN) with a sequence similar to that previously described for myeloblastin. Notably, PR3, p24PR3/MBN, and MPO were synthesized in cultured neutrophils from patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis, indicating that increased transcription results in newly synthesized autoantigens in peripheral neutrophils of patients. The synthesis of p24PR3/MBN seems to expand the autoantigen repertoire, because immunoblots showed that sera from patients recognized p24PR3/MBN. These findings emphasize the importance of transcriptional dysregulation of the autoantigen in autoimmune disease. PMID:25060059

  15. Traumatic endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis and white-centered hemorrhages: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Jalali, Subhadra; Nalamada, Suma; Dave, Vivek; Mathai, Annie

    2012-01-01

    The article reports a case and review of the literature of endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis. A 26-year-old male was observed to have white-centered retinal hemorrhages and retinal vasculitis following an occult scleral perforation. At presentation, the visual acuity was 20/60. With clinical suspicion of early endophthalmitis, he underwent wound exploration, scleral tear repair, vitreous biopsy and administration of intravitreal antibiotics. Microbiology evaluation revealed significant presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis. Final visual acuity improved to 20/20 at 6 weeks postoperatively. Literature search revealed eight similar cases, all of them due to Staphylococcus species. Retinal vasculitis and white-centered retinal hemorrhages can be a presenting sign of early endophthalmitis, especially with non-fulminant pathogens like S. epidermidis. PMID:22824604

  16. Expansion of Circulating T Follicular Helper Cells in Children with Acute Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jue; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ruan, Guoxiang; Yuan, Huiming; Fang, Hong; Wu, Jianyong; Cui, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a common systemic small vessel vasculitis in children with disorder autoimmune responses. T follicular helper (TFH) cells play crucial roles in regulating immune responses. The aim of our study was to investigate the probable role of TFH cells in the pathogenesis of children with HSP. In this study, the frequency of circulating CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells with inducible costimulator (ICOS) expression in the children with acute HSP was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (HCs) but not CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells with programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression. Moreover, serum levels of IL-21 and IL-6 cytokines, IgA, and C3 in HSP children were also significantly higher than those in HCs. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of circulating ICOS(+)CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells and the serum IL-21 or IgA levels of acute HSP children, respectively. Additionally, the mRNA expression levels of interleukin- (IL-) 21, IL-6, and transcriptional factors (B-cell lymphoma-6, Bcl-6) were also significantly increased in peripheral blood from acute HSP children compared to HCs. Taken together, these findings suggest that TFH cells and associated molecules might play critical roles in the pathogenesis of HSP, which are possible therapeutic targets in HSP children. PMID:26491701

  17. Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis After First Eye Cataract Surgery Without Subsequent Second Eye Involvement.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Nicole; Savini, Giacomo; Barboni, Piero; Ducoli, Pietro; Ciardella, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A case of monocular postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after uncomplicated bilateral cataract surgery is described. HORV is a severe syndrome that leads to painless visual loss after uncomplicated cataract surgery. The same surgical procedure was adopted in both eyes except for the use of intracameral vancomycin, which was injected only in the eye that developed HORV. Diffuse retinal ischemia with vascular sheathing and intraretinal hemorrhages were detected during the fourth postoperative day. Despite treatment, the patient developed severe neovascular glaucoma. This case supports the causative role of vancomycin in the pathogenesis of HORV and suggests avoiding it for chemoprophylaxis. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:764-766.]. PMID:27548454

  18. A case report and DSA findings of cerebral hemorrhage caused by syphilitic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Xiao, Guo-Dong; Xu, Xing-Shun; Zhang, Chun-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Feng; Cao, Yong-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Syphilis is now rare and easily misdiagnosed because of the wide use of antibiotics in the clinical. We report a case of cerebral hemorrhage in a patient with hypertension who was first diagnosed as hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. However, treponema pallidum particle agglutination and rapid plasma regain tests of cerebrospinal fluid revealed the existence of neurosyphilis. Interestingly, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed severe stenosis in both middle cerebral arteries and right anterior cerebral artery. The case reminded us to pay attention to syphilitic vasculitis in patients with cryptogenic stroke. DSA sometimes may play a critical role in differential diagnosis of neurosyphilis. PMID:22198645

  19. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N.; Rathi, M.; Nada, R.; Sharma, A.; Goyal, A.; Ramachandran, R.; Kumar, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Gupta, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a pathological entity characterized by collapse and wrinkling of glomerular tuft, podocyte dedifferentiation and hyperplasia. CG may be idiopathic or secondary to other diseases. CG has been described with IgA nephropathy, membranous glomerulopathy, diabetic nephropathy, and lupus nephritis. However, till date there is no report of CG in association with the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we present a case of CG that developed during follow-up in a case of AAV with biopsy proven pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. PMID:27051140

  20. Severe meningeal fibrinoid vasculitis associated with Theileria taurotragi infection in two short-horned Zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, Elena; Sferra, Chiara; Lynen, Godelieve; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; De Meneghi, Daniele; Tomassone, Laura; Valenza, Federico; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The Authors describe a severe vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis of the meningeal arteries observed in two brains of indigenous short-horn zebu (Bos indicus) cattle, with bovine cerebral theileriosis (BCT) caused by a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan, Theileria taurotragi, from Northern Tanzania. In the Author's opinion, the role of T. taurotragi infection in the angiocentric and angiodestructive detected features remains to be evaluated. A possible immunopathologic cancerous mechanism, secondary to the lymphoid deregulation, could be involved. This report suggests further studies to better characterize the lymphoid cell involvement in the pathogenesis of the meningeal vascular lesions by T. taurotragi. PMID:27145963

  1. Sarcoid Pericarditis and Large Vessel Vasculitis Detected on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan; Xie, Karen; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman with history of sarcoidosis, hypertension, and peripheral vascular disease presented with lower extremity claudication and low left ventricular ejection fraction of 45% on echocardiogram. Further FDG PET/CT revealed hypermetabolic bilateral chest lymphadenopathy and pulmonary nodules in a butterfly-shaped distribution pattern, which was typically seen in patients with sarcoidosis. In addition, abnormal increased radiotracer uptake was present in pericardium, and along the walls of inferior vena cava, aorta, and pulmonary artery, which correlated with delayed enhancement on further cardiac MRI. These findings were suggestive of sarcoid-related pericarditis and great vessel vasculitis. PMID:27280907

  2. Levamisole adulterated cocaine and pulmonary vasculitis: Presentation of two lethal cases and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Karch, Steven B; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Vaiano, Fabio; Portelli, Francesca; Zaami, Simona; Bertol, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    The first case reports of levamisole-related disease in cocaine users were published in 2010, although levamisole adulteration of cocaine was first recognized several years earlier. Currently, more than 70% of street cocaine seizures, in the US and the EU, contain levamisole, which could potentially be converted to aminorex, though the reasons for this practice still remain obscure. Here we report two fatal cases of isolated pulmonary vasculitis in abusers of levamisole-adulterated cocaine, where a complete autopsy, full toxicological analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using a previously published method of Karch et al. and histological examination were performed. A control group composed of 11 cases of cocaine related deaths, where the presence of levamisole was excluded in blood, urine and hair, was used. Recent literature on the human pharmacokinetics of levamisole and aminorex is also reviewed. The toxicological analysis revealed positive qualitative and quantitative results for cocaine, benzoylecgonine and levamisole in both cases. In case 1 levamisole was found at the concentration of 13.5 and 61.3mg/L in blood and urine respectively, whereas in case 2 at 17.9 and 70.2mg/L. The histological examination highlighted in case 1 in heart samples microscopic evidence of the typical remodeling changes associated with chronic stimulant abuse, whereas lungs showed numerous lymphocytes surrounding and infiltrating the wall of small pulmonary vessels and a perivascular fibrosis with transforming fibroblasts. In case 2, the myocardial samples showed wide fields of myocardial necrosis characterized by hypercontraction of the myocytes with thickened Z-lines and short sarcomeres, whereas lung samples showed a significant intimal thickening of arteriole walls and lymphocytic infiltration of the wall and edema. Moreover, there were also numerous perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates. Although the pathological cardiac findings have allowed us to establish

  3. Angiooedema due to acquired deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor associated with leucocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Szongoth, M; Bély, M; Varga, L; Fekete, B; Karádi, I; Füst, G

    2001-01-01

    A hereditary and an acquired type of C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency have been described. Manifestations characteristic of both forms include recurrent subcutaneous and submucosal angiooedema. Acquired C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency has been observed in association with lymphoproliferative disorders, malignancy, autoimmune diseases and infections. We report on a case with the acquired form of the disease accompanied by leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Treatment with antimalarial agents resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and signs. Furthermore, C1-esterase inhibitor concentration and activity, as well as C1 levels, all returned to normal. PMID:11720182

  4. Complement C3 is expressed by mast cells in cutaneous vasculitis and is degraded by chymase.

    PubMed

    Lipitsä, Tiina; Naukkarinen, Anita; Laitala, Joel; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2016-10-01

    The complement factor C3 and chymase released from tryptase(+), chymase(+) mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. To study whether mast cells contain C3 in vasculitis and whether chymase interacts with C3, cryosections from vasculitis biopsies were double-stained histochemically for C3c in tryptase(+) mast cells, as well as for chymase and vessel wall C3c, or they were treated with 5 µg/ml rh-chymase for 24 h followed by immunofluorescence (IF) analysis of C3c, IgG, IgM and IgA. The effect of rh-chymase on purified human C3, C3a and IgG was studied using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and LAD2 mast cell cultures. The results show that 34.2 ± 17.9, 37.4 ± 15.5 and 43.4 ± 18.6 % (mean ± SD) of the mast cells express C3c immunoreactivity in the healthy skin, initial petechial (IP) and palpable purpura (PP) lesions, respectively. About 9.4-12.1 % of the chymase(+) mast cells were in apparent contact with C3c(+) vessels in IP and PP. The treatment of cryosections with rh-chymase decreased the IF staining of C3c, but not that of immunoglobulins. In SDS-PAGE, 1-10 µg/ml rh-chymase degraded the alpha- and beta-chains of C3, but did not degrade IgG. Unexpectedly, the rh-chymase treatment of C3 produced fragments that resulted in the release of tryptase and histamine from LAD2 cells. However, rh-chymase degraded C3a and consequently inhibited C3a activity on LAD2. In conclusion, mast cells can be one source for C3 in the early and late phases of vasculitis pathogenesis. However, rh-chymase degraded native C3, vessel wall C3c, and biologically active C3a. Therefore, chymase may control C3-related pathology. PMID:27465068

  5. A compact and autoclavable system for acute extracellular neural recording and brain pressure monitoring for humans.

    PubMed

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Baranauskas, Gytis; Vato, Alessandro; Bonfanti, Andrea; Zambra, Guido; Maggiolini, Emma; Semprini, Marianna; Ricci, Davide; Ansaldo, Alberto; Castagnola, Elisa; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Fadiga, Luciano

    2015-02-01

    One of the most difficult tasks for the surgeon during the removal of low-grade gliomas is to identify as precisely as possible the borders between functional and non-functional brain tissue with the aim of obtaining the maximal possible resection which allows to the patient the longer survival. For this purpose, systems for acute extracellular recordings of single neuron and multi-unit activity are considered promising. Here we describe a system to be used with 16 microelectrodes arrays that consists of an autoclavable headstage, a built-in inserter for precise electrode positioning and a system that measures and controls the pressure exerted by the headstage on the brain with a twofold purpose: to increase recording stability and to avoid disturbance of local perfusion which would cause a degradation of the quality of the recording and, eventually, local ischemia. With respect to devices where only electrodes are autoclavable, our design permits the reduction of noise arising from long cable connections preserving at the same time the flexibility and avoiding long-lasting gas sterilization procedures. Finally, size is much smaller and set up time much shorter compared to commercial systems currently in use in surgery rooms, making it easy to consider our system very useful for intra-operatory mapping operations. PMID:25486648

  6. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  7. Acute Changes in Peripheral Vascular Tonus and Systemic Circulation during Static Stretching.

