Science.gov

Sample records for acute t-cell lymphoblastic

  1. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Beating the Clock in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William L; Aifantis, Iannis; Raetz, Elizabeth

    2017-02-15

    CDK4/6 inhibition was synergistic with dexamethasone and everolimus but antagonistic with conventional chemotherapy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) preclinical models. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition in combination with glucocorticoids and mTOR inhibition offers a unique therapeutic opportunity in T-ALL. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 873-5. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Pikman et al., p. 1012.

  3. Epigenetics in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Van der Meulen, Joni; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Normal T-cell development is a strictly regulated process in which hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate from the bone marrow to the thymus and differentiate from early T-cell progenitors toward mature and functional T cells. During this maturation process, cooperation between a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors can drive immature thymocytes into uncontrolled clonal expansion and cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite improved insights in T-ALL disease biology and comprehensive characterization of its genetic landscape, clinical care remained largely similar over the past decades and still consists of high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable side effects, clinical outcome is still extremely poor in a significant subset of T-ALL patients as a result of therapy resistance or hematological relapses. Recent genetic studies have identified recurrent somatic alterations in genes involved in DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in T-ALL, suggesting that epigenetic homeostasis is critically required in restraining tumor development in the T-cell lineage. In this review, we provide an overview of the epigenetic regulators that could be implicated in T-ALL disease biology and speculate how the epigenetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of epigenetic-based therapies to further improve the treatment of human T-ALL.

  4. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-04-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is importantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. The Notch driven long non-coding RNA repertoire in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van de Walle, Inge; Van Loocke, Wouter; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Vanhauwaert, Suzanne; Geerdens, Ellen; Benoit, Yves; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Soulier, Jean; Cools, Jan; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Rondou, Pieter; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Genetic studies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have uncovered a remarkable complexity of oncogenic and loss-of-function mutations. Amongst this plethora of genetic changes, NOTCH1 activating mutations stand out as the most frequently occurring genetic defect, identified in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, supporting a role as an essential driver for this gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish a comprehensive compendium of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome under control of Notch signaling. For this purpose, we measured the transcriptional response of all protein coding genes and long non-coding RNAs upon pharmacological Notch inhibition in the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CUTLL1 using RNA-sequencing. Similar Notch dependent profiles were established for normal human CD34(+) thymic T-cell progenitors exposed to Notch signaling activity in vivo. In addition, we generated long non-coding RNA expression profiles (array data) from ex vivo isolated Notch active CD34(+) and Notch inactive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and from a primary cohort of 15 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with known NOTCH1 mutation status. Integration of these expression datasets with publicly available Notch1 ChIP-sequencing data resulted in the identification of long non-coding RNAs directly regulated by Notch activity in normal and malignant T cells. Given the central role of Notch in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis, these data pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target hyperactive Notch signaling in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  7. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. The genetic basis of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Ding, Li; Holmfeldt, Linda; Wu, Gang; Heatley, Sue L; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Easton, John; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Jianmin; Rusch, Michael; Lu, Charles; Chen, Shann-Ching; Wei, Lei; Collins-Underwood, J Racquel; Ma, Jing; Roberts, Kathryn G; Pounds, Stanley B; Ulyanov, Anatoly; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard W; Parker, Matthew; McGoldrick, Daniel J; Zhao, David; Alford, Daniel; Espy, Stephen; Bobba, Kiran Chand; Song, Guangchun; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Roberts, Stefan; Barbato, Michael I; Campana, Dario; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Raimondi, Susana C; Kleppe, Maria; Cools, Jan; Shimano, Kristin A; Hermiston, Michelle L; Doulatov, Sergei; Eppert, Kolja; Laurenti, Elisa; Notta, Faiyaz; Dick, John E; Basso, Giuseppe; Hunger, Stephen P; Loh, Mignon L; Devidas, Meenakshi; Wood, Brent; Winter, Stuart; Dunsmore, Kimberley P; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Hong, Xin; Harris, Christopher C; Dooling, David J; Ochoa, Kerri; Johnson, Kimberly J; Obenauer, John C; Evans, William E; Pui, Ching-Hon; Naeve, Clayton W; Ley, Timothy J; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G

    2012-01-11

    Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ETP ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of unknown genetic basis. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 12 ETP ALL cases and assessed the frequency of the identified somatic mutations in 94 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cases. ETP ALL was characterized by activating mutations in genes regulating cytokine receptor and RAS signalling (67% of cases; NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, IL7R, JAK3, JAK1, SH2B3 and BRAF), inactivating lesions disrupting haematopoietic development (58%; GATA3, ETV6, RUNX1, IKZF1 and EP300) and histone-modifying genes (48%; EZH2, EED, SUZ12, SETD2 and EP300). We also identified new targets of recurrent mutation including DNM2, ECT2L and RELN. The mutational spectrum is similar to myeloid tumours, and moreover, the global transcriptional profile of ETP ALL was similar to that of normal and myeloid leukaemia haematopoietic stem cells. These findings suggest that addition of myeloid-directed therapies might improve the poor outcome of ETP ALL.

  10. A solitary uterine relapse in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: CT features and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, M A; Bettini, G; Pozzessere, C; Guerrini, S; Defina, M; Ambrosio, M R; Aprile, L; Bocchia, M; Volterrani, L

    2016-01-01

    T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-cell ALL) is a rare haematological neoplasia, that affects children and less commonly adults. Female genital tract and particularly uterus involvement in acute ALL is rare. This report presents the CT features of a 64-year-old woman with uterine relapse of T-cell ALL, occurring 11 months after the diagnosis, as a second, unique relapse of disease. The patient was asymptomatic when a CT examination showed a homogenous thickness of the uterine wall in comparison with the previous CT examination. Histology from biopsy specimens, obtained through hysteroscopy, confirmed T-cell ALL localisation (TdT+, CD10+, CD3c+ and CD2+). The uterus could be a site of relapse in patients suffering from ALL. Even though an MRI examination could better demonstrate the disease in cases of suspected female genital tract involvement by ALL, the comparison of differences between a present and a previous CT examination is sufficient to suspect the diagnosis.

  11. MicroRNA-128-3p is a novel oncomiR targeting PHF6 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mets, Evelien; Van Peer, Gert; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Taghon, Tom; Goossens, Steven; Mestdagh, Pieter; Benoit, Yves; De Moerloose, Barbara; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Vandesompele, Jo; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Rondou, Pieter

    2014-08-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arises from the leukemic transformation of developing thymocytes and results from cooperative genetic lesions. Inactivation of the PHF6 gene is frequently observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting an important tumor suppressive role for PHF6 in the pathobiology of this leukemia. Although the precise function of PHF6 is still unknown, this gene is most likely involved in chromatin regulation, a strongly emerging theme in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this context, our previous description of a cooperative microRNA regulatory network controlling several well-known T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia tumor suppressor genes, including PHF6, is of great importance. Given the high frequency of PHF6 lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the integration of PHF6 in this microRNA regulatory network, we aimed to identify novel oncogenic microRNAs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which suppress PHF6. To this end, we performed an unbiased PHF6 3'UTR-microRNA library screen and combined the results with microRNA profiling data of samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal thymocyte subsets. We selected miR-128-3p as a candidate PHF6-targeting, oncogenic microRNA and demonstrated regulation of PHF6 expression upon modulation of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. In vivo evidence of an oncogenic role of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was obtained through accelerated leukemia onset in a NOTCH1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia mouse model upon miR-128-3p over-expression. We conclude that miR-128-3p is a strong novel candidate oncogenic microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which targets the PHF6 tumor suppressor gene.

  12. Critical roles of NOTCH1 in acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hudan; Chiang, Mark Y; Pear, Warren S

    2011-08-01

    NOTCH1 plays a central role in T-cell development and, when aberrantly activated, in acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). As a transmembrane receptor that is ultimately converted into a transcription factor, NOTCH1 directly activates a spectrum of target genes, which function to mediate NOTCH1 signaling in normal or transformed T cells. During physiologic T-cell development, NOTCH1 has important functions in cell fate determination, proliferation, survival and metabolism. Activating NOTCH1 mutations occur in more than half of human patients with T-ALL, suggesting an important role for aberrant NOTCH1 signaling in the pathogenesis of this disease. Inhibiting NOTCH1 signaling in patient-derived cell lines and murine T-ALLs leads to growth arrest and/or apoptosis suggesting that NOTCH1 inhibitors can improve T-ALL treatment. However, there are challenges to translate NOTCH1 inhibitors to the clinic because of toxicity and resistance. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of oncogenic NOTCH1 signaling, molecular and functional analysis of NOTCH1 transcriptional targets in T-ALL, and recent advances in therapeutic targeting of NOTCH1.

  13. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Successful treatment of disseminated mucormycosis in a neutropenic patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Guymer, Chelsea; Khurana, Sanjeev; Suppiah, Ram; Hennessey, Iain; Cooper, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare angioinvasive fungal infection, more commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients, with reported mortality rates of 95% in disseminated disease. We present a case report of a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed disseminated infection with mucormycosis (involving the pancreas, left occipital lobe, right lower lobe of lung, appendix and right kidney) after having completed induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Growth of Lichtheimia corymbifera was initially isolated following a right pleural tap with fungal elements identified repeatedly on subsequent pathology specimens. Following radical surgical debridement and concurrent treatment with combination antifungal therapy, the patient survived. This case demonstrates that aggressive multisite surgical de-bulking of disseminated fungal foci, in conjunction with combination antifungal therapy and reversal of immunosuppression, can result in survival despite the grave prognosis associated with disseminated mucormycosis. PMID:23904418

  15. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R.; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  16. Childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia expressing "Ia-like" antigen:" a case report.

    PubMed

    Kupa, A; Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Moore, H; Thomas, M; Zola, H; Cheney, K; Rice, M; Toogood, I

    1982-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl presenting with vomiting, abdominal pain, and renal failure was found to have gross hepatosplenomegaly, a renal mass, and bilateral pleural effusions. A diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was suggested by a peripheral white cell count (WCC) of 119,000 x 10(6)mm3, 57% blasts, 22% lymphocytes, and confirmed by bone marrow examination. Lymphocyte surface marker studies at diagnosis enabled classification as a T-ALL, with a significant proportion of the T cells also bearing receptors for the third component of complement (C3). Seventy-two percent of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells reacted with anti-Ia monoclonal antibody (FMC44), and a smaller proportion (25%) carried receptors for the Fc portion of IgG. The T-classification of this ALL was verified at central nervous system (CNS) relapse and at a subsequent nodal relapse. Double-marker studies on cells from the infiltrated lymph node prepared in suspension confirmed the presence of Ia-positive T cells. The Ia marker is usually a useful discriminant between T and non-T cells in normal and ALL cell populations. The case described here highlights the need for a panel of markers to be used in classification of childhood ALL and supports the suggestion that there is a distinct subtype of Ia-positive T-ALL.

  17. A NOTCH1-driven MYC enhancer promotes T cell development, transformation and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Palomero, Teresa; Schnell, Stephanie A; Belver, Laura; Wendorff, Agnieszka A; Xu, Luyao; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Llobet-Navás, David; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Soulier, Jean; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to identify and annotate cancer driver genetic lesions have been focused primarily on the analysis of protein-coding genes; however, most genetic abnormalities found in human cancer are located in intergenic regions. Here we identify a new long range-acting MYC enhancer controlled by NOTCH1 that is targeted by recurrent chromosomal duplications in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). This highly conserved regulatory element, hereby named N-Me for NOTCH MYC enhancer, is located within a broad super-enhancer region +1.47 Mb from the MYC transcription initiating site, interacts with the MYC proximal promoter and induces orientation-independent MYC expression in reporter assays. Moreover, analysis of N-Me knockout mice demonstrates a selective and essential role of this regulatory element during thymocyte development and in NOTCH1-induced T-ALL. Together these results identify N-Me as a long-range oncogenic enhancer implicated directly in the pathogenesis of human leukemia and highlight the importance of the NOTCH1-MYC regulatory axis in T cell transformation and as a therapeutic target in T-ALL.

  18. Heterogeneity in mechanisms of emergent resistance in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C.; Bendak, Katerina; Anderson, Denise; Marshall, Glenn M.; Cole, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    Relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem and is thought to be associated with clonal selection during treatment. In this study we used an established pre-clinical model of induction therapy to increase our understanding of the effect of engraftment and chemotherapy on clonal selection and acquisition of drug resistance in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were engrafted with patient diagnostic specimens and exposed to a repeated combination therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, L-asparaginase and daunorubicin. Any re-emergence of disease following therapy was shown to be associated with resistance to dexamethasone, no resistance was observed to the other three drugs. Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements closely matched those in respective diagnosis and relapse patient specimens, highlighting that these clonal markers do not fully reflect the biological changes associated with drug resistance. Gene expression profiling revealed the significant underlying heterogeneity of dexamethasone-resistant xenografts. Alterations were observed in a large number of biological pathways, yet no dominant signature was common to all lines. These findings indicate that the biological changes associated with T-ALL relapse and resistance are stochastic and highly individual, and underline the importance of using sophisticated molecular techniques or single cell analyses in developing personalized approaches to therapy. PMID:27623214

  19. Notch is oncogenic dominant in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Demarest, Renée M.; Dahmane, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematologic neoplasm characterized by malignant expansion of immature T cells. Activated NOTCH (NotchIC) and c-MYC expression are increased in a large percentage of human T-ALL tumors. Furthermore, c-MYC has been shown to be a NOTCH target gene. Although activating mutations of Notch have been found in human T-ALL tumors, there is little evidence that the c-MYC locus is altered in this neoplasm. It was previously demonstrated that Notch and c-Myc–regulated genes have a broadly overlapping profile, including genes involved in cell cycle progression and metabolism. Given that Notch and c-Myc appear to function similarly in T-ALL, we sought to determine whether these two oncogenes could substitute for each other in T-ALL tumors. Here we report that NOTCHIC is able to maintain T-ALL tumors formed in the presence of exogenous NOTCHIC and c-MYC when exogenous c-MYC expression is extinguished. In contrast, c-MYC is incapable of maintaining these tumors in the absence of NOTCHIC. We propose that failure of c-MYC to maintain these tumors is the result of p53-mediated apoptosis. These results demonstrate that T-ALL maintenance is dependent on NOTCHIC, but not c-MYC, demonstrating that NOTCH is oncogenic dominant in T-ALL tumors. PMID:21217079

  20. Heterogeneity in mechanisms of emergent resistance in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Babasaheb D; Samuels, Amy L; Wells, Julia E; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Bendak, Katerina; Anderson, Denise; Marshall, Glenn M; Cole, Catherine H; Beesley, Alex H; Kees, Ursula R; Lock, Richard B

    2016-09-13

    Relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem and is thought to be associated with clonal selection during treatment. In this study we used an established pre-clinical model of induction therapy to increase our understanding of the effect of engraftment and chemotherapy on clonal selection and acquisition of drug resistance in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were engrafted with patient diagnostic specimens and exposed to a repeated combination therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, L-asparaginase and daunorubicin. Any re-emergence of disease following therapy was shown to be associated with resistance to dexamethasone, no resistance was observed to the other three drugs. Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements closely matched those in respective diagnosis and relapse patient specimens, highlighting that these clonal markers do not fully reflect the biological changes associated with drug resistance. Gene expression profiling revealed the significant underlying heterogeneity of dexamethasone-resistant xenografts. Alterations were observed in a large number of biological pathways, yet no dominant signature was common to all lines. These findings indicate that the biological changes associated with T-ALL relapse and resistance are stochastic and highly individual, and underline the importance of using sophisticated molecular techniques or single cell analyses in developing personalized approaches to therapy.

  1. Modeling T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia induced by the SCL and LMO1 oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mathieu; Tremblay, Cédric S; Herblot, Sabine; Aplan, Peter D; Hébert, Josée; Perreault, Claude; Hoang, Trang

    2010-06-01

    Deciphering molecular events required for full transformation of normal cells into cancer cells remains a challenge. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), the genes encoding the TAL1/SCL and LMO1/2 transcription factors are recurring targets of chromosomal translocations, whereas NOTCH1 is activated in >50% of samples. Here we show that the SCL and LMO1 oncogenes collaborate to expand primitive thymocyte progenitors and inhibit later stages of differentiation. Together with pre-T-cell antigen receptor (pre-TCR) signaling, these oncogenes provide a favorable context for the acquisition of activating Notch1 mutations and the emergence of self-renewing leukemia-initiating cells in T-ALL. All tumor cells harness identical and specific Notch1 mutations and Tcrbeta clonal signature, indicative of clonal dominance and concurring with the observation that Notch1 gain of function confers a selective advantage to SCL-LMO1 transgenic thymocytes. Accordingly, a hyperactive Notch1 allele accelerates leukemia onset induced by SCL-LMO1 and bypasses the requirement for pre-TCR signaling. Finally, the time to leukemia induced by the three transgenes corresponds to the time required for clonal expansion from a single leukemic stem cell, suggesting that SCL, LMO1, and Notch1 gain of function, together with an active pre-TCR, might represent the minimum set of complementing events for the transformation of susceptible thymocytes.

  2. Speed of leukemia development and genetic diversity in xenograft models of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Poglio, Sandrine; Lewandowski, Daniel; Calvo, Julien; Caye, Aurélie; Gros, Audrey; Laharanne, Elodie; Leblanc, Thierry; Landman-Parker, Judith; Baruchel, André; Soulier, Jean; Ballerini, Paola; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Pflumio, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) develops through accumulation of multiple genomic alterations within T-cell progenitors resulting in clonal heterogeneity among leukemic cells. Human T-ALL xeno-transplantation in immunodeficient mice is a gold standard approach to study leukemia biology and we recently uncovered that the leukemia development is more or less rapid depending on T-ALL sample. The resulting human leukemia may arise through genetic selection and we previously showed that human T-ALL development in immune-deficient mice is significantly enhanced upon CD7+/CD34+ leukemic cell transplantations. Here we investigated the genetic characteristics of CD7+/CD34+ and CD7+/CD34− cells from newly diagnosed human T-ALL and correlated it to the speed of leukemia development. We observed that CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− T-ALL cells that promote leukemia within a short-time period are genetically similar, as well as xenograft-derived leukemia resulting from both cell fractions. In the case of delayed T-ALL growth CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− cells were either genetically diverse, the resulting xenograft leukemia arising from different but branched subclones present in the original sample, or similar, indicating decreased fitness to mouse micro-environment. Altogether, our work provides new information relating the speed of leukemia development in xenografts to the genetic diversity of T-ALL cell compartments. PMID:27191650

  3. TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in minimal residual disease within childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Yin, Kailin; Dong, Yujun; Wang, Pingzhang; Xue, Yun; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Yuedan

    2017-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. In this study, a novel gene therapy target for childhood T-ALL to overcome chemoresistance was discovered: TFDP3 increased in the minimal residual disease (MRD) positive childhood T-ALL patients. Then, we established a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy to examine the functional relevance of TFDP3 to chemoresistance in MRD derived from Jurkat/E6-1. Jurkat xenografts in NOD/SCID mice were exposed to a four drug combination (VXLD) of vincristine (VCR), dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase (L-asp) and daunorubicin (DNR). During the 4-week VXLD treatment, the level of TFDP3 increased 4-fold. High expression of TFDP3 was identified in the re-emerging lines (Jurkat/MRD) with increased chemoresistance, which is correlated with partially promoter demethylation of TFDP3. Downregulation of TFDP3 by RNA interference reversed chemoresistance in Jurkat/MRD accompanied by reinstated E2F1 activity that coincided with increased levels of p53, p73, and associated proapoptotic target genes. Importantly, TFDP3 silencing in vivo induced apparent benefit to overcome chemoresistance in combination with VXLD treatment. Collectively, TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in MRD within childhood T-ALL, indicating that TFDP3 is a potential gene therapy target for residual cancer. PMID:27902457

  4. Phenothiazines induce PP2A-mediated apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Alejandro; Pan, Li; Groen, Richard W.J.; Baleydier, Frederic; Kentsis, Alex; Marineau, Jason; Grebliunaite, Ruta; Kozakewich, Elena; Reed, Casie; Pflumio, Francoise; Poglio, Sandrine; Uzan, Benjamin; Clemons, Paul; VerPlank, Lynn; An, Frank; Burbank, Jason; Norton, Stephanie; Tolliday, Nicola; Steen, Hanno; Weng, Andrew P.; Yuan, Huipin; Bradner, James E.; Mitsiades, Constantine; Look, A. Thomas; Aster, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive cancer that is frequently associated with activating mutations in NOTCH1 and dysregulation of MYC. Here, we performed 2 complementary screens to identify FDA-approved drugs and drug-like small molecules with activity against T-ALL. We developed a zebrafish system to screen small molecules for toxic activity toward MYC-overexpressing thymocytes and used a human T-ALL cell line to screen for small molecules that synergize with Notch inhibitors. We identified the antipsychotic drug perphenazine in both screens due to its ability to induce apoptosis in fish, mouse, and human T-ALL cells. Using ligand-affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a perphenazine target. T-ALL cell lines treated with perphenazine exhibited rapid dephosphorylation of multiple PP2A substrates and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, shRNA knockdown of specific PP2A subunits attenuated perphenazine activity, indicating that PP2A mediates the drug’s antileukemic activity. Finally, human T-ALLs treated with perphenazine exhibited suppressed cell growth and dephosphorylation of PP2A targets in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the recurring identification of phenothiazines as a class of drugs with anticancer effects. Furthermore, these data suggest that pharmacologic PP2A activation in T-ALL and other cancers driven by hyperphosphorylated PP2A substrates has therapeutic potential. PMID:24401270

  5. Genetic Inactivation of the PRC2 Complex in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Nedjic, Jelena; Trimarchi, Thomas; Flaherty, Maria Sol; Ferres-Marco, Dolors; da Ros, Vanina; Tang, Zuojian; Siegle, Jasmin; Asp, Patrik; Hadler, Michael; Rigo, Isaura; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Patel, Jay; Huynh, Tien; Utro, Filippo; Poglio, Sandrine; Samon, Jeremy B.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rabadan, Raul; Levine, Ross L.; Brown, Stuart; Pflumio, Francoise; Dominguez, Maria; Ferrando, Adolfo; Aifantis, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an immature hematopoietic malignancy driven mainly by oncogenic activation of NOTCH1 signaling1. In this study we report the presence of loss-of-function mutations and deletions of EZH2 and SUZ12 genes, encoding critical components of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) complex2,3, in 25% of T-ALLs. To further study the role of the PRC2 complex in T-ALL, we used NOTCH1-induced animal models of the disease, as well as human T-ALL samples, and combined locus-specific and global analysis of NOTCH1-driven epigenetic changes. These studies demonstrated that activation of NOTCH1 specifically induces loss of the repressive mark lysine-27 tri-methylation of histone 3 (H3K27me3)4 by antagonizing the activity of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) complex. These studies demonstrate a tumor suppressor role for the PRC2 complex in human leukemia and suggest a hitherto unrecognized dynamic interplay between oncogenic NOTCH1 and PRC2 function for the regulation of gene expression and cell transformation. PMID:22237151

  6. PTPN2 negatively regulates oncogenic JAK1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Maria; Soulier, Jean; Asnafi, Vahid; Mentens, Nicole; Hornakova, Tekla; Knoops, Laurent; Constantinescu, Stefan; Sigaux, François; Meijerink, Jules P; Vandenberghe, Peter; Tartaglia, Marco; Foa, Robin; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Haferlach, Torsten; Cools, Jan

    2011-06-30

    We have recently reported inactivation of the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 (also known as TC-PTP) through deletion of the entire gene locus in ∼ 6% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases. T-ALL is an aggressive disease of the thymocytes characterized by the stepwise accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations. In the present study, we confirmed the strong association of the PTPN2 deletion with TLX1 and NUP214-ABL1 expression. In addition, we found cooperation between PTPN2 deletion and activating JAK1 gene mutations. Activating mutations in JAK1 kinase occur in ∼ 10% of human T-ALL cases, and aberrant kinase activity has been shown to confer proliferation and survival advantages. Our results reveal that some JAK1 mutation-positive T-ALLs harbor deletions of the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2, a known negative regulator of the JAK/STAT pathway. We provide evidence that down-regulation of Ptpn2 sensitizes lymphoid cells to JAK1-mediated transformation and reduces their sensitivity to JAK inhibition.

  7. Characterization of a set of tumor suppressor microRNAs in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J.; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Wolfe, Andrew L.; Carty, Mark; Mohan, Prathibha; Rondou, Pieter; Socci, Nicholas D.; Benoit, Yves; Taghon, Tom; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Leslie, Christina S.; Speleman, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2015-01-01

    The posttranscriptional control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is highly redundant, and compensatory effects limit the consequences of the inactivation of individual miRNAs. This implies that only a few miRNAs can function as effective tumor suppressors. It is also the basis of our strategy to define functionally relevant miRNA target genes that are not under redundant control by other miRNAs. We identified a functionally interconnected group of miRNAs that exhibited a reduced abundance in leukemia cells from patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To pinpoint relevant target genes, we applied a machine learning approach to eliminate genes that were subject to redundant miRNA-mediated control and to identify those genes that were exclusively targeted by tumor-suppressive miRNAs. This strategy revealed the convergence of a small group of tumor suppressor miRNAs on the Myb oncogene, as well as their effects on HBP1, which encodes a transcription factor. The expression of both genes was increased in T-ALL patient samples, and each gene promoted the progression of T-ALL in mice. Hence, our systematic analysis of tumor suppressor miRNA action identified a widespread mechanism of oncogene activation in T-ALL. PMID:25406379

  8. Promoter DNA Methylation Pattern Identifies Prognostic Subgroups in Childhood T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Borssén, Magnus; Palmqvist, Lars; Karrman, Kristina; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Heldrup, Jesper; Forestier, Erik; Roos, Göran; Degerman, Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has improved, but there is a considerable fraction of patients experiencing a poor outcome. There is a need for better prognostic markers and aberrant DNA methylation is a candidate in other malignancies, but its potential prognostic significance in T-ALL is hitherto undecided. Design and Methods Genome wide promoter DNA methylation analysis was performed in pediatric T-ALL samples (n = 43) using arrays covering >27000 CpG sites. Clinical outcome was evaluated in relation to methylation status and compared with a contemporary T-ALL group not tested for methylation (n = 32). Results Based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), T-ALL samples were subgrouped as CIMP+ (high methylation) and CIMP− (low methylation). CIMP− T-ALL patients had significantly worse overall and event free survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively) compared to CIMP+ cases. CIMP status was an independent factor for survival in multivariate analysis including age, gender and white blood cell count. Analysis of differently methylated genes in the CIMP subgroups showed an overrepresentation of transcription factors, ligands and polycomb target genes. Conclusions We identified global promoter methylation profiling as being of relevance for subgrouping and prognostication of pediatric T-ALL. PMID:23762353

  9. Targeting oncogenic interleukin-7 receptor signalling with N-acetylcysteine in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Reed, Casie; Eisenberg, Amy R; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Daakour, Sarah; Yoda, Akinori; Rodig, Scott J; Tal, Noa; Shochat, Chen; Berezovskaya, Alla; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Weinstock, David M; Izraeli, Shai; Kung, Andrew L; Kentsis, Alex; Look, A Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane domain leading to receptor homodimerization through disulfide bond formation and ligand-independent activation of STAT5. We hypothesized that the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-tolerated drug used widely in clinical practice to treat acetaminophen overdose, would reduce disulfide bond formation, and inhibit mutant IL7R-mediated oncogenic signalling. We found that treatment with NAC disrupted IL7R homodimerization in IL7R-mutant DND-41 cells as assessed by non-reducing Western blot, as well as in a luciferase complementation assay. NAC led to STAT5 dephosphorylation and cell apoptosis at clinically achievable concentrations in DND-41 cells, and Ba/F3 cells transformed by an IL7R-mutant construct containing a cysteine insertion. The apoptotic effects of NAC could be rescued in part by a constitutively active allele of STAT5. Despite using doses lower than those tolerated in humans, NAC treatment significantly inhibited the progression of human DND-41 cells engrafted in immunodeficient mice. Thus, targeting leukaemogenic IL7R homodimerization with NAC offers a potentially effective and feasible therapeutic strategy that warrants testing in patients with T-ALL.

  10. Distinctive genotypes in infants with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Marcela B; van Delft, Frederik W; Colman, Susan M; Furness, Caroline L; Gibson, Jane; Emerenciano, Mariana; Kempski, Helena; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cave, Hélène; Soulier, Jean; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Greaves, Mel; Ford, Anthony M

    2015-11-01

    Infant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (iT-ALL) is a very rare and poorly defined entity with a poor prognosis. We assembled a unique series of 13 infants with T-ALL, which allowed us to identify genotypic abnormalities and to investigate prenatal origins. Matched samples (diagnosis/remission) were analysed by single nucleotide polymorphism-array to identify genomic losses and gains. In three cases, we identified a recurrent somatic deletion on chromosome 3. These losses result in the complete deletion of MLF1 and have not previously been described in T-ALL. We observed two cases with an 11p13 deletion (LMO2-related), one of which also harboured a deletion of RB1. Another case presented a large 11q14·1-11q23·2 deletion that included ATM and only five patients (38%) showed deletions of CDKN2A/B. Four cases showed NOTCH1 mutations; in one case FBXW7 was the sole mutation and three cases showed alterations in PTEN. KMT2A rearrangements (KMT2A-r) were detected in three out of 13 cases. For three patients, mutations and copy number alterations (including deletion of PTEN) could be backtracked to birth using neonatal blood spot DNA, demonstrating an in utero origin. Overall, our data indicates that iT-ALL has a diverse but distinctive profile of genotypic abnormalities when compared to T-ALL in older children and adults.

  11. Identification of novel molecular prognostic markers for paediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Nicholas G; Hoffmann, Katrin; Beesley, Alex H; Freitas, Joseph R; Firth, Martin J; Perera, Kanchana U; de Klerk, Nicolas H; Baker, David L; Kees, Ursula R

    2007-05-01

    In the last four decades the survival of patients with newly diagnosed childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has improved dramatically. In sharp contrast, relapsed T-ALL continues to confer a dismal prognosis. We sought to determine if gene expression profiling could uncover a signature of outcome for children with T-ALL. Using 12 patient specimens obtained before therapy started, we examined the gene expression profile by oligonucleotide microarrays. We identified three genes, CFLAR, NOTCH2 and BTG3, whose expression at the time of diagnosis accurately distinguished the patients according to disease outcome. These genes are involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cellular proliferation. The prognostic value of the three predictive genes was assessed in an independent cohort of 25 paediatric T-ALL patients using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Patients assigned to the adverse outcome group had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of relapse compared with patients assigned to the favourable outcome group (46% vs. 8%, P = 0.029). Five-year overall survival was also significantly worse in the patients assigned to the adverse outcome group (P = 0.0039). The independent influence of the 3-gene predictor was confirmed by multivariate analysis. Our study provides proof of principle that genome-wide expression profiling can detect novel molecular prognostic markers in paediatric T-ALL.

  12. An epigenetic mechanism of resistance to targeted therapy in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knoechel, Birgit; Roderick, Justine E; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Zhu, Jiang; Lohr, Jens G; Cotton, Matthew J; Gillespie, Shawn M; Fernandez, Daniel; Ku, Manching; Wang, Hongfang; Piccioni, Federica; Silver, Serena J; Jain, Mohit; Pearson, Daniel; Kluk, Michael J; Ott, Christopher J; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Kung, Andrew L; Root, David E; Bradner, James E; Aster, Jon C; Kelliher, Michelle A; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2014-04-01

    The identification of activating NOTCH1 mutations in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) led to clinical testing of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) that prevent NOTCH1 activation. However, responses to these inhibitors have been transient, suggesting that resistance limits their clinical efficacy. Here we modeled T-ALL resistance, identifying GSI-tolerant 'persister' cells that expand in the absence of NOTCH1 signaling. Rare persisters are already present in naive T-ALL populations, and the reversibility of their phenotype suggests an epigenetic mechanism. Relative to GSI-sensitive cells, persister cells activate distinct signaling and transcriptional programs and exhibit chromatin compaction. A knockdown screen identified chromatin regulators essential for persister viability, including BRD4. BRD4 binds enhancers near critical T-ALL genes, including MYC and BCL2. The BRD4 inhibitor JQ1 downregulates expression of these targets and induces growth arrest and apoptosis in persister cells, at doses well tolerated by GSI-sensitive cells. Consistently, the GSI-JQ1 combination was found to be effective against primary human leukemias in vivo. Our findings establish a role for epigenetic heterogeneity in leukemia resistance that may be addressed by incorporating epigenetic modulators in combination therapy.

  13. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation.

  14. Investigation of deregulated genes of Notch signaling pathway in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Samiee, Siamak Mirab; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Azadmanesh, Keyhan; Poopak, Behzad; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Karimipoor, Morteza; Mahdian, Reza

    2013-10-01

    In diagnostic research challenges, quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) has been widely utilized in gene expression analysis because of its sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility, and most importantly, quantitativeness. Real-time PCR base kits are wildly applicable in cancer signaling pathways, especially in cancer investigations. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a type of leukemia that is more common in older children and teenagers. Deregulation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of the lymphoblastic T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Notch signaling activation on the expression of target genes using real-time QPCR and further use this method in clinical examination after validation. Two T-ALL cell lines, Jurkat and Molt-4, were used as models for activation of the Notch signaling via over-expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain. Expression analysis was performed for six downstream target genes (NCSTN, APH1, PSEN1, ADAM17, NOTCH1 and C-MYC) which play critical roles in the Notch signaling pathway. The results showed significant difference in the expression of target genes in the deregulated Notch signaling pathway. These results were also verified in 12 clinical samples bearing over-expression of the Notch signaling pathway. Identification of such downstream Notch target genes, which have not been studied inclusively, provides insights into the mechanisms of the Notch function in T cell leukemia, and may help identify novel diagnoses and therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  15. Anti-leukemic mechanisms of pegylated arginase I in acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, K; Hernandez, CP; Raber, P; Valle, L Del; Wilk, AM; Majumdar, S; Wyczechowska, D; Reiss, K; Rodriguez, PC

    2013-01-01

    New treatments for adults with acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) are urgently needed, as the current rate of overall remission in these patients is only about 40 percent. We recently showed the potential therapeutic benefit of the pegylated-human-arginase I (peg-Arg I) in T-ALL. However, the mechanisms by which peg-Arg I induces an anti-T-ALL effect remained unknown. Our results show the induction of T-ALL cell apoptosis by peg-Arg I, which associated with a global arrest in protein synthesis and with the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic-translation-initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). Inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation in T-ALL cells prevented the apoptosis induced by peg-Arg I, whereas the expression of a phosphomimetic eIF2α form increased the sensibility of T-ALL cells to peg-Arg I. Phosphorylation of eIF2α by peg-Arg I was mediated through kinases PERK and GCN2 and down-regulation of phosphatase GADD34. GCN2 and decreased GADD34 promoted T-ALL cell apoptosis after treatment with peg-Arg I, whereas PERK had an unexpected anti-apoptotic role. Additional results showed that phospho-eIF2α signaling further increased the anti-leukemic effects induced by peg-Arg I in T-ALL-bearing mice. These results suggest the central role of phospho-eIF2α in the anti-T-ALL effects induced by peg-Arg I and support its study as a therapeutic target. PMID:22926702

  16. Genomic characterization of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals novel recurrent driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Spinella, Jean-François; Cassart, Pauline; Richer, Chantal; Saillour, Virginie; Ouimet, Manon; Langlois, Sylvie; St-Onge, Pascal; Sontag, Thomas; Healy, Jasmine; Minden, Mark D.; Sinnett, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with variable prognosis. It represents 15% of diagnosed pediatric ALL cases and has a threefold higher incidence among males. Many recurrent alterations have been identified and help define molecular subgroups of T-ALL, however the full range of events involved in driving transformation remain to be defined. Using an integrative approach combining genomic and transcriptomic data, we molecularly characterized 30 pediatric T-ALLs and identified common recurrent T-ALL targets such as FBXW7, JAK1, JAK3, PHF6, KDM6A and NOTCH1 as well as novel candidate T-ALL driver mutations including the p.R35L missense mutation in splicesome factor U2AF1 found in 3 patients and loss of function mutations in the X-linked tumor suppressor genes MED12 (frameshit mutation p.V167fs, splice site mutation g.chrX:70339329T>C, missense mutation p.R1989H) and USP9X (nonsense mutation p.Q117*). In vitro functional studies further supported the putative role of these novel T-ALL genes in driving transformation. U2AF1 p.R35L was shown to induce aberrant splicing of downstream target genes, and shRNA knockdown of MED12 and USP9X was shown to confer resistance to apoptosis following T-ALL relevant chemotherapy drug treatment in Jurkat leukemia cells. Interestingly, nearly 60% of novel candidate driver events were identified among immature T-ALL cases, highlighting the underlying genomic complexity of pediatric T-ALL, and the need for larger integrative studies to decipher the mechanisms that contribute to its various subtypes and provide opportunities to refine patient stratification and treatment. PMID:27602765

  17. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Nuno R.; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; da Silva, Ricardo C.; Fernandes, Mónica T.

    2010-01-01

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL. PMID:24281204

  18. Thymic overexpression of Ttg-1 in transgenic mice results in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E A; Rintoul, C E; Sclar, G M; Korsmeyer, S J

    1992-01-01

    T-cell translocation gene 1 (Ttg-1), also called rhombotin, is deregulated upon translocation into the alpha/delta T-cell receptor loci in acute lymphoblastic leukemias bearing the t(11;14)(p15;q11). Ttg-1 encodes a nuclear protein, expressed predominantly in neuronal cells, which belongs to a novel family of transcription factors possessing LIM domains. We utilized the lck proximal promoter to overexpress this candidate oncogene in immature thymocytes of transgenic mice. lckPr Ttg-1 mice develop immature, aggressive T-cell leukemia/lymphomas. Tumor incidence is proportional to the level of Ttg-1 expression. Most tumors contain CD4+8+ cells as well as CD4-8+ cells, which have an immature rather than a mature peripheral phenotype. Ttg-1-induced tumorigenesis preferentially affects a minority population of thymocytes representing an immature CD4-8+ intermediate stage between double-negative CD4-8- cells and double-positive CD4+8+ cells. This model indicates that the aberrant expression of putative transcription factors plays a primary role in the genesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Images PMID:1508213

  19. CD19-Targeted CAR T cells as novel cancer immunotherapy for relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-10-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the jump from the laboratory to the clinic, and the results have been remarkable. CD19-targeted CAR T cells have induced complete remissions of disease in up to 90% of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), who have an expected complete response rate of 30% in response to chemotherapy. The high efficacy of CAR T cells in B-ALL suggests that regulatory approval of this therapy for this routinely fatal leukemia is on the horizon. We review the preclinical development of CAR T cells and their early clinical application for lymphoma. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of the use of CAR T cells in patients with B-ALL. In addition, we discuss the unique toxicities associated with this therapy and the management schemes that have been developed.

  20. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  1. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  2. CD19-targeted T cells rapidly induce molecular remissions in adults with chemotherapy-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, Renier; Davila, Marco L; Riviere, Isabelle; Park, Jae; Wang, Xiuyan; Cowell, Lindsay G; Bartido, Shirley; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Bernal, Yvette; Rijo, Ivelise V; Hedvat, Cyrus; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Steinherz, Peter; Jurcic, Joseph; Rosenblat, Todd; Maslak, Peter; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Adults with relapsed B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. Only those patients able to achieve a second remission with no minimal residual disease (MRD−) have a hope for long-term survival in the context of a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have treated 5 relapsed B-ALL subjects with autologous T cells expressing a CD19-specific CD28/CD3ζ second generation dual-signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) termed 19-28z. All patients with persistent morphological disease or MRD+ disease upon T cell infusion demonstrated rapid tumor eradication and achieved MRD-negative complete remissions as assessed by deep sequencing PCR. Therapy was well tolerated although significant cytokine elevations, specifically observed in those patients with morphologic evidence of disease at the time of treatment, required lymphotoxic steroid therapy to ameliorate cytokine-mediated toxicities. Significantly, cytokine elevations directly correlated to tumor burden at the time of CAR modified T cell infusions. Tumor cells from one patient with relapsed disease after CAR modified T cell therapy, ineligible for additional allo-HSCT therapy, exhibited persistent expression of CD19 and sensitivity to autologous 19-28z T cell mediated cytotoxicity suggesting potential clinical benefit of additional CAR modified T cell infusions. These results demonstrate the marked anti-tumor efficacy of 19-28z CAR modified T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory B-ALL and the reliability of this novel therapy to induce profound molecular remissions, an ideal bridge to potentially curative therapy with subsequent allo-HSCT. PMID:23515080

  3. Efficacy and Toxicity Management of 19-28z CAR T Cell Therapy in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Marco L.; Riviere, Isabelle; Wang, Xiuyan; Bartido, Shirley; Park, Jae; Curran, Kevin; Chung, Stephen S.; Stefanski, Jolanta; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Fink, Mitsu; Shinglot, Himaly; Youssif, Maher; Satter, Mark; Wang, Yongzeng; Hosey, James; Quintanilla, Hilda; Halton, Elizabeth; Bernal, Yvette; Bouhassira, Diana C. G.; Arcila, Maria E.; Gonen, Mithat; Roboz, Gail J.; Maslak, Peter; Douer, Dan; Frattini, Mark G.; Giralt, Sergio; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2015-01-01

    We report on 16 patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that we treated with autologous T cells expressing the 19-28z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to the CD19 antigen. The overall complete response rate was 88%, which allowed us to transition most of these patients to a standard-of-care allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT). This therapy was as effective in high-risk patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) disease as in those with relapsed disease after previous allo-SCT. Through systematic analysis of clinical data and serum cytokine levels over the first 21 days after T cell infusion, we have defined diagnostic criteria for a severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS), with the goal of better identifying the subset of patients who will likely require therapeutic intervention with corticosteroids or interleukin-6 receptor blockade to curb the sCRS. Additionally, we found that serum C-reactive protein, a readily available laboratory study, can serve as a reliable indicator for the severity of the CRS. Together, our data provide strong support for conducting a multicenter phase 2 study to further evaluate 19-28z CAR T cells in B-ALL and a road map for patient management at centers now contemplating the use of CAR T cell therapy. PMID:24553386

  4. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Repression of BIM mediates survival signaling by MYC and AKT in high-risk T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C; Roderick, J E; LaBelle, J L; Bird, G; Mathieu, R; Bodaar, K; Colon, D; Pyati, U; Stevenson, K E; Qi, J; Harris, M; Silverman, L B; Sallan, S E; Bradner, J E; Neuberg, D S; Look, A T; Walensky, L D; Kelliher, M A; Gutierrez, A

    2014-09-01

    Treatment resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is associated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletions and resultant phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation, as well as MYC overexpression, and these pathways repress mitochondrial apoptosis in established T-lymphoblasts through poorly defined mechanisms. Normal T-cell progenitors are hypersensitive to mitochondrial apoptosis, a phenotype that is dependent on the expression of proapoptotic BIM. In a conditional zebrafish model, MYC downregulation induced BIM expression in T-lymphoblasts, an effect that was blunted by expression of constitutively active AKT. In human T-ALL cell lines and treatment-resistant patient samples, treatment with MYC or PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors each induced BIM upregulation and apoptosis, indicating that BIM is repressed downstream of MYC and PI3K-AKT in high-risk T-ALL. Restoring BIM function in human T-ALL cells using a stapled peptide mimetic of the BIM BH3 domain had therapeutic activity, indicating that BIM repression is required for T-ALL viability. In the zebrafish model, where MYC downregulation induces T-ALL regression via mitochondrial apoptosis, T-ALL persisted despite MYC downregulation in 10% of bim wild-type zebrafish, 18% of bim heterozygotes and in 33% of bim homozygous mutants (P=0.017). We conclude that downregulation of BIM represents a key survival signal downstream of oncogenic MYC and PI3K-AKT signaling in treatment-resistant T-ALL.

  6. Somatic inactivation of ATM in hematopoietic cells predisposes mice to cyclin D3 dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Lori A; Yang-Iott, Katherine; DeMicco, Amy; Bassing, Craig H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a cancer of immature T cells that exhibits heterogeneity of oncogenic lesions, providing an obstacle for development of more effective and less toxic therapies. Inherited deficiency of ATM, a regulator of the cellular DNA damage response, predisposes young humans and mice to T-ALLs with clonal chromosome translocations. While acquired ATM mutation or deletion occurs in pediatric T-ALLs, the role of somatic ATM alterations in T-ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. We demonstrate here that somatic Atm inactivation in haematopoietic cells starting as these cells differentiate in utero predisposes mice to T-ALL at similar young ages and harboring analogous translocations as germline Atm-deficient mice. However, some T-ALLs from haematopoietic cell specific deletion of Atm were of more mature thymocytes, revealing that the developmental timing and celluar origin of Atm inactivation influences the phenotype of ATM-deficient T-ALLs. Although it has been hypothesized that ATM suppresses cancer by preventing deletion and inactivation of TP53, we find that Atm inhibits T-ALL independent of Tp53 deletion. Finally, we demonstrate that the Cyclin D3 protein that drives immature T cell proliferation is essential for transformation of Atm-deficient thymocytes. Our study establishes a pre-clinical model for pediatric T-ALLs with acquired ATM inactivation and identifies the cell cycle machinery as a therapeutic target for this aggressive childhood T-ALL subtype.