    PubMed

    Inami, Takayuki; Baba, Reizo; Nakagaki, Akemi; Shimizu, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effect of static stretching (SS) on peripheral vascular tonus and to clarify the effect of SS on systemic circulation. Twenty healthy young male volunteers performed a 1-min SS motion of the right triceps surae muscle, repeated five times. The peripheral vascular tonus (|d/a| ratio) was obtained using second derivatives of the photoplethysmogram readings before, during, and after SS. Heart rate and blood pressure (BP) were also measured. The |d/a| ratio and BP were transiently, but significantly, elevated during SS and returned to baseline immediately after SS. Furthermore, we observed a significant correlation between the amount of change in the |d/a| ratio and the ankle range of motion during SS (r = 0.793 to 0.832, P = 0.01). These responses may be caused by mechanical stress during SS. PMID:25833293

  8. Acute systemic hypotension after arteriovenous fistula construction in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mise, Naobumi; Uchida, Lisa; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Tanaka, Shinji; Nakajima, Hiroyoshi; Sugimoto, Tokuichiro

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old hemodialysis patient with severe aortic stenosis, who developed acute systemic hypoperfusion after arteriovenous fistula (AVF) construction. He presented with hypotension and repeated syncope soon after distal radiocephalic AVF construction, and finally developed a respiratory arrest. His blood pressure and hemodynamics recovered promptly by sub-emergent aortic valve replacement surgery. In the present case, the heart with severe aortic stenosis could not increase cardiac output in response to the reduction in peripheral vascular resistance caused by the AVF. High-output heart failure, a relatively rare AVF-associated disorder, occurs with an excessive AVF flow, usually more than 3 L/min or 30% of cardiac output. However, heart failure may develop soon after construction of an AVF with a moderate blood flow if a patient's cardiac function is severely impaired. In addition, heart failure may improve with AVF preservation if the underlying heart disease is treatable. PMID:21725657

  9. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  10. A case of precocious emphysema and lung cancer in a woman with a history of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Suzanna C; Brierre, Stephen; Sweet, Jon; de Boisblanc, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Severe emphysema developed in a white woman with a 26-pack-year history of tobacco use. Serum alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were normal. A history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, angioedema, low complement, and recurrent urticaria prompted an immunologic workup that ultimately led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Treatment with oral prednisone and inhaled bronchodilators improved symptoms, but 4 months after diagnosis non-small cell lung cancer was discovered and she ultimately died. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis is an uncommon cause of precocious emphysema and has not previously been reported in a patient with bronchogenic carcinoma. PMID:18321906

  11. A clinical pathologic study of four adult cases of acute mercury inhalation toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanluen, S.; Gottlieb, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    We report four cases of fatal mercury vapor inhalation, a rare occurrence. The mercury vapor was released at a private home, where one of the occupants was smelting silver from dental amalgam containing an unknown amount of mercury. Within 24 hours of the incident, all occupants began having shortness of breath necessitating hospital admission. The clinical courses are briefly detailed; however, all included rapid deterioration with respiratory failure. Chest roentgenograms in all four cases were consistent with adult respiratory distress syndrome. All patients were treated with dimercaprol, a mercury chelator, but all died, with survival varying from 9 to 23 days postexposure. Autopsies were performed on all four patients. The lungs in all cases were heavy, firm, and airless. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, with variable amounts of fibrosis, conforming with acute lung injury in various stages of organization. Additional postmortem findings included acute proximal renal tubular necrosis, vacuolar hepatoxicity, and a spectrum of central nervous system alterations including multifocal ischemic necrosis, gliosis, and vasculitis.

  12. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Sarah J.; Savy, Claire Y.; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G.; Morris, Christopher M.; Gartside, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  13. Use of drug therapy to manage acute cutaneous necrosis of the skin.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jill S; Hall, John C

    2010-04-01

    Acute cutaneous necrosis is defined as a sudden onset of gangrenous skin changes in the skin, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The following diseases are included in this discussion: coumadin necrosis, heparin necrosis, brown recluse spider bite, necrotizing fasciitis, vasculitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, calciphylaxis, clotting abnormalities and embolic phenomena. The importance of early diagnosis, early distinction and early drug therapy or drug withdrawal must match the diagnosis for maximal preservation of the skin and underlying tissue. PMID:20514791

  14. Platelet satellitism, spurious neutropenia, and cutaneous vasculitis: casual or causal association?

    PubMed

    Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Piedras, Josefa; Romero-Lagarza, Penélope; Lome-Maldonado, Carmen; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; López-Karpovitch, Xavier

    2002-07-01

    About 90 cases of platelet satellitism (PS) have been published, most of them involving neutrophils, a few comprising monocytes, and one case involving basophils. The case of a 30-year-old female patient with cutaneous vasculitis who developed asymptomatic severe neutropenia is reported. All blood smears (BS) prepared from peripheral blood samples collected with either ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, trisodium citrate, and heparin showed PS involving neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes. Immunohistochemistry analysis of her skin biopsy and BS, employing peroxidase stain for the detection of antibodies directed against IgG, IgA, IgM, and C3, revealed an intense positive reaction only for IgG in the endothelium and leukocyte clumps within the microvasculature, as well as in peripheral blood neutrophils displaying the PS phenomenon. Transfer of the PS phenomenon was demonstrated by incubating the patient's plasma with leukocytes from an ABO-compatible healthy donor. In our patient, PS did not disappear after incubation at 37 degrees C, suggesting that this might be a different or "atypical" PS phenomenon probably mediated by an autoimmune process involving an IgG-class antibody responsible for both conditions, PS, and cutaneous vasculitis. PMID:12111772

  15. The role of IgM rheumatoid factor in experimental immune vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, M; Tesar, J T

    1979-01-01

    The effect of IgM rhematoid factor (RF) on reversepassive cutaneous Arthus reaction in rats was studied. The RF was obtained from the serum cryoglobulin of a patient with symptoms of purpura, arthralgia and digital gangrene. The cryoglobulins was of IgG-IgM type and when given i.v it induced a prompt hypocomplementaemia in experimental animals. The purified RF also induced low serum complement levels when injected i.v. along with complexes of non-complement-fixing, aggregated IgG. A reverse passive Arthus reaction was induced by intradermal injection of IgG anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA), followed by an i.v. dose of antigen (Ag). The cutaneous inflammatory reaction was aggravated by simultaneous administration of IgM RF intradermally, but not by IgM without antibody (Ab) properties. Intradermal injection of low concentrations of non-complement-fixing IgG anti-BSA, along with normal human IgM, followed by i.v. injection of BSA, resulted in a complete lack of cutaneous inflammation. At higher Ab concentrations there was only a mild inflammation. However, when IgM RF was substituted for normal IgM and injected with non-complement-fixing anti-BSA, an effective reverse passive cutaneous Arthus reaction and vasculitis was induced. The inflammatory response was greatly suppressed by decomplementation of animals by cobra venom factor. This study provides evidence favouring an inflammatory, complement-dependent role for RF in vasculitis. PMID:157238

  16. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  17. 77 FR 43089 - Evaluation of an Up-and-Down Procedure for Acute Dermal Systemic Toxicity Testing: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... (NICEATM), in collaboration with the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative... validation status of an up-and-down procedure (UDP) for acute dermal systemic toxicity testing. NICEATM... Panel and made available to the public. The Panel will meet in public session to review the...

  18. Mesotherapy versus Systemic Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Cosimo; Marangio, Emilio; Coruzzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy of back pain with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs is frequently associated with adverse effects, particularly in the elderly. Aim of this study was to compare mesotherapic versus conventional systemic administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids in patients with acute low back pain. Eighty-four patients were randomized to receive anti-inflammatory therapy according to the following protocols: (a) mesotherapy group received the 1st and 4th day 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 40 mg (1 mL), then on 7th, 10th, and 13th day, 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 20 mg (1 mL) (b) conventional therapy group received ketoprofen 80 mg × 2/die and esomeprazole 20 mg/die orally for 12 days, methylprednisolone 40 mg/die intramuscularly for 4 days, followed by methylprednisolone 20 mg/die for 3 days, and thereafter, methylprednisolone 20 mg/die at alternate days. Pain intensity and functional disability were assessed at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and 6 months thereafter (T2) by using visual analogic scale (VAS) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ). In both groups, VAS and RMDQ values were significantly reduced at the end of drug treatment and after 6 months, in comparison with baseline. No significant differences were found between the two groups. This suggests that mesotherapy may be a valid alternative to conventional therapy in the treatment of acute low back pain with corticosteroids and NSAIDs. PMID:20953425

  19. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study. PMID:27031591

  20. Changes in IgG and total plasma protein glycomes in acute systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Novokmet, Mislav; Lukić, Edita; Vučković, Frano; –Durić, Željko; Keser, Toma; Rajšl, Katarina; Remondini, Daniel; Castellani, Gastone; Gašparović, Hrvoje; Gornik, Olga; Lauc, Gordan

    2014-01-01

    Recovery after cardiac surgery is a complex process that has to compensate for both individual variability and extensive tissue damage in the context of systemic inflammation. Protein glycosylation is essential in many steps of the inflammatory cascade, but due to technological limitations the role of individual variation in glycosylation in systemic inflammation has not been addressed until now. We analysed composition of the total plasma and IgG N-glycomes in 107 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In nearly all individuals plasma N-glycome underwent the same pattern of changes in the first 72 h, revealing a general mechanism of glycosylation changes. To the contrary, changes in the IgG glycome were very individualized. Bi-clustering analysis revealed the existence of four distinct patterns of changes. One of them, characterized by a rapid increase in galactosylated glycoforms, was associated with nearly double mortality risk measured by EuroSCORE II. Our results indicate that individual variation in IgG glycosylation changes during acute systemic inflammation associates with increased mortality risk and indicates new avenues for the development of personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approach. PMID:24614541

  1. [Influence of cortical neurotrophic factors on the neurocytokine production system in acute hemorrhagic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Kositsyn, N S; Svinov, M M; Vasil'eva, I G; Makarenko, A N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of therapeutic action of cortical neurotropic factors (CNTF) was studied in hemorrhagic stroke. In intracerebral hemorrhage, CNTFs were shown to elevate the level of nerve growth factor mRNA and at the same time, produce no effect on its level in intact animals. The neuroactivating action of CNTF in the acute phase of hemorrhagic stroke was achieved by intranasal administration due to the retrograde axon transport of CNTF molecules along the olfactory nerve fibers to the brain, by passing the blood-brain barrier. It was ascertained that the molecules of tritium-labeled CHTF accumulated in the central nervous system following 20 minutes and the level of label accumulation is proportionally increased after 120 minutes. The pattern of accumulation of the intranasally administered label in the olfactory tract and olfactory bulb proves CNTF transportation along these structures of the nervous system. Therefore, when intranasally administered, CNTFs are able to transport to the central nervous system along the olfactory tract and to enhance the expression of nerve growth factor mRNA in hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:19919011

  2. Central Nervous System Involvement in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostic Tools, Prophylaxis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; De Santis, Giovanna; Di Veroli, Ambra; Ditto, Concetta; Nasso, Daniela; Postorino, Massimiliano; Refrigeri, Marco; Attrotto, Cristina; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC) and flow cytometry (FCM). Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of a large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. An early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review discusses risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. PMID:25408861

  3. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  4. Rare type of pancreatitis as the first presentation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Adachi, Takeya; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Nakagaki, Suguru; Yabana, Takashi; Goto, Akira; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic tumor was suspected on the abdominal ultrasound of a 72-year-old man. Abdominal computed tomography showed pancreatic enlargement as well as a diffuse, poorly enhanced area in the pancreas; endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. Based on the trend of improvement of the pancreatic enlargement, the treatment plan involved follow-up examinations. Later, he was hospitalized with an alveolar hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; he tested positive for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and was diagnosed with ANCA-related vasculitis, specifically microscopic polyangiitis. It appears that factors such as thrombus formation caused by the vasculitis in the early stages of ANCA-related vasculitis cause abnormal distribution of the pancreatic blood flow, resulting in non-uniform pancreatitis. Pancreatic lesions in ANCA-related vasculitis are very rare. Only a few cases have been reported previously. Therefore, we report our case and a review of the literature. PMID:26900301

  5. Rare type of pancreatitis as the first presentation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Adachi, Takeya; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Nakagaki, Suguru; Yabana, Takashi; Goto, Akira; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-21

    A pancreatic tumor was suspected on the abdominal ultrasound of a 72-year-old man. Abdominal computed tomography showed pancreatic enlargement as well as a diffuse, poorly enhanced area in the pancreas; endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. Based on the trend of improvement of the pancreatic enlargement, the treatment plan involved follow-up examinations. Later, he was hospitalized with an alveolar hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; he tested positive for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and was diagnosed with ANCA-related vasculitis, specifically microscopic polyangiitis. It appears that factors such as thrombus formation caused by the vasculitis in the early stages of ANCA-related vasculitis cause abnormal distribution of the pancreatic blood flow, resulting in non-uniform pancreatitis. Pancreatic lesions in ANCA-related vasculitis are very rare. Only a few cases have been reported previously. Therefore, we report our case and a review of the literature. PMID:26900301

  6. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  7. Acute Systemic Infusion of Bupropion Decrease Formalin Induced Pain Behavior in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Somayyeh; Ashrafi Osalou, Mostafa; Cankurt, Ulker

    2014-01-01

    Background The chronic pain can disturb physical, psychological, and social performances. Analgesic agents are widely used but some antidepressants (ADs) showed analgesia also. Bupropion is using for smoke cessation but it can change morphine withdrawal signs such as pain. This study tested the acute systemic effect of bupropion on formalin induced pain behavior in rats. Methods Wistar male healthy rats were divided into 7 groups (control, sham, and 5 treated groups with 10, 30, 90, 120, and 200 mg/kg of bupropion, i.p.). The bupropion injected 3 hours prior to formalin induced pain behavior. Formalin (50 µl, 2.5%) was injected subcutaneously in dorsal region of right hindpaw in all animals. Nociceptive signs were observed continuously on-line and off-line each minute. Common pain scoring was used for pain assessment. Results The analysis of data by one-way ANOVA showed that bupropion can reduce pain scores in the second phase but not in first phase. Bupropion decreased the licking/biting duration significantly in first and second phase of formalin test. Conclusions The results showed that bupropion has analgesic effects at systemic application. The change of second phase of the pain behavior was significant and it revealed that central mechanisms involve in bupropion analgesia. PMID:24748939

  8. Systemic response induced by Scorpaena plumieri fish venom initiates acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Boletini-Santos, Douglas; Komegae, Evilin Naname; Figueiredo, Suely G; Haddad, Vidal; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Lima, Carla

    2008-03-15

    Scorpaena plumieri venomous fish inflicted severe injuries in humans characterized by systemic effects and cardiovascular abnormalities. Although cardiotoxic and hypotensive effects induced in rats by this venom have been studied, little is known about their effect on bronchial epithelial permeability and airway inflammation in mice. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether the intraplantar or intraperitoneal injection of S. plumieri venom results in systemic response, and whether this event initiates acute lung injury. We found that BALB/c mice developed neutrophilic infiltrates, areas of lung hemorrhage and alveolar macrophage activation within 24h after injection with S. plumieri venom. These histopathological changes were associated with an early increase in BAL fluid protein and early induction of cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases, followed by a later increase in BAL fluid neutrophils. These findings provide clear evidence that the injection of S. plumieri venom in footpad or peritoneal cavity of mice results in venom deposition in the airway and initiates a sustained inflammatory response in the lungs. PMID:18191167

  9. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  10. Acute Resistance Exercise Induces Antinociception by Activation of the Endocannabinoid System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; da Silva, José Felippe Pinho; Aguiar, Daniele; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Methods Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase of endocannabinoid plasma levels. Conclusion The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception. PMID:24977916

  11. Vasculitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... These purplish spots can be felt in the skin. They do not turn white (blanch) when pressed. As the condition progresses, they may become larger and more bruise-like (ecchymotic), and some may develop central ulceration or necrosis (tissue death).

  12. Hypersensitivity Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... you think. More serious than you know. Support. Awareness. Education. Become a member today! Our Mission The ... Foundation supports and empowers our community through education, awareness and research. Contact Us Click here to send ...

  13. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  14. Current Evidence for Extracorporeal Liver Support Systems in Acute Liver Failure and Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Subramanian, Ram M

    2016-07-01

    Artificial (nonbiological) extracorporeal liver support devices aim to remove albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins to restore and preserve hepatic function and mitigate or limit the progression of multiorgan failure while hepatic recovery or liver transplant occurs. The following beneficial effects have been documented: improvement of jaundice, amelioration of hemodynamic instability, reduction of portal hypertension, and improvement of hepatic encephalopathy. The only randomized prospective multicenter controlled trial to show an improvement in transplant-free survival was for high-volume plasmapheresis. Biological (cell-based) extracorporeal liver support systems aim to support the failing liver through detoxification and synthetic function and warrant further study for safety and benefit. PMID:27339682

  15. Identification and Acute Targeting of Gaps in Atrial Ablation Lesion Sets using a Real Time MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Kholmovski, Eugene G.; Blauer, Joshua; Vijayakumar, Sathya; Volland, Nelly A.; Salama, Mohamed E.; Parker, Dennis L.; MacLeod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation is routinely used to treat cardiac arrhythmias, but gaps remain in ablation lesion sets, as there is no direct visualization of ablation related changes. In this study we describe using a real time MRI (RT-MRI) system to acutely identify and target gaps leading to a complete and transmural ablation in the atrium. Methods and Results A swine model was used for these studies (n=12). Ablation lesions with a gap were created in the atrium using fluoroscopy and an electro-anatomical system in the first group (n=5). The animal was then moved to a 3 Tesla MRI system where high-resolution late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI was used to identify the gap. Using a RT-MRI catheter navigation and visualization system the gap area was ablated in the MR scanner. In a second group (n=7) ablation lesions with varying gaps in between were created under RT-MRI guidance and gap lengths determined using LGE MR images were correlated with gap length measured from gross pathology. Gaps up to 1.0 mm were identified using gross pathology and 1.4 mm using LGE MRI. Using a RT-MRI system with active catheter navigation gaps can be targeted acutely, leading to lesion sets with no gaps. The correlation coefficient (R2) between gap length identified using MRI and gross pathology was 0.95. Conclusions Real time MRI system can be used to identify and acutely target gaps in atrial ablation lesion sets. Acute targeting of gaps in ablation lesion sets can potentially lead to significant improvement in clinical outcomes. PMID:23071143

  16. Acute lupus pneumonitis followed by intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, CAIHONG; YU, XING; WANG, YONG; SHI, LUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IpsO) and acute lupus pneumonitis (ALP) are uncommon severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study reports the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting as initial symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed the jejunal wall was thickened and streaky, mimicking the presentation of intestinal obstruction. Following emergency surgery, the patient's general condition was aggravated, with evident limb erythematous rashes. A series of laboratory examinations revealed SLE, and combined with patient's medical history IpsO was diagnosed, with a disease Activity Index score of 10. During the therapeutic period, high fever, dyspnea and oxygen saturation (SaO2) reductions were detected, and CT scans indicated lung infiltration, excluding other causes through a comprehensive infectious work-up and a bronchoalveolar lavage examination. ALP was confirmed and treated with high-dose methylprednisolone and gamma globulin supplement. The patient responded well and was discharged in 2 weeks. In the one-year tapering period and after stopping corticosteroids, the patient recovered well with no relapse detected. In conclusion, the manifestation of IpsO in SLE is rare and represents a challenge for the surgeon to establish the correct diagnosis and avoid inappropriate surgical intervention. ALP may be the consequence of emergency surgery, and immediate high-dose glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. PMID:27347044

  17. An Open Source 3-D Printed Modular Micro-Drive System for Acute Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Eskandar, Emad N.

    2014-01-01

    Current, commercial, electrode micro-drives that allow independent positioning of multiple electrodes are expensive. Custom designed solutions developed by individual laboratories require fabrication by experienced machinists working in well equipped machine shops and are therefore difficult to disseminate into widespread use. Here, we present an easy to assemble modular micro-drive system for acute primate neurophysiology (PriED) that utilizes rapid prototyping (3-d printing) and readily available off the shelf-parts. The use of 3-d printed parts drastically reduces the cost of the device, making it available to labs without the resources of sophisticated machine shops. The direct transfer of designs from electronic files to physical parts also gives researchers opportunities to easily modify and implement custom solutions to specific recording needs. We also demonstrate a novel model of data sharing for the scientific community: a publicly available repository of drive designs. Researchers can download the drive part designs from the repository, print, assemble and then use the drives. Importantly, users can upload their modified designs with annotations making them easily available for others to use. PMID:24736691

  18. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  19. An open source 3-d printed modular micro-drive system for acute neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shaun R; Ghose, Kaushik; Eskandar, Emad N

    2014-01-01

    Current, commercial, electrode micro-drives that allow independent positioning of multiple electrodes are expensive. Custom designed solutions developed by individual laboratories require fabrication by experienced machinists working in well equipped machine shops and are therefore difficult to disseminate into widespread use. Here, we present an easy to assemble modular micro-drive system for acute primate neurophysiology (PriED) that utilizes rapid prototyping (3-d printing) and readily available off the shelf-parts. The use of 3-d printed parts drastically reduces the cost of the device, making it available to labs without the resources of sophisticated machine shops. The direct transfer of designs from electronic files to physical parts also gives researchers opportunities to easily modify and implement custom solutions to specific recording needs. We also demonstrate a novel model of data sharing for the scientific community: a publicly available repository of drive designs. Researchers can download the drive part designs from the repository, print, assemble and then use the drives. Importantly, users can upload their modified designs with annotations making them easily available for others to use. PMID:24736691

  20. Hyperosmolar and methotrexate therapy avoiding surgery in the acute presentation of primary central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bryan S.; Juthani, Rupa G.; Healy, Andrew T.; Peereboom, David M.; Recinos, Violette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an aggressive type of extra-nodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Without treatment, PCNSL is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including rapid neurological deterioration. In contrast to other high-grade intracranial neoplasms, PCNSL is considered to have a high response rate to conventional medical therapy, especially in younger patients, and therefore warrants particular attention in terms of nonsurgical treatment. Case Description: We report a case of the medical management of acute deterioration due to rapidly growing PCNSL with mass effect to highlight the efficacy of temporization with hyperosmolar therapy while awaiting the known rapid effects of dexamethasone and methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Surgical intervention was avoided, and tumor response was rapid. The patient had corresponding clinical resolution of symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure with return to neurologic baseline. Conclusions: Despite the evidence that PCNSL responds well to steroids and MTX, the rapidity of onset with which this occurs can vary. In patients presenting with mass effect and rapid neurologic decline, there is little evidence to support medical over surgical intervention. Herein we present an illustrative case of a large PCNSL lesion presenting with rapid decline. With clinical improvement in one day and a 50% reduction in tumor volume over less than seven days, the authors present the specific time frame with which PCNSL responds to medical therapy and a safe strategy for medical temporization. PMID:25184099

  1. Acute exposure to 2G phase shifts the rat circadian timing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Murakami, D. M.; Tandon, T.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) provides internal and external temporal coordination of an animal's physiology and behavior. In mammals, the generation and coordination of these circadian rhythms is controlled by a neural pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), located within the hypothalamus. The pacemaker is synchronized to the 24 hour day by time cures (zeitgebers) such as the light/dark cycle. When an animal is exposed to an environment without time cues, the circadian rhythms maintain internal temporal coordination, but exhibit a 'free-running' condition in which the period length is determined by the internal pacemaker. Maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination are critical for normal physiological and psychological function in human and non-human primates. Exposure to altered gravitational environments has been shown to affect the amplitude, mean, and timing of circadian rhythms in species ranging from unicellular organisms to man. However, it has not been determined whether altered gravitational fields have a direct effect on the neural pacemaker, or affect peripheral parameters. In previous studies, the ability of a stimulus to phase shift circadian rhythms was used to determine whether a stimulus has a direct effect on the neural pacemaker. The present experiment was performed in order to determine whether acute exposure to a hyperdynamic field could phase shift circadian rhythms.