  7. Specific alternative HOX11 transcripts are expressed in paediatric neural tumours and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Paul M; Hoffmann, Katrin; Greene, Wayne K; Brake, Rachael L; Ford, Jette; Kees, Ursula R

    2003-12-24

    HOX11 is a proto-oncogene, which is silent in normal mature T-cells, while being aberrantly activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) by translocations t(10;14)(q24;q11) or t(7;10)(q35;q24). Although many oncogenes are expressed in alternative forms in cancer, thus far, only one form of the human HOX11 transcript has been reported. We describe here the identification of three alternative transcripts of the HOX11 proto-oncogene, expressed in primary T-ALL specimens. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and targeted RT-PCR, we have sequenced 23 individual cDNA clones characterising these novel transcripts. Northern hybridisation identified particular novel exons expressed in T-ALL, which are not expressed in normal T-cells. To date, aberrant expression of HOX11 has only been associated with leukaemia. Our survey of a range of neuroblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) cell lines demonstrated the expression of these novel HOX11 transcripts in tumours of neural origin, while their expression was not detected in normal brain tissues. Strikingly, the dominant transcript in these neural tumour cell lines is more than 1 kb larger than the dominant transcript in T-ALL. These observations, combined with sequence data from several EST clones derived from medulloblastoma cDNA libraries, support a new hypothesis that HOX11 may also function as a neural oncogene or brain tumour marker.

  8. MiR-146b negatively regulates migration and delays progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Nádia C.; Fragoso, Rita; Carvalho, Tânia; Enguita, Francisco J.; Barata, João T.

    2016-01-01

    Previous results indicated that miR-146b-5p is downregulated by TAL1, a transcription factor critical for early hematopoiesis that is frequently overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it has an oncogenic role. Here, we confirmed that miR-146b-5p expression is lower in TAL1-positive patient samples than in other T-ALL cases. Furthermore, leukemia T-cells display decreased levels of miR-146b-5p as compared to normal T-cells, thymocytes and other hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-146b-5p silencing enhances the in vitro migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, associated with increased levels of filamentous actin and chemokinesis. In vivo, miR-146b overexpression in a TAL1-positive cell line extends mouse survival in a xenotransplant model of human T-ALL. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146b-5p results in leukemia acceleration and decreased mouse overall survival, paralleled by faster tumor infiltration of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that miR-146b-5p is a functionally relevant microRNA gene in the context of T-ALL, whose negative regulation by TAL1 and possibly other oncogenes contributes to disease progression by modulating leukemia cell motility and disease aggressiveness. PMID:27550837

  9. Mutations of PHF6 are associated with mutations of NOTCH1, JAK1 and rearrangement of SET-NUP214 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Qiu, Huiying; Jiang, Hui; Wu, Lili; Dong, Shasha; Pan, Jinlan; Wang, Wenjuan; Ping, Nana; Xia, Jing; Sun, Aining; Wu, Depei; Xue, Yongquan; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Chen, Suning

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the PHF6 gene were recently described in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and in those with acute myeloid leukemia. The present study was designed to determine the prevalence of PHF6 gene alterations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the incidence and prognostic value of PHF6 mutations in 96 Chinese patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PHF6 deletions were screened by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Patients were also investigated for NOTCH1, FBXW7, WT1, and JAK1 mutations together with CALM-AF10, SET-NUP214, and SIL-TAL1 gene rearrangements. Results PHF6 mutations were identified in 11/59 (18.6%) adult and 2/37 (5.4%) pediatric cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, these incidences being significantly lower than those recently reported. Although PHF6 is X-linked and mutations have been reported to occur almost exclusively in male patients, we found no sex difference in the incidences of PHF6 mutations in Chinese patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PHF6 deletions were detected in 2/79 (2.5%) patients analyzed. NOTCH1 mutations, FBXW7 mutations, WT1 mutations, JAK1 mutations, SIL-TAL1 fusions, SET-NUP214 fusions and CALM-AF10 fusions were present in 44/96 (45.8%), 9/96 (9.4%), 4/96 (4.1%), 3/49 (6.1%), 9/48 (18.8%), 3/48 (6.3%) and 0/48 (0%) of patients, respectively. The molecular genetic markers most frequently associated with PHF6 mutations were NOTCH1 mutations (P=0.003), SET-NUP214 rearrangements (P=0.002), and JAK1 mutations (P=0.005). No differences in disease-free survival and overall survival between T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with and without PHF6 mutations were observed in a short-term follow-up. Conclusions Overall, these results indicate that, in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, PHF6 mutations are a recurrent genetic abnormality associated with

  10. Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-min; Wu, Zhao; Tan, You-ping; Du, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Zhi; Ou, Rui-ming; Liu, Shuang; Pu, Cheng-fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Jin-ping; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with a high risk of disease relapse and a poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established treatment for adults with Ph-positive ALL, but relapse remains the primary cause of treatment failure, and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) poses a challenge for patients with disease relapses after initial treatment with TKI-containing regimens. Patient concerns: Two patients with TKI-resistant recurrent Ph-positive ALL. Diagnoses: Ph-positive ALL. Interventions: Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion. Outcomes: One patient's bone marrow blasts decreased significantly, and the other reached negative minimal residual disease (MRD). However, we first recorded the development of new-onset acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion in a patient who received allogeneic HSCT. Our 2 case reports also demonstrate the efficacy of anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy in the treatment of TKI-resistant Ph-positive ALL. Lessons: Our report suggests that anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy may be a promising option for the treatment of relapsed Ph-positive ALL after conventional chemotherapy or allogeneic HSCT. However, caution is due given the possibility of the adverse effects of cytokine release syndrome (CRS)-induced aGVHD for patients receiving allogeneic HSCT. PMID:28002337

  11. Resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Valentina; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Nizzardo, Monica; Cristofaro, Brunella; Basile, Andrea; Sherbet, Gajanan V; Comi, Paola

    2007-12-03

    Resveratrol (RES) is a natural occurring phytoalexin that has been shown to have chemopreventive activity. Resveratrol acts both by suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. In this study, we show that RES induces apoptosis in MOLT-4 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells by modulating three different pathways that regulate cells survival and cell death. We show for the first time that RES inhibits the survival signalling pathways Notch and their down stream effector and modulates the operation of interacting signalling systems. It induces an increase in the levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53, its effector p21waf and Bax. We also show that RES inhibits the PI3K/Akt pathway and activates Gsk-3beta. The data presented here demonstrate unequivocally that RES induces apoptosis by inhibiting the Notch pathway and markedly influencing the operation of the interacting apoptosis pathways mediated by p53 and PI3K/Akt. These data support findings from other laboratories that have suggested the use of RES as a chemopreventive agent. Here, we have identified potential signalling pathways influenced by RES and this could lead to the identification of the targets of RES-induced apoptosis and growth control.

  12. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Lyndsey E; Hagman, Amanda M; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2012-01-01

    Certain bioactive food components, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) from cruciferous vegetables, have been shown to target cellular pathways regulating carcinogenesis. Previously, our laboratory showed that dietary I3C is an effective transplacental chemopreventive agent in a dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC)-dependent model of murine T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The primary objective of the present study was to extend our chemoprevention studies in mice to an analogous human neoplasm in cell culture. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that I3C or DIM may be chemotherapeutic in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Treatment of the T-ALL cell lines CCRF-CEM, CCRF-HSB2, SUP-T1 and Jurkat with DIM in vitro significantly reduced cell proliferation and viability at concentrations 8- to 25-fold lower than the parent compound I3C. DIM (7.5 µM) arrested CEM and HSB2 cells at the G(1) phase of the cell cycle and 15 µM DIM significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in all T-ALL lines. In CEM cells, DIM reduced protein expression of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4, CDK6) and D-type cyclin 3 (CCND3); DIM also significantly altered expression of eight transcripts related to human apoptosis (BCL2L10, CD40LG, HRK, TNF, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF25, TNFSF8, TRAF4). Similar anticancer effects of DIM were observed in vivo. Dietary exposure to 100 ppm DIM significantly decreased the rate of growth of human CEM xenografts in immunodeficient SCID mice, reduced final tumor size by 44% and increased the apoptotic index compared to control-fed mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a potential for therapeutic application of DIM in T-ALL.

  14. Vaccination to improve the persistence of CD19CAR gene-modified T cells in relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rossig, C; Pule, M; Altvater, B; Saiagh, S; Wright, G; Ghorashian, S; Clifton-Hadley, L; Champion, K; Sattar, Z; Popova, B; Hackshaw, A; Smith, P; Roberts, T; Biagi, E; Dreno, B; Rousseau, R; Kailayangiri, S; Ahlmann, M; Hough, R; Kremens, B; Sauer, M G; Veys, P; Goulden, N; Cummins, M; Amrolia, P J

    2017-03-10

    Trials with second generation CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) T-cells report unprecedented responses but are associated with risk of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Instead, we studied the use of donor Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cells (EBV CTL) transduced with a first generation CD19CAR, relying on the endogenous T-cell receptor for proliferation. We conducted a multi-center phase I/II study of donor CD19CAR transduced EBV CTL in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Patients were eligible pre-emptively if they developed molecular relapse (>5 × 10(-4)) post first stem cell transplant (SCT), or prophylactically post second SCT. An initial cohort showed poor expansion/persistence. We therefore investigated EBV-directed vaccination to enhance expansion/persistence. Eleven patients were treated. No CRS, neurotoxicity or graft versus host disease (GVHD) was observed. At 1 month, 5 patients were in CR (4 continuing, 1 de novo), 1 PR, 3 had stable disease and 3 no response. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 10 of 11 have relapsed, 2 are alive with disease and 1 alive in CR 3 years. Although CD19CAR CTL expansion was poor, persistence was enhanced by vaccination. Median persistence was 0 (range: 0-28) days without vaccination compared to 56 (range: 0-221) days with vaccination (P=0.06). This study demonstrates the feasibility of multi-center studies of CAR T cell therapy and the potential for enhancing persistence with vaccination.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.39.

  15. Variations in mRNA and protein levels of Ikaros family members in pediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a highly heterogeneous disease in which the cells share phenotypic characteristics with normal human thymocytes. The Ikaros family of transcription factors includes five members that are required for normal T cell development and are implicated in leukemogenesis. The goal of this work was to correlate the pattern of expression of Ikaros family members with the phenotype of the T-ALL cells. Methods We obtained twenty-four samples from pediatric T-ALL patients and used multi-parameter flow cytometry to characterize each sample, comparing the phenotype of the leukemic cells with normal human thymocytes. Then, we defined the expression levels of each Ikaros family member to determine whether the mRNA levels or splicing or protein levels were similar to the normal patterns seen during human T cell development. Results Multi-parameter analysis of the phenotype of T-ALL cells revealed that each patient’s cells were unique and could not be readily correlated with stages of T cell development. Similarly, the pattern of Ikaros expression varied among patients. In most patients, Ikaros mRNA was the dominant family member expressed, but some patients’ cells contained mostly Helios, Aiolos, or Eos mRNA. Despite that most patients had elevated mRNA levels of Ikaros family members and unique patterns of mRNA splicing, most patients had significantly reduced protein levels of Ikaros and Aiolos. Conclusions Our analysis of the cell phenotype and Ikaros expression levels in T-ALL cells revealed the extent of heterogeneity among patients. While it is rarely possible to trace leukemic cells to their developmental origin, we found distinct patterns of Ikaros family mRNA levels in groups of patients. Further, mRNA and protein levels of Ikaros and Aiolos did not correlate, indicating that mRNA and protein levels are regulated via distinct mechanisms. PMID:27826566

  16. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  17. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia.

  18. Targeting BET proteins improves the therapeutic efficacy of BCL-2 inhibition in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, S; Frismantas, V; Matthijssens, F; Van Loocke, W; Pieters, T; Vandamme, N; Lintermans, B; Dobay, M P; Berx, G; Poppe, B; Goossens, S; Bornhauser, B C; Bourquin, J-P; Van Vlierberghe, P

    2017-02-03

    Inhibition of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) has recently emerged as a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of a variety of human cancers, including leukemia. Here, we used T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a model system to identify novel synergistic drug combinations with the BH3 mimetic venetoclax (ABT-199). In vitro drug screening in primary leukemia specimens that were derived from patients with high risk of relapse or relapse and cell lines revealed synergistic activity between venetoclax and the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Notably, this drug synergism was confirmed in vivo using T-ALL cell line and patient-derived xenograft models. Moreover, the therapeutic benefit of this drug combination might, at least in part, be mediated by an acute induction of the pro-apoptotic factor BCL2L11 and concomitant reduction of BCL-2 upon BET bromodomain inhibition, ultimately resulting in an enhanced binding of BIM (encoded by BCL2L11) to BCL-2. Altogether, our work provides a rationale to develop a new type of targeted combination therapy for selected subgroups of high-risk leukemia patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 3 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.10.

  19. Dnmt3a haploinsufficiency cooperates with oncogenic Kras to promote an early-onset T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuan-I; Kong, Guangyao; Ranheim, Erik A; Tu, Po-Shu; Yu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) are prevalent in various myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. The most common DNMT3A R882 mutations inhibit methyltransferase activity of the remaining wild-type DNMT3A proteins at a heterozygous state due to their dominant-negative activity. Reports and COSMIC database analysis reveal significantly different frequencies of R882 mutations in myeloid versus T-cell malignancies, inspiring us to investigate whether downregulation of DNMT3A regulates malignancies of different lineages in a dose-dependent manner. In a competitive transplant setting, the survival of recipients with KrasG12D/+; Dnmt3a+/- bone marrow (BM) cells was significantly shortened than that of recipients with KrasG12D/+ cells. Moreover, all of the recipients with KrasG12D/+; Dnmt3a+/- cells developed a lethal T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) without significant myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) phenotypes, while ~20% of recipients with KrasG12D/+ cells developed MPN with or without T-ALL. This is in sharp contrast to the recipients with KrasG12D/+; Dnmt3a-/- cells, in which ~60% developed a lethal myeloid malignancy (MPN or acute myeloid leukemia [AML]). Our data suggest that in the context of oncogenic Kras, loss of Dnmt3a promotes myeloid malignancies, while Dnmt3a haploinsufficiency induces T-ALL. This dose-dependent phenotype is highly consistent with the prevalence of DNMT3A R882 mutations in AML versus T-ALL in human. PMID:28386358

  20. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuan; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Tang, Xiaowen; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Yuhui; Tian, Fang; Liu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background Nanobodies, named as VHHs (variable domain of heavy chain of HCAb [heavy-chain antibodies]), are derived from heavy-chain-only antibodies that circulate in sera of camelids. Their exceptional physicochemical properties, possibility of humanization, and unique antigen recognition properties make them excellent candidates for targeted delivery of biologically active components, including immunotoxins. In our previous efforts, we have successfully generated the monovalent and bivalent CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins, which can effectively trigger the apoptosis of CD7-positive malignant cells. To pursue the possibility of translating those immunotoxins into clinics, we humanized the nanobody sequences (designated as dhuVHH6) as well as further truncated the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE)-derived PE38 toxin to produce a more protease-resistant form, which is named as PE-LR, by deleting majority of PE domain II. Methods and results Three new types of immunotoxins, dhuVHH6-PE38, dVHH6-PE-LR, and dhuVHH6-PE-LR, were successfully constructed. These recombinant immunotoxins were expressed in Escherichia coli and showed that nanobody immunotoxins have the benefits of easy soluble expression in a prokaryotic expression system. Flow cytometry results revealed that all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdcem26Il

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell neuropsychiatric toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Vasthie; Breitbart, William S

    2017-01-04

    Chimeric antigen receptor T cells are used in the treatment of B-cell leukemias. Common chimeric antigen receptor T-cell toxicities can range from mild flu-like symptoms, such as fever and myalgia, to a more striking neuropsychiatric toxicity that can present as discrete neurological symptoms and delirium. We report here two cases of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell neuropsychiatric toxicity, one who presented as a mild delirium and aphasia that resolved without intervention, and one who presented with delirium, seizures, and respiratory insufficiency requiring intensive treatment. The current literature on the treatment and proposed mechanisms of this clinically challenging chimeric antigen receptor T-cell complication is also presented.

  2. Crucial role of the Rap G protein signal in Notch activation and leukemogenicity of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Doi, Keiko; Imai, Takahiko; Kressler, Christopher; Yagita, Hideo; Agata, Yasutoshi; Vooijs, Marc; Hamazaki, Yoko; Inoue, Joe; Minato, Nagahiro

    2015-01-23

    The Rap G protein signal regulates Notch activation in early thymic progenitor cells, and deregulated Rap activation (Rap(high)) results in the development of Notch-dependent T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We demonstrate that the Rap signal is required for the proliferation and leukemogenesis of established Notch-dependent T-ALL cell lines. Attenuation of the Rap signal by the expression of a dominant-negative Rap1A17 or Rap1GAP, Sipa1, in a T-ALL cell line resulted in the reduced Notch processing at site 2 due to impaired maturation of Adam10. Inhibition of the Rap1 prenylation with a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor abrogated its membrane-anchoring to Golgi-network and caused reduced proprotein convertase activity required for Adam10 maturation. Exogenous expression of a mature form of Adam10 overcame the Sipa1-induced inhibition of T-ALL cell proliferation. T-ALL cell lines expressed Notch ligands in a Notch-signal dependent manner, which contributed to the cell-autonomous Notch activation. Although the initial thymic blast cells barely expressed Notch ligands during the T-ALL development from Rap(high) hematopoietic progenitors in vivo, the ligands were clearly expressed in the T-ALL cells invading extrathymic vital organs. These results reveal a crucial role of the Rap signal in the Notch-dependent T-ALL development and the progression.

  3. Activation of the LMO2 oncogene through a somatically acquired neomorphic promoter in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sunniyat; Magnussen, Michael; León, Theresa E; Farah, Nadine; Li, Zhaodong; Abraham, Brian J; Alapi, Krisztina Z; Mitchell, Rachel J; Naughton, Tom; Fielding, Adele K; Pizzey, Arnold; Bustraan, Sophia; Allen, Christopher; Popa, Teodora; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Garcia-Perez, Laura; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Staal, Frank J T; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas; Mansour, Marc R

    2017-03-07

    Somatic mutations within non-coding genomic regions that aberrantly activate oncogenes have remained poorly characterized. Here we describe recurrent activating intronic mutations of LMO2, a prominent oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Heterozygous mutations were identified in PF-382 and DU.528 T-ALL cell lines, in addition to 3.7% (6/160) of pediatric and 5.5% (9/163) of adult T-ALL patient samples. The majority of indels harbour putative de novo MYB, ETS1 or RUNX1 consensus binding sites. Analysis of 5'-capped RNA transcripts in mutant cell lines identified the usage of an intermediate promoter site, with consequential monoallelic LMO2 overexpression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the mutant allele in PF-382 cells markedly downregulated LMO2 expression, establishing clear causality between the mutation and oncogene dysregulation. Furthermore, the spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-derived mutations provide important insights into the interconnected contributions of functional transcription factor binding. Finally, these mutations occur in the same intron as retroviral integration sites in gene therapy induced T-ALL, suggesting that such events occur at preferential sites in the non-coding genome.

  4. Sensitivity and resistance towards isoliquiritigenin, doxorubicin and methotrexate in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines by pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Kramer, Anne; Konkimalla, V Badireenath; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Sültmann, Holger; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The development of drug resistance in cancer cells necessitates the identification of novel agents with improved activity towards cancer cells. In the present investigation, we compared the cytotoxicity of the chalcone flavonoide, isoliquiritigenin (ISL), with that of doxorubicin (DOX) and methotrexate (MTX) in five T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cell lines (Jurkat, J-Jhan, J16, HUT78 and Karpas 45). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms which determine the response of T-ALL cells towards ISL, DOX and MTX, we applied array-based matrix comparative genomic hybridisation and microarray-based mRNA expression profiling and compared the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of the cell lines with their 50% inhibition (IC(50)) values for these three drugs. The IC(50) values for ISL did not correlate with those for DOX or MTX, indicating that ISL was still active in DOX- or MTX-unresponsive cell lines. Likewise, the genomic imbalances of chromosomal clones and mRNA expression profile significantly correlating with IC(50) values for ISL were different from thoses correlating with IC(50) values for DOX and MTX. In conclusion, ISL represents a cytotoxic natural product with activity towards T-ALL cell lines. There was no cross-resistance between ISL and DOX or MTX, and the genomic and transcriptomic profiles pointed to different molecular modes of action of ISL as compared to DOX and MTX, indicating that ISL may be a valuable adjunct for cancer therapy to treat otherwise drug-resistant tumours.

  5. PI3K inhibition synergizes with glucocorticoids but antagonizes with methotrexate in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, André Bortolini; Laranjeira, Angelo Brunelli Albertoni; Rodrigues, Gisele Olinto Libanio; Leal, Paulo César; Cardoso, Bruno António; Barata, João Taborda; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brandalise, Sílvia Regina; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is frequently hyperactivated in primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Activation of the PI3K pathway has been suggested as one mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL, and patients harboring mutations in the PI3K negative regulator PTEN may be at increased risk of induction failure and relapse. By gene expression microarray analysis of T-ALL cells treated with the PI3K inhibitor AS605240, we identified Myc as a prominent downstream target of the PI3K pathway. A significant association was found between the AS605240 gene expression signature and that of glucocorticoid resistance and relapse in T-ALL. AS605240 showed anti-leukemic activity and strong synergism with glucocorticoids both in vitro and in a NOD/SCID xenograft model of T-ALL. In contrast, PI3K inhibition showed antagonism with methotrexate and daunorubicin, drugs that preferentially target dividing cells. This antagonistic interaction, however, could be circumvented by the use of correct drug scheduling schemes. Our data indicate the potential benefits and difficulties for the incorporation of PI3K inhibitors in T-ALL therapy. PMID:25869207

  6. Generation of a tetracycline regulated mouse model of MYC-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rakhra, Kavya; Felsher, Dean W

    2013-01-01

    The tetracycline regulatory system provides a tractable strategy to interrogate the role of oncogenes in the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis through both spatial and temporal control of expression. This approach has several potential advantages over conventional methods to generate genetically engineered mouse models. First, continuous constitutive overexpression of an oncogene can be lethal to the host impeding further study. Second, constitutive overexpression fails to model adult onset of disease. Third, constitutive deletion does not permit, whereas conditional overexpression of an oncogene enables the study of the consequences of restoring expression of an oncogene back to endogenous levels. Fourth, the conditional activation of oncogenes enables examination of specific and/or developmental state-specific consequences. Hence, by allowing precise control of when and where a gene is expressed, the tetracycline regulatory system provides an ideal approach for the study of putative oncogenes in both the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis. In this protocol, we describe the methods involved in the development of a conditional mouse model of MYC-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. A cooperative microRNA-tumor suppressor gene network in acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Van Der Meulen, Joni; Wolfe, Andrew L; Liu, Xiaoping; Mets, Evelien; Taghon, Tom; Khan, Aly A; Setty, Manu; Rondou, Pieter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Delabesse, Eric; Benoit, Yves; Socci, Nicholas B; Leslie, Christina S; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-01-01

    The importance of individual microRNAs (miRNAs) has been established in specific cancers. However, a comprehensive analysis of the contribution of miRNAs to the pathogenesis of any specific cancer is lacking. Here we show that in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), a small set of miRNAs is responsible for the cooperative suppression of several tumor suppressor genes. Cross-comparison of miRNA expression profiles in human T-ALL with the results of an unbiased miRNA library screen allowed us to identify five miRNAs (miR-19b, miR-20a, miR-26a, miR-92 and miR-223) that are capable of promoting T-ALL development in a mouse model and which account for the majority of miRNA expression in human T-ALL. Moreover, these miRNAs produce overlapping and cooperative effects on tumor suppressor genes implicated in the pathogenesis of T-ALL, including IKAROS (also known as IKZF1), PTEN, BIM, PHF6, NF1 and FBXW7. Thus, a comprehensive and unbiased analysis of miRNA action in T-ALL reveals a striking pattern of miRNA-tumor suppressor gene interactions in this cancer. PMID:21642990

  8. Drug-gene modeling in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia highlights importance of 6-mercaptopurine for outcome.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Alex H; Firth, Martin J; Anderson, Denise; Samuels, Amy L; Ford, Jette; Kees, Ursula R

    2013-05-01

    Patients relapsing with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) face a dismal outcome. The aim of this study was to identify new markers of drug resistance and clinical response in T-ALL. We measured gene expression and drug sensitivity in 15 pediatric T-ALL cell lines to find signatures predictive of resistance to 10 agents used in therapy. These were used to generate a model for outcome prediction in patient cohorts using microarray data from diagnosis specimens. In three independent T-ALL cohorts, the 10-drug model was able to accurately identify patient outcome, indicating that the in vitro-derived drug-gene profiles were clinically relevant. Importantly, predictions of outcome within each cohort were linked to distinct drugs, suggesting that different mechanisms contribute to relapse. Sulfite oxidase (SUOX) expression and the drug-transporter ABCC1 (MRP1) were linked to thiopurine sensitivity, suggesting novel pathways for targeting resistance. This study advances our understanding of drug resistance in T-ALL and provides new markers for patient stratification. The results suggest potential benefit from the earlier use of 6-mercaptopurine in T-ALL therapy or the development of adjuvants that may sensitize blasts to this drug. The methodology developed in this study could be applied to other cancers to achieve patient stratification at the time of diagnosis.

  9. c-Myc is an important direct target of Notch1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Weng, Andrew P; Millholland, John M; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Arcangeli, Marie Laure; Lau, Arthur; Wai, Carol; Del Bianco, Cristina; Rodriguez, Carlos G; Sai, Hong; Tobias, John; Li, Yueming; Wolfe, Michael S; Shachaf, Cathy; Felsher, Dean; Blacklow, Stephen C; Pear, Warren S; Aster, Jon C

    2006-08-01

    Human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas (T-ALL) are commonly associated with gain-of-function mutations in Notch1 that contribute to T-ALL induction and maintenance. Starting from an expression-profiling screen, we identified c-myc as a direct target of Notch1 in Notch-dependent T-ALL cell lines, in which Notch accounts for the majority of c-myc expression. In functional assays, inhibitors of c-myc interfere with the progrowth effects of activated Notch1, and enforced expression of c-myc rescues multiple Notch1-dependent T-ALL cell lines from Notch withdrawal. The existence of a Notch1-c-myc signaling axis was bolstered further by experiments using c-myc-dependent murine T-ALL cells, which are rescued from withdrawal of c-myc by retroviral transduction of activated Notch1. This Notch1-mediated rescue is associated with the up-regulation of endogenous murine c-myc and its downstream transcriptional targets, and the acquisition of sensitivity to Notch pathway inhibitors. Additionally, we show that primary murine thymocytes at the DN3 stage of development depend on ligand-induced Notch signaling to maintain c-myc expression. Together, these data implicate c-myc as a developmentally regulated direct downstream target of Notch1 that contributes to the growth of T-ALL cells.

  10. Anti-leukaemic activity of the TYK2 selective inhibitor NDI-031301 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Koshi; Li, Zhaodong; Etchin, Julia; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gjini, Evisa; Masse, Craig E; Miao, Wenyan; Rocnik, Jennifer; Kapeller, Rosana; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Tiv, Hong; Sanda, Takaomi; Weinstock, David M; Look, A Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) contributes to the aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we demonstrate the anti-leukaemic activity of a novel TYK2 inhibitor, NDI-031301. NDI-031301 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TYK2 that induced robust growth inhibition of human T-ALL cell lines. NDI-031301 treatment of human T-ALL cell lines resulted in induction of apoptosis that was not observed with the JAK inhibitors tofacitinib and baricitinib. Further investigation revealed that NDI-031301 treatment uniquely leads to activation of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), resulting in phosphorylation of ERK, SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK coincident with PARP cleavage. Activation of p38 MAPK occurred within 1 h of NDI-031301 treatment and was responsible for NDI-031301-induced T-ALL cell death, as pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK partially rescued apoptosis induced by TYK2 inhibitor. Finally, daily oral administration of NDI-031301 at 100 mg/kg bid to immunodeficient mice engrafted with KOPT-K1 T-ALL cells was well tolerated, and led to decreased tumour burden and a significant survival benefit. These results support selective inhibition of TYK2 as a promising potential therapeutic strategy for T-ALL.

  11. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    LI, MIN; XIAO, LICHAN; XU, JINGYAN; ZHANG, RUN; GUO, JINGJING; OLSON, JUSTIN; WU, YUJIE; LI, JIANYONG; SONG, CHUNHUA; GE, ZHENG

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ2 test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease. PMID:27347093

  12. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lichan; Xu, Jingyan; Zhang, Run; Guo, Jingjing; Olson, Justin; Wu, Yujie; Li, Jianyong; Song, Chunhua; Ge, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ(2) test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease.

  13. IL-12-secreting CD19-targeted cord blood-derived T cells for the immunotherapy of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pegram, H J; Purdon, T J; van Leeuwen, D G; Curran, K J; Giralt, S A; Barker, J N; Brentjens, R J

    2015-02-01

    Disease relapse or progression is a major cause of death following umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation (UCBT) in patients with high-risk, relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Adoptive transfer of donor-derived T cells modified to express a tumor-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) may eradicate persistent disease after transplantation. Such therapy has not been available to UCBT recipients, however, due to the low numbers of available UCB T cells and the limited capacity for ex vivo expansion of cytolytic cells. We have developed a novel strategy to expand UCB T cells to clinically relevant numbers in the context of exogenous cytokines. UCB-derived T cells cultured with interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-15 generated >150-fold expansion with a unique central memory/effector phenotype. Moreover, UCB T cells were modified to both express the CD19-specific CAR, 1928z, and secrete IL-12. 1928z/IL-12 UCB T cells retained a central memory-effector phenotype and had increased antitumor efficacy in vitro. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of 1928z/IL-12 UCB T cells resulted in significantly enhanced survival of CD19(+) tumor-bearing SCID-Beige mice. Clinical translation of CAR-modified UCB T cells could augment the graft-versus-leukemia effect after UCBT and thus further improve disease-free survival of transplant patients with B-cell ALL.

  14. miR-125b regulates differentiation and metabolic reprogramming of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by directly targeting A20

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zixing; Smith, Kelly R.; Khong, Hung T.; Huang, Jingshan; Ahn, Eun-Young Erin; Zhou, Ming; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy. Although it has been reported that overexpression of miR-125b leads to T-ALL development, the underlying mechanisms of miR-125b action are still unclear. The goal of this study is to delineate the role of miR-125b in T-ALL development. We found that miR-125b is highly expressed in undifferentiated leukemic T cells (CD4-negative) while its expression is low in differentiated T cells (CD4-positive). Overexpression of miR-125b increased the CD4-negative population in T cells, whereas depletion of miR-125b by miR-125b-sponge decreased the CD4-negative cell population. We identified that A20 (TNFAIP3) is a direct target of miR-125b in T cells. Overexpression of miR-125b also increased glucose uptake and oxygen consumption in T cells through targeting A20. Furthermore, restoration of A20 in miR-125b-overexpressing cells decreased the CD4-negative population in T cell leukemia, and decreased glucose uptake and oxygen consumption to the basal level of T cells transfected with vector. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that miR-125b regulates differentiation and reprogramming of T cell glucose metabolism via targeting A20. Since both de-differentiation and dysregulated glucose metabolism contribute to the development of T-cell leukemia, these findings provide novel insights into the understanding and treatment of T-ALL. PMID:27637078

  15. T-cell responses against CD19+ pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia mediated by bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) are regulated contrarily by PD-L1 and CD80/CD86 on leukemic blasts

    PubMed Central

    Feucht, Judith; Kayser, Simone; Gorodezki, David; Hamieh, Mohamad; Döring, Michaela; Blaeschke, Franziska; Schlegel, Patrick; Bösmüller, Hans; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Ebinger, Martin; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T-cell immunotherapies are promising options in relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated the effect of co-signaling molecules on T-cell attack against leukemia mediated by CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell engager. Primary CD19+ ALL blasts (n≥10) and physiologic CD19+CD10+ bone marrow precursors were screened for 20 co-signaling molecules. PD-L1, PD-1, LAG-3, CD40, CD86, CD27, CD70 and HVEM revealed different stimulatory and inhibitory profiles of pediatric ALL compared to physiologic cells, with PD-L1 and CD86 as most prominent inhibitory and stimulatory markers. PD-L1 was increased in relapsed ALL patients (n=11) and in ALLs refractory to Blinatumomab (n=5). Exhaustion markers (PD-1, TIM-3) were significantly higher on patients' T cells compared to physiologic controls. T-cell proliferation and effector function was target-cell dependent and correlated to expression of co-signaling molecules. Blockade of inhibitory PD-1-PD-L and CTLA-4-CD80/86 pathways enhanced T-cell function whereas blockade of co-stimulatory CD28-CD80/86 interaction significantly reduced T-cell function. Combination of Blinatumomab and anti-PD-1 antibody was feasible and induced an anti-leukemic in vivo response in a 12-year-old patient with refractory ALL. In conclusion, ALL cells actively regulate T-cell function by expression of co-signaling molecules and modify efficacy of therapeutic T-cell attack against ALL. Inhibitory interactions of leukemia-induced checkpoint molecules can guide future T-cell therapies. PMID:27708227

  16. Focal cranial hyperostosis from meningioma: a complication from previous radiation treatment for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2014-03-01

    Nearly 75% of childhood cancer survivors will experience an adverse late effect from previous therapy. In patients previously treated with cranial irradiation, the late effect can manifest as secondary central nervous system tumors. Presented is a case of a 20 year man with a history of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed at age 22 months, treated with chemotherapy and cranial irradiation. He had developed increasing prominence of the top of his head over several months. Plain radiograph showed frontal calvarium thickening with focal "hair-on-end" periosteal reaction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing dural-based mass with transcalvarial extension, confirmed after resection to be meningioma (World Health Organization Grade I). This case illustrates an atypical presentation of a late effect of childhood cancer treatment and highlights the need to be informed about prior treatments received and potential attendant complications.

  17. CD19 CAR-targeted T cells induce long-term remission and B Cell Aplasia in an immunocompetent mouse model of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Kloss, Christopher C; Gunset, Gertrude; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Although many adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are induced into remission, most will relapse, underscoring the dire need for novel therapies for this disease. We developed murine CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and an immunocompetent mouse model of B-ALL that recapitulates the disease at genetic, cellular, and pathologic levels. Mouse T cells transduced with an all-murine CD3ζ/CD28-based CAR that is equivalent to the one being used in our clinical trials, eradicate B-ALL in mice and mediate long-term B cell aplasias. In this model, we find that increasing conditioning chemotherapy increases tumor eradication, B cell aplasia, and CAR-modified T cell persistence. Quantification of recipient B lineage cells allowed us to estimate an in vivo effector to endogenous target ratio for B cell aplasia maintenance. In mice exhibiting a dramatic B cell reduction we identified a small population of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow that may serve as a reservoir for long-term CAR-modified T cell stimulation. Lastly, we determine that infusion of CD8+ CAR-modified T cells alone is sufficient to maintain long-term B cell eradication. The mouse model we report here should prove valuable for investigating CAR-based and other therapies for adult B-ALL.

  18. Disruption of the SCL gene by a t(1;3) translocation in a patient with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    SCL gene disruptions are the most common chromosomal abnormality associated with the development of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Such disruptions can be the result of t(1;14) and t(1;7) translocations, as well as a cytogenetically undetectable interstitial deletion of chromosome 1. We present here a case of T cell ALL with a t(1;3)(p34;p21) translocation that also disrupts the SCL locus and leads to dysregulated SCL gene expression. This translocation, similar to previously reported SCL gene disruptions, appears to have been mediated, at least in part, by the V(D)J recombinase complex, since cryptic heptamer recognition sequences, as well as nontemplated N region nucleotide addition, are present at the breakpoints. The t(1;3) also disrupts a region on chromosome 3 characterized by alternating purine and pyrimidine residues, which can form a Z-DNA structure, reported to be prone to recombination events. A previously undescribed, evolutionarily conserved transcript unit is detected within 8 kb of the breakpoint on chromosome 3. This report extends the spectrum of recognized SCL translocations associated with T cell ALL, and underscores the contention that dysregulated SCL expression may be a causal event in T cell ALL. PMID:1402676

  19. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. In Vivo T Cell Depletion with Myeloablative Regimens on Outcomes after Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Eapen, Mary; Sparapani, Rodney; O'Brien, Tracey A; Chan, Ka Wah; Chen, Junfang; Craddock, John; Schultz, Kirk R; Wagner, John E; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in cord blood transplantation is controversial. We evaluated outcomes according to ATG inclusion in 297 children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received myeloablative total body irradiation-based conditioning and either single-unit (74%) or double-unit (26%) grafts. Ninety-two patients (31%) received ATG and 205 (69%) did not. ATG recipients were more likely to be cytomegalovirus seronegative. The incidences of day 100 grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; 30% versus 54%, P = .0002) and chronic GVHD (22% versus 43%, P = .0008) were lower with ATG compared with non-ATG regimens. However, day 100 grades III to IV acute GVHD was comparable (11% versus 17%, P = .15). The 3-year incidences of transplant-related mortality (16% versus 17%, P = .98), relapse (17% versus 27%, P = .12), and leukemia-free survival (66% versus 55%, P = .23) in ATG and non-ATG recipients were similar. There were no differences in viral reactivation between treatment groups (60% versus 58%, P = .83). Therefore, the data suggest that incorporation of ATG with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be useful in reducing the risk of acute and chronic GVHD without any deleterious effect on transplant-related mortality, relapse, or leukemia-free survival in children and adolescents with ALL.

  1. Prexasertib, a Chk1/Chk2 inhibitor, increases the effectiveness of conventional therapy in B-/T- cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rorà, Andrea Ghelli Luserna Di; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Imbrogno, Enrica; Papayannidis, Cristina; Derenzini, Enrico; Ferrari, Anna; Guadagnuolo, Viviana; Robustelli, Valentina; Parisi, Sarah; Sartor, Chiara; Abbenante, Maria Chiara; Paolini, Stefania; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years many Checkpoint kinase 1/2 (Chk1/Chk2) inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of different type of cancers. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of the Chk 1/2 inhibitor prexasertib mesylate monohydrate in B-/T- cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as single agent and in combination with other drugs. The prexasertib reduced the cell viability in a dose and time dependent manner in all the treated cell lines. The cytotoxic activity was confirmed by the increment of apoptotic cells (Annexin V/Propidium Iodide staining), by the increase of γH2A.X protein expression and by the activation of different apoptotic markers (Parp-1 and pro-Caspase3 cleavage). Furthermore, the inhibition of Chk1 changed the cell cycle profile. In order to evaluate the chemo-sensitizer activity of the compound, different cell lines were treated for 24 and 48 hours with prexasertib in combination with other drugs (imatinib, dasatinib and clofarabine). The results from cell line models were strengthened in primary leukemic blasts isolated from peripheral blood of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In this study we highlighted the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of prexasertib as single agent or in combination with other conventional drugs like imatinib, dasatinib and clofarabine in the treatment of B-/T-ALL. PMID:27438145

  2. IL-7 Receptor Mutations and Steroid Resistance in Pediatric T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Genome Sequencing Study

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Andrew P.; Vroegindeweij, Eric M.; Smits, Willem K.; van Marion, Ronald; Dinjens, Winand N. M.; Horstmann, Martin; Kuiper, Roland P.; Zaman, Guido J. R.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in children. T cell ALL (T-ALL) represents about 15% of pediatric ALL cases and is considered a high-risk disease. T-ALL is often associated with resistance to treatment, including steroids, which are currently the cornerstone for treating ALL; moreover, initial steroid response strongly predicts survival and cure. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in T-ALL patients are poorly understood. In this study, we combined various genomic datasets in order to identify candidate genetic mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in children undergoing T-ALL treatment. Methods and Findings We performed whole genome sequencing on paired pre-treatment (diagnostic) and post-treatment (remission) samples from 13 patients, and targeted exome sequencing of pre-treatment samples from 69 additional T-ALL patients. We then integrated mutation data with copy number data for 151 mutated genes, and this integrated dataset was tested for associations of mutations with clinical outcomes and in vitro drug response. Our analysis revealed that mutations in JAK1 and KRAS, two genes encoding components of the interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R) signaling pathway, were associated with steroid resistance and poor outcome. We then sequenced JAK1, KRAS, and other genes in this pathway, including IL7R, JAK3, NF1, NRAS, and AKT, in these 69 T-ALL patients and a further 77 T-ALL patients. We identified mutations in 32% (47/146) of patients, the majority of whom had a specific T-ALL subtype (early thymic progenitor ALL or TLX). Based on the outcomes of these patients and their prednisolone responsiveness measured in vitro, we then confirmed that these mutations were associated with both steroid resistance and poor outcome. To explore how these mutations in IL7R signaling pathway genes cause steroid resistance and subsequent poor outcome, we

  3. JAK3 mutants transform hematopoietic cells through JAK1 activation, causing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Degryse, Sandrine; de Bock, Charles E; Cox, Luk; Demeyer, Sofie; Gielen, Olga; Mentens, Nicole; Jacobs, Kris; Geerdens, Ellen; Gianfelici, Valentina; Hulselmans, Gert; Fiers, Mark; Aerts, Stein; Meijerink, Jules P; Tousseyn, Thomas; Cools, Jan

    2014-11-13

    JAK3 is a tyrosine kinase that associates with the common γ chain of cytokine receptors and is recurrently mutated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We tested the transforming properties of JAK3 pseudokinase and kinase domain mutants using in vitro and in vivo assays. Most, but not all, JAK3 mutants transformed cytokine-dependent Ba/F3 or MOHITO cell lines to cytokine-independent proliferation. JAK3 pseudokinase mutants were dependent on Jak1 kinase activity for cellular transformation, whereas the JAK3 kinase domain mutant could transform cells in a Jak1 kinase-independent manner. Reconstitution of the IL7 receptor signaling complex in 293T cells showed that JAK3 mutants required receptor binding to mediate downstream STAT5 phosphorylation. Mice transplanted with bone marrow progenitor cells expressing JAK3 mutants developed a long-latency transplantable T-ALL-like disease, characterized by an accumulation of immature CD8(+) T cells. In vivo treatment of leukemic mice with the JAK3 selective inhibitor tofacitinib reduced the white blood cell count and caused leukemic cell apoptosis. Our data show that JAK3 mutations are drivers of T-ALL and require the cytokine receptor complex for transformation. These results warrant further investigation of JAK1/JAK3 inhibitors for the treatment of T-ALL.

  4. A CD22-reactive TCR from the T-cell allorepertoire for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Lorenz; Hagedoorn, Renate S; van der Steen, Dirk M; Hombrink, Pleun; Kester, Michel G D; Schoonakker, Marjolein P; de Ridder, Daniëlle; van Veelen, Peter A; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2016-11-01

    CD22 is currently evaluated as a target-antigen for the treatment of B-cell malignancies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T-cells or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CAR- and mAbs-based immunotherapies have been successfully applied targeting other antigens, however, occurrence of refractory disease to these interventions urges the identification of additional strategies. Here, we identified a TCR recognizing the CD22-derived peptide RPFPPHIQL (CD22RPF) presented in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*07:02. To overcome tolerance to self-antigens such as CD22, we exploited the immunogenicity of allogeneic HLA. CD22RPF-specific T-cell clone 9D4 was isolated from a healthy HLA-B*07:02neg individual, efficiently produced cytokines upon stimulation with primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia and healthy B-cells, but did not react towards healthy hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell subsets, including dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages expressing low levels of CD22. Gene transfer of TCR-9D4 installed potent CD22-specificity onto recipient CD8+ T-cells that recognized and lysed primary B-cell leukemia. TCR-transduced T-cells spared healthy CD22neg hematopoietic cell subsets but weakly lysed CD22low-expressing DCs and macrophages. CD22-specific TCR-engineered T-cells could form an additional immunotherapeutic strategy with a complementary role to CAR- and antibody-based interventions in the treatment of B-cell malignancies. However, CD22 expression on non-B-cells may limit the attractiveness of CD22 as target-antigen in cellular immunotherapy.

  5. Loss of function tp53 mutations do not accelerate the onset of myc-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui; Stevenson, Kristen; Neuberg, Donna S; Calzada, Oscar; Zhou, Yi; Langenau, David M; Look, A Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The TP53 tumour suppressor is activated in response to distinct stimuli, including an ARF-dependent response to oncogene stress and an ATM/ATR-dependent response to DNA damage. In human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), TP53-dependent tumour suppression is typically disabled via biallelic ARF deletions. In murine models, loss of Arf (Cdkn2a) or Tp53 markedly accelerates the onset of Myc-induced lymphoblastic malignancies. In zebrafish, no ARF ortholog has been identified, but the sequence of ARF is very poorly conserved evolutionarily, making it difficult to exclude the presence of a zebrafish ARF ortholog without functional studies. Here we show that tp53 mutations have no significant influence on the onset of myc-induced T-ALL in zebrafish, consistent with the lack of additional effects of Tp53 loss on lymphomagenesis in Arf-deficient mice. By contrast, irradiation leads to complete T-ALL regression in tp53 wild-type but not homozygous mutant zebrafish, indicating that the tp53-dependent DNA damage response is intact. We conclude that tp53 inactivation has no impact on the onset of myc-induced T-ALL in the zebrafish, consistent with the lack of a functional ARF ortholog linking myc-induced oncogene stress to tp53-dependent tumour suppression. Thus, the zebrafish model is well suited to the study of ARF-independent pathways in T-ALL pathobiology.