  2. Identification of a New Cyclovirus in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Le Van; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; de Vries, Michel; Canuti, Marta; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Baker, Stephen; Bryant, Juliet E.; Tham, Nguyen Thi; BKrong, Nguyen Thi Thuy Chinh; Boni, Maciej F.; Loi, Tran Quoc; Phuong, Le Thi; Verhoeven, Joost T. P.; Crusat, Martin; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Schultsz, Constance; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Hien, Tran Tinh; van der Hoek, Lia; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute central nervous system (CNS) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, but the etiology remains unknown in a large proportion of cases. We identified and characterized the full genome of a novel cyclovirus (tentatively named cyclovirus-Vietnam [CyCV-VN]) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens of two Vietnamese patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology. CyCV-VN was subsequently detected in 4% of 642 CSF specimens from Vietnamese patients with suspected CNS infections and none of 122 CSFs from patients with noninfectious neurological disorders. Detection rates were similar in patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology and those in whom other pathogens were detected. A similar detection rate in feces from healthy children suggested food-borne or orofecal transmission routes, while high detection rates in feces from pigs and poultry (average, 58%) suggested the existence of animal reservoirs for such transmission. Further research is needed to address the epidemiology and pathogenicity of this novel, potentially zoonotic virus. PMID:23781068

  3. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  4. Noninvasive ventilatory correction as an adjunct to an experimental systemic reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Balucani, Clotilde; Palazzo, Paola; Zhao, Limin; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies. PMID:21052540

  5. Pyothorax caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in a patient with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Bandoh, Shuji; Fujita, Jiro; Tokuda, Michiaki; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2004-07-01

    We report a case of pyothorax caused by Nocardia (N.) otitidiscaviarum infection in a 69-year-old man with rheumatoid vasculitis, who was regularly treated with prednisolone in our hospital. Initially, the patient responded poorly to intravenous imipenem/cilastatin (IPM/CS), minocyclin (MINO), and oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), but later improved after treatment with levofloxacin (LVFX) and gentamicin sulfate (GM) according to in vitro susceptibility tests. To our knowledge, this is the first description of pyothorax caused by N. otitidiscaviarum infection. It is a rare disease, but recognition of the disease in immunocompromised patients and the prompt initiation of appropriate treatments based on isolation of the pathogen and susceptibility testing can lead to a successful outcome. PMID:15335193

  6. Severe gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus disease in two patients with renal vasculitis after immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Guan; Teo, Su-Hooi; Lim, Cynthia; Loh, Alwin; Chidambaram, Viswanath; Choo, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Although the use of current immunosuppressive regimens has significantly improved the outcomes of autoimmune renal diseases, infectious complications remain an important clinical concern. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been shown to be one of the major causes of mortality in this group of patients. We report two cases of renal vasculitis (Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)) that developed into severe gastrointestinal CMV disease and manifested with massive small bowel bleeding, resulting in an eventual fatal outcome for one of the patients. Risk factors, pathogenesis, role of immunosuppression in the development of CMV infection, and antiviral treatment are discussed in this review. These cases highlight the need for further research to evaluate the complex mechanisms between immunosuppression and CMV occurrence as well as the role of antiviral prophylaxis in high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies.
. PMID:27443566

  7. [Digoxin-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a very elderly woman: A case report].

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Béal, S; Vernier, N; Popitean, L; Levêque, L; Combret, S; Manckoundia, P

    2016-05-01

    Even though digoxin causes many side effects, few cases of skin involvement are recorded in the French Pharmacovigilance Database. We report a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LV) very probably due to digoxin. A 91-year-old woman, hospitalized following a fall, presented cardiac decompensation in a context of rapid atrial fibrillation requiring treatment with digoxin. Eight days later, a rash appeared on her back and trunk. It was neither itchy, nor painful and persisted despite local treatment. There were no other clinical anomalies. After a few days, the rash spread with appearance of bullous lesions, ulcerations and a necrosis on lymphedema of the two legs. Among the complementary examinations, skin biopsy revealed LV with necrosis and subepidermal detachment suggested toxic dermal necrolysis, while direct immunofluorescence was negative. The rash resolved progressively once the digoxin was stopped. The pharmacovigilance department recorded that digoxin was the probable cause. The evidence allowed us to conclude that digoxin was the cause. PMID:26970812

  8. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  9. Childhood-onset eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a rare childhood vasculitis mimicking anthrax and eosinophilic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sezgin; Adrovic, Amra; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy previously misdiagnosed as having cutaneous anthrax was referred with a 2-month history of multiple wide and deep ulceronecrotic lesions in the lower extremities, which occurred after contact with animals. Skin biopsy was compatible with vasculitis. Further examination at our hospital elicited eosinophilia and a history of asthma. On the second day of hospitalisation, he developed deep vein thrombosis. A diagnosis of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) was established and intravenous methylprednisolone was administered. The patient showed remarkable improvement of the cutaneous lesions. Diagnosis of EGPA is challenging in the vasculitic phase and necessitates a detailed history that specifically questions the patient for an asthma background. This case illustrates a severe cutaneous presentation of EGPA and emphasises the difficulty of diagnosis as a result of overlapped signs and symptoms with cutaneous anthrax and leukaemia. EGPA should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions associated with eosinophilia. PMID:26887883

  10. Combination anti-VEGF and corticosteroid therapy for idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Gagan K; Payne, John F; Ray, Robin; Mehta, Sonia; Bergstrom, Chris S; Yeh, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Vision loss associated with the idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis (IRVAN) syndrome most commonly occurs from macular edema or complications related to neovascularization. The authors present a case of advanced IRVAN associated with a massive exudative response characterized by peripheral retinal telangiectasias, exudative retinal detachment, and macular edema with lipid maculopathy. The patient was managed successfully with visual acuity from hand motion to 20/150 using a combination of local corticosteroids, intravitreal bevacizumab, panretinal photocoagulation, and eventually pars plana vitrectomy for progressive vitreomacular traction. VEGF- and non-VEGF-mediated mechanisms appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of IRVAN given the efficacy of combination therapy. [ophthalmic surg lasers imaging retina. 2013;44:599-602.]. PMID:24221466

  11. Angioedema in a 47-year-old woman with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julie M; Reich, Keith A; Raval, Deena G

    2012-02-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is a type III hypersensitivity reaction characterized by urticaria with persistent acquired hypocomplementemia. Although HUVS is uncommon, it is important for physicians to be familiar with this disease, as the initial presentation is often life-threatening angioedema. The author reports the case of a 47-year-old white woman with a history of HUVS. She presented to an outpatient clinic complaining of a rash and difficulty swallowing. Urticaria and angioedema were diagnosed. The patient was given epinephrine in the clinic and then transferred to the hospital. Laboratory testing confirmed urticaria, and the patient was given intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate and an additional dose of epinephrine. After 1 week, the patient's angioedema improved. PMID:22331803

  12. Quality of acute stroke care improvement framework for the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry: facilitating policy and system change at the hospital level.

    PubMed

    LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2006-12-01

    The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry prototypes baseline data collection demonstrated a significant gap in the use of evidenced-based interventions. Barriers to the use of these interventions can be characterized as relating to lack of knowledge, attitudes, and ineffective behaviors and systems. Quality improvement programs can address these issues by providing didactic presentations to disseminate the science and peer interactions to address the lack of belief in the evidence, guidelines, and likelihood of improved patient outcomes. Even with knowledge and intention to provide evidenced-based care, the absence of effective systems is a significant behavioral barrier. A program for quality improvement that includes multidisciplinary teams of clinical and quality improvement professionals has been successfully used to carry out redesign of stroke care delivery systems. Teams are given a methodology to set goals, test ideas for system redesign, and implement those changes that can be successfully adapted to the hospital's environment. Bringing teams from several hospitals together substantially accelerates the process by sharing examples of successful change and by providing strategies to support the behavior change necessary for the adoption of new systems. The participation of many hospitals also creates momentum for the adoption of change by demonstrating observable and successful improvement. Data collection and feedback are useful to demonstrate the need for change and evaluate the impact of system change, but improvement occurs very slowly without a quality improvement program. This quality improvement framework provides hospitals with the capacity and support to redesign systems, and has been shown to improve stroke care considerably, when coupled with an Internet-based decision support registry, and at a much more rapid pace than when hospitals use only the support registry. PMID:17178313

  13. The expanding spectrum of HCV-related cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Dammacco, Franco; Racanelli, Vito; Russi, Sabino; Sansonno, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV) is a small-to-medium-vessel vasculitis that appears in 10-15 % of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The classic symptom triad of CV, purpura/asthenia/arthralgia, is accompanied by clinical features that include glomerulonephritis, neuropathy, interstitial pneumonitis, and cardiomyopathy, ranging in their severity from mild to life threatening. The risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma is also higher. The cumulative 10-year survival rate of CV patients is significantly lower than in the age- and sex-matched general population, with death typically caused by nephropathy, malignancies, liver involvement, and severe infections. Unfailing serological stigmata include both a cryoglobulin IgM fraction with rheumatoid factor activity and decreased complement C4 levels. On peripheral B cells, the expression of the CD81 B cell receptor is reduced while that of the CD19 receptor is increased. A monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis develops in almost one-third of patients. HCV-related proteins (but not HCV-RNA genomic sequences) can be detected on biopsy samples by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry and involve the vessel lumen, vessel walls, and the perivascular spaces of the skin, kidney, and peripheral nerves, supporting the pathogenetic role of HCV in the onset of a widespread microvasculitis. Based on the demonstration of HCV infection in the large majority of CV patients, a therapeutic regimen consisting of once-weekly pegylated interferon-α and the daily administration of ribavirin results in a sustained virologic response in ~50 % of patients. In those with refractory and relapsing disease, addition of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab has significantly increased the overall response rates. The extension to CV of latest-generation direct-acting antivirals, strikingly successful in non-CV HCV-positive patients, has yielded high complete response rates according to the few studies published

  14. Farm Exposure as a Differential Risk Factor in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, P.; Schlüter, B.; Sauerland, C.; Becker, H.; Reuter, S.; Jacobi, A.; Schotte, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of farm exposure and the development of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods One hundred eighty-nine well defined patients with AAV (n = 119 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA], n = 48 with microscopic polyangiitis [MPA], n = 22 patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis [EGPA]) and 190 controls (n = 119 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, n = 71 with large vessel vasculitis) were interrogated using a structured questionnaire. Factors investigated were occupation, farm exposure, contact to different livestock, participation in harvesting, residence next to a farm, MRSA status, and contact to domestic pets at disease onset or ever before. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval [95%CI] were calculated for each item. Results Univariate analysis revealed a strong association of AAV with regular farm exposure; OR 3.44 [95%CI 1.43–8.27]. AAV was also associated with regular contact to cattle 4.30 (1.43–8.27), pigs 2.75 (1.12–6.75) and MRSA carriage 3.38 (1.11–10.3). This association was stronger in the subgroup of GPA patients. OR in this group for farm exposure was 4.97; [2.02–12.2], for cattle 6.71 [95% CI 2.19–20.7], for pigs 4.34 [1.75–10.9], and MRSA carriage 5.06 [1.62–15.8]). There was no significant association of MPA or EGPA with these parameters. Conclusion A significant association between farm exposure or farm animal exposure and AAV especially in the subgroup of patients with GPA has been identified. This suggests that these entities are distinct and have different triggers for the immune process. PMID:26339905

  15. EBNA1 expression in a lung transplant recipient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Malin A M; Heinlen, Latisha; Isaksson, Asa; Nyström, Ulla; Ricksten, Anne

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a transplant recipient with underlying hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome who expressed persistently Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) in peripheral blood. The patient received a bilateral lung transplant and was subsequently followed with monitoring of EBV expression in peripheral blood. Evaluation of viral expression in peripheral blood, serum, and graft tissue was performed with RT-PCR, Q-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence, anti-peptide assays, and in situ hybridization; samples were collected at various time-points up to 91 days post-transplantation. The patient expressed EBNA1 in 8/10 (80%) of the peripheral blood samples tested during the post-transplantation period, and interestingly, even including the day of transplantation. After analyses of indicative EBV mRNA, EBNA1 expression was found mainly to be Qp-initiated EBNA1, known to be important for EBV maintenance. Anti-EBNA1 epitope mapping showed significantly higher and broader antibody responses to EBNA1 epitopes pre-transplantation when compared to normal controls and a matched lung transplant control. Post-transplantation this response was largely diminished but there were still epitopes significantly higher than controls. Our results show the presence of EBV-positive proliferating cells before onset of intensive immunosuppressive treatment. Although no previous connection between EBV and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome has been reported, it is tempting to speculate that the continuous EBNA1 expression is not caused by immunosuppression or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, but may be a factor involved in the etiology of the autoimmune disease. PMID:17516536

  16. Acute alcohol intoxication and suicide: a gender-stratified analysis of the National Violent Death Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mark S; McFarland, Bentson H; Huguet, Nathalie; Conner, Kenneth; Caetano, Raul; Giesbrecht, Norman; Nolte, Kurt B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although it is well known that people with alcohol dependence are at a markedly elevated risk for suicide, much less is known about the role of acute alcohol use in suicidal behaviours. The primary aims of this epidemiological study were to assess the prevalence and factors associated with acute alcohol intoxication among 57 813 suicide decedents in 16 states. Methods Data from the restricted National Violent Death Reporting System 2003–2009 for male and female suicide decedents aged 18 years and older were analysed by multiple logistic regression to compare decedents with and without acute alcohol intoxication (defined as blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ≥0.08 g/dl). Results Among men, those who were younger, American Indian/Alaska Native, Hispanic, veterans, of lower educational attainment, deceased from a self-inflicted firearm injury or hanging/suffocation and residing in rural areas were more likely to have been intoxicated at the time of death. Among women, the factors associated with a BAC ≥0.08 g/dl were younger age, being American Indian/Alaska Native, and using a firearm, hanging/suffocation or falling as method of death. Conclusions In both men and women, alcohol intoxication was associated with violent methods of suicide and declined markedly with age, suggesting that addressing risks associated with acute alcohol use may be of the greatest aid in the prevention of violent suicides among young and middle age adults. PMID:22627777

  17. The K(+)-Cl(-) Cotransporter KCC2 and Chloride Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Target in Acute Central Nervous System Injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Che, Xiaoru; Tang, Junjia; Ma, Feiqiang; Pan, Kun; Zhao, Mingfei; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Jianmin; Hong, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-2 (KCC2) is a well-known member of the electroneutral cation-chloride cotransporters with a restricted expression pattern to neurons. This transmembrane protein mediates the efflux of Cl(-) out of neurons and exerts a critical role in inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) and glycinergic neurotransmission. Moreover, KCC2 participates in the regulation of various physiological processes of neurons, including cell migration, dendritic outgrowth, spine morphology, and dendritic synaptogenesis. It is important to note that down-regulation of KCC2 is associated with the pathogenesis of multiple neurological diseases, which is of particular relevance to acute central nervous system (CNS) injury. In this review, we aim to survey the pathogenic significance of KCC2 down-regulation under the condition of acute CNS injuries. We propose that further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regarding KCC2 down-regulation after acute CNS injuries is necessary because of potential promising avenues for prevention and treatment of acute CNS injury. PMID:25941074

  18. Sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system: a review of its use in patients with acute migraine.

    PubMed

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2013-09-01

    The sumatriptan iontophoretic transdermal system (ZECUITY®) [hereafter referred to as sumatriptan TDS] is the first transdermal treatment for migraine to be approved by the US FDA. This article reviews the available pharmacologic properties of sumatriptan TDS and its clinical efficacy and tolerability for the acute treatment of adult patients with migraine with or without aura. Sumatriptan, a selective 5-hydroxy-tryptamine receptor subtype 1 (5-HT₁) agonist, is presumed to exert its therapeutic effect on migraine patients by binding to the 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors on intracranial blood vessels and sensory nerves of the trigeminal system, resulting in cranial vessel constriction and the inhibition of the release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides and plasma extravasation. In a well designed, phase III clinical trial, sumatriptan TDS was shown to be more effective than placebo at treating a single migraine attack, with significantly more sumatriptan TDS than placebo recipients being headache pain free and nausea free at 2 hours. These data were supported by a long-term, repeat-use study over 12 months. Additionally, sumatriptan TDS was generally well tolerated in clinical trials; the most common adverse events were application-site reactions. The sumatriptan TDS formulation avoids the gastrointestinal tract, and has a controlled, sustained delivery, allowing for patients with migraine-associated nausea and vomiting to receive treatment without the risk of inconsistent absorption or avoidance of tablet use (associated with oral delivery of the drug in these patients). Moreover, it may offer a useful alternative to the nasal spray or subcutaneous sumatriptan formulations. However, definitive conclusions on the comparative efficacy and tolerability of sumatriptan TDS versus other sumatriptan formulations or other migraine drugs are not as yet possible, and data from comparative trials would be of great interest. Sumatriptan TDS is a useful addition to the treatment

  19. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis Onset: Evaluation Based on Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting Systems

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Valentina; Pozzi, Marco; Antoniazzi, Stefania; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate epidemiological features of post vaccine acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) by considering data from different pharmacovigilance surveillance systems. Methods The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database and the EudraVigilance post-authorisation module (EVPM) were searched to identify post vaccine ADEM cases. Epidemiological features including sex and related vaccines were analysed. Results We retrieved 205 and 236 ADEM cases from the EVPM and VAERS databases, respectively, of which 404 were considered for epidemiological analysis following verification and causality assessment. Half of the patients had less than 18 years and with a slight male predominance. The time interval from vaccination to ADEM onset was 2-30 days in 61% of the cases. Vaccine against seasonal flu and human papilloma virus vaccine were those most frequently associated with ADEM, accounting for almost 30% of the total cases. Mean number of reports per year between 2005 and 2012 in VAERS database was 40±21.7, decreasing after 2010 mainly because of a reduction of reports associated with human papilloma virus and Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B vaccines. Conclusions This study has a high epidemiological power as it is based on information on adverse events having occurred in over one billion people. It suffers from lack of rigorous case verification due to the weakness intrinsic to the surveillance databases used. At variance with previous reports on a prevalence of ADEM in childhood we demonstrate that it may occur at any age when post vaccination. This study also shows that the diminishing trend in post vaccine ADEM reporting related to Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B and human papilloma virus vaccine groups is most likely due to a decline in vaccine coverage indicative of a reduced attention to this adverse drug reaction. PMID:24147076

  20. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3-8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting-cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  1. Challenges and Rewards on the Road to Translational Systems Biology in Acute Illness: Four Case Reports from Interdisciplinary Teams

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Hunt, C. Anthony; Clermont, Gilles; Neugebauer, Edmund; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Translational systems biology approaches can be distinguished from mainstream systems biology in that their goal is to drive novel therapies and streamline clinical trials in critical illness. One systems biology approach, dynamic mathematical modeling (DMM), is increasingly used in dealing with the complexity of the inflammatory response and organ dysfunction. The use of DMM often requires a broadening of research methods and a multidisciplinary team approach that includes bioscientists, mathematicians, engineers, and computer scientists. However, the development of these groups must overcome domain-specific barriers to communication and understanding. Methods We present four case studies of successful translational, interdisciplinary systems biology efforts, which differ by organizational level from an individual to an entire research community. Results Case 1 is a single investigator involved in DMM of the acute inflammatory response at Cook County Hospital, in which extensive translational progress was made using agent-based models of inflammation and organ damage. Case 2 is a community-level effort from the University of Witten-Herdecke in Cologne, whose efforts have led to the formation of the Society for Complexity in Acute Illness. Case 3 is an institution-based group, the Biosystems Group at the University of California, San Francisco, whose work has included a focus on a common lexicon for DMM. Case 4 is an institution-based, trans-disciplinary research group (the Center for Inflammation and Regenerative Modeling at the University of Pittsburgh, whose modeling work has led to internal education efforts, grant support, and commercialization. Conclusion A transdisciplinary approach, which involves team interaction in an iterative fashion to address ambiguity and is supported by educational initiatives, is likely to be necessary for DMM in acute illness. Community-wide organizations such as the Society of Complexity in Acute Illness (SCAI) must

  2. Polyarteritis nodosa. Diagnostic challenges in a patient with cutaneous vasculitis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and pancytopenia: fatal progression after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Jobanputra, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with cutaneous vasculitis, leucopenia and psoriasis. He was treated initially with ciclosporin A. On withdrawal of ciclosporin, due to inadequate improvement of cutaneous vasculitis, he developed psoriatic arthritis. Worsening neutropenia and pancytopenia, believed to be immune mediated, developed. He was treated with prednisolone, methotrexate and adalimumab but developed pneumocystis pneumonia. Leucocyte levels improved markedly with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, whilst being treated with G-CSF his condition deteriorated. He developed gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms and progressive weight loss. Diagnosis was delayed, but eventually polyarteritis nodosa was diagnosed and he was treated with cyclophosphamide. The patient improved initially but died from small bowel perforation due to vasculitis. Evidence showing a temporal association of his deterioration with use of G-CSF is shown. The use of G-CSF in patients with autoimmune conditions including vasculitis should be undertaken with great caution. PMID:27123310

  3. Effect of adopting a new histological grading system of acute rejection after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Balk, A.; Zondervan, P.; van der Meer, P.; van Gelder, T.; Mochtar, B.; Simoons, M.; Weimar, W.

    1997-01-01

    Background—Treatment policy of acute rejection after heart transplantation has been changed after adopting the ISHLT endomyocardial biopsy grading system in 1991.
Objective—To determine the effect of this policy change on clinical outcome after transplantation.
Methods—The outcome of 147 patients who had a transplant before (early group, median follow up 96 months) and 114 patients who had a transplant after (late group, median follow up 41 months) the introduction of the ISHLT biopsy grading system was studied retrospectively. Initially "moderate rejection" according to Billingham's conventional criteria was treated. From January 1991 grade 3A and higher was considered to require intensification of immunosuppression.
Results—There were some differences between the two groups: recipients (50 v 44 years) as well as donors (28 v 24 years) were older in the "late group" and more patients of this group received early anti-T cell prophylaxis (92% v 56%). Despite more extensive use of early prophylaxis more rejection episodes were diagnosed (2.4 v 1.4) and considerably more courses of rejection treatment were instituted in the late compared with the early group (3.2 v 1.5). There were no deaths because of rejection in the late group, however, more infections occurred within the first year (mean 1.8 v 1.4) and more non-skin malignancies within the first 41 months were diagnosed (8 of 57 v 6 of 147, 95% CIs of difference includes 0). The incidence of graft vascular disease in the late group has been comparable to the early group until now. 
Conclusion—The interpretation of the ISHLT grading system resulted in lowering of the threshold for the diagnosis of rejection thereby increasing the number of rejections and subsequently the immunosuppressive load and its complications.