  6. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Acute T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Hagman, Amanda M.; Williams, David E.; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Benninghoff, Abby D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain bioactive food components, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) from cruciferous vegetables, have been shown to target cellular pathways regulating carcinogenesis. Previously, our laboratory showed that dietary I3C is an effective transplacental chemopreventive agent in a dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC)-dependent model of murine T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The primary objective of the present study was to extend our chemoprevention studies in mice to an analogous human neoplasm in cell culture. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that I3C or DIM may be chemotherapeutic in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Treatment of the T-ALL cell lines CCRF-CEM, CCRF-HSB2, SUP-T1 and Jurkat with DIM in vitro significantly reduced cell proliferation and viability at concentrations 8- to 25-fold lower than the parent compound I3C. DIM (7.5 µM) arrested CEM and HSB2 cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and 15 µM DIM significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in all T-ALL lines. In CEM cells, DIM reduced protein expression of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4, CDK6) and D-type cyclin 3 (CCND3); DIM also significantly altered expression of eight transcripts related to human apoptosis (BCL2L10, CD40LG, HRK, TNF, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF25, TNFSF8, TRAF4). Similar anticancer effects of DIM were observed in vivo. Dietary exposure to 100 ppm DIM significantly decreased the rate of growth of human CEM xenografts in immunodeficient SCID mice, reduced final tumor size by 44% and increased the apoptotic index compared to control-fed mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a potential for therapeutic application of DIM in T-ALL. PMID:22514694

  7. miRNA-149* promotes cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis by mediating JunB in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sheng-Jin; Li, Hui-Bo; Cui, Gang; Kong, Xiao-Lin; Sun, Li-Li; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Li, Ying-Hua; Zhou, Jin

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNA-149* (miRNA-149*) functions as an oncogenic regulator in human melanoma. However, the effect of miRNA-149* on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is unclear. Here we aimed to analyze the effects of miRNA-149* on in vitro T-ALL cells and to uncover the target for miRNA-149* in these cells. The miRNA-149* level was determined in multiple cell lines and bone marrow cells derived from patients with T-ALL, B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), and healthy donors. We found that miRNA-149* was highly expressed in T-ALL cell lines and T-ALL patients' bone marrow samples. JunB was identified as a direct target of miR-149*. miRNA-149* mimics downregulated JunB levels in Molt-4 and Jurkat cells, while miRNA-149* inhibitors dramatically upregulated JunB expression in these cells. miRNA-149* mimics promoted proliferation, decreased the proportion of cells in G1 phase, and reduced cell apoptosis in T-ALL cells, while miRNA-149* inhibitors prevented these effects. miRNA-149* mimics downregulated p21 and upregulated cyclinD1, 4EBP1, and p70s6k in Molt-4 and Jurkat cells. Again, inhibitors prevented these effects. Our findings demonstrate that miRNA-149* may serve as an oncogenic regulator in T-ALL by negatively regulating JunB.

  8. Cellular proteolytic modification of tumor-suppressor CYLD is critical for the initiation of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mansi; Kaul, Deepak; Varma, Neelam; Marwaha, R K

    2015-01-01

    There exists a general recognition of the fact that post translational modification of CYLD protein through proteolytic cleavage by MALT-1 results in sustained cellular NF-kB activity which is conspicuously found to be associated with cancer in general and hematological malignancies in particular. The present study was directed to understand the contribution of MALT-1 and deubiquitinase CYLD to the initiation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Such a study revealed for the first time that the 35kDa CYLD cleaved factor generated by MALT-1 mediated proteolytic cleavage was conspicuously present in human T- ALL subjects of pediatric age group. Further, over-expression of this 35kDa CYLD factor within normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells had the inherent capacity to program the genome of these cells resulting in T-cell lineage ALL. Based upon these results, we propose that MALT1 inhibitors may be of crucial importance in the treatment of T-ALL subjects of pediatric age group.

  9. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  10. B cell origin of non-T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A model for discrete stages of neoplastic and normal pre-B cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, L M; Korsmeyer, S J; Anderson, K C; Boyd, A W; Slaughenhoupt, B; Park, E; Jensen, J; Coral, F; Mayer, R J; Sallan, S E

    1984-01-01

    The expression of B cell associated and restricted antigens on tumor cells isolated from 138 patients with non-T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (non-T cell ALL) was investigated by flow cytometric analysis by means of a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Tumor cells from these patients could be assigned to one of four subgroups: human leukocyte antigen-DR-related Ia-like antigens (Ia) alone (4%, stage I); IaB4 (14%, stage II); IaB4CALLA (33%, stage III); and IaB4CALLAB1 (49%, stage IV). The expression of B cell-restricted antigens (B4 and B1) and rearrangements of Ig heavy chain genes provided strong evidence for the B cell lineage of stages II, III, and IV tumors. The lineage of the Ia alone group is still unknown. The B4 antigen was expressed on approximately 95% of all non-T cell ALLs tested, and given its absence on T cell and myeloid tumors, it appears to be an exceptional marker to define cells of B lineage. The demonstration that Ia alone, IaB4, IaB4CALLA, and IaB4CALLAB1 positive cells can be readily identified by dual fluorescence analysis in normal fetal and adult bone marrow provided critical support for the view that these leukemic pre-B cell phenotypes were representative of the stages of normal pre-B cell differentiation. It was interesting that the IaB4+ cell was more frequently identified in fetal bone marrow than in adult marrow, whereas the predominant cell found in adult marrow expressed the IaB4CALLAB1 phenotype. These data suggest that the leukemogenic event may be random, since the predominant pre-B cell leukemic phenotype appears to correspond to the normal pre-B cell phenotype present in these hematopoietic organs. Our observations provide an additional distinction between adult and childhood ALL, since these studies show that most non-T cell ALLs seen in children less than 2 yr old are of stage II phenotype, whereas the majority of non-T ALLs in adults are of stage IV phenotype. Finally, it should be noted that the present study suggests

  11. Complete hematologic response of early T-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia to the γ-secretase inhibitor BMS-906024: genetic and epigenetic findings in an outlier case

    PubMed Central

    Knoechel, Birgit; Bhatt, Ami; Pan, Li; Pedamallu, Chandra S.; Severson, Eric; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Dorfman, David M.; Kuo, Frank C.; Kluk, Michael; Kung, Andrew L.; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Meyerson, Matthew; Blacklow, Stephen C.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Aster, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Notch pathway antagonists such as γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) are being tested in diverse cancers, but exceptional responses have yet to be reported. We describe the case of a patient with relapsed/refractory early T-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) who achieved a complete hematologic response following treatment with the GSI BMS-906024. Whole-exome sequencing of leukemic blasts revealed heterozygous gain-of-function driver mutations in NOTCH1, CSF3R, and PTPN11, and a homozygous/hemizygous loss-of-function mutation in DNMT3A. The three gain-of-function mutations were absent from remission marrow cells, but the DNMT3A mutation persisted in heterozygous form in remission marrow, consistent with an origin for the patient's ETP-ALL from clonal hematopoiesis. Ex vivo culture of ETP-ALL blasts confirmed high levels of activated NOTCH1 that were repressed by GSI treatment, and RNA-seq documented that GSIs downregulated multiple known Notch target genes. Surprisingly, one potential target gene that was unaffected by GSIs was MYC, a key Notch target in GSI-sensitive T-ALL of cortical T-cell type. H3K27ac super-enhancer landscapes near MYC showed a pattern previously reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is sensitive to BRD4 inhibitors, and in line with this ETP-ALL blasts downregulated MYC in response to the BRD4 inhibitor JQ1. To our knowledge, this is the first example of complete response of a Notch-mutated ETP-ALL to a Notch antagonist and is also the first description of chromatin landscapes associated with ETP-ALL. Our experience suggests that additional attempts to target Notch in Notch-mutated ETP-ALL are merited. PMID:27148573

  12. EFA (9-beta-D-erythrofuranosyladenine) is an effective salvage agent for methylthioadenosine phosphorylase-selective therapy of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with L-alanosine.

    PubMed

    Batova, Ayse; Cottam, Howard; Yu, John; Diccianni, Mitchell B; Carrera, Carlos J; Yu, Alice L

    2006-02-01

    The deficiency of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and other cancers, while constitutively expressed in normal cells, allows for selective therapy using L-alanosine, an inhibitor of de novo AMP synthesis. We demonstrate that MTAP- T-ALL cells obtained at relapse are as sensitive to L-alanosine toxicity as diagnosis samples. The therapeutic index of L-alanosine can be increased by the use of a MTAP substrate, which protects MTAP+ normal cells. Since MTAP substrates MTA and 5'deoxyadenosine are prone to toxicities associated with adenosine, we synthesized and evaluated a potentially nontoxic MTAP substrate, 9-beta-D-erythrofuranosyladenine (EFA). The cytotoxicity of EFA to hematopoietic progenitors erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-Es) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) was at least 26- to 41-fold less than that of MTA. In addition, EFA selectively rescued MTAP+ MOLT-4 cells from L-alanosine toxicity at 25 microM with negligible toxicity even at 100 microM. As for MTA, significant, albeit incomplete, rescue was achieved at 12.5 microM, but higher concentrations were toxic. EFA at 20 microM or less rescued primary MTAP+ T-ALL cells and normal lymphocytes from L-alanosine toxicity. Collectively, these data indicate that EFA is an effective agent for salvaging MTAP+ cells from L-alanosine toxicity and is superior to MTA due to lower cytotoxicity.

  13. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells' apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro's dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days.

  14. The NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 induces G2 arrest and apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Han, Kun; Wang, Qingyang; Cao, Huanling; Qiu, Guihua; Cao, Junxia; Li, Xin; Wang, Jing; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-04-26

    The first-in-class compound MLN4924 is a small molecule inhibitor that selectively inactivates NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE). The anticancer effects of MLN4924 have been attributed to impaired neddylation of Cullin proteins. Here, we show that treatment of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells with MLN4924 potently suppressed the neddylation of Cullins and the oncogenic growth of T-ALL cells in-vitro. Moreover, MLN4924 induced disease regression in an in vivo xenograft model. MLN4924 also induced cell cycle arrest at G2 phase and apoptosis in T-ALL cells. However, inhibition of the neddylation of Cullins alone could not explain the effects of MLN4924 in T-ALL cells. Gene expression profiling indicated ribosome function, steroid biosynthesis, and hematopoietic cell lineage pathways were affected by MLN4924 treatment. MLN4924 also induced nucleolar disruption, suggesting nucleolar stress signaling might contribute to the anticancer effects of MLN4924 in T-ALL cells. In addition, MLN4924 treatment reduced 14-3-3ξ\\δ protein levels in T-ALL cells. Thus, MLN4924 may inhibit T-ALL cell proliferation via several pathways.

  15. Genome-wide RNA-mediated interference screen identifies miR-19 targets in Notch-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Wolfe, Andrew L; Oricchio, Elisa; Palomero, Teresa; de Keersmaecker, Kim; McJunkin, Katherine; Zuber, Johannes; James, Taneisha; Khan, Aly A; Leslie, Christina S; Parker, Joel S; Paddison, Patrick J; Tam, Wayne; Ferrando, Adolfo; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2010-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as novel cancer genes. In particular, the miR-17-92 cluster, containing six individual miRNAs, is highly expressed in haematopoietic cancers and promotes lymphomagenesis in vivo. Clinical use of these findings hinges on isolating the oncogenic activity within the 17-92 cluster and defining its relevant target genes. Here we show that miR-19 is sufficient to promote leukaemogenesis in Notch1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) in vivo. In concord with the pathogenic importance of this interaction in T-ALL, we report a novel translocation that targets the 17-92 cluster and coincides with a second rearrangement that activates Notch1. To identify the miR-19 targets responsible for its oncogenic action, we conducted a large-scale short hairpin RNA screen for genes whose knockdown can phenocopy miR-19. Strikingly, the results of this screen were enriched for miR-19 target genes, and include Bim (Bcl2L11), AMP-activated kinase (Prkaa1) and the phosphatases Pten and PP2A (Ppp2r5e). Hence, an unbiased, functional genomics approach reveals a coordinate clampdown on several regulators of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase-related survival signals by the leukaemogenic miR-19.

  16. The dual specificity PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 displays efficacy against T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

    PubMed

    Gazi, Mohiuddin; Moharram, Sausan A; Marhäll, Alissa; Kazi, Julhash U

    2017-04-28

    Although significant improvements have been made in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), there is a substantial subset of high-risk T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients with relatively poor prognosis. Like in other leukemia types, alterations of the PI3K/mTOR pathway are predominant in ALL which is also responsible for treatment failure and relapse. In this study, we show that relapsed T-ALL patients display an enrichment of the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Using a panel of inhibitors targeting multiple components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, we observed that the dual-specific PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 was the most selective inhibitor for T-ALL cells dependent on the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Furthermore, we observed that PKI-587 blocked proliferation and colony formation of T-ALL cell lines. Additionally, PKI-587 selectively abrogated PI3K/mTOR signaling without affecting MAPK signaling both in in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway using PKI-587 delayed tumor progression, reduced tumor load and enhanced the survival rate in immune-deficient mouse xenograft models without inducing weight loss in the inhibitor treated mice. This preclinical study shows beneficial effects of PKI-587 on T-ALL that warrants further investigation in the clinical setting.

  17. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin 2 regulates the development of Notch1 induced murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia via forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chunlan; Guo, Huidong; Bu, Jiachen; Zhou, Mi; Cheng, Hui; He, Fuhong; Wang, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yinchi; Wang, Qianfei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Tao; Xu, Mingjiang; Yuan, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is composed of two distinct biochemical complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In response to nutrients and growth factors, mTORC1 is known to control cellular growth by regulating the translational regulators S6 kinase 1 and 4E binding protein 1, whereas mTORC2 mediates cell proliferation and survival by activating Akt through phosphorylation at Ser473. Studies have shown that the deregulation of mTORC2 leads to the development of myeloproliferative disorder and leukemia in the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN)-deleted mouse model. However, the mechanism by which mTORC2 specifically affects leukemogenesis is still not fully understood. Here, we investigated the role of mTORC2 in NOTCH1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a Rictor-deficient mouse model. We found that, by deleting Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, leukemia progression was significantly suppressed by arresting a greater proportion of Rictor(△/△) leukemic cells at the G0 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the absence of Rictor led to the overexpression of chemotaxis-related genes, such as CCR2, CCR4 and CXCR4, which contributed to the homing and migration of Rictor-deficient T-ALL cells to the spleen but not the bone marrow. In addition, we demonstrated that inactivation of mTORC2 caused the overexpression of forkhead box O3 and its downstream effectors and eased the progression of leukemia in T-ALL mice. Our study thus indicates that forkhead box O3 could be a potential drug target for the treatment of T-ALL leukemia.

  19. ERK/Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission is involved in the MSC-induced drug resistance of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jianye; Wang, Jiancheng; Huang, Yinong; Wu, Haoxiang; Xia, Ting; Xiao, Jiaqi; Chen, Xiaoyong; Li, Hongyu; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Tao; Xia, Huimin; Zhang, Qi; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment facilitates the proliferation and survival of leukemia cells, contributing to disease relapse. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known to promote cancer chemoresistance via soluble factors and cell adhesion. However, little is known about the effects of MSCs on the mitochondrial dynamics of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells, or how this may influence the chemoresistance of these cells. Here, we tested both indirect (Transwell) and direct coculture strategies, and found that MSCs protected T-ALL cells from chemotherapeutic cell death and cytotoxicity under both culture conditions. In addition, cell viability was higher in the direct contact system compared with the Transwell system. We further showed that exposure of T-ALL cells to MSCs decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and promoted a pro-glycolytic shift that was characterized by increased glucose uptake and lactate production with concomitant reductions in adenosine triphosphate production and mitochondrial membrane potential. In T-ALL cells cocultured with MSCs, the mitochondrial morphology of T-ALL cells were altered from elongation to fragmentation because of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation-mediated phosphorylation of the pro-fission factor, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), at residue S616. Consistent with this, the expression of S616-phosphorylated Drp1 recapitulated the mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial ROS levels, metabolic switching and chemoresistance seen in T-ALL cells cocultured with MSCs. These findings suggest that the ability of MSCs to trigger Drp1 activation-induced changes in mitochondrial dynamics is crucial to their ability to protect cells against chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27831567

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. PMID:27114702

  1. miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Miao, Mei-hua; Ji, Xue-qiang; Xue, Jun; Shao, Xue-jun

    2015-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in leukaemia, particularly T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), has remained elusive. Here, we identified miR-664 and its predicted target gene PLP2 were differentially expressed in T-ALL using bioinformatics methods. In T-ALL cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-664, while miR-664 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation. Moreover, migration and invasion assay showed that overexpression of miR-664 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, whereas miR-664 inhibitor could reduce cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-664 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of PLP2, and western blotting showed that miR-664 suppressed the expression of PLP2 at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-664 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. - Highlights: • miR-664 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 targets 3′ UTR of PLP2 in T-ALL cells. • miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 in T-ALL cells.

  2. hMYH and hMTH1 cooperate for survival in mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eshtad, S; Mavajian, Z; Rudd, S G; Visnes, T; Boström, J; Altun, M; Helleday, T

    2016-01-01

    hMTH1 is an 8-oxodGTPase that prevents mis-incorporation of free oxidized nucleotides into genomic DNA. Base excision and mismatch repair pathways also restrict the accumulation of oxidized lesions in DNA by removing the mis-inserted 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosines (8-oxodGs). In this study, we aimed to investigate the interplay between hMYH DNA glycosylase and hMTH1 for cancer cell survival by using mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. To this end, MYH and MTH1 were silenced individually or simultaneously using small hairpin RNAs. Increased sub-G1 population and apoptotic cells were observed upon concurrent depletion of both enzymes. Elevated cell death was consistent with cleaved caspase 3 accumulation in double knockdown cells. Importantly, overexpression of the nuclear isoform of hMYH could remove the G1 arrest and partially rescue the toxicity observed in hMTH1-depleted cells. In addition, expression profiles of human DNA glycosylases were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR in MTH1 and/or MYH knockdown cells. NEIL1 DNA glycosylase, involved in repair of oxidized nucleosides, was found to be significantly downregulated as a cellular response to MTH1–MYH co-suppression. Overall, the results suggest that hMYH and hMTH1 functionally cooperate for effective repair and survival in mismatch repair defective T-ALL Jurkat A3 cells. PMID:27918552

  3. Different outcome of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with translocation t(11;14) treated in two consecutive children leukemia group EORTC trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Pauline; Suciu, Stefan; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cave, Hélène; Sirvent, Nicolas; Plat, Geneviève; Thyss, Antoine; Mechinaud, Françoise; Costa, Vitor M; Ferster, Alina; Lutz, Patrick; Mazingue, Françoise; Plantaz, Dominique; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Yves; Benoit, Yves; Dastugue, Nicole; Rohrlich, Pierre S

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T cell lineage (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignant disease which accounts for 15 % of childhood ALL. T(11;14) is the more frequent chromosomal abnormality in childhood T-ALL, but its prognostic value remained controversial. Our aim was to analyze the outcome of childhood T-ALL with t(11;14) to know if the presence of this translocation is associated with a poor prognosis. We conducted a retrospective study from a series of 20 patients with t(11;14), treated in two consecutive trials from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Children Leukemia Group over a 19-year period from 1989 to 2008. There were no significant differences between the 2 consecutive groups of patients with t(11;14) regarding the clinical and biological features at diagnosis. Among 19 patients who reached complete remission, 9 patients relapsed. We noticed 7 deaths all relapse- or failure-related. In the 58881 study, a presence of t(11;14) was associated with a poor outcome with an event-free survival at 5 years at 22.2 % versus 65.1 % for the non-t(11;14) T-ALL (p = 0.0004). In the more recent protocol, the outcome of T-ALL with t(11;14) reached that of non-t(11;14) T-ALL with an event-free survival at 5 years at 65.5 versus 74.9 % (p = 0.93). The presence of t(11;14) appeared as a poor prognostic feature in the 58881 trial whereas this abnormality no longer affected the outcome in the 58951 study. This difference is probably explained by the more intensive chemotherapy in the latest trial.

  4. Lymphotoxin-β receptor in microenvironmental cells promotes the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with cortical/mature immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Mónica T; Ghezzo, Marinella N; Silveira, André B; Kalathur, Ravi K; Póvoa, Vanda; Ribeiro, Ana R; Brandalise, Sílvia R; Dejardin, Emmanuel; Alves, Nuno L; Ghysdael, Jacques; Barata, João T; Yunes, José Andres; dos Santos, Nuno R

    2015-12-01

    Lymphotoxin-mediated activation of the lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR; LTBR) has been implicated in cancer, but its role in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has remained elusive. Here we show that the genes encoding lymphotoxin (LT)-α and LTβ (LTA, LTB) are expressed in T-ALL patient samples, mostly of the TAL/LMO molecular subtype, and in the TEL-JAK2 transgenic mouse model of cortical/mature T-ALL (Lta, Ltb). In these mice, expression of Lta and Ltb is elevated in early stage T-ALL. Surface LTα1 β2 protein is expressed in primary mouse T-ALL cells, but only in the absence of microenvironmental LTβR interaction. Indeed, surface LT expression is suppressed in leukaemic cells contacting Ltbr-expressing but not Ltbr-deficient stromal cells, both in vitro and in vivo, thus indicating that dynamic surface LT expression in leukaemic cells depends on interaction with its receptor. Supporting the notion that LT signalling plays a role in T-ALL, inactivation of Ltbr results in a significant delay in TEL-JAK2-induced leukaemia onset. Moreover, young asymptomatic TEL-JAK2;Ltbr(-/-) mice present markedly less leukaemic thymocytes than age-matched TEL-JAK2;Ltbr(+/+) mice and interference with LTβR function at this early stage delayed T-ALL development. We conclude that LT expression by T-ALL cells activates LTβR signalling in thymic stromal cells, thus promoting leukaemogenesis.

  5. The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Li, Xiaoyu; Kreslavsky, Taras; Novina, Carl D; Brand, Marjorie; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; von Boehmer, Harald; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2013-07-29

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling after depletion of TAL1, together with genome-wide analysis of TAL1 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing, we identified the miRNA genes directly controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. The most dynamically regulated miRNA was miR-223, which is bound at its promoter and up-regulated by the TAL1 complex. miR-223 expression mirrors TAL1 levels during thymic development, with high expression in early thymocytes and marked down-regulation after the double-negative-2 stage of maturation. We demonstrate that aberrant miR-223 up-regulation by TAL1 is important for optimal growth of TAL1-positive T-ALL cells and that sustained expression of miR-223 partially rescues T-ALL cells after TAL1 knockdown. Overexpression of miR-223 also leads to marked down-regulation of FBXW7 protein expression, whereas knockdown of TAL1 leads to up-regulation of FBXW7 protein levels, with a marked reduction of its substrates MYC, MYB, NOTCH1, and CYCLIN E. We conclude that TAL1-mediated up-regulation of miR-223 promotes the malignant phenotype in T-ALL through repression of the FBXW7 tumor suppressor.

  6. Notch and NF-kB signaling pathways regulate miR-223/FBXW7 axis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Palermo, R; Talora, C; Campese, A F; Checquolo, S; Bellavia, D; Tottone, L; Testa, G; Miele, E; Indraccolo, S; Amadori, A; Ferretti, E; Gulino, A; Vacca, A; Screpanti, I

    2014-12-01

    Notch signaling deregulation is linked to the onset of several tumors including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Deregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression is also associated with several cancers, including leukemias. However, the transcriptional regulators of miRNAs, as well as the relationships between Notch signaling and miRNA deregulation, are poorly understood. To identify miRNAs regulated by Notch pathway, we performed microarray-based miRNA profiling of several Notch-expressing T-ALL models. Among seven miRNAs, consistently regulated by overexpressing or silencing Notch3, we focused our attention on miR-223, whose putative promoter analysis revealed a conserved RBPjk binding site, which was nested to an NF-kB consensus. Luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on the promoter region of miR-223 show that both Notch and NF-kB are novel coregulatory signals of miR-223 expression, being able to activate cooperatively the transcriptional activity of miR-223 promoter. Notably, the Notch-mediated activation of miR-223 represses the tumor suppressor FBXW7 in T-ALL cell lines. Moreover, we observed the inverse correlation of miR-223 and FBXW7 expression in a panel of T-ALL patient-derived xenografts. Finally, we show that miR-223 inhibition prevents T-ALL resistance to γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) treatment, suggesting that miR-223 could be involved in GSI sensitivity and its inhibition may be exploited in target therapy protocols.

  7. Combined targeting of SET and tyrosine kinases provides an effective therapeutic approach in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Richard, Nameeta P; Pippa, Raffaella; Cleary, Megan M; Puri, Alka; Tibbitts, Deanne; Mahmood, Shawn; Christensen, Dale J; Jeng, Sophia; McWeeney, Shannon; Look, A Thomas; Chang, Bill H; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Vitek, Michael P; Odero, María D; Sears, Rosalie; Agarwal, Anupriya

    2016-12-20

    Recent evidence suggests that inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) tumor suppressor activity via the SET oncoprotein contributes to the pathogenesis of various cancers. Here we demonstrate that both SET and c-MYC expression are frequently elevated in T-ALL cell lines and primary samples compared to healthy T cells. Treatment of T-ALL cells with the SET antagonist OP449 restored the activity of PP2A and reduced SET interaction with the PP2A catalytic subunit, resulting in a decrease in cell viability and c-MYC expression in a dose-dependent manner. Since a tight balance between phosphatases and kinases is required for the growth of both normal and malignant cells, we sought to identify a kinase inhibitor that would synergize with SET antagonism. We tested various T-ALL cell lines against a small-molecule inhibitor screen of 66 compounds targeting two-thirds of the tyrosine kinome and found that combined treatment of T-ALL cells with dovitinib, an orally active multi-targeted small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and OP449 synergistically reduced the viability of all tested T-ALL cell lines. Mechanistically, combined treatment with OP449 and dovitinib decreased total and phospho c-MYC levels and reduced ERK1/2, AKT, and p70S6 kinase activity in both NOTCH-dependent and independent T-ALL cell lines. Overall, these results suggest that combined targeting of tyrosine kinases and activation of serine/threonine phosphatases may offer novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of T-ALL.

  8. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  9. Transplant Outcomes for Children with T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report of the CIBMTR®

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael J.; Verneris, Michael R.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A.; Auletta, Jeffery J.; Ayas, Mouhab; Brown, Valerie I.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Chan, Ka Wah; Diaz Perez, Miguel A.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Eldjerou, Lamis; Frangoul, Haydar; Guilcher, Gregory M. T.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Leung, Wing H.; Olsson, Richard F.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Shah, Niketa; Shah, Nirali N.; Thiel, Elizabeth; Talano, Julie-An; Kitko, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    Survival for children with relapsed T-ALL is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred and twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received a HCT following myeloablative conditioning between 2000–2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Median age was 10 (range, 2–18) years. Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%) or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute GVHD (grade 2–4) and chronic GVHD occurred in 35% (95% CI, 27–45) and 26% (95% CI, 20–33) of patients. Transplant related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9–18) and 30% (95% CI, 24–37) respectively. Three year overall survival and disease-free survival were 48% (95% CI, 41–55) and 46% (95% CI, 39–52%) respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse prior to HCT, were most likely to relapse (HR=3.94, p=0.005) as compared to isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes and consideration for HCT is warranted. PMID:26327632

  10. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein.

  11. KPT-330 inhibitor of CRM1 (XPO1)-mediated nuclear export has selective anti-leukaemic activity in preclinical models of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Etchin, Julia; Sanda, Takaomi; Mansour, Marc R; Kentsis, Alex; Montero, Joan; Le, Bonnie T; Christie, Amanda L; McCauley, Dilara; Rodig, Scott J; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Stone, Richard; Letai, Anthony; Kung, Andrew L; Thomas Look, A

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the anti-leukaemic efficacy of novel irreversible inhibitors of the major nuclear export receptor, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, also termed XPO1). We found that these novel CRM1 antagonists, termed SINE (Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export), induced rapid apoptosis at low nanomolar concentrations in a panel of 14 human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cell lines representing different molecular subtypes of the disease. To assess in vivo anti-leukaemia cell activity, we engrafted immunodeficient mice intravenously with the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cells, which harbour activating mutations of NOTCH1 and NRAS as well as loss of function of the CDKN2A, PTEN and TP53 tumour suppressors and express a high level of oncogenic transcription factor TAL1. Importantly, we examined the in vivo anti-leukaemic efficacy of the clinical SINE compound KPT-330 against T-ALL and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. These studies demonstrated striking in vivo activity of KPT-330 against T-ALL and AML cells, with little toxicity to normal murine haematopoietic cells. Taken together, our results show that SINE CRM1 antagonists represent promising 'first-in-class' drugs with a novel mechanism of action and wide therapeutic index, and imply that drugs of this class show promise for the targeted therapy of T-ALL and AML.

  12. In vivo T-cell depletion with myeloablative regimens on outcomes after cord blood transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Doris M.; Eapen, Mary; Sparapani, Rodney; O'Brien, Tracey A.; Chan, Ka Wah; Chen, Junfang; Craddock, John; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wagner, John E.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Barker, Juliet N.

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in cord blood transplantation is controversial. We evaluated outcomes according to ATG inclusion in 297 children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received myeloablative total body irradiation-based conditioning and either single (74%) or double-unit (26%) grafts. Ninety-two patients (31%) received ATG and 205 (69%) did not. ATG recipients were more likely to be cytomegalovirus seronegative. The incidence of day-100 grade II-IV acute GVHD (30% versus 54%, p = 0.0002), and chronic GVHD (22% versus 43%, p = 0.0008) were lower with ATG compared to non-ATG regimens. However, day 100 grade III-IV acute GVHD was comparable (11% versus 17%, p = 0.15). The 3-year incidences of transplant-related mortality (16% versus 17%, p = 0.98) and relapse (17% versus 27%, p = 0.12), and leukemia-free survival (66% versus 55%, p = 0.23) in ATG and non-ATG recipients were similar. There were no differences in viral reactivation between treatment groups (60% versus 58%, p=0.83). Therefore, the data suggest that incorporation of ATG with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be useful in reducing the risk of acute and chronic GVHD without any deleterious effect on transplant-related mortality, relapse or leukemia-free survival in children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26327630

  13. Outcome for children and young people with Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated on a contemporary protocol, UKALL 2003.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Katharine; Wade, Rachel; Goulden, Nick; Mitchell, Chris; Moorman, Anthony V; Rowntree, Clare; Jenkinson, Sarah; Hough, Rachael; Vora, Ajay

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the outcome for children and young people with Early T-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ETP-ALL), a recently described poor prognosis sub-group of T-ALL, treated on a contemporary protocol, UKALL 2003. After a median follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, the ETP sub-group, representing 16% of T-ALL patients, had non-significantly inferior 5-year event-free survival (76·7% vs. 84·6%, P = 0·2) and overall survival (82·4% vs. 90·9%, P = 0·1), and a higher relapse rate (18·6% vs. 9·6%, P = 0·1) compared to typical T-ALL. ETP-ALL has an intermediate risk outcome, which does not warrant experimental treatment or first remission allogeneic transplant for the group universally.

  14. T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia without posttransplant tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Akaihata, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Shogo; Ohto, Hitoshi; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    Intensive chemotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) improves the prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-ALL). However, the prognosis of cases of relapsed or refractory Ph-ALL remains poor. Here, we aimed to assess the efficacy of T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TCR-haplo-HSCT) in eight patients with relapsed or refractory pediatric Ph-ALL. Transplant-related mortality was observed in two patients. All patients discontinued TKI after receiving TCR-haplo-HSCT. The 3-year probability of overall survival and event-free survival was 75.0 and 62.5%, respectively. These results indicate the efficacy of TCR-haplo-HSCT for relapsed/refractory pediatric Ph-ALL.

  15. The t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line activates multiple transcripts, including Ttg-1, a gene encoding a potential zinc finger protein.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E A; Hockett, R D; Pollock, K M; Bartholdi, M F; O'Brien, S J; Korsmeyer, S J

    1989-01-01

    Interchromosomal translocations within lymphoid neoplasms frequently involve the antigen receptor genes. We cloned the breakpoints of the t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a CD3-negative T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (RPMI 8402) in order to identify new genes potentially involved in T-cell neoplasia. An extensive comparison of both breakpoints and their germ line counterparts indicated that an inadvertant recombinase-mediated break at chromosome segment 11p15 recombined with the delta T-cell receptor at 14q11. The derivative 11 breakpoint resembles a coding joint in which 11p15 rather than a variable region was introduced 5' to a D delta 1 D delta 2 J delta 1 intermediate rearrangement. Conversely, the derivative 14 breakpoint corresponds to a signal joint between the 5' heptamer-spacer-nonamer recombinational signal of D delta 1 and an isolated heptamer at 11p15. Multiple, apparently distinct transcripts were found flanking both breakpoints of 8402. RNAs of 3.5, 4.4, 1.4, and 8.0 kilobases originating from either side of the derivative 14 breakpoint were highly expressed in 8402 compared with other cells. This suggests that this translocation deregulated multiple genes and provides the opportunity to assess any multifactorial contribution they may have to malignancy. We cloned and sequenced several cDNAs representing the 1.4-kilobase transcript (termed Ttg-1 [T-cell translocation gene 1]) from an 8402 library. The predicted protein of 156 amino acids contained two internal repeats which could potentially form zinc fingers. Images PMID:2501659

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  17. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without in vitro T cell depletion for the treatment of philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Liu, Kai-yan; Xu, Lan-ping; Chen, Yu-hong; Han, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Wang, Yu; Qin, Ya-zhen; Liu, Yan-rong; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2015-06-01

    The role of haploidentical related allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL) is not clear. We aimed to investigate the long-term survival of Ph(+) ALL patients who underwent haploidentical donor (HID)-HSCT and to analyze the factors influencing relapse and survival after allo-HSCT. The study population included Ph(+) ALL patients who underwent haploidentical related allo-HSCT. Additionally, Ph(+) ALL patients who underwent HLA-matched related donor (MRD) transplants during the same period were included to compare outcomes. BCR-ABL transcript levels were analyzed by using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Clinical data from 139 Ph(+) ALL patients who received allo-HSCT in our center were analyzed. Of these patients, 101 received HID transplants and 38 received MRD transplants. At a median follow-up of 36 months, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in the HID transplant group were 65.8% and 74.0%, respectively. The 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates for the HID transplant group were 20.3% and 15.6%, respectively. In addition, there were no differences in OS, DFS, CIR, and NRM between the HID and MRD groups. Multivariate analysis showed that imatinib resistance was a significant factor influencing DFS and CIR in HID transplant patients. Haploidentical HSCT for the treatment of Ph(+) ALL achieves promising long-term survival, which is comparable with that of HLA-MRD HSCT. Imatinib resistance is a negative predictor of relapse and DFS after allo-HSCT.

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  19. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  20. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, 'type 1' relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas 'type 2' relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition.

  1. Healthy CD4+ T lymphocytes are not affected by targeted therapies against the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Alberto M.; Zauli, Giorgio; Ultimo, Simona; McCubrey, James A.; Gonelli, Arianna; Marisi, Giorgia; Ulivi, Paola; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M.

    2016-01-01

    An attractive molecular target for novel anti-cancer therapies is the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which is commonly deregulated in many types of cancer. Nevertheless, the effects of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors on T lymphocytes, a key component of immune responses, have been seldom explored. In this study we investigated the effects on human CD4+ T-cells of a panel of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors: BGT226, Torin-2, MK-2206, and ZSTK474. We also assessed their efficacy against two acute leukemia T cell lines. T lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin. Inhibitor effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, while cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assays. In addition, the activation status of the pathway as well as induction of autophagy were analyzed by Western blotting. Quiescent healthy T lymphocytes were unaffected by the drugs whereas mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes as well as leukemic cell lines displayed a cell cycle block, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and dephosphorylation of key components of the signaling pathway. Autophagy was also induced in proliferating lymphocytes and in JURKAT and MOLT-4 cell lines. When autophagy was inhibited by 3-methyladenine or Bafilomycin A1, drug cytotoxicity was increased, indicating that autophagy is a protective mechanism. Therefore, our findings suggest that PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors preserve lymphocyte viability. This is a valuable result to be taken into account when selecting drugs for targeted cancer therapy in order to minimize detrimental effects on immune function. PMID:27494886

  2. A novel long non-coding RNA T-ALL-R-LncR1 knockdown and Par-4 cooperate to induce cellular apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Hong-Gui; Lu, Chao

    2014-06-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematologic malignancy with a poor prognosis. It has been shown that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Here, we characterized a novel lncRNA, T-ALL-R-LncR1, with whole-transcriptome deep sequencing from the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line. T-ALL-R-LncR1 was not observed in human normal tissues. However, an obvious expression was observed in some tumor tissues. T-ALL-R-LncR1 was markedly expressed in neoplastic T lymphocytes of 11 cases out of 21 children with T-ALL, indicating that T-ALL-R-LncR1 might be associated with T-ALL. T-ALL-R-LncR1 knockdown predisposed Jurkat cells to undergo pro-apoptotic factor Par-4-induced apoptosis. Further studies revealed that T-ALL-R-LncR1 knockdown facilitated the formation of a Par-4/THAP1 protein complex, resulting in the activation of caspase-3 and an increase of pro-apoptotic Smac protein in T-ALL cells. Our studies indicate a potential role of suppressing the novel long non-coding RNA T-ALL-R-LncR1 in the therapy of human T-ALL.

  3. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Third-generation CD28/4-1BB chimeric antigen receptor T cells for chemotherapy relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a non-randomised, open-label phase I trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao-Yi; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Ang; Hu, Guo-Liang; Cao, Wei; Wang, Dan-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is no curative treatment available for patients with chemotherapy relapsed or refractory CD19+ B cells-derived acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (r/r B-ALL). Although CD19-targeting second-generation (2nd-G) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells carrying CD28 or 4-1BB domains have demonstrated potency in patients with advanced B-ALL, these 2 signalling domains endow CAR-T cells with different and complementary functional properties. Preclinical results have shown that third-generation (3rd-G) CAR-T cells combining 4-1BB and CD28 signalling domains have superior activation and proliferation capacity compared with 2nd-G CAR-T cells carrying CD28 domain. The aim of the current study is therefore to investigate the safety and efficacy of 3rd-G CAR-T cells in adults with r/r B-ALL. Methods and analysis This study is a phase I clinical trial for patients with r/r B-ALL to test the safety and preliminary efficacy of 3rd-G CAR-T cells. Before receiving lymphodepleting conditioning regimen, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from eligible patients will be leukapheresed, and the T cells will be purified, activated, transduced and expanded ex vivo. On day 6 in the protocol, a single dose of 1 million CAR-T cells per kg will be administrated intravenously. The phenotypes of infused CAR-T cells, copy number of CAR transgene and plasma cytokines will be assayed for 2 years after CAR-T infusion using flow cytometry, real-time quantitative PCR and cytometric bead array, respectively. Moreover, several predictive plasma cytokines including interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Soluble Interleukin (sIL)-2R-α, solubleglycoprotein (sgp)130, sIL-6R, Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP1), Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP1)-α, MIP1-β and Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which are highly associated with severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS), will be used to forecast CRS to allow doing earlier intervention, and CRS will

  5. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A What's in this article? ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  6. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) A A A What's in this article? About ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  7. Regulation of PTEN by CK2 and Notch1 in primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: rationale for combined use of CK2- and γ-secretase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana; Jotta, Patrícia Y.; Silveira, André B.; Ribeiro, Daniel; Brandalise, Silvia R.; Yunes, J. Andrés; Barata, João T.

    2010-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients frequently display NOTCH1 activating mutations and Notch can transcriptionally down-regulate the tumor suppressor PTEN. However, it is not clear whether NOTCH1 mutations associate with decreased PTEN expression in primary T-ALL. Here, we compared patients with or without NOTCH1 mutations and report that the former presented higher MYC transcript levels and decreased PTEN mRNA expression. We recently showed that T-ALL cells frequently display CK2-mediated PTEN phosphorylation, resulting in PTEN protein stabilization and concomitant functional inactivation. Accordingly, the T-ALL samples analyzed, irrespectively of their NOTCH1 mutational status, expressed significantly higher PTEN protein levels than normal controls. To evaluate the integrated functional impact of Notch transcriptional and CK2 post-translational inactivation of PTEN, we treated T-ALL cells with both the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT and the CK2 inhibitors DRB/TBB. Our data suggest that combined use of gamma-secretase and CK2 inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in T-ALL. PMID:20015880

  8. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) Detection with Translocations and T-Cell Receptor and Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangements in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Patients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sayitoğlu, Müge; Ar, M Cem; Hatırnaz, Özden; Öngören, Şeniz; Üre, Ümit; Başlar, Zafer; Sırma, Sema; Aydın, Yıldız; Özbek, Uğur; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan

    2008-09-05

    Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell-receptor (TCR) genes, which can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD. A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24%) of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22) translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11) and t(1;19). MRD-based risk stratification of the 16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients. MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  10. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Par-4/THAP1 complex and Notch3 competitively regulated pre-mRNA splicing of CCAR1 and affected inversely the survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Li, J-Y; Ge, Z; Zhang, L; Zhou, G-P

    2013-12-12

    Although the intensification of therapy for children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has substantially improved clinical outcomes, T-ALL remains an important challenge in pediatric oncology. Here, we report that the cooperative synergy between prostate apoptosis response factor-4 (Par-4) and THAP1 induces cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1) gene expression and cellular apoptosis in human T-ALL cell line Jurkat cells, CEM cells and primary cultured neoplastic T lymphocytes from children with T-ALL. Par-4 and THAP1 collaborated to activate the promoter of CCAR1 gene. Mechanistic investigations revealed that Par-4 and THAP1 formed a protein complex by the interaction of their carboxyl termini, and THAP1 bound to CCAR1 promoter though its zinc-dependent DNA-binding domain at amino terminus. Par-4/THAP1 complex and Notch3 competitively bound to CCAR1 promoter and competitively modulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing of CCAR1, which resulted in two different transcripts and played an opposite role in T-ALL cell survival. Despite Notch3 induced a shift splicing from the full-length isoform toward a shorter form of CCAR1 mRNA by splicing factor SRp40 and SRp55, Par-4/THAP1 complex strongly antagonized this inductive effect. Our finding revealed a mechanistic rationale for Par-4/THAP1-induced apoptosis in T-ALL cells that would be of benefit to develop a new therapy strategy for T-ALL.

  12. Inhibition of γ-secretase activity synergistically enhances tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via upregulation of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lisa M.; Nathwani, Seema M.; Zisterer, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a rare and aggressive hematopoietic malignancy prone to relapse and drug resistance. Half of all T-ALL patients exhibit mutations in Notch1, which leads to aberrant Notch1 associated signaling cascades. Notch1 activation is mediated by the γ-secretase cleavage of the Notch1 receptor into the active intracellular domain of Notch1 (NCID). Clinical trials of γ-secretase small molecule inhibitors (GSIs) as single agents for the treatment of T-ALL have been unsuccessful. The present study demonstrated, using immunofluorescence and western blotting, that blocking γ-secretase activity in T-ALL cells with N-[(3,5-difluorophenyl) acetyl]-L-alanyl-2-phenyl] glycine-1,1-dimethylethyl ester (DAPT) downregulated NCID and upregulated the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5). Upregulation of DR5 restored the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to TRAIL. Combination index revealed that the combined treatment of DAPT and TRAIL synergistically enhanced apoptosis compared with treatment with either drug alone. TRAIL combined with the clinically evaluated γ-secretase inhibitor 3-[(1r, 4s)-4-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-4-(2, 5-difluorophenyl) cyclohexyl] propanoic acid (MK-0752) also significantly enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death compared with either drug alone. DAPT/TRAIL apoptotic synergy was dependent on the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and was associated with a decrease in BH3 interacting-domain death agonist and x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. In conclusion, γ-secretase inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:27698877

  13. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with favourable long-term prognosis in paediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a retrospective study of patients treated on BCH-2003 and CCLG-2008 protocol in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-Guang; Zhang, Rui-Dong; Li, Wei-Jing; Zhao, Xiao-Xi; Cui, Lei; Wu, Min-Yuan; Zheng, Hu-Yong; Li, Zhi-Gang

    2014-07-01

    Activating mutations of NOTCH1 are a common occurrence in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), but its impact on T-ALL treatment is still controversial. In this study, the incidence, clinical features, and prognosis of 92 Chinese children with T-ALL treated using the Beijing Children's Hospital-2003 and Chinese Childhood Leukaemia Group-2008 protocols were analysed. NOTCH1 mutations were found in 42% of T-ALL patients and were not associated with clinical features, prednisone response, and minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 33 and 78. However, proline, glutamate, serine, threonine (PEST)/transactivation domain (TAD) mutations were associated with younger age (15/16 mutant vs. 48/76 wild-type, P = 0·018) and more central nervous system involvement (4/16 mutant vs. 3/76 wild-type, P = 0·016); while heterodimerization domain (HD) mutations were associated with KMT2A-MLLT1 (MLL-ENL; 4/30 mutant vs. 1/62 wild-type, P = 0·037). Furthermore, prognosis was better in patients with NOTCH1 mutations than in those with wild-type NOTCH1 (5-year event-free survival [EFS] 92·0 ± 4·5% vs. 64·0 ± 7·1%; P = 0·003). Long-term outcome was better in patients carrying HD mutations than in patients with wild-type HD (5-year EFS 89·7 ± 5·6% vs. 69·3 ± 6·2%; P = 0·034). NOTCH1 mutations and MRD at day 78 were independent prognostic factors. These findings indicate that NOTCH1 mutation predicts a favourable outcome in Chinese paediatric patients with T-ALL on the BCH-2003 and CCLG-2008 protocols, and may be considered a prognostic stratification factor.

  14. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Antibodies: Immunoconjugates and autologous cellular therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Advani, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Using a case study of a 57-year-old man with relapsed/refractory precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this review discusses treatment with immunoconjugates and autologous therapy in acute ALL. Three therapies--blinatumomab, inotuzumab, and CAR T cells--are considered here, each with advantages in specific clinical situations. These therapies represent some of the exciting advances that have been made in the treatment of ALL over the last several years.