 Keywords: transplantation;  biopsy grading system;  rejection PMID:9470880

  4. Factors Predicting the Effects of Hybrid Assistive Limb Robot Suit during the Acute Phase of Central Nervous System Injury

    PubMed Central

    CHIHARA, Hideo; TAKAGI, Yasushi; NISHINO, Kazunari; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; ARAKAWA, Yoshiki; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; TAKENOBU, Yohei; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    To improve the activities of daily living of patients with injury to the central nervous system, physical therapy starting from the acute phase of the injury is important. Recently, the efficacy of physical therapy using a hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robot suit was reported. However, individual differences exist in the effects of HAL. We investigated factors predicting the effects of HAL in 15 patients at our institution with central nervous system injury, primarily due to stroke, who underwent training using HAL during the acute phase. Patients were classified as either “with HAL suitability” or “without HAL suitability” based on scores from 10-m walking speed, gait, satisfaction, and pain. In both groups, Brunnstrom stage before HAL intervention, Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), stroke impairment assessment set (SIAS), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated. Although motor function items did not differ significantly, FIM cognitive function items (P = 0.036), visuospatial perception items on SIAS (P = 0.0277), and pain items on SIAS (P = 0.0122) differed significantly between groups. These results indicated that training using HAL does not involve pain in patients with central nervous system injury during the acute phase, and exhibits positive effects in patients without pain and with high communication ability and visuospatial perception function. When conducting HAL intervention, incorporating functional assessment scores (FIM and SIAS), including peripheral items, may be useful to predict the suitability of HAL. PMID:26538291

  5. Atypical presentation of acute-onset endophthalmitis after uncomplicated pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Gayatri S; Garfinkel, Richard A; Melamud, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with signs of acute-onset endophthalmitis within 24 hours of surgery, with retinal hemorrhages and vascular changes in the absence of pain or significant inflammation. She had undergone uncomplicated 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane with presenting visual acuity of 20/40- and significant distortion. Vitreous culture revealed Staphylococcus epidermidis. Final visual acuity was no light perception with persistent pain, and the patient ultimately underwent enucleation. Although rarely, acute-onset postoperative endophthalmitis can present as retinal vasculitis with intraretinal hemorrhages and mild inflammation. PMID:25856829

  6. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  7. Decongestion Strategies and Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Activation in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Stevens, Susanna R.; DeVore, Adam D.; Lala, Anuradha; Vader, Justin M.; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; Khazanie, Prateeti; Redfield, Margaret M.; Stevenson, Lynne W.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Braunwald, Eugene; Felker, G. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background High dose diuretics in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) are thought to activate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and alternative decongestion strategies, such as ultrafiltration (UF), have been proposed to mitigate this RAAS activation. Methods We analyzed 427 AHF patients enrolled in the DOSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF trials. We assessed the relationship between two markers of RAAS activation (plasma renin activity [PRA] and aldosterone) from baseline to 72-96h and decongestion strategy; high vs. low-dose and continuous infusion vs. bolus furosemide for DOSE-AHF and UF vs. stepped pharmacologic care for CARRESS-HF. We determined the relationship between RAAS biomarkers and 60-day outcomes. Results Patients with greater RAAS activation at baseline had lower blood pressures, lower serum sodium, and higher BUN. Continuous infusion furosemide and UF were associated with greater PRA increases (median +1.66 vs. +0.66 ng/mL/h with continuous vs. bolus, P=0.021; +4.05 vs. +0.56 ng/mL/h with UF vs. stepped care, P=0.014). There was no significant difference in RAAS biomarker change with high vs. low-dose diuretics (both P>0.5). Neither baseline log PRA nor log aldosterone was associated with increased death/HF hospitalization (HR for a doubling 1.05; 95% CI: 0.98-1.13, P=0.18 and HR 1.13; 95% CI: 0.99-1.28, P=0.069, respectively). The change in RAAS biomarkers from baseline to 72-96 h was not associated with outcomes (both P>0.5). Conclusions High-dose loop diuretics did not result in greater RAAS activation than low-dose diuretics. UF resulted in greater PRA increase than stepped pharmacologic care. Neither PRA nor aldosterone was significantly associated with short-term outcomes in this cohort. PMID:25543972

  8. Simvastatin is associated with reduced risk of acute pancreatitis: findings from a regional integrated healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bechien U; Pandol, Stephen J; Liu, In-Lu Amy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterise the relationship between simvastatin and risk of acute pancreatitis (AP). Design We conducted a retrospective cohort study (2006–2012) on data from an integrated healthcare system in southern California. Exposure to simvastatin was calculated from time of initial dispensation until 60 days following prescription termination. AP cases were defined by ICD-9 CM 577.0 and serum lipase≥3 times normal. Patients were censored at death, last follow-up, and onset of AP or end-of-study. Incidence rate of pancreatitis among simvastatin users was compared with the adult reference population. Robust Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratio (RR) estimates for simvastatin use adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, gallstone-related disorders, hypertriglyceridaemia, smoking and alcohol dependence. Analysis was repeated for atorvastatin. Results Among 3 967 859 adult patients (median duration of follow-up of 3.4 years), 6399 developed an initial episode of AP. A total of 707 236 patients received simvastatin during the study period. Patients that received simvastatin were more likely to have gallstone-related disorders, alcohol dependence or hypertriglyceridaemia compared with the reference population. Nevertheless, risk of AP was significantly reduced with simvastatin use, crude incidence rate ratio 0.626 (95% CL 0.588, 0.668), p<0.0001. In multivariate analysis, simvastatin was independently associated with reduced risk of pancreatitis, adjusted RR 0.29 (95% CL 0.27, 0.31) after adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, gallstone disorders, alcohol dependence, smoking and hypertriglyceridaemia. Similar results were noted with atorvastatin, adjusted RR 0.33 (0.29, 0.38). Conclusions Use of simvastatin was independently associated with reduced risk of AP in this integrated healthcare setting. Similar findings for atorvastatin suggest a possible class effect. PMID:24742713

  9. EphB1 Suppression in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Regulating the DNA Damage Control System

    PubMed Central

    Kampen, K.R.; Scherpen, F.J.G.; Garcia-Manero, G.; Yang, H.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Cloos, J.; Zwaan, C.M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M.; Kornblau, S.M.; De Bont, E.S.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of ephrin receptor (EphB1) expression may associate with aggressive cancer phenotypes; however, the mechanism of action remains unclear. To gain detailed insight into EphB1 function in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), comprehensive analysis of EphB1 transcriptional regulation was conducted. In AML cells, EphB1 transcript was inversely correlated with EphB1 promoter methylation. The presence of EphB1 allowed EfnB1 ligand–mediated p53 DNA binding, leading to restoration of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade by the activation of ATR, Chk1, p53, p21, p38, CDK1tyr15, and Bax, and downregulation of HSP27 and Bcl2. Comparatively, reintroduction of EphB1 expression in EphB1-methylated AML cells enhanced the same cascade of ATR, Chk1, p21, and CDK1tyr15, which consequently enforced programmed cell death. Interestingly, in pediatric AML samples, EphB1 peptide phosphorylation and mRNA expression were actively suppressed as compared with normal bone marrow, and a significant percentage of the primary AML specimens had EphB1 promoter hyper-methylation. Finally, EphB1 repression associated with a poor overall survival in pediatric AML. Combined, the contribution of EphB1 to the DDR system reveals a tumor-suppressor function for EphB1 in pediatric AML. Implications The tumor-suppressor function of EphB1 is clinically relevant across many malignancies, suggesting that EphB1 is an important regulator of common cancer cell trans forming pathways. PMID:25944917

  10. Central nervous system effects of meclizine and dimenhydrinate: evidence of acute tolerance to antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Manning, C; Scandale, L; Manning, E J; Gengo, F M

    1992-11-01

    Relative daytime drowsiness and performance impairment produced by meclizine and dimenhydrinate was assessed in 24 healthy male volunteers. Subjects received either dimenhydrinate, 100 mg, at 8:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 4:00 PM; meclizine, 50 mg, at 8:00 AM, with placebo at 12:00 PM and 4:00 PM; or placebo at all three times in this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Impairment of mental performance was assessed by choice reaction time testing and digit symbol substitution scores. Drowsiness was self-assessed on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and on a visual analog scale. Both antihistamines produced changes in digit symbol substitution, recognition time, and subjective assessments of sleepiness different from placebo. Expressed as change from baseline, the greatest reductions in digit symbol substitution scores after dimenhydrinate occurred 3 hours after the first dose (6.6 +/- 7) and were not different from the greatest measured change after meclizine (5.8 +/- 8), which occurred 9 hours after the dose was administered. Similar results were obtained with the other psychometric test scores. Self-rated sleepiness after dimenhydrinate was greatest 1 hour after the first dose, and was significantly greater than the largest degree of sleepiness after meclizine, which occurred at 7 hours after the dose. The effects of the first dose of dimenhydrinate on psychometric test scores were compared with the magnitude of the effects produced by subsequent doses. The magnitude of effect of the first dose of dimenhydrinate was significantly greater than the magnitude of effect produced by subsequent doses. The data suggest the possibility that acute tolerance to central nervous system impairment develops with multiple doses of dimenhydrinate. PMID:1474173

  11. Survival in acute and severe low o environment: use of a genetic model system.

    PubMed

    Azad, Priti; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2009-10-01

    Hypoxia whether present during physiologic states (e.g., embryogenesis) or during pathologic states (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea and sickle cell anemia), challenges the vertebrate or invertebrate organism. Clearly, hypoxia can lead to sublethal cell injury or death and consequently organ or systemic injury and failure, depending on severity. We discovered that the adult Drosophila melanogaster is tolerant to a low O(2) environment, withstanding approximately 3-4 hours of total O(2) deprivation or anoxia without showing any evidence of cell injury. This opened major avenues for us since the Drosophila has been used so effectively in so many relevant research areas. We investigated the changes in gene expression in D. melanogaster after severe (1% O(2)) intermittent or constant hypoxia treatment for 2.5 hours. Our microarray analysis has identified multiple gene families that are up- or downregulated in response to acute constant (CH) and intermittent hypoxia (IH). We observed that even for short-term the gene expression response to IH and CH varied not only in the number of genes but also type of gene families. Furthermore, by utilizing powerful Drosophila genetic tools we studied the role of single genes (up- or downregulated in arrays) in survival under either paradigm in adult flies. We observed significant increased adult survival (as compared to controls) of P-element lines for Hsp70 and Hsp23 genes during CH and Mdr49 and l (2)08717 genes during IH. This suggests that the increased transcript levels as observed in array data after either paradigm play an important role under severe hypoxia. Indeed, we found for example that over-expressing Hsp70 in vivo in specific fly organs (such as heart) significantly increased adult survival during CH as compared to controls. These data provide further clues about the mechanisms by which intermittent and constant hypoxia lead to cell injury and morbidity or adaptation and survival. PMID:19845605