  16. Notch1 receptor regulates AKT protein activation loop (Thr308) dephosphorylation through modulation of the PP2A phosphatase in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-null T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hales, Eric C; Orr, Steven M; Larson Gedman, Amanda; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H

    2013-08-02

    Notch1 activating mutations occur in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases and increase expression of Notch1 target genes, some of which activate AKT. HES1 transcriptionally silences phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in AKT activation, which is reversed by Notch1 inhibition with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Mutational loss of PTEN is frequent in T-ALL and promotes resistance to GSIs due to AKT activation. GSI treatments increased AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation and signaling in PTEN-deficient, GSI-resistant T-ALL cell lines (Jurkat, CCRF-CEM, and MOLT3), suggesting that Notch1 represses AKT independent of its PTEN transcriptional effects. AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation and downstream signaling were also increased by knocking down Notch1 in Jurkat (N1KD) cells. This was blocked by treatment with the AKT inhibitor perifosine. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor okadaic acid both impacted AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation to a greater extent in nontargeted control than N1KD cells, suggesting decreased dephosphorylation of AKT-Thr(308) by PP2A in the latter. Phosphorylations of AMP-activated protein kinaseα (AMPKα)-Thr(172) and p70S6K-Thr(389), both PP2A substrates, were also increased in both N1KD and GSI-treated cells and responded to okadaic acid treatment. A transcriptional regulatory mechanism was implied because ectopic expression of dominant-negative mastermind-like protein 1 increased and wild-type HES1 decreased phosphorylation of these PP2A targets. This was independent of changes in PP2A subunit levels or in vitro PP2A activity, but was accompanied by decreased association of PP2A with AKT in N1KD cells. These results suggest that Notch1 can regulate PP2A dephosphorylation of critical cellular regulators including AKT, AMPKα, and p70S6K.

  17. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  18. Fli-1 overexpression in hematopoietic progenitors deregulates T cell development and induces pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Monique F M A; Chan, Angela C; Dagger, Samantha; Bradley, Cara K; Wei, Andrew; Izon, David J

    2013-01-01

    The Ets transcription factor Fli-1 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic tissues and cells, including immature T cells, but the role of Fli-1 in T cell development has not been closely examined. To address this we retrovirally overexpressed Fli-1 in various in vitro and in vivo settings and analysed its effect on T cell development. We found that Fli-1 overexpression perturbed the DN to DP transition and inhibited CD4 development whilst enhancing CD8 development both in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, Fli-1 overexpression in vivo eventuated in development of pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (pre-T LBL). Known Fli-1 target genes such as the pro-survival Bcl-2 family members were not found to be upregulated. In contrast, we found increased NOTCH1 expression in all Fli-1 T cells and detected Notch1 mutations in all tumours. These data show a novel function for Fli-1 in T cell development and leukaemogenesis and provide a new mouse model of pre-T LBL to identify treatment options that target the Fli-1 and Notch1 signalling pathways.

  19. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Cardioprotection and Safety of Dexrazoxane in Patients Treated for Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Advanced-Stage Lymphoblastic Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report of the Children’s Oncology Group Randomized Trial Pediatric Oncology Group 9404

    PubMed Central

    Devidas, Meenakshi; Chen, Lu; Franco, Vivian I.; Pullen, Jeanette; Borowitz, Michael J.; Hutchison, Robert E.; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Armenian, Saro H.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the oncologic efficacy, cardioprotective effectiveness, and safety of dexrazoxane added to chemotherapy that included a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 360 mg/m2 to treat children and adolescents with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (L-NHL). Patients and Methods Patients were treated on Pediatric Oncology Group Protocol POG 9404, which included random assignment to treatment with or without dexrazoxane given as a bolus infusion immediately before every dose of doxorubicin. Cardiac effects were assessed by echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function and structure. Results Of 573 enrolled patients, 537 were eligible, evaluable, and randomly assigned to an arm with or without dexrazoxane. The 5-year event-free survival (with standard error) did not differ between groups: 76.7% (2.7%) for the dexrazoxane group versus 76.0% (2.7%) for the doxorubicin-only group (P = .9). The frequencies of severe grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity, infection, CNS events, and toxic deaths were similar in both groups (P ranged from .26 to .64). Of 11 second malignancies, eight occurred in patients who received dexrazoxane (P = .17). The mean left ventricular fractional shortening, wall thickness, and thickness-to-dimension ratio z scores measured 3 years after diagnosis were worse in the doxorubicin-alone group (n = 55 per group; P ≤ .01 for all comparisons). Mean fractional shortening z scores measured 3.5 to 6.4 years after diagnosis remained diminished and were lower in the 21 patients who received doxorubicin alone than in the 31 patients who received dexrazoxane (−2.03 v −0.24; P ≤ .001). Conclusion Dexrazoxane was cardioprotective and did not compromise antitumor efficacy, did not increase the frequencies of toxicities, and was not associated with a significant increase in second malignancies with this doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy regimen. We recommend dexrazoxane as a

  1. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  3. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  4. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Increased post-induction intensification improves outcome in children and adolescents with a markedly elevated white blood cell count (≥200 × 10(9) /l) with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia but not B cell disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Caroline; Gaynon, Paul S; Nachman, James B; Sather, Harland N; Lu, Xiaomin; Devidas, Meenakshi; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-02-01

    Children and adolescents presenting with a markedly elevated white blood cell (ME WBC) count (WBC ≥200 × 10(9) /l) comprise a unique subset of high-risk patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We evaluated the outcomes of the 251 patients (12% of the study population) with ME WBC treated on the Children's Cancer Group-1961 protocol. Patients were evaluated for early response to treatment by bone marrow morphology; those with a rapid early response were randomized to treatment regimens testing longer and stronger post-induction therapy. We found that ME WBC patients have a poorer outcome compared to those patients presenting with a WBC <200 × 10(9) /l (5-year event-free survival 62% vs. 73%, P = 0·0005). Longer duration of therapy worsened outcome for T cell ME WBC with a trend to poorer outcome in B-ALL ME WBC patients. Augmented therapy benefits T cell ME WBC patients, similar to the entire study cohort, however, there appeared to be no impact on survival for B-ALL ME WBC patients. ME WBC was not a prognostic factor for T cell patients. In patients with high risk features, B lineage disease in association with ME WBC has a negative impact on survival.

  7. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2017-02-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06-27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86-25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with central

  8. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro. CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06–27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86–25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with

  9. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Deregulated FADD expression and phosphorylation in T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Rubio, José L.; de Arriba, María C.; Cobos-Fernández, María A.; González-Sánchez, Laura; Ors, Inmaculada; Sastre, Isabel; Fernández-Piqueras, José; Villa-Morales, María

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we show that T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma cells exhibit a reduction of FADD availability in the cytoplasm, which may contribute to impaired apoptosis. In addition, we observe a reduction of FADD phosphorylation that inversely correlates with the proliferation capacity and tumor aggressiveness. The resultant balance between FADD-dependent apoptotic and non-apoptotic abilities may define the outcome of the tumor. Thus, we propose that FADD expression and phosphorylation can be reliable biomarkers with prognostic value for T-LBL stratification. PMID:27556297

  11. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Pattern of subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in India.

    PubMed

    Kamat, D M; Gopal, R; Advani, S H; Nair, C N; Kumar, A; Saikia, T; Nadkarni, J J; Nadkarni, J S

    1985-01-01

    Leukemic cells from 124 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 31 chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) were examined for sheep erythrocyte receptor (E), surface immunoglobulin (SIg) and their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing specific surface antigens including pan-T, Common ALL and Ia antigens. In acute lymphatic leukemia, 33% of patients reveal T-cell receptor associated with higher age group, mediastinal mass and high WBC count. Common ALL was predominant between 2 and 9-yr age group. Among chronic lymphatic leukemia, 2 patients were found to be T-CLL while 29 revealed presence of SIg. Ia antigen was detected in 44.4% of ALL and 64% fo CLL patients. The pattern of surface marker observed in our series may be related to our life style, socio-economic and environmental factors.

  14. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Philadelphia Chromosome Negative; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. EPHA7, a new target gene for 6q deletion in T-cell lymphoblastic lymphomas.

    PubMed

    López-Nieva, Pilar; Vaquero, Concepción; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; González-Sánchez, Laura; Villa-Morales, María; Santos, Javier; Esteller, Manel; Fernández-Piqueras, José

    2012-02-01

    Cryptic deletions at chromosome 6q are common cytogenetic abnormalities in T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-LBL), but the target genes have not been formally identified. Our results build on detection of specific chromosomal losses in a mouse model of γ-radiation-induced T-LBLs and provide interesting clues for new putative susceptibility genes in a region orthologous to human 6q15-6q16.3. Among these, Epha7 emerges as a bona fide candidate tumor suppressor gene because it is inactivated in practically all the T-LBLs analyzed (100% in mouse and 95.23% in human). We provide evidence showing that Epha7 downregulation may occur, at least in part, by loss of heterozygosity (19.35% in mouse and 12.5% in human) or promoter hypermethylation (51.61% in mouse and 43.75% in human) or a combination of both mechanisms (12.90% in mouse and 6.25% in human). These results indicate that EPHA7 might be considered a new tumor suppressor gene for 6q deletions in T-LBLs. Notably, this gene is located in 6q16.1 proximal to GRIK2 and CASP8AP2, other candidate genes identified in this region. Thus, del6q seems to be a complex region where inactivation of multiple genes may cooperatively contribute to the onset of T-cell lymphomas.

  16. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  19. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  20. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments.

  1. Antibody-based therapies in B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, Caroline; Thomas, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    Targeted therapies represent a major breakthrough in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Because lymphoblastic leukaemia cells express a variety of specific antigens, those ones can serve as targets for monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). Anti-CD20 (rituximab), anti-CD19 (blinatumomab, SAR3419), anti-CD22 (epratuzumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin) and anti-CD52 (alemtuzumab) have therefore been developed. Possible strategies even include recruitment of CD3 cytotoxic T cells (blinatumomab) or adoptive T-cell therapy by gene transfer of CD19-chimeric antigen receptors (CD19-CARs). Recent data show that antibody-based therapy is a highly promising treatment approach. However, optimal treatment approach still needs to be defined.

  2. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments. PMID:26216197

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  4. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  5. Pneumomediastinum after acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Portelles, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema are frequently benign and most commonly result from air escaping from the upper respiratory tract, intrathoracic airways, or gastrointestinal tract. Gas can also be generated by certain infections or reach the mediastinal space from outside air after trauma or surgery. In the article presented by Showkat et al a 14-year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) under chemotherapy developed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema. In the author’s opinion, these complications were caused by ALL or chemotherapy that progressed to severe respiratory failure until the patient finally died in the intensive care unit. I would like to underline some important points, which have been raised following a paper published in the October issue of World Journal of Clinical Cases. PMID:24868520

  6. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  7. Deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells leads to development of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma but not myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Dosil, Maria Alba; Hills, David; Yang, Jian; Eritja, Núria; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vilardell, Felip; Medvinsky, Alexander; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in the late 1990s, Pten has turned out to be one of the most important tumor suppressor genes. Pten loss results in increased activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, which is associated with increased proliferation, survival, and neoplastic growth. Here, we have addressed the effects of conditional deletion of Pten in hematopoietic cells by crossing Pten conditional knockout mice with a knock-in mouse expressing the Cre recombinase in the CD45 locus. CD45 is also known as leukocyte common antigen, and it is expressed in virtually all white cells and in hematopoietic stem cells. Using a reporter mouse, we demonstrate that CD45:Cre mouse displays recombinase activity in both myeloid and lymphoid cells. However, deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells induces development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma, but not other hematologic malignancies. PMID:26773036

  8. Cholinergic Machinery as Relevant Target in Acute Lymphoblastic T Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Valencia-Cruz, Georgina; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar O; Liñan-Rico, Liliana; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Various types of non-neuronal cells, including tumors, are able to produce acetylcholine (ACh), which acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. T lymphocytes represent a key component of the non-neuronal cholinergic system. T cells-derived ACh is involved in a stimulation of their activation and proliferation, and acts as a regulator of immune response. The aim of the present work was to summarize the data about components of cholinergic machinery in T lymphocytes, with an emphasis on the comparison of healthy and leukemic T cells. Cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of T lineage (T-ALL) were found to produce a considerably higher amount of ACh than healthy T lymphocytes. Additionally, ACh produced by T-ALL is not efficiently hydrolyzed, because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is drastically decreased in these cells. Up-regulation of muscarinic ACh receptors was also demonstrated at expression and functional level, whereas nicotinic ACh receptors seem to play a less important role and not form functional channels in cells derived from T-ALL. We hypothesized that ACh over-produced in T-ALL may act as an autocrine growth factor and play an important role in leukemic clonal expansion through shaping of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. We suggest that cholinergic machinery may be attractive targets for new drugs against T-ALL. Specifically, testing of high affinity antagonists of muscarinic ACh receptors as well as antagomiRs, which interfere with miRNAs involved in the suppression of AChE expression, may be the first choice options.

  9. Cholinergic Machinery as Relevant Target in Acute Lymphoblastic T Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Valencia-Cruz, Georgina; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar O.; Liñan-Rico, Liliana; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Various types of non-neuronal cells, including tumors, are able to produce acetylcholine (ACh), which acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. T lymphocytes represent a key component of the non-neuronal cholinergic system. T cells-derived ACh is involved in a stimulation of their activation and proliferation, and acts as a regulator of immune response. The aim of the present work was to summarize the data about components of cholinergic machinery in T lymphocytes, with an emphasis on the comparison of healthy and leukemic T cells. Cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of T lineage (T-ALL) were found to produce a considerably higher amount of ACh than healthy T lymphocytes. Additionally, ACh produced by T-ALL is not efficiently hydrolyzed, because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is drastically decreased in these cells. Up-regulation of muscarinic ACh receptors was also demonstrated at expression and functional level, whereas nicotinic ACh receptors seem to play a less important role and not form functional channels in cells derived from T-ALL. We hypothesized that ACh over-produced in T-ALL may act as an autocrine growth factor and play an important role in leukemic clonal expansion through shaping of intracellular Ca2+ signals. We suggest that cholinergic machinery may be attractive targets for new drugs against T-ALL. Specifically, testing of high affinity antagonists of muscarinic ACh receptors as well as antagomiRs, which interfere with miRNAs involved in the suppression of AChE expression, may be the first choice options. PMID:27630569

  10. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  11. Treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L; Novitzky, N

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-five consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 24 years (range 10-69 years), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, Adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate and monthly intrathecal therapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, Adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 59 patients (69%) and only the French-American-British (FAB) L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (P = 0.048). Twenty-three patients failed to achieve CR and of these 12 had primary drug resistance. Median follow-up is currently 260 weeks, median predicted survival of all patients is 58 weeks and for those who achieved CR it is 104 weeks. Median duration of CR is 70 weeks. Of the prognostic factors for survival, only FAB L1 subtype was significant. Bone marrow relapses occurred in 29 patients, and of these 9 (31%) achieved CR. There has been CNS relapse in two patients and both have died. Eleven patients continue in CR off therapy, with a median of 152 weeks. This regimen is effective, with acceptable toxicity, and a number of patients are potentially cured. The incidence of resistant and relapsing disease is an argument for further intensifying both induction and postinduction therapy.

  12. Incidence and prognostic relevance of genetic variations in T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Bettina R; Rohde, Marius; Zimmermann, Martin; Krieger, David; Oschlies, Ilske; Niggli, Felix; Wrobel, Grazyna; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Escherich, Gabriele; Klapper, Wolfram; Reiter, Alfred; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2013-04-18

    Probability of event-free survival (pEFS) in pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma is about 80%, whereas survival in relapsed patients is very poor. No stratification criteria have been established so far. Recently, activating NOTCH1 mutations were reported to be associated with favorable prognosis, and loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 6q (LOH6q) was reported to be associated with increased relapse risk. The current project was intended to evaluate the prognostic effect of these markers. Mutations in hot spots of NOTCH1 and FBXW7 were analyzed in 116 patients. Concerning LOH6q status, 118 patients were investigated, using microsatellite marker analysis, in addition to an earlier reported cohort of 99 available patients. Ninety-two cases were evaluable for both analyses. All patients were treated with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster group (BFM)-type treatment. LOH6q was observed in 12% of patients (25/217) and associated with unfavorable prognosis (pEFS 27% ± 9% vs 86% ± 3%; P < .0001). In 60% (70/116) of the patients, NOTCH1 mutations were detected and associated with favorable prognosis (pEFS 84% ± 5% vs 66% ± 7%; P = .021). Interestingly, NOTCH1 mutations were rarely observed in patients with LOH in 6q16. Both prognostic markers will be used as stratification criteria in coming Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma-BFM trials.

  13. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  14. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1992-08-01

    Forty-six consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 23 years (range 14 to 64), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate, and monthly intrathecal chemotherapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 36 patients (78%) and only the FAB L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (Chi-squared = 3.91: p < 0.05). Eight of the 10 non-responders had significant drug resistance and 3 deaths were associated with marrow hypoplasia. Median follow-up is 52 months. Median duration of CR is 28 months, median survival of all patients is 16 months, and for those who achieved CR is 44 months. There was no difference between the two maintenance arms. Significant prognostic factors for survival are French-American-British (FAB) subtype, in which the L1 is better than L2 (p = 0.05), and age (p = 0.035). Nineteen patients have experienced medullary relapse and 7 (37%) achieved subsequent CR; this is durable in a single patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Eight patients (17%) had CNS disease at diagnosis; 5 achieved CR and 1 is alive and disease-free at 65+ months. There has been 1 CNS relapse. These results demonstrate that prolonged remissions and survival can be achieved with this protocol and many patients possibly cured. The level of toxicity is acceptable and the pattern of induction failure indicates that a margin exists for intensifying chemotherapy and thereby possibly further improving results.

  15. Characterization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia subtypes in moroccan children.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Bennani, Sanae; Lahjouji, Ali; Cherkaoui, Siham; Harif, M'hamed; Khattab, Mohamed; Nassereddine, Ilham; Zafad, Saadia; El Aouad, Rajae

    2009-01-01

    We present the incidence and the immunologic characteristics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subsets in Moroccan children. We studied 279 unselected patients below the age of 18 years with newly diagnosed ALL. Cases were classified according to immunophenotype: 216 (77.42%) precursor B-cell phenotype (pB-cell), mature B-cell in 4 (1.43%), and T-cell in 59 (21.15%) cases. The subclassification using the CD10 antibody revealed 197 cases pB-ALL CD10+ (91.2%) and 9 cases T-ALL CD10+ (19.2%). The age distribution showed a peak in incidence between 3 and 5 years among the pB-cell ALLs subtype. There was a significantly higher frequency of males in the T-ALL subset (M/F ratio: 2.93 : 1) and more females in the T-ALL CD10+ subset when compared with the T-ALL CD10- subset. All tested pB-cell-lineage ALLs expressed CD19, CD79a, and surface CD22, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) was detectable in 89.9% of cases, and cells in 74.1% of cases express CD34. All tested T-lineage ALL cells have surface CD7 and cytoplasmic CD3 (cCD3) antigens, CD5 was found in 98.2% cases, and 70.5% express TdT. CD1a, surface CD3 (sCD3), and CD4 are detected in more than 80% of cases; this frequency is higher than the 45% generally observed. Myeloid antigens occur more frequently and were expressed in 124 (57.4%) of pB-cell-ALL cases and 20 (33.9%) of T-cell ALL cases. Our results show that the distribution of ALLs in Moroccan children is similar with the general distribution pattern in developed countries except for the high frequency of T-ALL phenotype. The phenotypic profiles of our patients are close to those reported in literature for B-lineage ALLs; for the T-cell ALL subgroup, the blast cells express more CD1a, surface CD3, and CD4 while expressing less TdT. The high frequency of CD1a expression resulted in an excess of the common thymocyte subtype.

  16. Characterization of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Subtypes in Moroccan Children

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Fatima; Bennani, Sanae; Lahjouji, Ali; Cherkaoui, Siham; Harif, M'hamed; Khattab, Mohamed; Nassereddine, Ilham; Zafad, Saadia; El Aouad, Rajae

    2009-01-01

    We present the incidence and the immunologic characteristics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subsets in Moroccan children. We studied 279 unselected patients below the age of 18 years with newly diagnosed ALL. Cases were classified according to immunophenotype: 216 (77.42%) precursor B-cell phenotype (pB-cell), mature B-cell in 4 (1.43%), and T-cell in 59 (21.15%) cases. The subclassification using the CD10 antibody revealed 197 cases pB-ALL CD10+ (91.2%) and 9 cases T-ALL CD10+ (19.2%). The age distribution showed a peak in incidence between 3 and 5 years among the pB-cell ALLs subtype. There was a significantly higher frequency of males in the T-ALL subset (M/F ratio: 2.93 : 1) and more females in the T-ALL CD10+ subset when compared with the T-ALL CD10– subset. All tested pB-cell-lineage ALLs expressed CD19, CD79a, and surface CD22, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) was detectable in 89.9% of cases, and cells in 74.1% of cases express CD34. All tested T-lineage ALL cells have surface CD7 and cytoplasmic CD3 (cCD3) antigens, CD5 was found in 98.2% cases, and 70.5% express TdT. CD1a, surface CD3 (sCD3), and CD4 are detected in more than 80% of cases; this frequency is higher than the 45% generally observed. Myeloid antigens occur more frequently and were expressed in 124 (57.4%) of pB-cell-ALL cases and 20 (33.9%) of T-cell ALL cases. Our results show that the distribution of ALLs in Moroccan children is similar with the general distribution pattern in developed countries except for the high frequency of T-ALL phenotype. The phenotypic profiles of our patients are close to those reported in literature for B-lineage ALLs; for the T-cell ALL subgroup, the blast cells express more CD1a, surface CD3, and CD4 while expressing less TdT. The high frequency of CD1a expression resulted in an excess of the common thymocyte subtype. PMID:20041009

  17. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. CRISPR Meets CAR T-cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    2017-03-21

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, researchers have devised a method to deliver a CAR gene to a specific locus, TRAC, in T cells. This targeted approach yielded therapeutic cells that were more potent even at low doses; in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, they outperformed CAR T cells created with a randomly integrating retroviral vector.

  19. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  20. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Abril, J C; Castillo, F; Loewinsonh, A F; Rivas, C; Bernacer, M

    1994-04-01

    We describe an 8 year old girl who developed chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) in the ilium and clavicle. Treatment for an acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had been finished two months before. After antibiotic therapy, the clinical symptoms improved and no fresh lesions appeared. The aetiology of CRMO is unknown, but we feel that infection may precipitate an immunological reaction.

  1. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  2. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  3. CAR therapy for hematological cancers: can success seen in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia be applied to other hematological malignancies?

    PubMed Central

    Pegram, Hollie J; Smith, Eric L; Rafq, Sarwish

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy has recently come into the spotlight due to impressive results in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. By targeting CD19, a marker expressed most B-cell tumors, as well as normal B cells, CAR T-cell therapy has been investigated as a treatment strategy for B-cell leukemia and lymphoma. This review will discuss the successes of this therapy for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the challenges to this therapeutic strategy. We will also discuss application of CAR T-cell therapy to chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies including a follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, as well as acute and plasma cell malignancies. PMID:26065479

  4. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  5. T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia resembling Burkitt leukemia cell morphology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YUE, QINGFANG; LIU, XINYUE; CHEN, LEI; LIU, ZHONGPING; CHEN, WANXIN

    2015-01-01

    Biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) is an uncommon type of cancer, which accounts for <5% of all adult ALs. Based upon a previously described scoring system, the European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) proposed a set of diagnostic criteria for BAL. This scoring system is based upon the number and degree of specificity of several markers for myeloid or T/B-lymphoid blasts. The present study describes a case of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with Burkitt-like cytology, which according to the French-American-British classification, corresponded to a diagnosis of Burkitt type L3 ALL. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that the blasts were positive for T-lymphoid markers, cytoplasmic cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD7 and CD56, and myeloid markers, CD13, CD33 and CD15. At first, a diagnosis of BAL was suggested by the EGIL score, however, according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria, a case of T-ALL with aberrant myeloid markers was established. The study also reviewed the literature and discussed the limitations of the EGIL scoring system in clinical decision making, to aid in the selection of an appropriate therapeutic regimen. PMID:25663889

  6. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Clustering of breakpoints on chromosome 10 in acute T-cell leukemias with the t(10; 14) chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, J.; Finger, L.R.; Letofsky, J.; Finan, J.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR){alpha}/{delta} chain locus on chromosome 14q11 is nonrandomly involved in translocations and inversions in human T-cell neoplasms. The authors have analyzed three acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia samples carrying a t(10;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation by means of somatic cell hybrids and molecular cloning. In all cases studied the translocation splits the TCR {delta} chain locus. Somatic cell hybrids containing the human 10q+ chromosome resulting from the translocation retain the human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase gene mapped at 10q23-q24 and the diversity and joining, D{sub {delta}}2-J{sub {delta}}1, regions of the TCR {delta} chain, but not the V{sub {alpha}} region (variable region of the TCR {alpha} chain), demonstrating that the split occurred within the V{sub {alpha}}-D{sub {delta}}2 region. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint junctions revealed that the TCR {delta} chain sequences involved are made from the D{sub {delta}}2 segment. The chromosome breakpoints are clustered within a region of {approx} 263 base pairs of chromosome 10. The results suggest that the translocation of the TCR {delta} chain locus to a locus on 10q, which the authors have designated TCL3, results in deregulation of this putative oncogene, leading to acute T-cell leukemia.

  9. Late marrow recurrences in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Chessells, J M; Breatnach, F

    1981-01-01

    Thirty children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had a recurrence in the bone marrow after treatment was stopped electively. A second haematological remission was achieved in 27 (90%), and the median duration of remission was shortest (six months) in those relapsing within six months of stopping treatment. Four of six children relapsing over one year after stopping treatment remained in second haematological remission. Leukaemic infiltration of the central nervous system developed in four patients remaining in marrow remission. It is concluded that conventional chemotherapy is unlikely to be effective in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who relapse soon after stopping treatment, that "reprophylaxis" of the central nervous system probably with long-term intrathecal chemotherapy is essential, and that some patients relapsing after prolonged unmaintained remission may achieve long-term leukaemia-free survival. PMID:6791733

  10. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bilateral serous macular detachment.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luisa; Silva, Nuno Aguiar; Medeiros, Marco Dutra; Flores, Rita; Maduro, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant hematopoietic neoplasia, which is rare in adults. Although ocular fundus alterations may be commonly observed in the course of the disease, such alterations are rarely the presenting signs of the disease. Here we describe the case of a patient with painless and progressive loss of visual acuity (right eye, 2/10; left eye, 3/10) developing over two weeks, accompanied by fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fundus examination showed bilateral macular serous detachment, which was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescent pinpoints in the posterior poles. The limits of the macular detachment were revealed in the late phase of the angiogram. The results of blood count analysis triggered a thorough, systematic patient examination. The diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia B (CD10+) was established, and intensive systemic chemotherapy was immediately initiated. One year after the diagnosis, the patient remains in complete remission without any ophthalmologic alterations.

  11. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  12. Cerebellar mass as a location of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Ilaria; Canovetti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Caniglia, Michele; Ciancia, Eugenio; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Puglioli, Michele; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-09-01

    A 22-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our observation for headache, cervical pain and sopor. A computed tomography study revealed triventricular obstructive hydrocephalus due to a left cerebellar hyperdense mass impinging on the fourth ventricle. A magnetic resonance study demonstrated an area of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, hypointensity on T1, restricted diffusivity and contrast enhancement involving the left hemispherical cerebellar cortex and the vermis and causing cerebellar herniation. After surgical excision of the lesion, histological examination revealed an infiltrate of lymphoblastic leukaemia with B cells. Leukaemic intracranial masses are rare. Our report describes a case presenting a cerebellar mass of leukaemic tissue characterized by high cellularity and low apparent diffusion coefficient value comparable to acute ischaemia. Therefore leukaemic intracranial mass has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses.

  13. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  14. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Gene expression profiling of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma identifies oncogenic pathways that are potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Wei; Aplan, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the gene expression pattern of thymic tumors from precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (pre-T LBL) that arose in transgenic mice which over-expressed SCL, LMO1, or NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) with that of thymocytes from normal littermates. Only two genes, Ccl8 and Mrpl38, were consistently more than 4-fold over-expressed in pre-T LBL from all three genotypes analyzed, and a single gene, Prss16 was consistently under-expressed. However, we identified a number of genes, such as Cfl1, Tcra, Tcrb, Pbx3, Eif4a, Eif4b, and Cox8b that were over or under-expressed in pre-T LBL that arose in specific transgenic lines. Similar to the situation seen with human pre-T LBL, the SCL/LMO1 leukemias displayed an expression profile consistent with mature, late cortical thymocytes, whereas the NHD13 leukemias displayed an expression profile more consistent with immature thymocytes. We evaluated two of the most differentially regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets. Cfl1 was specifically over-expressed in SCL-LMO1 tumors; inactivation of Cfl1 using Okadaic acid resulted in suppression of leukemic cell growth. Overexpression of Ccl8 was a consistent finding in all 3 transgenic lines, and an antagonist for the Ccl8 receptor induced death of leukemic cell lines, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:17429429

  16. Blinatumomab versus Chemotherapy for Advanced Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, Hagop; Stein, Anthony; Gökbuget, Nicola; Fielding, Adele K; Schuh, Andre C; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Wei, Andrew; Dombret, Hervé; Foà, Robin; Bassan, Renato; Arslan, Önder; Sanz, Miguel A; Bergeron, Julie; Demirkan, Fatih; Lech-Maranda, Ewa; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Thomas, Xavier; Horst, Heinz-August; Brüggemann, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Wood, Brent L; Fleishman, Alex; Nagorsen, Dirk; Holland, Christopher; Zimmerman, Zachary; Topp, Max S

    2017-03-02

    Background Blinatumomab, a bispecific monoclonal antibody construct that enables CD3-positive T cells to recognize and eliminate CD19-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) blasts, was approved for use in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor ALL on the basis of single-group trials that showed efficacy and manageable toxic effects. Methods In this multi-institutional phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned adults with heavily pretreated B-cell precursor ALL, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive either blinatumomab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. The primary end point was overall survival. Results Of the 405 patients who were randomly assigned to receive blinatumomab (271 patients) or chemotherapy (134 patients), 376 patients received at least one dose. Overall survival was significantly longer in the blinatumomab group than in the chemotherapy group. The median overall survival was 7.7 months in the blinatumomab group and 4.0 months in the chemotherapy group (hazard ratio for death with blinatumomab vs. chemotherapy, 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.93; P=0.01). Remission rates within 12 weeks after treatment initiation were significantly higher in the blinatumomab group than in the chemotherapy group, both with respect to complete remission with full hematologic recovery (34% vs. 16%, P<0.001) and with respect to complete remission with full, partial, or incomplete hematologic recovery (44% vs. 25%, P<0.001). Treatment with blinatumomab resulted in a higher rate of event-free survival than that with chemotherapy (6-month estimates, 31% vs. 12%; hazard ratio for an event of relapse after achieving a complete remission with full, partial, or incomplete hematologic recovery, or death, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.71; P<0.001), as well as a longer median duration of remission (7.3 vs. 4.6 months). A total of 24% of the patients in each treatment group underwent allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Adverse events of grade 3 or higher were reported in

  17. Acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia-propagating cells are present at high frequency in diverse lymphoblast populations.

    PubMed

    Rehe, Klaus; Wilson, Kerrie; Bomken, Simon; Williamson, Daniel; Irving, Julie; den Boer, Monique L; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Hall, Andrew G; Heidenreich, Olaf; Vormoor, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Leukaemia-propagating cells are more frequent in high-risk acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia than in many malignancies that follow a hierarchical cancer stem cell model. It is unclear whether this characteristic can be more universally applied to patients from non-'high-risk' sub-groups and across a broad range of cellular immunophenotypes. Here, we demonstrate in a wide range of primary patient samples and patient samples previously passaged through mice that leukaemia-propagating cells are found in all populations defined by high or low expression of the lymphoid differentiation markers CD10, CD20 or CD34. The frequency of leukaemia-propagating cells and their engraftment kinetics do not differ between these populations. Transcriptomic analysis of CD34(high) and CD34(low) blasts establishes their difference and their similarity to comparable normal progenitors at different stages of B-cell development. However, consistent with the functional similarity of these populations, expression signatures characteristic of leukaemia propagating cells in acute myeloid leukaemia fail to distinguish between the different populations. Together, these findings suggest that there is no stem cell hierarchy in acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia.

  18. Mathematical model of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: disease, treatment, cure or relapse of a virtual cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Eymard, N; Volpert, V; Kurbatova, P; Volpert, V; Bessonov, N; Ogungbenro, K; Aarons, L; Janiaud, P; Nony, P; Bajard, A; Chabaud, S; Bertrand, Y; Kassaï, B; Cornu, C; Nony, P

    2017-01-12

    T lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) is a rare type of lymphoma with a good prognosis with a remission rate of 85%. Patients can be completely cured or can relapse during or after a 2-year treatment. Relapses usually occur early after the remission of the acute phase. The median time of relapse is equal to 1 year, after the occurrence of complete remission (range 0.2-5.9 years) (Uyttebroeck et al., 2008). It can be assumed that patients may be treated longer than necessary with undue toxicity.The aim of our model was to investigate whether the duration of the maintenance therapy could be reduced without increasing the risk of relapses and to determine the minimum treatment duration that could be tested in a future clinical trial.We developed a mathematical model of virtual patients with T-LBL in order to obtain a proportion of virtual relapses close to the one observed in the real population of patients from the EuroLB database. Our simulations reproduced a 2-year follow-up required to study the onset of the disease, the treatment of the acute phase and the maintenance treatment phase.

  19. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  20. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  1. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  2. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. [Effect of Ikaros in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ying; Bai, Hai

    2015-08-01

    The Ikaros - a DNA-binding zinc finger protein, acting as a regulator of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, is crucial for regulating the development and function of the immune system and acting as a master regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Function-loss mutations of IKZF1, gene encoding Ikaros are frequent in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and are associated with a poor prognosis. This review briefly summarizes the available data regarding the structure and function of Ikaros, the role of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B-ALL, and its regulation mechanism.

  4. Prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okpala, I E; Olatunji, P O; Okunade, M A; Ogunsanwo, B A; Jeje, O M; Shokunbi, W A; Essien, E M

    1990-12-01

    Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) seen in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, still have low rates of complete remission and relatively short survival. Yet the overall prognosis was expected to have improved because the proportions of adults, males and people of low socio-economic class among the patients have decreased steadily over the past three decades. Possible causes of the persistent poor performance were sought for in 30 new ALL patients seen in the hospital over a period of 2 years and 9 months. Unfavourable prognostic factors, lack of standard cytotoxic drugs, inadequate supportive care and absence of modern facilities for therapy combined to make their disease outcome worse than expected.

  5. Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lisa; Hegde, Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T cells are an innate population of T lymphocytes that recognize antigens derived from host lipids and glycolipids. In this review, we focus on how these unique T cells are positioned to influence both acute and chronic inflammatory processes through their early recruitment to sites of inflammation, interactions with myeloid antigen presenting cells, and recognition of lipids associated with inflammation. PMID:20850561

  6. Long-lasting memory T cell responses following self-limited acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Penna, A; Artini, M; Cavalli, A; Levrero, M; Bertoletti, A; Pilli, M; Chisari, F V; Rehermann, B; Del Prete, G; Fiaccadori, F; Ferrari, C

    1996-01-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of long-term T cell memory against viral antigens is still largely undefined. To characterize anti-viral protection by memory T cells against non-cytopathic viruses able to cause acute self-limited and chronic infections, such as the hepatitis B virus (HBV), we studied HLA class II restricted responses against HBV structural antigens in 17 patients with acute hepatitis B, during the acute stage of infection and 2.2 to 13 yr after clinical resolution of disease. Results indicate that: (a) significant T cell proliferative responses to HBV nucleocapsid antigens were detectable in all patients during the acute phase of infection and in 14/17 also 2-13 yr after clinical resolution of disease; b) long-lasting T cell responses were sustained by CD45RO+T cells, predominantly expressing the phenotype of recently activated cells; c) limiting dilution analysis showed that in some patients the frequency of HBV-specific T cells was comparable to that observed in the acute stage of infection and, usually, higher than in patients with chronic HBV infection; d) the same amino acid sequences were recognized by T cells in the acute and recovery phases of infection; and e) HBV-DNA was detectable by nested-PCR in approximately half of the subjects. to conclusion, our results show that vigorous anti-viral T cell responses are detectable in vitro several years after clinical recovery from acute hepatitis B. Detection of minute amounts of virus in some recovered subjects suggests that long-term maintenance of an active anti-viral T cell response could be important not only for protection against reinfection but also for keeping the persisting virus under tight control. PMID:8787682

  7. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Jin; Kuo, Chia-Chen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX) is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs) inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS). Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment. PMID:25136372

  8. Inotuzumab ozogamicin in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Morley, N J; Marks, D I

    2016-01-01

    Whilst most adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia will go into remission with standard induction chemotherapy, many will relapse. Response rates to standard salvage chemotherapy regimens are low and the outlook on relapse is very poor and associated with significant morbidity and mortality hence the need for newer targeted approaches. Inotuzumab ozogamicin (previously known as CMC-544) is an antibody-drug conjugate and consists of a monoclonal anti-CD22 antibody bound to calicheamicin. The target, CD22, is widely expressed on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells making it a potential therapeutic target. The calicheamicin is delivered intracellularly and causes leukaemia cell apoptosis. Overall response rates of 57% were observed in a Phase II study and the final results of a Phase III randomised controlled trial comparing this drug to the investigator choice 'standard of care' chemotherapy are eagerly awaited. Whilst initial results are promising, there have been concerns regarding liver toxicity and the incidence of veno-occlusive disease of the liver especially in patients who have previously received or go on to allogeneic stem cell transplant.

  9. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinical examination was conducted using the dental preset tray. The condition of the oral mucosa was determined using the WHO scale for oral mucositis. Results In the first period of antineoplastic therapy the pathological lesions of the oral mucosa of the mucositis type were observed among the examined patients. The lesions had various levels of intensity. Pain was found to be the primary symptom of oral mucositis. In this study the following were observed: local erythema of the oral mucosa in 35%, white pseudomembranous lesions in 18%, erosions in 40% and oral ulcerative lesions in 4% of patients who underwent the antineoplastic therapy. Oral mucositis was observed in 3.17% of children after 6 months of chemotherapy. Conclusion Local treatment of oral mucositis with polyantibiotic-antifungal mixture, supporting antifungal systemic treatment, and improving the overall peripheral blood conditions in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia improve the condition of the oral mucosa. PMID:23788849

  10. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with Fanconi's anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Naureen; Wali, Rabia; Fadoo, Zehra; Saleem, Ali Faisal

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed.

  12. Tracking Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells during and after Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfafferot, Katja; Heeg, Malte H.J.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Grüner, Norbert; Rauch, Andri; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Zachoval, Reinhart; Pape, Gerd R.; Schraut, Winfried; Santantonio, Teresa; Nitschko, Hans; Obermeier, Martin; Phillips, Rodney; Scriba, Thomas J.; Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl; Weber, Jonathan N.; Fidler, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; Haberstroh, Anita; Baumert, Thomas F.; Klenerman, Paul; Diepolder, Helmut M.

    2007-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. Conclusions/Significance During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists. PMID:17653276

  13. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  14. Comparison between qualitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate minimal residual disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Francisco Danilo Ferreira; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; Ganazza, Mônica Aparecida; Jotta, Patricia Yoshioka; Yunes, José Andrés; Viana, Marcos Borato; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minimal residual disease is an important independent prognostic factor that can identify poor responders among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze minimal residual disease using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements by conventional polymerase chain reaction followed by homo-heteroduplex analysis and to compare this with real-time polymerase chain reaction at the end of the induction period in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods Seventy-four patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled. Minimal residual disease was evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in 57 and by both tests in 44. The Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox methods and the log-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results Nine patients (15.8%) were positive for minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction and 11 (25%) by real-time polymerase chain reaction considering a cut-off point of 1 × 10−3 for precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 × 10−2 for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using the qualitative method, the 3.5-year leukemia-free survival was significantly higher in children negative for minimal residual disease compared to those with positive results (84.1% ± 5.6% versus 41.7% ± 17.3%, respectively; p-value = 0.004). There was no significant association between leukemia-free survival and minimal residual disease by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction was the only variable significantly correlated to leukemia-free survival. Conclusion Given the difficulties in the implementation of minimal residual disease monitoring by real-time polymerase chain reaction in most treatment centers in Brazil, the qualitative polymerase chain reaction strategy may be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:26670399

  15. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  16. Targeting High Dynamin-2 (DNM2) Expression by Restoring Ikaros Function in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zheng; Gu, Yan; Han, Qi; Zhao, Gang; Li, Min; Li, Jianyong; Chen, Baoan; Sun, Tianyu; Dovat, Sinisa; Gale, Robert Peter; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin-2 (DNM2) is a GTPase essential for intracellular vesicle formation and trafficking, cytokinesis and receptor endocytosis. Mutations in DNM2 are common in early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, DNM2 expression in other types of ALL are not reported. We studied DNM2 mRNA level in adults with B- and T-cell ALL. We found DNM2 is more highly expressed compared with normals in both forms of ALL. High DNM2 expression is associated with some clinical and laboratory features, inferior outcomes and with leukaemia cell proliferation. We also found Ikaros directly binds the DNM2 promoter and suppresses DNM2 expression. Consequently IKZF1 deletion is associated with high DNM2 expression. Conversely, casein kinase-2 (CK2)-inhibitor increases Ikaros function thereby inhibiting DNM2 expression. Inhibiting DNM2 suppresses proliferation of leukemia cells and synergizes with CK2 inhibition. Our data indicate high DNM2 expression is associated with Ikaros dysregulation and may be important in the development of B-ALL. PMID:27885263

  17. Tim-3 directly enhances CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jacob V.; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel; Pham, Nhat-Long L.; Traver, Geri L.; Rothman, Paul B.; Harty, John T.; Colgan, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Tim-3 is a surface molecule expressed throughout the immune system that can mediate both stimulatory and inhibitory effects. Previous studies have provided evidence that Tim-3 functions to enforce CD8 T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with chronic stimulation. In contrast, the role of Tim-3 in the regulation of CD8 T cell responses to acute and transient stimulation remains undefined. To address this knowledge gap, we examined how Tim-3 affects CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. Analysis of wild-type (WT) mice infected with LM revealed that Tim-3 was transiently expressed by activated CD8 T cells and was associated primarily with acquisition of an effector phenotype. Comparison of responses to LM by WT and Tim-3 KO mice showed that the absence of Tim-3 significantly reduced the magnitudes of both primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses, which correlated with decreased IFN-γ production and degranulation by Tim-3 KO cells stimulated with peptide antigen ex vivo. To address the T cell-intrinsic role of Tim-3, we analyzed responses to LM infection by WT and Tim-3 KO TCR-transgenic CD8 T cells following adoptive transfer into a shared WT host. In this setting, the accumulation of CD8 T cells and the generation of cytokine-producing cells were significantly reduced by the lack of Tim-3, demonstrating that this molecule has a direct effect on CD8 T cell function. Combined, our results suggest that Tim-3 can mediate a stimulatory effect on CD8 T cell responses to an acute infection. PMID:24567532

  18. ICAM-1-dependent tuning of memory CD8 T-cell responses following acute infection.

    PubMed

    Cox, Maureen A; Barnum, Scott R; Bullard, Daniel C; Zajac, Allan J

    2013-01-22

    CD8 T-cell responses are critical for protection against intracellular pathogens and tumors. The induction and properties of these responses are governed by a series of integrated processes that rely heavily on cell-cell interactions. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 functions to enhance the strength of antigenic stimulation, extend the duration of contact with antigen-presenting cells, and augment cytokine signals, which are all factors that influence peripheral CD8 T-cell differentiation. Although previous studies suggest that ICAM-1 is essential for establishing memory T-cell populations following peptide immunization, the roles of ICAM-1 in antiviral cellular immunity are less well understood. Here we show that, following a prototypic acute viral infection, the formation and maintenance of memory-phenotype CD127(hi), KLRG-1(lo) CD8 T cells does not require ICAM-1. Nevertheless, ICAM-1 expression on nonlymphocytes dictates the phenotypic and functional attributes of the antiviral CD8 T-cell populations that develop and promotes the gradual attrition of residual effector-like CD127(lo), KLRG-1(hi) CD8 T cells during the memory phase of the response. Although memory T cells do emerge and are maintained if ICAM-1 expression is abolished, the secondary proliferative capacity of these T cells is severely curtailed. Collectively, these studies reveal potential dual roles for ICAM-1 in both promoting the decay of effector responses and programming the sensitivity of memory CD8 T cells to secondary stimuli.

  19. Acute Malaria Induces PD1+CTLA4+ Effector T Cells with Cell-Extrinsic Suppressor Function

    PubMed Central

    Mackroth, Maria Sophia; Abel, Annemieke; Steeg, Christiane; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Jacobs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In acute Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria, the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune pathways must be delicately balanced so that the parasitemia is controlled without inducing immunopathology. An important mechanism to fine-tune T cell responses in the periphery is the induction of coinhibitory receptors such as CTLA4 and PD1. However, their role in acute infections such as P. falciparum malaria remains poorly understood. To test whether coinhibitory receptors modulate CD4+ T cell functions in malaria, blood samples were obtained from patients with acute P. falciparum malaria treated in Germany. Flow cytometric analysis showed a more frequent expression of CTLA4 and PD1 on CD4+ T cells of malaria patients than of healthy control subjects. In vitro stimulation with P. falciparum-infected red blood cells revealed a distinct population of PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells that simultaneously produced IFNγ and IL10. This antigen-specific cytokine production was enhanced by blocking PD1/PDL1 and CTLA4. PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells were further isolated based on surface expression of PD1 and their inhibitory function investigated in-vitro. Isolated PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of the total CD4+ population in response to anti-CD3/28 and plasmodial antigens in a cell-extrinsic manner. The response to other specific antigens was not suppressed. Thus, acute P. falciparum malaria induces P. falciparum-specific PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ Teffector cells that coproduce IFNγ and IL10, and inhibit other CD4+ T cells. Transient induction of regulatory Teffector cells may be an important mechanism that controls T cell responses and might prevent severe inflammation in patients with malaria and potentially other acute infections. PMID:27802341

  20. Significant Haematogone Proliferation Mimicking Relapse in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia on Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ruchira; Dorwal, Pranav; Sharma, Rashi; Sachdev, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Haematogones are benign B lymphoid precursors which may mimic neoplastic lymphoblasts and pose diagnostic difficulty especially when the percentage of haematogones exceeds 10% in the bone marrow. Flow cytometric analysis with combination of CD19/CD10/CD20/CD34/CD38/CD58 can be used to differentiate the two depending upon the difference in the fluorescence intensity between blasts and haematogones. We hereby present a case of Common Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Associated Antigen (CALLA) positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL), in which patient presented with haematogone proliferation in bone marrow after 6 months of chemotherapy mimicking relapse. The distinction was made on flow cytometric immunophenotyping by using optimal antibody combination. Distinction of benign haematogones from neoplastic lymphoblasts is essential for disease management in cases of post chemotherapy or post marrow transplant, especially in patients of ALL. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is reliable to distinguish haematogones from residual lymphoblasts in almost all cases when optimal antibody combinations are used. PMID:28384870

  1. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  2. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  3. Prediction of intellectual deficits in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Trautman, P.D.; Erickson, C.; Shaffer, D.; O'Connor, P.A.; Sitarz, A.; Correra, A.; Schonfeld, I.S.

    1988-06-01

    Possible predictors of reported lower cognitive functioning in irradiated children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated. Thirty-four subjects, 5-14 years old, with ALL in continuous complete remission and without evidence of current or past central nervous system disease, were examined 9-110 months after diagnosis, using standard measures of intelligence and academic achievement. Subjects with a history of post-irradiation somnolence syndrome were significantly older at diagnosis than nonsomnolent subjects. Intelligence (IQ) was found to be unrelated to history of somnolence syndrome. IQ and achievement were unrelated to age at irradiation, irradiation-examination interval, and radiation dosages. The strongest predictor of IQ by far is parental social class. The importance of controlling for social class differences when searching for treatment effects on IQ and achievement is stressed.

  4. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    PubMed

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-09

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications.

  5. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  6. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Integrating Genomics into Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy of childhood, is a genetically complex entity that remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. Major advances in genomic and epigenomic profiling during the past decade have appreciably enhanced knowledge of the biology of de novo and relapsed ALL and have facilitated more precise risk stratification of patients. These achievements have also provided critical insights regarding potentially targetable lesions for development of new therapeutic approaches in the era of precision medicine. This review delineates the current genetic landscape of childhood ALL with emphasis upon patient outcomes with contemporary treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic implications of newly identified genomic alterations in specific subsets of ALL. PMID:26194091

  7. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology: a crucial interrelationship.

    PubMed

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sanchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2011-10-15

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease.

  8. Asparaginase-associated toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Nobuko; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an integral component of multiagent chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Positive outcomes are seen in patients who are able to complete their entire prescribed course of asparaginase therapy. Toxicities associated with asparaginase use include hypersensitivity (clinical and subclinical), pancreatitis, thrombosis, encephalopathy, and liver dysfunction. Depending on the nature and severity of the toxicity, asparaginase therapy may be altered or discontinued in some patients. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common asparaginase-associated toxicity requiring treatment discontinuation, occurring in up to 30% of patients receiving Escherichia coli-derived asparaginase. The ability to rapidly identify and manage asparaginase-associated toxicity will help ensure patients receive the maximal benefit from asparaginase therapy. This review will provide an overview of the common toxicities associated with asparaginase use and recommendations for treatment management.

  9. How to manage asparaginase hypersensitivity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved significantly in recent decades, primarily due to dose-intensified, multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, of which asparaginase has played a prominent role. Despite this success, hypersensitivity remains a significant problem, often requiring the termination of asparaginase. Failure to complete the entire asparaginase therapy course due to clinical hypersensitivity, subclinical hypersensitivity (i.e., silent inactivation), or other treatment-related toxicity is associated with poor ALL outcomes. Thus, it is critical to rapidly identify patients who develop clinical/subclinical hypersensitivity and switch these patients to an alternate asparaginase formulation. This article provides an overview of asparaginase hypersensitivity, identification and management of hypersensitivity and subclinical hypersensitivity, and issues related to switching patients to asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi following hypersensitivity reaction.

  10. Increased T cell glucose uptake reflects acute rejection in lung grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Wang, Xingan; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Carpenter, Danielle; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Xue; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Huang, Howard J.; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Although T cells are required for acute lung rejection, other graft-infiltrating cells such as neutrophils accumulate in allografts and are also high glucose utilizers. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose probe [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been employed to image solid organ acute rejection, but the sources of glucose utilization remain undefined. Using a mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation, we analyzed glucose probe uptake in the grafts of syngeneic and allogeneic recipients with or without immunosuppression treatment. Pulmonary microPET scans demonstrated significantly higher [18F]FDG uptake in rejecting allografts when compared to transplanted lungs of either immunosuppressed or syngeneic recipients. [18F]FDG uptake was also markedly attenuated following T cell depletion therapy in lung recipients with ongoing acute rejection. Flow-cytometric analysis using the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog 2-NBDG revealed that T cells, and in particular CD8+ T cells, were the largest glucose utilizers in acutely rejecting lung grafts followed by neutrophils and antigen presenting cells. These data indicate that imaging modalities tailored toward assessing T cell metabolism may be useful in identifying acute rejection in lung recipients PMID:23927673

  11. Expansion of CD8+CD57+ T Cells in an Immunocompetent Patient with Acute Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Muñoz, R.; Rodríguez-Otero, P.; Galar, A.; Merino, J.; Beunza, J. J.; Páramo, J. A.; Lecumberri, R.

    2009-01-01

    CD57+ T cells increase in several viral infections like cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, parvovirus, HIV and hepatitis C virus and are associated with several clinical conditions related to immune dysfunction and ageing. We report for the first time an expansion of CD8+ CD57+ T cells in a young patient with an acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Our report supports the concept that CD8+ CD57+ T cells could be important in the control of chronic phase of intracellular microorganisms and that the high numbers of these cells may reflect the continuing survey of the immune system, searching for parasite proliferation in the tissues. PMID:19946421

  12. Expansion of CD8+CD57+ T Cells in an Immunocompetent Patient with Acute Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, R; Rodríguez-Otero, P; Galar, A; Merino, J; Beunza, J J; Páramo, J A; Lecumberri, R

    2009-01-01

    CD57+ T cells increase in several viral infections like cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, parvovirus, HIV and hepatitis C virus and are associated with several clinical conditions related to immune dysfunction and ageing. We report for the first time an expansion of CD8+ CD57+ T cells in a young patient with an acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Our report supports the concept that CD8+ CD57+ T cells could be important in the control of chronic phase of intracellular microorganisms and that the high numbers of these cells may reflect the continuing survey of the immune system, searching for parasite proliferation in the tissues.

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of FLI-1 in acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL): a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Lin, Oscar; Filippa, Daniel A; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2009-10-01

    Cases of CD45-negative acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (ALL) immunoreactive for CD99 and Friend Leukemia Integration-1 (FLI-1) can occur and may lead to a misdiagnosis of Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor with critical clinical treatment management implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate a panel of antibodies that would allow greater diagnostic accuracy of ALL and evaluate the frequency of FLI-1 immunoreactivity in a series of ALL cases and an expanded series of T-cell lymphoma subtypes. Immunoreactivity for CD3 was seen in 12/20 (60%), CD20 in 5/20 (25%), CD43 in 19/20(95%), CD45 in 15/20(75%), CD99 in 15/20 (75%), FLI-1, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) in 17/20 (85%) cases. Two cases negative for leukocyte common antigen (LCA), CD20, and CD3 were positive for FLI-1, CD99, TdT, and CD43. Two other LCA-negative cases were positive for CD99 but negative for FLI-1. The majority of cases showed immunoreactivity for CD43 and/or TdT. Therefore, CD43 and/or TdT should be included in the immunohistochemical evaluation of small round blue cell tumors. Absence of immunoreactivity for LCA does not exclude ALL and immunoreactivity of FLI-1 is not restricted to Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor. We also report FLI-1 expression in an expanded series of 75 cases of T-cell lymphoma and found high expression in anaplastic large cell lymphoma and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

  14. Oncogenetics and minimal residual disease are independent outcome predictors in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beldjord, Kheira; Chevret, Sylvie; Asnafi, Vahid; Huguet, Françoise; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Leguay, Thibaut; Thomas, Xavier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Grardel, Nathalie; Chalandon, Yves; Boissel, Nicolas; Schaefer, Beat; Delabesse, Eric; Cavé, Hélène; Chevallier, Patrice; Buzyn, Agnès; Fest, Thierry; Reman, Oumedaly; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Lhéritier, Véronique; Béné, Marie C; Lafage, Marina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2014-06-12

    With intensified pediatric-like therapy and genetic disease dissection, the field of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has evolved recently. In this new context, we aimed to reassess the value of conventional risk factors with regard to new genetic alterations and early response to therapy, as assessed by immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor minimal residual disease (MRD) levels. The study was performed in 423 younger adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in first remission (265 B-cell precursor [BCP] and 158 T-cell ALL), with cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) as the primary end point. In addition to conventional risk factors, the most frequent currently available genetic alterations were included in the analysis. A higher specific hazard of relapse was independently associated with postinduction MRD level ≥10(-4) and unfavorable genetic characteristics (ie, MLL gene rearrangement or focal IKZF1 gene deletion in BCP-ALL and no NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutation and/or N/K-RAS mutation and/or PTEN gene alteration in T-cell ALL). These 2 factors allowed definition of a new risk classification that is strongly associated with higher CIR and shorter relapse-free and overall survival. These results indicate that genetic abnormalities are important predictors of outcome in adult ALL not fully recapitulated by early response to therapy. Patients included in this study were treated in the multicenter GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. Both trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027 and #NCT00327678, respectively.

  15. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  16. ETS-related gene is a novel prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Zhao; Jia, Ming; Luo, Ze-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Si-Si; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Guo, Xiao-Ping; Tang, Yong-Min

    2017-01-01

    The ETS-related gene (ERG) has been demonstrated to be associated with overall survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia and acute T cell-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in adult patients. However, there are no data available regarding the impact of ERG expression on childhood ALL. In the present study, ERG expression levels were analyzed in bone marrow samples from 119 ALL pediatric patients. ALL patients demonstrated higher ERG expression compared with the controls (P<0.0001). In addition, low ERG expression identified a group of patients with higher white blood cell counts (P=0.011), higher percentages of T-ALL immunophenotype (P=0.027), and higher relapse rates (P=0.009). Survival analyses demonstrated that low ERG expression was associated with inferior relapse-free survival (RFS) in childhood ALL (P=0.036) and was an independent prognostic factor in multivariable analyses for RFS. In conclusion, low ERG expression is associated with poor outcomes and may be used to serve as a molecular prognostic marker to identify patients with a high risk of relapse in childhood ALL.

  17. Dynamics of the Cytotoxic T Cell Response to a Model of Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, William S.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Lindau, Paul; Vignali, Marissa; Snyder, Thomas M.; Desmarais, Cindy; Sanders, Catherine; Utsugi, Heidi; Warren, Edus H.; McElrath, Juliana; Makar, Karen W.; Wald, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A detailed characterization of the dynamics and breadth of the immune response to an acute viral infection, as well as the determinants of recruitment to immunological memory, can greatly contribute to our basic understanding of the mechanics of the human immune system and can ultimately guide the design of effective vaccines. In addition to neutralizing antibodies, T cells have been shown to be critical for the effective resolution of acute viral infections. We report the first in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the CD8+ T cell repertoire at the level of individual T cell clonal lineages upon vaccination of human volunteers with a single dose of YF-17D. This live attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine yields sterile, long-term immunity and has been previously used as a model to understand the immune response to a controlled acute viral infection. We identified and enumerated unique CD8+ T cell clones specifically induced by this vaccine through a combined experimental and statistical approach that included high-throughput sequencing of the CDR3 variable region of the T cell receptor β-chain and an algorithm that detected significantly expanded T cell clones. This allowed us to establish that (i) on average, ∼2,000 CD8+ T cell clones were induced by YF-17D, (ii) 5 to 6% of the responding clones were recruited to long-term memory 3 months postvaccination, (iii) the most highly expanded effector clones were preferentially recruited to the memory compartment, and (iv) a fraction of the YF-17D-induced clones could be identified from peripheral blood lymphocytes solely by measuring clonal expansion. IMPORTANCE The exhaustive investigation of pathogen-induced effector T cells is essential to accurately quantify the dynamics of the human immune response. The yellow fever vaccine (YFV) has been broadly used as a model to understand how a controlled, self-resolving acute viral infection induces an effective and long-term protective immune response. Here, we

  18. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  19. HIV-1-Specific CD8 T Cells Exhibit Limited Cross-Reactivity during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Du, Victor Y; Bansal, Anju; Carlson, Jonathan; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Salazar, Maria G; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; Josephs, Tracy M; Heath, Sonya L; Price, David A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A

    2016-04-15

    Prior work has demonstrated that HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells can cross-recognize variant epitopes. However, most of these studies were performed in the context of chronic infection, where the presence of viral quasispecies makes it difficult to ascertain the true nature of the original antigenic stimulus. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated the extent of CD8 T cell cross-reactivity in patients with acute HIV-1 clade B infection. In each case, we determined the transmitted founder virus sequence to identify the autologous epitopes restricted by individual HLA class I molecules. Our data show that cross-reactive CD8 T cells are infrequent during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, in the uncommon instances where cross-reactive responses were detected, the variant epitopes were poorly recognized in cytotoxicity assays. Molecular analysis revealed that similar antigenic structures could be cross-recognized by identical CD8 T cell clonotypes mobilized in vivo, yet even subtle differences in a single TCR-accessible peptide residue were sufficient to disrupt variant-specific reactivity. These findings demonstrate that CD8 T cells are highly specific for autologous epitopes during acute HIV-1 infection. Polyvalent vaccines may therefore be required to provide optimal immune cover against this genetically labile pathogen.

  20. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-03-31

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  1. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  2. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported. The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection. A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection. Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743–751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283–289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327–3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection. We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  3. Comparative assessment of therapeutic safety of norcantharidin, N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide, and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide against Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic safety of an anticancer drug is one of the most important concerns of the physician treating the cancer patient. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and hillslope are usually used to represent the strength and sensitivity of an anticancer drug on cancer cells. The therapeutic safety of the anticancer drug can be assessed by comparing the IC50 and hillslope of anticancer drugs on cancer cells relative to normal cells. Since there are situations where “more anticancer activity” implies “more toxicity,” the safety of an anticancer drug in these situations is hard to evaluate by using IC50 and hillslope alone. In a previous study, the “net effect” index was devised to represent the net therapeutic effects of one anticancer drug relative to the other. However, the therapeutic safety of one specific anticancer drug alone was not defined in the “net effect” index. This study introduced the “safety index (SI)” to quantify the degree of safety of an anticancer drug by using 4-parameter logistic model on cancer cells relative to normal cells. The therapeutic safety of norcantharidin (NCTD), N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide (NC15) in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast was compared using the newly defined SI. We found that the SI of NOC15 and NC15 was significantly higher than that of NCTD, suggesting that both NOC15 and NC15 can damage more cancer cells and less normal cells than NCTD. We conclude that both NOC15 and NC15 are safer anticancer drugs than NCTD in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast. The SI can be further applied to the screening, developments, and applications of anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:27495082

  4. T-cell receptor gamma/delta expressing acute leukemia emerging from sideroblastic anemia: morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic features.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, G; Fonatsch, C; Heyll, A; Schneider, E M; Kögler, G; Söhngen, D; Aul, C; Schneider, W

    1992-01-01

    Striking numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities (-Y, +8, i(7q), del (10)(q24), and del (11)(q21)) were detected by cytogenetic analysis in a patient's bone marrow with morphological features of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic disorder. Surface marker analysis characterized blast cells to be CD2+ CD7+ CD3+ CD4- CD8- expressing gamma/delta-T-cell receptor antigen and coexpressing CD11b and CD16. Exhibiting an identical phenotype as the leukemic cells, a prominent gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population was found in the bone marrow as well as in the peripheral blood. Cells of the latter compartment coexpressed CD56 and HLA-DR antigens and exhibited nonspecific cytotoxic activity. In the bone marrow cells NSCA could be induced after stimulation with interleukin 2 in vitro. Morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic findings suggest that gamma/delta-T-ALL emerged from a myelodysplastic disorder after sequential steps of malignant transformation. Leukemic cells with "mixed lineage" character may provide evidence for a common progenitor cell in the bone marrow. Assuming that the leukemic cells represent the malignant counterpart of normal CD3+ gamma/delta-TCR+ cells the results may contribute to our understanding of the origin and differentiation as well as the possible steps of malignant transformation of a gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population.

  5. Suppressor T cell clones from patients with acute Epstein-Barr virus-induced infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F; Blaese, R M; Zoon, K C; Tosato, G

    1987-01-01

    Suppression and/or cytotoxicity are believed to play an important role in the defense against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To analyze the role of suppressor T cells in relation to EBV, we sought to clone and study these T cells. Analysis of 152 T cell clones derived from the peripheral blood of two patients with acute EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis (IM) yielded 11 highly suppressive clones that had no cytotoxic activity for the natural killer sensitive K562 cell line, an autologous EBV-infected cell line, or an allogeneic EBV-infected B cell line. Four of six suppressor T cell clones also profoundly inhibited EBV-induced immunoglobulin production, and five of five clones delayed the outgrowth of immortalized cells. These results indicate that during acute IM, suppressor T cells capable of inhibiting B cell activation in the absence of cytotoxicity can be identified, and may play a key role in the control of EBV infection. Images PMID:3025263

  6. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Jacques J M; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-06-25

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10(-4)), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10(-4), whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Multi-loci diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferret, Yann; Caillault, Aurélie; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Duez, Marc; Grardel, Nathalie; Duployez, Nicolas; Villenet, Céline; Figeac, Martin; Preudhomme, Claude; Salson, Mikaël; Giraud, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) is considered a technical revolution that has improved our knowledge of lymphoid and autoimmune diseases, changing our approach to leukaemia both at diagnosis and during follow-up. As part of an immunoglobulin/T cell receptor-based minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients, we assessed the performance and feasibility of the replacement of the first steps of the approach based on DNA isolation and Sanger sequencing, using a HTS protocol combined with bioinformatics analysis and visualization using the Vidjil software. We prospectively analysed the diagnostic and relapse samples of 34 paediatric patients, thus identifying 125 leukaemic clones with recombinations on multiple loci (TRG, TRD, IGH and IGK), including Dd2/Dd3 and Intron/KDE rearrangements. Sequencing failures were halved (14% vs. 34%, P = 0.0007), enabling more patients to be monitored. Furthermore, more markers per patient could be monitored, reducing the probability of false negative MRD results. The whole analysis, from sample receipt to clinical validation, was shorter than our current diagnostic protocol, with equal resources. V(D)J recombination was successfully assigned by the software, even for unusual recombinations. This study emphasizes the progress that HTS with adapted bioinformatics tools can bring to the diagnosis of leukaemia patients.

  8. The genomic landscape of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2014-12-05

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been greatly advanced by genomic profiling and sequencing studies. These efforts have characterized the genetic basis of recently described and poorly understood subtypes of ALL, including early T-cell precursor ALL, Philadelphia chromosome-like (Ph-like) ALL, and ALL with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21, and have identified several rational therapeutic targets in high-risk ALL, notably ABL1-class and JAK-STAT inhibitors in Ph-like ALL. Deep sequencing studies are also refining our understanding of the genetic basis of clonal heterogeneity and relapse. These studies have elucidated the nature of clonal evolution during disease progression and identified genetic changes that confer resistance to specific therapeutic agents, including CREBBP and NT5C2. Genomic profiling has also identified common and rare inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of developing leukemia. These efforts are now being extended to ALL in adolescents and adults with the goal of fully defining the genetic landscape of ALL to further improve treatment outcomes in high-risk populations.

  9. Bioenergetic modulation overcomes glucocorticoid resistance in T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Amy L; Heng, Jasmin Y; Beesley, Alex H; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-04-01

    Drug-resistant forms of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are a leading cause of death from disease in children. Up to 25% of patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL) develop resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, particularly to glucocorticoids (GCs), a class of drug to which resistance is one of the strongest indicators of poor clinical outcome. Despite their clinical importance, the molecular mechanisms that underpin GC resistance and leukaemia relapse are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that GC-resistance is associated with a proliferative metabolism involving the up-regulation of glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here we confirm that resistance is directly associated with a glycolytic phenotype and show that GC-resistant T-ALL cells are able to shift between glucose bioenergetic pathways. We evaluated the potential for targeting these pathways in vitro using a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), and the oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor oligomycin in combination with methylprednisolone (MPRED). We found that oligomycin synergized with MPRED to sensitize cells otherwise resistant to GCs. Similarly we observed synergy between MPRED and simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol metabolism. Collectively, our findings suggest that dual targeting of bioenergetic pathways in combination with GCs may offer a promising therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in ALL.

  10. Role of low density lipoprotein-bound cholesterol esters in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cutts, J.L.; Madden, E.A.; Melnykovych, G.

    1986-05-01

    The glucocorticoid sensitive CEM-C7 T-cell line was derived from human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Norman and Thompson. Madden et al. have demonstrated that this growth inhibitory effect is due in part to a glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and can be partially reversed by cholesterol dispersions. To further delineate the role of cholesterol in this growth inhibition, they have examined the ability of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-bound (/sup 3/H)cholesterol linoleate to reverse the growth inhibitory effect of 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone (Dex) on the CEM-C7 cells. LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate was unable to reverse the Dex-mediated growth inhibition, although incorporation of (/sup 14/C) acetate into free cholesterol was inhibited by 29%, following the Brown and Goldstein model. The presence of Dex further inhibited acetate incorporation into free cholesterol in the LDL-treated cells. Under all conditions, more than 99% of the acetate incorporated into cholesterol was present as free cholesterol, while over 87% of the LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate taken up remained in the ester compartment. These results indicate that CEM-C7 cells are unable to utilize LDL-bound cholesterol esters as a source of free cholesterol and rely on endogenous synthesis for their free cholesterol requirements.

  11. Application of oncoproteomics to aberrant signalling networks in changing the treatment paradigm in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    López Villar, Elena; Wang, Xiangdong; Madero, Luis; Cho, William C

    2015-01-01

    Oncoproteomics is an important innovation in the early diagnosis, management and development of personalized treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). As inherent factors are not completely known - e.g. age or family history, radiation exposure, benzene chemical exposure, certain viral exposures such as infection with the human T-cell lymphoma/leukaemia virus-1, as well as some inherited syndromes may raise the risk of ALL - each ALL patient may modify the susceptibility of therapy. Indeed, we consider these unknown inherent factors could be explained via coupling cytogenetics plus proteomics, especially when proteins are the ones which play function within cells. Innovative proteomics to ALL therapy may help to understand the mechanism of drug resistance and toxicities, which in turn will provide some leads to improve ALL management. Most important of these are shotgun proteomic strategies to unravel ALL aberrant signalling networks. Some shotgun proteomic innovations and bioinformatic tools for ALL therapies will be discussed. As network proteins are distinctive characteristics for ALL patients, unrevealed by cytogenetics, those network proteins are currently an important source of novel therapeutic targets that emerge from shotgun proteomics. Indeed, ALL evolution can be studied for each individual patient via oncoproteomics.

  12. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10−4), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10−4, whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25999452

  13. Molecular cloning of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) identifies a type II integral membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shipp, M.A.; Richardson, N.E.; Sayre, P.H.; Brown, N.R.; Masteller, E.L.; Clayton, L.K.; Ritz, J.; Reinherz, E.L. )

    1988-07-01

    Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) is a 100-kDa cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on most acute lymphoblastic leukemias and certain other immature lymphoid malignancies and on normal lymphoid progenitors. The latter are either uncommitted to B- or T-cell lineage or committed to only the earliest stages of B- or T-lymphocyte maturation. To elucidate the primary structure of CALLA, the authors purified the protein to homogeneity, obtained the NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence from both the intact protein and derived tryptic and V8 protease peptides and isolated CALLA cDNAs from a Nalm-6 cell line {lambda}gt10 library using redundant oligonucleotide probes. The CALLA cDNA sequence predicts a 750-amino acid integral membrane protein with a single 24-amino acid hydrophobic segment that could function as both a transmembrane region and a signal peptide. The COOH-terminal 700 amino acids, including six potential N-linked glycosylation sites compose the extracellular protein segment, whereas the 25 NM{sub 2}-terminal amino acids remaining after cleavage of the initiation methionine form the cytoplasmic tail. CALLA{sup +} cells contain CALLA transcripts of 2.7 to 5.7 kilobases with the major 5.7- and 3.7-kilobase mRNAs being preferentially expressed in specific cell types.

  14. Cognitive assessment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Preliminary findings

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anna; Appaji, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the cognitive functions of Indian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), periodically after initiation of treatment since prospective longitudinal research in this area on the Indian population has not been adequately documented. Unlike many western studies that have targeted survivors of ALL, we aimed to bring out the cognitive outcome after initiation of treatment. Materials and Methods: The cognitive functions of 19 patients diagnosed to have ALL were assessed using standardized tests after induction chemotherapy, and periodically thereafter following the second course of treatment comprising central nervous system-directed radiotherapy, and chemotherapy using intrathecal methotrexate. Results: The study found a statistically significant decline in the intelligence quotient and a deficit in the cognitive function of analytical reasoning. Conclusion: This preliminary study supports findings of an earlier Indian study and many studies conducted in the west. Since the life expectancy of these children has increased and most of them have long-term survival, and even cure, we suggest that identifying and managing children with cognitive difficulties are important in the rehabilitation of these children. PMID:20668601

  15. Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Exposure to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B.; Luban, Naomi L.; Shad, Aziza T.; Nelson, David

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case–control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child–mother pairs) were recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association. PMID:19571777

  16. Suppressed neutrophil function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Naruto, Takuya; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-10-01

    Infection is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia has been considered to be the most important risk factor for severe infection; however, other factors, such as impaired neutrophil function, may be involved in susceptibility to infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed neutrophil function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Whole blood samples were obtained from 16 children with ALL at diagnosis, after induction chemotherapy, and after consolidation chemotherapy. Oxidative burst and phagocytic activity of neutrophils were analyzed by flow cytometry. Oxidative burst of neutrophils was impaired in ALL patients. The percentage of neutrophils with normal oxidative burst after PMA stimulation was 59.0 +/- 13.2 or 70.0 +/- 21.0% at diagnosis or after induction chemotherapy, respectively, which was significantly lower compared with 93.8 +/- 6.1% in healthy control subjects (P = 0.00004, or 0.002, respectively); however, this value was normal after consolidation chemotherapy. No significant differences were noted in phagocytic activity in children with ALL compared with healthy control subjects. Impaired oxidative burst of neutrophils may be one risk factor for infections in children with ALL, especially in the initial periods of treatment.

  17. Cognitive reserve and brain volumes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R.; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koovakkattu, Della

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with long-term, progressive cognitive deficits and white matter injury. We measured global and regional white and gray matter as well as cognitive function and examined relationships between these variables and cognitive reserve, as indicated by maternal education level, in 28 young survivors of ALL and 31 healthy controls. Results indicated significantly reduced white matter volumes and cognitive testing scores in the ALL group compared to controls. Maternal education was inversely related to both global and regional white matter and directly related to gray matter in ALL and was directly related to both gray and white matter in controls, consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis. Cognitive performance was associated with different brain regions in ALL compared to controls. Maternal education was significantly positively correlated with working and verbal memory in ALL as well as processing speed and verbal memory in controls, improving models of cognitive outcome over medical and/or demographic predictors. Our findings suggest that cognitive reserve may be an important factor in brain injury and cognitive outcome in ALL. Additionally, children with ALL may experience some neural reorganization related to cognitive outcome. PMID:20814845

  18. Personalization of dexamethasone therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rosanna K; Irving, Julie A E; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-04-01

    Dexamethasone is a key component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Despite playing a key role in the improved survival of ALL over several decades, intensification of dexamethasone therapy has also contributed to the increased toxicity associated with treatment, which is now seen to be at unacceptable levels given the favourable disease prognosis. Therefore the focus for treatment is now shifting towards reducing toxicity whilst maintaining current survival rates. As approximately 50% of patients were successfully treated on less intensive protocols of the 1980s, it has been questioned whether therapy intensification is necessary in all patients. Furthermore, there remains a subset of children who are still not cured of their disease. New strategies are therefore needed to identify patients who could benefit from dose reduction or intensification. However, adjusting a potentially life threatening therapy is a challenging task, particularly given the heterogeneous nature of ALL. This review focuses on the potential for patient stratification based on our current knowledge of dexamethasone pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics and the action of dexamethasone at the cellular level. A carefully designed, combined approach is needed if we are to achieve the aim of improved personalization of dexamethasone therapy for future patients.

  19. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention. Mutations in genes regulating lymphoid development are a hallmark of ALL, and alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with a high risk of treatment failure in B-ALL. Approximately 20% of B-ALL cases harbor genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling that may be amenable to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including rearrangements of the cytokine receptor gene CRLF2; rearrangements of ABL1, JAK2, and PDGFRB; and mutations of JAK1 and JAK2. Whole-genome sequencing has also identified novel targets of mutation in aggressive T-lineage ALL, including hematopoietic regulators (ETV6 and RUNX1), tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic regulators. Challenges for the future are to comprehensively identify and experimentally validate all genetic alterations driving leukemogenesis and treatment failure in childhood and adult ALL and to implement genomic profiling into the clinical setting to guide risk stratification and targeted therapy.

  20. Longitudinal language outcomes following intrathecal chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fiona M; Perry, Meghan L; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC) is the treatment option for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Neurocognitive deficits have been described following ITC, but language status post-treatment is yet to be clarified. This study examined the language skills of nine children following ITC for ALL (mean age 7;8 years and 3;2 years post-diagnosis at baseline measurement) and nine age- and sex-matched controls, at baseline then 2 years later, using a battery of tests assessing general language skills. An assessment of cognitively-demanding high level language skills was undertaken on a sub-group of the children (n =12). Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between children treated with ITC and controls when comparing change in performance scores from baseline measurement to 2 years post-baseline measurement. Descriptive analysis of three of the ALL participants in the Intermediate Stage survivorship at language re-assessment indicated no clinically-significant change in performance over 2 years for all measures except receptive language skills, which improved over the time for two of the children. As language skills continue to develop into late adolescence, the need for the monitoring of language abilities of children treated at a young age with ITC as they enter the Intermediate and Late Stages of survivorship is discussed.

  1. Deregulation of DUX4 and ERG in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; McCastlain, Kelly; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Xu, Beisi; Chang, Yunchao; Churchman, Michelle L; Wu, Gang; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Liu, Yu; Qu, Chunxu; Wen, Ji; Edmonson, Michael; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Takayanagi, Shin-Ichiro; Wienholds, Erno; Waanders, Esmé; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Bakogianni, Sofia; Wang, Jingjing; Aifantis, Iannis; Roberts, Kathryn G; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather L; Chen, Xiang; Newman, Scott; Ma, Xiaotu; Rusch, Michael; Gupta, Pankaj; Boggs, Kristy; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Dalton, James; Liu, Yanling; Valentine, Marcus L; Ding, Li; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda; Tabib, Yashodhan; Ochoa, Kerri; Devidas, Meenakshi; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Jun; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Harvey, Richard C; Chen, I-Ming L; Willman, Cheryl L; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Paietta, Elisabeth; Tallman, Martin S; Stock, Wendy; Foster, Matthew C; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Luger, Selina; Kornblau, Steven M; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Raimondi, Susana C; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Dick, John E; Hunger, Stephen P; Loh, Mignon L; Downing, James R; Mullighan, Charles G

    2016-12-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements deregulating hematopoietic transcription factors are common in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here we show that deregulation of the homeobox transcription factor gene DUX4 and the ETS transcription factor gene ERG is a hallmark of a subtype of B-progenitor ALL that comprises up to 7% of B-ALL. DUX4 rearrangement and overexpression was present in all cases and was accompanied by transcriptional deregulation of ERG, expression of a novel ERG isoform, ERGalt, and frequent ERG deletion. ERGalt uses a non-canonical first exon whose transcription was initiated by DUX4 binding. ERGalt retains the DNA-binding and transactivation domains of ERG, but it inhibits wild-type ERG transcriptional activity and is transforming. These results illustrate a unique paradigm of transcription factor deregulation in leukemia in which DUX4 deregulation results in loss of function of ERG, either by deletion or induced expression of an isoform that is a dominant-negative inhibitor of wild-type ERG function.

  2. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  3. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and exposure to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Soldin, Offie P; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M; Loffredo, Christopher A; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B; Luban, Naomi L; Shad, Aziza T; Nelson, David

    2009-08-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case-control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child-mother pairs) recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association.

  4. The mystery of electroencephalography in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Cohen, Rony; Pollak, Lea; Kivity, Sara; Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Stark, Batya; Yaniv, Isaac; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during the course of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. The study group consisted of 48 children with ALL who underwent a total of 72 EEGs at various stages of the disease. The medical files were reviewed for pertinent clinical data, and the EEGs were evaluated for changes in brain activity. Abnormal background activity was noted in 52.2% of the EEGs done at 1-10 days of therapy, in 43.5% of those done at 10-60 days, and only 4.3% of those done at later stages (p=0.037). These findings, together with earlier reports, suggest that early-stage ALL, even before treatment, may be associated with excessive slow EEG activity, which improves over time. The EEG changes, by themselves, are not an indication of central nervous system leukemia or a predictor of later seizures or other central nervous system involvement.

  5. Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fabian; Wojcik, Bartosch; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by a remarkable intertumoral, intratumoral, and cellular heterogeneity that might be explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) and/or the clonal evolution models. CSCs have the ability to generate all different cells of a tumor and to reinitiate the disease after remission. In the clonal evolution model, a consecutive accumulation of mutations starting in a single cell results in competitive growth of subclones with divergent fitness in either a linear or a branching succession. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a highly malignant cancer of the lymphoid system in the bone marrow with a dismal prognosis after relapse. However, stabile phenotypes and functional data of CSCs in ALL, the so-called leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), are highly controversial and the question remains whether there is evidence for their existence. This review discusses the concepts of CSCs and clonal evolution in respect to LICs mainly in B-ALL and sheds light onto the technical controversies in LIC isolation and evaluation. These aspects are important for the development of strategies to eradicate cells with LIC capacity. Common properties of LICs within different subclones need to be defined for future ALL diagnostics, treatment, and disease monitoring to improve the patients' outcome in ALL. PMID:26236346

  6. Therapies on the Horizon for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, William L.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review The prognosis for children with the most common childhood malignancy, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically. However the burden of therapy can be substantial with long term side effects and certain subgroups continue to have a poor outcome. Recent Advances The recent discovery of new genetic alterations in high risk subsets provide targets for precision medicine-based interventions using existing FDA approved agents. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches are being deployed in relapsed ALL, one of the leading causes of cancer cell death in children. Moreover genomic analysis has charted the evolution of tumor subclones and relapse specific alterations now provide a mechanistic explanation for drug resistance setting the stage for targeted therapy. There is greater recognition that host factors, genetic polymorphisms, influence cancer risk, response to therapy and toxicity. In the future it is anticipated that they will be integrated into clinical decision making to maximize cure and minimize side effects. Recent efforts to limit prophylactic central nervous system irradiation have been successful thereby sparing many children late neurocognitive impairments. Summary Integration of advances in precision medicine approaches and novel agents will continue to increase the cure rate and decrease the burden of therapy for childhood ALL. PMID:26576011

  7. Transplant Outcomes for Children with Hypodiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Eapen, Mary; He, Wensheng; Seber, Adriana; Gibson, Brenda; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Lehmann, Leslie; Vicent, Marta Gonzalez; Diaz Pérez, Miguel A.; Ayas, Mouhab; Qayed, Muna; Carpenter, Paul A.; Jodele, Sonata; Lund, Troy C.; Leung, Wing H.; Davies, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have inferior outcomes despite intensive risk adapted chemotherapy regimens. We describe 78 children with hypodiploid ALL who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between 1990 and 2010. Thirty nine (50%) patients had ≤ 43 chromosomes, 12 (15%) had 44 chromosomes and 27 (35%) had 45 chromosomes. Forty three (55%) patients were transplanted in first remission (CR1) while 35 (45%) were transplanted in ≥CR2. Twenty nine patients (37%) received a graft from a related donor and 49 (63%) from an unrelated donor. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The 5-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), relapse, and treatment related mortality (TRM) for the entire cohort were 51%, 56%, 27% and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that mortality risks were higher for patients transplanted in CR2 (HR 2.16, p=0.05), with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.15, p=0.05) and for those transplanted in the first decade of the study period (HR 2.60, p=0.01). Similarly, treatment failure risks were higher with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.28, p=0.04) and the earlier transplant period (HR 2.51, p=0.01). Although survival is better with advances in donor selection and supportive care, disease-related risk factors significantly influence transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865650

  8. Predicting relapse risk in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Hunger, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    Intensive multi-agent chemotherapy regimens and the introduction of risk-stratified therapy have substantially improved cure rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Current risk allocation schemas are imperfect, as some children are classified as lower-risk and treated with less intensive therapy relapse, while others deemed higher-risk are probably over-treated. Most cooperative groups previously used morphological clearance of blasts in blood and marrow during the initial phases of chemotherapy as a primary factor for risk group allocation; however, this has largely been replaced by the detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). Other than age and white blood cell count (WBC) at presentation, many clinical variables previously used for risk group allocation are no longer prognostic, as MRD and the presence of sentinel genetic lesions are more reliable at predicting outcome. Currently, a number of sentinel genetic lesions are used by most cooperative groups for risk stratification; however, in the near future patients will probably be risk-stratified using genomic signatures and clustering algorithms, rather than individual genetic alterations. This review will describe the clinical, biological, and response-based features known to predict relapse risk in childhood ALL, including those currently used and those likely to be used in the near future to risk-stratify therapy.

  9. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  10. Vincristine sulfate liposomal injection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Raj, Trisha A Soosay; Smith, Amanda M; Moore, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is one of the most extensively used cytotoxic compounds in hemato-oncology. VCR is particularly important for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a disease that accounts for approximately one-third of all childhood cancer diagnoses. VCR's full therapeutic potential has been limited by dose-limiting neurotoxicity, classically resulting in autonomic and peripheral sensory-motor neuropathy. In the last decade, however, the discovery that liposomal encapsulation of chemotherapeutics can modulate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a compound has stimulated much interest in liposomal VCR (vincristine sulfate liposomal injection [VSLI]) formulations for the treatment of ALL and other hematological malignancies. Promising data from recent clinical trials investigating VSLI in adults with ALL resulted in US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (t[9;22]/BCR-ABL1) (Ph)-negative (Ph-) disease. Additional clinical trials of VSLI in adults and children with both Ph-positive (Ph+) and Ph- ALL are ongoing. Here we review the preclinical and clinical experience to date with VSLI for ALL.

  11. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  12. Bone Marrow Microenvironment Modulation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Blake S; Slone, William L; Thomas, Patrick; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Angel, Peggi M; Walsh, Callee M; Cantrell, Pamela S; Rellick, Stephanie L; Martin, Karen H; Simpkins, James W; Gibson, Laura F

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment regimens have dramatically improved the survival of ALL patients. However, chemoresistant minimal residual disease (MRD) that persists following cessation of therapy contributes to aggressive relapse. The bone marrow microenvironment (BMM) is an established “site of sanctuary” for ALL as well as myeloid lineage hematopoietic disease, with signals in this unique anatomical location contributing to drug resistance. Several models have been developed to recapitulate the interactions between the BMM and ALL cells. However, many in vitro models fail to accurately reflect the level of protection afforded to the most resistant sub-set of leukemic cells during co-culture with BMM elements. Pre-clinical in vivo models have advantages, but can be costly, and are often not fully informed by optimal in vitro studies. In the current report we describe an innovative extension of 2D co-culture wherein ALL cells uniquely interact with bone marrow derived stromal cells. Tumor cells in this model bury beneath primary human bone marrow derived stromal cells or osteoblasts, termed “phase dim” (PD) ALL, and exhibit a unique phenotype characterized by altered metabolism, distinct protein expression profiles, increased quiescence, and pronounced chemotherapy resistance. Investigation focused on the PD subpopulation may more efficiently inform pre-clinical design and investigation of MRD and relapse that arises from BMM supported leukemic tumor cells. PMID:26407636

  13. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response.

  14. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Slone, William L.; Moses, Blake S.; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  15. Genetic and epigenetic characterization of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Setareh; Olsson, Linda; Biloglav, Andrea; Veerla, Srinivas; Blendberg, Molly; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Behrendtz, Mikael; Castor, Anders; Hansson, Markus; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic and epigenetic landscape of hypodiploid (<45 chromosomes) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods Single nucleotide polymorphism array, whole exome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and methylation array analyses were performed on eleven hypodiploid ALL cases. Results In line with previous studies, mutations in IKZF3 and FLT3 were detected in near-haploid (25–30 chromosomes) cases. Low hypodiploidy (31–39 chromosomes) was associated with somatic TP53 mutations. Notably, mutations of this gene were also found in 3/3 high hypodiploid (40–44 chromosomes) cases, suggesting that the mutational patterns are similar in low hypodiploid and high hypodiploid ALL. The high hypodiploid ALLs frequently displayed substantial cell-to-cell variability in chromosomal content, indicative of chromosomal instability; a rare phenomenon in ALL. Gene expression analysis showed that genes on heterodisomic chromosomes were more highly expressed in hypodiploid cases. Cases clustered according to hypodiploid subtype in the unsupervised methylation analyses, but there was no association between chromosomal copy number and methylation levels. A comparison between samples obtained at diagnosis and relapse showed that the relapse did not arise from the major diagnostic clone in 3/4 cases. Conclusion Taken together, our data support the conclusion that near-haploid and low hypodiploid ALL are different with regard to mutational profiles and also suggest that ALL cases with high hypodiploidy may harbor chromosomal instability. PMID:26544893

  16. Oligoclonality and new agent evaluation in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gaynon, Paul S; Sun, Weili

    2016-06-01

    New agent development rests on the fundamental assumption that candidate agents or drug combinations that induce objective responses after relapse will prevent relapse, if applied prior to relapse. However, cumulative experience now includes at least 5 examples of interventions with post-relapse objective response rates greater than 50% that failed to improve outcomes when applied prior to relapse. Emerging insights into oligoclonality provide some explanation. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the predominant clones at relapse differ from the predominant clones at presentation. Arguably, the more highly proliferative clones that predominate at relapse differ in drug sensitivity from the less proliferative clones that escape primary therapy. Interventions effective against the predominant clones at relapse may have no effect on the antecedent escapee clones. Response is not sufficient in new agent development. Duration of response has attracted less attention because of variability in post-remission therapy but some patient subsets have such a uniformly dismal outcome that details of post-remission therapy may be irrelevant. Benchmarks are needed. Are recovering blasts members of the same clone or do they represent a new clone? When you eradicate the predominant clones you get a response. When you eradicate all clones, you get a cure.

  17. Adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to a unique group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who lie at the crossroad of therapeutic care by pediatric and adult hematologists/oncologists. ALL is a disease that affects infants, children, adolescents, and adult patients. With current therapies, the vast majority of children with ALL are now long-term survivors; unfortunately, the same good results have not yet been obtained for adults with ALL. This review will describe current controversies surrounding the treatment of adolescents and young adults with ALL--a group who finds themselves in the transition from "pediatric" to "adult" treatment approaches. The review focuses on recent insights into disease biology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes that have led to a series of prospective clinical trials specifically designed for adolescents and younger adults (AYAs) with ALL. These trials have been designed to provide important new clinical, psychosocial, and biological insights, and to further improve the survival of this challenging and unique group of patients.

  18. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with T + PH1 monocytosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Braham Jmili, Nejia; Sendi, Halima; Khelif, Abderrahim

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Type T PH1 positive (with t (9.22)) are exceptional. These effects can occur immediately or in the evolution of chronic myeloid leukemia known. We report the case of a patient aged 31 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia T PH1 + cyologiques with cytological atypia. The overall appearance of blood and marrow: the signs of dysplasia the presence of a monocytic contingent, with blood monocytes evoked a myeloid acute leukemia AL. But the immunophenotype was unequivocally in favor of T- acute lymphoblastic leukemia with one aspect of lymphoid blasts in morphology and myeloperoxidase negative. The karyotype showed the presence of Philadelphia chromosome in all mitoses with additional abnormalities (chromosomes 2, 11.16…).

  19. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further.

  20. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  1. Hypomethylation of the CTGF gene locus is a common feature of paediatric pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Welch, Mathew D; Greene, Wayne K; Kees, Ursula R

    2013-08-01

    The connective tissue growth factor gene (CTGF) is aberrantly expressed in 75% of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (pre-B ALL) and is associated with poor outcome. We identified consistent hypomethylation of the CTGF locus in primary pre-B ALL specimens regardless of CTGF expression. By contrast, primary T-cell ALL specimens, which do not express CTGF, exhibited distinctive patterns of hypermethylation. Furthermore, we confirmed that global changes in DNA methylation and histone acetylation can both functionally modulate CTGF expression in pre-B ALL cell lines. These data suggest that hypomethylation of the CTGF locus is an essential prerequisite for aberrant CTGF expression in pre-B ALL.