  12. Literature Review and Global Consensus on Management of Acute Radiation Syndrome Affecting Nonhematopoietic Organ Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Gent, Robert Nicolas; Carr, Zhanat; Schneider, Rita; Bader, Judith; Buglova, Elena; Chao, Nelson; Coleman, C. Norman; Ganser, Arnold; Gorin, Claude; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Huff, L. Andrew; Lillis-Hearne, Patricia; Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Powles, Ray; Schünemann, Holger; Shapiro, Alla; Stenke, Leif; Valverde, Nelson; Weinstock, David; White, Douglas; Albanese, Joseph; Meineke, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The World Health Organization convened a panel of experts to rank the evidence for medical countermeasures for management of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in a hypothetical scenario involving the hospitalization of 100 to 200 victims. The goal of this panel was to achieve consensus on optimal management of ARS affecting nonhematopoietic organ systems based upon evidence in the published literature. Methods English-language articles were identified in MEDLINE and PubMed. Reference lists of retrieved articles were distributed to conferees in advance of and updated during the meeting. Published case series and case reports of ARS, publications of randomized controlled trials of relevant interventions used to treat nonirradiated individuals, reports of studies in irradiated animals, and prior recommendations of subject matter experts were selected. Studies were extracted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation system. In cases in which data were limited or incomplete, a narrative review of the observations was made. Results No randomized controlled trials of medical countermeasures have been completed for individuals with ARS. Reports of countermeasures were often incompletely described, making it necessary to rely on data generated in nonirradiated humans and in experimental animals. A strong recommendation is made for the administration of a serotonin-receptor antagonist prophylactically when the suspected exposure is >2 Gy and topical steroids, antibiotics, and antihistamines for radiation burns, ulcers, or blisters; excision and grafting of radiation ulcers or necrosis with intractable pain; provision of supportive care to individuals with neurovascular syndrome; and administration of electrolyte replacement therapy and sedatives to individuals with significant burns, hypovolemia, and/ orshock. A strong recommendation is made against the use of systemic steroids in the absence of a specific indication. A weak

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  14. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  15. Acute urticaria as a side effect of the Mirena® (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system): a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The levonorgestrel intrauterine system, Mirena®, is widely used for contraception and the treatment of idiopathic menorrhagia. Here, we reported one case of acute urticaria following Mirena® implantation to increase the awareness of possible adverse side effects associated with Mirena®. Case presentation The case presented is a 27-year-old Chinese woman who received Mirena® implantation for her adenomyosis and menorrhagia. The operation was successful and the patient did not experience any discomfort during the operation. However, she developed acute urticaria on her entire body accompanied with pruritic, slight left lower quadrant pain, and slight dizziness two hours after the operation. The patient was recommended to have the Mirena® removed immediately, and she took 10 mg oral methylprednisolone and 5 mg desloratadine tablet daily for five days. Her urticaria resolved and did not recur. Conclusion The patient’s acute urticaria seems to have been associated with the Mirena® levonorgestrel intrauterine system implantation, since she had no history of allergic reactions to materials used during the operation such as plastic, metal, alcohol, medications, and povidone-iodine. PMID:24708811

  16. Neurofunctional endpoints assessed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells for estimation of acute systemic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Helena; Runesson, Johan; Lundqvist, Jessica; Lindegren, Helene; Axelsson, Viktoria; Forsby, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the EU-funded integrated project ACuteTox is to develop a strategy in which general cytotoxicity, together with organ-specific toxicity and biokinetic features, are used for the estimation of human acute systemic toxicity. Our role in the project is to characterise the effect of reference chemicals with regard to neurotoxicity. We studied cell membrane potential (CMP), noradrenalin (NA) uptake, acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine receptor (AChR) signalling and voltage-operated calcium channel (VOCC) function in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after exposure to 23 pharmaceuticals, pesticides or industrial chemicals. Neurotoxic alert chemicals were identified by comparing the obtained data with cytotoxicity data from the neutral red uptake assay in 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Furthermore, neurotoxic concentrations were correlated with estimated human lethal blood concentrations (LC50). The CMP assay was the most sensitive assay, identifying eight chemicals as neurotoxic alerts and improving the LC50 correlation for nicotine, lindane, atropine and methadone. The NA uptake assay identified five neurotoxic alert chemicals and improved the LC50 correlation for atropine, diazepam, verapamil and methadone. The AChE, AChR and VOCC assays showed limited potential for detection of acute toxicity. The CMP assay was further evaluated by testing 36 additional reference chemicals. Five neurotoxic alert chemicals were generated and orphendrine and amitriptyline showed improved LC50 correlation. Due to the high sensitivity and the simplicity of the test protocol, the CMP assay constitutes a good candidate assay to be included in an in vitro test strategy for prediction of acute systemic toxicity.

  17. Amelioration of Acute Kidney Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome by an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, Fidarestat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Mizukami, Hiroki; Kamata, Kosuke; Inaba, Wataru; Kato, Noriaki; Hibi, Chihiro; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a fatal disease because of multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury is a serious complication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and its genesis is still unclear posing a difficulty for an effective treatment. Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor is recently found to suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac failure and its lethality. We studied the effects of AR inhibitor on LPS-induced acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Methods Mice were injected with LPS and the effects of AR inhibitor (Fidarestat 32 mg/kg) before or after LPS injection were examined for the mortality, severity of renal failure and kidney pathology. Serum concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and their mRNA expressions in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney were measured. We also evaluated polyol metabolites in the kidney. Results Mortality rate within 72 hours was significantly less in LPS-injected mice treated with AR inhibitor both before (29%) and after LPS injection (40%) than untreated mice (90%). LPS-injected mice showed marked increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and cytokines, and AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the changes. LPS-induced acute kidney injury was associated with vacuolar degeneration and apoptosis of renal tubular cells as well as infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. With improvement of such pathological findings, AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the elevation of cytokine mRNA levels in multiple organs and renal sorbitol accumulation. Conclusion AR inhibitor treatment ameliorated LPS-induced acute kidney injury, resulting in the lowered mortality. PMID:22253906

  18. Acute systemic accumulation of acrolein in mice by inhalation at a concentration similar to that in cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Melissa; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Tian, Ran; Shi, Riyi

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is an important environmental factor associated with a wide array of public health concerns. Acrolein, a component of tobacco smoke and a known toxin to various cell types, may be a key pathological factor mediating the adverse effects linked with tobacco smoke. Although acrolein is known to accumulate in the respiratory system after acute nasal exposure, it is not clear if it accumulates systemically, and less is known in the nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of acrolein accumulation in the circulation and in the spinal cord following acute acrolein inhalation in mice. Using a laboratory-fabricated inhalation chamber, we found elevated urinary 3-HPMA, an acrolein metabolite, and increased acrolein adducts in the spinal cord after weeks of nasal exposure to acrolein at a concentration similar to that in tobacco smoke. The data indicated that acrolein is absorbed into the circulatory system and some enters the nervous system. It is expected that these findings may facilitate further studies to probe the pathological role of acrolein in the nervous system resulting from smoke and other external sources. PMID:25446876

  19. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C.; Law, Mark A.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  20. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C; Law, Mark A; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  1. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2016-08-01

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit. PMID:26122324

  2. Long-Term Maintenance Therapy Using Rituximab-Induced Continuous B-Cell Depletion in Patients with ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendergraft, William F.; Cortazar, Frank B.; Wenger, Julia; Murphy, Andrew P.; Rhee, Eugene P.; Laliberte, Karen A.; Niles, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Remission in the majority of ANCA vasculitis patients is not sustained after a single course of rituximab, and risk of relapse warrants development of a successful strategy to ensure durable remission. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective analysis of ANCA vasculitis patients who underwent maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion for up to 7 years was performed. Maintenance therapy with rituximab was initiated after achieving remission or converting from other prior maintenance therapy. Continuous B-cell depletion was achieved in all patients by scheduled rituximab administration every 4 months. Disease activity, serologic parameters, adverse events, and survival were examined. Results In the study, 172 patients (mean age=60 years, 55% women, 57% myeloperoxidase–ANCA) treated from April of 2006 to March of 2013 underwent continuous B-cell depletion with rituximab. Median remission maintenance follow-up time was 2.1 years. Complete remission (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score [BVAS]=0) was achieved in all patients. Major relapse (BVAS≥3) occurred in 5% of patients and was associated with weaning of other immunosuppression drugs. Remission was reinduced in all patients. Survival mirrored survival of a general age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched United States population. Conclusion This analysis provides evidence for long-term disease control using continuous B-cell depletion. This treatment strategy in ANCA vasculitis patients also seems to result in survival rates comparable with rates in a matched reference population. These findings suggest that prospective remission maintenance treatment trials using continuous B-cell depletion are warranted. PMID:24626432

  3. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5–2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028–9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary. PMID:27051237

  4. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE IN E. COLI CHALLENGED PIGS TREATED WITH SYSTEMIC ANTIBIOTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in serum C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (HG) and cortisol (CS), and rectal temperature (RT) were evaluated in response to an acute enterotoxemia elicited by antibiotic injection. Twenty-four, 24-day old, pigs were individually housed and provided feed and water ad libitum. Twelve pig...

  5. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Rituximab Following Failure of Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C-Associated Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sneller, Michael C.; Hu, Zonghui; Langford, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report on the results of a randomized controlled trial of rituximab in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated mixed cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. METHODS We conducted an open-label single center randomized controlled trial of rituximab (375 mg/m2 per week for 4 weeks) compared to best available therapy for treatment of patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy failed to induce remission. The primary endpoint was remission at 6 months from study entry. RESULTS A total of 24 patients were enrolled. Baseline disease activity and organ involvement were similar in the two groups. Ten patients in the rituximab group (83%) were in remission at study month 6, compared with 1 patient in the control group (8%), a result that met criterion for stopping the study (P<0.001). The median duration of remission for rituximab-treated patients reaching the primary endpoint was 7 months. No adverse effect of rituximab on HCV plasma viremia or hepatic transaminase levels was observed. CONCLUSIONS Therapy with rituximab was well tolerated and effective treatment for patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy fails to induce remission. PMID:22147444

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Remission Induction Therapy for Severe Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavsky, E. M.; Specks, U.; Merkel, P. A.; Seo, P.; Spiera, R.; Langford, C. A.; Hoffman, G. S.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; St.Clair, E. W.; Tchao, N. K.; Viviano, L.; Ding, L.; Sejismundo, L. P.; Mieras, K.; Iklé, D.; Jepson, B.; Mueller, M.; Brunetta, P.; Allen, N. B.; Fervenza, F. C.; Geetha, D.; Keogh, K.; Kissin, E. Y.; Monach, P. A.; Peikert, T.; Stegeman, C.; Ytterberg, S. R.; Stone, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reasons that complete remission is not achieved or maintained with original treatment in some patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV) treated with rituximab (RTX) or with cyclophosphamide/azathioprine (CYC/AZA). Methods The Rituximab in AAV trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing the rate of remission induction among patients treated with RTX (n = 99) and patients treated with CYC followed by AZA (n = 98). Glucocorticoids were tapered over a period of 5 months. The primary outcome measure was lack of disease activity without glucocorticoid treatment at 6 months. To determine the most important reason for failure to achieve the primary outcome, 7 hierarchical categories of reasons were defined retrospectively (uncontrolled disease, adverse event leading to therapy discontinuation, severe flare, limited flare, Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s Granulomatosis >0, prednisone treatment at any dosage, and other). Results Although remission (lack of disease activity) was achieved in 170 of the 197 patients (86%) in the first 6 months, the primary outcome measure was not achieved in 42%. There were 3 deaths. Twenty-four percent of the patients failed to achieve the primary end point due to active disease: 10 (5%) experienced uncontrolled disease in the first month and 37 (19%) experienced flares after initial improvement. In the majority of such patients, treatment with blinded crossover or according to best medical judgment led to disease control. Ninety-one percent of patients who had uncontrolled disease or experienced a severe flare had proteinase 3 (PR3)–ANCA. When patients with uncontrolled disease were excluded from analysis, those who were PR3-ANCA positive were found to experience fewer flares when treated with RTX compared to CYC/AZA (8 of 59 [14%] versus 20 of 62 [32%]; P = 0.02). Neither ANCA titers nor B cell counts predicted disease

  8. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  9. Facilitators and barriers to doing workplace mental health research: Case study of acute psychological trauma in a public transit system.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Bender, Ash; Eynan, Rahel; O'Grady, John; Shah, Ravi