  2. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M.; Fountaine, Thomas J.; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D.; Seif, Alix E.; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K.; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal L.; Gardner, Rebecca A.; Jensen, Michael C.; Shern, Jack F.; Fry, Terry J.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  3. Exogenous IL-33 overcomes T cell tolerance in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Dominguez, Donye; Chen, Siqi; Fan, Jie; Long, Alan; Zhang, Minghui; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Yi; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies suggest that dominant peripheral tolerance is a major mechanism of immune escape in disseminated leukemia. Using an established murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, we here show that systemic administration of recombinant IL-33 dramatically inhibits the leukemia growth and prolongs the survival of leukemia-bearing mice in a CD8+ T cell dependent manner. Exogenous IL-33 treatment enhanced anti-leukemia activity by increasing the expansion and IFN-γ production of leukemia-reactive CD8+ T cells. Moreover, IL-33 promoted dendritic cell (DC) maturation and activation in favor of its cross presentation ability to evoke a vigorous anti-leukemia immune response. Finally, we found that the combination of PD-1 blockade with IL-33 further prolonged the survival, with half of the mice achieving complete regression. Our data establish a role of exogenous IL-33 in reversing T cell tolerance, and suggest its potential clinical implication into leukemia immunotherapy. PMID:27517629

  4. The use of optical microscope equipped with multispectral detector to distinguish different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.; Frenkel, M. A.; Mozhenkova, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the use of a computer optical microscopy with multispectral camera to characterize the texture of blasts bone marrow of patients with different variants of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: B- and T- types. Specific characteristics of the chromatin of the nuclei of blasts for different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were obtained.

  5. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes. |

  6. A role for stroma-derived annexin A1 as mediator in the control of genetic susceptibility to T-cell lymphoblastic malignancies through prostaglandin E2 secretion.

    PubMed

    Santos, Javier; González-Sánchez, Laura; Matabuena-Deyzaguirre, María; Villa-Morales, María; Cozar, Patricia; López-Nieva, Pilar; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Fresno, Manuel; Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Guenet, Jean-Louis; Montagutelli, Xavier; Fernández-Piqueras, José

    2009-03-15

    Cancer susceptibility is essentially attributable to multiple low-penetrance genes. Using interspecific consomic and congenic mice between the tumor-resistant SEG/Pas and the tumor-sensitive C57BL/6J strains, a region on chromosome 19 involved in the genetic resistance to gamma-irradiation-induced T-cell lymphomas (Tlyr1) has been identified. Through the development of nonoverlapping subcongenic strains, it has been further shown that Anxa1 may be a candidate resistance gene on the basis of its differential expression in thymus stroma cells after gamma-radiation exposure. In addition, thymus stroma cells of thymic lymphomas exhibited a significant reduction in the expression levels of Anxa1. Interestingly, the activity of Anxa1 relies on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) induction that brings about apoptosis in thymocytes. In fact, in vitro transfection experiments revealed that PGE(2) production was enhanced when HEK 293 cells were transfected with full-length cDNAs of Anxa1, with PGE(2) production in the cells transfected with the allele of the resistant strain (Anxa1(Tyr)) being higher than that in cells transfected with the allele of the susceptible strain (Anxa1(Phe)). Furthermore, the presence of this compound in the medium induced apoptosis of immature CD4(+)CD8(+)CD3(low) cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results improve our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms triggering T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development while highlighting the relevance of the stroma in controlling genetic susceptibility and the use of PGE(2) as a new therapeutic approach in T-cell hematologic malignancies.

  7. Oncogenic PTEN functions and models in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tesio, M; Trinquand, A; Macintyre, E; Asnafi, V

    2016-07-28

    PTEN is a protein phosphatase that is crucial to prevent the malignant transformation of T-cells. Although a numerous mechanisms regulate its expression and function, they are often altered in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias and T-cell lymphomas. As such, PTEN inactivation frequently occurs in these malignancies, where it can be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Different Pten knockout models recapitulated the development of T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma, demonstrating that PTEN loss is at the center of a complex oncogenic network that sustains and drives tumorigenesis via the activation of multiple signalling pathways. These aspects and their therapeutic implications are discussed in this review.

  8. Humoral immunity to tetanus, measles and rubella in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Onorateli, Myriam; Botana, Claudia; Peralta, Laura; Rebollo, Magali; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Guitter, Myriam; Felice, Maria S; Posadas, Mercedes; Evangelista, Silvina; Villar, Maria V; Golluscio, Mariana; Molina, Agustina; Fraquelli, Lidia

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapy regimens and clinical support advances have improved survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The after-effects of treatment are a reason for concern, including damage to the immune system induced by immunosuppressive therapy which is reflected in the loss of antibody protection provided by prior immunizations. Our goal was to assess the presence of measles, rubella, and tetanus protective antibody titers among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after completing chemotherapy. Sixty-one children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia seen at the Hospital Garrahan were included; patients had finished their chemotherapy at least 6 months earlier and had a complete immunization schedule before diagnosis. The rates of protective antibodies were 46% (CI: 32-59) for measles, 53% (CI 40-67) for tetanus, and 60% (CI 47-63) for rubella. These results strengthen the need to reconsider revaccination in this group of patients.

  9. The evolution of clinical trials for infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, R S; Gottardo, N G; Kees, U R; Cole, C H

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants has a significantly inferior outcome in comparison with older children. Despite initial improvements in survival of infants with ALL since establishment of the first pediatric cooperative group ALL trials, the poor outcome has plateaued in recent years. Historically, infants were treated on risk-adapted childhood ALL protocols. These studies were pivotal in identifying the need for infant-specific protocols, delineating prognostic categories and the requirement for a more unified approach between study groups to overcome limitations in accrual because of low incidence. This subsequently led to the development of collaborative infant-specific studies. Landmark outcomes have included the elimination of cranial radiotherapy following the discovery of intrathecal and high-dose systemic therapy as a superior and effective treatment strategy for central nervous system disease prophylaxis, with improved neurodevelopmental outcome. Universal prospective identification of independent adverse prognostic factors, including presence of a mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement and young age, has established the basis for risk stratification within current trials. The infant-specific trials have defined limits to which conventional chemotherapeutic agents can be intensified to optimize the balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity. Despite variations in therapeutic intensity, there has been no recent improvement in survival due to the equilibrium between relapse and toxicity. Ultimately, to improve the outcome for infants with ALL, key areas still to be addressed include identification and adaptation of novel prognostic markers and innovative therapies, establishing the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory disease and monitoring and timely intervention of late effects in survivors. This would be best achieved through a single unified

  10. Can anthocyanins improve maintenance therapy of Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia?

    PubMed

    Köchling, Joachim; Schmidt, Manuel; Rott, Yvonne; Sagner, Michael; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Wittig, Burghard; Henze, Günter

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide high remission rates. However, prognosis of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph(+) ALL) still remains poor. Because most adults eventually relapse without allogeneic stem cell transplantation, which is not available for all patients, novel strategies are required for relapse prevention. As the integrity of the immune system is essential for the control of remaining leukaemia cells, we compared the efficacy of anthocyanins, imatinib and a DNA-based vaccine as non-immunosuppressant components with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) to control minimal residual disease in vitro and in vivo using different leukaemia cell lines and syngeneic mice. Proliferation of Ph(+) ALL was significantly better inhibited by anthocyanin-rich berry extract or imatinib compared with 6-MP. Although anthocyanins induced apoptosis in some leukaemia cell lines, the level of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 was significantly lower compared with imatinib and 6-MP. When used as single components, anthocyanins and imatinib mesylate failed to eradicate pre-existing Ph(+) ALL in syngeneic mice, while 6-MP led to 10% and DNA vaccination to 56% survival. Intriguingly, only the combination of DNA vaccination with berry extract but not with the isolated anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-rutinoside or imatinib further increased leukaemia-free and overall survival, and 90% of lethally challenged mice survived. We suggest that induction and enhancement of a leukaemia-specific immunity by DNA vaccination and anthocyanin-rich berry extract can also decrease the relapse rate in patients with Ph(+) ALL. Furthermore, this approach may serve as strategy for maintenance therapy of other malignancies.

  11. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  12. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the context of RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Vignal, Cédric; Ferster, Alice; Méchinaud, Françoise; Domenech, Carine; Pierri, Filomena; Contet, Audrey; Cacheux, Valère; Irving, Julie; Kratz, Christian; Clavel, Jacqueline; Verloes, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is associated with a range of malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, little information is available regarding the frequency, natural history, characteristics and prognosis of ALL in Noonan syndrome or RASopathies in general. Cross-referencing data from a large prospective cohort of 1176 patients having a molecularly confirmed RASopathy with data from the French childhood cancer registry allowed us to identify ALL in 6 (0.5%) patients including 4/778 (0.5%) with a germline PTPN11 mutation and 2/94 (2.1%) with a germline SOS1 mutation. None of the patients of our series with CFC syndrome (with germline BRAF or MAP2K1/MAP2K2 mutation - n = 121) or Costello syndrome (with HRAS mutation - n = 35) had an ALL. A total of 19 Noonan-ALL were gathered by adding our patients to those of the International Berlin-Munster-Frankfurt (I-BFM) study group and previously reported patients. Strikingly, all Noonan-associated ALL were B-cell precursor ALL, and high hyperdiploidy with more than 50 chromosomes was found in the leukemia cells of 13/17 (76%) patients with available genetics data. Our data suggest that children with Noonan syndrome are at higher risk to develop ALL. Like what is observed for somatic PTPN11 mutations, NS is preferentially associated with the development of hyperdiploid ALL that will usually respond well to chemotherapy. However, Noonan syndrome patients seem to have a propensity to develop post therapy myelodysplasia that can eventually be fatal. Hence, one should be particularly cautious when treating these patients.

  13. WT1 overexpression affecting clinical outcome in non-hodgkin lymphomas and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ujj, Zsófia; Buglyó, Gergely; Udvardy, Miklós; Vargha, György; Biró, Sándor; Rejtő, László

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene has a complex role as a transcriptional regulator, acting as tumor suppressor or oncogene in different malignancies. The prognostic role of its overexpression has been well-studied in leukemias, especially acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not in lymphomas. For the first time to our knowledge, we present a study demonstrating the correlation of WT1 expression and survival in various non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We also studied the prognostic implications of WT1 overexpression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In our sample of 53 patients--25 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 8 with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 9 with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), 2 with Burkitt's lymphoma, 2 with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and 7 with B-cell ALL--, we measured WT1 mRNA from blood samples by quantitative RT-PCR, and divided the patients into subgroups based on the level of expression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were drawn and compared using the logrank test. In the sample of DLBCL patients, the difference in overall and disease-free survival between WT1-positive and negative subgroups was significant (p = 0.0475 and p = 0.0004, respectively), and in a few observed cases, a sudden increase in WT1 expression signified a relapse soon followed by death. Disease-free survival curves in MCL and ALL were similarly suggestive of a potential role played by WT1. In PTCL, though WT1-positivity was detected in 4 out of 9 cases, it did not seem to affect survival. The few cases of MALT and Burkitt's lymphoma all proved to be WT1-negative.

  14. Severe neurotoxicity following intrathecal methotrexate with nitrous oxide sedation in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Löbel, U; Trah, J; Escherich, G

    2015-03-01

    Systemic and intrathecal methotrexate is widely used in treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its side effects vary in characteristics, intensity and time of onset, and depend on the administration route. Interactions with several drugs are known. Side effects of nitrous oxide sedation, often used for moderately painful procedures, typically occur after long time use and include neurological symptoms. We present a child who experienced a severe and long-lasting neurotoxicity after the third intrathecal application of methotrexate with short sedation by nitrous oxide during induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Symptoms completely resolved after 12 months.

  15. Drugs under preclinical and clinical study for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Joe Antony; Salmani, Jumah Masoud Mohammad; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy has modernized the treatment of both chronic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies and combinational drugs has increased the survival rate of patients. Preclinical studies with various agents have resulted in positive outputs with Phase III trial drugs and monoclonal antibodies entering clinical trials. Most of the monoclonal antibodies target the CD20 and CD22 receptors. This has led to the approval of a few of these drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on the drugs under preclinical and clinical study in the ongoing efforts for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27382259

  16. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mimicking late CNS relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ram; Nijalingappa, Shobha; Grainger, John; Ismayl, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Background Acute encephalomyelopathy occurring after an allogeneic bone marrow transplant for leukaemia is a diagnostic emergency. The diagnosis can be challenging since there is a wide set of alternative diagnoses, including opportunistic infections and relapse of the leukaemia. Case presentation A 13-year old girl presented with a severe acute myelopathy and encephalopathy. She was in prolonged remission from a central nervous system and bone marrow relapse of an acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Neuroimaging showed multifocal grey and white matter lesions of demyelinating appearance in the brain and entire spine. Immunophenotyping and cytogenetic investigations of the girl's cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis excluded a late central nervous system relapse of her leukaemia. The diagnosis was acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. With standard immunosuppressive therapy, the girl had early cerebral recovery but a prolonged period of recovery from her myelopathy. Conclusion Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute encephalomyelopathy after bone marrow transplantation for leukaemia. Demyelinating syndromes such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be late sequelae of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:17411447

  17. MicroRNA Expression Patterns of CD8+ T Cells in Acute and Chronic Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Ferah; Bal, S. Haldun; Tezcan, Gulcin; Guvenc, Furkan; Akalin, E. Halis; Goral, Guher; Deniz, Gunnur

    2016-01-01

    Although our knowledge about Brucella virulence factors and the host response increase rapidly, the mechanisms of immune evasion by the pathogen and causes of chronic disease are still unknown. Here, we aimed to investigate the immunological factors which belong to CD8+ T cells and their roles in the transition of brucellosis from acute to chronic infection. Using miRNA microarray, more than 2000 miRNAs were screened in CD8+ T cells of patients with acute or chronic brucellosis and healthy controls that were sorted from peripheral blood with flow cytometry and validated through qRT-PCR. Findings were evaluated using GeneSpring GX (Agilent) 13.0 software and KEGG pathway analysis. Expression of two miRNAs were determined to display a significant fold change in chronic group when compared with acute or control groups. Both miRNAs (miR-126-5p and miR-4753-3p) were decreased (p <0.05 or fold change > 2). These miRNAs have the potential to be the regulators of CD8+ T cell-related marker genes for chronic brucellosis infections. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their predicted target genes are involved in MAPK signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion indicating their potential roles in chronic brucellosis and its progression. It is the first study of miRNA expression analysis of human CD8+ T cells to clarify the mechanism of inveteracy in brucellosis. PMID:27824867

  18. Evaluation of Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute and Chronic Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Ali; Mosayebi, Ghasem; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; khosravi, Khadije; Zarinfar, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is one of the most common chronic diseases, with widespread distribution. In spite of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) modulated mainly via activated T-helper type 1 (Th1) cells, brucellosis can advance to chronic disease in about 10-30% of cases. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are involved the immune response to brucellosis; however, their role, particularly in the change from the acute to the chronic phase, have not yet been elucidated. The main hypothesis of this study was that Treg cells play critical roles in the progression of brucellosis from the acute to the chronic phase. Methods: Forty-eight unrelated subjects participated in this case-control study. The percentages of CD4+, CD25+, FoxP3+, and CD25/FoxP3+ T cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of acute (AB) and chronic brucellosis (CB) patients and healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. The mean florescence intensities (MFIs) of CD4+, CD25+, and FoxP3+ T cells were also measured. Results: We found a significantly lower percentage of CD25/FoxP3+ Treg cells in CB than in the AB and control groups (p < 0.05). Also, CD4 and CD25 MFIs were significantly less in CB than in AB and controls (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We propose that the reduced number of CD25/FoxP3+ Treg cells in the CB group leads to T cell anergy and this contributes to the development of chronic infection. PMID:28367469

  19. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment.

  20. Early Gag Immunodominance of the HIV-Specific T-Cell Response during Acute/Early Infection Is Associated with Higher CD8+ T-Cell Antiviral Activity and Correlates with Preservation of the CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Socias, María Eugenia; Laufer, Natalia; Coloccini, Romina Soledad; Rodriguez, Ana María; Ruiz, María Julia; Pando, María Ángeles; Giavedoni, Luis David; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Salomon, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the CD8+ T-cell response on HIV control is well established. Moreover, the acute phase of infection represents a proper scenario to delineate the antiviral cellular functions that best correlate with control. Here, multiple functional aspects (specificity, ex vivo viral inhibitory activity [VIA] and polyfunctionality) of the HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell subset arising early after infection, and their association with disease progression markers, were examined. Blood samples from 44 subjects recruited within 6 months from infection (primary HIV infection [PHI] group), 16 chronically infected subjects, 11 elite controllers (EC), and 10 healthy donors were obtained. Results indicated that, although Nef dominated the anti-HIV response during acute/early infection, a higher proportion of early anti-Gag T cells correlated with delayed progression. Polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were detected at early time points but did not associate with virus control. Conversely, higher CD4+ T-cell set points were observed in PHI subjects with higher HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell VIA at baseline. Importantly, VIA levels correlated with the magnitude of the anti-Gag cellular response. The advantage of Gag-specific cells may result from their enhanced ability to mediate lysis of infected cells (evidenced by a higher capacity to degranulate and to mediate VIA) and to simultaneously produce IFN-γ. Finally, Gag immunodominance was associated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β). All together, this study underscores the importance of CD8+ T-cell specificity in the improved control of disease progression, which was related to the capacity of Gag-specific cells to mediate both lytic and nonlytic antiviral mechanisms at early time points postinfection. PMID:23616666

  1. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  2. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  3. T cell abundance in blood predicts acute organ toxicity in chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Sybille D.; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Schirmer, Markus A.; Stadelmann, Christine; Canis, Martin; Wolff, Hendrik A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) often results in high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT). As these adverse effects impair the patients' quality of life and the feasibility of the planned therapy, we sought to analyze immunological parameters in tumor material and blood samples obtained from 48 HNSCC patients in order to assess the potential to predict the individual acute organ toxicity. T cells in the tumor stroma were enriched in patients developing HGAOT whereas levels of soluble factors in the plasma and gene expression in whole blood did not coincide with the occurrence of acute organ toxicity. In contrast, the frequency and absolute numbers of selected leukocyte subpopulations measured in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) directly before the beginning of CRT were significantly different in patients with HGAOT as compared to those without. When we validated several potential markers including the abundance of T cells in a small prospective study with 16 HNSCC patients, we were able to correctly predict acute organ toxicity in up to 81% of the patients. We conclude that analysis of PBMCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) might be a convenient strategy to identify patients at risk of developing HGAOT caused by CRT, which might allow to adapt the treatment regimen and possibly improve disease outcome. PMID:27589568

  4. Management and treatment of osteonecrosis in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    te Winkel, Mariël L.; Pieters, Rob; Wind, Ernst-Jan D.; Bessems, J.H.J.M. (Gert); van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding how to manage osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Therefore, we performed a quality assessment of the literature with the result of a search strategy using the MESH terms osteonecrosis, children, childhood cancer, surgery, bisphosphonates, 6 hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, anticoagulants and hyperbaric oxygen, and terms related to these MESH terms. A randomized controlled trial showed that osteonecrosis can be prevented by intermittent, instead of continuous, corticosteroid administration. The studies on interventions after onset of osteonecrosis were of low-quality evidence. Seven pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies described non-surgical interventions; bisphosphonates (n=5), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=1), or prostacyclin analogs (n=1). Safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Five studies focused on surgical interventions; none was of sufficient quality to draw definite conclusions. In conclusion, preventing osteonecrosis is feasible in a proportion of the pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients by discontinuous, instead of continuous, steroid scheduling. The questions as to how to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with osteonecrosis cannot be answered as good-quality studies are lacking. PMID:24598854

  5. Management and treatment of osteonecrosis in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Te Winkel, Mariël L; Pieters, Rob; Wind, Ernst-Jan D; Bessems, J H J M Gert; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding how to manage osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Therefore, we performed a quality assessment of the literature with the result of a search strategy using the MESH terms osteonecrosis, children, childhood cancer, surgery, bisphosphonates, 6 hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, anticoagulants and hyperbaric oxygen, and terms related to these MESH terms. A randomized controlled trial showed that osteonecrosis can be prevented by intermittent, instead of continuous, corticosteroid administration. The studies on interventions after onset of osteonecrosis were of low-quality evidence. Seven pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies described non-surgical interventions; bisphosphonates (n=5), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=1), or prostacyclin analogs (n=1). Safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Five studies focused on surgical interventions; none was of sufficient quality to draw definite conclusions. In conclusion, preventing osteonecrosis is feasible in a proportion of the pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients by discontinuous, instead of continuous, steroid scheduling. The questions as to how to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with osteonecrosis cannot be answered as good-quality studies are lacking.

  6. Prognostic value of quantitative analysis of WT1 gene transcripts in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiusa, Luigi; Francia di Celle, Paola; Campisi, Paola; Ceretto, Cristina; Marmont, Filippo; Pich, Achille

    2006-02-01

    We quantified Wilm's tumor gene (WT1) using a real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 20 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at presentation. A WT1 level greater than 906 (median value for the whole series) was a significant predictor of a poor disease-free and overall survival in uni- and multivariate analyses.

  7. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  8. An Initial Reintegration Treatment of Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Michelle; Kaufman, Nadeen

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the cognitive, psychological, and social adjustment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and assessed how their needs could best be met through reintegration programs focusing on learning/ educational needs. Findings from three case studies highlight the need for ALL patients to be provided with comprehensive programs…

  9. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

  10. T-cell count

    MedlinePlus

    ... 43. Read More Acute Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) HIV/AIDS Hodgkin lymphoma Immune response Immunodeficiency disorders Mononucleosis Multiple myeloma Radiation therapy Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia Review Date 8/29/2015 Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM ...

  11. TEL/AML-1 fusion gene. its frequency and prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamil, A; Theil, K S; Kahwash, S; Ruymann, F B; Klopfenstein, K J

    2000-10-15

    TEL gene rearrangement due to the 12;21 chromosome translocation is believed to be the most common molecular genetic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of TEL/AML-1 fusion gene resulting from a cryptic t(12;21)(p13;q22). Bone marrow samples from 86 patients diagnosed over the past 5 years at Columbus Children's Hospital were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for TEL/AML-1 fusion gene, using LSI((R)) DNA probes. The positive cases were analyzed for clinical outcome. Patients in this study received treatment according to Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols. Fifteen of the 86 cases (17%) were positive for the fusion gene. All were B-cell lineage and except for one, all were CD10 positive. TEL/AML-1 was not found in any T-cell ALL. The mean overall survival (OS) following diagnosis for the TEL/AML-1-positive group was significantly longer than for the TEL/AML-1-negative group by log-rank = 7.84, P = 0.005. Similarly, the event-free survival (EFS) after remission for the positive group (median 94.5 months) was longer than the negative group (median 57 months) by log-rank = 7.19, P = 0.007. This study confirms that the TEL/AML-1 fusion gene may be the most common genetic event in childhood ALL, occurring in 17% of the patients. It appears restricted to the B-cell lineage. In this study, the presence of a TEL/AML-1 fusion gene was statistically significant in predicting both OS and EFS, indicating a favorable clinical outcome for these patients. Screening for TEL/AML-1 should become routine at diagnosis and a useful biological variable for risk stratification in future clinical trials.

  12. Secondary acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is constitutional and probably not related to prior therapy.

    PubMed

    Ganzel, Chezi; Devlin, Sean; Douer, Dan; Rowe, Jacob M; Stein, Eytan M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-07-01

    Very little is known about secondary acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (s-ALL). This retrospective analysis studied a cohort of s-ALL patients treated at a single centre between 1994 and 2013, while comparing therapy-associated ALL (t-ALL) and antecedent malignancy ALL (am-ALL) patients. Thirty-two patients with s-ALL were identified. The overall incidence was 9.4% among ALL adults while T-cell s-ALL was rare (12% of s-ALLs). The median time interval between two malignant diagnoses was 5.3 years (range: 0.1-28). In contrast to previous reports, most of the s-ALLs were CD10 + and without KMT2A (MLL) abnormalities. The overall survival (OS) rates of the entire cohort at 12 and 24 months from ALL diagnosis was 49% and 25%, respectively. Most patients (n = 23, 72%) received prior chemo-/radio-therapy for their first malignancy (t-ALL) and only 9 (28%) did not (am-ALL). No significant difference was found in the incidence of B-/T- lineage ALL, extramedullary disease, blood count, and the rate of Philadelphia-positive ALL, nor in the rates of complete remission (P = 0.55) and OS (P = 0.97). This similarity, together with high incidence of family malignancy in both groups, raise the possibility that s-ALL patients may have an inherent predisposition to malignancies and a history of previous therapy may be of lesser importance in the pathogenesis of s-ALL.

  13. Ras activation in normal white blood cells and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    von Lintig, F C; Huvar, I; Law, P; Diccianni, M B; Yu, A L; Boss, G R

    2000-05-01

    Ras is an important cellular switch, relaying growth-promoting signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. In cultured cells, Ras is activated by various hematopoietic cytokines and growth factors, but the activation state of Ras in peripheral WBCs and bone marrow cells has not been studied nor has Ras activation been assessed in cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using an enzyme-based method, we assessed Ras activation in peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells from normal subjects and from children with T-cell ALL (T-ALL) and B-lineage ALL (B-ALL). In normal subjects, we found mean Ras activations of 14.3, 12.5, and 17.2% for peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells, respectively. All three of these values are higher than we have found in other normal human cells, compatible with constitutive activation of Ras by cytokines and growth factors present in serum and bone marrow. In 9 of 18 children with T-ALL, Ras activation exceeded two SDs above the mean of the corresponding cells from normal subjects, whereas in none of 11 patients with B-ALL did Ras show increased activation; activating genetic mutations in ras occur in less than 10% of ALL patients. Thus, Ras is relatively activated in peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells compared with other normal human cells, and Ras is activated frequently in T-ALL but not in B-ALL. Increased Ras activation in T-ALL compared with B-ALL may contribute to the more aggressive nature of the former disease.

  14. Prognostic relevance of pretreatment proliferative rapidity of marrow blast cells in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Trerè, D.; Pession, A.; Basso, G.; Rondelli, R.; Masera, G.; Paolucci, G.; Derenzini, M.

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation rate is a well-established prognostic factor in cancer, but it has not been considered to identify the risk group of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at presentation. We carried out a study to demonstrate the prognostic importance of the rapidity of cell proliferation in patients with ALL. To measure the rapidity of cell proliferation we used the parameter relative to the area of silver-stained nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) as evaluated by morphometric analysis on smeared marrow blast cells. The mean AgNOR area of leukaemic marrow cells was measured in 119 children. By using a cut-off value of 3 microns2, we identified a group of 91 children with low proliferating blast activity (mean AgNOR value 2.11 microns2) and a group of 28 children with high proliferating activity (mean AgNOR value 3.29 microns2). The group of patients with a mean AgNOR value > 3 microns2 was characterised by a higher number of deaths, more frequent relapse and shorter time interval to relapse than the group of patients with mean AgNOR value < 3 microns2 (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis performed to include T-cell immunophenotype, FAB morphology, leucocyte count and presence of mediastinal mass showed that the mean AgNOR value was the only independent predictor of unfavourable event-free survival probability (P > 0.01). Our results indicate that the rapidity of marrow blast cell proliferation is an important prognostic parameter in childhood ALL and should be routinely introduced in the group risk definition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7981077

  15. Frequencies and prognostic impact of RAS mutations in MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Emma M.C.; van Roon, Eddy H.J.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A.P.; Schneider, Pauline; de Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants represents an aggressive malignancy associated with a high incidence (approx. 80%) of translocations involving the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Attempts to mimic Mixed Lineage Leukemia fusion driven leukemogenesis in mice raised the question whether these fusion proteins require secondary hits. RAS mutations are suggested as candidates. Earlier results on the incidence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia are inconclusive. Therefore, we studied frequencies and relation with clinical parameters of RAS mutations in a large cohort of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Using conventional sequencing analysis, we screened neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog gene (NRAS), v-Ki-ras Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) for mutations in a large cohort (n=109) of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and studied the mutations in relation to several clinical parameters, and in relation to Homeobox gene A9 expression and the presence of ALL1 fused gene 4-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (AF4-MLL). Mutations were detected in approximately 14% of all cases, with a higher frequency of approximately 24% in t(4;11)-positive patients (P=0.04). Furthermore, we identified RAS mutations as an independent predictor (P=0.019) for poor outcome in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a hazard ratio of 3.194 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.211–8.429). Also, RAS-mutated infants have higher white blood cell counts at diagnosis (P=0.013), and are more resistant to glucocorticoids in vitro (P<0.05). Finally, we demonstrate that RAS mutations, and not the lack of Homeobox gene A9 expression nor the expression of AF4-MLL are associated with poor outcome in t(4;11)-rearranged infants. We conclude that the presence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia

  16. Acute kidney injury and bilateral symmetrical enlargement of the kidneys as first presentation of B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Su-fang; Zhou, Fu-de; Zou, Wan-zhong; Wang, Hai-yan

    2012-12-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma is an uncommon subtype of lymphoid neoplasm in adults. Acute kidney injury at initial presentation due to lymphoblastic lymphoma infiltration of the kidneys has rarely been described. We report a 19-year-old woman who presented with acute kidney injury due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys. The diagnosis of B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma was established by immunohistochemical study of the biopsied kidney. The patient had an excellent response to the VDCLP protocol (vincristine, daunomycin, cyclophosphamide, asparaginase, and dexamethasone) with sustained remission. We recommend that lymphomatous infiltration be considered in patients presenting with unexplained acute kidney injury and enlarged kidneys.

  17. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma presenting with hyperuricemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2004-01-01

    Acute spontaneous tumor lysis (ASTL) syndrome, an extremely rare disease, requires prompt recognition and aggressive management because it is fulminant at its outset, associated with severe metabolic derangement, and potentially reversible. We describe an unusual case in which spontaneous tumor lysis occurred in anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma associated with acute uric acid nephropathy, persistent oliguria, and shock. This case contrasts markedly with previously reported cases of ASTL syndrome, which developed mainly in the pathologic type of Burkitt lymphoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported occurrence of ASTL syndrome associated with anaplastic large T-cell type lymphoma. This report also chronicles our successful experience with continuous renal replacement therapy in the presence of compromised hemodynamic status.

  18. ERG promotes T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is transcriptionally regulated in leukemic cells by a stem cell enhancer.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Julie A I; Birger, Yehudit; Foster, Sam; Knezevic, Kathy; Kirschenbaum, Yael; Chandrakanthan, Vashe; Jonquieres, Georg; Spensberger, Dominik; Wong, Jason W; Oram, S Helen; Kinston, Sarah J; Groner, Yoram; Lock, Richard; MacKenzie, Karen L; Göttgens, Berthold; Izraeli, Shai; Pimanda, John E

    2011-06-30

    The Ets-related gene (ERG) is an Ets-transcription factor required for normal blood stem cell development. ERG expression is down-regulated during early T-lymphopoiesis but maintained in T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), where it is recognized as an independent risk factor for adverse outcome. However, it is unclear whether ERG is directly involved in the pathogenesis of T-ALL and how its expression is regulated. Here we demonstrate that transgenic expression of ERG causes T-ALL in mice and that its knockdown reduces the proliferation of human MOLT4 T-ALL cells. We further demonstrate that ERG expression in primary human T-ALL cells is mediated by the binding of other T-cell oncogenes SCL/TAL1, LMO2, and LYL1 in concert with ERG, FLI1, and GATA3 to the ERG +85 enhancer. This enhancer is not active in normal T cells but in transgenic mice targets expression to fetal liver c-kit(+) cells, adult bone marrow stem/progenitors and early CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative thymic progenitors. Taken together, these data illustrate that ERG promotes T-ALL and that failure to extinguish activity of stem cell enhancers associated with regulatory transcription factors such as ERG can contribute to the development of leukemia.

  19. Aggravated bone density decline following symptomatic osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, Marissa A H; Pluijm, Saskia M F; te Winkel, Mariël L; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Fiocco, Martha; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Leeuw, Jan A; Bruin, Marrie C A; van der Sluis, Inge M; Bresters, Dorien; Lequin, Maarten H; Roos, Jan C; Veerman, Anjo J P; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis and decline of bone density are serious side effects during and after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is unknown whether osteonecrosis and low bone density occur together in the same patients, or whether these two osteogenic side-effects can mutually influence each other's development. Bone density and the incidence of symptomatic osteonecrosis were prospectively assessed in a national cohort of 466 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4-18 years of age) who were treated according to the dexamethasone-based Dutch Child Oncology Group-ALL9 protocol. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDLS) (n=466) and of the total body (BMDTB) (n=106) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Bone density was expressed as age- and gender-matched standard deviation scores. Thirty patients (6.4%) suffered from symptomatic osteonecrosis. At baseline, BMDLS and BMDTB did not differ between patients who did or did not develop osteonecrosis. At cessation of treatment, patients with osteonecrosis had lower mean BMDLS and BMDTB than patients without osteonecrosis (respectively, with osteonecrosis: -2.16 versus without osteonecrosis: -1.21, P<0.01 and with osteonecrosis: -1.73 versus without osteonecrosis: -0.57, P<0.01). Multivariate linear models showed that patients with osteonecrosis had steeper BMDLS and BMDTB declines during follow-up than patients without osteonecrosis (interaction group time, P<0.01 and P<0.01). We conclude that bone density status at the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not seem to influence the occurrence of symptomatic osteonecrosis. Bone density declines from the time that osteonecrosis is diagnosed; this suggests that the already existing decrease in bone density during acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy is further aggravated by factors such as restriction of weight-bearing activities and destruction of bone architecture due to osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis can, therefore, be considered a risk

  20. Full-Breadth Analysis of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Early Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Georg M.; Lucas, Michaela; Timm, Joerg; Ouchi, Kei; Kim, Arthur Y.; Day, Cheryl L.; zur Wiesch, Julian Schulze; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Sheridan, Isabelle; Casson, Deborah R.; Reiser, Markus; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Li, Bin; Allen, Todd M.; Chung, Raymond T.; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D.

    2005-01-01

    Multispecific CD8+ T-cell responses are thought to be important for the control of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but to date little information is actually available on the breadth of responses at early time points. Additionally, the influence of early therapy on these responses and their relationships to outcome are controversial. To investigate this issue, we performed comprehensive analysis of the breadth and frequencies of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses on the single epitope level in eight acutely infected individuals who were all started on early therapy. During the acute phase, responses against up to five peptides were identified. During therapy, CD8+ T-cell responses decreased rather than increased as virus was controlled, and no new specificities emerged. A sustained virological response following completion of treatment was independent of CD8+ T-cell responses, as well as CD4+ T-cell responses. Rapid recrudescence also occurred despite broad CD8+ T-cell responses. Importantly, in vivo suppression of CD3+ T cells using OKT3 in one subject did not result in recurrence of viremia. These data suggest that broad CD8+ T-cell responses alone may be insufficient to contain HCV replication, and also that early therapy is effective independent of such responses. PMID:16189000

  1. Pseudo chediak-higashi granules in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Pallavi; Kumar, Narender; Sharma, Prashant; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Pseudo-Chediak-Highashi granules are giant cytoplasmic inclusions commonly encountered in myeloblasts or other myeloid precursors in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. They derive their name from the inherited Chediak-Higashi syndrome that presents with oculocutaneous albinism, chronic infections and platelet dense granule deficiency. We report possibly the third case in world literature where these granules were seen in the blast cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a 15-year-old male.

  2. High sensitivity of flow cytometry improves detection of occult leptomeningeal disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Maurillo, Luca; Di Caprio, Luigi; Di Piazza, Fabio; Sarlo, Chiara; De Angelis, Gottardo; Irno Consalvo, Maria; Fraboni, Daniela; De Santis, Giovanna; Ditto, Concetta; Postorino, Massimiliano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-09-01

    Conventional cytology (CC) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fails to demonstrate malignant cells in up to 45 % of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LL) in whom occult leptomeningeal disease is present. Flow cytometry (FCM) is considered more sensitive than CC, but clinical implications of CC negativity/CC positivity are not yet established. CSF samples from 38 adult patients with newly diagnosed ALL/LL were examined. Five (13 %) and nine (24 %) specimens were CC positive-FC positive (FCM(pos)/CC(pos)) and CC negative-FC positive (CC(neg)/FCM(pos)), respectively. The remaining 24 (63 %) samples were double negative (CC(neg)/FCM(neg)) (p = 0.001). CC(neg)/FCM(pos) patients showed a significantly shorter overall survival (OS) compared to CC(neg)/FCM(neg) ones. In multivariate analysis, the status of single FCM positivity was demonstrated to affect independently duration of OS (p = 0.005). In conclusion, FCM significantly improves detection of leptomeningeal occult localization in ALL/LL and appears to anticipate an adverse outcome. Further prospective studies on larger series are needed to confirm this preliminary observation.

  3. Targeting Class I PI3Ks in the Treatment of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Primary T-ALL tumors have been evaluated via flow cytometry analysis of cell viability using calibrating beads and differential count of tumor and...disease (median survival of 140 days), which was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis (Figures 1A and 1B). In contrast to PTEN null tumors of solid...followed for a period of 7 months. (B) Representative flow cytometric profiles of peripheral blood from diseased mice lacking p110g or p110d in the

  4. Immune reconstitution during maintenance therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relation to co-existing infection.

    PubMed

    El-Chennawi, Farha A; Al-Tonbary, Youssef A; Mossad, Youssef M; Ahmed, Mona A

    2008-08-01

    therapy. In conclusion, persistent immunosuppression is documented in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during maintenance therapy. Reconstitution of B lymphocytes and Natural killer cells occurs early while T cell reconstitution shows delayed recovery of both T helper and T suppressor cells. Immunosupression during maintenance therapy has no major clinical impact in terms of increased incidence or severity of systemic infections.

  5. Oral complications and dental care in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Valéra, Marie-Cécile; Noirrit-Esclassan, Emmanuelle; Pasquet, Marléne; Vaysse, Fréderic

    2015-08-01

    Acute leukaemia is the most common type of childhood cancer, the acute lymphoblastic type accounting for the majority of cases. Children affected by leukaemia receive various forms of treatments including chemotherapeutic agents and stem cell transplants. Leukaemia and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health and further dental treatments. The oral complications include mucositis, opportunistic infections, gingival inflammation and bleeding, xerostomia and carious lesions. An additional consideration in children is the impact of the treatments on the developing dentition and on orofacial growth. The aim of this review is to describe the oral complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and the methods of prevention and management before, during and after the cancer treatment.

  6. Deregulation of Regulatory T Cells in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure: A Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shunlan; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Naibin; Tang, Xinyue; Zhang, Shengguo; Hu, Danping

    2017-01-01

    Aims. Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute liver failure (ALF) are similar in many respects during their acute exacerbation; however, ACLF generally has a poorer prognosis. We aimed to investigate the role and dynamic changes of regulatory T cell (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cell proportions during ACLF progress. Methods. All rats were classified into two groups randomly: ACLF group and ALF group (control group). The rat model of ACLF was preestablished by intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride for 2 months. Then acute liver injury was induced by combined D-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide. Six time points were examined before or after acute induction. Liver samples were performed with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining; circulatory Treg and Th17 cell frequencies were determined using flow cytometry assays; serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were examined. Results. In group ACLF, both Th17 cell proportion and IFN-γ level presented upgrade firstly and then descend latter tendency; the trends of Treg cell proportion and IL-10 level were observed to gradually decrease and became stable. Conclusion. The Treg cells played an important role in the immunologic mechanism during the process of ACLF. And the function of Treg cells in ACLF was defective. PMID:28194045

  7. Tim-3 is highly expressed in T cells in acute myeloid leukemia and associated with clinicopathological prognostic stratification.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Chen, Xiaochen; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Yibei; Ma, Chao; Xia, Rui; Ma, Jinfeng; Gu, Caihong; Ye, Lu; Wu, Depei

    2014-01-01

    T cells immunoglobulin mucin 3 (Tim-3) is an important inhibitory stimulatory molecule, which has been reported to play a vital role in the tumor immune escape and be correlated with clinicopathological prognostic stratification in solid tumor. However, the related research is rare of Tim-3 in non-solid tumor, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we investigated the expression characteristics of Tim-3 on the peripheral blood T cells of newly diagnosed AML patients and its clinical significance. Peripheral blood was obtained from 36 patients with newly diagnosed AML before intervention, with peripheral blood from 20 cases of healthy volunteers collected as normal control. Expression levels of Tim-3 on the peripheral blood T cells were assayed with flow cytometry. We found that Tim-3 expression on the peripheral blood CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells in newly diagnosed AML patients were significantly increased compared with that of normal control. CD4+ T cells/CD8+ T cell ratio (CD4/CD8) of peripheral blood in AML patients was significantly correlated with NCCN high risk group. The higher expression level of Tim-3 on CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients had significant correlation with FLT3-ITD mutation, the higher expression level of Tim-3 on CD8+ T cells in AML patients was significantly correlated with NCCN high risk group. To conclude, our results support the concept that Tim-3 is highly expressed on the peripheral blood T cells of AML patients, and Tim-3 expression significantly correlates with clinicopathological prognostic stratification in AMLTim-3, T cell, acute myeloid leukemia, tumor immune escape, clinicopathological prognostic stratification.

  8. ICAM-1–dependent tuning of memory CD8 T-cell responses following acute infection

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Maureen A.; Barnum, Scott R.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Zajac, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T-cell responses are critical for protection against intracellular pathogens and tumors. The induction and properties of these responses are governed by a series of integrated processes that rely heavily on cell–cell interactions. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 functions to enhance the strength of antigenic stimulation, extend the duration of contact with antigen-presenting cells, and augment cytokine signals, which are all factors that influence peripheral CD8 T-cell differentiation. Although previous studies suggest that ICAM-1 is essential for establishing memory T-cell populations following peptide immunization, the roles of ICAM-1 in antiviral cellular immunity are less well understood. Here we show that, following a prototypic acute viral infection, the formation and maintenance of memory-phenotype CD127hi, KLRG-1lo CD8 T cells does not require ICAM-1. Nevertheless, ICAM-1 expression on nonlymphocytes dictates the phenotypic and functional attributes of the antiviral CD8 T-cell populations that develop and promotes the gradual attrition of residual effector-like CD127lo, KLRG-1hi CD8 T cells during the memory phase of the response. Although memory T cells do emerge and are maintained if ICAM-1 expression is abolished, the secondary proliferative capacity of these T cells is severely curtailed. Collectively, these studies reveal potential dual roles for ICAM-1 in both promoting the decay of effector responses and programming the sensitivity of memory CD8 T cells to secondary stimuli. PMID:23297203

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging and neurocognition in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Michelle N; Krull, Kevin R; Liu, Wei; Glass, John O; Ji, Qing; Ogg, Robert J; Sabin, Noah D; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Reddick, Wilburn E

    2014-11-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, though little information is available on its association with brain integrity, particularly for survivors treated without cranial radiation therapy. This study compares neurocognitive function and brain morphology in long-term adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with chemotherapy alone (n = 36) to those treated with cranial radiation therapy (n = 39) and to healthy control subjects (n = 23). Mean (standard deviation) age at evaluation was 24.9 (3.6) years for the chemotherapy group and 26.7 (3.4) years for the cranial radiation therapy group, while time since diagnosis was 15.0 (1.7) and 23.9 (3.1) years, respectively. Brain grey and white matter volume and diffusion tensor imaging was compared between survivor groups and to 23 healthy controls with a mean (standard deviation) age of 23.1 (2.6) years. Survivors treated with chemotherapy alone had higher fractional anisotropy in fibre tracts within the left (P < 0.05), but not in the right, hemisphere when compared to controls. Survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, regardless of treatment, had a lower ratio of white matter to intracranial volume in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05) compared with control subjects. Survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with chemotherapy alone performed worse in processing speed (P < 0.001), verbal selective reminding (P = 0.01), and academics (P < 0.05) compared to population norms and performed better than survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy on verbal selective reminding (P = 0.02), processing speed (P = 0.05) and memory span (P = 0.009). There were significant associations between neurocognitive performance and brain imaging, particularly for frontal and temporal white and grey matter volume. Survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with chemotherapy alone demonstrated significant long-term differences in

  10. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents: prognostic factors and analysis of survival

    PubMed Central

    Lustosa de Sousa, Daniel Willian; de Almeida Ferreira, Francisco Valdeci; Cavalcante Félix, Francisco Helder; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Vinicios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical and laboratory features of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated at three referral centers in Ceará and evaluate prognostic factors for survival, including age, gender, presenting white blood cell count, immunophenotype, DNA index and early response to treatment. Methods Seventy-six under 19-year-old patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância – acute lymphoblastic leukemia-93 and -99 protocols between September 2007 and December 2009 were analyzed. The diagnosis was based on cytological, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic criteria. Associations between variables, prognostic factors and response to treatment were analyzed using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Overall and event-free survival were estimated by Kaplan–Meier analysis and compared using the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent prognostic factors. Results The average age at diagnosis was 6.3 ± 0.5 years and males were predominant (65%). The most frequently observed clinical features were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Central nervous system involvement and mediastinal enlargement occurred in 6.6% and 11.8%, respectively. B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia was more common (89.5%) than T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A DNA index >1.16 was found in 19% of patients and was associated with favorable prognosis. On Day 8 of induction therapy, 95% of the patients had lymphoblast counts <1000/μL and white blood cell counts <5.0 × 109/L. The remission induction rate was 95%, the induction mortality rate was 2.6% and overall survival was 72%. Conclusion The prognostic factors identified are compatible with the literature. The 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were lower than those reported for developed countries. As shown by the multivariate analysis, age and baseline white

  12. Neurocognitive Late Effects of Chemotherapy in Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Focus on Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Ellen; Nieman, Brian J; Butcher, Darci T; Hitzler, Johann K; Weksberg, Rosanna; Ito, Shinya; Schachar, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors frequently experience long-lasting consequences of chemotherapy on health outcomes. Neurocognitive late effects of chemotherapy occur in 40 - 60% of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. These deficits affect mental health, school performance, job success, and are associated with poor quality of life, therefore presenting a clinical challenge for psychiatrists. However, not all cancer survivors are impacted by treatment in the same manner and emerging evidence suggests that genetic variation may modulate neurocognitive outcomes. Much like other complex psychopathologies, neurocognitive deficits in cancer survivors are the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental variables. This review describes adverse neurocognitive outcomes observed in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and discusses genetic variability in biochemical pathways targeted by chemotherapeutic agents as a possible mechanism contributing to psychopathology in ALL survivors.

  13. Neurocognitive Late Effects of Chemotherapy in Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Focus on Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Ellen; Nieman, Brian J.; Butcher, Darci T.; Hitzler, Johann K.; Weksberg, Rosanna; Ito, Shinya; Schachar, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors frequently experience long-lasting consequences of chemotherapy on health outcomes. Neurocognitive late effects of chemotherapy occur in 40 – 60% of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. These deficits affect mental health, school performance, job success, and are associated with poor quality of life, therefore presenting a clinical challenge for psychiatrists. However, not all cancer survivors are impacted by treatment in the same manner and emerging evidence suggests that genetic variation may modulate neurocognitive outcomes. Much like other complex psychopathologies, neurocognitive deficits in cancer survivors are the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental variables. This review describes adverse neurocognitive outcomes observed in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and discusses genetic variability in biochemical pathways targeted by chemotherapeutic agents as a possible mechanism contributing to psychopathology in ALL survivors. PMID:26336377

  14. World Health Organization Grade II Oligodendroglioma Occurring after Successful Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-In; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Yul; Chung, Yong-Gu

    2016-01-01

    When treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), secondary neoplasms are a significant long term problem. Radiation is generally accepted to be a major cause of the development of secondary neoplasms. Following treatment for ALL, a variety of secondary tumors, including brain tumors, hematologic malignancies, sarcomas, thyroid cancers, and skin cancers have been reported. However, oligodendroglioma as a secondary neoplasm is extremely rare. Herein we present a case of secondary oligodendroglioma occurring 13 years after the end of ALL treatment. PMID:27867928

  15. The molecular genetic makeup of acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Abstract: Genomic profiling has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent years have seen a shift from microarray analysis and candidate gene sequencing to next-generation sequencing. Together, these approaches have shown that many ALL subtypes are characterized by constellations of structural rearrangements, submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations, and sequence mutations, several of which have clear implications for risk stratification and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  16. [Molecular genetic detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Koehler, R; Bartram, C R

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence achieves nowadays cure rates of more than 80%. The detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) via molecular genetic methods provides - in comparison with conventional clinical and biological parameters - much more sensitive approaches to monitor individual treatment response. Here we will discuss the molecular background and technical developments in the framework of the BFM-study group.

  17. Case report: late aggressive meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, M E; Drumea, K; Guilbord, J N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Kuten, A

    1995-10-01

    The clinical, radiological and pathological findings in a 28-year-old female patient who developed aggressive meningioma 20 years after prophylatic cranial irradiation (PCI) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are described here. Only four cases of late atypical/aggressive meningioma following PCI were detected in a thorough search of the literature. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and PCI, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumour, including aggressive meningioma.

  18. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  19. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  20. VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  2. Heterogeneity of genomic fusion of BCR and ABL in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, C.M.; Carrino, J.J.; Dickler, M.N.; Leibowitz, D.; Smith, S.D.; Westbrook, C.A.

    1988-04-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs in two molecular forms, those with and those without rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region on chromosome 22. The molecular abnormality in the former group is similar to that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. To characterize the abnormality in the breakpoint cluster region-unrearranged form, the authors have mapped a 9; 22 translocation from the Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line SUP-B13 by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and have cloned the DNA at the translocation junctions. They demonstrate a BCR-ABL fusion gene on the Philadelphia chromosome. The exons from ABL are the same. Analysis of leukemic cells from four other patients with breakpoint cluster region-unrearranged Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia revealed a rearrangement on chromosome 22 close to the breakpoint in SUP-B13 in only one patient. These data indicate that breakpoints do not cluster tightly in this region but are scattered, possibly in a large intron. Given the large size of BCR and the heterogeneity in breakpoint location, detection of BCR rearrangement by standard Southern blot analysis is difficult. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis should allow detection at the DNA level in every patient and thus will permit clinical correlation of the breakpoint location with prognosis.

  3. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaink, Alexis; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  4. Management of Concurrent Pregnancy and Acute Lymphoblastic Malignancy in Teenaged Patients: Two Illustrative Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L.; Gomez-Garcia, Wendy C.; Popescu, Marcela I.; Margolin, Judith F.; Ribeiro, Raul C.

    2014-01-01

    The usual age range of acute lymphoblastic malignancies (acute lymphoblastic leukemia and advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma) includes teenagers and young adults (<22 years of age) and coincides with the age of fertility. Concurrence of acute lymphoblastic malignancy with pregnancy is therefore most likely to happen during the younger childbearing ages. However, the therapeutic challenges posed by the dual diagnosis of lymphoblastic malignancy and pregnancy have not specifically been studied in the context of age, and management guidelines for pregnant young patients are lacking. Inconsistency in defining the legal decision-making rights of pregnant teenaged patients adds a further level of complexity in this age group. Management of this challenging combination in the young patient therefore entails unique ethical considerations. Here we present two illustrative cases of teenage pregnancy complicated by acute lymphoblastic malignancy, review the available literature, and offer suggestions for the therapeutic management of such cases in adolescent and young adult patients. Importantly, practical management recommendations are provided in the context of clinical ethics principles that are universally applicable, including in developing countries, where the highest incidence of adolescent pregnancies has been documented. PMID:25538861

  5. Pre-Transplant Donor-Specific T-Cell Alloreactivity Is Strongly Associated with Early Acute Cellular Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Not Receiving T-Cell Depleting Induction Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Elena; Lucia, Marc; Cruzado, Josep M.; Luque, Sergio; Melilli, Edoardo; Manonelles, Anna; Lloberas, Nuria; Torras, Joan; Grinyó, Josep M.; Bestard, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90), to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67). We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction therapy. PMID:25689405

  6. Novel gene targets detected by genomic profiling in a consecutive series of 126 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Hansson, Markus; Karlsson, Karin; Biloglav, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, adult cases of this disease are associated with a very poor prognosis. In order to ascertain whether the frequencies and patterns of submicroscopic changes, identifiable with single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, differ between childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of 126 adult cases, the largest series to date, including 18 paired diagnostic and relapse samples. Apart from identifying characteristic microdeletions of the CDKN2A, EBF1, ETV6, IKZF1, PAX5 and RB1 genes, the present study uncovered novel, focal deletions of the BCAT1, BTLA, NR3C1, PIK3AP1 and SERP2 genes in 2-6% of the adult cases. IKZF1 deletions were associated with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.036), BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P<0.001), and higher white blood cell counts (P=0.005). In addition, recurrent deletions of RASSF3 and TOX were seen in relapse samples. Comparing paired diagnostic/relapse samples revealed identical changes at diagnosis and relapse in 27%, clonal evolution in 22%, and relapses evolving from ancestral clones in 50%, akin to what has previously been reported in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicating that the mechanisms of relapse may be similar in adult and childhood cases. These findings provide novel insights into the leukemogenesis of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, showing similarities to childhood disease in the pattern of deletions and the clonal relationship between diagnostic and relapse samples, but with the adult cases harboring additional aberrations that have not been described in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  8. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.

  10. T helper 2 (Th2) T cells induce acute pancreatitis and diabetes in immune-compromised nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Pakala, S V; Kurrer, M O; Katz, J D

    1997-07-21

    Autoimmune diabetes is caused by the CD4(+), T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated apoptosis of insulin-producing beta cells. We have previously shown that Th2 T cells bearing the same T cell receptor (TCR) as the diabetogenic Th1 T cells invade islets in neonatal nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice but fail to cause disease. Moreover, when mixed in excess and cotransferred with Th1 T cells, Th2 T cells could not protect NOD neonates from Th1-mediated diabetes. We have now found, to our great surprise, the same Th2 T cells that produced a harmless insulitis in neonatal NOD mice produced intense and generalized pancreatitis and insulitis associated with islet cell necrosis, abscess formation, and subsequent diabetes when transferred into immunocompromised NOD.scid mice. These lesions resembled allergic inflamation and contained a large eosinophilic infiltrate. Moreover, the Th2-mediated destruction of islet cells was mediated by local interleukin-10 (IL-10) production but not by IL-4. These findings indicate that under certain conditions Th2 T cells may not produce a benign or protective insulitis but rather acute pathology and disease. Additionally, these results lead us to question the feasibility of Th2-based therapy in type I diabetes, especially in immunosuppressed recipients of islet cell transplants.

  11. Amelioration of acute graft-versus-host disease by NKG2A engagement on donor T cells.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Hiroki; Yagita, Hideo; Nisizawa, Tetsuro; Izumi, Nakako; Miyaji, Chikako; Vance, Russell E; Raulet, David H; Okumura, Ko; Abo, Toru

    2005-08-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) remains a major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, which is caused by donor T cells specific for host alloantigens. In a murine model, we found that donor T cells expressed a natural killer cell inhibitory receptor, CD94/NKG2A, during the course of aGVHD. Administration of an anti-NKG2A mAb markedly inhibited the expansion of donor T cells and ameliorated the aGVHD pathologies. These results suggested that the CD94/NKG2A inhibitory receptor expressed on host-reactive donor T cells can be a novel target for the amelioration of aGVHD.

  12. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-05-29

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  13. [Malignant T-cell lymphoma with osteomyelitis-like bone infiltration].

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, H; Schmitt, O

    1980-01-01

    After a short review on the late literature, existing about various forms of acute lymphoblastic leucemias, it is reported on a rare case of malignant T-cell-Lymphoma with ostemyelitis-like, painfull bone infiltration. The clinical symptoms, as well as differential-diagnostic criterias to other leucemias are described.

  14. Molecular evidence for central nervous system involvement in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D A; Nowak, J S

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) would have profound implication for the prognosis and accurate stratification of CNS prophylactic therapy. Using PCR technique with specific primers for V, D and J segments of TCRD gene, the pattern of TCRD gene rearrangements in bone marrow lymphoblasts and in cells from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been investigated. The study involved 21 children at the time of diagnosis with B-lineage ALL. In nine of 21 patients incomplete TCRDVD gene rearrangement has been found in CSF cells, which was identical to that observed in bone marrow of the same children. It can be concluded that at least in 43 per cent of all analysed cases, there were signs of CNS involvement in newly diagnosed ALL patients.

  15. Collapse of Cytolytic Potential in SIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Emily R.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Poor maintenance of cytotoxic factor expression among HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, in part caused by dysregulated expression of the transcription factor T-bet, is associated with HIV disease progression. However, the precise evolution and context in which CD8+ T cell cytotoxic functions become dysregulated in HIV infection remain unclear. Using the rhesus macaque (RM) SIV infection model, we evaluated the kinetics of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic factor expression in peripheral blood, lymph node, spleen, and gut mucosa from early acute infection through chronic infection. We identified rapid acquisition of perforin and granzyme B expression in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa that collapsed rapidly during the transition to chronic infection. The evolution of this expression profile was linked to low expression of T-bet and occurred independent of epitope specificity, viral escape patterns and tissue origin. Importantly, during acute infection SIV-specific CD8+ T cells that maintained T-bet expression retained the ability to express granzyme B after stimulation, but this relationship was lost in chronic infection. Together, these data demonstrate the loss of cytolytic machinery in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood and at tissue sites of viral reservoir and active replication during the transition from acute to chronic infection. This phenomenon occurs despite persistent high levels of viremia suggesting that an inability to maintain properly regulated cytotoxic T cell responses in all tissue sites enables HIV/SIV to avoid immune clearance, establish persistent viral reservoirs in lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa, and lead ultimately to immunopathogenesis and death. PMID:28036372

  16. Hypereosinophilia in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at diagnosis: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Parasole, Rosanna; Petruzziello, Fara; De Matteo, Antonia; Maisto, Giovanna; Castelli, Luisa; Errico, Maria Elena; Menna, Giuseppe; Poggi, Vincenzo

    2014-04-10

    Hypereosinophilia as first clinical presentation has rarely been reported in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. It is commonly associated with specific cytogenetic abnormalities. Although eosinophilia is considered a reactive, non-neoplastic epiphenomenon, it adversely affects patient outcomes, both in children and adults. We describe herewith two paediatric patients who had marked eosinophilia at onset of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. We point out the importance of a correct differential diagnosis in persistent, unexplained peripheral hypereosinophilia. Clinicians should keep in mind that eosinophilia can be part of the overall pattern of acute leukaemia and therefore needs to be properly investigated. We also provide some recommendations for an appropriate approach to hypereosinophilia - related morbidities.

  17. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Hana; Dallas, Ronald; Zhou, Yinmei; Pei, Dequing; Cheng, Cheng; Flynn, Patricia M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the incidence, clinical course and impact of respiratory viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. Methods A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed ALL on Total Therapy XVI protocol at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 2007 and 2011 was evaluated. Results Of 223 children, 95 (43%) developed 133 episodes of viral acute respiratory illness (ARI) (incidence = 1.1/1,000 patient-days). ARI without viral etiology was identified in 65 (29%) patients and no ARI in 63 (28%). There were no significant associations between race, gender, age, or ALL risk group and development of ARI. Children receiving induction chemotherapy were at the highest risk for viral ARI (incidence, 2.3 per 1,000 patient-days). Influenza virus was the most common virus (38%) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (33%). Of 133 episodes of viral ARI, 61% of patients were hospitalized, 26% suffered a complicated course, 80% had their chemotherapy delayed, and 0.7% died. Twenty-four (18%) patients developed viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI); of which 5 (21%) had complications. Patients with viral LRTI had significantly lower nadir absolute lymphocyte count, were sicker at presentation, and were more likely to have RSV, to be hospitalized, and to have their chemotherapy delayed for longer time compared to those with viral URTI. Conclusion Despite the low incidence of viral ARI in children with ALL, the associated morbidity, mortality, and delay in chemotherapy remain clinically significant. Viral LRTI was particularly associated with high morbidity requiring intensive care level support. PMID:26700662

  18. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  19. Bafilomycin A1 targets both autophagy and apoptosis pathways in pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Na; Song, Lin; Zhang, Suping; Lin, Weiwei; Cao, Yan; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhijian; Cai, Jinyang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yi; Mao, Xinliang; Zhao, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Chen, Suning; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common type of pediatric leukemia. Despite improved remission rates, current treatment regimens for pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are often associated with adverse effects and central nervous system relapse, necessitating more effective and safer agents. Bafilomycin A1 is an inhibitor of vacuolar H+-ATPase that is frequently used at high concentration to block late-phase autophagy. Here, we show that bafilomycin A1 at a low concentration (1 nM) effectively and specifically inhibited and killed pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. It targeted both early and late stages of the autophagy pathway by activating mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and by disassociating the Beclin 1-Vps34 complex, as well as by inhibiting the formation of autolysosomes, all of which attenuated functional autophagy. Bafilomycin A1 also targeted mitochondria and induced caspase-independent apoptosis by inducing the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria to the nucleus. Moreover, bafilomycin A1 induced the binding of Beclin 1 to Bcl-2, which further inhibited autophagy and promoted apoptotic cell death. In primary cells from pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a xenograft model, bafilomycin A1 specifically targeted leukemia cells while sparing normal cells. An in vivo mouse toxicity assay confirmed that bafilomycin A1 is safe. Our data thus suggest that bafilomycin A1 is a promising candidate drug for the treatment of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25512644

  20. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Myeloid Antigen-positive T Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia with t(14;18) and Trisomy 10: Report of a Case and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Limin; Zhao, Guangsheng; Si, Yejun; Zhang, Xingxia; Sun, Yumei; Lu, Shuhua; Zhang, Yanming

    2015-08-01

    The chromosomal translocation t(14;18)(q32;q21) is commonly associated with neoplasms of follicular center cell origin and has also been reported in cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, T cell acute lymphoblastic (or lymphocytic) leukemia (T-ALL) with t(14;18)(q32;q21) has been rarely reported. Here, we report a case of myeloid antigen-positive T-ALL (My+T-ALL) with t(14;18)(q32;q21) and trisomy 10. This is the first reported case of My+T-ALL (L2) with such chromosomal abnormalities. Other published de novo ALL cases, with t(14;18)(q32;q21) and without a documented history of lymphoma, are summarized and reviewed in this report. The patient in this study was treated with remission induction therapy and intensive chemotherapy, followed by maintenance therapy. As of this writing, he has remained in remission for more than 3 years and has presented a better clinical outcome compared with other reported adult ALL patients with t(14;18)(q32;q21).

  3. Facial manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission: Two atypical presentations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benjamin Y; Kojima, Lisa; Huang, Mary S; Friedmann, Alison M; Ferry, Judith A; Weinstein, Howard J

    2016-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) rarely occurs in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), who have not received hematopoietic transplantation. We describe EBV-LPD manifesting as facial lesions in two children with ALL in remission. One patient was a 16-year-old male with T-cell ALL with an EBV-positive angiocentric polymorphous lip lesion presenting as right-sided facial swelling. The other patient was a 12-year-old male with B-cell ALL with an EBV-positive polymorphous lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate presenting as bilateral dacryoadenitis. Neither patient had known primary immunodeficiencies. Both cases improved with immunosuppressant de-escalation. These cases suggest that immunosuppression induced by maintenance chemotherapy is sufficient to promote EBV-LPD.

  4. Mcl-1 regulates effector and memory CD8 T-cell differentiation during acute viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui Ho; Neldner, Brandon; Gui, Jingang; Craig, Ruth W; Suresh, M

    2016-03-01

    Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family maintains cell viability during clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, but the cell intrinsic role of Mcl-1 in contraction of effectors or the number of memory CD8 T cells is unknown. Mcl-1 levels decline during the contraction phase but rebound to high levels in memory CD8 T cells. Therefore, by overexpressing Mcl-1 in CD8 T cells we asked whether limiting levels of Mcl-1 promote contraction of effectors and constrain CD8 T-cell memory. Mcl-1 overexpression failed to affect CD8 T-cell expansion, contraction or the magnitude of CD8 T-cell memory. Strikingly, high Mcl-1 levels enhanced mTOR phosphorylation and augmented the differentiation of terminal effector cells and effector memory CD8 T cells to the detriment of poly-cytokine-producing central memory CD8 T cells. Taken together, these findings provided unexpected insights into the role of Mcl-1 in the differentiation of effector and memory CD8 T cells.

  5. CREBBP knockdown enhances RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signalling in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukaemia but does not modulate chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Zach A; Nicholson, Lindsay; Zeppetzauer, Martin; Matheson, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Paul; Harrison, Christine J; Irving, Julie A E

    2016-12-15

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in young people and new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve outcome. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous inactivating mutations in the histone acetyl transferase, CREBBP, are particularly frequent in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and associated with a hyperdiploid karyotype and KRAS mutations. To study the functional impact of CREBBP haploinsufficiency in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, RNA interference was used to knock down expression of CREBBP in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines and various primagraft acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. We demonstrate that attenuation of CREBBP results in reduced acetylation of histone 3 lysine 18, but had no significant impact on cAMP-dependent target gene expression. Impaired induction of glucocorticoid receptor targets was only seen in 1 of 4 CREBBP knockdown models, and there was no significant difference in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, sensitivity to other acute lymphoblastic leukaemia chemotherapeutics or histone deacetylase inhibitors. Importantly, we show that CREBBP directly acetylates KRAS and that CREBBP knockdown enhances signalling of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells, which are still sensitive to MEK inhibitors. Thus, CREBBP mutations might assist in enhancing oncogenic RAS signalling in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia but do not alter response to MEK inhibitors.

  6. Randomized trial of radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis comparing intrathecal triple therapy with liposomal cytarabine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Renato; Masciulli, Arianna; Intermesoli, Tamara; Audisio, Ernesta; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Romani, Claudio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corti, Consuelo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Parolini, Margherita; Marmont, Filippo; Borlenghi, Erika; Fumagalli, Monica; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Gallamini, Andrea; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Oldani, Elena; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Developing optimal radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis is a desirable goal in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to avoid the long-term toxicity associated with cranial irradiation. In a randomized, phase II trial enrolling 145 adult patients, we compared intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (50 mg: 6/8 injections in B-/T-cell subsets, respectively) with intrathecal triple therapy (methotrexate/cytarabine/prednisone: 12 injections). Systemic therapy included methotrexate plus cytarabine or L-asparaginase courses, with methotrexate augmented to 2.5 and 5 g/m(2) in Philadelphia-negative B- and T-cell disease, respectively. The primary study objective was the comparative assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, combining the analysis of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. In the liposomal cytarabine arm 17/71 patients (24%) developed grade 3-4 neurotoxicity compared to 2/74 (3%) in the triple therapy arm (P=0.0002), the median number of episodes of neurotoxicity of any grade was one per patient compared to zero, respectively (P=0.0001), and even though no permanent disabilities or deaths were registered, four patients (6%) discontinued intrathecal prophylaxis on account of these toxic side effects (P=0.06). Neurotoxicity worsened with liposomal cytarabine every 14 days (T-cell disease), and was improved by the adjunct of intrathecal dexamethasone. Two patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm suffered from a meningeal relapse (none with T-cell disease, only one after high-dose chemotherapy) compared to four in the triple therapy arm (1 with T-cell disease). While intrathecal liposomal cytarabine could contribute to improved, radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis, the toxicity reported in this trial does not support its use at 50 mg and prompts the investigation of a lower dosage. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT-00795756).

  7. Immunological effects of nilotinib prophylaxis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced chronic myeloid leukemia or philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shouval, Roni; Eldror, Shiran; Lev, Atar; Davidson, Jacqueline; Rosenthal, Esther; Volchek, Yulia; Shem-Tov, Noga; Yerushalmi, Ronit; Shimoni, Avichai; Somech, Raz; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains the standard treatment for resistant advanced chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Relapse is the major cause of treatment failure in both diseases. Post-allo-SCT administration of TKIs could potentially reduce relapse rates, but concerns regarding their effect on immune reconstitution have been raised. We aimed to assess immune functions of 12 advanced CML and Ph+ ALL patients who received post-allo-SCT nilotinib. Lymphocyte subpopulations and their functional activities including T-cell response to mitogens, NK cytotoxic activity and thymic function, determined by quantification of the T cell receptor (TCR) excision circles (TREC) and TCR repertoire, were evaluated at several time points, including pre-nilotib-post-allo-SCT, and up to 365 days on nilotinib treatment. NK cells were the first to recover post allo-SCT. Concomitant to nilotinib administration, total lymphocyte counts and subpopulations gradually increased. CD8 T cells were rapidly reconstituted and continued to increase until day 180 post SCT, while CD4 T cells counts were low until 180−270 days post nilotinib treatment. T-cell response to mitogenic stimulation was not inhibited by nilotinib administration. Thymic activity, measured by TREC copies and surface membrane expression of 24 different TCR Vβ families, was evident in all patients at the end of follow-up after allo-SCT and nilotinib treatment. Finally, nilotinib did not inhibit NK cytotoxic activity. In conclusion, administration of nilotinib post allo-SCT, in attempt to reduce relapse rates or progression of Ph+ ALL and CML, did not jeopardize immune reconstitution or function following transplantation. PMID:27880933

  8. Randomized trial of radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis comparing intrathecal triple therapy with liposomal cytarabine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Renato; Masciulli, Arianna; Intermesoli, Tamara; Audisio, Ernesta; Rossi, Giuseppe; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Cassibba, Vincenzo; Mattei, Daniele; Romani, Claudio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corti, Consuelo; Scattolin, Anna Maria; Spinelli, Orietta; Tosi, Manuela; Parolini, Margherita; Marmont, Filippo; Borlenghi, Erika; Fumagalli, Monica; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Gallamini, Andrea; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Oldani, Elena; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Developing optimal radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis is a desirable goal in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, to avoid the long-term toxicity associated with cranial irradiation. In a randomized, phase II trial enrolling 145 adult patients, we compared intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (50 mg: 6/8 injections in B-/T-cell subsets, respectively) with intrathecal triple therapy (methotrexate/cytarabine/prednisone: 12 injections). Systemic therapy included methotrexate plus cytarabine or L-asparaginase courses, with methotrexate augmented to 2.5 and 5 g/m2 in Philadelphia-negative B- and T-cell disease, respectively. The primary study objective was the comparative assessment of the risk/benefit ratio, combining the analysis of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. In the liposomal cytarabine arm 17/71 patients (24%) developed grade 3–4 neurotoxicity compared to 2/74 (3%) in the triple therapy arm (P=0.0002), the median number of episodes of neurotoxicity of any grade was one per patient compared to zero, respectively (P=0.0001), and even though no permanent disabilities or deaths were registered, four patients (6%) discontinued intrathecal prophylaxis on account of these toxic side effects (P=0.06). Neurotoxicity worsened with liposomal cytarabine every 14 days (T-cell disease), and was improved by the adjunct of intrathecal dexamethasone. Two patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm suffered from a meningeal relapse (none with T-cell disease, only one after high-dose chemotherapy) compared to four in the triple therapy arm (1 with T-cell disease). While intrathecal liposomal cytarabine could contribute to improved, radiation-free central nervous system prophylaxis, the toxicity reported in this trial does not support its use at 50 mg and prompts the investigation of a lower dosage. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT-00795756). PMID:25749825

  9. Cross-reactivity and expansion of dengue-specific T cells during acute primary and secondary infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Heather; Bashyam, Hema; Toyosaki-Maeda, Tomoko; Potts, James A; Greenough, Thomas; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Gibbons, Robert V; Nisalak, Ananda; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Green, Sharone; Stephens, Henry A F; Rothman, Alan L; Mathew, Anuja

    2011-01-01

    Serotype-cross-reactive memory T cells responding to secondary dengue virus (DENV) infection are thought to contribute to disease. However, epitope-specific T cell responses have not been thoroughly compared between subjects with primary versus secondary DENV infection. We studied CD8(+) T cells specific for the HLA-A*1101-restricted NS3(133) epitope in a cohort of A11(+) DENV-infected patients throughout acute illness and convalescence. We compared the expansion, serotype-cross-reactivity, and activation of these cells in PBMC from patients experiencing primary or secondary infection and mild or severe disease by flow cytometry. Our results show expansion and activation of DENV-specific CD8(+) T cells during acute infection, which are predominantly serotype-cross-reactive regardless of DENV infection history. These data confirm marked T cell activation and serotype-cross-reactivity during the febrile phase of dengue; however, A11-NS3(133)-specific responses did not correlate with prior antigenic exposure or current disease severity.

  10. [The impact of donor naive and memory T cell subsets on patient outcome following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: relationship between infused donor CD4+/CCR7+ T cell subsets and acute graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Choufi, B; Thiant, S; Trauet, J; Cliquennois, M; Cherrel, M; Boulanger, F; Coiteux, V; Magro, L; Labalette, M; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-06-01

    In a previous prospective study on 62 patients who underwent an HLA-matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation, we have observed that proportion of donor-derived CCR7(+)/CD4(+) T cells in the graft provided a predictive indicator of acute GVHD without interfering on chronic GVHD and relapse rate. Here we present our results on a confirmatory cohort of 137 consecutive patients. Indeed patients who received more than 76% of CCR7(+)/CD4(+) T cells in the graft developed more often acute GVHD be it of low or high grade than those who did not. Determination of the CCR7(+)/CCR7(neg) ratio of CD4(+) T cells in the graft provides a predictive indicator of acute GVHD and could help to define strategies of partial selective T cell depleted transplantation.

  11. Segmentation of White Blood Cell from Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Images Using Dual-Threshold Method

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yihui; Yao, Di

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dual-threshold method based on a strategic combination of RGB and HSV color space for white blood cell (WBC) segmentation. The proposed method consists of three main parts: preprocessing, threshold segmentation, and postprocessing. In the preprocessing part, we get two images for further processing: one contrast-stretched gray image and one H component image from transformed HSV color space. In the threshold segmentation part, a dual-threshold method is proposed for improving the conventional single-threshold approaches and a golden section search method is used for determining the optimal thresholds. For the postprocessing part, mathematical morphology and median filtering are utilized to denoise and remove incomplete WBCs. The proposed method was tested in segmenting the lymphoblasts on a public Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) image dataset. The results show that the performance of the proposed method is better than single-threshold approach independently performed in RGB and HSV color space and the overall single WBC segmentation accuracy reaches 97.85%, showing a good prospect in subsequent lymphoblast classification and ALL diagnosis. PMID:27313659

  12. Delayed differentiation of potent effector CD8(+) T cells reducing viremia and reservoir seeding in acute HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Kessing, Cari; Fletcher, James L K; Muir, Roshell; Tardif, Virginie; Cartwright, Pearline; Vandergeeten, Claire; Bakeman, Wendy; Nichols, Carmen N; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Hansasuta, Pokrath; Kroon, Eugene; Chalermchai, Thep; O'Connell, Robert; Kim, Jerome; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Chomont, Nicolas; Haddad, Elias K; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Trautmann, Lydie

    2017-02-15

    CD8(+) T cells play a critical role in controlling HIV viremia and could be important in reducing HIV-infected cells in approaches to eradicate HIV. The simian immunodeficiency virus model provided the proof of concept for a CD8(+) T cell-mediated reservoir clearance but showed conflicting evidence on the role of these cells to eliminate HIV-infected cells. In humans, HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses have not been associated with a reduction of the HIV-infected cell pool in vivo. We studied HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the RV254 cohort of individuals initiating ART in the earliest stages of acute HIV infection (AHI). We showed that the HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells generated as early as AHI stages 1 and 2 before peak viremia are delayed in expanding and acquiring effector functions but are endowed with higher memory potential. In contrast, the fully differentiated HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells at peak viremia in AHI stage 3 were more prone to apoptosis but were associated with a steeper viral load decrease after ART initiation. Their capacity to persist in vivo after ART initiation correlated with a lower HIV DNA reservoir. These findings demonstrate that HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell magnitude and differentiation are delayed in the earliest stages of infection. These results also demonstrate that potent HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells contribute to the reduction of the pool of HIV-producing cells and the HIV reservoir seeding in vivo and provide the rationale to design interventions aiming at inducing these potent responses to cure HIV infection.

  13. Disseminated fusariosis and endogenous fungal endophthalmitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following platelet transfusion possibly due to transfusion-related immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To report a case of disseminated fusariosis with endogenous endophthalmitis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Transfusion-associated immune modulation secondary to platelet transfusion could play an important role in the pathophysiology of this case. Case Presentation A 9 year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pancytopenia and disseminated Intravascular coagulation was given platelet transfusion. He developed disseminated fusariosis and was referred to the ophthalmology team for right endogenous endophthalmitis. The infection was controlled with aggressive systemic and intravitreal antifungals. Conclusion Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are predisposed to endogenous fungal endophthalmitis. Transfusion-associated immune modulation may further increase host susceptibility to such opportunistic infections. PMID:22044440

  14. [Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a girl with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia carrying the prothrombin G20210A variant].

    PubMed

    González García, H; Sacoto Erazo, G; Moreno Gómez, E; Blanco Quirós, A; Fernández Abril, M C; Alvarez Guisasola, F J

    2013-04-01

    Although cerebral venous thrombosis is rare, it is more commonly associated with children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl who developed massive cerebral sinovenous thrombosis on day 22 of induction therapy for high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Clinical symptoms were gradual onset of headache, decreasing consciousness, and ensuing left hemiplegia. A subsequent prothrombotic study revealed a heterozygous prothrombin G20210A variant in the child and mother. We analysed the prothrombotic factors found in the case before and after thrombosis. We confirm the importance of early exploration of patients for clinical predisposing risk factors of thrombosis and primary prothrombotic states in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This might help identify patients at particular risk from thrombosis and so administer thromboprophylaxis.

  15. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  16. A T-cell-directed chimeric antigen receptor for the selective treatment of T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mamonkin, Maksim; Rouce, Rayne H; Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-08-20

    Options for targeted therapy of T-cell malignancies remain scarce. Recent clinical trials demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can effectively redirect T lymphocytes to eradicate lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin. However, T-lineage neoplasms remain a more challenging task for CAR T cells due to shared expression of most targetable surface antigens between normal and malignant T cells, potentially leading to fratricide of CAR T cells or profound immunodeficiency. Here, we report that T cells transduced with a CAR targeting CD5, a common surface marker of normal and neoplastic T cells, undergo only limited fratricide and can be expanded long-term ex vivo. These CD5 CAR T cells effectively eliminate malignant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoma lines in vitro and significantly inhibit disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. These data support the therapeutic potential of CD5 CAR in patients with T-cell neoplasms.

  17. Association between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and use of electrical appliances during pregnancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Hatch, E E; Linet, M S; Kleinerman, R A; Tarone, R E; Severson, R K; Hartsock, C T; Haines, C; Kaune, W T; Friedman, D; Robison, L L; Wacholder, S

    1998-05-01

    As part of a comprehensive study of residential magnetic field exposure in nine midwestern and mid-Atlantic states, we evaluated the use of appliances by 640 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 0-14 years of age, diagnosed between 1989 and 1993, and 640 matched control children. Mothers were interviewed regarding use of electrical appliances during their pregnancy with the subject and the child's postnatal use. The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was elevated in children whose mothers reported use of an electric blanket or mattress pad during pregnancy [odds ratio (OR) = 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-2.29] but was reduced for use of sewing machines during pregnancy (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.59-0.98). The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was increased with children's use of electric blankets or mattress pads (OR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.52-4.98) and three other electrical appliances (hair dryers, video machines in arcades, and video games connected to a television), but the patterns of risk for duration in years of use and frequency of use were inconsistent for most appliances used by children. Risks rose with increasing number of hours per day children spent watching television, but risks were similar regardless of the usual distance from the television. The inconsistency in the dose-response patterns for many appliances, reporting and selection bias, and the lack of an effect for measured 60 Hertz magnetic fields or wire codes in our companion study must be considered before ascribing these associations to exposures from magnetic fields.

  18. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  19. [Transverse myelopathy in an adult with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V; Guedes Filho, G E; Santos, F J; Souto, M G

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of transverse myelopathy in a 31 year old white man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, subtype L3 (ALL-L3). This is a severe form of leukemia that affects children more often than adults. Less than 1% of leukemic patients develop neurologic complication in the spinal cord. The symptomatology in the present case started with back pain, flaccid paraplegia, and loss of sensibility and vegetative functions below the lesion. The etiologic diagnostic was obtained through peripheral blood study, bone marrow cytology, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance image of the dorsal cord. The antileukemic treatment with specific drugs had no influence on the fatal outcome of the disease.

  20. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: where are we going and how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Mullighan, Charles G; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2012-08-09

    Improved supportive care, more precise risk stratification, and personalized chemotherapy based on the characteristics of leukemic cells and hosts (eg, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics) have pushed the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia to near 90%. Further increase in cure rate can be expected from the discovery of additional recurrent molecular lesions, coupled with the development of novel targeted treatment through high-throughput genomics and innovative drug-screening systems. We discuss specific areas of research that promise to further refine current treatment and to improve the cure rate and quality of life of the patients.

  1. Targetable kinase-activating lesions in Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Publication Abstract:  Philadelphia chromosome-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) is characterized by a gene-expression profile similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, alterations of lymphoid transcription factor genes, and a poor outcome. The frequency and spectrum of genetic alterations in Ph-like ALL and its responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibition are undefined, especially in adolescents and adults. We performed genomic profiling of 1725 patients with precursor B-cell ALL and detailed genomic analysis of 154 patients with Ph-like ALL.

  2. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  3. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in a neonate with congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Steven K; Lipson, David M

    2010-04-01

    We report the case of a 46-day-old boy with a fulminant vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy after treatment for congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Flaccid paralysis developed at the end of the first phase of induction, requiring intubation and ventilation for 51 days. Treatment was initiated with levocarnitine, N-acetylcysteine, and pyridoxine and progressive reversal of the neuropathy occurred over the next 4 months. Potential differences in pathogenesis and presentation of vincristine neurotoxicity and Guillian-Barre syndrome in the neonate are discussed.

  4. [High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylatic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylatic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed.

  5. Ophthalmic evaluation of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R.G. Jr.; Chauvenet, A.R.; Smith, T.J.; Schwartz, A.C.

    1986-08-15

    Thirty-four long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations to detect retinopathy or other ocular sequelae. Sixteen of the 34 patients received whole brain radiation (greater than or equal to 2400 rad). All 18 patients in the non-radiated group had normal eye examinations, while 4 of 16 in the radiated group had ocular abnormalities. None of the ocular abnormalities could be definitely attributed to radiation and all patients had normal visual acuity. No radiation retinopathy was found in either group.

  6. Gonadal function after 12-Gy testicular irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, L.A.; Craft, A.W.; Kernahan, J.; Evans, R.G.; Aynsley-Green, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in 15 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had received testicular irradiation. The dose to the testes was 12 Gy in 12, 15 Gy in 1, and 24 Gy in 2 cases. All of those who had received 12 or 15 Gy had normal Leydig cell function, although high levels of gonadotropins suggest subclinical Leydig cell damage. The 2 who had 24 Gy had Leydig cell failure. All who were old enough to produce a semen specimen were azoospermic.

  7. Out come of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Begum, M; Jahan, S; Tawfique, M; Mannan, M A

    2012-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood leukaemia. On the other hand under-nutrition is a common problem in our country. This prospective study was conducted to see the outcome of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This study was carried out in the department of Paediatric hematology and oncology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during the period from November 2002 to October 2004. A total of sixty (60) children who were diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 1 to 15 years of age were included in this study. But the children with previous history of congenital disease and that of chemotherapy or steroid were excluded from this study. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of Z score of weight for age. Thirty (30) children those with Z score- 2 or less were classified as undernourished and was labeled as Group A and another thirty (30) patient those Z score above-2 were classified as well nourished and was placed in Group B, After inclusion into the study, completion of induction of remission was monitored by physical examination and laboratory investigations. The result showed that mean age in Group A was 77.16 ± 7.07 months and that in Group B was 74.13 ± 5.09 months with male preponderance in both the groups. Mean body weight in Group A was 14.55 ± 0.76 Kg and that in Group B was 21.40 ± 1.05 kg (p<0.001). Children in Group A required 39.06 ± 0.72 days to complete induction but in Group B it required 31.63 ± 0.17 days (p<0.04). Hospital stay in Group A children was 52.10 ± 1.08 days and in Group B 42.37 ± 0.50 (p<0.002). The result suggested that under nutrition has an influence on the out come of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. So appropriate measures are essential to improve nutritional status of children for successful management of ALL in children.

  8. Towards an understanding of the biology and targeted treatment of paediatric relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A E

    2016-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is the most common childhood cancer and for those children who relapse, prognosis is poor and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Recurrent pathways implicated in relapse include RAS, JAK STAT, cell cycle, epigenetic regulation, B cell development, glucocorticoid response, nucleotide metabolism and DNA repair. Targeting these pathways is a rational therapeutic strategy and may deliver novel, targeted therapies into the clinic. Relapse often stems from a minor clone present at diagnosis and thus analysis of persisting leukaemia during upfront therapy may allow targeted drug intervention to prevent relapse.

  9. Bacillus cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gurler, N; Oksuz, L; Muftuoglu, M; Sargin, Fd; Besisik, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related bloodstream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B. cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts. Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblast c leukemia (ALL) in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.

  10. Preferential loss of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their circulating functional subsets in acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Zhen; Li, Qunhui; Jiao, Yanmei; Ji, Yunxia; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Zhuoming; Li, Wei; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Preferential infection and depletion of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells in the blood are observed in chronic HIV/SIV infection. The dynamic change in gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets during the acute stages of HIV-1 infection are less documented. Therefore, we conducted a cohort study to investigate whether acute HIV-1 infection induced abnormalities in gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets. We examined the frequency, absolute number, and functionality of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells in 26 acute HIV-1-infected patients compared with 20 healthy individuals. We found that circulating gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells were preferentially depleted during acute HIV-1 infection and were positively correlated with absolute CD4+ T-cell count in blood. Notably, Th17 and Th1 cell subsets of gut-homing CD4+ T cells were also decreased, which resulted in an imbalance of T helper cells (Th1):regulatory T cells (Treg) and Treg:Th17 ratios. Gut-homing Th17 and Th1 cells were also positively correlated with the absolute number of total CD4+ T cells and gut-homing CD4+ T cells. The gut-homing Treg:Th17 ratio was inversely correlated with the CD4+ T-cell count. Taken together, the analyses of our acute HIV-1 cohort demonstrate that gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets were profoundly depleted during acute HIV-1 infection, which may have resulted in the persistent loss of circulating CD4+ T cells and an imbalance of Th1:Treg and Treg:Th17 ratios and contribute to HIV-1 disease pathogenesis. PMID:26277899

  11. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Impaired Circulating CD4+LAP+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Its Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao-Bo; Yu, Kun-Wu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Peng-Fei; Ren, Ze-Peng; Wu, Bang-Wei; Ji, Qin-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Zeng, Qiu-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objective CD4+ latency-associated peptide (LAP)+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs are defective in ACS. Methods One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina) and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA) and chest pain syndrome (CPS). The frequencies of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP) on CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β) levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. Results We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. Conclusions A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4+LAP+ T cells is defective in ACS patients. PMID:24558424

  13. Bispecific antibody releasing-mesenchymal stromal cell machinery for retargeting T cells towards acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Aliperta, R; Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Arndt, C; Koristka, S; Michalk, I; von Bonin, M; Ehninger, A; Bachmann, J; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Bachmann, M P

    2015-09-18

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) engaging T cells are emerging as a promising immunotherapeutic tool for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Because their low molecular mass, bsAbs have short half-lives. To achieve clinical responses, they have to be infused into patients continously, for a long period of time. As a valid alternative we examined the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as autonomous cellular machines for the constant production of a recently described, fully humanized anti-CD33-anti-CD3 bsAb, which is capable of redirecting human T cells against CD33-expressing leukemic cells. The immortalized human MSC line SCP-1 was genetically modified into expressing bsAb at sufficient amounts to redirect T cells efficiently against CD33 presenting target cells, both in vitro and in an immunodeficient mouse model. Moreover, T cells of patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in blast crisis eliminated autologous leukemic cells in the presence of the bsAb secreting MSCs over time. The immune response against AML cells could be enhanced further by providing T cells an additional co-stimulus via the CD137-CD137 ligand axis through CD137L expression on MSCs. This study demonstrates that MSCs have the potential to be used as cellular production machines for bsAb-based tumor immunotherapy in the future.

  14. IL-10 distinguishes a unique population of activated, effector-like CD8(+) T cells in murine acute liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julia E; Canna, Scott W; Weaver, Lehn K; Tobias, John W; Behrens, Edward M

    2017-04-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is a central feature of hyperinflammatory diseases, such as hemophagocytic syndromes, yet the immunologic mechanisms underlying those processes are incompletely understood. In this study, we used the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated model of a hemophagocytic syndrome known as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) to dissect the predominant immune cell populations infiltrating the liver during inflammation. We identified CD8(+) T cells that unexpectedly produce interleukin-10 (IL-10) in addition to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) as a major hepatic population induced by TLR9 stimulation. Despite their ability to produce this anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells in TLR9-MAS mice did not resemble CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Instead, the induction of these cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and was partially dependent on IFN-γ. IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells demonstrated an activated phenotype and high turnover rate, consistent with an effector-like identity. Transcriptional analysis of this population confirmed a gene signature of effector CD8(+) T cells yet suggested responsiveness to liver injury-associated growth factors. Together, these findings suggest that IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells induced by systemic inflammation to infiltrate the liver have initiated an inflammatory, rather than regulatory, program and may thus have a pathogenic role in severe, acute hepatitis.

  15. OX40 controls effector CD4+ T-cell expansion, not follicular T helper cell generation in acute Listeria infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Clare L; Mackley, Emma C; Ferreira, Cristina; Veldhoen, Marc; Yagita, Hideo; Withers, David R

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the importance of OX40 signals for physiological CD4(+) T-cell responses, an endogenous antigen-specific population of CD4(+) T cells that recognise the 2W1S peptide was assessed and temporal control of OX40 signals was achieved using blocking or agonistic antibodies (Abs) in vivo. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes expressing 2W1S peptide, OX40 was briefly expressed by the responding 2W1S-specific CD4(+) T cells, but only on a subset that co-expressed effector cell markers. This population was specifically expanded by Ab-ligation of OX40 during priming, which also caused skewing of the memory response towards effector memory cells. Strikingly, this greatly enhanced effector response was accompanied by the loss of T follicular helper (TFH) cells and germinal centres. Mice deficient in OX40 and CD30 showed normal generation of TFH cells but impaired numbers of 2W1S-specific effector cells. OX40 was not expressed by 2W1S-specific memory cells, although it was rapidly up-regulated upon challenge whereupon Ab-ligation of OX40 specifically affected the effector subset. In summary, these data indicate that for CD4(+) T cells, OX40 signals are important for generation of effector T cells rather than TFH cells in this response to acute bacterial infection.

  16. CD44v6-targeted T cells mediate potent antitumor effects against acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Monica; Nicolis di Robilant, Benedetta; Falcone, Laura; Camisa, Barbara; Norelli, Margherita; Genovese, Pietro; Gentner, Bernhard; Gullotta, Fabiana; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bernardi, Massimo; Marcatti, Magda; Saudemont, Aurore; Bordignon, Claudio; Savoldo, Barbara; Ciceri, Fabio; Naldini, Luigi; Dotti, Gianpietro; Bonini, Chiara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2013-11-14

    Genetically targeted T cells promise to solve the feasibility and efficacy hurdles of adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer. Selecting a target expressed in multiple-tumor types and that is required for tumor growth would widen disease indications and prevent immune escape caused by the emergence of antigen-loss variants. The adhesive receptor CD44 is broadly expressed in hematologic and epithelial tumors, where it contributes to the cancer stem/initiating phenotype. In this study, silencing of its isoform variant 6 (CD44v6) prevented engraftment of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells in immunocompromised mice. Accordingly, T cells targeted to CD44v6 by means of a chimeric antigen receptor containing a CD28 signaling domain mediated potent antitumor effects against primary AML and MM while sparing normal hematopoietic stem cells and CD44v6-expressing keratinocytes. Importantly, in vitro activation with CD3/CD28 beads and interleukin (IL)-7/IL-15 was required for antitumor efficacy in vivo. Finally, coexpressing a suicide gene enabled fast and efficient pharmacologic ablation of CD44v6-targeted T cells and complete rescue from hyperacute xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease modeling early and generalized toxicity. These results warrant the clinical investigation of suicidal CD44v6-targeted T cells in AML and MM.