    2016-03-10

    The Acute Psychological Trauma (APT) Study was a collaboration between an acute care hospital, a specialized multidisciplinary program designed to meet the mental health needs of injured workers, and a large urban public transit system. The overall purpose was to evaluate a Best Practices Intervention (BPI) for employees affected by acute psychological trauma compared to a Treatment as Usual (TAU) group. The specific purpose is to discuss facilitators and barriers that were recognized in implementing and carrying out mental health research in a workplace setting. Over the course of the APT study, a joint implementation committee was responsible for day-to-day study operations and made regular observations on the facilitators and barriers that arose throughout the study. The facilitators to this study included the longstanding relationships among the partners, increased recognition for the need of mental health research in the workplace, and the existence of a community advisory committee. The significant barriers to doing this study of mental health research in the workplace included differences in organizational culture, inconsistent union support, co-interventions, and stigma. Researchers and funding agencies need to be flexible and provide additional resources in order to overcome the barriers that can exist doing workplace mental health research. PMID:26967029

  10. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  11. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  12. Left ventricular apical thrombus after systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doepp, Florian; Sanad, Wasiem; Schreiber, Stephan J; Baumann, Gert; Borges, Adrian C

    2005-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is an established treatment in acute stroke. To prevent rethrombosis after rtPA therapy, secondary anticoagulation with heparin is commonly performed. However, the recommended time-point and extent of heparin treatment vary and are not well investigated. Case presentation We report a 61-year-old man who developed an acute global aphasia and right-sided hemiparesis. Cranial CT was normal and systemic thrombolytic therapy with tPA was started 120 minutes after symptom onset. Low-dose subcutaneous heparin treatment was initiated 24 hours later. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) 12 hours after admission showed slightly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) but was otherwise normal. 48 hours later the patient suddenly deteriorated with clinical signs of dyspnea and tachycardia. TTE revelead a large left ventricular apical thrombus as well as a reduction of LVEF to 20 %. Serial further TTE investigations demonstrated a complete resolution of the thrombus and normalisation of LVEF within two days. Conclusion Our case demonstrates an intracardiac thrombus formation following rtPA treatment of acute stroke, probably caused by secondary hypercoagulability. Rethrombosis or new thrombus formation might be an underestimated complication of rtPA therapy and potentially explain cases of secondary stroke progression. PMID:15918893

  13. Public Health Response Systems In-Action: Learning from Local Health Departments’ Experiences with Acute and Emergency Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer C.; Yang, Jane E.; Crawley, Adam W.; Biesiadecki, Laura; Aragón, Tomás J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of their core mission, public health agencies attend to a wide range of disease and health threats, including those that require routine, acute, and emergency responses. While each incident is unique, the number and type of response activities are finite; therefore, through comparative analysis, we can learn about commonalities in the response patterns that could improve predictions and expectations regarding the resources and capabilities required to respond to future acute events. In this study, we interviewed representatives from more than 120 local health departments regarding their recent experiences with real-world acute public health incidents, such as infectious disease outbreaks, severe weather events, chemical spills, and bioterrorism threats. We collected highly structured data on key aspects of the incident and the public health response, particularly focusing on the public health activities initiated and community partners engaged in the response efforts. As a result, we are able to make comparisons across event types, create response profiles, and identify functional and structural response patterns that have import for future public health preparedness and response. Our study contributes to clarifying the complexity of public health response systems and our analysis reveals the ways in which these systems are adaptive to the character of the threat, resulting in differential activation of functions and partners based on the type of incident. Continued and rigorous examination of the experiences of health departments throughout the nation will refine our very understanding of what the public health response system is, will enable the identification of organizational and event inputs to performance, and will allow for the construction of rich, relevant, and practical models of response operations that can be employed to strengthen public health systems. PMID:24236137

  14. Early multi-system organ failure associated with acute pancreatitis: a plea for a conservative therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Dugernier, T; Reynaert, M; Laterre, P F

    2003-01-01

    The mortality of severe acute pancreatitis still ranges between 10 and 20%. Nowadays, infected pancreatic necrosis is the leading cause of death. Despite advances in intensive care therapy, however, early and worsening multi-system organ failure remains a source of substantial morbidity and still accounts for 20 to 50% of the deaths. In recent years, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the relevant cascades of inflammatory mediators have been implicated as the key factor in the emergence of remote tissue damage. Early multi-system organ failure that supervenes in the first week is typically associated with a sterile necrotizing process. There are no pathophysiological, clinical or economical data to support the practice of debridement of sterile necrosis to prevent or to control early multi-system organ failure. This issue has never been addressed in a controlled study. Besides intensive care support, non-surgical therapeutic modalities including urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy for impacted stones, antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of pancreatic infection and early jejunal nutrition have been specifically developed hopefully to attenuate multiple organ failure, to obviate the need of surgical drainage and to improve survival. Fine needle aspiration of necrotic areas must be incorporated in any conservative therapeutic strategy in order to identify and not to jeopardize those with infected necrosis that remains an absolute indication for drainage. A specific treatment of acute pancreatitis is still lacking, so far. However, there is ample experimental and pathophysiological evidence in favour of immunomodulatory therapy in severe acute pancreatitis. The administration of one or several antagonists of inflammatory mediators possibly combined with a protease inhibitor may at last provide the opportunity to interfere with the two major determinants of prognosis: the severity of multiple organ failure and the extent of necrotic areas that creates

  15. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, Vanessa; Wong, K. Thong; Looi, R.Y.; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Barrot, Laura; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2009-05-10

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  16. Effects of acute versus post-acute systemic delivery of neural progenitor cells on neurological recovery and brain remodeling after focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Doeppner, T R; Kaltwasser, B; Teli, M K; Bretschneider, E; Bähr, M; Hermann, D M

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) induces functional recovery after stroke, albeit grafted cells are not integrated into residing neural networks. However, a systematic analysis of intravenous NPC delivery at acute and post-acute time points and their long-term consequences does not exist. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, and NPCs were intravenously grafted on day 0, on day 1 or on day 28. Animals were allowed to survive for up to 84 days. Mice and tissues were used for immunohistochemical analysis, flow cytometry, ELISA and behavioral tests. Density of grafted NPCs within the ischemic hemisphere was increased when cells were transplanted on day 28 as compared with transplantation on days 0 or 1. Likewise, transplantation on day 28 yielded enhanced neuronal differentiation rates of grafted cells. Post-ischemic brain injury, however, was only reduced when NPCs were grafted at acute time points. On the contrary, reduced post-ischemic functional deficits due to NPC delivery were independent of transplantation paradigms. NPC-induced neuroprotection after acute cell delivery was due to stabilization of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), reduction in microglial activation and modulation of both peripheral and central immune responses. On the other hand, post-acute NPC transplantation stimulated post-ischemic regeneration via enhanced angioneurogenesis and increased axonal plasticity. Acute NPC delivery yields long-term neuroprotection via enhanced BBB integrity and modulation of post-ischemic immune responses, whereas post-acute NPC delivery increases post-ischemic angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity. Post-ischemic functional recovery, however, is independent of NPC delivery timing, which offers a broad therapeutic time window for stroke treatment. PMID:25144721

  17. Effects of acute versus post-acute systemic delivery of neural progenitor cells on neurological recovery and brain remodeling after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Doeppner, T R; Kaltwasser, B; Teli, M K; Bretschneider, E; Bähr, M; Hermann, D M

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) induces functional recovery after stroke, albeit grafted cells are not integrated into residing neural networks. However, a systematic analysis of intravenous NPC delivery at acute and post-acute time points and their long-term consequences does not exist. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, and NPCs were intravenously grafted on day 0, on day 1 or on day 28. Animals were allowed to survive for up to 84 days. Mice and tissues were used for immunohistochemical analysis, flow cytometry, ELISA and behavioral tests. Density of grafted NPCs within the ischemic hemisphere was increased when cells were transplanted on day 28 as compared with transplantation on days 0 or 1. Likewise, transplantation on day 28 yielded enhanced neuronal differentiation rates of grafted cells. Post-ischemic brain injury, however, was only reduced when NPCs were grafted at acute time points. On the contrary, reduced post-ischemic functional deficits due to NPC delivery were independent of transplantation paradigms. NPC-induced neuroprotection after acute cell delivery was due to stabilization of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduction in microglial activation and modulation of both peripheral and central immune responses. On the other hand, post-acute NPC transplantation stimulated post-ischemic regeneration via enhanced angioneurogenesis and increased axonal plasticity. Acute NPC delivery yields long-term neuroprotection via enhanced BBB integrity and modulation of post-ischemic immune responses, whereas post-acute NPC delivery increases post-ischemic angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity. Post-ischemic functional recovery, however, is independent of NPC delivery timing, which offers a broad therapeutic time window for stroke treatment. PMID:25144721

  18. Anti-oxidized low-density lipoprotein antibodies in myeloperoxidase–positive vasculitis patients preferentially recognize hypochlorite-modified low density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Slot, M C; Theunissen, R; van Paassen, P; Damoiseaux, J G M C; Cohen Tervaert, J W

    2007-01-01

    Many patients surviving vasculitis are prone to accelerated atherosclerosis and often have enhanced levels of antibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). To measure anti-oxLDL antibodies, oxidation of LDL is achieved with copper (Cu) or malondialdehyde (MDA). Because, in vivo, LDL may be oxidized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) or its product hypochlorite, we measured anti-hypochlorite LDL antibodies in patients with vasculitis, haemodialysis patients and healthy controls. A newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect antibodies to oxLDL as modified by hypochlorite. Results are compared with data obtained by standard LDL oxidation using MDA–LDL or Cu–LDL as substrate. Results were compared between anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients (n = 93), haemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 59) and healthy controls (HC; n = 43). Furthermore, patients with MPO–ANCA-associated vasculitis (n = 47) were compared with patients with proteinase 3 (PR3)–ANCA associated vasculitis (n = 46). Optimal cut-off points were determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Anti-oxLDL antibodies are enhanced in AAV patients (MDA–LDL and hypochlorite–LDL) and in HD patients (hypochlorite–LDL), when compared to HC. Furthermore, patients with MPO–ANCA-associated vasculitis had higher levels of antibodies to hypochlorite–LDL than patients with PR3–ANCA-associated vasculitis. Our newly developed assay, in which hypochlorite–LDL is used as substrate, seems a more sensitive assay than traditional assays to measure oxLDL antibodies. Furthermore, our results suggest that enhanced MPO-mediated LDL oxidation occurs in patients with MPO–ANCA. PMID:17521320

  19. PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC HEALTH EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND SUBCHRONIC EXPOSURE TO SMOKE OBSCURANT SGF-2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sixty-day old, male rats were exposed to air, 0.5 or 1.5 ml/1 fog-oil for 3.5 hr/d, 4 days/wk for either 4 or 13 wk. Following the acute (4 wk) exposure to 1.5 mg/1, a multifocal pneumonitis was observed. Lung lavage fluid had an elevated number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, a...

  20. Relapsing polychondritis with p-ANCA associated vasculitis: Which triggers the other?

    PubMed Central

    File, Ibolya; Trinn, Csilla; Mátyus, Zsolt; Ujhelyi, László; Balla, József; Mátyus, János

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease with chronic inflammatory/destructive lesions of the cartilaginous tissues. In one third of the cases it is associated with other autoimmune disorders, mostly with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). We report three cases of RP with p-ANCA positive AAV. In the first patient RP developed 1.5 years after the onset of AAV. In the others the signs of RP were present before the onset of severe crescent glomerulonephritis. Patients responded well on steroid and cyclophosphamide. In dialysis dependent cases plasmapheresis was also used successfully. During the 2 and 1.5 years of follow up, they were symptom-free, and had stable glomerular filtration rate. The first patient died after four years of follow-up due to the complications of sudden unset pancytopenia, which raises the possibility of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. In the setting of RP or AAV physicians should always be aware of the possibility of sudden or insidious appearance of the other disease. PMID:25516870