  17. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  18. Regulatory T cells reduce acute lung injury fibroproliferation by decreasing fibrocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; D'Alessio, Franco R; Mock, Jason R; Files, D Clark; Chau, Eric; Eto, Yoshiki; Drummond, M Bradley; Aggarwal, Neil R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; King, Landon S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Fibroproliferation in ALI results in worse outcomes, but the mechanisms governing fibroproliferation remain poorly understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in lung injury resolution. Their role in fibroproliferation is unknown. We sought to identify the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation, using a murine model of lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-) mice received intratracheal LPS. Fibroproliferation was characterized by histology and the measurement of lung collagen. Lung fibrocytes were measured by flow cytometry. To dissect the role of Tregs in fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice received CD4(+)CD25(+) (Tregs) or CD4(+)CD25(-) Tcells (non-Tregs) at the time of LPS injury. To define the role of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)-CXCR4 pathway in ALI fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 to block fibrocyte recruitment. WT and Rag-1(-/-) mice demonstrated significant collagen deposition on Day 3 after LPS. WT mice exhibited the clearance of collagen, but Rag-1(-/-) mice developed persistent fibrosis. This fibrosis was mediated by the sustained epithelial expression of CXCL12 (or stromal cell-derived factor 1 [SDF-1]) that led to increased fibrocyte recruitment. The adoptive transfer of Tregs resolved fibroproliferation by decreasing CXCL12 expression and subsequent fibrocyte recruitment. Blockade of the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis with AMD3100 also decreased lung fibrocytes and fibroproliferation. These results indicate a central role for Tregs in the resolution of ALI fibroproliferation by reducing fibrocyte recruitment along the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. A dissection of the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation may inform the design of new therapeutic tools for patients with ALI.

  19. CD4+ T cells provide protection against acute lethal encephalitis caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Peng, Bi-Hung; Bertke, Andrea S; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Smith, Jennifer K; Smith, Jeanon N; Poussard, Allison L; Salazar, Milagros; Judy, Barbara M; Zacks, Michele A; Estes, D Mark; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-06-19

    Studying the mechanisms of host survival resulting from viral encephalitis is critical to the development of vaccines. Here we have shown in several independent studies that high dose treatment with neutralizing antibody prior to intranasal infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus had an antiviral effect in the visceral organs and prolonged survival time of infected mice, even in the absence of alphabeta T cells. Nevertheless, antibody treatment did not prevent the development of lethal encephalitis. On the contrary, the adoptive transfer of primed CD4(+) T cells was necessary to prevent lethal encephalitis in mice lacking alphabeta T cell receptor.

  20. New development in CAR-T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Han, Weidong

    2017-02-21

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  1. Clonal origins of relapse in ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    van Delft, Frederik W; Horsley, Sharon; Colman, Sue; Anderson, Kristina; Bateman, Caroline; Kempski, Helena; Zuna, Jan; Eckert, Cornelia; Saha, Vaskar; Kearney, Lyndal; Ford, Anthony; Greaves, Mel

    2011-06-09

    B-cell precursor childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion has an overall good prognosis, but relapses occur, usually after cessation of treatment and occasionally many years later. We have investigated the clonal origins of relapse by comparing the profiles of genomewide copy number alterations at presentation in 21 patients with those in matched relapse (12-119 months). We identified, in total, 159 copy number alterations at presentation and 231 at relapse (excluding Ig/TCR). Deletions of CDKN2A/B or CCNC (6q16.2-3) or both increased from 38% at presentation to 76% in relapse, suggesting that cell-cycle deregulation contributed to emergence of relapse. A novel observation was recurrent gain of chromosome 16 (2 patients at presentation, 4 at relapse) and deletion of plasmocytoma variant translocation 1 in 3 patients. The data indicate that, irrespective of time to relapse, the relapse clone was derived from either a major or minor clone at presentation. Backtracking analysis by FISH identified a minor subclone at diagnosis whose genotype matched that observed in relapse ∼ 10 years later. These data indicate subclonal diversity at diagnosis, providing a variable basis for intraclonal origins of relapse and extended periods (years) of dormancy, possibly by quiescence, for stem cells in ETV6-RUNX1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  2. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  3. Association between MTR A2756G polymorphism and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; Wang, Yadan; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Abstract To date, many studies on the association between methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have provided either controversial or inconclusive results. To clarify the effect of MTR A2756G on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a meta-analysis of all relevant studies was performed. The fixed effects model showed that the 2756A allele was associated with a decreased risk of childhood ALL compared with the G allele (ORA vs. G = 0.872; 95% CI 0.782-0.974; p = 0.015, I(2) = 46.9%). Additionally, when comparing subjects with ALL and controls with AA vs. AG or AA vs. AG + GG (dominant model), significant differences were found in the fixed effects model (ORAA vs. AG = 0.869; 95% CI 0.760-0.994; p = 0.040, I(2) = 26.4%; ORAA vs. AG+ GG = 0.858; 95% CI 0.754-0.976; p = 0.020, I(2) = 39.6%). In a subgroup analysis in a population with the same background, individuals with the AA genotype had a reduced risk of developing ALL compared to individuals with the AG genotype. In conclusion, our study provides evidence suggesting that MTR A2756G is associated with a reduced risk of developing childhood ALL.

  4. Dexamethasone exposure and asparaginase antibodies affect relapse risk in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Liu, Chengcheng; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Fernandez, Christian A; Howard, Scott C; Campana, Dario; Panetta, John C; Bowman, W Paul; Evans, William E; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V

    2012-02-16

    We have previously hypothesized that higher systemic exposure to asparaginase may cause increased exposure to dexamethasone, both critical chemotherapeutic agents for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Whether interpatient pharmaco-kinetic differences in dexamethasone contribute to relapse risk has never been studied. The impact of plasma clearance of dexamethasone and anti-asparaginase antibody levels on risk of relapse was assessed in 410 children who were treated on a front-line clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and were evaluable for all pharmacologic measures, using multivariate analyses, adjusting for standard clinical and biologic prognostic factors. Dexamethasone clearance (mean ± SD) was higher (P = 3 × 10(-8)) in patients whose sera was positive (17.7 ± 18.6 L/h per m(2)) versus nega-tive (10.6 ± 5.99 L/h per m(2)) for anti-asparaginase antibodies. In multivariate analyses, higher dexamethasone clearance was associated with a higher risk of any relapse (P = .01) and of central nervous system relapse (P = .014). Central nervous system relapse was also more common in patients with anti-asparaginase antibodies (P = .019). In conclusion, systemic clearance of dexamethasone is higher in patients with anti-asparaginase antibodies. Lower exposure to both drugs was associated with an increased risk of relapse.

  5. Studies on the assessment of neurotoxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Muchi, H.; Satoh, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Karube, T.; Miyao, M.

    1987-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis caused a remarkable reduction in the incidence of CNS disease, however there has evolved a growing concern regarding the immediate or late toxicities to the developing CNS. Twenty-eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who survived for more than 2 years were examined for the assessment of neurotoxicity induced by CNS prophylaxis and its treatment. The patients were stratified into three groups: Stratum I, prophylaxis with methotrexate; Stratum II, prophylaxis with cranial irradiation with methotrexate; and Stratum III, with CNS leukemia. Once CNS disease developed the sequelae were frequent and severe, due to the elevated methotrexate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. CNS prophylaxis with intermediate-dose methotrexate was less toxic to the developing CNS than prophylactic cranial irradiation, especially in children under 5 years of age. Electroencephalograms and evoked potentials are likely to find increasing application in defining the CNS sequelae of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and its treatment. Although the sample size was small, the findings delineate specific areas of neurotoxicity.

  6. Intragenic ERG Deletions Do Not Explain the Biology of ERG-Related Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Potuckova, Eliska; Zuna, Jan; Hovorkova, Lenka; Starkova, Julia; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Zaliova, Marketa

    2016-01-01

    Intragenic ERG deletions occur in 3–5% of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, specifically in B-other subtype lacking the classifying genetic lesions. They represent the only genetic lesion described so far present in the majority of cases clustering into a subgroup of B-other subtype characterized by a unique gene expression profile, probably sharing a common, however, not yet fully described, biological background. We aimed to elucidate whether ERG deletions could drive the specific biology of this ERG-related leukemia subgroup through expression of aberrant or decreased expression of wild type ERG isoforms. We showed that leukemic cells with endogenous ERG deletion express an aberrant transcript translated into two proteins in transfected cell lines and that one of these proteins colocalizes with wild type ERG. However, we did not confirm expression of the proteins in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with endogenous ERG deletion. ERG deletions resulted in significantly lower expression of wild type ERG transcripts compared to B-other cases without ERG deletion. However, cases with subclonal ERG deletion, clustering to the same ERG deletion associated subgroup, presented similar levels of wild type ERG as cases without ERG deletion. In conclusion, our data suggest that neither the expression of aberrant proteins from internally deleted allele nor the reduced expression of wild type ERG seem to provide a plausible explanation of the specific biology of ERG -related leukemia subgroup. PMID:27494621

  7. High level of PD-1 expression on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells during acute HCV infection, irrespective of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Kuntzen, Thomas; Nolan, Brian E; Longworth, Steven; Berical, Andrew; Blum, Jenna; McMahon, Cory; Reyor, Laura L; Elias, Nahel; Kwok, William W; McGovern, Barbara G; Freeman, Gordon; Chung, Raymond T; Klenerman, Paul; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M; Kim, Arthur Y; Lauer, Georg M

    2008-03-01

    We monitored expression of PD-1 (a mediator of T-cell exhaustion and viral persistence) on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells from blood and liver during acute and chronic infections and after the resolved infection stage. PD-1 expression on HCV-specific T cells was high early in acute infection irrespective of clinical outcome, and most cells continued to express PD-1 in resolved and chronic stages of infection; intrahepatic expression levels were especially high. Our results suggest that an analysis of PD-1 expression alone is not sufficient to predict infection outcome or to determine T-cell functionality in HCV infection.

  8. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  9. AIEOP-BFM consensus guidelines 2016 for flow cytometric immunophenotyping of Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dworzak, Michael N; Buldini, Barbara; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Ratei, Richard; Hrusak, Ondrej; Luria, Drorit; Rosenthal, Eti; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Sartor, Mary; Schumich, Angela; Karawajew, Leonid; Mejstrikova, Ester; Maglia, Oscar; Mann, Georg; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Biondi, Andrea; Schrappe, Martin; Basso, Giuseppe

    2017-02-10

    Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry (FCM) is a worldwide mainstay in leukemia diagnostics. For concordant multicentric application, however, a gap exists between available classification systems, technologic standardization, and clinical needs. The AIEOP-BFM consortium induced an extensive standardization and validation effort between its nine national reference laboratories collaborating in immunophenotyping of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We elaborated common guidelines which take advantage of the possibilities of multi-color FCM: marker panel requirements, immunological blast gating, in-sample controls, tri-partite antigen expression rating (negative vs. weak or strong positive) with capturing of blast cell heterogeneities and subclone formation, refined ALL subclassification, and a dominant lineage assignment algorithm able to distinguish "simple" from bilineal/"complex" mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) cases, which is essential for choice of treatment. These guidelines are a first step toward necessary inter-laboratory standardization of pediatric leukemia immunophenotyping for a concordant multicentric application. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  10. Germline ETV6 Mutations Confer Susceptibility to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lauren; Maria, Ann; Villano, Danylo; Gaddam, Pragna; Wu, Gang; McGee, Rose B.; Quinn, Emily; Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine; Pui, Ching-hon; Pappo, Alberto; Edmonson, Michael; Zhang, Michael Y.; Stepensky, Polina; Steinherz, Peter; Schrader, Kasmintan; Lincoln, Anne; Bussel, James; Lipkin, Steve M.; Goldgur, Yehuda; Harit, Mira; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Mullighan, Charles; Weintraub, Michael; Shimamura, Akiko; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; Nichols, Kim E.; Offit, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations affecting ETV6 often occur in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy. The genetic factors that predispose to ALL remain poorly understood. Here we identify a novel germline ETV6 p. L349P mutation in a kindred affected by thrombocytopenia and ALL. A second ETV6 p. N385fs mutation was identified in an unrelated kindred characterized by thrombocytopenia, ALL and secondary myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemic cells from the proband in the second kindred showed deletion of wild type ETV6 with retention of the ETV6 p. N385fs. Enforced expression of the ETV6 mutants revealed normal transcript and protein levels, but impaired nuclear localization. Accordingly, these mutants exhibited significantly reduced ability to regulate the transcription of ETV6 target genes. Our findings highlight a novel role for ETV6 in leukemia predisposition. PMID:26102509

  11. A Rare Case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in Pregnancy- Unique Maternal-Fetal Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Shabana

    2014-01-01

    Leukaemia in pregnancy is rare and lethal. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000 pregnancies. Use of chemotherapeutic agents during pregnancy can give rise to maternal and fetal adversity; resulting in dilemma regarding proper management plan. A 25-year-old pregnant lady was presented at 24 wk of gestational age with cervical and inguinal lymphadenopathy and bicytopenia in complete blood counts. Diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. Treated with appropriate chemotherapeutic regimen with some modification in the standard protocol due to pregnancy and delivered successfully by lower segment caesarean section at 34 wk of gestational age. Diagnosis of acute leukaemia during pregnancy need high index of suspicion and need prompt management with the proper chemotherapeutic regimen. Clinical judgement regarding the risk benefit ratio of using chemotherapeutic drugs ensures better mother and fetal outcome. PMID:25478417

  12. Hickman to central venous catheter: A case of difficult venous access in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Agrawal, Sanjit; Datta, Taniya; Mitra, Suparna; Khemka, Rakhi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy in children suffering from cancer usually requires placement of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC). A child may need to undergo repeated procedures because of infection and occlusion of previous access devices. We present a case of CVC insertion in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia where an innovative technique was employed. PMID:27695218

  13. Novel in vivo model of inducible multidrug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal translocation t(4;11)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with translocation t(4;11) is found in 60-85% of infants with ALL and is classified as high-risk due to the generally poor prognosis for survival. Using the SEM cell line established from a patient with t(4;11) ALL, we evaluated the resistance of these cells to the...

  14. Rise and fall of subclones from diagnosis to relapse in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    There is incomplete understanding of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution during cancer progression. Here we use deep whole-exome sequencing to describe the clonal architecture and evolution of 20 pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias from diagnosis to relapse. We show that clonal diversity is comparable at diagnosis and relapse and clonal survival from diagnosis to relapse is not associated with mutation burden.

  15. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated within the Interfant-99 protocol.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, V H J; Corral, L; Valsecchi, M G; Jansen, M W J C; De Lorenzo, P; Cazzaniga, G; Panzer-Grümayer, E R; Schrappe, M; Schrauder, A; Meyer, C; Marschalek, R; Nigro, L L; Metzler, M; Basso, G; Mann, G; Den Boer, M L; Biondi, A; Pieters, R; Van Dongen, J J M

    2009-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants younger than 1 year is a rare but relatively homogeneous disease ( approximately 80% MLL gene rearranged, approximately 70% CD10-negative) when compared with childhood and adult ALL. Several studies in children and adults with ALL have shown that minimal residual disease (MRD) status is a strong and independent prognostic factor. We therefore evaluated the prognostic significance of MRD in infant ALL. Ninety-nine infant patients treated according to the Interfant-99 protocol were included in this study. MRD was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, T-cell receptor genes and MLL genes at various time points (TP) during therapy. Higher MRD levels at the end of induction (TP2) and consolidation (TP3) were significantly associated with lower disease-free survival. Combined MRD information at TP2 and TP3 allowed recognition of three patients groups that significantly differed in outcome. All MRD-high-risk patients (MRD levels > or =10(-4) at TP3; 26% of patients) relapsed. MRD-low-risk patients (MRD level <10(-4) at both TP2 and TP3) constituted 44% of patients and showed a relapse-rate of only 13%, whereas remaining patients (MRD-medium-risk patients; 30% of patients) had a relapse rate of 31%. Comparison between the current Interfant-06 stratification at diagnosis and the here presented MRD-based stratification showed that both stratifications recognized different subgroups of patients. These data indicate that MRD diagnostics has added value for recognition of risk groups in infant ALL and that MRD diagnostics can be used for treatment intervention in infant ALL as well.

  16. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Placing Ion Channels into a Signaling Network of T Cells: From Maturing Thymocytes to Healthy T Lymphocytes or Leukemic T Lymphoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Best-Aguilera, Carlos; Rojas-Sotelo, Rocío Monserrat; Pottosin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    T leukemogenesis is a multistep process, where the genetic errors during T cell maturation cause the healthy progenitor to convert into the leukemic precursor that lost its ability to differentiate but possesses high potential for proliferation, self-renewal, and migration. A new misdirecting “leukemogenic” signaling network appears, composed by three types of participants which are encoded by (1) genes implicated in determined stages of T cell development but deregulated by translocations or mutations, (2) genes which normally do not participate in T cell development but are upregulated, and (3) nondifferentially expressed genes which become highly interconnected with genes expressed differentially. It appears that each of three groups may contain genes coding ion channels. In T cells, ion channels are implicated in regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, activation, migration, and cell death. In the present review we are going to reveal a relationship between different genetic defects, which drive the T cell neoplasias, with calcium signaling and ion channels. We suggest that changes in regulation of various ion channels in different types of the T leukemias may provide the intracellular ion microenvironment favorable to maintain self-renewal capacity, arrest differentiation, induce proliferation, and enhance motility. PMID:25866806

  18. Proteomic profile of pre - B2 lymphoblasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in relation with the translocation (12; 21)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Until now, the major prognostic factors for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), age, white blood cell count and chromosomal alterations are initially taken into account for the risk stratification of patients. In the light of protein marker studies to classify subtypes of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia efficiently, we have compared the lymphoblastes proteome in Childhood ALL in accordance with the presence of t(12;21), indicator of good prognosis, usually. Methods Protein expression in pre-B2 lymphoblastic cells, collected from residual bone marrow cells after diagnostic procedures, was analyzed using two dimensional gel electrophoresis protocol. Protein spots whose average normalized volumes were statistically different in the two patients groups (n = 13; student t test p < 0.01), were excised. Tryptic peptides were then analyzed using a nano-LC1200 system coupled to a 6340 Ion Trap mass spectrometer equipped with a HPLC-chip cube interface. The tandem mass spectrometry peak lists extracted using the DataAnalysis program, were compared with the protein database Mascot Daemon. Results We focused on twelve spots corresponding to sixteen identified candidate proteins among the 26 found differentially expressed (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the presence of t(12;21). Among over expressed proteins, two proteins were implicated in cellular growth arrest (i.e. calponine 2, p ≤ 0.001 and phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta, p ≤ 0.001) in accordance with good prognosis, while two other proteins favored cell cycle proliferation (i.e. methionine adenosyl transferase 2β, p ≤ 0.005 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleo-proteins A2 p ≤ 0.01) and could therefore be good marker candidates of aggressiveness. Level of expression of proteasome subunit beta type-2 (p ≤ 0.01) and protein casein kinase 2α (p ≤ 0.01) which both favored apoptosis, deubiquitinating enzyme OTUB1 (p ≤ 0.05) and MLL septin-like fusion

  19. The ratio of absolute lymphocyte count at interim of therapy to absolute lymphocyte count at diagnosis predicts survival in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuping; Luo, Zebin; Yang, Shilong; Jia, Ming; Zhao, Haizhao; Xu, Weiqun; Tang, Yongmin

    2015-02-01

    Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) after therapy has been reported to be an independent prognostic factor for clinical outcome in leukemia. This study mainly analyzed ALC at interim of therapy on day 22 (ALC-22) and the ratio of ALC-22 to ALC at diagnosis (ALC-0) on the impact of survival and the relation of ALC to lymphocyte subsets in 119 pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients. Univariate analysis revealed that ALC-22/ALC-0 ratio <10% was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio (HR)=12.24, P=0.0014) and event-free survival (EFS) (HR=3.3, P=0.0046). In multivariate analysis, ALC-22/ALC-0 ratio remained an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR=6.92, P=0.0181) and EFS (HR=2.78, P=0.0329) after adjusting for age, white blood cell (WBC) count and minimal residual disease (MRD) status. A Spearman correlation test showed that CD3+ T cells had a negative correlation with ALC-0 (r=-0.7204, P<0.0001) and a positive correlation with ALC-22 (r=0.5061, P=0.0071). These data suggest that ALC-22/ALC-0 ratio may serve as a more effective biomarker to predict survival in pediatric B-ALL and ALC is mainly associated with CD3+ T cells.

  20. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels.

  1. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cancela, Camila Silva Peres; Murao, Mitiko; Viana, Marcos Borato; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99) treatment protocol. Results The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% (± 3.6%) and 58.8% (± 4.0%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined) relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis ≥ 50 x 109/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count < 50 x 109/L (p-value = 0.0008). There was no difference in cumulative central nervous system relapse (isolated or combined) for the other analyzed variables: immunophenotype, traumatic lumbar puncture, interval between diagnosis and first lumbar puncture and place where the procedure was performed. Conclusions These results suggest that a leukocyte count > 50 x 109/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23323068

  2. Clinical reversible myelopathy in T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma treated with nelarabine and radiotherapy: report of a case and review of literature of an increasing complication.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Maria Chiara; Ausoni, Giuseppe; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Balducci, Mario; Laurenti, Luca; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Hohaus, Stefan; Sica, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Eleven cases of neurological defects in T-ALL patients treated with nelarabine have been described in the last 4 years, seven of these after stem cell transplantation (SCT) for T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (T-LBL). Most of these patients had an unfavorable outcome or irreversible neurological damage. We now report the case of a 41-year-old woman suffering from T-LBL who presented with severe, but reversible myelopathy after receiving nelarabine-based treatment and mediastinal radiotherapy, and we provide a review of the literature on the topic.

  3. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood

  4. Broadly directed virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses are primed during acute hepatitis C infection, but rapidly disappear from human blood with viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Nolan, Brian E; Streeck, Hendrik; Aneja, Jasneet; Reyor, Laura L; Allen, Todd M; Lohse, Ansgar W; McGovern, Barbara; Chung, Raymond T; Kwok, William W; Kim, Arthur Y; Lauer, Georg M

    2012-01-16

    Vigorous proliferative CD4(+) T cell responses are the hallmark of spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, whereas comparable responses are absent in chronically evolving infection. Here, we comprehensively characterized the breadth, specificity, and quality of the HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell response in 31 patients with acute HCV infection and varying clinical outcomes. We analyzed in vitro T cell expansion in the presence of interleukin-2, and ex vivo staining with HCV peptide-loaded MHC class II tetramers. Surprisingly, broadly directed HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were universally detectable at early stages of infection, regardless of the clinical outcome. However, persistent viremia was associated with early proliferative defects of the HCV-specific CD4(+) T cells, followed by rapid deletion of the HCV-specific response. Only early initiation of antiviral therapy was able to preserve CD4(+) T cell responses in acute, chronically evolving infection. Our results challenge the paradigm that HCV persistence is the result of a failure to prime HCV-specific CD4(+) T cells. Instead, broadly directed HCV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses are usually generated, but rapid exhaustion and deletion of these cells occurs in the majority of patients. The data further suggest a short window of opportunity to prevent the loss of CD4(+) T cell responses through antiviral therapy.

  5. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  6. Cannabis Extract Treatment for Terminal Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with a Philadelphia Chromosome Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yadvinder; Bali, Chamandeep

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30–40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation). A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation. PMID:24474921

  7. Cannabis extract treatment for terminal acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a Philadelphia chromosome mutation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yadvinder; Bali, Chamandeep

    2013-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation). A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation.

  8. Relapse specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julia A.; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E.; Yang, Jun J.; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P.; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L.; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Evans, William E.; Morrison, Debra J.; Mason, Christopher E.; Carroll, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis despite intensive retreatment, due to intrinsic drug resistance1-2. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten pediatric B lymphoblastic leukemia patients using RNA-sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired novel non-synonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, of which two patients harbored relapse specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, a 5′-nucleotidase. Full exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 additional relapse specimens, identifying five additional cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins revealed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analogue therapies. Clinically, all patients who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, or within 36 months of initial diagnosis (p=0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug resistant clones in ALL. PMID:23377183

  9. Relapse-specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julia A; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E; Yang, Jun J; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Evans, William E; Morrison, Debra J; Mason, Christopher E; Carroll, William L

    2013-03-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis, despite intensive retreatment, owing to intrinsic drug resistance. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here, we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten individuals with pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired, novel nonsynonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, with 2 individuals harboring relapse-specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, encoding a 5'-nucleotidase. Full-exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 further relapse specimens, identifying additional mutations in 5 cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins showed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analog therapies. Clinically, all individuals who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, within 36 months of initial diagnosis (P = 0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug-resistant clones in ALL.

  10. Violacein Treatment Modulates Acute and Chronic Inflammation through the Suppression of Cytokine Production and Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Verinaud, Liana; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; Prado, Isabel Cristina Naranjo; Zanucoli, Fábio; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Di Gangi, Rosária; Issayama, Luidy Kazuo; Carvalho, Ana Carolina; Bonfanti, Amanda Pires; Niederauer, Guilherme Francio; Duran, Nelson; Costa, Fábio Trindade Maranhão; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; Höfling, Maria Alice da Cruz; Machado, Dagmar Ruth Stach; Thomé, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a necessary process to control infection. However, exacerbated inflammation, acute or chronic, promotes deleterious effects in the organism. Violacein (viola), a quorum sensing metabolite from the Gram-negative bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum, has been shown to protect mice from malaria and to have beneficial effects on tumors. However, it is not known whether this drug possesses anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated whether viola administration is able to reduce acute and chronic autoimmune inflammation. For that purpose, C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 μg of LPS and were treated with viola (3.5mg/kg) via i.p. at the same time-point. Three hours later, the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the sera and phenotypical characterization of leukocytes were determined. Mice treated with viola presented a significant reduction in the production of inflammatory cytokines compared with untreated mice. Interestingly, although viola is a compound derived from bacteria, it did not induce inflammation upon administration to naïve mice. To test whether viola would protect mice from an autoimmune inflammation, Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)-inflicted mice were given viola i.p. at disease onset, at the 10th day from immunization. Viola-treated mice developed mild EAE disease in contrast with placebo-treated mice. The frequencies of dendritic cells and macrophages were unaltered in EAE mice treated with viola. However, the sole administration of viola augmented the levels of splenic regulatory T cells (CD4+Foxp3+). We also found that adoptive transfer of viola-elicited regulatory T cells significantly reduced EAE. Our study shows, for the first time, that violacein is able to modulate acute and chronic inflammation. Amelioration relied in suppression of cytokine production (in acute inflammation) and stimulation of regulatory T cells (in chronic inflammation). New studies must be conducted in order to

  11. Violacein Treatment Modulates Acute and Chronic Inflammation through the Suppression of Cytokine Production and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Verinaud, Liana; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; Prado, Isabel Cristina Naranjo; Zanucoli, Fábio; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Di Gangi, Rosária; Issayama, Luidy Kazuo; Carvalho, Ana Carolina; Bonfanti, Amanda Pires; Niederauer, Guilherme Francio; Duran, Nelson; Costa, Fábio Trindade Maranhão; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; Höfling, Maria Alice da Cruz; Machado, Dagmar Ruth Stach; Thomé, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a necessary process to control infection. However, exacerbated inflammation, acute or chronic, promotes deleterious effects in the organism. Violacein (viola), a quorum sensing metabolite from the Gram-negative bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum, has been shown to protect mice from malaria and to have beneficial effects on tumors. However, it is not known whether this drug possesses anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated whether viola administration is able to reduce acute and chronic autoimmune inflammation. For that purpose, C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 μg of LPS and were treated with viola (3.5mg/kg) via i.p. at the same time-point. Three hours later, the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the sera and phenotypical characterization of leukocytes were determined. Mice treated with viola presented a significant reduction in the production of inflammatory cytokines compared with untreated mice. Interestingly, although viola is a compound derived from bacteria, it did not induce inflammation upon administration to naïve mice. To test whether viola would protect mice from an autoimmune inflammation, Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)-inflicted mice were given viola i.p. at disease onset, at the 10th day from immunization. Viola-treated mice developed mild EAE disease in contrast with placebo-treated mice. The frequencies of dendritic cells and macrophages were unaltered in EAE mice treated with viola. However, the sole administration of viola augmented the levels of splenic regulatory T cells (CD4+Foxp3+). We also found that adoptive transfer of viola-elicited regulatory T cells significantly reduced EAE. Our study shows, for the first time, that violacein is able to modulate acute and chronic inflammation. Amelioration relied in suppression of cytokine production (in acute inflammation) and stimulation of regulatory T cells (in chronic inflammation). New studies must be conducted in order to

  12. Biological, Functional and Genetic Characterization of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pediatric Patients Affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma during induction chemotherapy with l-asparaginase: The GRAALL experience.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Marie-Anne; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Suarez, Felipe; Thomas, Xavier; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Cacheux, Victoria; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Bonmati, Caroline; Sanhes, Laurence; Bories, Pierre; Daguindau, Etienne; Dorvaux, Véronique; Reman, Oumedaly; Frayfer, Jamile; Orvain, Corentin; Lhéritier, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Tanguy-Schmidt, Aline

    2015-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) thrombotic events are a well-known complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) induction therapy, especially with treatments including l-asparaginase (l-ASP). Data on risk factors and clinical evolution is still lacking in adult patients. We report on the clinical evolution of 22 CNS venous thrombosis cases occurring in 708 adults treated for ALL or lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) with the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-induction protocol, which included eight L-ASP (6,000 IU/m(2) ) infusions. The prevalence of CNS thrombosis was 3.1%. CNS thrombosis occurred after a median of 18 days (range: 11-31) when patients had received a median of three l-ASP injections (range: 2-7). Patients with CNS thrombosis exhibited a median antithrombin (AT) nadir of 47.5% (range: 36-67%) at Day 17 (range: D3-D28), and 95% of them exhibited AT levels lower than 60%. There were no evident increase in hereditary thrombotic risk factors prevalence, and thrombosis occurred despite heparin prophylaxis which was performed in 90% of patients. Acquired AT deficiency was frequently detected in patients with l-ASP-based therapy, and patients with CNS thrombosis received AT prophylaxis (45%) less frequently than patients without CNS thrombosis (83%), P = 0.0002). CNS thrombosis was lethal in 5% of patients, while 20% had persistent sequelae. One patient received all planned l-ASP infusions without recurrence of CNS thrombotic whereas l-ASP injections were discontinued in 20 patients during the management of thrombosis without a significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.4).

  14. HIV-1 Vpr accelerates viral replication during acute infection by exploitation of proliferating CD4+ T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kei; Misawa, Naoko; Iwami, Shingo; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Ito, Mamoru; Aihara, Kazuyuki; An, Dong Sung; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The precise role of viral protein R (Vpr), an HIV-1-encoded protein, during HIV-1 infection and its contribution to the development of AIDS remain unclear. Previous reports have shown that Vpr has the ability to cause G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In addition, vpr is highly conserved in transmitted/founder HIV-1s and in all primate lentiviruses, which are evolutionarily related to HIV-1. Although these findings suggest an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 pathogenesis, its direct evidence in vivo has not been shown. Here, by using a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model, we demonstrated that Vpr causes G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis predominantly in proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells, which mainly consist of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs), resulting in Treg depletion and enhanced virus production during acute infection. The Vpr-dependent enhancement of virus replication and Treg depletion is observed in CCR5-tropic but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1-infected mice, suggesting that these effects are dependent on the coreceptor usage by HIV-1. Immune activation was observed in CCR5-tropic wild-type but not in vpr-deficient HIV-1-infected humanized mice. When humanized mice were treated with denileukin diftitox (DD), to deplete Tregs, DD-treated humanized mice showed massive activation/proliferation of memory T cells compared to the untreated group. This activation/proliferation enhanced CCR5 expression in memory CD4(+) T cells and rendered them more susceptible to CCR5-tropic wild-type HIV-1 infection than to vpr-deficient virus. Taken together, these results suggest that Vpr takes advantage of proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells for enhancing viremia of CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Because Tregs exist in a higher cycling state than other T cell subsets, Tregs appear to be more vulnerable to exploitation by Vpr during acute HIV-1 infection.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  16. MTHFR polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: influence on methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Umerez, Maitane; Gutierrez-Camino, Ángela; Muñoz-Maldonado, Carmen; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an important component in the therapy used to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme for MTX pharmacokinetics. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, affecting MTHFR activity, have been widely studied as potential markers of MTX toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. In this review, we show that the majority of published reports do not find association or present opposite effect. Therefore, MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms do not seem to be good markers of MTX-related toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. The efforts should be focused on other genes, such as transporter genes or microRNA-related genes. PMID:28392709

  17. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL.

  18. Discovery of Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at subnanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design. PMID:22662287

  19. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yang, Chao; Simpson, Catherine; Deryckere, Deborah; Van Deusen, Amy; Miley, Michael J; Kireev, Dmitri; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Sather, Susan; Hunter, Debra; Korboukh, Victoria K; Patel, Hari S; Janzen, William P; Machius, Mischa; Johnson, Gary L; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K; Frye, Stephen V; Wang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-09

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design.

  20. Leydig-cell function in children after direct testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, R.; Czernichow, P.; Cramer, P.; Schaison, G.; Rappaport, R.

    1983-07-07

    To assess the effect of testicular irradiation on testicular endocrine function, we studied 12 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had been treated with direct testicular irradiation 10 months to 8 1/2 years earlier. Insufficient Leydig-cell function, manifested by a low response of plasma testosterone to chorionic gonadotropin or an increased basal level of plasma luteinizing hormone (or both), was observed in 10 patients, 7 of whom were pubertal. Two of these patients had a compensated testicular endocrine insufficiency with only high plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone. Testosterone secretion was severely impaired in three pubertal boys studied more than four years after testicular irradiation. A diminished testicular volume indicating tubular atrophy was found in all pubertal patients, including three who had not received cyclophosphamide or cytarabine. These data indicate that testosterone insufficiency is a frequent complication of testicular irradiation, although some patients continue to have Leydig-cell activity for several years after therapy.

  1. Impact of clinical and subclinical hypersensitivity to asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara L; Fisher, Vicki

    2014-12-01

    Asparaginase is an essential element of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. It depletes serum asparagine (an amino acid necessary for synthesis of cellular proteins), deprives leukemic blast cells of asparagine, and eventually results in cell death. To gain benefit from asparaginase, asparagine depletion must be ensured by giving intensive therapy and completing the full course of treatment. Three formulations of asparaginase exist; two are derived from Escherichia coli, a native form and pegylated form, and one is derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Erwinia asparaginase). Like many large proteins, asparaginases are immunogenic, and some patients develop antibodies to asparaginase. Antibodies may result in clinical hypersensitivity or subclinical hypersensitivity without symptoms, and both can result in a reduction in asparaginase activity and may affect therapeutic benefit. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common reason for patients to stop asparaginase treatment. Subclinical hypersensitivity can only be identified by laboratory testing; therapeutic monitoring of asparaginase activity is used as a surrogate measure for asparagine depletion.

  2. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  3. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  4. JAK3 pathway is constitutively active in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Uckun, Fatih M; Pitt, Jason; Qazi, Sanjive

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report that primary leukemic B-cell precursors from B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients overexpress multiple JAK3-activating cytokines as well as their receptors. We also show that amplified expression of JAK3 pathway genes in B-lineage ALL is associated with steroid resistance and relapse. Our findings further demonstrate that several different diagnostic classes of B-lineage lymphoid malignancies exhibit upregulated expression of JAK3 pathway genes, which are associated with an overexpression of genes for JAK3-stimulatory cytokines with concomitant deficiency of JAK3-inhibitory signaling molecules. Thus, despite the rare occurrence of activating JAK3 mutations, JAK3 appears to be constitutively active and represents a viable molecular target in the treatment of a broad range of B-lineage lymphoid malignancies, including B-lineage ALL.

  5. Metastatic Calcinosis Cutis: A Case in a Child with Acute Pre-B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo; Reyes-Herrera, Amalia; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia in children with malignancy is an uncommon condition. It has been described in leukemia patients with impaired renal excretion of calcium or osteolytic lesions. Metastatic calcinosis cutis (MCC) may develop if hypercalcemia persists. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with an atypical dermatosis and unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Considered clinical diagnoses were xanthomas, histiocytosis, molluscum contagiosum, and nongenital warts. Cutaneous histological analysis showed amorphous basophilic deposits in the dermis suggestive of calcium deposits. Laboratory tests confirmed serum hypercalcemia. Extensive investigations such as bone marrow biopsy established the diagnosis of an acute pre-B cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia in hematopoietic malignancies is unusual, especially as initial manifestation of the disease. Careful review of the literature fails to reveal previous reports of these peculiar cutaneous lesions of MCC in children with leukemia. PMID:26346120

  6. Maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nousome, Darryl; Lupo, Philip J.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Discovering genetic predictors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) necessitates the evaluation of novel factors including maternal genetic effects, which are a proxy for the intrauterine environment, and robust epidemiologic study designs. Therefore, we evaluated five maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood ALL among 120 case-parent triads. Two of the five haplotypes were significantly associated with risk: GSTM3/GSTM4 (P=0.01) and GSTP1 (P=0.02). The EPHX1 haplotype was marginally associated with risk (P=0.05), whereas haplotypes in CYP1B1 and GSTA4 were not. Our results suggest genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolism is important in childhood ALL etiology. PMID:23433810

  7. Non‐tumour bone marrow lymphocytes correlate with improved overall survival in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, Claire; Dean, Joanne; Bonnett, Laura; Phillips, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Composition of tumour immune cell infiltrates correlates with response to treatment and overall survival (OS) in several cancer settings. We retrospectively examined immune cells present in diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from paediatric patients with B‐cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Our analysis identified a sub‐group (∼30% of patients) with >2.37% CD20 and >6.05% CD7 expression, which had 100% OS, and a sub‐group (∼30% of patients) with ≤2.37% CD20 and ≤6.05% CD7 expression at increased risk of treatment failure (66.7% OS, P < 0.05). Immune cell infiltrate at diagnosis may predict treatment response and could provide a means to enhance immediate treatment risk stratification. PMID:27348401

  8. Classification, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Eng-Juh; Ross, Mary E; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Williams, W Kent; Patel, Divyen; Mahfouz, Rami; Behm, Fred G; Raimondi, Susana C; Relling, Mary V; Patel, Anami; Cheng, Cheng; Campana, Dario; Wilkins, Dawn; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Jinyan; Liu, Huiqing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Naeve, Clayton; Wong, Limsoon; Downing, James R

    2002-03-01

    Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is based on the concept of tailoring the intensity of therapy to a patient's risk of relapse. To determine whether gene expression profiling could enhance risk assignment, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the pattern of genes expressed in leukemic blasts from 360 pediatric ALL patients. Distinct expression profiles identified each of the prognostically important leukemia subtypes, including T-ALL, E2A-PBX1, BCR-ABL, TEL-AML1, MLL rearrangement, and hyperdiploid >50 chromosomes. In addition, another ALL subgroup was identified based on its unique expression profile. Examination of the genes comprising the expression signatures provided important insights into the biology of these leukemia subgroups. Further, within some genetic subgroups, expression profiles identified those patients that would eventually fail therapy. Thus, the single platform of expression profiling should enhance the accurate risk stratification of pediatric ALL patients.

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in pregnancy: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Shilpa; Friend, Sarah; Busowski, John; Langenstroer, Mary; Baidas, Said

    2013-01-01

    The management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during pregnancy requires treatment with high-dose chemotherapy that can pose risks to both the mother and fetus. Special consideration to chemotherapy regimen and its doses and to fetal gestational age at the time of chemotherapy administration should be taken in order to limit fetal exposure while still providing optimal therapy to the mother. Here we describe a 22-year-old patient who was diagnosed at 26 weeks gestation with ALL and was treated in the third trimester with HyperCVAD (cytoxan, vincristine, adriamycin, dexamethasone) combination chemotherapy giving birth via Caesarean section to a healthy baby girl 4 weeks after induction chemotherapy. PMID:24082992

  10. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  11. Isolated testicular relapse in boys with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: treatment and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, J; Chessells, J M; Sandland, R M

    1982-01-01

    In 22 boys among a group of 169 with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia the first relapse occurred in the testis. In 14 of these late isolated testicular relapse was detected on routine biopsy or became apparent after treatment was electively stopped. Eleven of these boys were treated with reinduction, irradiation of 2400 rads to both testicles, intrathecal methotrexate, and two years of chemotherapy; 10 remained well and were in second complete remission from two and a half to five and a half years later. It is concluded that boys with late isolated testicular relapse fare better than those with late marrow relapse and may have a change of long-term disease-free survival. Images p1616-a PMID:6814673

  12. ATF7IP as a novel PDGFRB fusion partner in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Kazumasa; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Matsuoka, Masaki; Kojima, Yasuko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Ootsubo, Kaori; Oboki, Keisuke; Okita, Hajime; Yasuda, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Hata, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Ohara, Akira

    2014-06-01

    We identified ATF7IP as a novel PDGFRB fusion partner in B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) and showed that B-ALL with ATF7IP/PDGFRB translocation is included within the genomic lesions of a Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like ALL subgroup. Comprehensive analyses of previous repositories of gene expression data sets disclosed that B-ALL cases with high PDGFRB expression level in the context of the Ph-like ALL gene are likely to have a PDGFRB translocation. Thus, it is possible that measurement of the PDGFRB expression level can be utilized as a screening test for the detection of the cryptic PDGFRB translocation, especially within the Ph-like ALL subgroup.

  13. Hematuria and decreased kidney function as initial signs of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Kenney, Barton; McNamara, Joseph; Stein, Jeffrey; Moeckel, Gilbert W

    2010-11-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and decreased kidney function as initial manifestations of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed extensive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and bilateral nephromegaly. The patient's kidney biopsy specimen showed a dense monomorphous interstitial infiltrate of small round blue cells with significant nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemical workup showed positive staining for CD20, CD10, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), consistent with ALL. The patient underwent induction chemotherapy, attained remission 4 weeks after induction, and presently is stable in the consolidation phase of chemotherapy. This is an unusual case of ALL involving both kidneys with initial presenting signs of hematuria and decreased kidney function.

  14. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Holly; Rubenstein, Mara; Dombkowski, Alan A; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets.

  15. Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia with unusual multiple bone invasions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HANGAI, MAYUMI; WATANABE, KENTARO; SHIOZAWA, RYOSUKE; HIWATARI, MITSUTERU; IDA, KOHMEI; TAKITA, JUNKO

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a unique pediatric case with multiple bone invasions of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during remission. An eight-year-old male with a history of ALL was admitted complaining of intermittent and migrating pain in the limb 2 years following complete remission. Magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed abnormal multifocal involvement in the bones and corresponding soft tissues. Repeated bone marrow (BM) aspiration indicated normal cellular marrow without leukemic cells, and marked leukemic cell infiltration in different sections of the ilium, respectively. These findings suggested isolated bone relapse, and it is probable that systematic BM relapse occurred as a consequence. PMID:24944655

  16. High-dose radiation-induced meningiomas following acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Salvati, M; Cervoni, L; Artico, M

    1996-05-01

    The authors review three personal cases of patients who developed cerebral meningiomas following high-dose radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two patients were female and one male. Their ages when the leukemia appeared were between 11 and 15 years. All patients were treated with a course of prophylactic irradiation to the neuraxis for a total dose of 24 Gy. After an average interval of 10.4 years, all three patients presented a meningioma; histologically, one was meningothelial and two were fibrous. All three meningiomas presented atypical features. At follow-up 1, 4, and 4 years respectively after surgery, none of these patients presents neurological deficits or neuroradiological signs of recurrence. Forty-nine cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma are also reviewed.

  17. Novel molecular and cellular therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Reid, Gregor S. D.; Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    While the outcome for pediatric patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) or lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has improved dramatically, patients often suffer from therapeutic sequelae. Additionally, despite intensified treatment, the prognosis remains dismal for patients with refractory or relapsed disease. Thus, novel biologically targeted treatment approaches are needed. These targets can be identified by understanding how a loss of lymphocyte homeostasis can result in LPD or ALL. Herein, we review potential molecular and cellular therapeutic strategies that (i) target key signaling networks (e.g., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT, Notch1, and SRC kinase family-containing pathways) which regulate lymphocyte growth, survival, and function; (ii) block the interaction of ALL cells with stromal cells or lymphoid growth factors secreted by the bone marrow microenvironment; or (iii) stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:18716718

  18. Advances in therapy for Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Kirsten; Schrappe, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The presence of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a rare finding and has been an adverse prognostic factor associated with a high risk of therapeutic failure. The current key components of treatment are intensive polychemotherapy and a BCR/ABL1 kinase domain inhibitor. This treatment approach has been applied in a few clinical trials by paediatric leukaemia study groups. Thus, this subtype of ALL serves as the first model system for truly targeted treatment. The role of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly called into question, at least in a favourable, though not yet clearly defined, subset of patients. Currently, the choice of the most effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor is not yet settled, in particular, in view of potential reduction of overall treatment intensity.

  19. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment.

  20. Asparaginase Therapy in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on the Mode of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    Asparaginase is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. The therapeutic efficacy (e.g., chemoresistance) and adverse effects of asparaginase (e.g., hypersensivity and pancreatitis) have been investigated over the past four decades. It was suggested early on that leukemic cells are resistant to asparaginase because of their increased asparagine synthetase activity. Afterward, other mechanisms associated with asparaginase resistance were reported. Not only leukemic cells but also patients themselves may play a role in causing asparaginase resistance, which has been associated with unfavorable outcome in children with ALL. This article will briefly review asparaginase therapy in children with ALL and comprehensively analyze recent reports on the potential mechanisms of asparaginase resistance.